WorldWideScience

Sample records for prevented dexa-induced atrophy

  1. Extracellular polysaccharides purified from Aureobasidium pullulans SM-2001 (Polycan) inhibit dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyung-Rae; Park, Dong-Chan; Jung, Go-Woon

    2018-01-01

    The present study assessed the beneficial skeletal muscle-preserving effects of extracellular polysaccharides from Aureobasidium pullulans SM-2001 (Polycan) (EAP) on dexamethasone (DEXA)-induced catabolic muscle atrophy in mice. To investigate whether EAP prevented catabolic DEXA-induced muscle atrophy, and to examine its mechanisms of action, EAP (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) was administered orally, once a day for 24 days. EAP treatment was initiated 2 weeks prior to DEXA treatment (1 mg/kg, once a day for 10 days) in mice. Body weight alterations, serum biochemistry, calf thickness, calf muscle strength, gastrocnemius muscle thickness and weight, gastrocnemius muscle antioxidant defense parameters, gastrocnemius muscle mRNA expression, histology and histomorphometry were subsequently assessed. After 24 days, DEXA control mice exhibited muscle atrophy according to all criteria indices. However, these muscle atrophy symptoms were significantly inhibited by oral treatment with all three doses of EAP. Regarding possible mechanisms of action, EAP exhibited favorable ameliorating effects on DEXA-induced catabolic muscle atrophy via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects; these effects were mediated by modulation of the expression of genes involved in muscle protein synthesis (AKT serine/threonine kinase 1, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, adenosine A1 receptor and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4) and degradation (atrogin-1, muscle RING-finger protein-1, myostatin and sirtuin 1). Therefore, these results indicated that EAP may be helpful in improving muscle atrophies of various etiologies. EAP at 400 mg/kg exhibited favorable muscle protective effects against DEXA-induced catabolic muscle atrophy, comparable with the effects of oxymetholone (50 mg/kg), which has been used to treat various muscle disorders. PMID:29138805

  2. Atomoxetine prevents dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesinkey, Sean R; Korrapati, Midhun C; Rasbach, Kyle A; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2014-12-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy remains a clinical problem in numerous pathologic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists, such as formoterol, can induce mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) to prevent such atrophy. Additionally, atomoxetine, an FDA-approved norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, was positive in a cellular assay for MB. We used a mouse model of dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy to investigate the potential role of atomoxetine and formoterol to prevent muscle mass loss. Mice were administered dexamethasone once daily in the presence or absence of formoterol (0.3 mg/kg), atomoxetine (0.1 mg/kg), or sterile saline. Animals were euthanized at 8, 16, and 24 hours or 8 days later. Gastrocnemius muscle weights, changes in mRNA and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 α (PGC-1α) isoforms, ATP synthase β, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1 β subcomplex, 8, ND1, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), myostatin, muscle Ring-finger protein-1 (muscle atrophy), phosphorylated forkhead box protein O 3a (p-FoxO3a), Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and ribosomal protein S6 (rp-S6; muscle hypertrophy) in naive and muscle-atrophied mice were measured. Atomoxetine increased p-mTOR 24 hours after treatment in naïve mice, but did not change any other biomarkers. Formoterol robustly activated the PGC-1α-4-IGF1-Akt-mTOR-rp-S6 pathway and increased p-FoxO3a as early as 8 hours and repressed myostatin at 16 hours. In contrast to what was observed with acute treatment, chronic treatment (7 days) with atomoxetine increased p-Akt and p-FoxO3a, and sustained PGC-1α expression and skeletal muscle mass in dexamethasone-treated mice, in a manner comparable to formoterol. In conclusion, chronic treatment with a low dose of atomoxetine prevented dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle wasting and supports a potential role in preventing muscle atrophy. U.S. Government work not protected by U

  3. Atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis: implications for Alzheimer prevention trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Abigail Andrews

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in designing therapeutic studies of individuals at risk of Alzheimer disease (AD to prevent the onset of symptoms. Cortical β-amyloid plaques, the first stage of AD pathology, can be detected in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET, and several studies have shown that ~1/3 of healthy elderly have significant β-amyloid deposition. Here we assessed whether asymptomatic amyloid-PET-positive controls have increased rates of brain atrophy, which could be harnessed as an outcome measure for AD prevention trials. We assessed 66 control subjects (age = 73.5±7.3 yrs; MMSE = 29±1.3 from the Australian Imaging Biomarkers & Lifestyle study who had a baseline Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET scan and two 3T MRI scans ~18-months apart. We calculated PET standard uptake value ratios (SUVR, and classified individuals as amyloid-positive/negative. Baseline and 18-month MRI scans were registered, and brain, hippocampal, and ventricular volumes and annualized volume changes calculated. Increasing baseline PiB-PET measures of β-amyloid load correlated with hippocampal atrophy rate independent of age (p = 0.014. Twenty-two (1/3 were PiB-positive (SUVR>1.40, the remaining 44 PiB-negative (SUVR≤1.31. Compared to PiB-negatives, PiB-positive individuals were older (76.8±7.5 vs. 71.7±7.5, p<0.05 and more were APOE4 positive (63.6% vs. 19.2%, p<0.01 but there were no differences in baseline brain, ventricle or hippocampal volumes, either with or without correction for total intracranial volume, once age and gender were accounted for. The PiB-positive group had greater total hippocampal loss (0.06±0.08 vs. 0.02±0.05 ml/yr, p = 0.02, independent of age and gender, with non-significantly higher rates of whole brain (7.1±9.4 vs. 4.7±5.5 ml/yr and ventricular (2.0±3.0 vs. 1.1±1.0 ml/yr change. Based on the observed effect size, recruiting 384 (95%CI 195-1080 amyloid-positive subjects/arm will provide 80% power to detect 25

  4. Preservation of deep inferior epigastric artery at kidney transplantation prevents atrophy of lower rectus abdominis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Daiki; Harada, Hiroshi; Morita, Ken; Oba, Koji; Fukuzawa, Nobuyuki; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Sasaki, Hajime; Miyazaki, Chihoko; Nonomura, Katsuya

    2012-05-27

    The deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA), which feeds the lower rectus abdominis muscle (lower RAM), is usually transected in kidney transplantation. In this study, we investigated whether preservation of DIEA can prevent lower RAM atrophy. Two hundred and forty-five kidney transplant recipients (150 men and 95 women) were enrolled in the study (mean age 39.9 years) and were divided into two groups according to whether DIEA was transected (group A, n = 175) or preserved (group B, n = 70). The extent of lower RAM atrophy calculated in computed tomography (performed 1 year after transplantation) and incidence of lower RAM atrophy were compared between the two groups. The most predictive factors for lower RAM atrophy were assessed using a multivariate logistic regression model. The extent of lower RAM atrophy was significantly lower in group B (15.0 ± 18.5%) than that in group A (38.9 ± 25.4%, P = 0.003). The incidence of lower RAM atrophy was less prevalent in group B (20.0%) compared with that in group A (62.9%, P DIEA was the only independent predictive factor for lower RAM atrophy (P DIEA during kidney transplant can prevent lower RAM atrophy.

  5. Can endurance exercise preconditioning prevention disuse muscle atrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Wiggs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can provide a level of protection against disuse muscle atrophy. Endurance exercise training imposes oxidative, metabolic, and heat stress on skeletal muscle which activates a variety of cellular signaling pathways that ultimately leads to the increased expression of proteins that have been demonstrated to protect muscle from inactivity –induced atrophy. This review will highlight the effect of exercise-induced oxidative stress on endogenous enzymatic antioxidant capacity (i.e., superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, the role of oxidative and metabolic stress on PGC1-α, and finally highlight the effect heat stress and HSP70 induction. Finally, this review will discuss the supporting scientific evidence that these proteins can attenuate muscle atrophy through exercise preconditioning.

  6. Oleate Prevents Palmitate-Induced Atrophy via Modulation of Mitochondrial ROS Production in Skeletal Myotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of saturated fatty acids contributes to lipotoxicity-related insulin resistance and atrophy in skeletal muscle. Conversely, unsaturated fatty acids like docosahexaenoic acid were proven to preserve muscle mass. However, it is not known if the most common unsaturated oleate will protect skeletal myotubes against palmitate-mediated atrophy, and its specific mechanism remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oleate on atrophy-related factors in palmitate-conditioned myotubes. Exposure of myotubes to palmitate, but not to oleate, led to an induction of fragmented nuclei, myotube loss, atrophy, and mitochondrial superoxide in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of oleate to myotubes attenuated production of palmitate-induced mitochondrial superoxide in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of oleate or MitoTEMPO to palmitate-conditioned myotubes led to inhibition of palmitate-induced mRNA expression of proinflammatory (TNF-α and IL6, mitochondrial fission (Drp1 and Fis1, and atrophy markers (myostatin and atrogin1. In accordance with the gene expression data, our immunocytochemistry experiment demonstrated that oleate and MitoTEMPO prevented or attenuated palmitate-mediated myotube shrinkage. These results provide a mechanism indicating that oleate prevents palmitate-mediated atrophy via at least partial modulation of mitochondrial superoxide production.

  7. Postural muscle atrophy prevention and recovery and bone remodelling through high frequency proprioception for astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Dario; Rossitto, Franco; Battocchio, Luciano

    2009-09-01

    The difficulty in applying active exercises during space flights increases the importance of passive countermeasures, but coupling load and instability remains indispensable for generating high frequency (HF) proprioceptive flows and preventing muscle atrophy and osteoporosis. The present study, in microgravity conditions during a parabolic flight, verified whether an electronic system, composed of a rocking board, a postural reader and a bungee-cord loading apparatus creates HF postural instability comparable to that reachable on the Earth. Tracking the subject, in single stance, to real-time visual signals is necessary to obtain HF instability situations. The bungee-cord loading apparatus allowed the subject to manage the 81.5% body weight load (100% could easily be exceeded). A preliminary training programme schedule on the Earth and in space is suggested. Comparison with a pathological muscle atrophy is presented. The possibility of generating HF proprioceptive flows could complement current countermeasures for the prevention and recovery of muscle atrophy and osteoporosis in terrestrial and space environments. These exercises combine massive activation of spindles and joint receptors, applying simultaneously HF variations of pressure to different areas of the sole of the foot. This class of exercises could improve the effectiveness of current countermeasures, reducing working time and fatigue.

  8. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sarah A.; Sandesara, Pooja B.; Senf, Sarah M.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Cachexia is characterized by inexorable muscle wasting that significantly affects patient prognosis and increases mortality. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of this muscle wasting is of significant importance. Recent work showed that components of the forkhead box O (FoxO) pathway are increased in skeletal muscle during cachexia. In the current study, we tested the physiological significance of FoxO activation in the progression of muscle atrophy associated with cachexia. FoxO-DNA binding dependent transcription was blocked in the muscles of mice through injection of a dominant negative (DN) FoxO expression plasmid prior to inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells or the induction of sepsis. Expression of DN FoxO inhibited the increased mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, cathepsin L, and/or Bnip3 and inhibited muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis. Interestingly, during control conditions, expression of DN FoxO decreased myostatin expression, increased MyoD expression and satellite cell proliferation, and induced fiber hypertrophy, which required de novo protein synthesis. Collectively, these data show that FoxO-DNA binding-dependent transcription is necessary for normal muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis, and further suggest that basal levels of FoxO play an important role during normal conditions to depress satellite cell activation and limit muscle growth.—Reed, S. A., Sandesara, P. B., Senf, S. F., Judge, A. R. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy. PMID:22102632

  9. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media prevent muscle atrophy by suppressing muscle atrophy-related proteins and ROS generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Mi; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Sun-Mi; Park, Jin-Ho; Kim, Z-Hun; Choi, Yong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) has been reported with various types of disease models. Here, we examine the therapeutic effect of umbilical cord MSC-CM (UCMSC-CM) on muscle-related disease, using a dexamethasone (Dex)-induced muscle atrophy in vitro model. The expressions of muscle atrophy-related proteins (MuRF-1 and MAFbx) and muscle-specific proteins (desmin and myogenin) were evaluated by Western blot analysis. The level of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) dye assay. The expression of antioxidant enzymes (copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), and catalase (CAT)) was verified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). When L6 cells were exposed to Dex, the expression of muscle atrophy-related proteins was increased by 50-70%, and the expression of muscle-specific proteins was in turn decreased by 23-40%. Conversely, when the L6 cells were co-treated with UCMSC-CM and Dex, the expression of muscle atrophy-related proteins was reduced in a UCMSC-CM dose-dependent manner and the expression of muscle-specific proteins was restored to near-normal levels. Moreover, ROS generation was effectively suppressed and the expression of antioxidant enzymes was recovered to a normal degree. These data imply that UCMSC-CM clearly has the potential to prevent muscle atrophy. Thus, our present study offers fundamental data on the potential treatment of muscle-related disease using UCMSC-CM.

  10. Albumin infusion after reperfusion prevents gut ischemia-reperfusion-induced gut-associated lymphoid tissue atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezawa, Fumie; Fukatsu, Kazuhiko; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Maeshima, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Koichi; Hara, Etsuko; Hiraide, Hoshio; Compher, Charlene W

    2006-01-01

    Our recent study clarified that gut ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) causes gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) mass atrophy, a possible mechanism for increased morbidity of infectious complications after severe surgical insults. Because albumin administration reportedly reduces hemorrhagic shock-induced lung injury, we hypothesized that albumin treatment prevents GALT atrophy due to gut I/R. Male mice (n = 37) were randomized to albumin, normal saline, and sham groups. All groups underwent jugular vein catheter insertion. The albumin and normal saline groups underwent 75-minute occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. During gut ischemia, all mice received normal saline infusions at 1.0 mL/h. The albumin group was given 5% bovine serum albumin in normal saline at 1.0 mL/h for 60 minutes after reperfusion, whereas the normal saline group received 0.9% sodium chloride at 1.0 mL/h. The sham group underwent laparotomy only. Mice were killed on day 1 or 7, and the entire small intestine was harvested. GALT lymphocytes were isolated and counted. Their phenotypes (alphabetaTCR, gammadeltaTCR, CD4, CD8, B220) were determined by flow cytometry. On day 1, the gut I/R groups showed significantly lower total lymphocyte and B cell numbers in Peyer's patches and the lamina propria than the sham group. However, the albumin infusion partially but significantly restored these cell numbers. On day 7, there were no significant differences in any of the parameters measured among the 3 groups. Albumin infusion after a gut ischemic insult may maintain gut immunity by preventing GALT atrophy.

  11. Prevention of muscle fibers atrophy during gravitational unloading: The effect of L-arginine administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashkina, N.; Lomonosova, Y.; Shevchenko, T. F.; Bugrova, A. E.; Turtikova, O. V.; Kalamkarov, G. R.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational unloading results in pronounced atrophy of m.soleus. Probably, the output of NO is controlled by the muscle activity. We hypothesized that NO may be involved in the protein metabolism and increase of its concentration in muscle can prevent atrophic changes induced by gravitational unloading. In order to test the hypothesis we applied NO donor L-arginine during gravitational unloading. 2.5-month-old male Wistar rats weighing 220-230g were divided into sedentary control group (CTR, n=7), 14-day hindlimb suspension (HS, n=7), 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-arginine (HSL, n=7) (with a daily supplementation of 500 mg/kg wt L-arginine) and 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-NAME (HSN, n=7) (90 mg/kg wt during 14 days). Cross sectional area (CSA) of slow twitch (ST) and fast twitch (FT) soleus muscle fibers decreased by 45% and 28% in the HS group ( pL-arginine administration. The levels of atrogin-1 mRNA were considerably altered in suspended animals (HS group: plus 27%, HSL group: minus 13%) as compared to the control level. Conclusion: L-arginine administration allows maintaining NO concentration in m.soleus at the level of cage control group, prevents from dystrophin layer destruction, decreases the atrogin mRNA concentration in the muscle and atrophy level under gravitational unloading.

  12. Preventive effects of Chlorella on skeletal muscle atrophy in muscle-specific mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yuya; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Kumamoto, Shoichiro; Maruyama, Isao; Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Ohta, Shigeo

    2014-10-11

    Oxidative stress is involved in age-related muscle atrophy, such as sarcopenia. Since Chlorella, a unicellular green alga, contains various antioxidant substances, we used a mouse model of enhanced oxidative stress to investigate whether Chlorella could prevent muscle atrophy. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is an anti-oxidative enzyme that detoxifies reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxides such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE). We therefore used transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative form of ALDH2 (ALDH2*2 Tg mice) to selectively decrease ALDH2 activity in the muscles. To evaluate the effect of Chlorella, the mice were fed a Chlorella-supplemented diet (CSD) for 6 months. ALDH2*2 Tg mice exhibited small body size, muscle atrophy, decreased fat content, osteopenia, and kyphosis, accompanied by increased muscular 4-HNE levels. The CSD helped in recovery of body weight, enhanced oxidative stress, and increased levels of a muscle impairment marker, creatine phosphokinase (CPK) induced by ALDH2*2. Furthermore, histological and histochemical analyses revealed that the consumption of the CSD improved skeletal muscle atrophy and the activity of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase. This study suggests that long-term consumption of Chlorella has the potential to prevent age-related muscle atrophy.

  13. Oleate Prevents Palmitate-Induced Atrophy via Modulation of Mitochondrial ROS Production in Skeletal Myotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hojun; Lim, Jae-Young; Choi, Seung-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of saturated fatty acids contributes to lipotoxicity-related insulin resistance and atrophy in skeletal muscle. Conversely, unsaturated fatty acids like docosahexaenoic acid were proven to preserve muscle mass. However, it is not known if the most common unsaturated oleate will protect skeletal myotubes against palmitate-mediated atrophy, and its specific mechanism remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oleate on atrophy-related factors in palmitate-c...

  14. Comparison of premodulated interferential and pulsed current electrical stimulation in prevention of deep muscle atrophy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Minoru; Hirayama, Yusuke; Fujita, Naoto; Fujino, Hidemi

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effects of electrical stimulation using pulsed current (PC) and premodulated interferential current (IC) on prevention of muscle atrophy in the deep muscle layer of the calf. Rats were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups: control, hindlimb unloading for 2 weeks (HU), and HU plus electrical stimulation for 2 weeks. The animals in the electrical stimulation group received therapeutic stimulation of the left (PC) or right (IC) calf muscles twice a day during the unloading period. Animals undergoing HU for 2 weeks exhibited significant loss of muscle mass, decreased cross-sectional area (CSA) of muscle fibers, and increased expression of ubiquitinated proteins in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles compared with control animals. Stimulation with PC attenuated the effects on the muscle mass, fiber CSA, and ubiquitinated proteins in the gastrocnemius muscle. However, PC stimulation failed to prevent atrophy of the deep layer of the gastrocnemius muscle and the soleus muscle. In contrast, stimulation with IC inhibited atrophy of both the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. In addition, the IC protocol inhibited the HU-induced increase in ubiquitinated protein expression in both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. These results suggest that electrical stimulation with IC is more effective than PC in preventing muscle atrophy in the deep layer of limb muscles.

  15. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol prevents skeletal muscle atrophy: role of p38 MAPKinase and E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Derbre

    Full Text Available Alterations in muscle play an important role in common diseases and conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated during hindlimb unloading due, at least in part, to the activation of xanthine oxidase (XO. The major aim of this study was to determine the mechanism by which XO activation causes unloading-induced muscle atrophy in rats, and its possible prevention by allopurinol, a well-known inhibitor of this enzyme. For this purpose we studied one of the main redox sensitive signalling cascades involved in skeletal muscle atrophy i.e. p38 MAPKinase, and the expression of two well known muscle specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in proteolysis, the Muscle atrophy F-Box (MAFbx; also known as atrogin-1 and Muscle RING (Really Interesting New Gene Finger-1 (MuRF-1. We found that hindlimb unloading induced a significant increase in XO activity and in the protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes CuZnSOD and Catalase in skeletal muscle. The most relevant new fact reported in this paper is that inhibition of XO with allopurinol, a drug widely used in clinical practice, prevents soleus muscle atrophy by ~20% after hindlimb unloading. This was associated with the inhibition of the p38 MAPK-MAFbx pathway. Our data suggest that XO was involved in the loss of muscle mass via the activation of the p38MAPK-MAFbx pathway in unloaded muscle atrophy. Thus, allopurinol may have clinical benefits to combat skeletal muscle atrophy in bedridden, astronauts, sarcopenic, and cachexic patients.

  16. Suppression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 prevents dexamethasone-induced atrophy of cultured myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillero, Estibaliz; Alamdari, Nima; Lecker, Stewart H; Hasselgren, Per-Olof

    2013-10-01

    The mechanistic role of the ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in glucocorticoid-induced muscle wasting is not fully understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy is at least in part linked to atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression and that the ubiquitin ligases are regulated by compensatory mechanisms. The expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 was suppressed individually or in combination in cultured L6 myotubes by using siRNA technique. Myotubes were treated with dexamethasone followed by determination of mRNA and protein levels for atrogin-1 and MuRF1, protein synthesis and degradation rates, and myotube morphology. Suppression of atrogin-1 resulted in increased expression of MuRF1 and vice versa, suggesting that the ubiquitin ligases are regulated by compensatory mechanisms. Simultaneous suppression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 resulted in myotube hypertrophy, mainly reflecting stimulated protein synthesis, and prevented dexamethasone-induced myotube atrophy, mainly reflecting inhibited protein degradation. The results provide evidence for a link between upregulated atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression and glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. The study also suggests that atrogin-1 and MuRF1 levels are regulated by compensatory mechanisms and that inhibition of both ubiquitin ligases may be needed to prevent glucocorticoid-induced muscle proteolysis and atrophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrical stimulation using sine waveform prevents unloading-induced muscle atrophy in the deep calf muscles of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Minoru; Hirayama, Yusuke; Fujita, Naoto; Fujino, Hidemi

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of electrical stimulation by using rectangular and sine waveforms in the prevention of deep muscle atrophy in rat calf muscles. Rats were randomly divided into the following groups: control, hindlimb unloading (HU), and HU plus electrical stimulation (ES). The animals in the ES group were electrically stimulated using rectangular waveform (RS) on the left calves and sine waveform (SS) on the right calves, twice a day, for 2 weeks during unloading. HU for 2 weeks resulted in a loss of the muscle mass, a decrease in the cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers, and overexpression of ubiquitinated proteins in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. In contrast, electrical stimulation with RS attenuated the HU-induced reduction in the cross-sectional area of muscle fibers and the increase of ubiquitinated proteins in the gastrocnemius muscle. However, electrical stimulation with RS failed to prevent muscle atrophy in the deep portion of the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles. Nevertheless, electrical stimulation with SS attenuated the HU-induced muscle atrophy and the up-regulation of ubiquitinated proteins in both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. This indicates that SS was more effective in the prevention of deep muscle atrophy than RS. Since the skin muscle layers act like the plates of a capacitor, separated by the subcutaneous adipose layer, the SS can pass through this capacitor more easily than the RS. Hence, SS can prevent the progressive loss of muscle fibers in the deep portion of the calf muscles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensoric Protection after Median Nerve Injury: Babysitter-Procedure Prevents Muscular Atrophy and Improves Neuronal Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E.; Becker, Stephan T.; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Geuna, Stefano; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The babysitter-procedure might offer an alternative when nerve reconstruction is delayed in order to overcome muscular atrophy due to denervation. In this study we aimed to show that a sensomotoric babysitter-procedure after median nerve injury is capable of preserving irreversible muscular atrophy. The median nerve of 20 female Wistar rats was denervated. 10 animals received a sensory protection with the N. cutaneous brachii. After six weeks the median nerve was reconstructed by autologous n...

  19. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sarah A; Sandesara, Pooja B; Senf, Sarah M; Judge, Andrew R

    2012-03-01

    Cachexia is characterized by inexorable muscle wasting that significantly affects patient prognosis and increases mortality. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of this muscle wasting is of significant importance. Recent work showed that components of the forkhead box O (FoxO) pathway are increased in skeletal muscle during cachexia. In the current study, we tested the physiological significance of FoxO activation in the progression of muscle atrophy associated with cachexia. FoxO-DNA binding dependent transcription was blocked in the muscles of mice through injection of a dominant negative (DN) FoxO expression plasmid prior to inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells or the induction of sepsis. Expression of DN FoxO inhibited the increased mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, cathepsin L, and/or Bnip3 and inhibited muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis. Interestingly, during control conditions, expression of DN FoxO decreased myostatin expression, increased MyoD expression and satellite cell proliferation, and induced fiber hypertrophy, which required de novo protein synthesis. Collectively, these data show that FoxO-DNA binding-dependent transcription is necessary for normal muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis, and further suggest that basal levels of FoxO play an important role during normal conditions to depress satellite cell activation and limit muscle growth.

  20. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Weidong; Feng, Yongjia; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    Small intestine luminal nutrient sensing may be crucial for modulating physiological functions. However, its mechanism of action is incompletely understood. We used a model of enteral nutrient deprivation, or total parenteral nutrition (TPN), resulting in intestinal mucosal atrophy and decreased...... was regulated by T1R3 and mGluR5, suggesting a novel negative regulator pathway for IEC proliferation not previously described. Loss of luminal nutrients with TPN administration may widely affect intestinal taste sensing. GLM has previously unrecognized actions on IEC growth and EBF. Restoring luminal sensing...

  1. Sensoric protection after median nerve injury: babysitter-procedure prevents muscular atrophy and improves neuronal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E; Becker, Stephan T; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Geuna, Stefano; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The babysitter-procedure might offer an alternative when nerve reconstruction is delayed in order to overcome muscular atrophy due to denervation. In this study we aimed to show that a sensomotoric babysitter-procedure after median nerve injury is capable of preserving irreversible muscular atrophy. The median nerve of 20 female Wistar rats was denervated. 10 animals received a sensory protection with the N. cutaneous brachii. After six weeks the median nerve was reconstructed by autologous nerve grafting from the contralateral median nerve in the babysitter and the control groups. Grasping tests measured functional recovery over 15 weeks. At the end of the observation period the weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle was determined. The median nerve was excised for histological examinations. Muscle weight (P nerve fiber (P = 0.0409), and nerve surface (P = 0.0184) in the babysitter group. We conclude that sensory protection of a motor nerve is capable of preserving muscule weight and we may presume that metabolism of the sensory nerve was sufficient to keep the target muscle's weight and vitality.

  2. Sensoric Protection after Median Nerve Injury: Babysitter-Procedure Prevents Muscular Atrophy and Improves Neuronal Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicta E. Beck-Broichsitter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The babysitter-procedure might offer an alternative when nerve reconstruction is delayed in order to overcome muscular atrophy due to denervation. In this study we aimed to show that a sensomotoric babysitter-procedure after median nerve injury is capable of preserving irreversible muscular atrophy. The median nerve of 20 female Wistar rats was denervated. 10 animals received a sensory protection with the N. cutaneous brachii. After six weeks the median nerve was reconstructed by autologous nerve grafting from the contralateral median nerve in the babysitter and the control groups. Grasping tests measured functional recovery over 15 weeks. At the end of the observation period the weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle was determined. The median nerve was excised for histological examinations. Muscle weight (P<0.0001 was significantly superior in the babysitter group compared to the control group at the end of the study. The histological evaluation revealed a significantly higher diameter of axons (P=0.0194, nerve fiber (P=0.0409, and nerve surface (P=0.0184 in the babysitter group. We conclude that sensory protection of a motor nerve is capable of preserving muscule weight and we may presume that metabolism of the sensory nerve was sufficient to keep the target muscle’s weight and vitality.

  3. The combined influence of stretch, mobility and electrical stimulation in the prevention of muscle fiber atrophy caused hypokinesia and hypodynamia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D.; Loughna, P.

    1984-01-01

    The morphological and biochemical changes which occur in the hind limb muscles of the rat in response to hypokinesia and hypodynamia were investigated. Hind limb cast fixation and suspension techniques were employed to study the musclar atrophy after five days of hypokinesia and hypodynamia induced by suspension, appreciable muscular atrophy was apparent, particularly in the anti-gravity muscles. The effect of passive stretching and electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy was studied. Changes in muscle protein mass were assessed with spectrophotometric and radioactive techniques. Passive stretch is shown to counteract muscle disuse atrophy. The change in the numbers of specific muscle fibers in atrophied muscles is discussed.

  4. Short-term, daily exposure to cold temperature may be an efficient way to prevent muscle atrophy and bone loss in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Claudia; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ya

    2015-04-01

    Microgravity induces less pressure on muscle/bone, which is a major reason for muscle atrophy as well as bone loss. Currently, physical exercise is the only countermeasure used consistently in the U.S. human space program to counteract the microgravity-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and bone loss. However, the routinely almost daily time commitment is significant and represents a potential risk to the accomplishment of other mission operational tasks. Therefore, development of more efficient exercise programs (with less time) to prevent astronauts from muscle atrophy and bone loss are needed. Consider the two types of muscle contraction: exercising forces muscle contraction and prevents microgravity-induced muscle atrophy/bone loss, which is a voluntary response through the motor nervous system; and cold temperature exposure-induced muscle contraction is an involuntary response through the vegetative nervous system, we formed a new hypothesis. The main purpose of this pilot study was to test our hypothesis that exercise at 4 °C is more efficient than at room temperature to prevent microgravity-induced muscle atrophy/bone loss and, consequently reduces physical exercise time. Twenty mice were divided into two groups with or without daily short-term (10 min × 2, at 12 h interval) cold temperature (4 °C) exposure for 30 days. The whole bodyweight, muscle strength and bone density were measured after terminating the experiments. The results from the one-month pilot study support our hypothesis and suggest that it would be reasonable to use more mice, in a microgravity environment and observe for a longer period to obtain a conclusion. We believe that the results from such a study will help to develop efficient exercise, which will finally benefit astronauts' heath and NASA's missions.

  5. Intranasal Insulin Prevents Cognitive Decline, Cerebral Atrophy and White Matter Changes in Murine Type I Diabetic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, George J.; Martinez, Jose A.; Liu, Wei Q.; Xu, Kevin; Ayer, Amit; Fine, Jared; Tuor, Ursula I.; Glazner, Gordon; Hanson, Leah R.; Frey, William H., II; Toth, Cory

    2008-01-01

    Insulin deficiency in type I diabetes may lead to cognitive impairment, cerebral atrophy and white matter abnormalities. We studied the impact of a novel delivery system using intranasal insulin (I-I) in a mouse model of type I diabetes (streptozotocin-induced) for direct targeting of pathological and cognitive deficits while avoiding potential…

  6. Overexpression of IGF-I in skeletal muscle of transgenic mice does not prevent unloading-induced atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, D. S.; Booth, F. W.; DeMayo, F.; Schwartz, R. J.; Gordon, S. E.; Fiorotto, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the association between local insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) overexpression and atrophy in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that endogenous skeletal muscle IGF-I mRNA expression would decrease with hindlimb unloading (HU) in mice, and that transgenic mice overexpressing human IGF-I (hIGF-I) specifically in skeletal muscle would exhibit less atrophy after HU. Male transgenic mice and nontransgenic mice from the parent strain (FVB) were divided into four groups (n = 10/group): 1) transgenic, weight-bearing (IGF-I/WB); 2) transgenic, hindlimb unloaded (IGF-I/HU); 3) nontransgenic, weight-bearing (FVB/WB); and 4) nontransgenic, hindlimb unloaded (FVB/HU). HU groups were hindlimb unloaded for 14 days. Body mass was reduced (P < 0.05) after HU in both IGF-I (-9%) and FVB mice (-13%). Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that the relative abundance of mRNA for the endogenous rodent IGF-I (rIGF-I) was unaltered by HU in the gastrocnemius (GAST) muscle of wild-type FVB mice. High-level expression of hIGF-I peptide and mRNA was confirmed in the GAST and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of the transgenic mice. Nevertheless, masses of the GAST and TA muscles were reduced (P < 0.05) in both FVB/HU and IGF-I/HU groups compared with FVB/WB and IGF-I/WB groups, respectively, and the percent atrophy in mass of these muscles did not differ between FVB and IGF-I mice. Therefore, skeletal muscle atrophy may not be associated with a reduction of endogenous rIGF-I mRNA level in 14-day HU mice. We conclude that high local expression of hIGF-I mRNA and peptide in skeletal muscle alone cannot attenuate unloading-induced atrophy of fast-twitch muscle in mice.

  7. Overexpression of IGF-I in skeletal muscle of transgenic mice does not prevent unloading-induced atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, D. S.; Booth, F. W.; DeMayo, F.; Schwartz, R. J.; Gordon, S. E.; Fiorotto, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the association between local insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) overexpression and atrophy in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that endogenous skeletal muscle IGF-I mRNA expression would decrease with hindlimb unloading (HU) in mice, and that transgenic mice overexpressing human IGF-I (hIGF-I) specifically in skeletal muscle would exhibit less atrophy after HU. Male transgenic mice and nontransgenic mice from the parent strain (FVB) were divided into four groups (n = 10/group): 1) transgenic, weight-bearing (IGF-I/WB); 2) transgenic, hindlimb unloaded (IGF-I/HU); 3) nontransgenic, weight-bearing (FVB/WB); and 4) nontransgenic, hindlimb unloaded (FVB/HU). HU groups were hindlimb unloaded for 14 days. Body mass was reduced (P mice (-13%). Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that the relative abundance of mRNA for the endogenous rodent IGF-I (rIGF-I) was unaltered by HU in the gastrocnemius (GAST) muscle of wild-type FVB mice. High-level expression of hIGF-I peptide and mRNA was confirmed in the GAST and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of the transgenic mice. Nevertheless, masses of the GAST and TA muscles were reduced (P mice. Therefore, skeletal muscle atrophy may not be associated with a reduction of endogenous rIGF-I mRNA level in 14-day HU mice. We conclude that high local expression of hIGF-I mRNA and peptide in skeletal muscle alone cannot attenuate unloading-induced atrophy of fast-twitch muscle in mice.

  8. Differential alterations in gene expression profiles contribute to time-dependent effects of nandrolone to prevent denervation atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauman William A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anabolic steroids, such as nandrolone, slow muscle atrophy, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. Their effects on muscle size and gene expression depend upon time, and the cause of muscle atrophy. Administration of nandrolone for 7 days beginning either concomitantly with sciatic nerve transection (7 days or 29 days later (35 days attenuated denervation atrophy at 35 but not 7 days. We reasoned that this model could be used to identify genes that are regulated by nandrolone and slow denervation atrophy, as well as genes that might explain the time-dependence of nandrolone effects on such atrophy. Affymetrix microarrays were used to profile gene expression changes due to nandrolone at 7 and 35 days and to identify major gene expression changes in denervated muscle between 7 and 35 days. Results Nandrolone selectively altered expression of 124 genes at 7 days and 122 genes at 35 days, with only 20 genes being regulated at both time points. Marked differences in biological function of genes regulated by nandrolone at 7 and 35 days were observed. At 35, but not 7 days, nandrolone reduced mRNA and protein levels for FOXO1, the mTOR inhibitor REDD2, and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN2 and increased those for ApoD. At 35 days, correlations between mRNA levels and the size of denervated muscle were negative for RCAN2, and positive for ApoD. Nandrolone also regulated genes for Wnt signaling molecules. Comparison of gene expression at 7 and 35 days after denervation revealed marked alterations in the expression of 9 transcriptional coregulators, including Ankrd1 and 2, and many transcription factors and kinases. Conclusions Genes regulated in denervated muscle after 7 days administration of nandrolone are almost entirely different at 7 versus 35 days. Alterations in levels of FOXO1, and of genes involved in signaling through calcineurin, mTOR and Wnt may be linked to the favorable action of nandrolone on

  9. [Acidic fibroblast growth factor for preventing motor endplate degeneration and muscular atrophy after motor nerve injury: a morphological and electrophysiological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-an; Jin, An-min; Zou, Xiao-ying; Xiao, Xiao-tao; Xiao, Sha

    2006-03-01

    To explore measures to prevent motor endplate degeneration and muscular atrophy after motor nerve injury. Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 3 equal groups. In two of the groups, the right common peroneal nerves of the rats were transected and immediately sutured with implantation of collagen gel carrier of acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) or the empty carrier into the denervated tibialis anterior muscles. In the control group, the transected nerves were sutured without implantation. Six weeks after the operation, morphological and electrophysiological examinations were performed. In the control rats and those with empty collagen gel carrier implantation, obvious motor endplate degeneration and muscular atrophy occurred, which were not obvious in rats receiving aFGF carrier implantation. The decrement of repetitive nerve stimulation was significantly greater in the former two groups than in the latter. Implantation of collagen gel carrier of aFGF may prevent motor endplate degeneration and facilitate functional recovery of the neuromuscular junction after motor nerve injury.

  10. Urogenital atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja-Agius, J; Brincat, M P

    2009-08-01

    The major cause of urogenital atrophy in menopausal women is estrogen loss. The symptoms are usually progressive in nature and deteriorate with time from the menopausal transition. The most prevalent urogenital symptoms are vaginal dryness, vaginal irritation and itching. The classical changes in an atrophic vulva include loss of labial and vulvar fullness, with narrowing of the introitus and inflamed mucosal surfaces. Dyspareunia and vaginal bleeding from fragile atrophic skin are common problems. Other urogenital complaints include frequency, nocturia, urgency, incontinence and urinary tract infections. Atrophic changes of the vulva, vagina and lower urinary tract can have a large impact on the quality of life of the menopausal woman. However, hormonal and non-hormonal treatments can provide patients with the solution to regain previous level of function. Therefore, clinicians should sensitively question and examine menopausal women, in order to correctly identify the pattern of changes in urogenital atrophy and manage them appropriately.

  11. Spinal Muscular Atrophy FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SMA: Frequently Asked Questions What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy? Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a genetic neuromuscular ... future trials in SMA. What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy with Respiratory Distress (SMARD)? SMARD and SMA are ...

  12. Unilateral hindlimb casting induced a delayed generalized muscle atrophy during rehabilitation that is prevented by a whey or a high protein diet but not a free leucine-enriched diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues Magne

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is the general muscle mass and strength loss associated with ageing. Muscle atrophy could be made worse by exposure to acute periods of immobilization, because muscle disuse by itself is a stimulus for atrophy. Using a model of unilateral hindlimb casting in old adult rats, we have already demonstrated that the primary effect of immobilization was atrophy in the casted leg, but was also surprisingly associated with a retarded atrophy in the non-casted leg during rehabilitation. In search of mechanisms involved in this generalized atrophy, we demonstrated in the present study that contrary to pair-fed non-immobilized control animals, muscle protein synthesis in the non-immobilized limb was unable to adapt and to respond positively to food intake. Because pair-fed control rats did not lose muscle mass, this defect in muscle protein synthesis may represent one of the explanation for the muscle mass loss observed in the non-immobilized rats. Nevertheless, in order to stimulate protein turn over and generate a positive nitrogen balance required to maintain the whole muscle mass in immobilized rats, we tested a dietary free leucine supplementation (an amino acid known for its stimulatory effect on protein metabolism during the rehabilitation period. Leucine supplementation was able to overcome the anabolic resistance in the non-immobilized limb. A greater muscle protein synthesis up-regulation associated with a stimulation of the mTOR signalling pathway was indeed recorded but it remained inefficient to prevent the loss of muscle in the non-immobilized limb. By contrast, we demonstrated here that whey protein or high protein diets were able to prevent the muscle mass loss of the non-immobilized limb by sustaining muscle protein synthesis during the entire rehabilitation period.

  13. Unilateral Hindlimb Casting Induced a Delayed Generalized Muscle Atrophy during Rehabilitation that Is Prevented by a Whey or a High Protein Diet but Not a Free Leucine-Enriched Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magne, Hugues; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Migné, Carole; Peyron, Marie-Agnès; Combaret, Lydie; Rémond, Didier; Dardevet, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the general muscle mass and strength loss associated with ageing. Muscle atrophy could be made worse by exposure to acute periods of immobilization, because muscle disuse by itself is a stimulus for atrophy. Using a model of unilateral hindlimb casting in old adult rats, we have already demonstrated that the primary effect of immobilization was atrophy in the casted leg, but was also surprisingly associated with a retarded atrophy in the non-casted leg during rehabilitation. In search of mechanisms involved in this generalized atrophy, we demonstrated in the present study that contrary to pair-fed non-immobilized control animals, muscle protein synthesis in the non-immobilized limb was unable to adapt and to respond positively to food intake. Because pair-fed control rats did not lose muscle mass, this defect in muscle protein synthesis may represent one of the explanation for the muscle mass loss observed in the non-immobilized rats. Nevertheless, in order to stimulate protein turn over and generate a positive nitrogen balance required to maintain the whole muscle mass in immobilized rats, we tested a dietary free leucine supplementation (an amino acid known for its stimulatory effect on protein metabolism) during the rehabilitation period. Leucine supplementation was able to overcome the anabolic resistance in the non-immobilized limb. A greater muscle protein synthesis up-regulation associated with a stimulation of the mTOR signalling pathway was indeed recorded but it remained inefficient to prevent the loss of muscle in the non-immobilized limb. By contrast, we demonstrated here that whey protein or high protein diets were able to prevent the muscle mass loss of the non-immobilized limb by sustaining muscle protein synthesis during the entire rehabilitation period. PMID:24015173

  14. Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) Overview Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare, degenerative neurological disorder affecting your body's involuntary (autonomic) functions, including blood pressure, breathing, bladder function and muscle ...

  15. The complex of PAMAM-OH dendrimer with Angiotensin (1–7) prevented the disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Abrigo, Johanna; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Aravena, Javier; Simon, Felipe; Pacheco, Nicolás; González-Nilo, Fernando Danilo; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin (1–7) (Ang-(1–7)) is a bioactive heptapeptide with a short half-life and has beneficial effects in several tissues – among them, skeletal muscle – by preventing muscle atrophy. Dendrimers are promising vehicles for the protection and transport of numerous bioactive molecules. This work explored the use of a neutral, non-cytotoxic hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM-OH) dendrimer as an Ang-(1–7) carrier. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the Ang-(1–7)-binding capacity of the dendrimer presented a 2:1 molar ratio. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis revealed the capacity of neutral PAMAM-OH to protect Ang-(1–7) and form stable complexes. The peptide coverage ability of the dendrimer was between ~50% and 65%. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that neutral PAMAM-OH effectively bonded peptides. Experimental results showed that the Ang-(1–7)/PAMAM-OH complex, but not Ang-(1–7) alone, had an anti-atrophic effect when administered intraperitoneally, as evaluated by muscle strength, fiber diameter, myofibrillar protein levels, and atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions. The results of the Ang-(1–7)/PAMAM-OH complex being intraperitoneally injected were similar to the results obtained when Ang-(1–7) was systemically administered through mini-osmotic pumps. Together, the results suggest that Ang-(1–7) can be protected for PAMAM-OH when this complex is intraperitoneally injected. Therefore, the Ang-(1–7)/PAMAM-OH complex is an efficient delivery method for Ang-(1–7), since it improves the anti-atrophic activity of this peptide in skeletal muscle. PMID:28331320

  16. Brain atrophy during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Yamada, Kenji; Yamada, Susumu; Ono, Shuichi; Takeda, Shunpei; Hatazawa, Jun; Ito, Masatoshi; Kubota, Kazuo

    1985-01-01

    Age-related brain atrophy was investigated in thousands of persons with no neurologic disturbances using X-CT and NMR-CT. Brain atrophy was minimal in 34-35 years old in both sexes, increased exponentially to the increasing age after 34-35 years, and probably resulted in dementia, such as vascular or multi-infarct dementia. Brain atrophy was significantly greater in men than in women at all ages. Brain volumes were maximal in 34-35 years old in both sexes with minimal individual differences which increased proportionally to the increasing age. Remarkable individual differences in the extent of brain atrophy (20 - 30 %) existed among aged subjects. Progression of brain atrophy was closely related to loss of mental activities independently of their ages. Our longitudinal study has revealed that the most important factors promoting brain atrophy during aging was the decrease in the cerebral blood flow. We have classified brain atrophy into sulcal and cisternal enlargement type (type I), ventricular enlargement type (type II) and mixed type (type III) according to the clinical study using NMR-CT. Brain atrophy of type I progresses significantly in almost all of the geriatric disorders. This type of brain atrophy progresses significantly in heavy smokers and drinkers. Therefore this type of brain atrophy might be caused by the decline in the blood flow in anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Brain atrophy of type II was caused by the disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid circulation after cerebral bleeding and subarachnoid bleeding. Brain atrophy of type III was seen in vascular dementia or multi-infarct dementia which was caused by loss of brain matter after multiple infarction, and was seen also in dementia of Alzheimer type in which degeneration of nerve cells results in brain atrophy. NMR-CT can easily detect small infarction (lacunae) and edematous lesions resulting from ischemia and hypertensive encephalopathy. (J.P.N.)

  17. Resveratrol prevents TNF-α-induced muscle atrophy via regulation of Akt/mTOR/FoxO1 signaling in C2C12 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Tao; Yin, Yi; Yang, Ya-Jun; Lv, Pei-Jia; Shi, Ying; Lu, Lu; Wei, Lian-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Muscle atrophy poses a serious concern to patients inflicted with inflammatory diseases. There is now increasing evidence which suggests a vital role for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in muscle pathology associated with impairment of differentiation and muscle wasting. Resveratrol has been an ascribed inhibitory effect on glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy in vitro, but the influence of resveratrol on the growth of C2C12 myotubes exposed to TNF-α remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of TNF-α in the regulation of skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy, and the possibility to interfere with such modulations by means of resveratrol supplementation. For this purpose, C2C12 myotubes were treated with TNF-α in the presence or absence of resveratrol. Myotube treatment with TNF-α contributes to both hyperexpression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase MAFbx and MuRF1, and these alterations are linked to a decrease of anabolic targets (Akt, mTOR, p70S6k and 4E-BP1) and an increase of catabolic targets (FoxO1, FoxO3a, MAFbx and MuRF1). Resveratrol supplementation effectively counteracts TNF-α induced muscle protein loss and reverses declining expression of Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, 4E-BP1and FoxO1, but exerts no influence of FoxO3a expression. Our study demonstrates that resveratrol can reverse the muscle cell atrophy caused by TNF-α through regulation of the Akt/mTOR/FoxO1 signaling pathways, followed by inhibition of the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligase. Our findings suggested that resveratrol could represent a possible strategy to improve muscle mass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuronal involvement in muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alejandro Cisterna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The innervation of skeletal myofibers exerts a crucial influence on the maintenance of muscle tone and normal operation. Consequently, denervated myofibers manifest atrophy, which is preceded by an increase in sarcolemma permeability. Recently, de novo expression of hemichannels formed by connexins and other none selective channels, including P2X7 receptors, TRPV2 channels were demonstrated in denervated fast skeletal muscles. The denervation-induced atrophy was drastically prevented in denervated muscles deficient in connexins 43 and 45. Nonetheless, the transduction mechanism by which the nerve represses the expression of the above mentioned none selective channels remains unknown. The paracrine action of extracellular signaling molecules including ATP, neurotrophic factors (i.e., BDNF, agrin/Lrp4/MuSK and acetylcholine are among the possible perpetrators of repression for connexin expression. This review discusses the possible role of relevant factors in maintaining the normal functioning of fast skeletal muscles and suppression of connexin hemichannel expression.

  19. Brain atrophy during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Takeda, Shumpei; Hatazawa, Jun

    1985-01-01

    Age-related brain atrophy was investigated in thousands of persons with no neurologic disturbances using X-CT and NMR-CT and following results were obtained. Brain atrophy was minimal in 34 -- 35 years old in both sexes, increased exponentially to the increasing age after 34 -- 35 years, and probably resulted in dementia, such as vascular or multiinfarct dementia. Brain atrophy was significantly greater in men than in women at all ages. Brain volumes were maximal in 34 -- 35 years old in both sexes with minimal individual differences which increased proportionally to the increasing age. Remarkable individual differences in the extents of brain atrophy (20 -- 30 %) existed among aged subjects. Some aged subjects had little or no atrophy of their brains, as seen in young subjects, and others had markedly shrunken brains associated with senility. From these results there must be pathological factors promoting brain atrophy with a great individual difference. We have studied the relation of intelligence to brain volume, and have ascertained that progression of brain atrophy was closely related to loss of mental activities independently of their ages. Our longitudinal study has revealed that the most important factors promoting brain atrophy during aging was decrease in the cerebral blood flow. MNR-CT can easily detected small infarction (lacunae) and edematous lesions resulting from ischemia and hypertensive encephalopathy, while X-CT can not. Therefore NMR-CT is very useful for detection of subtle changes in the brain. (J.P.N.)

  20. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  1. Dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaers, Guy; Hamel, Christian; Delettre, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    DEFINITION OF THE DISEASE: Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC) an......) and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain....

  2. Progressive hemifacial atrophy with ciliary body atrophy and ocular hypotony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ashwini Kini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive hemifacial atrophy (PHA is a disease of unknown etiology affecting one-half of the face. Ocular involvement is uncommon. Atrophy of iris is rare, with only a few cases of partial atrophy being reported in the literature. We report a case of total atrophy of iris and ciliary body with associated ocular hypotony in a 16-year-old girl with PHA. We believe this is the first reported case of complete atrophy of iris and ciliary body in PHA. Ocular hypotony in PHA was thought to be due to intra-ocular inflammation. However in our case it appears to be secondary to severe atrophy of the ciliary body.

  3. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non...... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  4. Chroroideremie et Atrophie Gyrata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chams

    1957-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe case history of three patients who one-side progressive atrophy of the iris. Two of these'; cases became later a glaucoma which could' not' be treated' even surgidily. third patient' had a betercebromi~'of the same side. The authors. discuss t4e different theories for the pathogenesi~ o~ the pl:imary. progl:lcssive att:«;>phy o( the iris bu~ believe that sy~pathetic theory which is nearer to Fuchs' syndrom is more accepJable..

  5. Mechanisms of Botulinum Neurotoxin Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Brian A.

    Our previous research suggests that the mechanism of botulinum neurotoxintype A (BoNT/A)-induced atrophy does not occur via a NF-kappaB/Foxo-dependent process. We thus hypothesized that the primary mechanism would be activation of either the proteosomal or calpain pathways. BoNT/A injection induced elevations in proteolytic activity markers of the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) and calpain systems after 3 days of a single dose. Inhibition of the proteasome significantly attenuated BoNT/Ainduced atrophy 3-days post BoNT/A injection. Calpastatin overexpression prevented BoNT/A-induced calpain activity at 3 days, and but did not result in a significant attenuation of atrophy. Concurrent attenuation of the UPS and calpain systems was sufficient to attenuate all of the atrophy associated with BoNT/A induced atrophy. In conclusion, it appears that the UPS and calpain system work in an additive fashion with neurotoxin-induced muscle atrophy. Inhibiting both of these pathways while administering BoNT/A attenuates all of the observed muscle atrophy.

  6. The inheritance of peripapillary atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Healey, Paul R.; Mitchell, Paul; Gilbert, Clare E.; Lee, Anne J.; Ge, Dongliang; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    PURPOSE. To estimate the relative importance of genes and environment in peripapillary atrophy type beta (beta-PPA) in a classic twin study. METHODS. Female twin pairs (n = 506) aged 49 to 79 years were recruited from the St. Thomas' UK Adult Twin Registry. Peripapillary atrophy was identified from

  7. A multi-ingredient dietary supplement abolishes large-scale brain cell loss, improves sensory function, and prevents neuronal atrophy in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, J A; Aksenov, V; Samigullina, R; Aksenov, S; Rodgers, W H; Rollo, C D; Boreham, D R

    2016-06-01

    Transgenic growth hormone mice (TGM) are a recognized model of accelerated aging with characteristics including chronic oxidative stress, reduced longevity, mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, muscle wasting, and elevated inflammatory processes. Growth hormone/IGF-1 activate the Target of Rapamycin known to promote aging. TGM particularly express severe cognitive decline. We previously reported that a multi-ingredient dietary supplement (MDS) designed to offset five mechanisms associated with aging extended longevity, ameliorated cognitive deterioration and significantly reduced age-related physical deterioration in both normal mice and TGM. Here we report that TGM lose more than 50% of cells in midbrain regions, including the cerebellum and olfactory bulb. This is comparable to severe Alzheimer's disease and likely explains their striking age-related cognitive impairment. We also demonstrate that the MDS completely abrogates this severe brain cell loss, reverses cognitive decline and augments sensory and motor function in aged mice. Additionally, histological examination of retinal structure revealed markers consistent with higher numbers of photoreceptor cells in aging and supplemented mice. We know of no other treatment with such efficacy, highlighting the potential for prevention or amelioration of human neuropathologies that are similarly associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular dysfunction. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:382-404, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  9. [Urogenital atrophy and recurrent urinary tract infection in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvat, J; Capilna, M; Schmidt, M H

    1997-08-13

    Postmenopausal lower urinary tract atrophy and its relations to recurrent urinary infections in elderly women are studied. Clinical aspects, functional and histological aspects and hypothetic mechanisms of atrophy are reported, epidemiologic data, mechanisms of urinary infections and of estrogen effects are reviewed and reports on the results of local or systemic use of drugs from the literature are presented. Local administration of estrogen seems to be efficient on the urinary tract. Local treatment is less dangerous and cheaper than systemic treatment. Hormonal treatment is one of the preventive measures against recurrent urinary infections in elderly women.

  10. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal muscle weakness can increase the duration of hospitalization, result in exercise limitation, and contribute to a poor quality of life. Importantly, skeletal muscle atrophy is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality of patients. Therefore, improving our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue in patients is a required first step to develop clinical protocols to prevent these skeletal muscle problems. This review will highlight the consequences and potential mechanisms responsible for skeletal muscle atrophy and fatigue in patients suffering from acute critical illness, cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurological disorders. PMID:27128663

  11. Types of SMA (Spinal Muscular Atrophy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genes other than the SMN1 gene. Spinal Muscular Atrophy Respiratory Distress (SMARD) SMARD is a very rare ... and 50. It causes muscle weakness and wasting (atrophy) throughout the body, which is most noticeable in ...

  12. Hemifacial atrophy treated with autologous fat transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year-old male developed right hemifacial atrophy following marphea profunda. Facial asymmetry due to residual atrophy was treated with autologous fat harvested from buttocks with marked cosmetic improvement.

  13. Lobar atrophy without Pick bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulette, C M; Crain, B J

    1992-01-01

    Four patients from the Kathleen Price Bryan Brain Bank with clinical Pick's syndrome are presented. Thorough neurological evaluation revealed no evidence of a movement disorder. The brains showed marked knife-blade type atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes with relative sparing of the superior temporal gyrus and parietal and occipital lobes. There was marked caudate atrophy in all four. Histologically there was severe neuronal loss and gemistocytic astrocytosis in the involved areas with marked myelin pallor in the deep white matter and subcortical gliosis. There was sometimes marked spongiform change in cortical layer 2. There was severe neuronal loss and gliosis of the caudate nucleus. The gross and microscopic features were characteristic of Pick's disease except that careful search failed to uncover either Pick's bodies or Pick's cells. Review of the literature revealed that fronto-temporal cortical and caudate atrophy with clinical features of Pick's disease has received many different names including Pick's disease type C, Pick's disease type II, progressive subcortical gliosis, presenile glial dystrophy, long duration Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, frontal lobe degeneration, dysphasic dementia, and dementia lacking distinctive histologic features. Nevertheless, the morphologic findings in the present cases so closely resemble Pick's disease that they may well represent endstage Pick's disease. In our experience, such cases account for a significant proportion of non-Alzheimer disease dementia.

  14. Thymic Atrophy: Experimental Studies and Therapeutic Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, S; Nandi, D

    2018-01-01

    The thymus is essential for T cell development and maturation. It is extremely sensitive to atrophy, wherein loss in cellularity of the thymus and/or disruption of the thymic architecture occur. This may lead to lower naïve T cell output and limited TCR diversity. Thymic atrophy is often associated with ageing. What is less appreciated is that proper functioning of the thymus is critical for reduction in morbidity and mortality associated with various clinical conditions including infections and transplantation. Therefore, therapeutic interventions which possess thymopoietic potential and lower thymic atrophy are required. These treatments enhance thymic output, which is a vital factor in generating favourable outcomes in clinical conditions. In this review, experimental studies on thymic atrophy in rodents and clinical cases where the thymus atrophies are discussed. In addition, mechanisms leading to thymic atrophy during ageing as well as during various stress conditions are reviewed. Therapies such as zinc supplementation, IL7 administration, leptin treatment, keratinocyte growth factor administration and sex steroid ablation during thymic atrophy involving experiments in animals and various clinical scenarios are reviewed. Interventions that have been used across different scenarios to reduce the extent of thymic atrophy and enhance its output are discussed. This review aims to speculate on the roles of combination therapies, which by acting additively or synergistically may further alleviate thymic atrophy and boost its function, thereby strengthening cellular T cell responses. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  15. Microvillous inclusion disease (microvillous atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goulet Olivier

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microvillous inclusion disease (MVID or microvillous atrophy is a congenital disorder of the intestinal epithelial cells that presents with persistent life-threatening watery diarrhea and is characterized by morphological enterocyte abnormalities. MVID manifests either in the first days of life (early-onset form or in the first two months (late-onset form of life. MVID is a very rare disorder of unknown origin, probably transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. To date, no prevalence data are available. Ultrastructural analyses reveal: 1 a partial to total atrophy of microvilli on mature enterocytes with apical accumulation of numerous secretory granules in immature enterocytes; 2 the highly characteristic inclusion bodies containing rudimentary or fully differentiated microvilli in mature enterocytes. Light microscopy shows accumulation of PAS-positive granules at the apical pole of immature enterocytes, together with atrophic band indicating microvillus atrophy and, in parallel, an intracellular PAS or CD10 positive line (marking the microvillous inclusion bodies seen on electron microscopy. Intestinal failure secondary to diarrhea is definitive. To date, no curative therapy exists and children with MVID are totally dependent on parenteral nutrition. Long-term outcome is generally poor, due to metabolic decompensation, repeated states of dehydration, infectious and liver complications related to the parenteral nutrition. As MVID is a very rare disorder, which is extremely difficult to diagnose and manage, children with MVID should be transferred to specialized pediatric gastro-intestinal centers, if possible, a center equipped to perform small bowel transplantation. Early small bowel transplantation resulting in intestinal autonomy gives new hope for disease management and outcome.

  16. Characterization of disuse skeletal muscle atrophy and the efficacy of a novel muscle atrophy countermeasure during spaceflight and simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrea Marie

    Humans are an integral part of the engineered systems that will enable return to the Moon and eventually travel to Mars. Major advancements in countermeasure development addressing deleterious effects of microgravity and reduced gravity on the musculoskeletal system need to be made to ensure mission safety and success. The primary objectives of this dissertation are to advance the knowledge and understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy, and support development of novel countermeasures for disuse atrophy to enable healthy long-duration human spaceflight. Models simulating microgravity and actual spaceflight were used to examine the musculoskeletal adaptations during periods of unloading. Myostatin inhibition, a novel anti-atrophy drug therapy, and exercise were examined as a means of preventing and recovering from disuse atrophy. A combination of assays was used to quantify adaptation responses to unloading and examine efficacy of the countermeasures. Body and muscle masses were collected to analyze systemic changes due to treatments. Hindlimb strength and individual muscle forces were measured to demonstrate functional adaptations to treatments. Muscle fiber morphology and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression was examined to identify adaptations at the cellular level. Protein synthesis signals insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), Akt, and p70s6 kinase; and the degradation signals Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 were examined to identify adaptations at the molecular level that ultimately lead to muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. A time course study provided a thorough characterization of the adaptation of skeletal muscle during unloading in C57BL/6 mice, and baseline data for comparison to and evaluation of subsequent studies. Time points defining the on-set and endpoints of disuse muscle atrophy were identified to enable characterization of rapid vs. long-term responses of skeletal muscle to hindlimb suspension. Unloading-induced atrophy primarily resulted from increased protein

  17. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Andrew P

    2018-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset degenerative disorder of the neuromuscular system resulting in slowly progressive weakness and atrophy of the proximal limb and bulbar muscles. The disease is caused by the expansion of a CAG/glutamine tract in the amino-terminus of the androgen receptor. That SBMA exclusively affects males reflects the fact that critical pathogenic events are hormone-dependent. These include translocation of the polyglutamine androgen receptor from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and unfolding of the mutant protein. Studies of the pathology of SBMA subjects have revealed nuclear aggregates of the mutant androgen receptor, loss of lower motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord, and both neurogenic and myopathic changes in skeletal muscle. Mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis include toxicity in both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle, where effects on transcription, intracellular transport, and mitochondrial function have been documented. Therapies to treat SBMA patients remain largely supportive, although experimental approaches targeting androgen action or promoting degradation of the mutant androgen receptor protein or the encoding RNA are under active study. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Aerobic training prevents dexamethasone-induced peripheral insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionísio, T J; Louzada, J C A; Viscelli, B A; Dionísio, E J; Martuscelli, A M; Barel, M; Perez, O A B; Bosqueiro, J R; Brozoski, D T; Santos, C F; Amaral, S L

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated how proteins of the insulin signaling cascade could modulate insulin resistance after dexamethasone (Dexa) treatment and aerobic training. Rats were distributed into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary+Dexa (SD), trained control (TC), and trained+Dexa (TD), and underwent aerobic training for 70 days or remained sedentary. Dexa was administered during the last 10 days (1 mg · kg(-1) per day i. p.). After 70 days, an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (ipGTT) was performed. Protein levels of IRS-1, AKT, and PKC-α in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle were identified using Western blots. Dexa treatment increased blood glucose and the area under the curve (AUC) of ipGTT. Training attenuated the hyperglycemia and the AUC induced by Dexa. Dexa reduced IRS-1 (- 16%) and AKT (- 43%) protein level with no changes in PKC-α levels. Moreover, these effects on IRS-1 and AKT protein level were prevented in trained animals. These results show for the first time that aerobic exercise prevented reductions of IRS-1 and AKT level induced by Dexa in the TA muscle, suggesting that aerobic exercise is a good strategy to prevent Dexa-induced peripheral insulin resistance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  20. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described—olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy.

  1. Therapeutics development for spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sumner, Charlotte J.

    2006-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease that is the leading inherited cause of infant and early childhood mortality. Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by mutation of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1), but all patients retain a centromeric copy of the gene,SMN2. SMN2 produces reduced amounts of full-length SMN mRNA, and spinal muscular atrophy likely results from insufficient levels of SMN protein in motor neurons. The SMN protein plays ...

  2. Increasing Agrin Function Antagonizes Muscle Atrophy and Motor Impairment in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Boido

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a pediatric genetic disease, characterized by motor neuron (MN death, leading to progressive muscle weakness, respiratory failure, and, in the most severe cases, to death. Abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ have been reported in SMA, including neurofilament (NF accumulation at presynaptic terminals, immature and smaller than normal endplates, reduced transmitter release, and, finally, muscle denervation. Here we have studied the role of agrin in SMAΔ7 mice, the experimental model of SMAII. We observed a 50% reduction in agrin expression levels in quadriceps of P10 SMA mice compared to age-matched WT controls. To counteract such condition, we treated SMA mice from birth onwards with therapeutic agrin biological NT-1654, an active splice variant of agrin retaining synaptogenic properties, which is also resistant to proteolytic cleavage by neurotrypsin. Mice were analyzed for behavior, muscle and NMJ histology, and survival. Motor behavior was significantly improved and survival was extended by treatment of SMA mice with NT-1654. At P10, H/E-stained sections of the quadriceps, a proximal muscle early involved in SMA, showed that NT-1654 treatment strongly prevented the size decrease of muscle fibers. Studies of NMJ morphology on whole-mount diaphragm preparations revealed that NT-1654-treated SMA mice had more mature NMJs and reduced NF accumulation, compared to vehicle-treated SMA mice. We conclude that increasing agrin function in SMA has beneficial outcomes on muscle fibers and NMJs as the agrin biological NT-1654 restores the crosstalk between muscle and MNs, delaying muscular atrophy, improving motor performance and extending survival.

  3. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  4. Denervation atrophy is independent from Akt and mTOR activation and is not rescued by myostatin inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Elizabeth M.; Andres-Mateos, Eva; Mejias, Rebeca; Simmers, Jessica L.; Mi, Ruifa; Park, Jae-Sung; Ying, Stephanie; Hoke, Ahmet; Lee, Se-Jin; Cohn, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare two acquired muscle atrophies and the use of myostatin inhibition for their treatment. Myostatin naturally inhibits skeletal muscle growth by binding to ActRIIB, a receptor on the cell surface of myofibers. Because blocking myostatin in an adult wild-type mouse induces profound muscle hypertrophy, we applied a soluble ActRIIB receptor to models of disuse (limb immobilization) and denervation (sciatic nerve resection) atrophy. We found that treatment of immobilized mice with ActRIIB prevented the loss of muscle mass observed in placebo-treated mice. Our results suggest that this protection from disuse atrophy is regulated by serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase (SGK) rather than by Akt. Denervation atrophy, however, was not protected by ActRIIB treatment, yet resulted in an upregulation of the pro-growth factors Akt, SGK and components of the mTOR pathway. We then treated the denervated mice with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and found that, despite a reduction in mTOR activation, there is no alteration of the atrophy phenotype. Additionally, rapamycin prevented the denervation-induced upregulation of the mTORC2 substrates Akt and SGK. Thus, our studies show that denervation atrophy is not only independent from Akt, SGK and mTOR activation but also has a different underlying pathophysiological mechanism than disuse atrophy. PMID:24504412

  5. Denervation atrophy is independent from Akt and mTOR activation and is not rescued by myostatin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Elizabeth M; Andres-Mateos, Eva; Mejias, Rebeca; Simmers, Jessica L; Mi, Ruifa; Park, Jae-Sung; Ying, Stephanie; Hoke, Ahmet; Lee, Se-Jin; Cohn, Ronald D

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare two acquired muscle atrophies and the use of myostatin inhibition for their treatment. Myostatin naturally inhibits skeletal muscle growth by binding to ActRIIB, a receptor on the cell surface of myofibers. Because blocking myostatin in an adult wild-type mouse induces profound muscle hypertrophy, we applied a soluble ActRIIB receptor to models of disuse (limb immobilization) and denervation (sciatic nerve resection) atrophy. We found that treatment of immobilized mice with ActRIIB prevented the loss of muscle mass observed in placebo-treated mice. Our results suggest that this protection from disuse atrophy is regulated by serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase (SGK) rather than by Akt. Denervation atrophy, however, was not protected by ActRIIB treatment, yet resulted in an upregulation of the pro-growth factors Akt, SGK and components of the mTOR pathway. We then treated the denervated mice with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and found that, despite a reduction in mTOR activation, there is no alteration of the atrophy phenotype. Additionally, rapamycin prevented the denervation-induced upregulation of the mTORC2 substrates Akt and SGK. Thus, our studies show that denervation atrophy is not only independent from Akt, SGK and mTOR activation but also has a different underlying pathophysiological mechanism than disuse atrophy.

  6. Denervation atrophy is independent from Akt and mTOR activation and is not rescued by myostatin inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. MacDonald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to compare two acquired muscle atrophies and the use of myostatin inhibition for their treatment. Myostatin naturally inhibits skeletal muscle growth by binding to ActRIIB, a receptor on the cell surface of myofibers. Because blocking myostatin in an adult wild-type mouse induces profound muscle hypertrophy, we applied a soluble ActRIIB receptor to models of disuse (limb immobilization and denervation (sciatic nerve resection atrophy. We found that treatment of immobilized mice with ActRIIB prevented the loss of muscle mass observed in placebo-treated mice. Our results suggest that this protection from disuse atrophy is regulated by serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase (SGK rather than by Akt. Denervation atrophy, however, was not protected by ActRIIB treatment, yet resulted in an upregulation of the pro-growth factors Akt, SGK and components of the mTOR pathway. We then treated the denervated mice with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and found that, despite a reduction in mTOR activation, there is no alteration of the atrophy phenotype. Additionally, rapamycin prevented the denervation-induced upregulation of the mTORC2 substrates Akt and SGK. Thus, our studies show that denervation atrophy is not only independent from Akt, SGK and mTOR activation but also has a different underlying pathophysiological mechanism than disuse atrophy.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pro56Ser VAPB mutation: proximal SMA with dysautonomia. Muscle Nerve. 2006 Dec;34(6):731-9. Citation on PubMed Monani UR. Spinal muscular atrophy: a deficiency in a ubiquitous protein; a motor ...

  8. A quantitative study of the physiological cerebral atrophy with aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, K.

    1987-01-01

    A new method of discriminating pathological cerebral atrophy from physiological atrophy during aging is reported. The authors advocate a pixel counting method using a minicomputer for the quantitative measurement of cerebral atrophy. Five hundred cases were studied with this quantitative method and the normal range of the physiological atrophy was determined statistically. In order to estimate the degree of cerebral atrophy easily, the conventional linear measurement methods were compared with the pixel counting method using multivariant analysis, and a simple formula for the calculation of the degree of cerebral atrophy is proposed. Using this formula and the normal range, pathological cerebral atrophy is easily detectable. (orig.)

  9. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy in professional baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Craig Anthony; Messer, Terry M; Schafer, Michael F

    2004-01-01

    Infraspinatus muscle atrophy has been observed in athletes who stress their upper extremities in an overhead fashion. The majority of such case reports have been in volleyball players, with far fewer cases reported in baseball players. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy occurs to a notable degree in professional baseball players. Retrospective cohort study. At the end of the 1999 baseball season, data were collected from all Major League Baseball teams in regards to players affected with infraspinatus muscle atrophy. Twelve of the 1491 major league professional baseball players were identified as having appreciable infraspinatus muscle atrophy. There was an increased prevalence of the muscle atrophy in professional pitchers (10 of 494, 4%) compared to position players (2 of 997, 0.2%) (P relief pitchers (2 of 10) (P = 0.036), pitchers who had played for more years at the major league level (8.7 +/- 4.9 versus 5.2 +/- 4.0) (P = 0.017), and pitchers who had thrown for more innings at the major league level (971.4 +/- 784.4 versus 485.0 +/- 594.6) (P <0.001). Infraspinatus atrophy was identified in 4.4% of major league starting pitchers and occurred in those pitchers who pitched for more years and innings during their major league career.

  10. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  11. Can endoscopic atrophy predict histological atrophy? Historical study in United Kingdom and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Shin; Gotoda, Takuji; Yoshida, Shigeaki; Oda, Ichiro; Kondo, Hitoshi; Gatta, Luigi; Naylor, Greg; Dixon, Michael; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Axon, Anthony

    2015-12-14

    To assess the diagnostic concordance between endoscopic and histological atrophy in the United Kingdom and Japan. Using published data, a total of 252 patients, 126 in the United Kingdom and 126 in Japan, aged 20 to 80 years, were evaluated. The extent of endoscopic atrophy was classified into five subgroups according to a modified Kimura-Takemoto classification system and was compared with histological findings of atrophy at five biopsy sites according to the updated Sydney system. The strength of agreement of the extent of atrophy between histology and visual endoscopic inspection showed good reproducibility, with a weighted kappa value of 0.76 (P atrophy (OR = 0.10, 95%CI: 0.03-0.36). The strength of agreement between endoscopic and histological atrophy, assessed by cancer risk-oriented grading, was reproducible, with a kappa value of 0.81 (95%CI: 0.75-0.87). Only nine patients (3.6%) were endoscopically underdiagnosed with antral predominant rather than extensive atrophy and were considered false negatives. Endoscopic grading can predict histological atrophy with few false negatives, indicating that precancerous conditions can be identified during screening endoscopy, particularly in patients in western countries.

  12. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we...

  13. Extensive Delayed Brain Atrophy after Resuscitation in a Patient with Multiple System Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazuku Nisitani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of multiple system atrophy (MSA shows atrophy in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem. It is also characterized by specific patterns such as hyperintense lateral putaminal rim. MRI of hypoxic encephalopathy shows atrophy mainly in the gray matter, and laminar necrosis in the cerebral cortex is often observed. Here, we report an MSA patient damaged by hypoxic insult and resuscitated after 18-min cardiac arrest. The brain of the patient developed severe atrophy within a period of 10 months. Furthermore, brain atrophy was observed in the white and gray matter, which preserved the brain atrophy pattern in MSA. We assume that alpha-synuclein oligomerization is involved in the neural cell death and brain atrophy. It might have caused further neural cell death in the brain damaged by hypoxia. Alpha-synuclein, which is involved in the pathogenesis of MSA, is suggested to be a prion. Misfolded alpha-synuclein may propagate through cell-to-cell transmission and cause wide pathological change, visible as atrophied MR imaging.

  14. Visual signs and symptoms of multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A

    2014-11-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare movement disorder and a member of the 'parkinsonian syndromes', which also include Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Multiple system atrophy is a complex syndrome, in which patients exhibit a variety of signs and symptoms, including parkinsonism, ataxia and autonomic dysfunction. It can be difficult to separate MSA from the other parkinsonian syndromes but if ocular signs and symptoms are present, they may aid differential diagnosis. Typical ocular features of MSA include blepharospasm, excessive square-wave jerks, mild to moderate hypometria of saccades, impaired vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR), nystagmus and impaired event-related evoked potentials. Less typical features include slowing of saccadic eye movements, the presence of vertical gaze palsy, visual hallucinations and an impaired electroretinogram (ERG). Aspects of primary vision such as visual acuity, colour vision or visual fields are usually unaffected. Management of the disease to deal with problems of walking, movement, daily tasks and speech problems is important in MSA. Optometrists can work in collaboration with the patient and health-care providers to identify and manage the patient's visual deficits. A more specific role for the optometrist is to correct vision to prevent falls and to monitor the anterior eye to prevent dry eye and control blepharospasm. © 2014 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometrists Association Australia.

  15. MicroRNA in skeletal muscle development, growth, atrophy, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanda, Anja; Režen, Tadeja; Rogelj, Boris

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that are important global- as well as tissue- and cell-type-specific regulators of gene expression. Muscle-specific miRNAs or myomirs have been shown to control various processes in skeletal muscles, from myogenesis and muscle homeostasis to different responses to environmental stimuli, such as exercise. Importantly, myomirs are also involved in the development of muscle atrophy arising from aging, immobility, prolonged exposure to microgravity, or muscular and neuromuscular disorders. Additionally, muscle atrophy is both induced by and exacerbates many important chronic and infectious diseases. As global yet specific muscle regulators, myomirs are also good candidates for therapeutic use. Understanding the dynamics of myomirs expression and their role in the development of disease is necessary to determine their potential for muscle atrophy prevention. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Taurine Rescues Cisplatin-Induced Muscle Atrophy In Vitro: A Morphological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacchiotti, Alessandra; Rovetta, Francesca; Ferroni, Matteo; Corsetti, Giovanni; Lavazza, Antonio; Sberveglieri, Giorgio; Aleo, Maria Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug whose side effects include muscle weakness and cachexia. Here we analysed CisPt-induced atrophy in C2C12 myotubes by a multidisciplinary morphological approach, focusing on the onset and progression of autophagy, a protective cellular process that, when excessively activated, may trigger protein hypercatabolism and atrophy in skeletal muscle. To visualize autophagy we used confocal and transmission electron microscopy at different times of treatment and doses of CisPt. Moreover we evaluated the effects of taurine, a cytoprotective beta-amino acid able to counteract oxidative stress, apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in different tissues and organs. Our microscopic results indicate that autophagy occurs very early in 50 μM CisPt challenged myotubes (4 h–8 h) before overt atrophy but it persists even at 24 h, when several autophagic vesicles, damaged mitochondria, and sarcoplasmic blebbings engulf the sarcoplasm. Differently, 25 mM taurine pretreatment rescues the majority of myotubes size upon 50 μM CisPt at 24 h. Taurine appears to counteract atrophy by restoring regular microtubular apparatus and mitochondria and reducing the overload and the localization of autophagolysosomes. Such a promising taurine action in preventing atrophy needs further molecular and biochemical studies to best define its impact on muscle homeostasis and the maintenance of an adequate skeletal mass in vivo. PMID:24955211

  17. Taurine Rescues Cisplatin-Induced Muscle Atrophy In Vitro: A Morphological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Stacchiotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug whose side effects include muscle weakness and cachexia. Here we analysed CisPt-induced atrophy in C2C12 myotubes by a multidisciplinary morphological approach, focusing on the onset and progression of autophagy, a protective cellular process that, when excessively activated, may trigger protein hypercatabolism and atrophy in skeletal muscle. To visualize autophagy we used confocal and transmission electron microscopy at different times of treatment and doses of CisPt. Moreover we evaluated the effects of taurine, a cytoprotective beta-amino acid able to counteract oxidative stress, apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in different tissues and organs. Our microscopic results indicate that autophagy occurs very early in 50 μM CisPt challenged myotubes (4 h–8 h before overt atrophy but it persists even at 24 h, when several autophagic vesicles, damaged mitochondria, and sarcoplasmic blebbings engulf the sarcoplasm. Differently, 25 mM taurine pretreatment rescues the majority of myotubes size upon 50 μM CisPt at 24 h. Taurine appears to counteract atrophy by restoring regular microtubular apparatus and mitochondria and reducing the overload and the localization of autophagolysosomes. Such a promising taurine action in preventing atrophy needs further molecular and biochemical studies to best define its impact on muscle homeostasis and the maintenance of an adequate skeletal mass in vivo.

  18. CT features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.D.; Gururaj, A.K.; Jeans, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Between 1990 and 1992, 14 children were seen in whom a clinical diagnosis of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) had been made. The majority of patients presented with cerebellar ataxia and hypotonia. Five children had a family history of a similar illness in first-degree relatives. All cases had undergone clinical and neurologic examinations, routine laboratory tests and cranial CT. CT features were graded to quantitative the degree of atrophy in each cerebellar hemisphere, vermis and brain stem. All patients had varying degrees of atrophic changes of cerebellum, brain stem and cerebrum. These CT features appear to be distinctive enough to enable the diagnosis of OPCA to be made. (orig.)

  19. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2006-01-01

    and multifocal electroretinography. Results: All three patients demonstrated partial or complete photoreceptor atrophy corresponding to partial or complete scotomata of retinal origin. Conclusion: Photoreceptor atrophy can be demonstrated early in the course of AZOOR, before ophthalmoscopically visible changes...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myoclonic epilepsy Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... boxes. Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  1. Fluid biomarkers in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurens, Brice; Constantinescu, Radu; Freeman, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing research efforts, no reliable biomarker currently exists for the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Such biomarkers are urgently needed to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic guidance and also to serve as efficacy measures or surrogates of target engagem...

  2. Sensorimotor gating deficits in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Biernat, Heidi Bryde; Nikolic, Miki

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the auditory blink reflex is a measure of sensorimotor gating, which reflects an organism's ability to filter out irrelevant sensory information. PPI has never been studied in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), although sensorimotor deficits are frequently...

  3. Assessment of vaginal atrophy: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, M. A.; Limpens, J.; Roovers, J. P. W. R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an evidence-based definition of vaginal atrophy (VA) and present an overview of subjective and objective measurements of VA applicable in clinical practice and research. A systematic literature search was performed in MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify studies

  4. Cube propagation for focal brain atrophy estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru; Sørensen, Lauge; Darkner, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Precise and robust whole brain, ventricle, and hippocampal atrophy measurements are important as they serve as biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. They are used as secondary outcomes in drug trials, and they correlate with the cognitive scores. When two successive scans are non-linearly aligned...

  5. Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy with Morphea of Cheek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Auluck

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is a rare collagen disorder in which fibrosis of skin, subcutaneous tissues and muscles can occur with occasional involvement of bones. Localized scleroderma is a benign condition but can cause significant deformity when it affects the face. We report a case of localized scleroderma of the face causing progressive hemifacial atrophy.

  6. Myostatin and the skeletal muscle atrophy and hypertrophy signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J; Vernus, B; Chelh, I; Cassar-Malek, I; Gabillard, J C; Hadj Sassi, A; Seiliez, I; Picard, B; Bonnieu, A

    2014-11-01

    Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and is conserved in many species, from rodents to humans. Myostatin inactivation can induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy, while its overexpression or systemic administration causes muscle atrophy. As it represents a potential target for stimulating muscle growth and/or preventing muscle wasting, myostatin regulation and functions in the control of muscle mass have been extensively studied. A wealth of data strongly suggests that alterations in skeletal muscle mass are associated with dysregulation in myostatin expression. Moreover, myostatin plays a central role in integrating/mediating anabolic and catabolic responses. Myostatin negatively regulates the activity of the Akt pathway, which promotes protein synthesis, and increases the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system to induce atrophy. Several new studies have brought new information on how myostatin may affect both ribosomal biogenesis and translation efficiency of specific mRNA subclasses. In addition, although myostatin has been identified as a modulator of the major catabolic pathways, including the ubiquitin-proteasome and the autophagy-lysosome systems, the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. The goal of this review is to highlight outstanding questions about myostatin-mediated regulation of the anabolic and catabolic signaling pathways in skeletal muscle. Particular emphasis has been placed on (1) the cross-regulation between myostatin, the growth-promoting pathways and the proteolytic systems; (2) how myostatin inhibition leads to muscle hypertrophy; and (3) the regulation of translation by myostatin.

  7. White Matter Hyperintensities, Medial Temporal Lobe Atrophy, Cortical Atrophy, and Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy in Severely Depressed Elderly Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudega, Mardien L.; van Exel, Eric; Wattjes, Mike P.; Comijs, Hannie C.; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Eikelenboom, Piet; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.; Stek, Max L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a valuable treatment option in severely depressed elderly patients. Structural abnormalities in the brain, such as white matter hyperintensities, medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), or global cortical atrophy, may influence therapeutic response. The

  8. Effect of IR Laser on Myoblasts: Prospects of Application for Counteracting Microgravity-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monici, Monica; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Rizzo, Angela Maria; Caselli, Anna; Ranaldi, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    Microgravity-induced muscle atrophy is a problem of utmost importance for the impact it may have on the health and performance of astronauts. Therefore, appropriate countermeasures are needed to prevent disuse atrophy and favour muscle recovery. Muscle atrophy is characterized by loss of muscle mass and strength, and a shift in substrate utilization from fat to glucose, that leads to a reduced metabolic efficiency and enhanced fatigability. Laser therapy is already used in physical medicine and rehabilitation to accelerate muscle recovery and in sports medicine to prevent damages produced by metabolic disturbances and inflammatory reactions after heavy exercise. The aim of the research we present was to get insights on possible benefits deriving from the application of an advanced infrared laser system to counteract deficits of muscle energy metabolism and stimulate the recovery of the hypotrophic tissue. The source used was a Multiwave Locked System (MLS) laser, which combines continuous and pulsed emissions at 808 nm and 905 nm, respectively. We studied the effect of MLS treatment on morphology and energy metabolism of C2C12 cells, a widely accepted myoblast model, previously exposed to microgravity conditions modelled by a Random Positioning Machine. The MLS laser treatment was able to restore basal levels of serine/threonine protein phosphatase activity and to counteract cytoskeletal alterations and increase in glycolytic enzymes activity that occurred following the exposure to modelled microgravity. In conclusion, the results provide interesting insights for the application of infrared laser in the treatment of muscle atrophy.

  9. Soy Glycinin Contains a Functional Inhibitory Sequence against Muscle-Atrophy-Associated Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl-b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Unloading stress induces skeletal muscle atrophy. We have reported that Cbl-b ubiquitin ligase is a master regulator of unloading-associated muscle atrophy. The present study was designed to elucidate whether dietary soy glycinin protein prevents denervation-mediated muscle atrophy, based on the presence of inhibitory peptides against Cbl-b ubiquitin ligase in soy glycinin protein. Methods. Mice were fed either 20% casein diet, 20% soy protein isolate diet, 10% glycinin diet containing 10% casein, or 20% glycinin diet. One week later, the right sciatic nerve was cut. The wet weight, cross sectional area (CSA, IGF-1 signaling, and atrogene expression in hindlimb muscles were examined at 1, 3, 3.5, or 4 days after denervation. Results. 20% soy glycinin diet significantly prevented denervation-induced decreases in muscle wet weight and myofiber CSA. Furthermore, dietary soy protein inhibited denervation-induced ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 in tibialis anterior muscle. Dietary soy glycinin partially suppressed the denervation-mediated expression of atrogenes, such as MAFbx/atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, through the protection of IGF-1 signaling estimated by phosphorylation of Akt-1. Conclusions. Soy glycinin contains a functional inhibitory sequence against muscle-atrophy-associated ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b. Dietary soy glycinin protein significantly prevented muscle atrophy after denervation in mice.

  10. Shoulder muscle atrophy and its relation to strength loss in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Christelle; Sheehan, Frances T; Im, Hyun Soo; Brochard, Sylvain; Alter, Katharine E

    2017-10-01

    Treatment/prevention of shoulder muscle strength imbalances are major therapeutic goals for children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The study aims were to characterize muscle atrophy in children/adolescents with unilateral obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, to quantify the agonist-antagonist muscle volume balance and the association between muscle volume and strength. Eight boys and four girls (age=12.1, standard deviation=3.3) participated in this case-control study. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance images of both shoulders were acquired. The unimpaired shoulder served as a reference. Volumes of deltoid, pectoralis major, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres major, subscapularis were calculated based on 3D models, derived through image segmentation. Maximal isometric torques were collected in six directions. All the major muscles studied were significantly atrophied. The teres major demonstrated the biggest difference in atrophy between groups (51 percentage points), the pectoralis major was the least atrophied (23 percentage points). The muscle volume distribution was significantly different between shoulders. Muscle volume could predict maximal voluntary isometric torques, but the regression coefficients were weaker on the impaired side (72% to 91% of the strength could be predicted in the uninvolved side and 24% to 90% in the involved side and external rotation strength could not be predicted). This study demonstrates muscle atrophy varied across all the main shoulder muscles of the glenohumeral joint, leading to significant muscle volume imbalances. The weaker coefficients of determination on the impaired side suggest that other variables may contribute to the loss of strength in addition to atrophy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Cerebral atrophy in Parkinson's disease - represented in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, H.; Schneider, E.; Hacker, H.; Fischer, P.A.; Frankfurt Univ.

    1979-01-01

    To clarify the importance of brain atrophy in relation to the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, 173 patients were examined by computed tomography (CT). In 51.4% of the CT findings, brain atrophy was considered to be pathological. Statistically significant relations of age and sex were found with regard to the extent and localization of brain atrophy. Cortical atrophy also showed a significant dependence on duration of disease. Linear measurements at the lateral ventricles and the third ventricle lead us to assume that brain atrophy in Parkinson's patients is more prevalent than in normal patients within the scope of age involution. (orig.)

  12. The diagnostic dilemma of progressive muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Saeed Bin; Matee, Sumeera; Gill, Zaheer Ahmed; Khan, Atif Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    Progressive muscle atrophy is a rare subtype of motor neuron disease that affects only the lower motor neurons and presents as asymmetrical rapidly progressive muscle weakness, atrophy and normal sensations. The diagnostic electrophysiological findings are denervation potentials in three out of four body segments (bulbar, cervical, thoracic and lumbosacral). The disease is fatal and the management is supportive. We present the report of a 45-year-old female patient who presented with unilateral foot drop and rapidly progressed to profound weakness in muscles of all limbs, neck and back along with dysarthria and dysphagia. She had been operated twice for suspected cervical and lumbosacral intervertebral disc herniations and ultimately guided in right direction after muscle biopsy, nerve conduction studies and electromyography.

  13. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Prendiville, Julie S.

    2005-01-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  14. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  15. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  16. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  17. Corpus callosum atrophy correlates with gray matter atrophy in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawiter, Eric C; Ceccarelli, Antonia; Arora, Ashish; Jackson, Jonathan; Bakshi, Sonya; Kim, Gloria; Miller, Jennifer; Tauhid, Shahamat; von Gizycki, Christian; Bakshi, Rohit; Neema, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Atrophy of the corpus callosum is a recognized characteristic of multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe a new reliable method for measuring corpus callosum atrophy and correlate this with global cerebral atrophy measures. Whole brain 3T MRI was performed in 38 relapsing-remitting MS subjects and 21 healthy controls (HC). Brain global gray and white matter volumes were segmented with SPM8. The contour of the corpus callosum was outlined on the midline of 3-D T1-weighted images by a semiautomated edge-detection technique to determine the corpus callosum area (CCA). Normalized CCA was correlated with other brain atrophy measures in MS subjects. CCA was disproportionately lower in MS subjects vs. HC (20.1% mean decrease; P corpus callosum can have sensitivity as a useful imaging biomarker in patients with MS, even in patients with low disability levels. Both gray and white matter involvement in MS contribute to corpus callosum atrophy. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  18. Eccentric exercise training as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing soleus muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Ryan, Mirelle J.; Booth, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation tested whether eccentric resistance training could prevent soleus muscle atrophy during non-weight bearing. Adult female rats were randomly assigned to either weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes or non-weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes groups. Electrically stimulated maximal eccentric contractions were performed on anesthetized animals at 48-h intervals during the 10-day experiment. Non-weight bearing significantly reduced soleus muscle wet weight (28-31 percent) and noncollagenous protein content (30-31 percent) compared with controls. Eccentric exercise training during non-weight bearing attenuated but did not prevent the loss of soleus muscle wet weight and noncollagenous protein by 77 and 44 percent, respectively. The potential of eccentric exercise training as an effective and highly efficient counter-measure to non-weight-bearing atrophy is demonstrated in the 44 percent attenuation of soleus muscle noncollagenous protein loss by eccentric exercise during only 0.035 percent of the total non-weight-bearing time period.

  19. Schisandrae Fructus Supplementation Ameliorates Sciatic Neurectomy-Induced Muscle Atrophy in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Wan Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the possible beneficial skeletal muscle preserving effects of ethanol extract of Schisandrae Fructus (EESF on sciatic neurectomy- (NTX- induced hindlimb muscle atrophy in mice. Here, calf muscle atrophy was induced by unilateral right sciatic NTX. In order to investigate whether administration of EESF prevents or improves sciatic NTX-induced muscle atrophy, EESF was administered orally. Our results indicated that EESF dose-dependently diminished the decreases in markers of muscle mass and activity levels, and the increases in markers of muscle damage and fibrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokines, and apoptotic events in the gastrocnemius muscle bundles are induced by NTX. Additionally, destruction of gastrocnemius antioxidant defense systems after NTX was dose-dependently protected by treatment with EESF. EESF also upregulated muscle-specific mRNAs involved in muscle protein synthesis but downregulated those involved in protein degradation. The overall effects of 500 mg/kg EESF were similar to those of 50 mg/kg oxymetholone, but it showed more favorable antioxidant effects. The present results suggested that EESF exerts a favorable ameliorating effect on muscle atrophy induced by NTX, through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects related to muscle fiber protective effects and via an increase in protein synthesis and a decrease in protein degradation.

  20. Schisandrae Fructus Supplementation Ameliorates Sciatic Neurectomy-Induced Muscle Atrophy in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Wan; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Ki Young; Kim, Sung Goo; Han, Min Ho; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Cheol Min

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible beneficial skeletal muscle preserving effects of ethanol extract of Schisandrae Fructus (EESF) on sciatic neurectomy- (NTX-) induced hindlimb muscle atrophy in mice. Here, calf muscle atrophy was induced by unilateral right sciatic NTX. In order to investigate whether administration of EESF prevents or improves sciatic NTX-induced muscle atrophy, EESF was administered orally. Our results indicated that EESF dose-dependently diminished the decreases in markers of muscle mass and activity levels, and the increases in markers of muscle damage and fibrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokines, and apoptotic events in the gastrocnemius muscle bundles are induced by NTX. Additionally, destruction of gastrocnemius antioxidant defense systems after NTX was dose-dependently protected by treatment with EESF. EESF also upregulated muscle-specific mRNAs involved in muscle protein synthesis but downregulated those involved in protein degradation. The overall effects of 500 mg/kg EESF were similar to those of 50 mg/kg oxymetholone, but it showed more favorable antioxidant effects. The present results suggested that EESF exerts a favorable ameliorating effect on muscle atrophy induced by NTX, through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects related to muscle fiber protective effects and via an increase in protein synthesis and a decrease in protein degradation. PMID:26064425

  1. Therapeutic potential of eccentric exercises for age-related muscle atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on evidence-based interventions to prevent mobility decline and enhance physical performance in older adults. Several modalities, in addition to traditional strengthening programs, have been designed to manage age-related functional decline more effectively. In this study, we reviewed the current relevant literatures to assess the therapeutic potential of eccentric exercises for age-related muscle atrophy (sarcopenia). Age-related changes in human skeletal muscle, ...

  2. mTORC1 promotes denervation-induced muscle atrophy through a mechanism involving the activation of FoxO and E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huibin; Inoki, Ken; Lee, Myung; Wright, Erika; Khuong, Andy; Khuong, Amanda; Sugiarto, Sista; Garner, Matthew; Paik, Jihye; DePinho, Ronald A; Goldman, Daniel; Guan, Kun-Liang; Shrager, Joseph B

    2014-02-25

    Skeletal muscle mass and function are regulated by motor innervation, and denervation results in muscle atrophy. The activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is substantially increased in denervated muscle, but its regulatory role in denervation-induced atrophy remains unclear. At early stages after denervation of skeletal muscle, a pathway involving class II histone deacetylases and the transcription factor myogenin mediates denervation-induced muscle atrophy. We found that at later stages after denervation of fast-twitch muscle, activation of mTORC1 contributed to atrophy and that denervation-induced atrophy was mitigated by inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin. Activation of mTORC1 through genetic deletion of its inhibitor TSC1 (tuberous sclerosis complex 1) sensitized mice to denervation-induced muscle atrophy and suppressed the kinase activity of Akt, leading to activation of FoxO transcription factors and increasing the expression of genes encoding E3 ubiquitin ligases atrogin [also known as MAFbx (muscle atrophy F-box protein)] and MuRF1 (muscle-specific ring finger 1). Rapamycin treatment of mice restored Akt activity, suggesting that the denervation-induced increase in mTORC1 activity was producing feedback inhibition of Akt. Genetic deletion of the three FoxO isoforms in skeletal muscle induced muscle hypertrophy and abolished the late-stage induction of E3 ubiquitin ligases after denervation, thereby preventing denervation-induced atrophy. These data revealed that mTORC1, which is generally considered to be an important component of anabolism, is central to muscle catabolism and atrophy after denervation. This mTORC1-FoxO axis represents a potential therapeutic target in neurogenic muscle atrophy.

  3. Columbia SMA Project: A Randomized, Control Trial of the Effects of Exercise on Motor Function and Strength in Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). SMA causes significant disability, and there is no effective drug treatment. Maximizing function, endurance...REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: An abstract entitled "Falls and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA): Exploring Cause and Prevention" was presented at the...Rubenstein LZ, Josephson KR. The epidemiology of falls and syncope . Clin Geriatr Med 2002;18:141-158. Wang HY, Yang YH, Jong YJ. Evaluation of muscle

  4. An antibody blocking activin type II receptors induces strong skeletal muscle hypertrophy and protects from atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach-Trifilieff, Estelle; Minetti, Giulia C; Sheppard, KellyAnn; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Feige, Jerome N; Hartmann, Steffen; Brachat, Sophie; Rivet, Helene; Koelbing, Claudia; Morvan, Frederic; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Glass, David J

    2014-02-01

    The myostatin/activin type II receptor (ActRII) pathway has been identified to be critical in regulating skeletal muscle size. Several other ligands, including GDF11 and the activins, signal through this pathway, suggesting that the ActRII receptors are major regulatory nodes in the regulation of muscle mass. We have developed a novel, human anti-ActRII antibody (bimagrumab, or BYM338) to prevent binding of ligands to the receptors and thus inhibit downstream signaling. BYM338 enhances differentiation of primary human skeletal myoblasts and counteracts the inhibition of differentiation induced by myostatin or activin A. BYM338 prevents myostatin- or activin A-induced atrophy through inhibition of Smad2/3 phosphorylation, thus sparing the myosin heavy chain from degradation. BYM338 dramatically increases skeletal muscle mass in mice, beyond sole inhibition of myostatin, detected by comparing the antibody with a myostatin inhibitor. A mouse version of the antibody induces enhanced muscle hypertrophy in myostatin mutant mice, further confirming a beneficial effect on muscle growth beyond myostatin inhibition alone through blockade of ActRII ligands. BYM338 protects muscles from glucocorticoid-induced atrophy and weakness via prevention of muscle and tetanic force losses. These data highlight the compelling therapeutic potential of BYM338 for the treatment of skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness in multiple settings.

  5. Network structure of brain atrophy in de novo Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeighami, Yashar; Ulla, Miguel; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Dadar, Mahsa; Zhang, Yu; Larcher, Kevin Michel-Herve; Fonov, Vladimir; Evans, Alan C; Collins, D Louis; Dagher, Alain

    2015-09-07

    We mapped the distribution of atrophy in Parkinson's disease (PD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical data from 232 PD patients and 117 controls from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative. Deformation-based morphometry and independent component analysis identified PD-specific atrophy in the midbrain, basal ganglia, basal forebrain, medial temporal lobe, and discrete cortical regions. The degree of atrophy reflected clinical measures of disease severity. The spatial pattern of atrophy demonstrated overlap with intrinsic networks present in healthy brain, as derived from functional MRI. Moreover, the degree of atrophy in each brain region reflected its functional and anatomical proximity to a presumed disease epicenter in the substantia nigra, compatible with a trans-neuronal spread of the disease. These results support a network-spread mechanism in PD. Finally, the atrophy pattern in PD was also seen in healthy aging, where it also correlated with the loss of striatal dopaminergic innervation.

  6. Mechanical Ventilation-induced Diaphragm Atrophy Strongly Impacts Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goligher, Ewan C; Dres, Martin; Fan, Eddy; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Scales, Damon C; Herridge, Margaret S; Vorona, Stefannie; Sklar, Michael C; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Lanys, Ashley; Murray, Alistair; Brace, Deborah; Urrea, Cristian; Reid, W Darlene; Tomlinson, George; Slutsky, Arthur S; Kavanagh, Brian P; Brochard, Laurent J; Ferguson, Niall D

    2018-01-15

    Diaphragm dysfunction worsens outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients, but the clinical impact of potentially preventable changes in diaphragm structure and function caused by mechanical ventilation is unknown. To determine whether diaphragm atrophy developing during mechanical ventilation leads to prolonged ventilation. Diaphragm thickness was measured daily by ultrasound in adults requiring invasive mechanical ventilation; inspiratory effort was assessed by thickening fraction. The primary outcome was time to liberation from ventilation. Secondary outcomes included complications (reintubation, tracheostomy, prolonged ventilation, or death). Associations were adjusted for age, severity of illness, sepsis, sedation, neuromuscular blockade, and comorbidity. Of 211 patients enrolled, 191 had two or more diaphragm thickness measurements. Thickness decreased more than 10% in 78 patients (41%) by median Day 4 (interquartile range, 3-5). Development of decreased thickness was associated with a lower daily probability of liberation from ventilation (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.87; per 10% decrease), prolonged ICU admission (adjusted duration ratio, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.29-2.27), and a higher risk of complications (adjusted odds ratio, 3.00; 95% CI, 1.34-6.72). Development of increased thickness (n = 47; 24%) also predicted prolonged ventilation (adjusted duration ratio, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.00-1.90). Decreasing thickness was related to abnormally low inspiratory effort; increasing thickness was related to excessive effort. Patients with thickening fraction between 15% and 30% (similar to breathing at rest) during the first 3 days had the shortest duration of ventilation. Diaphragm atrophy developing during mechanical ventilation strongly impacts clinical outcomes. Targeting an inspiratory effort level similar to that of healthy subjects at rest might accelerate liberation from ventilation.

  7. Novel in vitro platform to investigate myotube atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Oelkrug, Christopher; Horn, Katharina; Makert, Gustavo R.; Schubert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The electrical current exclusion (ECE) principle provides an alternative to common methods of cell diameter measurement and especially in atrophy and cancer associated cachexia research. C2C12 myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes and treated with 100 μM dexamethasone to induce atrophy in vitro. Subsequently, they were incubated for 24 h with media containing different concentrations of curcumin and/or branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in order to counteract atrophy. After treatment wi...

  8. Association between baseline peri-infarct magnetic resonance spectroscopy and regional white matter atrophy after stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid; Donnan, Geoffrey A. [The University of Melbourne, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Cerebral atrophy after stroke is associated with poor functional outcome. The prediction and prevention of post-stroke brain atrophy could therefore represent a target for neurorestorative therapies. We investigated the associations between peri-infarct metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative MRS and brain volume change in the infarct hemisphere after stroke. Twenty patients with ischemic stroke were enrolled. Patients underwent 3T-MRI within 1 week of onset, and at 1 and 3 months. At the baseline scan, an MRS voxel was placed manually in the peri-infarct area and another in the corresponding contralateral region. Volumetric analysis of T1 images was performed using two automated processing packages. Changes in gray and white matter volume were assessed as percentage change between 1 and 3 months. Mean concentrations (institutional units) of N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) (6.1 vs 7.0, p = 0.039), total creatine (Cr+PCr) (5.4 vs 5.8, p = 0.043), and inositol (4.5 vs 5.0, p = 0.014), were significantly lower in the peri-infarct region compared with the contralateral hemisphere. There was a significant correlation between baseline peri-infarct NAA and white matter volume change in the infarct hemisphere between 1 and 3 months, with lower NAA being associated with subsequent white matter atrophy (Spearman's rho = 0.66, p = 0.010). The baseline concentration of Cr+PCr was also significantly correlated with white matter atrophy in the infarct hemisphere (Spearman's rho = 0.59, p = 0.027). Both of these associations were significant after adjustment for the false discovery rate and were validated using the secondary volumetric method. MRS may be useful in the prediction of white matter atrophy post-stroke and in the testing of novel neurorestorative therapies. (orig.)

  9. Pharmacological inhibition of myostatin protects against skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness after anterior cruciate ligament tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtzel, Caroline Nw; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Grekin, Jeremy A; Khouri, Roger K; Russell, Alan J; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are among the most frequent knee injuries in sports medicine, with tear rates in the US up to 250,000 per year. Many patients who suffer from ACL tears have persistent atrophy and weakness even after considerable rehabilitation. Myostatin is a cytokine that directly induces muscle atrophy, and previous studies rodent models and patients have demonstrated an upregulation of myostatin after ACL tear. Using a preclinical rat model, our objective was to determine if the use of a bioneutralizing antibody against myostatin could prevent muscle atrophy and weakness after ACL tear. Rats underwent a surgically induced ACL tear and were treated with either a bioneutralizing antibody against myostatin (10B3, GlaxoSmithKline) or a sham antibody (E1-82.15, GlaxoSmithKline). Muscles were harvested at either 7 or 21 days after induction of a tear to measure changes in contractile function, fiber size, and genes involved in muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. These time points were selected to evaluate early and later changes in muscle structure and function. Compared to the sham antibody group, 7 days after ACL tear, myostatin inhibition reduced the expression of proteolytic genes and induced the expression of hypertrophy genes. These early changes in gene expression lead to a 22% increase in muscle fiber cross-sectional area and a 10% improvement in maximum isometric force production that were observed 21 days after ACL tear. Overall, myostatin inhibition lead to several favorable, although modest, changes in molecular biomarkers of muscle regeneration and reduced muscle atrophy and weakness following ACL tear. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2499-2505, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Acceleration of hippocampal atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, K Abigail; Frost, Chris; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M Jorge; Rowe, Chris C; Villemagne, Victor; Fox, Nick C; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schott, Jonathan M

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of brain atrophy measured from serial magnetic resonance imaging precede symptom onset in Alzheimer's disease and may be useful outcome measures for prodromal clinical trials. Appropriate trial design requires a detailed understanding of the relationships between β-amyloid load and accumulation, and rate of brain change at this stage of the disease. Fifty-two healthy individuals (72.3 ± 6.9 years) from Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Aging had serial (0, 18 m, 36 m) magnetic resonance imaging, (0, 18 m) Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography, and clinical assessments. We calculated rates of whole brain and hippocampal atrophy, ventricular enlargement, amyloid accumulation, and cognitive decline. Over 3 years, rates of whole brain atrophy (p atrophy (p = 0.001, p = 0.023), and ventricular expansion (p atrophy rates were also independently associated with β-amyloid accumulation over the first 18 months (p = 0.003). Acceleration of left hippocampal atrophy rate was associated with baseline β-amyloid load across the cohort (p atrophy are associated with both baseline β-amyloid load and accumulation, and that there is presymptomatic, amyloid-mediated acceleration of hippocampal atrophy. Clinical trials using rate of hippocampal atrophy as an outcome measure should not assume linear decline in the presymptomatic phase. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanisms regulating skeletal muscle growth and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiaffino, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A; Ciciliot, Stefano; Blaauw, Bert; Sandri, Marco

    2013-09-01

    Skeletal muscle mass increases during postnatal development through a process of hypertrophy, i.e. enlargement of individual muscle fibers, and a similar process may be induced in adult skeletal muscle in response to contractile activity, such as strength exercise, and specific hormones, such as androgens and β-adrenergic agonists. Muscle hypertrophy occurs when the overall rates of protein synthesis exceed the rates of protein degradation. Two major signaling pathways control protein synthesis, the IGF1-Akt-mTOR pathway, acting as a positive regulator, and the myostatin-Smad2/3 pathway, acting as a negative regulator, and additional pathways have recently been identified. Proliferation and fusion of satellite cells, leading to an increase in the number of myonuclei, may also contribute to muscle growth during early but not late stages of postnatal development and in some forms of muscle hypertrophy in the adult. Muscle atrophy occurs when protein degradation rates exceed protein synthesis, and may be induced in adult skeletal muscle in a variety of conditions, including starvation, denervation, cancer cachexia, heart failure and aging. Two major protein degradation pathways, the proteasomal and the autophagic-lysosomal pathways, are activated during muscle atrophy and variably contribute to the loss of muscle mass. These pathways involve a variety of atrophy-related genes or atrogenes, which are controlled by specific transcription factors, such as FoxO3, which is negatively regulated by Akt, and NF-κB, which is activated by inflammatory cytokines. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  12. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  13. Differential response of skeletal muscles to mTORC1 signaling during atrophy and hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzinger, C Florian; Lin, Shuo; Romanino, Klaas; Castets, Perrine; Guridi, Maitea; Summermatter, Serge; Handschin, Christoph; Tintignac, Lionel A; Hall, Michael N; Rüegg, Markus A

    2013-03-06

    Skeletal muscle mass is determined by the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of protein translation and has been implicated in the control of muscle mass. Inactivation of mTORC1 by skeletal muscle-specific deletion of its obligatory component raptor results in smaller muscles and a lethal dystrophy. Moreover, raptor-deficient muscles are less oxidative through changes in the expression PGC-1α, a critical determinant of mitochondrial biogenesis. These results suggest that activation of mTORC1 might be beneficial to skeletal muscle by providing resistance to muscle atrophy and increasing oxidative function. Here, we tested this hypothesis by deletion of the mTORC1 inhibitor tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in muscle fibers. Skeletal muscles of mice with an acute or a permanent deletion of raptor or TSC1 were examined using histological, biochemical and molecular biological methods. Response of the muscles to changes in mechanical load and nerve input was investigated by ablation of synergistic muscles or by denervation . Genetic deletion or knockdown of raptor, causing inactivation of mTORC1, was sufficient to prevent muscle growth and enhance muscle atrophy. Conversely, short-term activation of mTORC1 by knockdown of TSC induced muscle fiber hypertrophy and atrophy-resistance upon denervation, in both fast tibialis anterior (TA) and slow soleus muscles. Surprisingly, however, sustained activation of mTORC1 by genetic deletion of Tsc1 caused muscle atrophy in all but soleus muscles. In contrast, oxidative capacity was increased in all muscles examined. Consistently, TSC1-deficient soleus muscle was atrophy-resistant whereas TA underwent normal atrophy upon denervation. Moreover, upon overloading, plantaris muscle did not display enhanced hypertrophy compared to controls. Biochemical analysis indicated that the atrophy response of muscles was based on the suppressed phosphorylation

  14. Differential response of skeletal muscles to mTORC1 signaling during atrophy and hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle mass is determined by the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of protein translation and has been implicated in the control of muscle mass. Inactivation of mTORC1 by skeletal muscle-specific deletion of its obligatory component raptor results in smaller muscles and a lethal dystrophy. Moreover, raptor-deficient muscles are less oxidative through changes in the expression PGC-1α, a critical determinant of mitochondrial biogenesis. These results suggest that activation of mTORC1 might be beneficial to skeletal muscle by providing resistance to muscle atrophy and increasing oxidative function. Here, we tested this hypothesis by deletion of the mTORC1 inhibitor tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in muscle fibers. Method Skeletal muscles of mice with an acute or a permanent deletion of raptor or TSC1 were examined using histological, biochemical and molecular biological methods. Response of the muscles to changes in mechanical load and nerve input was investigated by ablation of synergistic muscles or by denervation . Results Genetic deletion or knockdown of raptor, causing inactivation of mTORC1, was sufficient to prevent muscle growth and enhance muscle atrophy. Conversely, short-term activation of mTORC1 by knockdown of TSC induced muscle fiber hypertrophy and atrophy-resistance upon denervation, in both fast tibialis anterior (TA) and slow soleus muscles. Surprisingly, however, sustained activation of mTORC1 by genetic deletion of Tsc1 caused muscle atrophy in all but soleus muscles. In contrast, oxidative capacity was increased in all muscles examined. Consistently, TSC1-deficient soleus muscle was atrophy-resistant whereas TA underwent normal atrophy upon denervation. Moreover, upon overloading, plantaris muscle did not display enhanced hypertrophy compared to controls. Biochemical analysis indicated that the atrophy response of muscles was based on the

  15. Inhibition of IkappaB kinase alpha (IKK{alpha}) or IKKbeta (IKK{beta}) plus forkhead box O (Foxo) abolishes skeletal muscle atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S.A. [Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, 101 S. Newell Drive, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Senf, S.M. [Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, 25 Stadium Road, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Cornwell, E.W.; Kandarian, S.C. [Department of Health Sciences, Boston University, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Judge, A.R., E-mail: arjudge@phhp.ufl.edu [Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, 101 S. Newell Drive, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Independent inhibition of Foxo, IKK{alpha} and IKK{beta} activities does not alter muscle fiber size in weight bearing muscles. {yields} Inhibition of Foxo activity plus IKK{alpha} or IKK{beta} activities increases muscle fiber size. {yields} Independent inhibition of Foxo and IKK{beta} activities attenuates cast immobilization-induced muscle fiber atrophy. {yields} Disuse muscle fiber atrophy is abolished by inhibition of Foxo activity plus IKK{alpha} or IKK{beta} activities. -- Abstract: Two transcription factor families that are activated during multiple conditions of skeletal muscle wasting are nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and forkhead box O (Foxo). There is clear evidence that both NF-{kappa}B and Foxo activation are sufficient to cause muscle fiber atrophy and they are individually required for at least half of the fiber atrophy during muscle disuse, but there is no work determining the combined effect of inhibiting these factors during a physiological condition of muscle atrophy. Here, we determined whether inhibition of Foxo activation plus inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation, the latter by blocking the upstream inhibitor of kappaB kinases (IKK{alpha} and IKK{beta}), would prevent muscle atrophy induced by 7 days of cast immobilization. Results were based on measurements of mean fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) from 72 muscles transfected with 5 different mutant expression plasmids or plasmid combinations. Immobilization caused a 47% decrease in fiber CSA in muscles injected with control plasmids. Fibers from immobilized muscles transfected with dominant negative (d.n.) IKK{alpha}-EGFP, d.n. IKK{beta}-EGFP or d.n. Foxo-DsRed showed a 22%, 57%, and 76% inhibition of atrophy, respectively. Co-expression of d.n. IKK{alpha}-EGFP and d.n. Foxo-DsRed significantly inhibited 89% of the immobilization-induced fiber atrophy. Similarly, co-expression of d.n. IKK{beta}-EGFP and d.n. Foxo-DsRed inhibited the immobilization

  16. Abnormal pain perception in patients with Multiple System Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory-Magne, F; Pellaprat, J; Harroch, E; Galitzsky, M; Rousseau, V; Pavy-Le Traon, A; Rascol, O; Gerdelat, A; Brefel-Courbon, C

    2018-03-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease or Multiple System Atrophy frequently experience painful sensations. The few studies investigating pain mechanisms in Multiple System Atrophy patients have reported contradictory results. In our study, we compared pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls and evaluated the effect of l-DOPA on pain thresholds. We assessed subjective and objective pain thresholds (using a thermotest and RIII reflex), and pain tolerance in OFF and ON conditions, clinical pain, motor and psychological evaluation. Pain was reported in 78.6% of Multiple System Atrophy patients and in 37.5% of Parkinson's disease patients. In the OFF condition, subjective and objective pain thresholds were significantly lower in Multiple System Atrophy patients than in healthy controls (43.8 °C ± 1.3 vs 45.7 °C ± 0.8; p = 0.0005 and 7.4 mA ± 3.8 vs 13.7 mA ± 2.8; p = 0.002, respectively). They were also significantly reduced in Multiple System Atrophy compared to Parkinson's disease patients. No significant difference was found in pain tolerance for the 3 groups and in the effect of l-DOPA on pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients. In the ON condition, pain tolerance tended to be reduced in Multiple System Atrophy versus Parkinson's disease patients (p = 0.05). Multiple System Atrophy patients had an increase in pain perception compared to Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls. The l-DOPA effect was similar for pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients, but tended to worsen pain tolerance in Multiple System Atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Scoliosis occurs in nearly all non-ambulatory children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Non-operative treatments have not been shown to be effective at preventing progression of scoliosis. Progressive scoliosis can impact the ability of patients to sit comfortably, be cosmetically unappealing, and in severe cases exacerbate pulmonary disease. The main goal of operative treatment is to improve sitting balance and prevent progression of scoliosis. Complication rates are high and there is little data on effect of operative treatment on quality of life in children with SMA and DMD. Comprehensive multi-disciplinary pre-operative evaluations are vital to reduce the risks of operative treatment.

  18. Urogenital atrophy: diagnosis, sequelae, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Kristinell

    2002-08-01

    It is estimated that 17% of our population will be over the age of 65 by the year 2030. As the body ages, many physiologic processes begin to decline. Health-care providers will need to be well-educated in the many sequelae of aging. Practitioners will especially need to focus on the health-care needs of women, since women have a longer life expectancy than men. Estrogen deprivation occurs in all women. Some will not have any symptoms, while others may experience all of its debilitating side effects: hot flashes, osteoporosis, insomnia, irritability, depression, and urogenital atrophy. Even though the latter is not life-threatening, it can alter a woman's quality of life considerably. Because it is easily treatable with minimal risk, all practitioners should become familiar with its presentation and management. This article discusses the many sequelae of urogenital atrophy: vulvovaginal irritation, urinary tract irritative symptoms and infection, urinary incontinence, and sexual dysfunction. Diagnosis and current management strategies are also discussed in detail.

  19. Advances in spinal muscular atrophy therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Valeria; Corti, Stefania

    2018-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a progressive, recessively inherited neuromuscular disease, characterized by the degeneration of lower motor neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem, which leads to weakness and muscle atrophy. SMA currently represents the most common genetic cause of infant death. SMA is caused by the lack of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein due to mutations, which are often deletions, in the SMN1 gene. In the absence of treatments able to modify the disease course, a considerable burden falls on patients and their families. Greater knowledge of the molecular basis of SMA pathogenesis has fuelled the development of potential therapeutic approaches, which are illustrated here. Nusinersen, a modified antisense oligonucleotide that modulates the splicing of the SMN2 mRNA transcript, is the first approved drug for all types of SMA. Moreover, the first gene therapy clinical trial using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors encoding SMN reported positive results in survival and motor milestones achievement. In addition, other strategies are in the pipeline, including modulation of SMN2 transcripts, neuroprotection, and targeting an increasing number of other peripheral targets, including the skeletal muscle. Based on this premise, it is reasonable to expect that therapeutic approaches aimed at treating SMA will soon be changed, and improved, in a meaningful way. We discuss the challenges with regard to the development of novel treatments for patients with SMA, and depict the current and future scenarios as the field enters into a new era of promising effective treatments.

  20. Oats induced villous atrophy in coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, K E A; Nilsen, E M; Scott, H G; Løberg, E M; Gjøen, A; Bratlie, J; Skar, V; Mendez, E; Løvik, A; Kett, K

    2003-01-01

    The current trend is to allow coeliac disease (CD) patients to introduce oats to their gluten free diet. We sought further data from the clinical setting with regards to oats consumption by coeliac patients. Several oat products were tested for wheat contamination using a commercial enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) kit, and six samples were examined by an ELISA using a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies, mass spectrometry, and western blot analysis. Nineteen adult CD patients on a gluten free diet were challenged with 50 g of oats per day for 12 weeks. Serological testing and gastroduodenoscopy was performed before and after the challenge. Biopsies were scored histologically and levels of mRNA specific for interferon γ were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Oats were well tolerated by most patients but several reported initial abdominal discomfort and bloating. One of the patients developed partial villous atrophy and a rash during the first oats challenge. She subsequently improved on an oats free diet but developed subtotal villous atrophy and dramatic dermatitis during a second challenge. Five of the patients showed positive levels of interferon γ mRNA after challenge. Some concerns therefore remain with respect to the safety of oats for coeliacs. PMID:14570737

  1. Geographic atrophy: Etiopathogenesis and current therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Ibáñez, M; Barreiro-González, A; Gallego-Pinazo, R; Dolz-Marco, R; García-Armendariz, B

    2018-01-01

    Geographic atrophy is characterized by severe visual deficit whose etiology and pathophysiology are yet to be elucidated. As a working hypothesis, oxidative damage could trigger a chronic inflammation in Bruch's membrane-RPE-choriocapillaris complex, mostly due to complement pathway overactivation. Some individuals with mutations in the complement system and other factors have diminished capacity in the modulation of the inflammatory response, which results in cell damage and waste accumulation. This accumulation of intracellular and extracellular waste products manifests as drusen and pigmentary changes that precede the atrophy of photoreceptors, RPE, choriocapillaris with an ischemic process with decreased choroid flow. All these processes can be detected as tomographic findings and autofluorescence signals that are useful in the evaluation of patients with atrophic AMD, which helps to establish an individualized prognosis. Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and therapies that decrease the accumulation of toxins for the preservation of the RPE cells and photoreceptors are being investigated in order to slow down the progression of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Glucocorticoids Induce Bone and Muscle Atrophy by Tissue-Specific Mechanisms Upstream of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Amy Y; Richardson, Danielle; Cregor, Meloney; Davis, Hannah M; Au, Ernie D; McAndrews, Kevin; Zimmers, Teresa A; Organ, Jason M; Peacock, Munro; Plotkin, Lilian I; Bellido, Teresita

    2017-03-01

    Glucocorticoid excess, either endogenous with diseases of the adrenal gland, stress, or aging or when administered for immunosuppression, induces bone and muscle loss, leading to osteopenia and sarcopenia. Muscle weakness increases the propensity for falling, which, combined with the lower bone mass, increases the fracture risk. The mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced bone and muscle atrophy are not completely understood. We have demonstrated that the loss of bone and muscle mass, decreased bone formation, and reduced muscle strength, hallmarks of glucocorticoid excess, are accompanied by upregulation in both tissues in vivo of the atrophy-related genes atrogin1, MuRF1, and MUSA1. These are E3 ubiquitin ligases traditionally considered muscle-specific. Glucocorticoids also upregulated atrophy genes in cultured osteoblastic/osteocytic cells, in ex vivo bone organ cultures, and in muscle organ cultures and C2C12 myoblasts/myotubes. Furthermore, glucocorticoids markedly increased the expression of components of the Notch signaling pathway in muscle in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In contrast, glucocorticoids did not increase Notch signaling in bone or bone cells. Moreover, the increased expression of atrophy-related genes in muscle, but not in bone, and the decreased myotube diameter induced by glucocorticoids were prevented by inhibiting Notch signaling. Thus, glucocorticoids activate different mechanisms in bone and muscle that upregulate atrophy-related genes. However, the role of these genes in the effects of glucocorticoids in bone is unknown. Nevertheless, these findings advance our knowledge of the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids in the musculoskeletal system and provide the basis for novel therapies to prevent glucocorticoid-induced atrophy of bone and muscle. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  3. Consensus Definition for Atrophy Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration on OCT: Classification of Atrophy Report 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadda, Srinivas R; Guymer, Robyn; Holz, Frank G; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Curcio, Christine A; Bird, Alan C; Blodi, Barbara A; Bottoni, Ferdinando; Chakravarthy, Usha; Chew, Emily Y; Csaky, Karl; Danis, Ronald P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Freund, K Bailey; Grunwald, Juan; Hoyng, Carel B; Jaffe, Glenn J; Liakopoulos, Sandra; Monés, Jordi M; Pauleikhoff, Daniel; Rosenfeld, Philip J; Sarraf, David; Spaide, Richard F; Tadayoni, Ramin; Tufail, Adnan; Wolf, Sebastian; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2018-04-01

    To develop consensus terminology and criteria for defining atrophy based on OCT findings in the setting of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Consensus meeting. Panel of retina specialists, image reading center experts, retinal histologists, and optics engineers. As part of the Classification of Atrophy Meetings (CAM) program, an international group of experts surveyed the existing literature, performed a masked analysis of longitudinal multimodal imaging for a series of eyes with AMD, and reviewed the results of this analysis to define areas of agreement and disagreement. Through consensus discussions at 3 meetings over 12 months, a classification system based on OCT was proposed for atrophy secondary to AMD. Specific criteria were defined to establish the presence of atrophy. A consensus classification system for atrophy and OCT-based criteria to identify atrophy. OCT was proposed as the reference standard or base imaging method to diagnose and stage atrophy. Other methods, including fundus autofluorescence, near-infrared reflectance, and color imaging, provided complementary and confirmatory information. Recognizing that photoreceptor atrophy can occur without retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy and that atrophy can undergo an evolution of different stages, 4 terms and histologic candidates were proposed: complete RPE and outer retinal atrophy (cRORA), incomplete RPE and outer retinal atrophy, complete outer retinal atrophy, and incomplete outer retinal atrophy. Specific OCT criteria to diagnose cRORA were proposed: (1) a region of hypertransmission of at least 250 μm in diameter, (2) a zone of attenuation or disruption of the RPE of at least 250 μm in diameter, (3) evidence of overlying photoreceptor degeneration, and (4) absence of scrolled RPE or other signs of an RPE tear. A classification system and criteria for OCT-defined atrophy in the setting of AMD has been proposed based on an international consensus. This classification is a more complete

  4. Evaluating Alzheimer's disease progression using rate of regional hippocampal atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edit Frankó

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by neurofibrillary tangle and neuropil thread deposition, which ultimately results in neuronal loss. A large number of magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported a smaller hippocampus in AD patients as compared to healthy elderlies. Even though this difference is often interpreted as atrophy, it is only an indirect measurement. A more direct way of measuring the atrophy is to use repeated MRIs within the same individual. Even though several groups have used this appropriate approach, the pattern of hippocampal atrophy still remains unclear and difficult to relate to underlying pathophysiology. Here, in this longitudinal study, we aimed to map hippocampal atrophy rates in patients with AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI and elderly controls. Data consisted of two MRI scans for each subject. The symmetric deformation field between the first and the second MRI was computed and mapped onto the three-dimensional hippocampal surface. The pattern of atrophy rate was similar in all three groups, but the rate was significantly higher in patients with AD than in control subjects. We also found higher atrophy rates in progressive MCI patients as compared to stable MCI, particularly in the antero-lateral portion of the right hippocampus. Importantly, the regions showing the highest atrophy rate correspond to those that were described to have the highest burden of tau deposition. Our results show that local hippocampal atrophy rate is a reliable biomarker of disease stage and progression and could also be considered as a method to objectively evaluate treatment effects.

  5. Agreement between endoscopic and histological gastric atrophy scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yi; Uemura, Naomi; Xiao, Shu-Dong; Tytgat, Guido N. J.; Kate, Fiebo J. W. Ten

    2005-01-01

    Background. This study was conducted to investigate the strength of agreement between the endoscopic atrophic border (EAB) and the histological score for atrophy. Methods. A series of 298 dyspeptic Japanese patients underwent upper endoscopy. The grade of gastric atrophy was estimated according to

  6. Detection of muscle atrophy on routine sonography of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofka, Carolyn M; Haddad, Ziyad K; Adler, Ronald S

    2004-08-01

    To describe the utility of sonography in visualizing muscle atrophy during routine sonographic examination of the shoulder for evaluation of the rotator cuff tendons. A retrospective review of 199 shoulder sonographic examinations performed by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists trained in musculoskeletal sonography with knowledge of the typical sonographic findings of muscle atrophy was performed. Reports were reviewed for the presence of muscle atrophy. If atrophy was present, the reports from those examinations were rereviewed for concomitant rotator cuff abnormalities. Forty-five examinations (23%) showed atrophy in at least 1 muscle on the basis of the criteria of increased echogenicity and decreased bulk. There were a total of 81 individual muscles that showed atrophy, with the following distribution: 16% supraspinatus (n = 13), 31% infraspinatus (n = 25), 36% teres minor (n = 29), 2% subscapularis (n = 2), and 6% biceps brachii (n = 5). In 34 of the 45 examinations with muscle atrophy, there were 57 concomitant full-thickness tendon tears: 64% supraspinatus (n = 29), 38% infraspinatus (n = 17), 7% subscapularis (n = 3), 0% teres minor (n = 0), 16% long head of biceps (n = 7), and 2% deltoid (n = 1). Although primary sonographic evaluation of the painful shoulder concentrates on the tendons of the rotator cuff, we suggest that examination of the muscles should become a standard component of the comprehensive shoulder sonographic examination, particularly given the potential clinical implications of muscle atrophy on the outcome of rotator cuff surgery.

  7. MRI study of degenerative process in multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo

    1995-01-01

    The characteristic morphological changes of the brainstem and cerebellar regions of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied by MRI in varing subtypes, that is olivoponto cerebellar atrophy (OPCA: 23 cases), striatonigral degeneration (SND: 7 cases) and Shy-Drager's syndrome (SDS: 9 cases). OPCA was characterized by atrophy of the entire regions of the brainstem and the cerebellum. SND and SDS tended to show atrophy similar in type but lessin extent to OPCA. The common lesions in MSA were atrophy of the pontine base and cerebellum, and dilation of the fourth ventricle. Atrophy of the pontine base was more dominant in the inferior part than in the superior part, and cerebellar atrophy was more dominant in the superior part than in the inferior part, indicating that degeneration of the pontocerebellar pathway proceeds principally along fibers connecting the inferior part of the pons and the superior part of the cerebellum. Dilation of the fourth ventricle indicated atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In almost all the cases of OPCA and about a half the cases of SND and SDS, the pontine base and the middle cerebellar peduncle appeared as high signal intensity on T 2 weighted image and as low intensity on T 1 , suggesting degeneration and demyelination. In a few cases of OPCA, the dorsolateral part of the putamen were demonstrated as low signal intensity on T 2 weighted image. (author)

  8. MRI study of degenerative process in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-02-01

    The characteristic morphological changes of the brainstem and cerebellar regions of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied by MRI in varing subtypes, that is olivoponto cerebellar atrophy (OPCA: 23 cases), striatonigral degeneration (SND: 7 cases) and Shy-Drager`s syndrome (SDS: 9 cases). OPCA was characterized by atrophy of the entire regions of the brainstem and the cerebellum. SND and SDS tended to show atrophy similar in type but lessin extent to OPCA. The common lesions in MSA were atrophy of the pontine base and cerebellum, and dilation of the fourth ventricle. Atrophy of the pontine base was more dominant in the inferior part than in the superior part, and cerebellar atrophy was more dominant in the superior part than in the inferior part, indicating that degeneration of the pontocerebellar pathway proceeds principally along fibers connecting the inferior part of the pons and the superior part of the cerebellum. Dilation of the fourth ventricle indicated atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In almost all the cases of OPCA and about a half the cases of SND and SDS, the pontine base and the middle cerebellar peduncle appeared as high signal intensity on T{sub 2} weighted image and as low intensity on T{sub 1}, suggesting degeneration and demyelination. In a few cases of OPCA, the dorsolateral part of the putamen were demonstrated as low signal intensity on T{sub 2} weighted image. (author).

  9. Corpus callosum atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Garde, Ellen; Skimminge, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain......, such as age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) and progression of the disease....

  10. Deformation-Based Atrophy Estimation for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) - the most common form of dementia, is a term used for accelerated memory loss and cognitive abilities enough to severely hamper day-to-day activities. One of the most globally accepted markers for AD is atrophy, in mainly the brain parenchyma. The goal of the PhD project...... is to develop a deformation-based atrophy estimation pipeline that is reliable and stable. We investigate the application of image registration using freeform deformation and stationary velocity fields in atrophy estimation. In the process, we propose a new multi-scale model for the transformation model...... and a new way to estimate atrophy from a deformation field. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed solution but applying it on the publicly available Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging data (ADNI) initiative and compare to existing state-of-art atrophy estimation methods....

  11. CT findings of brain atrophy after chemotherapy in acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jun; Park, Seog Hee; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic University Medicine College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-10-15

    A study was performed to evaluate the atrophic changes of the central nerve system after chemotherapy in the patients with acute leukemia. The computed tomographic findings and medical records of 20 proven acute leukemia patients under 35 years-old who developed various CNS symptoms and signs during and/or after 2 courses of chemotherapy were reviewed. The results were as follows: 1. Age distribution was from 14 to 5 years (mean was 26 years). Male was 15. 2. Presenting clinical symptoms and signs were headache (16/20), nausea and vomiting (11/20) and loss of consciousness (5/20). 3. Brain atrophy was noted in 16 patients including cortical and subcortical atrophy 15 cases and subcortical atrophy 1 case. 4. Two cases of hemorrhage, one each of intracranial hematoma and chronic subdural hematoma were found in addition to brain atrophy. This showed that chemotherapeutic agents cause brain atrophy in a considerable number of the patients with symptomatic acute leukemia.

  12. Posterior cerebral atrophy in the absence of medial temporal lobe atrophy in pathologically-confirmed Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, M.; Koedam, E.L.G.E.; Barnes, J.; Bartlett, J.W.; Ryan, N.S.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.; Barkhof, F.; Wattjes, M.P.; Scheltens, P.; Fox, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) is a recognized marker of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, it can be prominent in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). There is an increasing awareness that posterior atrophy (PA) is important in AD and may aid the differentiation of AD from FTLD. Visual

  13. Assessing atrophy measurement techniques in dementia: Results from the MIRIAD atrophy challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, David M.; Frost, Chris; Iheme, Leonardo O.; Ünay, Devrim; Kandemir, Melek; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Reuter, Martin; Fischl, Bruce; Lorenzi, Marco; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Pennec, Xavier; Pierson, Ronald K.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Jack, Clifford R.; Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Collins, D. Louis; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Leung, Kelvin K.; Wang, Hongzhi; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Malone, Ian B.; Fox, Nick C.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Structural MRI is widely used for investigating brain atrophy in many neurodegenerative disorders, with several research groups developing and publishing techniques to provide quantitative assessments of this longitudinal change. Often techniques are compared through computation of required sample size estimates for future clinical trials. However interpretation of such comparisons is rendered complex because, despite using the same publicly available cohorts, the various techniques have been assessed with different data exclusions and different statistical analysis models. We created the MIRIAD atrophy challenge in order to test various capabilities of atrophy measurement techniques. The data consisted of 69 subjects (46 Alzheimer's disease, 23 control) who were scanned multiple (up to twelve) times at nine visits over a follow-up period of one to two years, resulting in 708 total image sets. Nine participating groups from 6 countries completed the challenge by providing volumetric measurements of key structures (whole brain, lateral ventricle, left and right hippocampi) for each dataset and atrophy measurements of these structures for each time point pair (both forward and backward) of a given subject. From these results, we formally compared techniques using exactly the same dataset. First, we assessed the repeatability of each technique using rates obtained from short intervals where no measurable atrophy is expected. For those measures that provided direct measures of atrophy between pairs of images, we also assessed symmetry and transitivity. Then, we performed a statistical analysis in a consistent manner using linear mixed effect models. The models, one for repeated measures of volume made at multiple time-points and a second for repeated “direct” measures of change in brain volume, appropriately allowed for the correlation between measures made on the same subject and were shown to fit the data well. From these models, we obtained estimates of the

  14. Different atrophy-hypertrophy transcription pathways in muscles affected by severe and mild spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millino Caterina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN and is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy caused by degeneration of spinal motor neurons. SMN has a role in neurons but its deficiency may have a direct effect on muscle tissue. Methods We applied microarray and quantitative real-time PCR to study at transcriptional level the effects of a defective SMN gene in skeletal muscles affected by the two forms of SMA: the most severe type I and the mild type III. Results The two forms of SMA generated distinct expression signatures: the SMA III muscle transcriptome is close to that found under normal conditions, whereas in SMA I there is strong alteration of gene expression. Genes implicated in signal transduction were up-regulated in SMA III whereas those of energy metabolism and muscle contraction were consistently down-regulated in SMA I. The expression pattern of gene networks involved in atrophy signaling was completed by qRT-PCR, showing that specific pathways are involved, namely IGF/PI3K/Akt, TNF-α/p38 MAPK and Ras/ERK pathways. Conclusion Our study suggests a different picture of atrophy pathways in each of the two forms of SMA. In particular, p38 may be the regulator of protein synthesis in SMA I. The SMA III profile appears as the result of the concurrent presence of atrophic and hypertrophic fibers. This more favorable condition might be due to the over-expression of MTOR that, given its role in the activation of protein synthesis, could lead to compensatory hypertrophy in SMA III muscle fibers.

  15. Choroidal Round Hyporeflectivities in Geographic Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Corbelli

    Full Text Available In geographic atrophy (GA, choroidal vessels typically appear on structural optical coherence tomography (OCT as hyperreflective round areas with highly reflective borders. We observed that some GA eyes show choroidal round hyporeflectivities with highly reflective borders beneath the atrophy, and futher investigated the charcteristcs by comparing structural OCT, indocyanine green angiography (ICGA and OCT angiography (OCT-A.Round hyporeflectivities were individuated from a pool of patients with GA secondary to non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration consecutively presenting between October 2015 and March 2016 at the Medical Retina & Imaging Unit of the University Vita-Salute San Raffaele. Patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including ICGA, structural OCT and OCT-A. The correspondence between choroidal round hyporeflectivities beneath GA on structural OCT and ICGA and OCT-A imaging were analyzed.Fifty eyes of 26 consecutive patients (17 females and 9 males; mean age 76.8±6.2 years with GA were included. Twenty-nine round hyporeflectivities have been found by OCT in choroidal layers in 21 eyes of 21 patients (42.0%; estimated prevalence of 57.7%. All 29 round hyporeflectivities showed constantly a hyperreflective border and a backscattering on structural OCT, and appeared as hypofluorescent in late phase ICGA and as dark foci with non detectable flow in the choroidal segmentation of OCT-A. Interestingly, the GA area was greater in eyes with compared to eyes without round hyporeflectivities (9.30±5.74 and 5.57±4.48mm2, respectively; p = 0.01.Our results suggest that most round hyporeflectivities beneath GA may represent non-perfused or hypo-perfused choroidal vessels with non-detectable flow.

  16. Choroidal Round Hyporeflectivities in Geographic Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbelli, Eleonora; Sacconi, Riccardo; De Vitis, Luigi Antonio; Carnevali, Adriano; Rabiolo, Alessandro; Querques, Lea; Bandello, Francesco; Querques, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In geographic atrophy (GA), choroidal vessels typically appear on structural optical coherence tomography (OCT) as hyperreflective round areas with highly reflective borders. We observed that some GA eyes show choroidal round hyporeflectivities with highly reflective borders beneath the atrophy, and futher investigated the charcteristcs by comparing structural OCT, indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) and OCT angiography (OCT-A). Round hyporeflectivities were individuated from a pool of patients with GA secondary to non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration consecutively presenting between October 2015 and March 2016 at the Medical Retina & Imaging Unit of the University Vita-Salute San Raffaele. Patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including ICGA, structural OCT and OCT-A. The correspondence between choroidal round hyporeflectivities beneath GA on structural OCT and ICGA and OCT-A imaging were analyzed. Fifty eyes of 26 consecutive patients (17 females and 9 males; mean age 76.8±6.2 years) with GA were included. Twenty-nine round hyporeflectivities have been found by OCT in choroidal layers in 21 eyes of 21 patients (42.0%; estimated prevalence of 57.7%). All 29 round hyporeflectivities showed constantly a hyperreflective border and a backscattering on structural OCT, and appeared as hypofluorescent in late phase ICGA and as dark foci with non detectable flow in the choroidal segmentation of OCT-A. Interestingly, the GA area was greater in eyes with compared to eyes without round hyporeflectivities (9.30±5.74 and 5.57±4.48mm2, respectively; p = 0.01). Our results suggest that most round hyporeflectivities beneath GA may represent non-perfused or hypo-perfused choroidal vessels with non-detectable flow.

  17. Frontal lobe atrophy of the brain in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Tomio

    1981-01-01

    Reported here are the CT findings on cerebral atrophic lesion chiefly developed in the frontal lobe in schizophrenics with unusual organic encephalopathy. Encephalopathy was recognized in 84 (73%) of 115 schizophrenics and 13 (33%) of 40 neurotics. In an attempt to exclude the effects of aging on encephalopathy, the ages at CT and at the development of disease, the number of morbid years, subtypical schizophrenia and relation between the clinical severity and the atrophic condition were comparatively studied. As a result, cerebral atrophy tended to increase along with aging, but the findings differed in that atrophia classified by age covered the entire brain in general, whereas atrophia in schizophrenics was found in the frontal lobe. In particular, because of the fact that clinical severity and atrophia in the frontal lobe are high correlated and that severe atrophia is recognized even in young people, schizophrenia and atrophia in the frontal lobe are considered to be closely related to each other. It is therefore suggested that the CT findings are useful to clinicians for finding appropriate methods to deal with the prognosis of schizophrenics in their daily diagnosis and for the therapeutic prevention of encephalatrophy by stimulating the frontal lobe, thereby delaying mental deterioration. (author)

  18. Reviewing the options for local estrogen treatment of vaginal atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindahl SH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarah H Lindahl Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation, SEBMF – Diablo Division, Castro Valley, CA, USA Background: Vaginal atrophy is a chronic condition with symptoms that include vaginal dryness, pain during sex, itching, irritation, burning, and discharge, as well as various urinary problems. Up to 45% of postmenopausal women may be affected, but it often remains underreported and undertreated. This article aims to review the current recommendations for treatment of vaginal atrophy, and current data on the effectiveness and safety of local vaginal estrogen therapies. Methods: Literature regarding vaginal atrophy (2007–2012 was retrieved from PubMed and summarized, with emphasis on data related to the treatment of vaginal atrophy with local vaginal estrogen therapy. Results: Published data support the effectiveness and endometrial safety of low-dose local estrogen therapies. These results further support the general recommendation by the North American Menopause Society that a progestogen is not needed for endometrial protection in patients using low-dose local vaginal estrogen. Benefits of long-term therapy for vaginal atrophy include sustained relief of symptoms as well as physiological improvements (eg, decreased vaginal pH and increased blood flow, epithelial thickness, secretions. Conclusion: Currently available local vaginal estrogen therapies are well tolerated and effective in relieving symptoms of vaginal atrophy. Recent data support the endometrial safety of low-dose regimens for up to 1 year. Keywords: menopause, estrogen, local estrogen therapy, vaginal atrophy

  19. Mature IGF-I excels in promoting functional muscle recovery from disuse atrophy compared with pro-IGF-IA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soohyun; Brisson, Becky K; Liu, Min; Spinazzola, Janelle M; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2014-04-01

    Prolonged disuse of skeletal muscle results in atrophy, and once physical activity is resumed, there is increased susceptibility to injury. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is considered a potential therapeutic target to attenuate atrophy during unloading and to enhance rehabilitation upon reloading of skeletal muscles, due to its multipronged actions on satellite cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival, as well as its actions on muscle fibers to boost protein synthesis and inhibit protein degradation. However, the form of IGF-I delivered may alter the success of treatment. Using the hindlimb suspension model of disuse atrophy, we compared the efficacy of two IGF-I forms in protection against atrophy and enhancement of recovery: mature IGF-I (IGF-IS) lacking the COOH-terminal extension, called the E-peptide, and IGF-IA, which is the predominant form retaining the E-peptide. Self-complementary adeno-associated virus harboring the murine Igf1 cDNA constructs were delivered to hindlimbs of adult female C57BL6 mice 3 days prior to hindlimb suspension. Hindlimb muscles were unloaded for 7 days and then reloaded for 3, 7, and 14 days. Loss of muscle mass following suspension was not prevented by either IGF-I construct. However, IGF-IS expression maintained soleus muscle force production. Further, IGF-IS treatment caused rapid recovery of muscle fiber morphology during reloading and maintained muscle strength. Analysis of gene expression revealed that IGF-IS expression accelerated the downregulation of atrophy-related genes compared with untreated or IGF-IA-treated samples. We conclude that mature-IGF-I may be a better option than pro-IGF-IA to promote skeletal muscle recovery following disuse atrophy.

  20. Mature IGF-I excels in promoting functional muscle recovery from disuse atrophy compared with pro-IGF-IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, SooHyun; Brisson, Becky K.; Liu, Min; Spinazzola, Janelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged disuse of skeletal muscle results in atrophy, and once physical activity is resumed, there is increased susceptibility to injury. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is considered a potential therapeutic target to attenuate atrophy during unloading and to enhance rehabilitation upon reloading of skeletal muscles, due to its multipronged actions on satellite cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival, as well as its actions on muscle fibers to boost protein synthesis and inhibit protein degradation. However, the form of IGF-I delivered may alter the success of treatment. Using the hindlimb suspension model of disuse atrophy, we compared the efficacy of two IGF-I forms in protection against atrophy and enhancement of recovery: mature IGF-I (IGF-IS) lacking the COOH-terminal extension, called the E-peptide, and IGF-IA, which is the predominant form retaining the E-peptide. Self-complementary adeno-associated virus harboring the murine Igf1 cDNA constructs were delivered to hindlimbs of adult female C57BL6 mice 3 days prior to hindlimb suspension. Hindlimb muscles were unloaded for 7 days and then reloaded for 3, 7, and 14 days. Loss of muscle mass following suspension was not prevented by either IGF-I construct. However, IGF-IS expression maintained soleus muscle force production. Further, IGF-IS treatment caused rapid recovery of muscle fiber morphology during reloading and maintained muscle strength. Analysis of gene expression revealed that IGF-IS expression accelerated the downregulation of atrophy-related genes compared with untreated or IGF-IA-treated samples. We conclude that mature-IGF-I may be a better option than pro-IGF-IA to promote skeletal muscle recovery following disuse atrophy. PMID:24371018

  1. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients.

  2. Visual impairment and posterior cortical atrophy preceding rapid progressive dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kai Ivar; Bekkelund, Svein Ivar

    2013-01-02

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), also known as Benson's disease, has been previously reported as a variant of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We present a clinical picture and MRI findings of a patient with PCA who developed early right-sided homonymous haemianopia and marked atrophy of parieto-occipital regions of the brain before a cognitive decline appeared. This case demonstrates that PCA may appear with advanced brain atrophy at the onset of focal visual deficits before the development of progressive dementia, and adds to the knowledge of dementias with rapid progression.

  3. Deformation-Based Atrophy Estimation for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) - the most common form of dementia, is a term used for accelerated memory loss and cognitive abilities enough to severely hamper day-to-day activities. One of the most globally accepted markers for AD is atrophy, in mainly the brain parenchyma. The goal of the PhD project...... and a new way to estimate atrophy from a deformation field. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed solution but applying it on the publicly available Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging data (ADNI) initiative and compare to existing state-of-art atrophy estimation methods....

  4. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Hiroyasu, E-mail: sakai@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sato, Ken [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Chiba, Yoshihiko [Department of Biology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Yamazaki, Mitsuaki [Department of Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama-shi, Toyama 9300194 (Japan); Matoba, Motohiro [Department of Palliative Medicine and Psychooncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 1040045 (Japan); Narita, Minoru, E-mail: narita@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin.

  5. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara; Sato, Ken; Chiba, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Matoba, Motohiro; Narita, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin

  6. Genetics Home Reference: gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... newborn period. Gyrate atrophy usually does not affect intelligence; however, abnormalities may be observed in brain imaging ... generated when protein is broken down by the body. In addition to its role in the urea ...

  7. Atrophy and hypertrophy of skeletal muscles: structural and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyarom, O; Inui, K

    2006-10-01

    This review summarizes current information on structural and functional changes that occur during muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. Most published studies consider an increase in total mass of a muscle as hypertrophy, whereas a decrease in total mass of a muscle is referred to as atrophy. In hypertrophy, the rate of synthesis is much higher than the rate of degradation of muscle contractile proteins, leading to an increase in the size or volume of an organ due to enlargement of existing cells. When a muscle remains in disuse for a long period, the rate of degradation of contractile proteins becomes greater than the rate of replacement, resulting in muscle atrophy. This defect may occur as a result of lack of nutrition, loss of nerve supply, micro-gravity, ageing, systemic disease, prolonged immobilization or disuse. An understanding of the specific modifications that occur during muscle atrophy and hypertrophy may facilitate the development of novel techniques, as well as new therapies for affected muscles.

  8. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal

  9. Acquired alopecia, mental retardation, short stature, microcephaly, and optic atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Renckens-Wennen, E. G.

    1990-01-01

    We report on a female patient who had acquired total alopecia, short stature, microcephaly, optic atrophy, severe myopia, and mental retardation. A survey of published reports failed to show an identical patient, despite various similar cases

  10. Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension (Shy-Drager Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or other vision disturbances, difficulty breathing and swallowing, sleep disturbances, and decreased sweating. Because the disease resembles others, a correct diagnosis may take years. × Definition Multiple system atrophy with orthostatic hypotension is the ...

  11. Forced oscillation technique in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Leanne M; Keeling, Lucy A; Shackleton, Claire E; Sly, Peter D

    2014-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes respiratory compromise that is difficult to assess in young children. The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is commercially available for children as young as 2 years of age and is nonvolitional. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of FOT in young children with SMA. Children with SMA aged resistance at 8 Hz (Rrs8) (mean z score, +0.66; SD, 1.34; P = .12) were abnormal. Four children performed spirometry. Linear relationships to Xrs8 exist: FVC (R2, 0.54), unassisted PCF (R2, 0.33), assisted PCF (R2, 0.43), and AHI (R2, 0.32). Over 12 months, Xrs8z score worsened (rate of change of +1.08, P change +0.51, P .05) was found between clinical characteristics and FOT values. FOT is feasible in young children with SMA, with abnormal values of reactance and resistance on grouped data, worsening over 12 months. Xrs8 is related to respiratory tests used to monitor progress in SMA (FVC, PCF, AHI). Further research on the value of FOT in managing individuals is warranted.

  12. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Keir X X; Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Leff, Alexander P; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-28

    We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%-270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    appearance were examined using optical coherence tomography (OCT), automated perimetry and electroretinography (ERG). RESULTS: Both patients demonstrated photoreceptor atrophy corresponding to partial or complete scotomata with reduced or extinct electroretinographic responses. Attenuation or complete loss...... dysfunction. The field loss was more extensive than the area of photoreceptor loss. CONCLUSION: Photoreceptor atrophy can be demonstrated in AZOOR without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus lesions Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  14. Steroid-induced Kager's fat pad atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Musculoskeletal Imaging, Diagnostic Center, Hospital do Coracao (HCor) and Teleimagem, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Durval C.B. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    We report a rare case of Kager's fat pad atrophy and fibrosis in a 60-year-old woman 1 year after a steroid injection for Achilles tendinopathy. There are few published reports of steroid-induced atrophy affecting deeper layers of fat tissue. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to illustrate its features using magnetic resonance imaging. A review of the scientific literature is also presented. (orig.)

  15. Rectus abdominis atrophy after ventral abdominal incisions: midline versus chevron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneswaran, Y; Poli, E; Talamonti, M S; Haggerty, S P; Linn, J G; Ujiki, M B

    2017-08-01

    Although many outcomes have been compared between a midline and chevron incision, this is the first study to examine rectus abdominis atrophy after these two types of incisions. Patients undergoing open pancreaticobiliary surgery between 2007 and 2011 at our single institution were included in this study. Rectus abdominis muscle thickness was measured on both preoperative and follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans to calculate percent atrophy of the muscle after surgery. At average follow-up of 24.5 and 19.0 months, respectively, rectus abdominis atrophy was 18.9% greater in the chevron (n = 30) than in the midline (n = 180) group (21.8 vs. 2.9%, p 20% atrophy at follow-up compared with 10% with a midline incision [odds ratio (OR) 9.0, p atrophy of the rectus abdominis compared with midline incisions. The long-term effects of transecting the rectus abdominis and disrupting its innervation creates challenging abdominal wall pathology. Atrophy of the abdominal wall can not be readily fixed with an operation, and this significant side effect of a transverse incision should be factored into the surgeon's decision-making process when choosing a transverse over a midline incision.

  16. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin impair skeletal muscle atrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporato, Paolo E; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Reano, Simone; Ferrara, Michele; Angelino, Elia; Gnocchi, Viola F; Prodam, Flavia; Ronchi, Giulia; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Fornaro, Michele; Chianale, Federica; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Surico, Nicola; Sinigaglia, Fabiola; Perroteau, Isabelle; Smith, Roy G; Sun, Yuxiang; Geuna, Stefano; Graziani, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and several other disease states. It is characterized by weight loss, fatigue, loss of appetite, and skeletal muscle atrophy and is associated with poor patient prognosis, making it an important treatment target. Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH) release and positive energy balance through binding to the receptor GHSR-1a. Only acylated ghrelin (AG), but not the unacylated form (UnAG), can bind GHSR-1a; however, UnAG and AG share several GHSR-1a-independent biological activities. Here we investigated whether UnAG and AG could protect against skeletal muscle atrophy in a GHSR-1a-independent manner. We found that both AG and UnAG inhibited dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and atrogene expression through PI3Kβ-, mTORC2-, and p38-mediated pathways in myotubes. Upregulation of circulating UnAG in mice impaired skeletal muscle atrophy induced by either fasting or denervation without stimulating muscle hypertrophy and GHSR-1a-mediated activation of the GH/IGF-1 axis. In Ghsr-deficient mice, both AG and UnAG induced phosphorylation of Akt in skeletal muscle and impaired fasting-induced atrophy. These results demonstrate that AG and UnAG act on a common, unidentified receptor to block skeletal muscle atrophy in a GH-independent manner.

  17. FGFR1 inhibits skeletal muscle atrophy associated with hindlimb suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrard Dave

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscle atrophy can occur under many different conditions, including prolonged disuse or immobilization, cachexia, cushingoid conditions, secondary to surgery, or with advanced age. The mechanisms by which unloading of muscle is sensed and translated into signals controlling tissue reduction remains a major question in the field of musculoskeletal research. While the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and their receptors are synthesized by, and intimately involved in, embryonic skeletal muscle growth and repair, their role maintaining adult muscle status has not been examined. Methods We examined the effects of ectopic expression of FGFR1 during disuse-mediated skeletal muscle atrophy, utilizing hindlimb suspension and DNA electroporation in mice. Results We found skeletal muscle FGF4 and FGFR1 mRNA expression to be modified by hind limb suspension,. In addition, we found FGFR1 protein localized in muscle fibers within atrophying mouse muscle which appeared to be resistant to atrophy. Electroporation and ectopic expression of FGFR1 significantly inhibited the decrease in muscle fiber area within skeletal muscles of mice undergoing suspension induced muscle atrophy. Ectopic FGFR1 expression in muscle also significantly stimulated protein synthesis in muscle fibers, and increased protein degradation in weight bearing muscle fibers. Conclusion These results support the theory that FGF signaling can play a role in regulation of postnatal skeletal muscle maintenance, and could offer potentially novel and efficient therapeutic options for attenuating muscle atrophy during aging, illness and spaceflight.

  18. Brain atrophy and dementia from the aspect of CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkuni, Michiko

    1979-01-01

    Two major causes of dementia in the elderly are reported to be the degeneration of brain and cerebrovascular diseases. Recently, CT findings of cerebrovascular diseases and brain atrophy have been noticed, because they rather clearly show these changes. The authors examined the view of atrophy frequently observed on the dementia in the elderly. The results obtained are as follows: 1) In accordance with the increase of age the appearance of the view of atrophy increased in frequency and that of extreme brain atrophy also increased. 2) As the age increased, the average value of the width of the 3rd ventricle tended to increase. 3) In the cases accompanied with the view of cerebrovascular diseases remarkable ventricular dilatation was frequently observed, and in the very old dilatations of cerebral sulci, central fissure and Sylvian fissure were observed of all cases. 4) Of the group of severe dementia the view of extreme brain atrophy was observed in the major. However, there was no significant difference on the lesion of atrophy between the cases. The results mentioned above include some exceptional points respectively, so further investigation will be necessary from the qualitative and quantitative points of view. (author)

  19. Antral atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and pre-neoplastic markers in Mexican children with Helicobacter pylori-positive and negative gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Luévano-González, Arturo; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Zhu, Hongtu; Yuan, Ying; Xiang, Qun; Yan, Benjamin; Stoll, Kathryn Anne; Cross, Janet V.; Iczkowski, Kenneth A.; Mackinnon, Alexander Craig

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and infection are major risk factors for gastric carcinogenesis in adults. As chronic gastritis is common in Mexican children, diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori and other causes of gastritis are critical for the identification of children who would benefit from closer surveillance. Antral biopsies from 82 Mexican children (mean age 8.3±4.8y) with chronic gastritis (36 H. pylori +, 46 H. pylori -) were examined for gastritis activity, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and immunohistochemical expression of gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers CDX2, ephrin type-B receptor 4, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), p53, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Atrophy was diagnosed in 7/82 (9%) and intestinal metaplasia in 5/82 (6%) by routine histology, while 6 (7%) additional children (3 H. pylori +) exhibited aberrant CDX2 expression without intestinal metaplasia. Significant positive correlations were seen between EphB4, MMP3, and MIF (p<0.0001). Atrophy and follicular pathology were more frequent in H. pylori + biopsies (p<0.0001), while intestinal metaplasia and CDX2 expression showed no significant correlation with H. pylori status. Antral biopsies demonstrating atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and/or aberrant CDX2 expression were seen in 21.95 % (18/82) of the children, potentially identifying those who would benefit from closer surveillance and preventive dietary strategies. Biomarkers CDX2, EphB4, MMP3, and MIF may be useful in the work-up of pediatric gastritis. PMID:24656654

  20. The Stress Protein/Chaperone Grp94 Counteracts Muscle Disuse Atrophy by Stabilizing Subsarcolemmal Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitadello, Maurizio; Gherardini, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Redox and growth-factor imbalance fosters muscle disuse atrophy. Since the endoplasmic-reticulum chaperone Grp94 is required for folding insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and for antioxidant cytoprotection, we investigated its involvement in muscle mass loss due to inactivity. Results: Rat soleus muscles were transfected in vivo and analyzed after 7 days of hindlimb unloading, an experimental model of muscle disuse atrophy, or standard caging. Increased muscle protein carbonylation and decreased Grp94 protein levels (pmuscle atrophy regulators identified 160 kDa neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) as a new Grp94 partner. Unloading was demonstrated to untether nNOS from myofiber subsarcolemma; here, we show that such nNOS localization, revealed by means of NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, appeared preserved in unloaded myofibers expressing recombinant Grp94, compared to those transfected with the empty vector or deleted Grp94 cDNA (p<0.02). Innovation: Grp94 interacts with nNOS and prevents its untethering from sarcolemma in unloaded myofibers. Conclusion: Maintenance of Grp94 expression is sufficient to counter unloading atrophy and oxidative stress by mechanistically stabilizing nNOS-multiprotein complex at the myofiber sarcolemma. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2479–2496. PMID:24093939

  1. Contribution of white matter hyperintensities, medial temporal lobe atrophy and cortical atrophy on outcome, seven to twelve years after ECT in severely depressed geriatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudega, M.L.; Dols, A.; Adelerhof, I.; Rozing, M.; Wattjes, M.P.; Comijs, H.C.; Barkhof, F.; Eikelenboom, P.; Stek, M.L.; van Exel, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression and cognitive decline are highly prevalent and often coexisting, however, the association between depression and dementia remains unclear. White matter hyperintensities (WMH), medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) and global cortical atrophy (GCA) are associated with depression,

  2. Calculation of brain atrophy using computed tomography and a new atrophy measurement tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Zahid, Abdullah; Mikheev, Artem; Yang, Andrew Il; Samadani, Uzma; Rusinek, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine if brain atrophy can be calculated by performing volumetric analysis on conventional computed tomography (CT) scans in spite of relatively low contrast for this modality. Materials & Method: CTs for 73 patients from the local Veteran Affairs database were selected. Exclusion criteria: AD, NPH, tumor, and alcohol abuse. Protocol: conventional clinical acquisition (Toshiba; helical, 120 kVp, X-ray tube current 300mA, slice thickness 3-5mm). Locally developed, automatic algorithm was used to segment intracranial cavity (ICC) using (a) white matter seed (b) constrained growth, limited by inner skull layer and (c) topological connectivity. ICC was further segmented into CSF and brain parenchyma using a threshold of 16 Hu. Results: Age distribution: 25-95yrs; (Mean 67+/-17.5yrs.). Significant correlation was found between age and CSF/ICC(r=0.695, patrophy among elderly VA patients is attributable to the presence of other comorbidities. Conclusion: Brain atrophy can be reliably calculated using automated software and conventional CT. Compared to MRI, CT is more widely available, cheaper, and less affected by head motion due to ~100 times shorter scan time. Work is in progress to improve the precision of the measurements, possibly leading to assessment of longitudinal changes within the patient.

  3. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hauerslev

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  4. Visual neglect in posterior cortical atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Katia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, there is a progressive impairment of high-level visual functions and parietal damage, which might predict the occurrence of visual neglect. However, neglect may pass undetected if not assessed with specific tests, and might therefore be underestimated in PCA. In this prospective study, we aimed at establishing the side, the frequency and the severity of visual neglect, visual extinction, and primary visual field defects in an unselected sample of PCA patients. Methods Twenty-four right-handed PCA patients underwent a standardized battery of neglect tests. Visual fields were examined clinically by the confrontation method. Results Sixteen of the 24 patients (66% had signs of visual neglect on at least one test, and fourteen (58% also had visual extinction or hemianopia. Five patients (21% had neither neglect nor visual field defects. As expected, left-sided neglect was more severe than right-sided neglect. However, right-sided neglect resulted more frequently in this population (29% than in previous studies on focal brain lesions. Conclusion When assessed with specific visuospatial tests, visual neglect is frequent in patients with PCA. Diagnosis of neglect is important because of its negative impact on daily activities. Clinicians should consider the routine use of neglect tests to screen patients with high-level visual deficits. The relatively high frequency of right-sided neglect in neurodegenerative patients supports the hypothesis that bilateral brain damage is necessary for right-sided neglect signs to occur, perhaps because of the presence in the right hemisphere of crucial structures whose damage contributes to neglect.

  5. Cerebellar atrophy in neurodegeneration-a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellersen, Helena M; Guo, Christine C; O'Callaghan, Claire; Tan, Rachel H; Sami, Saber; Hornberger, Michael

    2017-09-01

    The cerebellum has strong cortical and subcortical connectivity, but is rarely taken into account for clinical diagnosis in many neurodegenerative conditions, particularly in the absence of clinical ataxia. The current meta-analysis aims to assess patterns of cerebellar grey matter atrophy in seven neurodegenerative conditions (Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (MSP)). We carried out a systematic search in PubMed (any date: 14 July 2016) and a hand search of references from pertinent articles according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The authors were contacted to provide missing coordinate data. Peer-reviewed studies with direct comparison of patient and control groups, and availability of coordinate data of grey matter cerebellar atrophy in patients were included. These coordinates were used in an anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analysis. Across 54 studies, clusters of cerebellar atrophy were found for AD, ALS, FTD, MSA, and PSP. Atrophy patterns were largely disease-specific, with overlap in certain areas of the cerebellar hemisphere, which showed marked atrophy in AD, ALS, FTD and PSP (Crus I/II), and MSA and PSP (lobules I-IV), respectively. Atrophy colocated with cerebellar areas implicated for motor (PSP, MSA) or cognitive symptoms (FTD, ALS, PSP) in the diseases. Our findings suggest that cerebellar changes are largely disease-specific and correspond to cortical or subcortical changes in neurodegenerative conditions. High clinical variability in PD and HD samples may explain the absence of findings for consistent grey matter loss across studies. Our results have clinical implications for diagnosis and cerebellar neuroimaging referencing approaches. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  6. A case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Sadanari; Komiya, Tadatoshi

    1988-01-01

    A clinical case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) was reported. We established several aspects on the basis of MRI findings and a neuro-otological study. A 47-year-old woman had gait disturbance, involuntary movements, speech disturbance, and memory disturbance at the age of 42. She was admitted to the hospital because of worsening of the gait disturbance. Neurological examinations showed choreo-athetosis of the face, neck and upper extremities, mental disturbance, and scanning speech. However, she had neither ocular disturbance nor epilepsy or myoclonus. On the MRI-CT, an atrophy of midbrain and pontine tegmentum was observed. The neuro-otological study showed gaze nystagmus at the horizontal gaze, rebound nystagmus, hypometria of the saccade, saccadic pursuit, reduction of the optokinetic nystagmus, and increase in caloric nystagmus by means of visual input. A severe atrophy of the brainstem tegmentum and a mild atrophy of the cerebellar hemisphere and cerebral cortex are regarded as neuro-radiological features of DRPLA. Moreover, tegmental atrophy is related to ocular disturbance as a clinical feature. Various neuro-otological findings reveal many systems of ocular movements, i.e., a smooth pursuit system, a saccade system, and a vestibulo-ocular reflex system, involving flocculus. DRPLA can be clinically diagnosed by means of clinical features, MRI findings, and neuro-otological findings. A variety of neuro-otological abnormalities may indicate a progression of the ocular disturbance and a variety of lesions. (author)

  7. Significance of type II fiber atrophy in chronic alcoholic myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Solá, J; Sacanella, E; Estruch, R; Nicolás, J M; Grau, J M; Urbano-Márquez, A

    1995-05-01

    To determine the significance of type II fiber atrophy in alcoholic myopathy and its relationship with ethanol-related diseases a prospective study was carried out in 100 chronic alcoholics who showed clinical suspicion of skeletal myopathy. Measurement of muscle strength, laboratory analysis, nutritional assessment and open biopsy of deltoid muscle were performed in each case, as well as electrophysiological testing for peripheral neuropathy. Hepatic ultrasonography and liver biopsy, echocardiography and radionuclide cardiac scanning were carried out in selected subjects. According to histomorphometric analysis, type II fiber atrophy was found in 33 cases (33%), being selective for type II B fiber in 23 (70%). Skeletal myopathy was diagnosed in 61 cases, alcoholic cardiomyopathy in 26, peripheral neuropathy in 23 and cirrhosis in 12. Patients with type II fiber atrophy had a significantly higher total lifetime dose of ethanol, presented a greater incidence of skeletal myopathy and peripheral neuropathy, and exhibited significantly lower values of percentage of ideal body weight and lean body mass than their counterparts. However, the only independent factors for developing type II fiber atrophy were the coexistence of caloric malnutrition (p = 0.004) and the presence of skeletal myopathy (p = 0.043). Selective type II fiber atrophy is a non-specific finding in alcohol-induced muscle damage appearing, overall, in the patients with caloric malnutrition as well as in those with histologic evidence of myopathy.

  8. Spinal muscular atrophy functional composite score: A functional measure in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Jacqueline; Glanzman, Allan M; Mazzone, Elena S; Martens, William B; Dunaway, Sally; Pasternak, Amy; Riley, Susan O; Quigley, Janet; Pandya, Shree; De Vivo, Darryl C; Kaufmann, Petra; Chiriboga, Claudia A; Finkel, Richard S; Tennekoon, Gihan I; Darras, Basil T; Pane, Marika; Mercuri, Eugenio; Mcdermott, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    With clinical trials underway, our objective was to construct a composite score of global function that could discriminate among people with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Data were collected from 126 participants with SMA types 2 and 3. Scores from the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale-Expanded and Upper Limb Module were expressed as a percentage of the maximum score and 6-minute walk test as percent of predicted normal distance. A principal component analysis was performed on the correlation matrix for the 3 percentage scores. The first principal component yielded a composite score with approximately equal weighting of the 3 components and accounted for 82% of the total variability. The SMA functional composite score, an unweighted average of the 3 individual percentage scores, correlated almost perfectly with the first principal component. This combination of measures broadens the spectrum of ability that can be quantified in type 2 and 3 SMA patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Myostatin blockade with a fully human monoclonal antibody induces muscle hypertrophy and reverses muscle atrophy in young and aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latres, Esther; Pangilinan, Jeffrey; Miloscio, Lawrence; Bauerlein, Roy; Na, Erqian; Potocky, Terra B; Huang, Ying; Eckersdorff, Mark; Rafique, Ashique; Mastaitis, Jason; Lin, Calvin; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Gromada, Jesper; Stitt, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle mass and function in humans is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The role of myostatin as a key negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass and function has supported the concept that inactivation of myostatin could be a useful approach for treating muscle wasting diseases. We generated a myostatin monoclonal blocking antibody (REGN1033) and characterized its effects in vitro using surface plasmon resonance biacore and cell-based Smad2/3 signaling assays. REGN1033 was tested in mice for the ability to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and prevent atrophy induced by immobilization, hindlimb suspension, or dexamethasone. The effect of REGN1033 on exercise training was tested in aged mice. Messenger RNA sequencing, immunohistochemistry, and ex vivo force measurements were performed on skeletal muscle samples from REGN1033-treated mice. The human monoclonal antibody REGN1033 is a specific and potent myostatin antagonist. Chronic treatment of mice with REGN1033 increased muscle fiber size, muscle mass, and force production. REGN1033 prevented the loss of muscle mass induced by immobilization, glucocorticoid treatment, or hindlimb unweighting and increased the gain of muscle mass during recovery from pre-existing atrophy. In aged mice, REGN1033 increased muscle mass and strength and improved physical performance during treadmill exercise. We show that specific myostatin antagonism with the human antibody REGN1033 enhanced muscle mass and function in young and aged mice and had beneficial effects in models of skeletal muscle atrophy.

  10. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A.; Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J.; Viader, F.

    2000-01-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  11. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A. [Section of Neuropsychology, Division of Disability Science, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, 980-8575 Sendai (Japan); Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J. [MR Unit, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France); Viader, F. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France)

    2000-06-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  12. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sluimer, Jasper D. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Karas, Giorgos B.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schijndel, Ronald van [VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Informatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barnes, Josephine; Boyes, Richard G. [UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Cover, Keith S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olabarriaga, Silvia D. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fox, Nick C. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Vrenken, Hugo [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 {+-} 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  13. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluimer, Jasper D.; Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip; Karas, Giorgos B.; Barkhof, Frederik; Schijndel, Ronald van; Barnes, Josephine; Boyes, Richard G.; Cover, Keith S.; Olabarriaga, Silvia D.; Fox, Nick C.; Vrenken, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 ± 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  14. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scola Rosana Herminia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 3-1/2-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA. The serum muscle enzimes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.

  15. Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome with crossed cerebellar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay M. Khaladkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome is a rare condition with classical, clinical and radiological changes – mental retardation, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, seizures and cerebral hemiatrophy with calvarial changes. Contralateral cerebellar atrophy is rare and occurs if insult occurs after 1 month of age. We report a case of a 6-year-old female child presenting with right-sided hemiparesis, convulsions and left cerebral hemiatrophy with an old infarct in left middle cerebral artery (MCA territory, ipsilateral calvarial thickening and right (crossed cerebellar atrophy.

  16. Recommendations for the management of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdee, D W; Panay, N; Ulrich, Lian

    2010-01-01

    for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) over recent years that has suggested an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke. But, regardless of whether these scares are justified, local treatment of vaginal atrophy is not associated with these possible risks of systemic HRT. Other reasons...... dryness can be helped by simple lubricants but the best and most logical treatment for urogenital atrophy is to use local estrogen. This is safe, effective and with few contraindications. It is hoped that these guidelines and recommendations, produced to coincide with World Menopause Day 2010, will help...

  17. Homocysteine, Liver Function Derangement and Brain Atrophy in Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Camino; González-Reimers, Emilio; Quintero-Platt, Geraldine; de la Vega-Prieto, María José; Pérez-Hernández, Onán; Martín-González, Candelaria; Espelosín-Ortega, Elisa; Romero-Acevedo, Lucía; Santolaria-Fernández, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia may be involved in the development of brain atrophy in alcoholics. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. In the present study, we analyse the relationship between homocysteine levels and brain atrophy, and the relative weight of co-existing factors such as liver function impairment, the amount of ethanol consumed, serum vitamin B12, B6, and folic acid levels on homocysteine levels and brain alterations in alcoholic patients. We included 59 patients admitted to this hospital for major withdrawal symptoms and 24 controls. The mini-mental state examination test and a brain computed tomography (CT) scan were performed and several indices were calculated. Serum levels of homocysteine, folic acid, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 were determined. Liver function was assessed by Child-Pugh score. The daily consumption of ethanol in grams per day and years of addiction were recorded. A total of 83.6% and 80% of the patients showed cerebellar or frontal atrophy, respectively. Patients showed altered values of brain indices, higher levels of homocysteine and vitamin B12, but lower levels of folic acid, compared with controls. Homocysteine, B12 and liver function variables showed significant correlations with brain CT indices. Multivariate analyses disclosed that Pugh's score, albumin and bilirubin were independently related to cerebellar atrophy, frontal atrophy, cella index or ventricular index. Serum vitamin B12 was the only factor independently related to Evans index. It was also related to cella index, but after bilirubin. Homocysteine levels were independently related to ventricular index, but after bilirubin. Vitamin B12 and homocysteine levels are higher among alcoholics. Liver function derangement, vitamin B12 and homocysteine are all independently related to brain atrophy, although not to cognitive alterations. Hyperhomocysteinemia has been described in alcoholics and may be related to brain atrophy, a reversible condition with an obscure pathogenesis

  18. Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome with crossed cerebellar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay M. Khaladkar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome is a rare condition with classical, clinical and radiological changes – mental retardation, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, seizures and cerebral hemiatrophy with calvarial changes. Contralateral cerebellar atrophy is rare and occurs if insult occurs after 1 month of age. We report a case of a 6-year-old female child presenting with right-sided hemiparesis, convulsions and left cerebral hemiatrophy with an old infarct in left middle cerebral artery (MCA territory, ipsilateral calvarial thickening and right (crossed cerebellar atrophy.

  19. The histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate improves metabolism and reduces muscle atrophy during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael E; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Qaisar, Rizwan; Sloane, Lauren; Rahman, Md M; Kinter, Michael; Van Remmen, Holly

    2015-12-01

    Sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function during aging, is a major contributor to disability and frailty in the elderly. Previous studies found a protective effect of reduced histone deacetylase activity in models of neurogenic muscle atrophy. Because loss of muscle mass during aging is associated with loss of motor neuron innervation, we investigated the potential for the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor butyrate to modulate age-related muscle loss. Consistent with previous studies, we found significant loss of hindlimb muscle mass in 26-month-old C57Bl/6 female mice fed a control diet. Butyrate treatment starting at 16 months of age wholly or partially protected against muscle atrophy in hindlimb muscles. Butyrate increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and prevented intramuscular fat accumulation in the old mice. In addition to the protective effect on muscle mass, butyrate reduced fat mass and improved glucose metabolism in 26-month-old mice as determined by a glucose tolerance test. Furthermore, butyrate increased markers of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and whole-body oxygen consumption without affecting activity. The increase in mass in butyrate-treated mice was not due to reduced ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. However, butyrate reduced markers of oxidative stress and apoptosis and altered antioxidant enzyme activity. Our data is the first to show a beneficial effect of butyrate on muscle mass during aging and suggests HDACs contribute to age-related muscle atrophy and may be effective targets for intervention in sarcopenia and age-related metabolic disease. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Development of a functional food or drug against unloading-mediated muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Nakao, Reiko; Kagawa, Sachiko; Yamada, Chiharu; Abe, Manami; Tamura, Seiko; Kohno, Shohei; Sukeno, Akiko; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Okumura, Yuushi; Ishidoh, Kazumi

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a primary regulator of muscle protein turnover, providing a mechanism for selective degradation of regulatory and structural proteins. This pathway is constitutively active in muscle fibers and mediates both intracellular signaling events and normal muscle protein turnover. However, conditions of decreased muscle use, so called unloading, remarkably stimulate activity of this pathway, resulting in loss of muscle protein. In fact, we previously reported that expression of several ubiquitin ligase genes, such as MuRF-1, Cbl-b, and Siah-1A, which are rate-limiting enzymes of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway, are significantly up-regulated in rat skeletal muscle during spaceflight. Moreover, we found that Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1, an important intermediates of IGF-1 signal transduction, contributes to muscle atrophy during unloading. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 leads to prevention of muscle atrophy during unloading. In this study, we aimed to evaluate oligopeptide as an inhibitor against ubiquitination of IRS-1 by Cbl-b. We synthesized various oligopeptides that may competitively inhibit the binding of Cbl-b to IRS-1 on the basis of their structures and screened inhibitory effects of these synthesized oligopeptides on Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination of IRS-1 using in vitro ubiquitination systems. We found that two synthetic oligopeptides with specific amino acid sequences effectively inhibited interaction with Cbl-b and IRS-1, resulting in decreased ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 (Patent pending). In contrast, we also found inhibitory activity against Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination of IRS-1 in soy protein-derived oligopeptides, whereas their inhibitory effects were weaker than those of synthetic oligopeptides. Our results suggest that specific oligopeptides may be available as a functional food against the muscle

  1. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 in a guinea pig model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation: II. Effects on skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhees, Koen J P; Pansters, Nicholas A M; Baarsma, Hoeke A; Remels, Alexander H V; Haegens, Astrid; de Theije, Chiel C; Schols, Annemie M W J; Gosens, Reinoud; Langen, Ramon C J

    2013-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is accompanied by pulmonary inflammation and associated with extra-pulmonary manifestations, including skeletal muscle atrophy. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the regulation of muscle protein- and myonuclear turnover; two crucial processes that determine muscle mass. In the present study we investigated the effect of the selective GSK-3 inhibitor SB216763 on muscle mass in a guinea pig model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation-associated muscle atrophy. Guinea pigs were pretreated with either intranasally instilled SB216763 or corresponding vehicle prior to each LPS/saline challenge twice weekly. Pulmonary inflammation was confirmed and indices of muscle mass were determined after 12 weeks. Additionally, cultured skeletal muscle cells were incubated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) or glucocorticoids (GCs) to model the systemic effects of pulmonary inflammation on myogenesis, in the presence or absence of GSK-3 inhibitors. Repeated LPS instillation induced muscle atrophy based on muscle weight and muscle fiber cross sectional area. Intriguingly, GSK-3 inhibition using SB216763 prevented the LPS-induced muscle mass decreases and myofiber atrophy. Indices of protein turnover signaling were unaltered in guinea pig muscle. Interestingly, inhibition of myogenesis of cultured muscle cells by TNF-α or synthetic GCs was prevented by GSK-3 inhibitors. In a guinea pig model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, GSK-3 inhibition prevents skeletal muscle atrophy without affecting pulmonary inflammation. Resistance to inflammation- or GC-induced impairment of myogenic differentiation, imposed by GSK-3 inhibition, suggests that sustained myogenesis may contribute to muscle mass maintenance despite persistent pulmonary inflammation. Collectively, these results warrant further exploration of GSK-3 as a potential novel drug target to prevent or reverse muscle wasting in COPD.

  2. Evaluation of both perfusion and atrophy in multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type using brain SPECT alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Kuji, Ichiei; Seto, Akira; Ito, Kimiteru; Kikuta, Daisuke; Yamada, Minoru; Shimano, Yasumasa; Sato, Noriko

    2010-01-01

    Partial volume effects in atrophied areas should be taken into account when interpreting brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of neurodegenerative diseases. To evaluate both perfusion and atrophy using brain SPECT alone, we developed a new technique applying tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to SPECT. After linear spatial normalization of brain perfusion SPECT using 99m Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-ECD) to a Talairach space, high-dimension-warping was done using an original 99m Tc-ECD template. Contraction map images calculated from Jacobian determinants and spatially normalized SPECT images using this high-dimension-warping were compared using statistical parametric mapping (SPM2) between two groups of 16 multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C) patients and 73 age-matched normal controls. This comparison was also performed in conventionally warped SPECT images. SPM2 demonstrated statistically significant contraction indicating local atrophy and decreased perfusion in the whole cerebellum and pons of MSA-C patients as compared to normal controls. Higher significance for decreased perfusion in these areas was obtained in high-dimension-warping than in conventional warping, possibly due to sufficient spatial normalization to a 99m Tc-ECD template in high-dimensional warping of severely atrophied cerebellum and pons. In the present high-dimension-warping, modification of tracer activity remained within 3% of the original tracer distribution. The present new technique applying TBM to brain SPECT provides information on both perfusion and atrophy at the same time thereby enhancing the role of brain perfusion SPECT

  3. Evaluation of both perfusion and atrophy in multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type using brain SPECT alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuda Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partial volume effects in atrophied areas should be taken into account when interpreting brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images of neurodegenerative diseases. To evaluate both perfusion and atrophy using brain SPECT alone, we developed a new technique applying tensor-based morphometry (TBM to SPECT. Methods After linear spatial normalization of brain perfusion SPECT using 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD to a Talairach space, high-dimension-warping was done using an original 99mTc-ECD template. Contraction map images calculated from Jacobian determinants and spatially normalized SPECT images using this high-dimension-warping were compared using statistical parametric mapping (SPM2 between two groups of 16 multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C patients and 73 age-matched normal controls. This comparison was also performed in conventionally warped SPECT images. Results SPM2 demonstrated statistically significant contraction indicating local atrophy and decreased perfusion in the whole cerebellum and pons of MSA-C patients as compared to normal controls. Higher significance for decreased perfusion in these areas was obtained in high-dimension-warping than in conventional warping, possibly due to sufficient spatial normalization to a 99mTc-ECD template in high-dimensional warping of severely atrophied cerebellum and pons. In the present high-dimension-warping, modification of tracer activity remained within 3% of the original tracer distribution. Conclusions The present new technique applying TBM to brain SPECT provides information on both perfusion and atrophy at the same time thereby enhancing the role of brain perfusion SPECT

  4. Quantitative assessment of gastric antrum atrophy shows restitution to normal histology after Helicobacter pylori eradication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Kale, Ilse; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Lindeman, Jan; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Meuwissen, Stefan G. M.; Baak, Jan P. A.; Kuipers, Ernst J.

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: Grading gastric mucosal atrophy in antrum biopsy specimens remains a controversial subject because of limitations in interobserver agreement. We previously described a reliable, quantitative method for grading atrophy of the corpus mucosa with excellent reproducibility and good

  5. Brain atrophy and lesion load predict long term disability in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popescu, Veronica; Agosta, Federica; Hulst, Hanneke E

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS).......To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  6. Smad2/3 Proteins Are Required for Immobilization-induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy*

    OpenAIRE

    Tando, Toshimi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Oike, Takatsugu; Miyamoto, Kana; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy promotes muscle weakness, limiting activities of daily living. However, mechanisms underlying atrophy remain unclear. Here, we show that skeletal muscle immobilization elevates Smad2/3 protein but not mRNA levels in muscle, promoting atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myostatin, which negatively regulates muscle hypertrophy, is dispensable for denervation-induced muscle atrophy and Smad2/3 protein accumulation. Moreover, muscle-specific Smad2/3-deficient mice ex...

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7 attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Morales

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7 in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7 and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophy in vivo using unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT and Mas-knockout (Mas KO mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7 immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7 prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7 increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7 were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7 via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy.

  8. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Acuña, María José; Santos, Robson A.; Bader, Michael; Brandan, Enrique; Simon, Felipe; Olguin, Hugo; Cabrera, Daniel; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7) in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7) and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophy in vivo using unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT) and Mas-knockout (Mas KO) mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7) immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7) prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7) increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:26851244

  9. Causative mutations for progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) in the dog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Jaromír; Horák, Pavel; Bechyňová, Renata; Přibáňová, M.; Stratil, Antonín; Schröffelová, D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2008), s. 55-58 ISSN 1803-4403. [Genetické dny /23./. České Budějovice, 10.09.2008-12.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : progressive retinal atrophy * dog Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Brain atrophy at onset and physical disability in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS patients during the disease onset predicts long term disability. METHODS: MS patients with follow-up time of at least 7 years from disease onset and with baseline and second magnetic resonance 12 months later were included to measure brain atrophy. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS was categorized in three groups, EDSS=0, EDSS=1 and 2.5 and EDSS>2.5, and used as disability measure. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients were included. Mean atrophy during the first year in patients that reached an EDSS≥3 was -0.76±0.45 %, in patients with an EDSS between 1 and 2.5 was -0.59±0.56, while in patients with an EDSS of 0 it was -0.38±0.42 (p=0.003. DISCUSSION: Brain atrophy rates during the first year of disease were predictive of disease progression in our population.

  11. Excessive daytime sleepiness in multiple system atrophy (SLEEMSA study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Lopez, C.; Santamaria, J.; Salamero, M.; Del Sorbo, F.; Albanese, A.; Pellecchia, M.T.; Barone, P.; Overeem, S.; Bloem, B.R.; Aarden, W.C.C.A.; Canesi, M.; Antonini, A.; Duerr, S.; Wenning, G.K.; Poewe, W.; Rubino, A.; Meco, G.; Schneider, S.A.; Bhatia, K.P.; Djaldetti, R.; Coelho, M.; Sampaio, C.; Cochen, V.; Hellriegel, H.; Deuschl, G.; Colosimo, C.; Marsili, L.; Gasser, T.; Tolosa, E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders are common in multiple system atrophy (MSA), but the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is not well known. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and associations of EDS in MSA. DESIGN: Survey of EDS in consecutive patients with MSA and comparison with patients

  12. Multiple systems atrophy: Differentiation and findings by Magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas Velez, Sergio Alberto; Alzate Betancur, Catalina Maria

    2006-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neuro degenerative disorder of undetermined cause, characterized clinically by Parkinson's, autonomic, cerebellar or pyramidal sing and symptoms. lts differentiation from Parkinson's disease may be difficult, mainly in the early stages owing to overlapping features. Magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated usefulness in MSA diagnosis and in differentiation with Parkinson's disease. One case with magnetic resonance findings is described

  13. LINKAGE MAPPING OF THE SPINAL MUSCULAR-ATROPHY GENE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BURGHES, AHM; INGRAHAM, SE; KOTEJARAI, Z; ROSENFELD, S; HERTA, N; NADKARNI, N; DIDONATO, CJ; CARPTEN, J; HURKO, O; FLORENCE, J; MOXLEY, RT; COBBEN, JM; MENDELL, [No Value

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive disorder resulting in loss of motor neurons. We have performed linkage analysis on a panel of families using nine markers that are closely linked to the SMA gene. The highest lod score was obtained with the marker D5S351 (Z(max) = 10.04

  14. Observer agreement on the grading of gastric atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offerhaus, G. J.; Price, A. B.; Haot, J.; ten Kate, F. J.; Sipponen, P.; Fiocca, R.; Stolte, M.; Dixon, M. F.

    1999-01-01

    Assessment of lesser or doubtful degrees of gastric atrophy can be difficult, especially in the antrum, since well established criteria are lacking. At the Houston Working Party on Gastritis in 1994 a visual analogue scale was designed for the grading of histopathological parameters. This was done

  15. Atrophy of the Parietal Lobe in Preclinical Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Heidi I. L.; Van Boxtel, Martin P. J.; Uylings, Harry B. M.; Gronenschild, Ed H. B. M.; Verhey, Frans R.; Jolles, Jelle

    2011-01-01

    Cortical grey matter atrophy patterns have been reported in healthy ageing and Alzheimer disease (AD), but less consistently in the parietal regions of the brain. We investigated cortical grey matter volume patterns in parietal areas. The grey matter of the somatosensory cortex, superior and inferior parietal lobule was measured in 75 older adults…

  16. Intravaginally applied oxytocin improves post-menopausal vaginal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saqi, Shahla H; Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin; Jonasson, Aino F

    2015-09-01

    To explore the efficacy of local oxytocin for the treatment of post-menopausal vaginal atrophy. Double-blinded randomised controlled trial. Healthy post-menopausal women in Stockholm, Sweden. Sixty four post-menopausal women between February and June 2012 at the Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge/Sweden. The efficacy of oxytocin for treatment of vaginal atrophy after seven weeks and cytological evaluation. The percentage of superficial cells in the vaginal smears and the maturation values were significantly increased after seven weeks of treatment with vagitocin 400 IU (p = 0.0288 and p = 0.0002, respectively). The vaginal pH decreased significantly after seven weeks of treatment with vagitocin 100 IU (p = 0.02). The scores of vaginal atrophy, according to the histological evaluation, were significantly reduced after administration of vagitocin 100 IU (p = 0.03). The thickness of the endometrium did not differ between the treatment and placebo groups after seven weeks of treatment. The symptom experienced as the most bothersome was significantly reduced after seven weeks of treatment in the women receiving vagitocin 400 IU compared to women in the placebo group (p = 0.0089). Treatment with intravaginally applied oxytocin could be an alternative to local estrogen treatment in women with post-menopausal vaginal atrophy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Mandibular atrophy and metabolic bone loss. Endocrinology, radiology and histomorphometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, L. L.; Bras, J.; Borgmeyer-Hoelen, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    In 11 edentulous patients with a severe atrophy of the mandible and submitted for ridge augmentation, endocrinological, radiological and histomorphometrical studies were carried out. The results showed that metabolic bone loss, histologically in nearly all patients characterized as a disturbance in

  18. Rapid quantitative assessment of gastric corpus atrophy in tissue sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grieken, N. C.; Weiss, M. M.; Meijer, G. A.; Bloemena, E.; Lindeman, J.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Meuwissen, S. G.; Baak, J. P.; Kuipers, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Grading of Helicobacter pylori induced atrophic gastritis using the updated Sydney system is severely limited by high interobserver variability. The aim of this study was to set up a quantitative test of gastric corpus mucosal atrophy in tissue sections and test its reproducibility and correlation

  19. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin impair skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and several other disease states. It is characterized by weight loss, fatigue, loss of appetite, and skeletal muscle atrophy and is associated with poor patient prognosis, making it an important treatment target. Ghreli...

  20. Novel in vitro platform to investigate myotube atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelkrug, Christopher; Horn, Katharina; Makert, Gustavo R; Schubert, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The electrical current exclusion (ECE) principle provides an alternative to common methods of cell diameter measurement and especially in atrophy and cancer associated cachexia research. C2C12 myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes and treated with 100 μM dexamethasone to induce atrophy in vitro. Subsequently, they were incubated for 24 h with media containing different concentrations of curcumin and/or branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in order to counteract atrophy. After treatment with curcumin, an increase in cell diameter was detectable; the highest increase with 13.9 ± 0.4% was seen with 10 μM curcumin. The combination of curcumin and BCAAs showed an increase of 13.4 ± 1.2 %. Cell diameter measurement via the ECE showed that curcumin, and curcumin in combination with BCAAs, were able to restore atrophic C2C12 myotubes. Therefore, the application of ECE in muscle atrophy and also cancer-associated cachexia research allows rapid screening of novel compounds in order to test their efficacy in vitro. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Physical complaints in ageing persons with spinal muscular atrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, I.J.M. de; Witte, L.P de

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: While life expectancy is improving for persons with spinal muscular atrophy, new physical complaints may arise. To investigate this, we studied persons with a long duration and severe course (high functional limitations) of the disease. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study.

  2. Frontal Cortical Atrophy as a Predictor of Poststroke Apathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, Ján; Mikula, Peter; Budiš, Jaroslav; Valkovič, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to identify associations between the symptoms of poststroke apathy and sociodemographic, stroke-related (severity of stroke, degree of disability, and performance in activities of daily living), and radiological correlates. We determined the degree of cortical and subcortical brain atrophy, the severity of white matter and basal ganglia lesions on baseline computed tomography (CT) scans, and the localization of acute ischemia on control CT or magnetic resonance imaging scans in subacute stages of stroke. During follow-up examinations, in addition to the assessment of apathy symptoms using the Apathy Scale, we also evaluated symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The study included 47 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke. Correlates significantly associated with apathy, determined at baseline and during follow-up, were entered into the "predictive" and "associative" multiple regression models, respectively. Frontal cortical atrophy and symptoms of depression were most strongly associated with poststroke apathy symptoms. In order to model an interrelation between both cortical atrophy and white matter lesions and aging, we supplemented 2 additional "predictive" models using interaction variables, whereby we confirmed the role of frontal cortical atrophy as a predictor of poststroke apathy also as a function of the increasing age of patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Clinico-epidemiologic characteristics of spinal muscular atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    Deletion;. Chromosome 5;. Mutations. Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by progressive hypotonia and muscular weakness because of progressive degeneration of alpha motor neuron from anterior horn cells in the spinal cord. It is inherited by an autosomal recessive pattern. The precise frequency of ...

  4. Interpretation of electrodiagnostic findings in sporadic progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.; de Visser, M.; van den Berg-Vos, R. M.; van den Berg, L. H.; Wokke, J. H. J.; de Jong, J. M. B. V.; Franssen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We present the electrophysiologic data at baseline of 37 patients who were included in our prospective study on sporadic adult-onset progressive muscular atrophy (PMA). The aim was to correlate electrophysiological. signs of lower motor neuron (LMN) loss with clinical signs of LMN loss,

  5. Axonal loss occurs early in dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Sander, Birgit; Wegener, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to investigate retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in relation to age in healthy subjects and patients with OPA1 autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional investigation of RNFL...

  6. Anaesthetic management of a patient with multiple system atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. Symptoms vary from autonomic dysfunction to Parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, in any combination. MSA affects many organ systems with many possible complications and makes perioperative management of a patient with this condition ...

  7. Sjögren's syndrome and acquired splenic atrophy with septic shock: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Natacha; Silva, Rui; Rodrigues, Joana; Torres-Costa, José

    2014-01-06

    The most frequent causes of adult-onset recurrent infections are human immunodeficiency virus infection, malignancy, and autoimmune diseases, while acquired non-surgical hyposplenism is rare. Although acquired asplenia/hyposplenism have been described in association with celiac disease and, less frequently, with autoimmune diseases such as Sjögren's syndrome, the manifestations in this context are usually only detectable in the laboratory setting, with Howell-Jolly bodies or thrombocytosis. To the best of our knowledge, no previous case of pneumococcal septic shock in a patient with acquired hyposplenism and co-morbid Sjögren's syndrome has been reported. We report a case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman who developed pneumococcal pneumonia at age 42 years, pneumococcal meningitis at age 44 years and septic shock with Streptococcus agalactiae bacteremia at age 45 years and was subsequently diagnosed with radiological splenic atrophy and functional asplenia, as well as primary Sjögren's syndrome. After appropriate immunizations, the patient has been free from clinically important infections. Hyposplenism should be suspected in patients with adult-onset infections caused by encapsulated bacteria, especially if autoantibodies are present. Early diagnosis can help prevent potentially life-threatening infections. Possible associations between splenic atrophy and Sjögren's syndrome are discussed.

  8. Sjögren’s syndrome and acquired splenic atrophy with septic shock: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The most frequent causes of adult-onset recurrent infections are human immunodeficiency virus infection, malignancy, and autoimmune diseases, while acquired non-surgical hyposplenism is rare. Although acquired asplenia/hyposplenism have been described in association with celiac disease and, less frequently, with autoimmune diseases such as Sjögren’s syndrome, the manifestations in this context are usually only detectable in the laboratory setting, with Howell-Jolly bodies or thrombocytosis. To the best of our knowledge, no previous case of pneumococcal septic shock in a patient with acquired hyposplenism and co-morbid Sjögren’s syndrome has been reported. Case presentation We report a case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman who developed pneumococcal pneumonia at age 42 years, pneumococcal meningitis at age 44 years and septic shock with Streptococcus agalactiae bacteremia at age 45 years and was subsequently diagnosed with radiological splenic atrophy and functional asplenia, as well as primary Sjögren’s syndrome. After appropriate immunizations, the patient has been free from clinically important infections. Conclusion Hyposplenism should be suspected in patients with adult-onset infections caused by encapsulated bacteria, especially if autoantibodies are present. Early diagnosis can help prevent potentially life-threatening infections. Possible associations between splenic atrophy and Sjögren’s syndrome are discussed. PMID:24393211

  9. Potential Therapeutic Role of L-Carnitine in Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Stress and Atrophy Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Montesano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The targeting of nutraceutical treatment to skeletal muscle damage is an emerging area of research, driven by the need for new therapies for a range of muscle-associated diseases. L-Carnitine (CARN is an essential nutrient and plays a key role in mitochondrial β-oxidation and in the ubiquitin-proteasome system regulation. As a dietary supplement to improve athletic performance, CARN has been studied for its potential to enhance β-oxidation. However, CARN effects on myogenesis, mitochondrial activity, and hypertrophy process are not completely elucidated. This in vitro study aims to investigate CARN role on skeletal muscle remodeling, differentiation process, and myotubes formation. We analyzed muscle differentiation and morphological features in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to 5 mM CARN. Our results showed that CARN was able to accelerate C2C12 myotubes formation and induce morphological changes, characterizing the start of hypertrophy process. In addition, CARN improved AKT activation and downstream cellular signaling pathways involved in skeletal muscle atrophy process prevention. Also, CARN positively regulated the pathways involved in oxidative stress defense. In this work, we provide an interesting novel mechanism of the potential therapeutic use of CARN to treat pathological conditions characterized by skeletal muscle morphological and functional impairment, oxidative stress production, and atrophy process in aging.

  10. Potential therapeutic role of L-carnitine in skeletal muscle oxidative stress and atrophy conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesano, Anna; Senesi, Pamela; Luzi, Livio; Benedini, Stefano; Terruzzi, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    The targeting of nutraceutical treatment to skeletal muscle damage is an emerging area of research, driven by the need for new therapies for a range of muscle-associated diseases. L-Carnitine (CARN) is an essential nutrient and plays a key role in mitochondrial β-oxidation and in the ubiquitin-proteasome system regulation. As a dietary supplement to improve athletic performance, CARN has been studied for its potential to enhance β-oxidation. However, CARN effects on myogenesis, mitochondrial activity, and hypertrophy process are not completely elucidated. This in vitro study aims to investigate CARN role on skeletal muscle remodeling, differentiation process, and myotubes formation. We analyzed muscle differentiation and morphological features in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to 5 mM CARN. Our results showed that CARN was able to accelerate C2C12 myotubes formation and induce morphological changes, characterizing the start of hypertrophy process. In addition, CARN improved AKT activation and downstream cellular signaling pathways involved in skeletal muscle atrophy process prevention. Also, CARN positively regulated the pathways involved in oxidative stress defense. In this work, we provide an interesting novel mechanism of the potential therapeutic use of CARN to treat pathological conditions characterized by skeletal muscle morphological and functional impairment, oxidative stress production, and atrophy process in aging.

  11. How to diminish calcium loss and muscle atrophy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgolewski, S.

    Humans in micro-gravity suffer from Ca loss and muscle atrophy, efforts are made to prevent it by means of physical exercises and with medicaments. The tread-mill and exercise bike are just two most frequently used examples. This can and should be widely extended, and in such a way as to mimic as close as possible the normal loading of the muscles and skeleton which we experience here on the earth. Special very light weight active harness is proposed which monitors the body loading. This is accomplished by means of computer aided monitoring of muscle and bone loading systems. Using feedback it helps the crew to load their bodies and skeletons in the same way as it happens here on the earth. The active exercise mat with pressure sensors first creates a record here on the earth of all normal muscle tensions during exercise. In space the computer guides each exercising crew member to follow their earthbound training routine. High care is needed to select the best and most effective exercises which should demand least energy, yet providing the very best results. May I suggest the very best known to me kind of comprehensive exercises: Yoga. Doing it on the Earth you need next to none special training equipment. Our body is in principle all we need here to do Yoga exercises on the Earth. Integral part of Yoga exercises are abdominal breathing exercises, which can slow down the breathing rate even threefold. This improves the oxygen and CO_2 exchange and massages all internal organs around the clock, helping the adept to stay fit and also keeps their minds steady and calm. Yoga exercises should be mastered already here on the earth, providing the crew with much greater tolerance to micro-gravity. In Yoga we acquire the tolerance not only to zero gravity but also to "negative" gravity: as it happens in all inverted positions. This should help the astronauts to be more tolerant of the half way only step into "zero gravity". Weightlessness state provides us the ultimate in

  12. Is the Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy Truly Irreversible after Surgical Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Sae Hoon; Tae, Suk-Kee; Yoon, Jong Pil; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrophy of rotator cuff muscles has been considered an irreversible phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether atrophy is truly irreversible after rotator cuff repair. Methods We measured supraspinatus muscle atrophy of 191 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative multidetector computed tomography images, taken at least 1 year after operation. The occupation ratio was calculated using Photoshop CS3 software. We compared the change between pre- and postoperative occupation ratios after modifying the preoperative occupation ratio. In addition, possible relationship between various clinical factors and the change of atrophy, and between the change of atrophy and cuff integrity after surgical repair were evaluated. Results The mean occupation ratio was significantly increased postoperatively from 0.44 ± 0.17 to 0.52 ± 0.17 (p < 0.001). Among 191 patients, 81 (42.4%) showed improvement of atrophy (more than a 10% increase in occupation ratio) and 33 (17.3%) worsening (more than a 10% decrease). Various clinical factors such as age tear size, or initial degree of atrophy did not affect the change of atrophy. However, the change of atrophy was related to repair integrity: cuff healing failure rate of 48.5% (16 of 33) in worsened atrophy; and 22.2% (18 of 81) in improved atrophy (p = 0.007). Conclusions The supraspinatus muscle atrophy as measured by occupation ratio could be improved postoperatively in case of successful cuff repair. PMID:23467404

  13. RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIAL ATROPHY AFTER ANTI-VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR INJECTIONS FOR RETINAL ANGIOMATOUS PROLIFERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Masayuki; Yamashiro, Kenji; Oishi, Akio; Ooto, Sotaro; Tamura, Hiroshi; Miyata, Manabu; Ueda-Arakawa, Naoko; Kuroda, Yoshimasa; Takahashi, Ayako; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the incidence rate and risk factors for development of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) atrophy during anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment for retinal angiomatous proliferation. This study included 46 eyes with treatment-naive retinal angiomatous proliferation. All patients were treated with ranibizumab or aflibercept injections. Color fundus photography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence were evaluated for RPE atrophy diagnosis. Baseline characteristics and gene polymorphisms of ARMS2 A69S, and CFH I62V were analyzed for association with development and progression of RPE atrophy. Among 21 eyes treated with ranibizumab without preexisting RPE atrophy at baseline, 5 eyes (23.8%) developed RPE atrophy at 12 months. Among 20 eyes treated with aflibercept without preexisting RPE atrophy at baseline, 10 eyes (50.0%) developed RPE atrophy at 12 months. Refractile drusen at baseline was associated with RPE atrophy development at 12 months (P = 0.014), and the progression rate of RPE atrophy area was negatively correlated with subfoveal choroidal thickness at baseline (R = -0.595, P = 0.019). Gene polymorphisms were not associated with RPE atrophy. Retinal pigment epithelial atrophy developed in 36.6% during 12 months after anti-VEGF treatment for retinal angiomatous proliferation. The presence of refractile drusen at baseline was identified as a novel significant risk factor for RPE atrophy development.

  14. Stress-induced Skeletal Muscle Gadd45a Expression Reprograms Myonuclei and Causes Muscle Atrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Bullard, Steven A.; Bongers, Kale S.; Fox, Daniel K.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Foster, Eric D.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Diverse stresses including starvation and muscle disuse cause skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy are complex and not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45a protein (Gadd45a) is a critical mediator of muscle atrophy. We identified Gadd45a through an unbiased search for potential downstream mediators of the stress-inducible, pro-atrophy transcription factor ATF4. We show that Gadd45a is required for skeletal muscle atrophy induced by three distinct skeletal muscle stresses: fasting, muscle immobilization, and muscle denervation. Conversely, forced expression of Gadd45a in muscle or cultured myotubes induces atrophy in the absence of upstream stress. We show that muscle-specific ATF4 knock-out mice have a reduced capacity to induce Gadd45a mRNA in response to stress, and as a result, they undergo less atrophy in response to fasting or muscle immobilization. Interestingly, Gadd45a is a myonuclear protein that induces myonuclear remodeling and a comprehensive program for muscle atrophy. Gadd45a represses genes involved in anabolic signaling and energy production, and it induces pro-atrophy genes. As a result, Gadd45a reduces multiple barriers to muscle atrophy (including PGC-1α, Akt activity, and protein synthesis) and stimulates pro-atrophy mechanisms (including autophagy and caspase-mediated proteolysis). These results elucidate a critical stress-induced pathway that reprograms muscle gene expression to cause atrophy. PMID:22692209

  15. Renal Atrophy Secondary to Chemoradiotherapy of Abdominal Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Gary Y.; May, Kilian Salerno; Iyer, Renuka V.; Chandrasekhar, Rameela M.A.; Wilding, Gregory E.; McCloskey, Susan A.; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Yendamuri, Saikrishna S.; Gibbs, John F.; Fakih, Marwan; Thomas, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive of renal atrophy after chemoradiotherapy of gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods and Materials: Patients who received chemotherapy and abdominal radiotherapy (RT) between 2002 and 2008 were identified for this study evaluating change in kidney size and function after RT. Imaging and biochemical data were obtained before and after RT in 6-month intervals. Kidney size was defined by craniocaudal measurement on CT images. The primarily irradiated kidney (PK) was defined as the kidney that received the greater mean kidney dose. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to predict risk for renal atrophy. Results: Of 130 patients, median age was 64 years, and 51.5% were male. Most primary disease sites were pancreas and periampullary tumors (77.7%). Median follow-up was 9.4 months. Creatinine clearance declined 20.89%, and size of the PK decreased 4.67% 1 year after completion of chemoradiation. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-PK was not seen. Percentage volumes of the PK receiving ≥10 Gy (V 10 ), 15 Gy (V 15 ), and 20 Gy (V 20 ) were significantly associated with renal atrophy 1 year after RT (p = 0.0030, 0.0029, and 0.0028, respectively). Areas under the ROC curves for V 10 , V 15 , and V 20 to predict >5% decrease in PK size were 0.760, 0.760, and 0.762, respectively. Conclusions: Significant detriments in PK size and renal function were seen after abdominal RT. The V 10 , V 15 , and V 20 were predictive of risk for PK atrophy 1 year after RT. Analyses suggest the association of lower-dose renal irradiation with subsequent development of renal atrophy.

  16. Clinical and MRI correlation in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    By using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we studied 11 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA): 5 olivo-pontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), 2 Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS), and 4 striatonigral degeneration (SND). The diagnoses of OPCA, SDS and SND were clinically made. The MR images were performed on 1.5 tesla MRI unit (Siemens Asahi Medical, Magnetom H15), using a T[sub 2]-weighted spin echo (SE) sequence (TR: 2000-3000 ms, TE: 80-90 ms), a T[sub 1]-weighted SE sequence (TR: 550, TE: 15), and a proton density-weighted (PD) SE sequence (TR: 2000-3000, TE: 12-22). In the patients with OPCA, MRI revealed cerebellar and brainstem atrophy and degeneration of pontine transverse fibers more marked than in the patients with SDS and SND. T[sub 2]-weighted images showed low intensity in posterolateral putamina in one OPCA patient and all of SDS and SND patients. PD images demonstrated the abnormal slit-like high signals in posterolateral putamina in three SND. The degree of cerebellar ataxia was not well correlated with cerebellar and brainstem atrophy and degeneration of pontine transverse fibers. There was a positive correlation between the atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem and the duration of cerebellar ataxia. In most of the patients with Parkinsonism, MRI demonstrated abnormal low signals in putamina on T[sub 2]-weighted images. There were positive correlations between the abnormal low signals putamina and the duration and severity of Parkinsonism. Though abnormal low signals in lateral putamina may be seen in normal aging and other disorders on T[sub 2]-weighted images, it is useful to evaluate Parkinsonism in MSA. We believe that the abnormal slit-like high signals in posterolateral putamina in MSA may suggest loss of neurons and gliosis. (author).

  17. Protection against dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy is related to modulation by testosterone of FOXO1 and PGC-1α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Weiping; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → In rat gastrocnemius muscle, dexamethasone reduced PGC-1α cellular and nuclear levels without altering mRNA levels for this factor. → Dexamethasone reduced phosphorylating of p38 MAPK, which stabilizes PGC-1α and promotes its nuclear entry. → Co-administration of testosterone with dexamethasone increased cellular and nuclear levels of PGC-1α protein without changing its mRNA levels. → Co-administration of testosterone restored p38 MAPK levels to those of controls. -- Abstract: Glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy results from muscle protein catabolism and reduced protein synthesis, associated with increased expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases (MAFbx and MuRF1), and of two inhibitors of protein synthesis, REDD1 and 4EBP1. MAFbx, MuRF1, REDD1 and 4EBP1 are up-regulated by the transcription factors FOXO1 and FOXO3A. The transcriptional co-activator PGC-1α has been shown to attenuate many forms of muscle atrophy and to repress FOXO3A-mediated transcription of atrophy-specific genes. Dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy can be prevented by testosterone, which blocks up-regulation by dexamethasone of FOXO1. Here, an animal model of dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy was used to further characterize effects of testosterone to abrogate adverse actions of dexamethasone on FOXO1 levels and nuclear localization, and to determine how these agents affect PGC-1α, and its upstream activators, p38 MAPK and AMPK. In rat gastrocnemius muscle, testosterone blunted the dexamethasone-mediated increase in levels of FOXO1 mRNA, and FOXO1 total and nuclear protein. Dexamethasone reduced total and nuclear PGC-1α protein levels in the gastrocnemius; co-administration of testosterone with dexamethasone increased total and nuclear PGC-1α levels above those present in untreated controls. Testosterone blocked dexamethasone-induced decreases in activity of p38 MAPK in the gastrocnemius muscle. Regulation of FOXO1, PGC-1α and p38 MAPK by

  18. Protection against dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy is related to modulation by testosterone of FOXO1 and PGC-1{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Weiping, E-mail: weiping.qin@mssm.edu [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States); Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Bauman, William A. [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States); Cardozo, Christopher, E-mail: Chris.Cardozo@mssm.edu [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} In rat gastrocnemius muscle, dexamethasone reduced PGC-1{alpha} cellular and nuclear levels without altering mRNA levels for this factor. {yields} Dexamethasone reduced phosphorylating of p38 MAPK, which stabilizes PGC-1{alpha} and promotes its nuclear entry. {yields} Co-administration of testosterone with dexamethasone increased cellular and nuclear levels of PGC-1{alpha} protein without changing its mRNA levels. {yields} Co-administration of testosterone restored p38 MAPK levels to those of controls. -- Abstract: Glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy results from muscle protein catabolism and reduced protein synthesis, associated with increased expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases (MAFbx and MuRF1), and of two inhibitors of protein synthesis, REDD1 and 4EBP1. MAFbx, MuRF1, REDD1 and 4EBP1 are up-regulated by the transcription factors FOXO1 and FOXO3A. The transcriptional co-activator PGC-1{alpha} has been shown to attenuate many forms of muscle atrophy and to repress FOXO3A-mediated transcription of atrophy-specific genes. Dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy can be prevented by testosterone, which blocks up-regulation by dexamethasone of FOXO1. Here, an animal model of dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy was used to further characterize effects of testosterone to abrogate adverse actions of dexamethasone on FOXO1 levels and nuclear localization, and to determine how these agents affect PGC-1{alpha}, and its upstream activators, p38 MAPK and AMPK. In rat gastrocnemius muscle, testosterone blunted the dexamethasone-mediated increase in levels of FOXO1 mRNA, and FOXO1 total and nuclear protein. Dexamethasone reduced total and nuclear PGC-1{alpha} protein levels in the gastrocnemius; co-administration of testosterone with dexamethasone increased total and nuclear PGC-1{alpha} levels above those present in untreated controls. Testosterone blocked dexamethasone-induced decreases in activity of p38 MAPK in the gastrocnemius

  19. Autosomal dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy: a true form of spinal muscular atrophy caused by early loss of anterior horn cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Emily C; Reddel, Stephen; Rodriguez, Michael L; Gandolfo, Luke C; Bahlo, Melanie; Hawke, Simon H; Lamandé, Shireen R; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N

    2012-06-01

    Autosomal dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy is characterized by predominantly lower limb weakness and wasting, and congenital or early-onset contractures of the hip, knee and ankle. Mutations in TRPV4, encoding a cation channel, have recently been identified in one large dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy kindred, but the genetic basis of dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy in many families remains unknown. It has been hypothesized that differences in the timing and site of anterior horn cell loss in the central nervous system account for the variations in clinical phenotype between different forms of spinal muscular atrophy, but there has been a lack of neuropathological data to support this concept in dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy. We report clinical, electrophysiology, muscle magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology findings in a four generation family with typical dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy features, without mutations in TRPV4, and in whom linkage to other known dominant neuropathy and spinal muscular atrophy genes has been excluded. The autopsy findings in the proband, who died at 14 months of age from an unrelated illness, provided a rare opportunity to study the neuropathological basis of dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy. There was a reduction in anterior horn cell number in the lumbar and, to a lesser degree, the cervical spinal cord, and atrophy of the ventral nerve roots at these levels, in the absence of additional peripheral nerve pathology or abnormalities elsewhere along the neuraxis. Despite the young age of the child at the time of autopsy, there was no pathological evidence of ongoing loss or degeneration of anterior horn cells suggesting that anterior horn cell loss in dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy occurs in early life, and is largely complete by the end of infancy. These findings confirm that dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy is a true form of spinal

  20. Control of skeletal muscle atrophy in response to disuse: clinical/preclinical contentions and fallacies of evidence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhaff, Paul L.; Phillips, Stuart M.; Bodine, Sue C.; Adams, Christopher M.; Lang, Charles H.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting resulting wholly or in part from disuse represents a serious medical complication that, when prolonged, can increase morbidity and mortality. Although much knowledge has been gained over the past half century, the underlying etiology by which disuse alters muscle proteostasis remains enigmatic. Multidisciplinary and novel methodologies are needed to fill gaps and overcome barriers to improved patient care. The present review highlights seminal concepts from a symposium at Experimental Biology 2016. These proceedings focus on 1) the role of insulin resistance in mediating disuse-induced changes in muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and breakdown (MPB), as well as cross-talk between carbohydrate and protein metabolism; 2) the relative importance of MPS/MPB in mediating involuntary muscle loss in humans and animals; 3) interpretative limitations associated with MPS/MPB “markers,” e.g., MuRF1/MAFbx mRNA; and finally, 4) how OMIC technologies can be leveraged to identify molecular pathways (e.g., ATF4, p53, p21) mediating disuse atrophy. This perspective deals primarily with “simple atrophy” due to unloading. Nonetheless, it is likely that disuse is a pervasive contributor to muscle wasting associated with catabolic disease-related atrophy (i.e., due to associated sedentary behaviour of disease burden). Key knowledge gaps and challenges are identified to stimulate discussion and identify opportunities for translational research. Data from animal and human studies highlight both similarities and differences. Integrated preclinical and clinical research is encouraged to better understand the metabolic and molecular underpinnings and translational relevance,for disuse atrophy. These approaches are crucial to clinically prevent or reverse muscle atrophy, thereby reestablishing homeostasis and recovery. PMID:27382036

  1. Expanding the spectrum of neuronal pathology in multiple system atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cykowski, Matthew D.; Coon, Elizabeth A.; Powell, Suzanne Z.; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Benarroch, Eduardo E.; Low, Phillip A.; Schmeichel, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy is a sporadic alpha-synucleinopathy that typically affects patients in their sixth decade of life and beyond. The defining clinical features of the disease include progressive autonomic failure, parkinsonism, and cerebellar ataxia leading to significant disability. Pathologically, multiple system atrophy is characterized by glial cytoplasmic inclusions containing filamentous alpha-synuclein. Neuronal inclusions also have been reported but remain less well defined. This study aimed to further define the spectrum of neuronal pathology in 35 patients with multiple system atrophy (20 male, 15 female; mean age at death 64.7 years; median disease duration 6.5 years, range 2.2 to 15.6 years). The morphologic type, topography, and frequencies of neuronal inclusions, including globular cytoplasmic (Lewy body-like) neuronal inclusions, were determined across a wide spectrum of brain regions. A correlation matrix of pathologic severity also was calculated between distinct anatomic regions of involvement (striatum, substantia nigra, olivary and pontine nuclei, hippocampus, forebrain and thalamus, anterior cingulate and neocortex, and white matter of cerebrum, cerebellum, and corpus callosum). The major finding was the identification of widespread neuronal inclusions in the majority of patients, not only in typical disease-associated regions (striatum, substantia nigra), but also within anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, basal forebrain and hypothalamus. Neuronal inclusion pathology appeared to follow a hierarchy of region-specific susceptibility, independent of the clinical phenotype, and the severity of pathology was duration-dependent. Neuronal inclusions also were identified in regions not previously implicated in the disease, such as within cerebellar roof nuclei. Lewy body-like inclusions in multiple system atrophy followed the stepwise anatomic progression of Lewy body-spectrum disease inclusion pathology in 25.7% of patients

  2. A novel method of quantifying brain atrophy associated with age-related hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jason Qian

    2017-01-01

    Audiometric evaluations and mini-mental state exams were obtained in 34 subjects over the age of 80 who have had brain MRIs in the past 6 years. CSF and parenchymal brain volumes (whole brain and by lobe were obtained through a novel, fully automated algorithm. Atrophy was calculated by taking the ratio of CSF to parenchyma. High frequency hearing loss was associated with disproportional temporal lobe atrophy relative to whole brain atrophy independent of age (r = 0.471, p = 0.005. Mental state was associated with frontoparietal atrophy but not to temporal lobe atrophy, which is consistent with known results. Our method demonstrates that hearing loss is associated with temporal lobe atrophy and generalized whole brain atrophy. Our algorithm is efficient, fully automated, and able to detect significant associations in a small cohort.

  3. Recommendations for the management of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdee, D W; Panay, N; Ulrich, Lian

    2010-01-01

    for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) over recent years that has suggested an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke. But, regardless of whether these scares are justified, local treatment of vaginal atrophy is not associated with these possible risks of systemic HRT. Other reasons...... itching, burning and dyspareunia, and sexual activity is often compromised. But, despite the various safe and effective options, only a minority (about 25% in the Western world and probably considerably less in other areas) will seek medical help. Some of this reluctance is due to the adverse publicity...... dryness can be helped by simple lubricants but the best and most logical treatment for urogenital atrophy is to use local estrogen. This is safe, effective and with few contraindications. It is hoped that these guidelines and recommendations, produced to coincide with World Menopause Day 2010, will help...

  4. Study of brain atrophy using X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Masayoshi

    1987-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid space-cranial cavity ratio (CCR) of 811 subjects with no brain damage were investigated using X-ray computed tomography. Brain volume of healthy adults aged 20 - 59 years was almost constant and decreased gradually after 60 years. CCR of men aged 20 - 49 years kept constant value and increased with aging after 50 years. CCR of women aged 20 - 59 years kept equal value and CCR increased with aging after 60 years. Brain atrophy with aging was investigated in this study also. In retrospective study, CCR of patients in any age diagnosed brain atrophy in daily CT reports were beyond the normal range of CCR of healthy subjects aged 20 - 49 years. In 48 patients with Parkinson's disease, almost of CCR of them were included within normal range of CCR in age-matched control. (author)

  5. Acid suppression and gastric atrophy: sifting fact from fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genta, R M

    1998-07-01

    Prolonged pharmacological acid suppression is associated with various histological changes in the gastric mucosa, particularly in Helicobacter pylori infected patients. In a number of subjects these changes include a shift in the gastric inflammation from the antrum to the corpus. This finding has been interpreted as gastric atrophy, and the possibility that acid suppression accelerates the progress of lesions that may lead to gastric cancer has been considered. Two recent studies on the relation between treatment with proton pump inhibitors and atrophic gastritis have yielded apparently contradictory results. These studies are reviewed in detail here and some of the possible reasons for the discrepant conclusions are explored. In particular, the way the terms "gastric atrophy" and "atrophic gastritis" are used is examined critically.

  6. Crustaceans as a model for microgravity-induced muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykles, D. L.

    Atrophy of skeletal muscles is a serious problem in a microgravity environment. It is hypothesized that the unloading of postural muscles, which no longer must resist gravity force, causes an accelerated breakdown of contractile proteins, resulting in a reduction in muscle mass and strength. A crustacean model using the land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis, to assess the effects of spaceflight on protein metabolism is presented. The model is compared to a developmentally-regulated atrophy in which a premolt reduction in muscle mass allows the withdrawal of the large claws at molt. The biochemical mechanisms underlying protein breakdown involves both Ca^2+-dependent and multicatalytic proteolytic enzymes. Crustacean claw muscle can be used to determine the interactions between shortening and unloading at the molecular level.

  7. The treatment of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy with ovestin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kicovic, P.M.; Cortesprieto, J.; Milojevic, S.; Haspels, A.A.; Aljinovic, A.

    1980-01-01

    Seventy-four postmenopausal women presenting with vaginal atrophy were treated with either Ovestin® vaginal cream (Group A, 23 women: 1 mg/day E3; Group B, 30 women: 0.5 mg/day E3) or vaginal suppositories (Group C, 21 women: 0.5 mg/day E3), applied daily for 3 wk (A and B) or 2 wk (C) before

  8. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy: An Unusual Cause of Villous Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eusébio

    2016-03-01

    Olmesartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker commonly prescribed for the management of hypertension. Spruelike enteropathy associated with this drug is a recently described entity with few cases reported. It presents with chronic diarrhea and intestinal villous atrophy and should be included in its differential diagnosis. This case intends to alert clinicians for the possibility of this event in a patient on treatment with this drug.

  9. Retinal structure, function, and molecular pathologic features in gyrate atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Davidson, Alice E; Lenassi, Eva; Devery, Sophie R; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R

    2012-03-01

    To describe phenotypic variability and to report novel mutational data in patients with gyrate atrophy. Retrospective case series. Seven unrelated patients (10 to 52 years of age) with clinical and biochemical evidence of gyrate atrophy. Detailed ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and microperimetry testing were performed. The coding region and intron-exon boundaries of ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) were analyzed. OAT mRNA was isolated from peripheral blood leucocytes of 1 patient and analyzed. OAT mutation status and resultant clinical, structural, and functional characteristics. Funduscopy revealed circular areas of chorioretinal atrophy, and FAF imaging showed sharply demarcated areas of increased or preserved signal in all 7 patients. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed multiple intraretinal cystic spaces and hyperreflective deposit in the ganglion cell layer of all study subjects. Round tubular, rosette-like structures located in the outer nuclear layer of the retinae of the 4 older patients were observed (termed outer retinal tubulation). Thickening was evident in the foveolae of younger patients, despite the posterior pole appearing relatively preserved. Macular function, assessed by microperimetry, was preserved over areas of normal or increased autofluorescence. However, sensitivity was reduced even in structurally intact parts of the retina. The molecular pathologic features were determined in all study subjects: 9 mutations, 4 novel, were detected in the OAT gene. OAT mRNA was isolated from blood leukocytes, and monoallelic expression of a mutated allele was demonstrated in 1 patient. Fundus autofluorescence imaging can reveal the extent of neurosensory dysfunction in gyrate atrophy patients. Macular edema is a uniform finding; the fovea is relatively thick in early stages of disease and retinal tubulation is present in advanced disease

  10. Progressive Retinal Atrophy in the Border Collie: A new XLPRA

    OpenAIRE

    Vilboux, Thierry; Chaudieu, Gilles; Jeannin, Patricia; Delattre, Delphine; Hedan, Benoit; Bourgain, Catherine; Queney, Guillaume; Galibert, Francis; Thomas, Anne; André, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Several forms of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) segregate in more than 100 breeds of dog with each PRA segregating in one or a few breeds. This breed specificity may be accounted for by founder effects and genetic drift, which have reduced the genetic heterogeneity of each breed, thereby facilitating the identification of causal mutations. We report here a new form of PRA segregating in the Border Collie breed. The clinical signs, including the loss of night vision and ...

  11. Interactive segmentation for geographic atrophy in retinal fundus images

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Noah; Smith, R. Theodore; Laine, Andrew F.

    2008-01-01

    Fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF) imaging is a non-invasive technique for in vivo ophthalmoscopic inspection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of blindness in developed countries. Geographic atrophy (GA) is an advanced form of AMD and accounts for 12–21% of severe visual loss in this disorder [3]. Automatic quantification of GA is important for determining disease progression and facilitating clinical diagnosis of AMD. The problem of automatic segmentation of patho...

  12. MR imaging of psychosurgery: rostral atrophy following stereotacic subcaudate tractotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, K A; Waheed, W; Salmela, M; Filippi, C G

    2010-11-01

    There are few reports of MR imaging findings following psychosurgery. Here, we report the findings of 3T MR imaging of the sequelae of stereotactic subcaudate tractotomy (SST). Rostral atrophy is noted on conventional imaging. Diffusion tensor (DT) tractography demonstrated no communicating white matter tracts between the inferior frontal lobes, which appeared normally as thick fibre bundles in age-matched controls. DT tractography provides a unique tool for the evaluation of sequelae of ablative psychosurgical procedures.

  13. Advancing functional dysconnectivity and atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse A. Brown

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (PSP-S results from neurodegeneration within a network of brainstem, subcortical, frontal and parietal cortical brain regions. It is unclear how network dysfunction progresses and relates to longitudinal atrophy and clinical decline. In this study, we evaluated patients with PSP-S (n = 12 and healthy control subjects (n = 20 at baseline and 6 months later. Subjects underwent structural MRI and task-free functional MRI (tf-fMRI scans and clinical evaluations at both time points. At baseline, voxel based morphometry (VBM revealed that patients with mild-to-moderate clinical symptoms showed structural atrophy in subcortex and brainstem, prefrontal cortex (PFC; supplementary motor area, paracingulate, dorsal and ventral medial PFC, and parietal cortex (precuneus. Tf-fMRI functional connectivity (FC was examined in a rostral midbrain tegmentum (rMT-anchored intrinsic connectivity network that is compromised in PSP-S. In healthy controls, this network contained a medial parietal module, a prefrontal-paralimbic module, and a subcortical-brainstem module. Baseline FC deficits in PSP-S were most severe in rMT network integrative hubs in the prefrontal-paralimbic and subcortical-brainstem modules. Longitudinally, patients with PSP-S had declining intermodular FC between the subcortical-brainstem and parietal modules, while progressive atrophy was observed in subcortical-brainstem regions (midbrain, pallidum and posterior frontal (perirolandic cortex. This suggested that later-stage subcortical-posterior cortical change may follow an earlier-stage subcortical-anterior cortical disease process. Clinically, patients with more severe baseline impairment showed greater subsequent prefrontal-parietal cortical FC declines and posterior frontal atrophy rates, while patients with more rapid longitudinal clinical decline showed coupled prefrontal-paralimbic FC decline. VBM and FC can augment disease monitoring in PSP

  14. Hereditary distal spinal muscular atrophy with vocal cord paralysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, I D; Harper, P S

    1980-01-01

    A large kindred is described in which an unusual form of spinal muscular atrophy is segregating in an autosomal dominant manner. The disease presents most commonly in the teens with small muscle wasting in the hands, particularly involving median nerve musculature. Subsequently distal muscle wasting and weakness occur in the lower limbs. Vocal cord paralysis is a characteristic and potentially hazardous feature. No previous report of this condition has been found.

  15. Cortical atrophy in presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease presenilin 1 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Stern, Chantal E; Reiman, Eric M; Brickhouse, Michael; Ruiz, Adriana; Sperling, Reisa A; Lopera, Francisco; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2013-05-01

    Sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia has been associated with a 'signature' of cortical atrophy in paralimbic and heteromodal association regions measured with MRI. To investigate whether a similar pattern of cortical atrophy is present in presymptomatic presenilin 1 E280A mutation carriers an average of 6 years before clinical symptom onset. 40 cognitively normal volunteers from a Colombian population with familial AD were included; 18 were positive for the AD-associated presenilin 1 mutation (carriers, mean age=38) whereas 22 were non-carriers. T1-weighted volumetric MRI images were acquired and cortical thickness was measured. A priori regions of interest from our previous work were used to obtain thickness from AD-signature regions. Compared to non-carriers, presymptomatic presenilin 1 mutation carriers exhibited thinner cortex within the AD-signature summary measure (p<0.008). Analyses of individual regions demonstrated thinner angular gyrus, precuneus and superior parietal lobule in carriers compared to non-carriers, with trend-level effects in the medial temporal lobe. Results demonstrate that cognitively normal individuals genetically determined to develop AD have a thinner cerebral cortex than non-carriers in regions known to be affected by typical late-onset sporadic AD. These findings provide further support for the hypothesis that cortical atrophy is present in preclinical AD more than 5 years prior to symptom onset. Further research is needed to determine whether this method could be used to characterise the age-dependent trajectory of cortical atrophy in presymptomatic stages of AD.

  16. Optic atrophy and cerebral infarcts caused by methanol intoxication: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, H.H. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen, C.Y. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen, F.H. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Lee, C.C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chou, T.Y. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Zimmerman, R.A. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-03-01

    We present the MRI findings of cerebral and optic pathway damage in the acute and subacute stages of methanol intoxication. In the acute stage, CT and MRI showed bilateral haemorrhagic necrosis of the corpus striatum and infarcts in the anterior and middle cerebral arterial territories. MRI in the subacute stage demonstrated atrophy of the optic chiasm and prechiasmatic optic nerves in addition to the cerebral infarcts. The patient survived, with total blindness. (orig.)

  17. Can leucine supplementation attenuate muscle atrophy? A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, Rafael Bruno; Martins, Carlos Eduardo Carvalho; Lancha Junior, Antonio Herbert; Painelli, Vitor de Salles

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there has been new expectations in studying strategies with the potential to mitigate the skeletal muscle atrophy that characterizes conditions such as aging, disuse, cancer, and the use of certain medications. Among them, amino acid leucine has received special attention due to its potential to stimulate specific pathways of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Due to the wide spread use of this amino acid by the media, several studies have been aimed at investigating th...

  18. Serological assessment of gastric mucosal atrophy in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bornschein Jan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive tools for gastric cancer screening and diagnosis are lacking. Serological testing with the detection of pepsinogen 1 (PG1, pepsinogen 2 (PG2 and gastrin 17 (G17 offers the possibility to detect preneoplastic gastric mucosal conditions. Aim of this study was to assess the performance of these serological tests in the presence of gastric neoplasia. Methods Histological and serological samples of 118 patients with gastric cancer have been assessed for tumor specific characteristics (Laurén type, localisation, degree of mucosal abnormalities (intestinal metaplasia, atrophy and serological parameters (PG1, PG2, PG1/2-ratio, G17, H. pylori IgG, CagA status. Association of the general factors to the different serological values have been statistically analyzed. Results Patients with intestinal type gastric cancer had lower PG1 levels and a lower PG1/2-ratio compared to those with diffuse type cancer (p = 0.003. The serum levels of PG2 itself and G17 were not significantly altered. H. pylori infection in general had no influence on the levels of PG1, PG2 and G17 in the serum of gastric cancer patients. There was a trend towards lower PG1 levels in case of positive CagA-status (p = 0.058. The degree of both intestinal metaplasia and atrophy correlated inversely with serum levels for PG1 and the PG1/2-ratio (p Conclusions Glandular atrophy and a positive CagA status are determinant factors for decreased pepsinogen 1 levels in the serum of patients with gastric cancer. The serological assessment of gastric atrophy by analysis of serum pepsinogen is only adequate for patients with intestinal type cancer.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy in myotonic dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Timchenko, Lubov

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) are multisystemic diseases that primarily affect skeletal muscle, causing myotonia, muscle atrophy, and muscle weakness. DM1 and DM2 pathologies are caused by expansion of CTG and CCTG repeats in non-coding regions of the genes encoding myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and Zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9) respectively. These expansions cause DM pathologies through accumulation of mutant RNAs that alter RNA metabolism in p...

  20. [Progressive hemifacial atrophy with sympathetic nerve dysfunction of central origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, I; Sahashi, K; Ibi, T; Iwase, S; Mano, T

    1989-09-01

    A 37-year-old unmarried man was admitted because of gait disturbance and right hemifacial atrophy. Family history was unremarkable. He had an unconscious attack at age 13 and had writer's cramp since age 15. He was thin and lipodystrophic. In reviewing his portraits, hemifacial atrophy was considered to develop in his early teens and to be progressive since then. Pigmented gum, high arched palate, mild mental retardation, pseudo-Argyll Robertson's pupil, sexual impotence, amyotrophy of the left thigh and the right calf, and a limp due to bony abnormalities was detected. Serological tests for syphilis were negative. Bone X-rays disclosed coxa-deformance. Cerebrospinal fluid. EMG, EEG, muscle biopsy and brain CT were normal. Hearing was decreased to 20-35 dB bilaterally. Plasma norepinephrine levels were 450 pg/ml in the supine position and 539 pg/ml in standing. Plasma renin activity was 5.1-5.4 ng/ml/hr. Microneurography revealed highly accentuated muscle and skin sympathetic nerve activities. Hypothermia on the feet, reduced CVR-R and decreased mydriatic response to 5% cocaine instillation were present. Intravenous infusion of norepinephrine and intradermal injection of either acetylcholine or histamine revealed normal results. In the case, sympathicotonia due to dysfunction in the central nervous system is considered to be related to the pathogenesis of hemifacial atrophy.

  1. Internal anal sphincter atrophy in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoua, Nora M; Schizas, Alexis; Forbes, Alastair; Denton, Christopher P; Emmanuel, Anton V

    2011-09-01

    SSc is a connective tissue, multisystem disorder of unknown aetiology. The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is affected in up to 90% of patients. The exact pathophysiology of GIT involvement is not known, but it is related to both neurogenic and myogenic abnormalities as well as possible vascular and ischaemic changes. Thinning of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) has been demonstrated in SSc with faecal incontinence. We aimed to investigate anal sphincter structure in patients with SSc. Forty-four SSc patients [24 symptomatic (Sx) and 20 asymptomatic (ASx)] and 20 incontinent controls (ICs) were studied. Patients underwent anorectal manometry and endoanal US. In the ICs, external anal sphincter defects were more common, but the IAS was less atrophic, evident by both atrophy scores and IAS thickness. There was no significant difference in atrophy scores [Sx: 2 (1.5-3) vs ASx: 2 (1-2)] or IAS thickness [Sx: 1.85 (1.5-2.3) vs ASx: 1.8 (1.7-2.25)] between the Sx and ASx SSc patients. Patients with SSc (both Sx and ASx) have thin and atrophic IAS, suggesting that IAS atrophy develops even in ASx patients and this may be amenable to treatment with sacral neuromodulation.

  2. Clinical case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsube, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro; Shimada, Yasuo

    1987-06-01

    Dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) has been described as an atypical type of spino-cerebellar degeneration by J.K. Smith (1958). Choreo-athetoid movement characterizes the DRPLA. We here report a case of DRPLA that was suspected from clinical symptoms and CT brain examinations. Case report: A 36-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of involuntary movements of the extremities in July, 1978. He had epileptic seizures since the age of 25. Since then, his intelligence had gradually been getting worse. At the same time, dysarthria (slow and slurred speech) also appeared. The neurological examination on admission revealed choreo-athetoid movements, with ataxia of the extremities, trancal ataxia, ataxic speech, moderate dementia, and a disturbance of the smooth-pursuit eye movements. He could not maintain his eye position in a steady gaze, but nystagmus was absent. A brain CT scan revealed a marked atrophy of the upper brain stem and cerebellar peduncle. The cerebral atrophy was mild, and caudate nuclei were spared. The electroencephalograph showed a slow, diffuse, high-voltage wave, with an associated spike and waves. The cerebrospinal fluid examination was normal. An electrophysiological examination revealed no myoclonus in the extremities. These clinical findings suggested that this case is a pseudo-Huntington form of DRPLA.

  3. Progressive Diaphragm Atrophy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glau, Christie L; Conlon, Thomas W; Himebauch, Adam S; Yehya, Nadir; Weiss, Scott L; Berg, Robert A; Nishisaki, Akira

    2018-02-05

    Diaphragm atrophy is associated with delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation and increased mortality in critically ill adults. We sought to test for the presence of diaphragm atrophy in children with acute respiratory failure. Prospective, observational study. Single-center tertiary noncardiac PICU in a children's hospital. Invasively ventilated children with acute respiratory failure. Diaphragm thickness at end-expiration and end-inspiration were serially measured by ultrasound in 56 patients (median age, 17 mo; interquartile range, 5.5-52), first within 36 hours of intubation and last preceding extubation. The median duration of mechanical ventilation was 140 hours (interquartile range, 83-201). At initial measurement, thickness at end-expiration was 2.0 mm (interquartile range, 1.8-2.5) and thickness at end-inspiration was 2.5 mm (interquartile range, 2-2.8). The change in thickness at end-expiration during mechanical ventilation between first and last measurement was -13.8% (interquartile range, -27.4% to 0%), with a -3.4% daily atrophy rate (interquartile range, -5.6 to 0%). Thickening fraction = ([thickness at end-inspiration - thickness at end-expiration]/thickness at end-inspiration) throughout the course of mechanical ventilation was linearly correlated with spontaneous breathing fraction (beta coefficient, 9.4; 95% CI, 4.2-14.7; p = 0.001). For children with a period of spontaneous breathing fraction less than 0.5 during mechanical ventilation, those with exposure to a continuous neuromuscular blockade infusion (n = 15) had a significantly larger decrease in thickness at end-expiration compared with children with low spontaneous breathing fraction who were not exposed to a neuromuscular blockade infusion (n = 18) (-16.4%, [interquartile range, -28.4% to -7.0%] vs -7.3%; [interquartile range, -10.9% to -0%]; p = 0.036). Diaphragm atrophy is present in children on mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure. Diaphragm contractility, measured as

  4. Analysis of voxel-based rCBF in patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy of multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Sang Ho; Kim, Jae Woo

    2004-01-01

    Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy (OPCA) is one phenotype of multiple system atrophy (MSA) and is characterized neuropathologically by neuronal degeneration in the inferior olives, pons and cerebellar cortex. The diagnosis of OPCA requires clinical evaluation to exclude other diseases. And it's usually supported by atrophy of the cerebellum and brainstem visualized on CT or MRI. But there are some reports that the disease can occur without demonstrable atrophy in these anatomic studies. There are only a few reports about perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with OPCA. The aim of this study was to describe voxel-based rCBF of OPCA in comparison of healthy volunteers. We studied 5 patients with OPCA (1 men, 4 women: age 50.4±9.6y) and age matched 13 healthy volunteers (4 men, 9 women: age 54.9±6.6y). All subjects injected 20mCi of Tc-99m HMPAO and scanning was initiated 20 min after injection. Images were analyzed using SPM (SPM99) with Matlab 5.3. On visual analysis, in 3 patients with OPCA, SPECT image showed significant hypoperfusion in the cerebellum. In another 2 patients, diffuse hypoperfusion was found in the both cerebro-cerebellar hemispheres, untypical perfusion pattern in OPCA. So there is existed limitation to diagnosis by only visual analysis. On SPM analysis, in OPCA patients significantly decreased perfusion was present in culmen, tonsil, tuber in Lt. cerebellum and declive, tonsil, pyramid and inf. Semi-lunar lobule in Rt. cerebellum, Rt. inf. frontal gyrus and Rt. temporal lobe (p<0.001, uncorrected). We also performed individual analysis with SPM. Two of 5 patients have additional hypoperfusion brain lesions. In one patient, decreased perfusion found in Lt. temporal, both occipital lobe, Lt. parahippocampal gyrus. In another patient, decreased perfusion found in both frontal and parietal lobe. This study is one of a few trials analysis with SPM for OPCA. We defined the specific location of decreased perfusion in patients with OPCA

  5. Liver atrophy after percutaneous transhepatic portal embolization occurs in two histological phases: Hepatocellular atrophy followed by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Yasuhito; Ojima, Hidenori; Kobayashi, Tatsushi; Kishi, Yoji; Nara, Satoshi; Esaki, Minoru; Shimada, Kazuaki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Tanabe, Minoru; Kanai, Yae

    2017-11-18

    To clarify the histological changes associated with liver atrophy after percutaneous transhepatic portal embolization (PTPE) in pigs and humans. As a preliminary study, we performed pathological examinations of liver specimens from five pigs that had undergone PTPE in a time-dependent model of liver atrophy. In specimens from embolized lobes (EMB) and nonembolized lobes (controls), we measured the portal vein to central vein distance (PV-CV), the area and number of hepatocytes per lobule, and apoptotic activity using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay. Immunohistochemical reactivities were evaluated for light chain 3 (LC3) and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2) as autophagy markers and for glutamine synthetase and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) as metabolic zonation markers. Samples from ten human livers taken 20-36 d after PTPE were similarly examined. PV-CVs and lobule areas did not differ between EMB and controls at day 0, but were lower in EMB than in controls at weeks 2, 4, and 6 ( P ≤ 0.001). Hepatocyte numbers were not significantly reduced in EMB at day 0 and week 2 but were reduced at weeks 4 and 6 ( P ≤ 0.05). Apoptotic activity was higher in EMB than in controls at day 0 and week 4. LC3 and LAMP2 staining peaked in EMB at week 2, with no significant difference between EMB and controls at weeks 4 and 6. Glutamine synthetase and CYP2E1 zonation in EMB at weeks 2, 4, and 6 were narrower than those in controls. Human results were consistent with those of porcine specimens. The mechanism of liver atrophy after PTPE has two histological phases: Hepatocellular atrophy is likely caused by autophagy in the first 2 wk and apoptosis thereafter.

  6. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eConejo Bayón

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi, 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA, yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the MTL in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of AD, FTLD and correlation with cognitive impairment in PD, formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: a series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65-85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT plus one experienced tracer (ET traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater ICC for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA.Conclusion: our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest.

  7. The administration of Fructus Schisandrae attenuates dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, JOO WAN; KU, SAE-KWANG; HAN, MIN HO; KIM, KI YOUNG; KIM, SUNG GOO; KIM, GI-YOUNG; HWANG, HYE JIN; KIM, BYUNG WOO; KIM, CHEOL MIN; CHOI, YUNG HYUN

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether ethanol extracts of Fructus Schisandrae (FS), the dried fruit of Schizandra chinensis Baillon, mitigates the development of dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy. Adult SPF/VAT outbred CrljOri:CD1 (ICR) mice were either treated with dexamethasone to induce muscle atrophy. Some mice were treated with various concentrations of FS or oxymetholone, a 17α-alkylated anabolic-androgenic steroid. Muscle thickness and weight, calf muscle strength, and serum creatine and creatine kinase (CK) levels were then measured. The administration of FS attenuated the decrease in calf thickness, gastrocnemius muscle thickness, muscle strength and weight, fiber diameter and serum lactate dehydrogenase levels in the gastrocnemius muscle bundles which was induced by dexamethasone in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with FS also prevented the dexamethasone-induced increase in serum creatine and creatine kinase levels, histopathological muscle fiber microvacuolation and fibrosis, and the immunoreactivity of muscle fibers for nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxynonenal, inducible nitric oxide synthase and myostatin. In addition, the destruction of the gastrocnemius antioxidant defense system was also inhibited by the administration of FS in a dose-dependent manner. FS downregulated the mRNA expression of atrogin-1 and muscle RING-finger protein-1 (involved in muscle protein degradation), myostatin (a potent negative regulator of muscle growth) and sirtuin 1 (a representative inhibitor of muscle regeneration), but upregulated the mRNA expression of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt1, adenosine A1 receptor and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4, involved in muscle growth and the activation of protein synthesis. The overall effects of treatment with 500 mg/kg FS were comparable to those observed following treatment with 50 mg/kg oxymetholone. The results from the present study support the hypothesis that FS has a favorable

  8. Crossed cerebellar atrophy in children: a neurologic sequela of extreme prematurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollins, N.K. [Dept. of Radiology, Children`s Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)]|[Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Wen, T.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical Center of Plano, TX (United States); Dominguez, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Brook Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    We retrospectively identified eight children, aged 8 months to 13 years, in whom cerebellar atrophy associated with cerebral injury was diagnosed on MR or CT, and reviewed their past medical history, neurologic findings, and neuroimaging studies. Seven patients were born extremely premature, EGA 25-28 weeks, and had severe perinatal intracranial hemorrhage. Neurologic problems include severe developmental delay in seven, spastic paresis in six, and seizures in five. Neuroimaging showed severe unilaterial holohemispheric atrophy in four, bilateral asymmetric holohemispheric atrophy in two, and left temporoparietal atrophy in one. Cerebellar atrophy was unilateral in five and bilateral but asymmetric in two. Gliosis of the atrophic cerebellum occurred in one patient. Sequential neuroimaging in one patient showed evolution of crossed cerebellar atrophy at 8 months of age. The final patient, a term infant, had an idiopathic perinatal left cerebral infarct. (orig./MG)

  9. Neuropsychological correlates of brain atrophy in Huntington's disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starkstein, S.E.; Brandt, J.; Bylsma, F.; Peyser, C.; Folstein, M.; Folstein, S.E.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and a comprehensive cognitive evaluation were carried out in a series of 29 patients with mild to moderate Huntington's disease (HD). A factor analysis of the neuropsychological test scores provided three factors: A memory/speed-of-processing factor, a 'frontal' factor, and a response inhibition factor. The memory/speed factor correlated significantly with measures of caudate atrophy, frontal atrophy, and atrophy of the left (but not the right) sylvian cistern. There were no significant correlations between the 'frontal' or response inhibition factors and measures of cortical or subcortical brain atrophy. Our findings confirm that subcortical atrophy is significantly correlated with specific cognitive deficits in HD, and demonstrate that cortical atrophy also has important association with the cognitive deficits of patients with HD. (orig.)

  10. Systems-based Discovery of Tomatidine as a Natural Small Molecule Inhibitor of Skeletal Muscle Atrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyle, Michael C.; Ebert, Scott M.; Cook, Daniel P.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Fox, Daniel K.; Bongers, Kale S.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:24719321

  11. The Effects of Meditation on Grey Matter Atrophy and Neurodegeneration: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Nicole; Tufts, Emily; Auger, Leslie E

    2017-01-01

    The present systematic review is based on the premise that a variety of neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by grey matter atrophy in the brain and meditation may impact this. Given that age is a major risk factor for many of these progressive and neurodegenerative diseases and that the percentage of the population over the age of 65 is quickly increasing, there is an obvious need for prompt treatment and prevention advances in research. As there is currently no cure for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, many are seeking non-pharmacological treatment options in attempts to offset the disease-related cognitive and functional declines. On the basis of a growing body of research suggesting that meditation is effective in increasing grey matter volume in healthy participants, this paper systematically reviewed the literature regarding the effects of meditation on restoring grey matter volume in healthy individuals and those affected by neurodegeneration. This review searched PubMed, CINAHL, and APA PsycNET to identify original studies that included MRI imaging to measure grey matter volume in meditators and post-mindfulness-based intervention participants compared to controls. Thirteen studies were considered eligible for review and involved a wide variety of meditation techniques and included participants with and without cognitive impairment. All studies reported significant increases in grey matter volume in the meditators/intervention group, albeit in assorted regions of the brain. Limited research exists on the mechanisms through which meditation affects disease-related neurodegeneration, but preliminary evidence suggests that it may offset grey matter atrophy.

  12. "Twin peaks" papilledema: the appearance of papilledema with optic tract atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, J S; Weingeist, T A; Burton, T C; Thompson, H S

    1976-10-01

    A woman with a right middle fossa meningioma causing right optic tract atrophy and papilledema had distinctive funduscopic changes. The ipsilateral eye showed temporal disc pallor and nasal edema. The contralateral disc showed edema of the upper and lower poles which was separated by a horizontal band of optic atrophy. The fluorescein angiographic changes clearly illustrate this pattern. Apart from its theoretical interest this appearance of papilledema and atrophy provides definite localizing information.

  13. Biomechanical implications of skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy: a musculoskeletal model

    OpenAIRE

    Vigotsky, Andrew D.; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and atrophy occur frequently as a result of mechanical loading or unloading, with implications for clinical, general, and athletic populations. The effects of muscle hypertrophy and atrophy on force production and joint moments have been previously described. However, there is a paucity of research showing how hypertrophy and atrophy may affect moment arm (MA) lengths. The purpose of this model was to describe the mathematical relationship between the anatomical cross-secti...

  14. Retinal detachment and gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbel, Rodrigo Fabri; Rauen, Paulo Igor; Pallone, Raphael Frangiote; Casella, Antônio Marcelo Barbante

    2012-01-01

    To report a case of gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina associated with retinal detachment. Hyperornithinemia confirmed the diagnosis of gyrate atrophy. Pars plana vitrectomy with silicone oil infusion was performed with good anatomical results, despite the persistence of low visual acuity. Retinal detachment is a rare complication of gyrate atrophy and can be managed with pars plana vitrectomy and silicone oil. We discuss the possible mechanisms that led to low visual acuity.

  15. Occupation attributes relate to location of atrophy in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Spreng, R. Nathan; Rosen, Howard J.; Strother, Stephen; Chow, Tiffany W.; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Freedman, Morris; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Hodges, John R.; Lipton, Anne M.; Mendez, Mario F.; Morelli, Sylvia A.; Black, Sandra E.; Miller, Bruce L.; Levine, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) often presents with asymmetric atrophy. We assessed whether premorbid occupations in FTLD patients were associated with these hemispheric asymmetries. In a multi-center chart review of 588 patients, occupation information was related to location of tissue loss or dysfunction. Patients with atrophy lateralized to the right had professions more dependent on verbal abilities than patients with left-lateralized or symmetrical atrophy. In a subgroup of 96 w...

  16. Muscle Plasticity and β2-Adrenergic Receptors: Adaptive Responses of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Expression to Muscle Hypertrophy and Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Sato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the functional roles of β2-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β2-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented by the downregulation of the receptor. Endurance training improves oxidative performance partly by increasing β2-adrenergic receptor density in exercise-recruited slow-twitch muscles. However, excessive stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors negates their beneficial effects. Although the preventive effects of β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on atrophy induced by muscle disuse and catabolic hormones or drugs are observed, these catabolic conditions decrease β2-adrenergic receptor expression in slow-twitch muscles. These findings present evidence against the use of β2-adrenergic agonists in therapy for muscle wasting and weakness. Thus, β2-adrenergic receptors in the skeletal muscles play an important physiological role in the regulation of protein and energy balance.

  17. Smad2/3 Proteins Are Required for Immobilization-induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tando, Toshimi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Oike, Takatsugu; Miyamoto, Kana; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Tomita, Masaru; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy promotes muscle weakness, limiting activities of daily living. However, mechanisms underlying atrophy remain unclear. Here, we show that skeletal muscle immobilization elevates Smad2/3 protein but not mRNA levels in muscle, promoting atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myostatin, which negatively regulates muscle hypertrophy, is dispensable for denervation-induced muscle atrophy and Smad2/3 protein accumulation. Moreover, muscle-specific Smad2/3-deficient mice exhibited significant resistance to denervation-induced muscle atrophy. In addition, expression of the atrogenes Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, which underlie muscle atrophy, did not increase in muscles of Smad2/3-deficient mice following denervation. We also demonstrate that serum starvation promotes Smad2/3 protein accumulation in C2C12 myogenic cells, an in vitro muscle atrophy model, an effect inhibited by IGF1 treatment. In vivo, we observed IGF1 receptor deactivation in immobilized muscle, even in the presence of normal levels of circulating IGF1. Denervation-induced muscle atrophy was accompanied by reduced glucose intake and elevated levels of branched-chain amino acids, effects that were Smad2/3-dependent. Thus, muscle immobilization attenuates IGF1 signals at the receptor rather than the ligand level, leading to Smad2/3 protein accumulation, muscle atrophy, and accompanying metabolic changes. PMID:27129272

  18. Fronto-striatal atrophy correlates of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia (FTD and Alzheimer's disease (AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Seok Yi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Behavioural disturbances in frontotemporal dementia (FTD are thought to reflect mainly atrophy of cortical regions. Recent studies suggest that subcortical brain regions, in particular the striatum, are also significantly affected and this pathology might play a role in the generation of behavioural symptoms. Objective: To investigate prefrontal cortical and striatal atrophy contributions to behavioural symptoms in FTD. Methods: One hundred and eighty-two participants (87 FTD patients, 39 AD patients and 56 controls were included. Behavioural profiles were established using the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory Revised (CBI-R and Frontal System Behaviour Scale (FrSBe. Atrophy in prefrontal (VMPFC, DLPFC and striatal (caudate, putamen regions was established via a 5-point visual rating scale of the MRI scans. Behavioural scores were correlated with atrophy rating scores. Results: Behavioural and atrophy ratings demonstrated that patients were significantly impaired compared to controls, with bvFTD being most severely affected. Behavioural-anatomical correlations revealed that VMPFC atrophy was closely related to abnormal behaviour and motivation disturbances. Stereotypical behaviours were associated with both VMPFC and striatal atrophy. By contrast, disturbance of eating was found to be related to striatal atrophy only. Conclusion: Frontal and striatal atrophy contributed to the behavioural disturbances seen in FTD, with some behaviours related to frontal, striatal or combined fronto-striatal pathology. Consideration of striatal contributions to the generation of behavioural disturbances should be taken into account when assessing patients with potential FTD.

  19. Smad2/3 Proteins Are Required for Immobilization-induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tando, Toshimi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Oike, Takatsugu; Miyamoto, Kana; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Tomita, Masaru; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-06-03

    Skeletal muscle atrophy promotes muscle weakness, limiting activities of daily living. However, mechanisms underlying atrophy remain unclear. Here, we show that skeletal muscle immobilization elevates Smad2/3 protein but not mRNA levels in muscle, promoting atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myostatin, which negatively regulates muscle hypertrophy, is dispensable for denervation-induced muscle atrophy and Smad2/3 protein accumulation. Moreover, muscle-specific Smad2/3-deficient mice exhibited significant resistance to denervation-induced muscle atrophy. In addition, expression of the atrogenes Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, which underlie muscle atrophy, did not increase in muscles of Smad2/3-deficient mice following denervation. We also demonstrate that serum starvation promotes Smad2/3 protein accumulation in C2C12 myogenic cells, an in vitro muscle atrophy model, an effect inhibited by IGF1 treatment. In vivo, we observed IGF1 receptor deactivation in immobilized muscle, even in the presence of normal levels of circulating IGF1. Denervation-induced muscle atrophy was accompanied by reduced glucose intake and elevated levels of branched-chain amino acids, effects that were Smad2/3-dependent. Thus, muscle immobilization attenuates IGF1 signals at the receptor rather than the ligand level, leading to Smad2/3 protein accumulation, muscle atrophy, and accompanying metabolic changes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Visualizing stages of cortical atrophy in progressive MCI from the ADNI cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Fonov, Vladimir; Coupé, Pierrick

    of atrophy in the parahippocampal gyrus, the cingulate gyrus and temporal lobes (figure). At two years before conversion, atrophy has spread to large parts of the temporal and frontal lobes, much of the cingulate gyrus and parts of the orbitofrontal region. Twelve months before conversion, atrophy is present...... and medial temporal lobe structures such as hippocampus. Understanding the structural pattern of cortical atrophy at different stages of MCI, before AD can be diagnosed, may help in patient monitoring and prognosis. We used data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to calculate...

  1. APOE ε4 is associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy in AD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily N Manning

    Full Text Available To investigate whether APOE ε4 carriers have higher hippocampal atrophy rates than non-carriers in Alzheimer's disease (AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI and controls, and if so, whether higher hippocampal atrophy rates are still observed after adjusting for concurrent whole-brain atrophy rates.MRI scans from all available visits in ADNI (148 AD, 307 MCI, 167 controls were used. MCI subjects were divided into "progressors" (MCI-P if diagnosed with AD within 36 months or "stable" (MCI-S if a diagnosis of MCI was maintained. A joint multi-level mixed-effect linear regression model was used to analyse the effect of ε4 carrier-status on hippocampal and whole-brain atrophy rates, adjusting for age, gender, MMSE and brain-to-intracranial volume ratio. The difference in hippocampal rates between ε4 carriers and non-carriers after adjustment for concurrent whole-brain atrophy rate was then calculated.Mean adjusted hippocampal atrophy rates in ε4 carriers were significantly higher in AD, MCI-P and MCI-S (p≤0.011, all tests compared with ε4 non-carriers. After adjustment for whole-brain atrophy rate, the difference in mean adjusted hippocampal atrophy rate between ε4 carriers and non-carriers was reduced but remained statistically significant in AD and MCI-P.These results suggest that the APOE ε4 allele drives atrophy to the medial-temporal lobe region in AD.

  2. Cognitive impairment in multiple system atrophy: Changing concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agessandro Abrahão

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiple system atrophy (MSA is characterized by a variable combination of cerebellar ataxia, parkinsonism and pyramidal signs associated with autonomic failure. Classically, cognitive impairment was not considered a clinical feature of MSA and dementia was pointed out as an exclusion diagnostic criteria. Based on comprehensive neuropsychological assessment, cognitive impairment was found to be a frequent feature in MSA, and clinically-defined dementia is now reported in 14-16% of cases. This article reviews the current data on cognitive impairment in MSA along with its neuropsychological profile and pathophysiology.

  3. Exercise Therapy in Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Other Neuromuscular Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia Rebecka; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    There is no curative treatment for most neuromuscular disorders. Exercise, as a treatment for these diseases, has therefore received growing attention. When executed properly, exercise can maintain and improve health and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. In persons...... in patients with neuromuscular diseases associated with weakness and wasting. We review studies that have investigated different types of exercise in both myopathies and motor neuron diseases, with particular emphasis on training of persons affected by spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Finally, we provide...

  4. Neocortical Neuronal Loss in Patients with Multiple System Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvesen, Lisette; Winge, Kristian; Brudek, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    To determine the extent of neocortical involvement in multiple system atrophy (MSA), we used design-based stereological methods to estimate the total numbers of neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortex of brains from 11 patients...... with MSA and 11 age- and gender-matched control subjects. The stereological data were supported by cell marker expression analyses in tissue samples from the prefrontal cortex. We found significantly fewer neurons in the frontal and parietal cortex of MSA brains compared with control brains. Significantly...

  5. New Frontiers in the Treatment of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, CL

    2018-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder, with a current estimated incidence of 1 in 11,000 live births. Although there is a variable phenotype, 60% of patients with SMA have type 1 disease. Typically diagnosed by the age of six months, this severe form of the condition is characterised by progressive weakness and the failure to meet motor milestones. There is an early need for permanent assisted ventilation, without which the median life expectancy is less than two years.\\r\

  6. [Type I Chiari malformation associated with cerebellar atrophy. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Calderón-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Lee-Aguirre, Ángel; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Chiari malformation is characterized by caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils that penetrate into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum, achieving reach the atlas or axis. trunk and any drop of the fourth ventricle is observed. Typically is seen in young adults. In some cases scoliosis and Syringomyelic cavities may occur. The authors present (as far as they know) the first case in the literature with long term follow-up, of a caucasian woman with an unusual form of cerebellar atrophy and Chiari Type I malformation, suffering from weakness in his upper and lower extremities with rapidly progression. The patient was successfully treated with suboccipital decompression and C1 laminectomy.

  7. Agent-based computational model investigates muscle-specific responses to disuse-induced atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kyle S.; Peirce, Shayn M.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is highly responsive to use. In particular, muscle atrophy attributable to decreased activity is a common problem among the elderly and injured/immobile. However, each muscle does not respond the same way. We developed an agent-based model that generates a tissue-level skeletal muscle response to disuse/immobilization. The model incorporates tissue-specific muscle fiber architecture parameters and simulates changes in muscle fiber size as a result of disuse-induced atrophy that are consistent with published experiments. We created simulations of 49 forelimb and hindlimb muscles of the rat by incorporating eight fiber-type and size parameters to explore how these parameters, which vary widely across muscles, influence sensitivity to disuse-induced atrophy. Of the 49 muscles modeled, the soleus exhibited the greatest atrophy after 14 days of simulated immobilization (51% decrease in fiber size), whereas the extensor digitorum communis atrophied the least (32%). Analysis of these simulations revealed that both fiber-type distribution and fiber-size distribution influence the sensitivity to disuse atrophy even though no single tissue architecture parameter correlated with atrophy rate. Additionally, software agents representing fibroblasts were incorporated into the model to investigate cellular interactions during atrophy. Sensitivity analyses revealed that fibroblast agents have the potential to affect disuse-induced atrophy, albeit with a lesser effect than fiber type and size. In particular, muscle atrophy elevated slightly with increased initial fibroblast population and increased production of TNF-α. Overall, the agent-based model provides a novel framework for investigating both tissue adaptations and cellular interactions in skeletal muscle during atrophy. PMID:25722379

  8. SIRT1 Protein, by Blocking the Activities of Transcription Factors FoxO1 and FoxO3, Inhibits Muscle Atrophy and Promotes Muscle Growth*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    In several cell types, the protein deacetylase SIRT1 regulates the activities of FoxO transcription factors whose activation is critical in muscle atrophy. However, the possible effects of SIRT1 on the activity of FoxOs in skeletal muscle and on the regulation of muscle size have not been investigated. Here, we show that after food deprivation, SIRT1 levels fall dramatically in type II skeletal muscles (tibialis anterior), which show marked atrophy, unlike in the liver (where SIRT1 rises) or heart or the soleus, a type I muscle (where SIRT1 is unchanged). Maintenance of high SIRT1 levels by electroporation in mouse muscle inhibits markedly the muscle wasting induced by fasting as well as by denervation, and these protective effects require its deacetylase activity. SIRT1 overexpression reduces muscle wasting by blocking the activation of FoxO1 and 3. It thus prevents the induction of key atrogenes, including the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, atrogin1 and MuRF1, and multiple autophagy (Atg) genes and the increase in overall proteolysis. In normal muscle, SIRT1 overexpression by electroporation causes rapid fiber hypertrophy without, surprisingly, activation of the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. Thus, SIRT1 activation favors postnatal muscle growth, and its fall appears to be critical for atrophy during fasting. Consequently, SIRT1 activation represents an attractive possible pharmacological approach to prevent muscle wasting and cachexia. PMID:24003218

  9. SIRT1 protein, by blocking the activities of transcription factors FoxO1 and FoxO3, inhibits muscle atrophy and promotes muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2013-10-18

    In several cell types, the protein deacetylase SIRT1 regulates the activities of FoxO transcription factors whose activation is critical in muscle atrophy. However, the possible effects of SIRT1 on the activity of FoxOs in skeletal muscle and on the regulation of muscle size have not been investigated. Here, we show that after food deprivation, SIRT1 levels fall dramatically in type II skeletal muscles (tibialis anterior), which show marked atrophy, unlike in the liver (where SIRT1 rises) or heart or the soleus, a type I muscle (where SIRT1 is unchanged). Maintenance of high SIRT1 levels by electroporation in mouse muscle inhibits markedly the muscle wasting induced by fasting as well as by denervation, and these protective effects require its deacetylase activity. SIRT1 overexpression reduces muscle wasting by blocking the activation of FoxO1 and 3. It thus prevents the induction of key atrogenes, including the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, atrogin1 and MuRF1, and multiple autophagy (Atg) genes and the increase in overall proteolysis. In normal muscle, SIRT1 overexpression by electroporation causes rapid fiber hypertrophy without, surprisingly, activation of the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. Thus, SIRT1 activation favors postnatal muscle growth, and its fall appears to be critical for atrophy during fasting. Consequently, SIRT1 activation represents an attractive possible pharmacological approach to prevent muscle wasting and cachexia.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease with a high incidence and is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is primarily characterized by degeneration of the spinal motor neurons that leads to skeletal muscle atrophy followed by symmetric limb paralysis, respiratory failure, and death. In humans, mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1 gene shifts the load of expression of SMN protein to the SMN2 gene that produces low levels of full-length SMN protein because of alternative splicing, which are sufficient for embryonic development and survival but result in SMA. The molecular mechanisms of the (a regulation of SMN gene expression and (b degeneration of motor neurons caused by low levels of SMN are unclear. However, some progress has been made in recent years that have provided new insights into understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of SMA pathogenesis. In this review, we have briefly summarized recent advances toward understanding of the molecular mechanisms of regulation of SMN levels and signaling mechanisms that mediate neurodegeneration in SMA.

  11. How common is pelvic floor muscle atrophy after vaginal childbirth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, P; Shek, K L; Dietz, H P

    2014-01-01

    To determine if there is evidence of levator ani atrophy in primiparous women. This was a prospective observational cohort study of 202 primiparous women recruited between November 2006 and March 2008. Translabial ultrasound volumes were obtained at 36-38 weeks' gestation and at a mean of 4.5 months postpartum. Peripartum changes in bladder neck elevation and reduction of anteroposterior hiatal diameter on pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) and changes in muscle thickness were analyzed. Of the 202 participants enrolled, 158 (78%) completed the study. There was a significant reduction in bladder neck elevation (P = 0.001) and change in anteroposterior hiatal diameter (P = 0.03) on PFMC when comparing antenatal and postnatal results, the latter being significantly associated with delivery mode (P = 0.013). No significant changes were detected in muscle thickness (P = 0.76). There is a reduction in sonographic measures of pelvic floor function after childbirth, but muscle atrophy is unlikely to be a significant factor. Copyright © 2013 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Posterior Cortical Atrophy: Visuomotor Deficits in Reaching and Grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Meek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA is a rare clinical syndrome characterised by the predominance of higher-order visual disturbances such as optic ataxia, a characteristic of Balint’s syndrome. Deficits result from progressive neurodegeneration of occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal cortices. The current study sought to explore the visuomotor functioning of four individuals with PCA by testing their ability to reach out and grasp real objects under various viewing conditions. Experiment 1 had participants reach out and grasp simple, rectangular blocks under visually- and memory-guided conditions. Experiment 2 explored participants’ abilities to accurately reach for objects located in their visual periphery. This investigation revealed that PCA patients demonstrate many of the same deficits that have been previously reported in other individuals with optic ataxia, such as ‘magnetic misreaching’ – a pathological reaching bias towards the point of visual fixation when grasping peripheral targets. Unlike many other individuals with optic ataxia, however, the patients in the current study also show symptoms indicative of damage to the more perceptual stream of visual processing, including abolished grip scaling during memory-guided grasping and deficits in face and object identification. These investigations are the first to perform a quantitative analysis of the visuomotor deficits exhibited by patients with Posterior Cortical Atrophy. Critically, this study helps characterize common symptoms of PCA, a vital first step for generating effective diagnostic criteria and therapeutic strategies for this understudied neurodegenerative disorder.

  13. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: More than a Disease of Motor Neurons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, L A; Burns, J K; Chardon, J Warman; Kothary, R; Parks, R J

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetically inherited neurodegenerative disease resulting in infant mortality. SMA is caused by genetic deletion or mutation in the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, which results in reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein. SMN protein deficiency preferentially affects α- motor neurons, leading to their degeneration and subsequent atrophy of limb and trunk muscles, progressing to death in severe forms of the disease. More recent studies have shown that SMN protein depletion is detrimental to the functioning of other tissues including skeletal muscle, heart, autonomic and enteric nervous systems, metabolic/endocrine (e.g. pancreas), lymphatic, bone and reproductive system. In this review, we summarize studies discussing SMN protein's function in various cell and tissue types and their involvement in the context of SMA disease etiology. Taken together, these studies indicate that SMA is a multi-organ disease, which suggests that truly effective disease intervention may require body-wide correction of SMN protein levels. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Posterior Cortical Atrophy and Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Aida; Crutch, Sebastian J; Franco-Macías, Emilio; Gil-Néciga, Eulogio

    2016-03-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by early progressive visual dysfunction in the context of relative preservation of memory and a pattern of atrophy mainly involving the posterior cortex. The aim of the present study is to characterize the neuropsychiatric profile of PCA. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory was used to assess 12 neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in 28 patients with PCA and 34 patients with typical Alzheimer disease (AD) matched by age, disease duration, and illness severity. The most commonly reported NPS in both groups were depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability. However, aside from a trend toward lower rates of apathy in patients with PCA, there were no differences in the percentage of NPS presented in each group. All those patients presenting visual hallucinations in the PCA group also met diagnostic criteria for dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Auditory hallucinations were only present in patients meeting diagnosis criteria for DLB. Prevalence of the 12 NPS examined was similar between patients with PCA and AD. Hallucinations in PCA may be helpful in the differential diagnosis between PCA-AD and PCA-DLB. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Interactive segmentation for geographic atrophy in retinal fundus images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Noah; Smith, R Theodore; Laine, Andrew F

    2008-10-01

    Fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF) imaging is a non-invasive technique for in vivo ophthalmoscopic inspection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of blindness in developed countries. Geographic atrophy (GA) is an advanced form of AMD and accounts for 12-21% of severe visual loss in this disorder [3]. Automatic quantification of GA is important for determining disease progression and facilitating clinical diagnosis of AMD. The problem of automatic segmentation of pathological images still remains an unsolved problem. In this paper we leverage the watershed transform and generalized non-linear gradient operators for interactive segmentation and present an intuitive and simple approach for geographic atrophy segmentation. We compare our approach with the state of the art random walker [5] algorithm for interactive segmentation using ROC statistics. Quantitative evaluation experiments on 100 FAF images show a mean sensitivity/specificity of 98.3/97.7% for our approach and a mean sensitivity/specificity of 88.2/96.6% for the random walker algorithm.

  16. Disease Mechanisms and Therapeutic Approaches in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Motor neuron diseases are neurological disorders characterized primarily by the degeneration of spinal motor neurons, skeletal muscle atrophy, and debilitating and often fatal motor dysfunction. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive motor neuron disease of high incidence and severity and the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is caused by homozygous mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and retention of at least one copy of the hypomorphic gene paralog SMN2. Early studies established a loss-of-function disease mechanism involving ubiquitous SMN deficiency and suggested SMN upregulation as a possible therapeutic approach. In recent years, greater knowledge of the central role of SMN in RNA processing combined with deep characterization of animal models of SMA has significantly advanced our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of the disease. SMA is emerging as an RNA disease not limited to motor neurons, but one that involves dysfunction of motor circuits that comprise multiple neuronal subpopulations and possibly other cell types. Advances in SMA research have also led to the development of several potential therapeutics shown to be effective in animal models of SMA that are now in clinical trials. These agents offer unprecedented promise for the treatment of this still incurable neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26063904

  17. Development and Translation of Therapies for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah K. Shorrock

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterised by widespread loss of lower motor neurons from the spinal cord, leading to progressive weakness and muscle atrophy. SMA is largely caused by homozygous loss of the survival motor neuron (SMN 1 gene, resulting in reduced levels of full-length SMN protein. Although no approved treatment is currently available for SMA, several clinical trials investigating different approaches to increase SMN levels are showing promising early results. Trials investigating the use of therapies targeting muscle strength and neuroprotective pathways are also in progress, generating the possibility of delivering combination therapies utilising both SMN-dependent and SMN-independent targets. Due to an increased understanding of the cellular and molecular consequences of SMN depletion, a second wave of therapies targeted at pathways downstream of SMN are currently undergoing preclinical development. As these therapies move forward towards the clinic, new treatment options are likely to become available, raising the potential to generate an effective ‘cure’ for SMA.

  18. Longitudinal association between hippocampus atrophy and episodic-memory decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, Tetiana; Pudas, Sara; Lundquist, Anders; Orädd, Greger; Josefsson, Maria; Salami, Alireza; de Luna, Xavier; Nyberg, Lars

    2017-03-01

    There is marked variability in both onset and rate of episodic-memory decline in aging. Structural magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed that the extent of age-related brain changes varies markedly across individuals. Past studies of whether regional atrophy accounts for episodic-memory decline in aging have yielded inconclusive findings. Here we related 15-year changes in episodic memory to 4-year changes in cortical and subcortical gray matter volume and in white-matter connectivity and lesions. In addition, changes in word fluency, fluid IQ (Block Design), and processing speed were estimated and related to structural brain changes. Significant negative change over time was observed for all cognitive and brain measures. A robust brain-cognition change-change association was observed for episodic-memory decline and atrophy in the hippocampus. This association was significant for older (65-80 years) but not middle-aged (55-60 years) participants and not sensitive to the assumption of ignorable attrition. Thus, these longitudinal findings highlight medial-temporal lobe system integrity as particularly crucial for maintaining episodic-memory functioning in older age. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Current Status of Treatment of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is the first member identified among polyglutamine diseases characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy of the bulbar, facial, and limb muscles pathologically associated with motor neuron loss in the spinal cord and brainstem. Androgen receptor (AR, a disease-causing protein of SBMA, is a well-characterized ligand-activated transcription factor, and androgen binding induces nuclear translocation, conformational change and recruitment of coregulators for transactivation of AR target genes. Some therapeutic strategies for SBMA are based on these native functions of AR. Since ligand-induced nuclear translocation of mutant AR has been shown to be a critical step in motor neuron degeneration in SBMA, androgen deprivation therapies using leuprorelin and dutasteride have been developed and translated into clinical trials. Although the results of these trials are inconclusive, renewed clinical trials with more sophisticated design might prove the effectiveness of hormonal intervention in the near future. Furthermore, based on the normal function of AR, therapies targeted for conformational changes of AR including amino-terminal (N and carboxy-terminal (C (N/C interaction and transcriptional coregulators might be promising. Other treatments targeted for mitochondrial function, ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS, and autophagy could be applicable for all types of polyglutamine diseases.

  20. Diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy: study of the Wolfram syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Gómez, Bernardette; Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), also known by the acronym DIDMOAD, is a rare and progresive hereditary disease of autosomal recessive inheritance which minimum ascertainment diagnostic criteria are the occurrence together of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy before 15 years of age. To describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular profile of WS in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. We reviewed patients records who fulfill the minimum ascertainment diagnostic criteria of WS presenting between January 1987 and May 2015 in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. Five patients fulfill the inclusion criteria (three male and two female). Diabetes mellitus was the first manifestation of the syndrome in all of them, with a mean age at diagnosis of 5.8 ± 2.71 years, while the WS diagnosis was established at a mean age of 15.8 ± 8.37 years. All the patients had optic atrophy and two of them presented with the complete DIDMOAD spectrum. We found new associations with autoimmune hepatitis and testicular cancer. This study shows the variability of clinical presentation of WS, as well as two new associations. Copyright: © 2017 SecretarÍa de Salud

  1. Correlation between intervertebral disc degeneration, paraspinal muscle atrophy, and lumbar facet joints degeneration in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dong; Liu, Peng; Cheng, Jie; Ma, Zikun; Liu, Jingpei; Qin, Tingzheng

    2017-04-20

    To assess the correlation between lumbar disc degeneration (LDD), multifidus muscle atrophy (LMA), and facet joints degeneration in patients with L4-L5 lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Sixty patients with L4-L5 LDH diagnosed by a 1.5 T MRI scanner were enrolled in the study group and another 60 patients with non-specific back pain were enrolled in the control group. LDD, LMA, and facet joints degeneration were examined and analyzed independently by two independent orthopedic surgeons using T2-weighted images. Wilcoxon test was used for analyzing the difference of LDD and facet joints degeneration between L3-L4 and L5-S1 and difference of LMA between the herniated and control groups. Correlation analysis of the three degeneration grades at the same level was determined by Spearman rank correlation test. In the herniated group, most LMA at L3-L4 level was grade 1 (42, 70.0%); grade 2 (33, 55.0%) at L4-L5 level; and grade 3 (27, 45.0%) at L5-S1 level. LMA and LDD grading were significantly different between L3-L4 and L5-S1 levels (P herniation group, the Spearman value for LDD and LMA grading were 0.352 (P  0.05) at the L5-S1 level. The differences in LMA between the herniated and control groups at the three levels were significant (P Disc degeneration and multifidus muscles atrophy were positively correlated at the L3-L4 disc level. A lumbar extension muscle strengthening program could be helpful in preventing muscle atrophy and lumbar spinal degeneration.

  2. Clinical significance of corpus callosum atrophy in a mixed elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, C; Rostrup, E; Stegmann, M B

    2007-01-01

    Corpus callosum (CC) is the main tract connecting the hemispheres, but the clinical significance of CC atrophy is poorly understood. The aim of this work was to investigate clinical and functional correlates of CC atrophy in subjects with age-related white matter changes (ARWMC). In 569 elderly s...

  3. Association between blood pressure levels over time and brain atrophy in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, T; Skoog, [No Value; Oudkerk, M; de Leeuw, FE; de Groot, JC; Hofman, A; Breteler, MMB

    2003-01-01

    The relation between blood pressure level and degree of global brain atrophy is equivocal. We evaluated past and present blood pressure levels and change in blood pressure over 20 years in relation to the degree of cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 1995-1996, we measured blood

  4. Association between blood pressure levels over time and brain atrophy in the elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, T.; Skoog, I.; Oudkerk, M.; Leeuw, H.F. de; Groot, J.C. de; Hofman, A.W.I.M.; Breteler, M.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    The relation between blood pressure level and degree of global brain atrophy is equivocal. We evaluated past and present blood pressure levels and change in blood pressure over 20 years in relation to the degree of cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 1995-1996, we measured blood

  5. [The hemodynamic disorders in Sudeck's atrophy and the effect on them of interference therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, L

    1992-01-01

    Interferential currents applied to the forearm fracture region of 80 patients with Sudeck atrophy eliminated hemodynamic changes in the affected limb as shown by capillaroscopy, rheovasography. The effect of the treatment is attributed to recovery of normal blood flow and microcirculation in the region of bone atrophy as well as analgetic action of pulse current.

  6. Endometrial safety of ultra-low-dose Vagifem 10 microg in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, L S G; Naessen, T; Elia, D

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the endometrial safety of a 10 microg estradiol vaginal tablet in the treatment of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women.......The objective of the study was to evaluate the endometrial safety of a 10 microg estradiol vaginal tablet in the treatment of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women....

  7. Bayesian model reveals latent atrophy factors with dissociable cognitive trajectories in Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuming; Mormino, Elizabeth C.; Sun, Nanbo; Sperling, Reisa A.; Sabuncu, Mert R.; Yeo, B. T. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We used a data-driven Bayesian model to automatically identify distinct latent factors of overlapping atrophy patterns from voxelwise structural MRIs of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia patients. Our approach estimated the extent to which multiple distinct atrophy patterns were expressed within each participant rather than assuming that each participant expressed a single atrophy factor. The model revealed a temporal atrophy factor (medial temporal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala), a subcortical atrophy factor (striatum, thalamus, and cerebellum), and a cortical atrophy factor (frontal, parietal, lateral temporal, and lateral occipital cortices). To explore the influence of each factor in early AD, atrophy factor compositions were inferred in beta-amyloid–positive (Aβ+) mild cognitively impaired (MCI) and cognitively normal (CN) participants. All three factors were associated with memory decline across the entire clinical spectrum, whereas the cortical factor was associated with executive function decline in Aβ+ MCI participants and AD dementia patients. Direct comparison between factors revealed that the temporal factor showed the strongest association with memory, whereas the cortical factor showed the strongest association with executive function. The subcortical factor was associated with the slowest decline for both memory and executive function compared with temporal and cortical factors. These results suggest that distinct patterns of atrophy influence decline across different cognitive domains. Quantification of this heterogeneity may enable the computation of individual-level predictions relevant for disease monitoring and customized therapies. Factor compositions of participants and code used in this article are publicly available for future research. PMID:27702899

  8. Brain atrophy in patients with arterial disease. The SMART-MR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelman, A.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Brain atrophy is often observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the elderly. This is of clinical importance since the extent and rate of progression of brain atrophy are associated with future cognitive deterioration and conversion to Alzheimer’s dementia. The overall aim of this thesis was

  9. Relating Cortical Atrophy in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Graph Diffusion-Based Network Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnour, Farras; Mueller, Susanne; Raj, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is characterized by stereotyped origination and spread pattern of epileptogenic activity, which is reflected in stereotyped topographic distribution of neuronal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both epileptogenic activity and atrophy spread appear to follow white matter connections. We model the networked spread of activity and atrophy in TLE from first principles via two simple first order network diffusion models. Atrophy distribution is modeled as a simple consequence of the propagation of epileptogenic activity in one model, and as a progressive degenerative process in the other. We show that the network models closely reproduce the regional volumetric gray matter atrophy distribution of two epilepsy cohorts: 29 TLE subjects with medial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS), and 50 TLE subjects with normal appearance on MRI (TLE-no). Statistical validation at the group level suggests high correlation with measured atrophy (R = 0.586 for TLE-MTS, R = 0.283 for TLE-no). We conclude that atrophy spread model out-performs the hyperactivity spread model. These results pave the way for future clinical application of the proposed model on individual patients, including estimating future spread of atrophy, identification of seizure onset zones and surgical planning. PMID:26513579

  10. Evaluating Alzheimer’s Disease Progression Using Rate of Regional Hippocampal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankó, Edit; Joly, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by neurofibrillary tangle and neuropil thread deposition, which ultimately results in neuronal loss. A large number of magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported a smaller hippocampus in AD patients as compared to healthy elderlies. Even though this difference is often interpreted as atrophy, it is only an indirect measurement. A more direct way of measuring the atrophy is to use repeated MRIs within the same individual. Even though several groups have used this appropriate approach, the pattern of hippocampal atrophy still remains unclear and difficult to relate to underlying pathophysiology. Here, in this longitudinal study, we aimed to map hippocampal atrophy rates in patients with AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and elderly controls. Data consisted of two MRI scans for each subject. The symmetric deformation field between the first and the second MRI was computed and mapped onto the three-dimensional hippocampal surface. The pattern of atrophy rate was similar in all three groups, but the rate was significantly higher in patients with AD than in control subjects. We also found higher atrophy rates in progressive MCI patients as compared to stable MCI, particularly in the antero-lateral portion of the right hippocampus. Importantly, the regions showing the highest atrophy rate correspond to those that were described to have the highest burden of tau deposition. Our results show that local hippocampal atrophy rate is a reliable biomarker of disease stage and progression and could also be considered as a method to objectively evaluate treatment effects. PMID:23951142

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vis, J B; Zwanenburg, J J; van der Kleij, L A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T2 of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. METHODS: Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T1-weighted and CSF MRI were...

  12. Intellectual enrichment lessens the effect of brain atrophy on learning and memory in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumowski, James F; Wylie, Glenn R; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; DeLuca, John

    2010-06-15

    Learning and memory impairments are prevalent among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, such deficits are only weakly associated with MS disease severity (brain atrophy). The cognitive reserve hypothesis states that greater lifetime intellectual enrichment lessens the negative impact of brain disease on cognition, thereby helping to explain the incomplete relationship between brain disease and cognitive status in neurologic populations. The literature on cognitive reserve has focused mainly on Alzheimer disease. The current research examines whether greater intellectual enrichment lessens the negative effect of brain atrophy on learning and memory in patients with MS. Forty-four persons with MS completed neuropsychological measures of verbal learning and memory, and a vocabulary-based estimate of lifetime intellectual enrichment. Brain atrophy was estimated with third ventricle width measured from 3-T magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo MRIs. Hierarchical regression was used to predict learning and memory with brain atrophy, intellectual enrichment, and the interaction between brain atrophy and intellectual enrichment. Brain atrophy predicted worse learning and memory, and intellectual enrichment predicted better learning; however, these effects were moderated by interactions between brain atrophy and intellectual enrichment. Specifically, higher intellectual enrichment lessened the negative impact of brain atrophy on both learning and memory. These findings help to explain the incomplete relationship between multiple sclerosis disease severity and cognition, as the effect of disease on cognition is attenuated among patients with higher intellectual enrichment. As such, intellectual enrichment is supported as a protective factor against disease-related cognitive impairment in persons with multiple sclerosis.

  13. Dominant inherited distal spinal muscular atrophy with atrophic and hypertrophic calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; Sie, O G; van Weerden, T W

    The clinical, electrophysiological, radiological and morphological data of 3 members of a family with autosomal dominant distal spinal muscular atrophy (DSMA) are reported. One patient has the clinical picture of peroneal muscular atrophy with atrophic calves. His father and sister suffer from

  14. Porencephaly in dogs and cats: relationships between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and hippocampal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Ai; Hanazono, Kiwamu; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Nakade, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    Porencephaly is the congenital cerebral defect and a rare malformation and described few MRI reports in veterinary medicine. MRI features of porencephaly are recognized the coexistence with the unilateral/bilateral hippocampal atrophy, caused by the seizure symptoms in human medicine. We studied 2 dogs and 1 cat with congenital porencephaly to characterize the clinical signs and MRI, and to discuss the associated MRI with hippocampal atrophy. The main clinical sign was the seizure symptoms, and all had hippocampal atrophy at the lesion side or the larger defect side. There is association between hippocampal atrophy or the cyst volume and the severe of clinical signs, and it is suggested that porencephaly coexists with hippocampal atrophy as well as humans in this study.

  15. Quantitative analysis of the muscle atrophy in osteoarthritis of the hip by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajiri, Masahiro; Hieda, Hiroshi (Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-06-01

    Twenty normal hips and 30 cases of the unilateral osteoarthritic hips were examined by computed tomography in order to measure the atrophy of the muscles around the hip. We discussed the relationship among the muscle atrophy, stages of the osteoarthritic hip, and the clinical score of the JOA's criteria. The results were as follows: 1. There is no difference between the muscle volume of both sides in normal hips. 2. Atrophy of the gluteus maximus and the gluteus medius were already observed at the preosteoarthritic stage and the gluteus minimus, the tensor fasciae latae, iliopsoas revealed atrophy at the late stage. 3. There was a negative correlation between the percentage of atrophy of the gluteus maximus and the clinical score of the JOA's criteria. 4. In cases of normal position of the greater trochanter, artophy of the gluteus medius was more distinguished in cases of abductors of grade 4 by MMT than in those of normal grade.

  16. HDAC1 activates FoxO and is both sufficient and required for skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beharry, Adam W.; Sandesara, Pooja B.; Roberts, Brandon M.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Senf, Sarah M.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors are activated, and necessary for the muscle atrophy, in several pathophysiological conditions, including muscle disuse and cancer cachexia. However, the mechanisms that lead to FoxO activation are not well defined. Recent data from our laboratory and others indicate that the activity of FoxO is repressed under basal conditions via reversible lysine acetylation, which becomes compromised during catabolic conditions. Therefore, we aimed to determine how histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins contribute to activation of FoxO and induction of the muscle atrophy program. Through the use of various pharmacological inhibitors to block HDAC activity, we demonstrate that class I HDACs are key regulators of FoxO and the muscle-atrophy program during both nutrient deprivation and skeletal muscle disuse. Furthermore, we demonstrate, through the use of wild-type and dominant-negative HDAC1 expression plasmids, that HDAC1 is sufficient to activate FoxO and induce muscle fiber atrophy in vivo and is necessary for the atrophy of muscle fibers that is associated with muscle disuse. The ability of HDAC1 to cause muscle atrophy required its deacetylase activity and was linked to the induction of several atrophy genes by HDAC1, including atrogin-1, which required deacetylation of FoxO3a. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of class I HDACs during muscle disuse, using MS-275, significantly attenuated both disuse muscle fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Together, these data solidify the importance of class I HDACs in the muscle atrophy program and indicate that class I HDAC inhibitors are feasible countermeasures to impede muscle atrophy and weakness. PMID:24463822

  17. Growth and atrophy of neurons labeled at their birth in a song nucleus of the zebra finch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, M.; Akutagawa, E.

    1990-01-01

    The robust nucleus of the archistriatum (RA) is one of the forebrain nuclei that control song production in birds. In the zebra finch (Poephila guttata), this nucleus contains more and larger neurons in the male than in the female. A single injection of tritiated thymidine into the egg on the 6th or 7th day of incubation resulted in labeling of many RA neurons with tritium. The size of tritium-labeled neurons and the tissue volume containing them did not differ between the sexes at 15 days after hatching. In the adult brain, tritium-labeled neurons and the tissue volume containing them were much larger in the male than in the female. Also, tritium-labeled RA neurons were large in females which received an implant of estrogen immediately after hatching. The gender differences in the neuron size and nuclear volume of the zebra finch RA are, therefore, due not to the replacement of old neurons by new ones during development but to the growth and atrophy of neurons born before hatching. Similarly, the masculinizing effects of estrogen on the female RA are due not to neuronal replacement but to the prevention of atrophy and promotion of growth in preexisting neurons

  18. Influence of APOE Genotype on Hippocampal Atrophy over Time - An N=1925 Surface-Based ADNI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolun Li

    Full Text Available The apolipoprotein E (APOE e4 genotype is a powerful risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD. In the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI cohort, we previously reported significant baseline structural differences in APOE e4 carriers relative to non-carriers, involving the left hippocampus more than the right--a difference more pronounced in e4 homozygotes than heterozygotes. We now examine the longitudinal effects of APOE genotype on hippocampal morphometry at 6-, 12- and 24-months, in the ADNI cohort. We employed a new automated surface registration system based on conformal geometry and tensor-based morphometry. Among different hippocampal surfaces, we computed high-order correspondences, using a novel inverse-consistent surface-based fluid registration method and multivariate statistics consisting of multivariate tensor-based morphometry (mTBM and radial distance. At each time point, using Hotelling's T(2 test, we found significant morphological deformation in APOE e4 carriers relative to non-carriers in the full cohort as well as in the non-demented (pooled MCI and control subjects at each follow-up interval. In the complete ADNI cohort, we found greater atrophy of the left hippocampus than the right, and this asymmetry was more pronounced in e4 homozygotes than heterozygotes. These findings, combined with our earlier investigations, demonstrate an e4 dose effect on accelerated hippocampal atrophy, and support the enrichment of prevention trial cohorts with e4 carriers.

  19. A Patient With PHACE Syndrome With Marked Ipsilateral Cerebral Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Koong Wang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The association of posterior fossa malformation, facial cavernous hemangioma, arterial anomalies, coarctation of the aorta/cardiac defects and eye abnormalities (PHACE syndrome represents a rare congenital anomaly with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations and female predominance. We herein report on a girl who manifested the typical clinical features of PHACE syndrome, unusually associated with severe ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and hemiplegia. She received surgical aortoplasty, local steroid injection and laser therapy for the hemangioma, and intense physical therapy soon after diagnosis. The etiology of PHACE syndrome remains unclear, and its clinical spectrum is broad. The current case suggests that the spectrum of PHACE syndrome should be further expanded to include other forms of cerebral disorder.

  20. Imaging geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Arno P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Brinkmann, Christian K; Holz, Frank G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in retinal imaging technology have largely contributed to the understanding of the natural history, prognostic markers and disease mechanisms of geographic atrophy (GA) due to age-related macular degeneration. There is still no therapy available to halt or slow the disease process. In order to evaluate potential therapeutic effects in interventional trials, there is a need for precise quantification of the GA progression rate. Fundus autofluorescence imaging allows for accurate identification and segmentation of atrophic areas and currently represents the gold standard for evaluating progressive GA enlargement. By means of high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, distinct microstructural alterations related to GA can be visualized. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Splice-Switching Therapy for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina E. Meijboom

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a genetic disorder with severity ranging from premature death in infants to restricted motor function in adult life. Despite the genetic cause of this disease being known for over twenty years, only recently has a therapy been approved to treat the most severe form of this disease. Here we discuss the genetic basis of SMA and the subsequent studies that led to the utilization of splice switching oligonucleotides to enhance production of SMN protein, which is absent in patients, through a mechanism of exon inclusion into the mature mRNA. Whilst approval of oligonucleotide-based therapies for SMA should be celebrated, we also discuss some of the limitations of this approach and alternate genetic strategies that are currently underway in clinical trials.

  2. Global brain atrophy and metabolic dysfunction in LGI1 encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szots, Monika; Blaabjerg, Morten; Orsi, Gergely

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic cognitive deficits are frequent in leucin-rich glioma-inactivated 1 protein (LGI1) encephalitis. We examined structural and metabolic brain abnormalities following LGI1 encephalitis and correlated findings with acute and follow-up clinical outcomes. METHODS: Nine patients...... underwent prospective multimodal 3 Tesla MRI 33.1±18months after disease onset, including automated volumetry, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Data were compared to 9 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Although extratemporal lesions were not present...... clinical outcome following LGI1 encephalitis is associated with global brain atrophy and disintegration of white matter tracts. The pathological changes affect not only temporomesial structures but also frontal lobes and the cerebellum....

  3. Pilot trial of clenbuterol in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, Giorgia; D'Ascenzo, Carla; Peterle, Enrico; Ermani, Mario; Bello, Luca; Melacini, Paola; Morandi, Lucia; Mazzini, Letizia; Silani, Vincenzo; Raimondi, Monika; Mandrioli, Jessica; Romito, Silvia; Angelini, Corrado; Pegoraro, Elena; Sorarù, Gianni

    2013-06-04

    To test the efficacy and tolerability of clenbuterol in patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Twenty patients with a diagnosis of SBMA were given oral clenbuterol (0.04 mg/d) for 12 months. The primary efficacy end point was the change from baseline of the walking distance covered in 6 minutes at 12 months. Secondary end points included the change over time in muscle strength assessed with the Medical Research Council scale, the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R), and forced vital capacity values. Safety was assessed by a series of laboratory and instrumental tests, as well as reporting of adverse events. Sixteen patients completed the study. There was a significant and sustained increase in walking distance covered in 6 minutes and forced vital capacity between the baseline and the 12-month assessments (p clenbuterol on SBMA disease progression. This study provides Class IV evidence that clenbuterol is effective in improving motor function in SBMA.

  4. Autonomic dysfunction in different subtypes of multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Claudia; Herting, Birgit; Prieur, Silke; Junghanns, Susann; Schweitzer, Katherine; Globas, Christoph; Schöls, Ludger; Reichmann, Heinz; Berg, Daniela; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2008-09-15

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) can clinically be divided into the cerebellar (MSA-C) and the parkinsonian (MSA-P) variant. However, till now, it is unknown whether autonomic dysfunction in these two entities differs regarding severity and profile. We compared the pattern of autonomic dysfunction in 12 patients with MSA-C and 26 with MSA-P in comparison with 27 age- and sex-matched healthy controls using a standard battery of autonomic function tests and a structured anamnesis of the autonomic nervous system. MSA-P patients complained significantly more often about the symptoms of autonomic dysfunctions than MSA-C patients, especially regarding vasomotor, secretomotor, and gastrointestinal subsystems. However, regarding cardiovascular, sudomotor pupil, urogenital, and sleep subsystems, there were no significant quantitative or qualitative differences as analyzed by autonomic anamnesis and testing. Our results suggest that there are only minor differences in the pattern of autonomic dysfunction between the two clinical MSA phenotypes. (c) 2007 Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Protective Variant for Hippocampal Atrophy Identified by Whole Exome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, Kwangsik; Kim, Sungeun; Risacher, Shannon L.; Shen, Li; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Swaminathan, Shanker; Lin, Hai; Ramanan, Vijay K.; Liu, Yunlong; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Inlow, Mark H.; Siniard, Ashley L.; Reiman, Rebecca A.; Aisen, Paul S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Green, Robert C.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Furney, Simon J.; Lovestone, Simon; Simmons, Andrew; Mecocci, Patrizia; Vellas, Bruno; Tsolaki, Magda; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; McDonald, Brenna C.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    We used whole-exome sequencing to identify variants other than APOE associated with the rate of hippocampal atrophy in amnestic mild cognitive impairment. An in-silico predicted missense variant in REST (rs3796529) was found exclusively in subjects with slow hippocampal volume loss and validated using unbiased whole-brain analysis and meta-analysis across 5 independent cohorts. REST is a master regulator of neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation that has not been previously implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. These findings nominate REST and its functional pathways as protective and illustrate the potential of combining next-generation sequencing with neuroimaging to discover novel disease mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25559091

  6. Thymic atrophy and rebound enlargement following chemotherapy for testicular cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickx, P.; Doehring, W.

    1989-01-01

    Serial thoracic CT scans of 50 consecutive patients with testicular cancer were reviewed. In 30 of them with metastatic disease treated according to the Einhorn Scheme changes in thymic size caused by cytostatic agents were studied. During chemotherapy 78.6% of all patients examined developed thymic atrophy, followed by rebound enlargement that reached its culminating point 13 months after initiation of treatment. After that a slow (approximately 2 years) involution process began, until the initial size or somewhat smaller size was re-achieved. The other 20 patients with no evidence of metastases, and therefore not treated with chemotherapy, showed no changes in thymic size. Rebound thymic enlargement following cytostatic therapy for metastatic testicular cancer should not be mistaken for lymphadenopathy. (orig.)

  7. Therapeutic strategies for spinal muscular atrophy: SMN and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bowerman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a devastating neuromuscular disorder characterized by loss of motor neurons and muscle atrophy, generally presenting in childhood. SMA is caused by low levels of the survival motor neuron protein (SMN due to inactivating mutations in the encoding gene SMN1. A second duplicated gene, SMN2, produces very little but sufficient functional protein for survival. Therapeutic strategies to increase SMN are in clinical trials, and the first SMN2-directed antisense oligonucleotide (ASO therapy has recently been licensed. However, several factors suggest that complementary strategies may be needed for the long-term maintenance of neuromuscular and other functions in SMA patients. Pre-clinical SMA models demonstrate that the requirement for SMN protein is highest when the structural connections of the neuromuscular system are being established, from late fetal life throughout infancy. Augmenting SMN may not address the slow neurodegenerative process underlying progressive functional decline beyond childhood in less severe types of SMA. Furthermore, individuals receiving SMN-based treatments may be vulnerable to delayed symptoms if rescue of the neuromuscular system is incomplete. Finally, a large number of older patients living with SMA do not fulfill the present criteria for inclusion in gene therapy and ASO clinical trials, and may not benefit from SMN-inducing treatments. Therefore, a comprehensive whole-lifespan approach to SMA therapy is required that includes both SMN-dependent and SMN-independent strategies that treat the CNS and periphery. Here, we review the range of non-SMN pathways implicated in SMA pathophysiology and discuss how various model systems can serve as valuable tools for SMA drug discovery.

  8. [Infantile spinal atrophy: our experience in the last 25 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Rodríguez, A; Martínez Martínez, P L; Ramos Fernández, J M; Urda Cardona, A; Martínez Antón, J

    2015-03-01

    To determine the incidence of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in our study population and genetic distribution and epidemiological and clinical characteristics and to analyze the level of care and development. Retrospective descriptive study of patients treated in our hospital in the past 25 years (from 1987 to early 2013), with a clinical and neurophysiological diagnosis of SMA. A total of 37 patients were found, representing an incidence for our reference population and year of 1 case per 10,000 live births. Males predominated (male/female ratio: 1.6/1). The type of SMA diagnosed more frequently was, type i (26 cases), followed by type ii (9 cases), one case with SMA type iii, and one case of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1). The most frequent genetic alteration was homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of SMN1 gene in 31 cases, while five patients had atypical genetics. The median survival for type i was 8.0 months and 15.8 years for type ii. The incidence in our population remains stable at around 1/10.000. Most cases presented with, predominantly male, typical genetics. In approximately 1/10 patients the genetic alteration was different from the classical one to the SMN gene. The prevalence of AME unrelated SMN gene was 1/37. The level of care has increased in line with social and welfare demands in recent years. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. White matter atrophy and cognitive dysfunctions in neuromyelitis optica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Blanc

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of central nervous system characterized by optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive acute transverse myelitis. NMO patients have cognitive dysfunctions but other clinical symptoms of brain origin are rare. In the present study, we aimed to investigate cognitive functions and brain volume in NMO. The study population consisted of 28 patients with NMO and 28 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex and educational level. We applied a French translation of the Brief Repeatable Battery (BRB-N to the NMO patients. Using SIENAx for global brain volume (Grey Matter, GM; White Matter, WM; and whole brain and VBM for focal brain volume (GM and WM, NMO patients and controls were compared. Voxel-level correlations between diminished brain concentration and cognitive performance for each tests were performed. Focal and global brain volume of NMO patients with and without cognitive impairment were also compared. Fifteen NMO patients (54% had cognitive impairment with memory, executive function, attention and speed of information processing deficits. Global and focal brain atrophy of WM but not Grey Matter (GM was found in the NMO patients group. The focal WM atrophy included the optic chiasm, pons, cerebellum, the corpus callosum and parts of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, including superior longitudinal fascicle. Visual memory, verbal memory, speed of information processing, short-term memory and executive functions were correlated to focal WM volumes. The comparison of patients with, to patients without cognitive impairment showed a clear decrease of global and focal WM, including brainstem, corticospinal tracts, corpus callosum but also superior and inferior longitudinal fascicles. Cognitive impairment in NMO patients is correlated to the decreased of global and focal WM volume of the brain. Further studies are needed to better understand the precise origin of cognitive impairment in

  10. Effectiveness of daily eccentric contractions induced via kilohertz frequency transcutaneous electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Minoru; Nakanishi, Ryosuke; Murakami, Shinichiro; Fujita, Naoto; Kondo, Hiroyo; Ishihara, Akihiko; Roy, Roland R; Fujino, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    The effects of daily repeated bouts of concentric, isometric, or eccentric contractions induced by high frequency (kilohertz) transcutaneous electrical stimulation in ameliorating atrophy of the soleus muscle in hindlimb unloaded rats were determined. Five groups of male rats were studied: control, hindlimb unloaded for 2 weeks (HU), or HU plus two daily bouts of concentric, isometric, or eccentric high-frequency electrical stimulation-induced contractions of the calf musculature. Soleus mass and fiber size were smaller, the levels of phosphorylated Akt1 and FoxO3a lower, and atrogin-1 and ubiquitinated proteins higher in the HU, and the HU plus concentric or isometric contraction groups than in the control group. In contrast, daily bouts of eccentric contractions maintained these values at near control levels and all measures were significantly different from all other HU groups. These results indicate that daily bouts of eccentric contractions induced by high-frequency stimulation inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome catabolic pathway and enhanced the Akt1/FoxO3a anabolic pathway that resulted in a prevention of the atrophic response of the soleus muscle to chronic unloading. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Converging Mechanisms of p53 Activation Drive Motor Neuron Degeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Christian M; Dai, Ya; Van Alstyne, Meaghan; Koutsioumpa, Charalampia; Pagiazitis, John G; Chalif, Joshua I; Wang, Xiaojian; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Henderson, Christopher E; Pellizzoni, Livio; Mentis, George Z

    2017-12-26

    The hallmark of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), an inherited disease caused by ubiquitous deficiency in the SMN protein, is the selective degeneration of subsets of spinal motor neurons. Here, we show that cell-autonomous activation of p53 occurs in vulnerable but not resistant motor neurons of SMA mice at pre-symptomatic stages. Moreover, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of p53 prevents motor neuron death, demonstrating that induction of p53 signaling drives neurodegeneration. At late disease stages, however, nuclear accumulation of p53 extends to resistant motor neurons and spinal interneurons but is not associated with cell death. Importantly, we identify phosphorylation of serine 18 as a specific post-translational modification of p53 that exclusively marks vulnerable SMA motor neurons and provide evidence that amino-terminal phosphorylation of p53 is required for the neurodegenerative process. Our findings indicate that distinct events induced by SMN deficiency converge on p53 to trigger selective death of vulnerable SMA motor neurons. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Survival motor neuron protein in motor neurons determines synaptic integrity in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Tara L; Kong, Lingling; Wang, Xueyong; Osborne, Melissa A; Crowder, Melissa E; Van Meerbeke, James P; Xu, Xixi; Davis, Crystal; Wooley, Joe; Goldhamer, David J; Lutz, Cathleen M; Rich, Mark M; Sumner, Charlotte J

    2012-06-20

    The inherited motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by deficient expression of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein and results in severe muscle weakness. In SMA mice, synaptic dysfunction of both neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and central sensorimotor synapses precedes motor neuron cell death. To address whether this synaptic dysfunction is due to SMN deficiency in motor neurons, muscle, or both, we generated three lines of conditional SMA mice with tissue-specific increases in SMN expression. All three lines of mice showed increased survival, weights, and improved motor behavior. While increased SMN expression in motor neurons prevented synaptic dysfunction at the NMJ and restored motor neuron somal synapses, increased SMN expression in muscle did not affect synaptic function although it did improve myofiber size. Together these data indicate that both peripheral and central synaptic integrity are dependent on motor neurons in SMA, but SMN may have variable roles in the maintenance of these different synapses. At the NMJ, it functions at the presynaptic terminal in a cell-autonomous fashion, but may be necessary for retrograde trophic signaling to presynaptic inputs onto motor neurons. Importantly, SMN also appears to function in muscle growth and/or maintenance independent of motor neurons. Our data suggest that SMN plays distinct roles in muscle, NMJs, and motor neuron somal synapses and that restored function of SMN at all three sites will be necessary for full recovery of muscle power.

  13. Therapeutic potential of eccentric exercises for age-related muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Lim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have focused on evidence-based interventions to prevent mobility decline and enhance physical performance in older adults. Several modalities, in addition to traditional strengthening programs, have been designed to manage age-related functional decline more effectively. In this study, we reviewed the current relevant literatures to assess the therapeutic potential of eccentric exercises for age-related muscle atrophy (sarcopenia. Age-related changes in human skeletal muscle, and their relationship with physical performance, are discussed with reference to in vitro physiologic and human biomechanics studies. An overview of issues relevant to sarcopenia is provided in the context of the recent consensus on the diagnosis and management of the condition. A decline in mobility among the aging population is closely linked with changes in the muscle force–velocity relationship. Interventions based specifically on increasing velocity and eccentric strength can improve function more effectively compared with traditional strengthening programs. Eccentric strengthening programs are introduced as a specific method for improving both muscle force and velocity. To be more effective, exercise interventions for older adults should focus on enhancing the muscle force–velocity relationship. Exercises that can be performed easily, and that utilize eccentric strength (which is relatively spared during the aging process, are needed to improve both muscle force and velocity.

  14. The segmentation of zones with increased autofluorescence in the junctional zone of parapapillary atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolář, R; Jan, J; Laemmer, R; Mardin, Ch Y

    2009-01-01

    The autofluorescence (AF) derived from the retinal pigment epithelium has the potential to be used as a feature for early glaucoma diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to design and evaluate the method used for semi-automatic segmentation of the zones with increased autofluorescence. A randomized sample of 20 patients (age: 56 ± 10 years) with open angle glaucoma was used. A new method for semi-automatic detection and segmentation of the zones with a higher level of autofluorescence in the junctional zone of parapapillary atrophy has been evaluated. Good agreement has been observed between manually and semi-automatically segmented zones for most of the images, but higher differences may occur for larger hyperfluorescent regions. The data were evaluated using the limits of agreement, with a 2σ border. The described method allows fast and objective evaluation of AF images, preventing undesirable inter-expert variance. A large proportion of AF images could be evaluated successfully by the developed procedure, and the obtained results are comparable to the manual procedure in most cases

  15. Structural neuroimaging in preclinical dementia: From microstructural deficits and grey matter atrophy to macroscale connectomic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Elijah; Gabel, Silvy; Mirette, Habib; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; Waldman, Adam; Wells, Katie; Ritchie, Karen; Ritchie, Craig; O'Brien, John

    2017-05-01

    The last decade has witnessed a proliferation of neuroimaging studies characterising brain changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), where both widespread atrophy and 'signature' brain regions have been implicated. In parallel, a prolonged latency period has been established in AD, with abnormal cerebral changes beginning many years before symptom onset. This raises the possibility of early therapeutic intervention, even before symptoms, when treatments could have the greatest effect on disease-course modification. Two important prerequisites of this endeavour are (1) accurate characterisation or risk stratification and (2) monitoring of progression using neuroimaging outcomes as a surrogate biomarker in those without symptoms but who will develop AD, here referred to as preclinical AD. Structural neuroimaging modalities have been used to identify brain changes related to risk factors for AD, such as familial genetic mutations, risk genes (for example apolipoprotein epsilon-4 allele), and/or family history. In this review, we summarise structural imaging findings in preclinical AD. Overall, the literature suggests early vulnerability in characteristic regions, such as the medial temporal lobe structures and the precuneus, as well as white matter tracts in the fornix, cingulum and corpus callosum. We conclude that while structural markers are promising, more research and validation studies are needed before future secondary prevention trials can adopt structural imaging biomarkers as either stratification or surrogate biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrical stimulation attenuates morphological alterations and prevents atrophy of the denervated cranial tibial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Cleuber Rodrigo de Souza; Pereira, Mizael; Favaretto, Idvaldo Aparecido; Bortoluci, Carlos Henrique Fachin; Santos, Thais Caroline Pereira Dos; Dias, Daniel Ventura; Daré, Letícia Rossi; Rosa, Geraldo Marco

    2017-01-01

    To investigate if electrical stimulation through Russian current is able to maintain morphology of the cranial tibial muscle of experimentally denervated rats. Thirty-six Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the Initial Control Group, Final Control Group, Experimental Denervated and Treated Group, Experimental Denervated Group. The electrostimulation was performed with a protocol of Russian current applied three times per week, for 45 days. At the end, the animals were euthanized and histological and morphometric analyses were performed. Data were submitted to statistical analysis with a significance level of pprotocolo de corrente russa aplicada três vezes por semanas, durante 45 dias. Ao final, os animais foram eutanasiados e, em seguida, foram realizadas as análises histológica e morfométrica. Os dados foram submetidos à análise estatística, com nível de significância de p<0,05. Os Grupos Experimental Desnervado e o Grupo Experimental Desnervado Tratado apresentaram área de secção transversal da fibra menor quando comparados ao Grupo Controle Final. Entretanto, constatou-se diferença significativa entre o Grupo Experimental Desnervado e o Grupo Experimental Desnervado Tratado, mostrando que a estimulação elétrica minimizou atrofia muscular. Ainda, observou-se que o Grupo Experimental Desnervado Tratado apresentou resultados semelhantes ao Grupo Controle Inicial. A estimulação elétrica por meio da corrente russa foi favorável na manutenção da morfologia do músculo tibial cranial desnervado experimentalmente, minimizando a atrofia muscular.

  17. Electrical stimulation attenuates morphological alterations and prevents atrophy of the denervated cranial tibial muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Bueno, Cleuber Rodrigo de Souza; Pereira, Mizael; Favaretto, Idvaldo Aparecido; Bortoluci, Carlos Henrique Fachin; dos Santos, Thais Caroline Pereira; Dias, Daniel Ventura; Dar?, Let?cia Rossi; Rosa, Geraldo Marco

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate if electrical stimulation through Russian current is able to maintain morphology of the cranial tibial muscle of experimentally denervated rats. Methods Thirty-six Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the Initial Control Group, Final Control Group, Experimental Denervated and Treated Group, Experimental Denervated Group. The electrostimulation was performed with a protocol of Russian current applied three times per week, for 45 days. At the end, the ani...

  18. Electrical stimulation attenuates morphological alterations and prevents atrophy of the denervated cranial tibial muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Bueno, Cleuber Rodrigo de Souza; Pereira, Mizael; Favaretto Junior, Idvaldo Aparecido; Bortoluci, Carlos Henrique Fachin; Santos, Thais Caroline Pereira dos; Dias, Daniel Ventura; Daré, Letícia Rossi; Rosa Junior, Geraldo Marco

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate if electrical stimulation through Russian current is able to maintain morphology of the cranial tibial muscle of experimentally denervated rats. Methods Thirty-six Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the Initial Control Group, Final Control Group, Experimental Denervated and Treated Group, Experimental Denervated Group. The electrostimulation was performed with a protocol of Russian current applied three times per week, for 45 days. At the end, the...

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, J.B. de; Zwanenburg, J.J.; Kleij, L.A. van der; Spijkerman, J.M.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, E.T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hvidovre Hospital, Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T{sub 2} of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T{sub 1}-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (V{sub CSF}) and the T{sub 2} of CSF (T{sub 2,CSF}) was calculated. The correlation between V{sub CSF} / T{sub 2,CSF} and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular V{sub CSF} increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T{sub 2} of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T{sub 2} of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. (orig.)

  20. Potential hippocampal region atrophy in diabetes mellitus type 2. A voxel-based morphometry VSRAD study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyama, Kazutoshi; Sugihara, Masaki; Wada, Akihiko

    2010-01-01

    Among diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) patients, the frequency of cognitive dysfunction is higher and the relative risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is approximately twice that of nondiabetics. Cognitive impairment symptoms of AD are induced by limbic system dysfunction, and an early-stage AD brain without dementia has the potential for atrophy in the hippocampal region. In this study, we estimated potential hippocampal region atrophy in DM2 and pursued the association between DM2 and cognitive impairment/AD. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed in 28 diabetics (14 men, 14 women; ages 59-79 years, mean 70.7 years) and 28 sex- and age- matched (±1 year) nondiabetics. Severity of gray matter loss in the hippocampal region and whole brain were investigated. Group analysis was performed using two-tailed unpaired t-test; significance was assumed with less than 1% (P<0.01) of the critical rate. There was a significant difference between diabetics and nondiabetics regarding the severity of hippocampal region atrophy and whole-brain atrophy. Only diabetics showed a positive correlation for severity of hippocampal region atrophy and whole-brain atrophy (rs=0.69, P<0.0001). Aged DM2 patients have the potential for hippocampal region atrophy, and its dysfunction can be related to the expression of a cognitive impairment that resembles AD. (author)

  1. Age-related infra-tentorial brain atrophy on CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitani, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Okada, Kazunori; Murata, Akihiro; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro

    1985-01-01

    We had reported that the brain atrophy progressed significantly with advancing age using the two dimensional CT measurement by digitizer which was connected with personal computer. Using this method, we studied the age-related infra-tentrial brain atrophy in 67 normal subjects (14-90 years), and compared that with age-related supra-tentrial brain atrophy. There was a significant correlation between age and all indices [cranio-ventricular index (CVI), ventricular area index (VAI) and brain atrophy index (BAI)] in supratentrial brain. These indices did not correlated to the age in infra-tentrial brain (brainstem and cerebellum). Significant change of the brain atrophy occured above 60 years old was observed by BAI and VAI in supra-tentrial brain. There was a significant correlation between supra-tentrial brain atrophy index (BAI) and that of infratentrial brain. These results indicate that age-related brain atrophy might progress more slowly in brainstem and cerebellum than in cerebrum. (author)

  2. Default mode network links to visual hallucinations: A comparison between Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciotti, Raffaella; Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Perfetti, Bernardo; Tartaro, Armando; Bonanni, Laura; Thomas, Astrid; Weis, Luca; Biundo, Roberta; Antonini, Angelo; Onofrj, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Studying default mode network activity or connectivity in different parkinsonisms, with or without visual hallucinations, could highlight its roles in clinical phenotypes' expression. Multiple system atrophy is the archetype of parkinsonism without visual hallucinations, variably appearing instead in Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed to evaluate default mode network functions in multiple system atrophy in comparison with PD. Functional magnetic resonance imaging evaluated default mode network activity and connectivity in 15 multiple system atrophy patients, 15 healthy controls, 15 early PD patients matched for disease duration, 30 severe PD patients (15 with and 15 without visual hallucinations), matched with multiple system atrophy for disease severity. Cortical thickness and neuropsychological evaluations were also performed. Multiple system atrophy had reduced default mode network activity compared with controls and PD with hallucinations, and no differences with PD (early or severe) without hallucinations. In PD with visual hallucinations, activity and connectivity was preserved compared with controls and higher than in other groups. In early PD, connectivity was lower than in controls but higher than in multiple system atrophy and severe PD without hallucinations. Cortical thickness was reduced in severe PD, with and without hallucinations, and correlated only with disease duration. Higher anxiety scores were found in patients without hallucinations. Default mode network activity and connectivity was higher in PD with visual hallucinations and reduced in multiple system atrophy and PD without visual hallucinations. Cortical thickness comparisons suggest that functional, rather than structural, changes underlie the activity and connectivity differences. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Brain MRI atrophy quantification in MS: From methods to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Maria A; Battaglini, Marco; Benedict, Ralph H B; De Stefano, Nicola; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Henry, Roland G; Horsfield, Mark A; Jenkinson, Mark; Pagani, Elisabetta; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-24

    Patients with the main clinical phenotypes of multiple sclerosis (MS) manifest varying degrees of brain atrophy beyond that of normal aging. Assessment of atrophy helps to distinguish clinically and cognitively deteriorating patients and predicts those who will have a less-favorable clinical outcome over the long term. Atrophy can be measured from brain MRI scans, and many technological improvements have been made over the last few years. Several software tools, with differing requirements on technical ability and levels of operator intervention, are currently available and have already been applied in research or clinical trial settings. Despite this, the measurement of atrophy in routine clinical practice remains an unmet need. After a short summary of the pathologic substrates of brain atrophy in MS, this review attempts to guide the clinician towards a better understanding of the methods currently used for quantifying brain atrophy in this condition. Important physiologic factors that affect brain volume measures are also considered. Finally, the most recent research on brain atrophy in MS is summarized, including whole brain and various compartments thereof (i.e., white matter, gray matter, selected CNS structures). Current methods provide sufficient precision for cohort studies, but are not adequate for confidently assessing changes in individual patients over the scale of months or a few years. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Prominent fatigue in spinal muscular atrophy and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: evidence of activity-dependent conduction block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Yu-ichi; Misawa, Sonoko; Mori, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Naoki; Kanai, Kazuaki; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Isose, Sagiri; Nasu, Saiko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Beppu, Minako; Ohmori, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Masanori; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    To clarify whether patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) or spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) suffer disabling muscle fatigue, and whether activity-dependent conduction block (ADCB) contributes to their fatigue. ADCB is usually caused by reduced safety factor for impulse transmission in demyelinating diseases, whereas markedly increased axonal branching associated with collateral sprouting may reduce the safety factor in chronic lower motor neuron disorders. We assessed the fatigue severity scale (FSS) in 22 patients with SMA/SBMA, and in 100 disease controls (multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and axonal neuropathy). We then performed stimulated-single fibre electromyography (s-SFEMG) in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle of 21 SMA/SBMA patients, 6 CIDP patients, and 10 normal subjects. The FSS score was the highest in SMA/SBMA patients [4.9 ± 1.1 (mean ± SD)], with 81% of them complaining of disabling fatigue, compared with normal controls (3.5 ± 1.0), whereas patients with multiple sclerosis (4.3 ± 1.6), myasthenia gravis (4.0 ± 1.6) or CIDP (4.3 ± 1.4) also showed higher FSS score. When 2000 stimuli were delivered at 20 Hz in s-SFEMG, conduction block of single motor axons developed in 46% of patients with SMA/SBMA, and 40% of CIDP patients, but in none of the normal controls. SMA/SBMA patients frequently suffer from disabling fatigue presumably caused by ADCB induced by voluntary activity. ADCB could be the mechanism for muscle fatigue in chronic lower motor neuron diseases. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antral atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and preneoplastic markers in Mexican children with Helicobacter pylori-positive and Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Luévano-González, Arturo; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Zhu, Hongtu; Yuan, Ying; Xiang, Qun; Yan, Benjamin; Stoll, Kathryn Anne; Cross, Janet V; Iczkowski, Kenneth A; Mackinnon, Alexander Craig

    2014-06-01

    Chronic inflammation and infection are major risk factors for gastric carcinogenesis in adults. As chronic gastritis is common in Mexican children, diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori and other causes of gastritis are critical for the identification of children who would benefit from closer surveillance. Antral biopsies from 82 Mexican children (mean age, 8.3 ± 4.8 years) with chronic gastritis (36 H pylori+, 46 H pylori-) were examined for gastritis activity, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and immunohistochemical expression of gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), ephrin type-B receptor 4 (EphB4), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), p53, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Atrophy was diagnosed in 7 (9%) of 82, and IM, in 5 (6%) of 82 by routine histology, whereas 6 additional children (7%) (3 H pylori+) exhibited aberrant CDX2 expression without IM. Significant positive correlations were seen between EphB4, MMP3, and MIF (Ppylori+ biopsies (Ppylori status. Antral biopsies demonstrating atrophy, IM, and/or aberrant CDX2 expression were seen in 21.95% (18/82) of the children, potentially identifying those who would benefit from closer surveillance and preventive dietary strategies. Biomarkers CDX2, EphB4, MMP3, and MIF may be useful in the workup of pediatric gastritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The transitional association between β-amyloid pathology and regional brain atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Philip S; Mattsson, Niklas; Donohue, Michael C; Mackin, R Scott; Aisen, Paul S; Jack, Clifford R; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) associated with brain atrophy and cognitive decline. The functional form to model the association between Aβ and regional brain atrophy has not been well defined. To determine the relationship between Aβ and atrophy, we compared the performance of the usual dichotomization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ to identify subjects as Aβ+ and Aβ- with a trilinear spline model of CSF Aβ. One hundred and eighty-three subjects with mild cognitive impairment and 108 cognitively normal controls with baseline CSF Aβ and up to 4 years of longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative were analyzed using mixed-effects regression. Piecewise-linear splines were used to evaluate the nonlinear nature of the association between CSF Aβ and regional atrophy and to identify points of acceleration of atrophy with respect to Aβ. Several parameterizations of CSF Aβ were compared using likelihood ratio tests and the Akaike information criterion. Periods of acceleration of atrophy in which subjects transition from CSF Aβ negativity to CSF Aβ positivity were estimated from the spline models and tested for significance. Spline models resulted in better fits for many temporal and parietal regions compared with the dichotomous models. The trilinear model showed that periods of acceleration of atrophy varied greatly by region with early changes seen in the insula, amygdala, precuneus, hippocampus, and other temporal regions, occurring before the clinical threshold for CSF Aβ positivity. The use of piecewise-linear splines provides an improved model of the nonlinear association between CSF Aβ and regional atrophy in regions implicated in the progression of AD. The important biological finding of this work is that some brain regions show periods of accelerated volume loss well before the CSF Aβ42 threshold. This implies that signs of brain atrophy

  7. Muscular atrophy in severe cases of cubital tunnel syndrome: prognostic factors and outcome after surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Markus; Dützmann, Stephan; Rekkab, Nourdin; Quick, Johanna; Seifert, Volker; Marquardt, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome (CuTS) is a frequent neuropathy, leading to sensor-motoric dysfunction. Many patients even present with muscular atrophy as a sign for severe and long-lasting nerve impairment, usually suggesting unfavourable outcome. We analysed if those patients benefit from surgical treatment on a long-term basis. Between January 2010 and March 2015, 42 consecutive cases of CuTS with atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles were surgically treated in our department. Clinical data of the treatment course and postoperative results were collected. Follow-up was prospectively assessed according to McGowen grading and Bishop outcome score. Mean follow-up time was 39.8 (±17.0) months. All patients were treated with in situ decompression; in 33%, submuscular transposition was performed. Forty-five percent showed improvement of sensory deficits and 57% showed improvement of motor deficits 6 months after the operation. Atrophy improved in 76%. At the time of follow-up, 79% were satisfied with the postoperative result and 77% of patients reached good or excellent outcome according to modified Bishop rating scale. Patients with improvement of atrophy had significantly shorter symptom duration period (7 ± 10 months vs 26 ± 33 months; p atrophy improvement was less likely (p atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles, surgical treatment enables improvement of sensory function, motor function and atrophy even in cases with muscular atrophy. Atrophy improvement was more likely in cases of short symptom duration and less likely in cases with pseudoneuroma.

  8. Dysfunction of axonal membrane conductances in adolescents and young adults with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Michelle A; Vucic, Steve; Lin, Cindy S-Y; Park, Susanna B; Johnston, Heather M; du Sart, Desirée; Bostock, Hugh; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2011-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is distinct among neurodegenerative conditions of the motor neuron, with onset in developing and maturing patients. Furthermore, the rate of degeneration appears to slow over time, at least in the milder forms. To investigate disease pathophysiology and potential adaptations, the present study utilized axonal excitability studies to provide insights into axonal biophysical properties and explored correlation with clinical severity. Multiple excitability indices (stimulus-response curve, strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, current-threshold relationship and recovery cycle) were investigated in 25 genetically characterized adolescent and adult patients with spinal muscular atrophy, stimulating the median motor nerve at the wrist. Results were compared with 50 age-matched controls. The Medical Research Council sum score and Spinal Muscular Atrophy Functional Rating Scale were used to define the strength and motor functional status of patients with spinal muscular atrophy. In patients with spinal muscular atrophy, there were reductions in compound muscle action potential amplitude (P muscular atrophy, there was reduction of peak amplitude without alteration in axonal excitability; in contrast, in the non-ambulatory or severe spinal muscular atrophy cohort prominent changes in axonal function were apparent. Specifically, there were steep changes in the early phase of hyperpolarization in threshold electrotonus (P muscular atrophy supported a mixed pathology comprising features of axonal degeneration and regeneration. The present study has provided novel insight into the pathophysiology of spinal muscular atrophy, with identification of functional abnormalities involving axonal K(+) and Na(+) conductances and alterations in passive membrane properties, the latter linked to the process of neurodegeneration.

  9. Detection of brain atrophy due to ACTH or corticosteroid therapy with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamai, I.; Takei, T. (National Sagamihara Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan)); Oota, H.; Maekawa, K.

    1981-07-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or corticosteroids seemed to cause brain atrophy in infants. We studied the atrophy which was caused by these drugs with computed tomography (CT). 1) Nine cases of infantile spasms examined before, during and after ACTH therapy with CT. Brain atrophy on CT was observed immediately after the completion of ACTH therapy. The brain atrophy receded slightly after several months. It was more marked in younger patients, in cases treated by high doses of ACTH and in cases where brain atrophy had already been observed before ACTH therapy. 2) Twenty cases of infantile spasms or Lennox Gastaut syndrome were examined after ACTH therapy with CT. Brain atrophy was observed in twelve cases. Main features of brain atrophy were the enlargement of sylvian fissure and the widening of subarachnoid space at the frontal or temporal region. Mental retardation was observed in eighteen cases. 3) Two cases of nephrotic syndrome were treated with pulse therapy of prednisolone. CT was carried out before and after treatment. Atrophy of cerebrum was observed in these cases. 4) A case of infantile spasms treated with anticonvulsants without ACTH was studied by electroencephalography (EEG) and CT. The abnormal pattern of EEG was markedly corrected, while brain atrophy on CT was not observed after the therapy. Because of these observations the use of ACTH has to be reconsidered. ACTH should be the drug of second choice for the therapy of infantile spasms and should be used in case other anticonvulsants have no effect. ACTH should be used at lower dosages and for shorter periods of time.

  10. Association between the vaginal microbiota, menopause status and signs of vulvovaginal atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Rebecca M.; Shardell, Michelle D.; Gajer, Pawel; Fadrosh, Doug; Chang, Kathryn; Silver, Michelle; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Burke, Anne E.; Ravel, Jacques; Gravitt, Patti E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The vaginal microbiota help protect the female genital tract from disease. We sought to describe the composition of the vaginal microbiota between pre-, peri- and postmenopausal women and to explore the association between the microbiota and vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA). Methods 87 women (age 35–60) were classified as premenopausal (n=30), perimenopausal (n=29) or postmenopausal (n=28) according to STRAW guidelines. Mid-vagina bacterial community composition was characterized by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Results Bacterial communities clustered into six community state types (CSTs), of which four were dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus, L. gasseri, L. iners, or L. jensenii; and two (CST-IV-A and IV-B) had low relative abundance of Lactobacillus. CST IV-A was characterized by Streptococcus and Prevotella, whereas CST IV-B by Atopobium. There was a significant association between menopause stage and CST (p-value=0.004) and VVA and CST (p-value=0.002). Perimenopausal women were more likely to be classified as CST IV-A or the L. gasseri CST, whereas postmenopausal women were mostly CST IV-A. CSTs dominated by L. crispatus and L. iners were more prevalent in premenopausal women. Nineteen participants had signs of mild or moderate VVA. Compared to women with no VVA, the vaginal microbiota of women with mild or moderate atrophy had 25-fold greater odds of being classified as CST IV-A vs. L. crispatus CST (aOR: 25.89, 95% Credible Interval:2.98-406.79). Conclusions A distinct bacterial community state (CST IV-A) with low relative abundance of Lactobacillus was associated with VVA. Future studies recruiting a larger number of women are needed to replicate the findings. This study provides an impetus for future longitudinal studies designed to manage, modulate and restore vaginal microbiota homeostasis which would provide stronger evidence for a causal relationship with VVA and ultimately improve treatment and prevention of atrophic vaginitis in menopause. PMID

  11. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness: A case of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Nasrollah; Bashardoust, Bahman; Zakeri, Anahita; Salehifar, Azita; Tavosi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    To report a case of Wolfram syndrome (WS) characterized by diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, progressive optic atrophy, and deafness. A 19-year-old female patient, a known case of diabetes mellitus type I from six years before, presented with progressive vision loss since four years earlier. On fundoscopic examination, she had bilateral optic atrophy without diabetic retinopathy. The patient also had diabetes insipidus, neurosensory deafness, and neurogenic bladder. WS should be considered a differential diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus who present with optic atrophy, and it is necessary to perform a hearing test as well as collecting 24-h urine output.

  12. Eyelid Fat Atrophy and Depigmentation After an Intralesional Injection of Triamcinolone Acetonide to Treat Chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihyun; Chang, Minwook

    2017-05-01

    Two patients with depigmentation and fat atrophy after an intralesional injection of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) to treat chalazion are reported. A 2-year-old girl with chalazion in her right lower eyelid received a subconjunctival injection of TA and developed fat atrophy and depigmentation around the injected area. These changes subsided after 7 months. The second patient was a 5-year-old boy who received a triamcinolone injection into a chalazion through the eyelid skin and also developed fat atrophy and depigmentation but these changes improved after 1 year.

  13. Atrophy of foot muscles in diabetic patients can be detected with ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kaare; Obel, Annette; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish a bedside test with ultrasonography for evaluation of foot muscle atrophy in diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle (EDB) and of the muscles of the first interstitium (MILs) were...... than in nonneuropathic diabetic patients (5.8 +/- 2.1 vs. 7.5 +/- 1.7 mm [P Atrophy of intrinsic foot muscles determined at ultrasonography is directly related to foot muscle volume determined by MRI and to various...... measures of diabetic neuropathy. Ultrasonography seems to be useful for detection of foot muscle atrophy in diabetes. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  14. Combining the boundary shift integral and tensor-based morphometry for brain atrophy estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalkiewicz, Mateusz; Pai, Akshay; Leung, Kelvin K.; Sommer, Stefan; Darkner, Sune; Sørensen, Lauge; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2016-03-01

    Brain atrophy from structural magnetic resonance images (MRIs) is widely used as an imaging surrogate marker for Alzheimers disease. Their utility has been limited due to the large degree of variance and subsequently high sample size estimates. The only consistent and reasonably powerful atrophy estimation methods has been the boundary shift integral (BSI). In this paper, we first propose a tensor-based morphometry (TBM) method to measure voxel-wise atrophy that we combine with BSI. The combined model decreases the sample size estimates significantly when compared to BSI and TBM alone.

  15. Increased steroidogenesis promotes early-onset and severe vision loss in females with OPA1 dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarzi, Emmanuelle; Seveno, Marie; Angebault, Claire

    2016-01-01

    OPA1 mutations are responsible for autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA), a progressive blinding disease characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration and large phenotypic variations, the underlying mechanisms of which are poorly understood. OPA1 encodes a mitochondrial protein...... with essential biological functions, its main roles residing in the control of mitochondrial membrane dynamics as a pro-fusion protein and prevention of apoptosis. Considering recent findings showing the importance of the mitochondrial fusion process and the involvement of OPA1 in controlling steroidogenesis, we...... tested the hypothesis of deregulated steroid production in retina due to a disease-causing OPA1 mutation and its contribution to the visual phenotypic variations. Using the mouse model carrying the human recurrent OPA1 mutation, we disclosed that Opa1 haploinsufficiency leads to very high circulating...

  16. Predictive models of choroidal neovascularization and geographic atrophy incidence applied to clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Linda C; Newcombe, Paul J; Whittaker, John C; Wurzelmann, John I; Fries, Michael A; Burnham, Nancy R; Cai, Gengqian; Stinnett, Sandra W; Trivedi, Trupti M; Xu, Chun-Fang

    2012-09-01

    To develop comprehensive predictive models for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and geographic atrophy (GA) incidence within 3 years that can be applied realistically to clinical practice. Retrospective evaluation of data from a longitudinal study to develop and validate predictive models of CNV and GA. The predictive performance of clinical, environmental, demographic, and genetic risk factors was explored in regression models, using data from both eyes of 2011 subjects from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS). The performance of predictive models was compared using 10-fold cross-validated receiver operating characteristic curves in the training data, followed by comparisons in an independent validation dataset (1410 AREDS subjects). Bayesian trial simulations were used to compare the usefulness of predictive models to screen patients for inclusion in prevention clinical trials. Logistic regression models that included clinical, demographic, and environmental factors had better predictive performance for 3-year CNV and GA incidence (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.87 and 0.89, respectively), compared with simple clinical criteria (AREDS simplified severity scale). Although genetic markers were associated significantly with 3-year CNV (CFH: Y402H; ARMS2: A69S) and GA incidence (CFH: Y402H), the inclusion of genetic factors in the models provided only marginal improvements in predictive performance. The logistic regression models combine good predictive performance with greater flexibility to optimize clinical trial design compared with simple clinical models (AREDS simplified severity scale). The benefit of including genetic factors to screen patients for recruitment to CNV prevention studies is marginal and is dependent on individual clinical trial economics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA): a simple 2D/3D method for estimating deep gray matter atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-González, Manuel; Salas-Pacheco, José M; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Despite a strong correlation to outcome, the measurement of gray matter (GM) atrophy is not being used in daily clinical practice as a prognostic factor and monitor the effect of treatments in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). This is mainly because the volumetric methods available to date are sophisticated and difficult to implement for routine use in most hospitals. In addition, the meanings of raw results from volumetric studies on regions of interest are not always easy to understand. Thus, there is a huge need of a methodology suitable to be applied in daily clinical practice in order to estimate GM atrophy in a convenient and comprehensive way. Given the thalamus is the brain structure found to be more consistently implied in MS both in terms of extent of atrophy and in terms of prognostic value, we propose a solution based in this structure. In particular, we propose to compare the extent of thalamus atrophy with the extent of unspecific, global brain atrophy, represented by ventricular enlargement. We name this ratio the "yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy" (yrRTA). In this report we aim to describe the concept of yrRTA and the guidelines for computing it under 2D and 3D approaches and explain the rationale behind this method. We have also conducted a very short crossectional retrospective study to proof the concept of yrRTA. However, we do not seek to describe here the validity of this parameter since these researches are being conducted currently and results will be addressed in future publications.

  18. The yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA: a simple 2D/3D method for estimating deep gray matter atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eMenéndez-González

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite a strong correlation to outcome, the measurement of gray matter (GM atrophy is not being used in daily clinical practice as a prognostic factor and monitor the effect of treatments in Multiple Sclerosis (MS. This is mainly because the volumetric methods available to date are sophisticated and difficult to implement for routine use in most hospitals. In addition, the meaning of raw results from volumetric studies on regions of interest are not always easy to understand. Thus, there is a huge need of a methodology suitable to be applied in daily clinical practice in order to estimate GM atrophy in a convenient and comprehensive way. Given the thalamus is the brain structure found to be more consistently implied in MS both in terms of extent of atrophy and in terms of prognostic value, we propose a solution based in this structure. In particular, we propose to compare the extent of thalamus atrophy (TA with the extent of unspecific, global brain atrophy, represented by ventricular enlargement. We name this ratio the yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA. In this report we aim to describe the concept of yrRTA and the guidelines for computing it under 2D and 3D approaches and explain the rationale behind this method. We have also conducted a very short crossectional retrospective study to proof the concept of yrRTA. However, we do not seek to describe here the validity of this parameter since these researches are being conducted currently and results will be addressed in future publications.

  19. Progressive cerebellar atrophy and polyneuropathy: expanding the spectrum of PNKP mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulton, C.; Oegema, R.; Heijsman, D.; Hoogeboom, J.; Schot, R.; Stroink, H.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Verheijen, F.W.; Spek, P. van der; Kremer, A.; Mancini, G.M.S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a neurodegenerative disorder starting in early childhood of two brothers consisting of severe progressive polyneuropathy, severe progressive cerebellar atrophy, microcephaly, mild epilepsy, and intellectual disability. The cause of this rare syndrome was found to be a homozygous mutation

  20. Aging affects the transcriptional regulation of human skeletal muscle disuse atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte; Frandsen, Ulrik; Nielsen, Line

    2012-01-01

    Important insights concerning the molecular basis of skeletal muscle disuse-atrophy and aging related muscle loss have been obtained in cell culture and animal models, but these regulatory signaling pathways have not previously been studied in aging human muscle. In the present study, muscle...... atrophy was induced by immobilization in healthy old and young individuals to study the time-course and transcriptional factors underlying human skeletal muscle atrophy. The results reveal that irrespectively of age, mRNA expression levels of MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1 increased in the very initial phase (2......-4 days) of human disuse-muscle atrophy along with a marked reduction in PGC-1a and PGC-1ß (1-4 days) and a ~10% decrease in myofiber size (4 days). Further, an age-specific decrease in Akt and S6 phosphorylation was observed in young muscle within the first days (1-4 days) of immobilization. In contrast...

  1. Clinical significance of corpus callosum atrophy in a mixed elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, C.; Rostrup, E.; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2007-01-01

    Corpus callosum (CC) is the main tract connecting the hemispheres, but the clinical significance of CC atrophy is poorly understood. The aim of this work was to investigate clinical and functional correlates of CC atrophy in subjects with age-related white matter changes (ARWMC). In 569 elderly......) score, history of depression, geriatric depression scale (GDS) score, subjective gait difficulty, history of falls, walking speed, and total score on the short physical performance battery (SPPB) were analyzed. Significant correlations between CC atrophy and MMSE, SPPB, and walking speed were identified......, and the CC areas were smaller in subjects with subjective gait difficulty. The correlations remained significant after correction for ARWMC grade. In conclusion, CC atrophy was independently associated with impaired global cognitive and motor function in subjects with ARWMC. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights...

  2. Atrophying pityriasis versicolor: is this a new variant of pityriasis versicolor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Seok; Shin, Min-Kyung; Haw, Choong-Rim

    2010-11-01

    An atypical clinical form of pityriasis versicolor has been infrequently reported, in which cutaneous atrophy is associated with individual pityriasis versicolor lesions. The pathogenesis of this atrophy remains unclear, but is believed to be a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to antigens derived from the Malassezia species. A 60-year-old man presented with multiple, slightly scaly, and depressed maculopatches or plaques on the trunk and extremities. Our microscopic examination of the skin scrapings on a KOH preparation revealed numerous short hyphae and spores. The patient was treated daily with 200 mg of itraconazole in combination with topical antifungals, achieving clinical improvement and mycological recovery, which was confirmed upon follow-up 1 month later. This is the first case report of atrophying pityriasis versicolor in Korea. It needs to be differentiated from other atrophying disorders of the skin.

  3. Intermittent blood flow restriction does not reduce atrophy following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Iversen

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: In conflict with other studies using a similar protocol, application of blood flow restriction the first 14 days after ACL reconstruction did not reduce quadriceps ACSA muscle atrophy measured by MR in a population of athletes.

  4. Changes in brain atrophy indices in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis treated with natalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpín, Eva Costa; Sobrino, Tania García; Vivero, Clara Domínguez; del Campo Amigo Jorrín, María; Regal, Ana Rodríguez; González, José Prieto; Bouzas, Manuela Lema

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of natalizumab on progression of brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and to search for a clinical or radiological marker of progression of brain atrophy. We retrospectively recorded demographic and clinical data, as well as the corpus callosum index (CCI) using MRI, in MS patients treated with natalizumab for 1-4 years. In the study population (n = 29), baseline mean CCI was 0.37 ± 0.04 and final CCI 0.36 ± 0.04. 17 patients did not develop brain atrophy during follow-up. There was no statistically significant relationship between progression of atrophy and clinical and radiological parameters. Natalizumab may have a neuroprotective effect.

  5. Imaging of the Macula Indicates Early Completion of Structural Deficit in Autosomal-Dominant Optic Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Milea, Dan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables 3-dimensional imaging of the retina, including the layer of ganglion cells that supplies the optic nerve with its axons. We tested OCT as means of diagnosing and phenotyping autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (ADOA)....

  6. Subacute brain atrophy induced by radiation therapy to the malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Akio; Matsutani, Masao; Takakura, Kintomo.

    1987-01-01

    In order to analyze brain atrophy after radiation therapy to the brain tumors, we calculated a CSF-cranial volume ratio on CT scan as an index of brain atrophy, and estimated dementia-score by Hasegawa's method in 91 post-irradiated patients with malignant brain tumors. Radiation-induced brain atrophy was observed in 51 out of 91 patients (56 %) and dementia in 23 out of 47 patients (49 %). These two conditions were closely related, and observed significantly more often in aged and whole-brain-irradiated patients. As radiation-induced brain atrophy accompanied by dementia appeared 2 - 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy, it should be regarded as a subacute brain injury caused by radiation therapy. (author)

  7. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness: A case of Wolfram (DIDMOAD syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollah Maleki

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: WS should be considered a differential diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus who present with optic atrophy, and it is necessary to perform a hearing test as well as collecting 24-h urine output.

  8. Atrophy of sacrospinal muscle groups in patients with chronic, diffusely radiating lumbar back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    After surgery necessitated by lumbar back pain syndromes, radiolucency verified by CT may appear in the sacrospinal muscle group on the operate side. This radiolucency represents muscular atrophy and is in its most severe form a result of the replacement of muscle tissue with adipose tissue. Such muscular atrophy appeared in the present series in 31 out of all 156 patients (19.9%) and in 29 out of 94 patients operated on because of radiating lumbar back pain (30.9%). The radiological appearance, extent, and HU values of this muscular atrophy are presented in detail. Only weak correlations with the multitude of clinical symptoms and signs were found in this retrospective study. The effects of irreversible muscular atrophy on the indications for surgery and physiotherapy are discussed.

  9. The diagnosis of thymoma and thymic atrophy in patients with myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sund, K.K.; Skeie, G.O.; Gilhus, N.E.; Aarli, J.A.; Varhaug, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have compared clinical, immunological and radiological data in 20 patients with myasthenia gravis and thymoma and in 21 patients with myasthenia gravis and thymic atrophy. The median age at onset was 54 years in the thymoma group and 63 years in the thymic atrophy group. The severity of the disease was similar in the two groups, and there was no significant difference in the concentration of acetylcholine receptor antibodies. CA antibodies were demonstrated in 17/20 thymoma patients and in 6/21 with thymic atrophy, while 19/20 thymoma patients had antibodies to titin, compared with 9/21 among those with thymic atrophy. The diagnosis and treatment of patients with myasthenia gravis is based upon an evaluation of clinical, immunological and radiological data. 28 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Dutch patients with progressive encephalopathy with edema, hypsarrhythmia, and optic atrophy (PEHO) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhatalo, S.; Somer, M.; Barth, P. G.

    2002-01-01

    PEHO syndrome (progressive encephalopathy, peripheral edema, hypsarrhythmia, and optic atrophy) is a neurodegenerative disorder first characterized in Finnish patients. Subsequent reports have occasionally identified cases of PEHO occurring in some other countries. We describe two Dutch children who

  11. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Susan D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, a form of progressive bilateral blindness due to loss of retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve deterioration, arises predominantly from mutations in the nuclear gene for the mitochondrial GTPase, OPA1. OPA1 localizes to mitochondrial cristae in the inner membrane where electron transport chain complexes are enriched. While OPA1 has been characterized for its role in mitochondrial cristae structure and organelle fusion, possible effects of OPA1 on mitochondrial function have not been determined. Results Mitochondria from six ADOA patients bearing OPA1 mutations and ten ADOA patients with unidentified gene mutations were studied for respiratory capacity and electron transport complex function. Results suggest that the nuclear DNA mutations that give rise to ADOA in our patient population do not alter mitochondrial electron transport. Conclusion We conclude that the pathophysiology of ADOA likely stems from the role of OPA1 in mitochondrial structure or fusion and not from OPA1 support of oxidative phosphorylation.

  12. Dental implants for severely atrophied jaws due to ectodermal dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to present the successful esthetical and functional rehabilitation of partial anodontia in a case of severe ectodermal dysplasia with complete atrophy of the jaws. A 17-year-old male with Class III malocclusion with partial anodontia sought dental implant treatment. His expectation was that of Class I occlusion. The challenge in the case was to match the expectation, reality, and the clinical possibilities. Ridge augmentation was performed with a combination of rib graft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Simultaneously, 6 implants (Nobel Biocare™ - Tapered Groovy were placed in maxillary arch and 10 in the mandible. Simultaneous placement ensured faster and better osseointegration though a mild compromise of the primary stability was observed initially. After adequate healing, Customized Zirconia Procera™ system was used to build the framework. Zirconia crown was cemented to the framework. Radiological and clinical evidence of osseointegration was observed in all 16 dental implants. Successful conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion was achieved with the combination of preprosthetic alveolar ridge augmentation, Procera™ Implant Bridge system. Abnormal angulations and or placement of dental implants would result in failure of the implant. Hence conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion needs complete and complex treatment planning so that the entire masticatory apparatus is sufficiently remodeled. Planning should consider the resultant vectors that would otherwise result in failure of framework or compromise the secondary stability of the dental implant during function. A successful case of rehabilitation of complex partial anodontia is presented.

  13. Hypospadias as a novel feature in spinal bulbar muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenvall, Anna Skarin; Paucar, Martin; Almqvist, Catarina; Nordenström, Anna; Frisén, Louise; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2016-04-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neuromuscular disorder caused by CAG repeat expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The SBMA phenotype consists of slowly progressive neuromuscular symptoms and undermasculinization features as the result of malfunction of the AR. The latter mainly includes gynecomastia and infertility. Hypospadias is also a feature of undermasculinization with an underdeveloped urethra and penis; it has not been described as part of the SBMA phenotype but has been suggested to be associated with a prolonged CAG repeat in the AR gene. This study includes the first epidemiologic description of the co-occurrence of hypospadias and SBMA in subjects and their male relatives in Swedish population-based health registers, as well as an additional clinical case. One boy with severe hypospadias was screened for mutations in the AR gene and was found to have 42 CAG repeats in it, which is in the full range of mutations causing SBMA later in life. We also detected a maximum of four cases displaying the combination of SBMA and hypospadias in our national register databases. This is the third case report with hypospadias in association with CAG repeat expansions in the AR gene in the full range known to cause SBMA later in life. Our findings suggest that hypospadias may be an under diagnosed feature of the SBMA phenotype and we propose that neurologists working with SBMA further investigate and report the true prevalence of hypospadias among patients with SBMA.

  14. Progressive Retinal Atrophy in the Border Collie: A new XLPRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Anne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several forms of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA segregate in more than 100 breeds of dog with each PRA segregating in one or a few breeds. This breed specificity may be accounted for by founder effects and genetic drift, which have reduced the genetic heterogeneity of each breed, thereby facilitating the identification of causal mutations. We report here a new form of PRA segregating in the Border Collie breed. The clinical signs, including the loss of night vision and a progressive loss of day vision, resulting in complete blindness, occur at the age of three to four years and may be detected earlier through systematic ocular fundus examination and electroretinography (ERG. Results Ophthalmic examinations performed on 487 dogs showed that affected dogs present a classical form of PRA. Of those, 274 have been sampled for DNA extraction and 87 could be connected through a large pedigree. Segregation analysis suggested an X-linked mode of transmission; therefore both XLPRA1 and XLPRA2 mutations were excluded through the genetic tests. Conclusion Having excluded these mutations, we suggest that this PRA segregating in Border Collie is a new XLPRA (XLPRA3 and propose it as a potential model for the homologous human disease, X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa.

  15. Resistance strength training exercise in children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewelt, Aga; Krosschell, Kristin J; Stoddard, Gregory J; Weng, Cindy; Xue, Mei; Marcus, Robin L; Gappmaier, Eduard; Viollet, Louis; Johnson, Barbara A; White, Andrea T; Viazzo-Trussell, Donata; Lopes, Philippe; Lane, Robert H; Carey, John C; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2015-10-01

    Preliminary evidence in adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in SMA animal models suggests exercise has potential benefits in improving or stabilizing muscle strength and motor function. We evaluated feasibility, safety, and effects on strength and motor function of a home-based, supervised progressive resistance strength training exercise program in children with SMA types II and III. Up to 14 bilateral proximal muscles were exercised 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Nine children with SMA, aged 10.4 ± 3.8 years, completed the resistance training exercise program. Ninety percent of visits occurred per protocol. Training sessions were pain-free (99.8%), and no study-related adverse events occurred. Trends in improved strength and motor function were observed. A 12-week supervised, home-based, 3-day/week progressive resistance training exercise program is feasible, safe, and well tolerated in children with SMA. These findings can inform future studies of exercise in SMA. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Progressive retinal atrophy in the Border Collie: a new XLPRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilboux, Thierry; Chaudieu, Gilles; Jeannin, Patricia; Delattre, Delphine; Hedan, Benoit; Bourgain, Catherine; Queney, Guillaume; Galibert, Francis; Thomas, Anne; André, Catherine

    2008-03-03

    Several forms of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) segregate in more than 100 breeds of dog with each PRA segregating in one or a few breeds. This breed specificity may be accounted for by founder effects and genetic drift, which have reduced the genetic heterogeneity of each breed, thereby facilitating the identification of causal mutations. We report here a new form of PRA segregating in the Border Collie breed. The clinical signs, including the loss of night vision and a progressive loss of day vision, resulting in complete blindness, occur at the age of three to four years and may be detected earlier through systematic ocular fundus examination and electroretinography (ERG). Ophthalmic examinations performed on 487 dogs showed that affected dogs present a classical form of PRA. Of those, 274 have been sampled for DNA extraction and 87 could be connected through a large pedigree. Segregation analysis suggested an X-linked mode of transmission; therefore both XLPRA1 and XLPRA2 mutations were excluded through the genetic tests. Having excluded these mutations, we suggest that this PRA segregating in Border Collie is a new XLPRA (XLPRA3) and propose it as a potential model for the homologous human disease, X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa.

  17. Peripheral nerve abnormalities in pediatric patients with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekawa, Takahiro; Komaki, Hirofumi; Saito, Yuko; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2013-02-01

    We examined the specific nerve conduction deficits distinguishing spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) subtypes I and II. Five SMA I patients (age, 0.2-1.1 years) and 10 SMA II patients (age, 1.0-2.8 years) were examined. Patients were compared to age-matched controls for motor and sensory conduction velocity (MCV and SCV) changes, compound muscle and sensory nerve action potential amplitudes (CMAP and SNAP), and F-wave occurrence (FO). Slower MCVs were found in three of five SMA I patients; all five exhibited markedly decreased CMAP amplitudes. Tibial nerve CMAP amplitudes significantly reduced in SMA II patients (pnerve of SMA II patients (p=0.031). Loss of motor units may be widespread in the early stage of SMA I, while specific to the legs in young SMA II patients. SMA I showed sensory nerve degeneration, especially of large myelinated fibers. SMA II showed no sensory nerve abnormalities. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Optimization of Spinal Muscular Atrophy subject's muscle activity during gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umat, Gazlia; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary disease related muscle nerve disorder caused by degeneration of the anterior cells of the spinal cord. SMA is divided into four types according to the degree of seriousness. SMA patients show different gait with normal people. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of SMA patient muscle actions and the difference that exists between SMA subjects and normal subjects. Therefore, the electromyography (EMG) test will be used to track the behavior of muscle during walking and optimization methods are used to get the muscle stress that is capable of doing the work while walking. Involved objective function is non-linear function of the quadratic and cubic functions. The study concludes with a comparison of the objective function using the force that sought to use the moment of previous studies and the objective function using the data obtained from EMG. The results shows that the same muscles, peroneus longus and bisepsfemoris, were used during walking activity by SMA subjects and control subjects. Muscle stress force best solution achieved from part D in simulation carried out.

  19. Gait assessment with solesound instrumented footwear in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Jacqueline; Zanotto, Damiano; Dunaway Young, Sally; Salazar, Rachel; De Vivo, Darryl C; Agrawal, Sunil

    2017-08-01

    Gait impairment is common in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and is described using clinical assessments and instrumented walkways. Continuous over-ground walking has not been studied. Nine SMA participants completed the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and 10-meter walk/run wearing instrumented footwear (SoleSound). Data were simultaneously collected using a reference system (GAITRite). The root-mean-square error (RMSE) indicated criterion validity. The decrease in walking speed represented fatigue. Foot loading patterns were evaluated using force sensors. The RMSE for stride time, length, and velocity ranged from 1.3% to 1.7%. Fatigue was 11.6 ± 9.1%, which corresponded to an average deceleration of 0.37 ± 0.28 mm/s 2 . Participants spent most of their stance without heel contact. Forefoot contact occurred early in the gait cycle. These results suggest that footwear-based devices are an alternative to specialized equipment for gait assessment. Better understanding of gait disturbances should inform ongoing treatment efforts and provide a more sensitive outcome measure. Muscle Nerve 56: 230-236, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Atrophy of the deltoid muscle following rotator cuff surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Yukihiko; Saitoh, Satoru; Murakami, Narumichi; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Takaoka, Kunio

    2004-07-01

    Less invasive procedures have recently been introduced to facilitate an earlier return to sports or work activities after rotator cuff repair. Few reports, however, have verified whether such procedures are really less invasive than conventional open repair. The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative thickness of the deltoid muscle in patients treated with either conventional or mini-open rotator cuff repair. Conventional open repair was performed from 1994 through 1997 in forty-three patients with rotator cuff tears. The mini-open deltoid-splitting approach was introduced in 1997, and the cases of thirty-five patients who underwent that procedure were reviewed. The two groups were compared with respect to the thickness of the anterior fibers of the deltoid muscle measured on the transverse magnetic resonance images, the degree of active forward flexion, and the times required for return to work and sports activities. The thickness of the anterior deltoid fibers did not change significantly after surgery in the mini-open repair group, whereas it was significantly decreased in the open repair group at six months as well as at twelve months postoperatively (p atrophy of the deltoid muscle than did the conventional open rotator cuff repair, and patients treated with the mini-open repair recovered more quickly.

  1. Serum cholinesterase activity in infantile and juvenile spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebroj-Dobosz, I; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I

    1989-09-01

    Serum acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and pseudocholinesterase (ChE) activity in infantile and juvenile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) was determined. The total AChE activity was either normal or decreased in the childhood SMA (Type 1), the other SMA groups and disease controls (ALS, X-linked SMA). In the majority of SMA Type 1 cases (6/7 tested) an absence of the asymmetric A12 form was found. This was accompanied by changes in the other asymmetric and globular forms. The latter was, however, not specific for SMA Type 1 cases. The ChE activity was increased in the majority of SMA cases as well as disease controls. The asymmetric A12 ChE form was increased in all SMA Type 3 cases, the values of this form in SMA Type 1 was variable. A change in the ChE globular forms in SMA Type 1 and SMA Type 2 was a frequent finding. It is suggested that the absence of the asymmetric A12 AChE form in SMA Type 1 arises because of muscle cell immaturity and undeveloped muscle-nerve interactions. The reason of ChE changes is obscure.

  2. Treatment of multiple system atrophy using intravenous immunoglobulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak Peter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple system atrophy (MSA is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology, manifesting as combination of parkinsonism, cerebellar syndrome and dysautonomia. Disease-modifying therapies are unavailable. Activation of microglia and production of toxic cytokines suggest a role of neuroinflammation in MSA pathogenesis. This pilot clinical trial evaluated safety and tolerability of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG in MSA. Methods This was a single-arm interventional, single-center, open-label pilot study. Interventions included monthly infusions of the IVIG preparation Privigen®, dose 0.4 gram/kg, for 6 months. Primary outcome measures evaluated safety and secondary outcome measures evaluated preliminary efficacy of IVIG. Unified MSA Rating Scale (UMSARS was measured monthly. Quantitative brain imaging using 3T MRI was performed before and after treatment. Results Nine subjects were enrolled, and seven (2 women and 5 men, age range 55–64 years completed the protocol. There were no serious adverse events. Systolic blood pressure increased during IVIG infusions (p Conclusions Treatment with IVIG appears to be safe, feasible and well tolerated and may improve functionality in MSA. A larger, placebo-controlled study is needed.

  3. Subregional Basal Forebrain Atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease: A Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilimann, Ingo; Grothe, Michel; Heinsen, Helmut; Alho, Eduardo Joaquim Lopez; Grinberg, Lea; Amaro, Edson; dos Santos, Gláucia Aparecida Bento; da Silva, Rafael Emídio; Mitchell, Alex J.; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Filippi, Massimo; Hampel, Harald; Klöppel, Stefan; Teipel, Stefan J.

    2014-01-01

    Histopathological studies in Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggest severe and region-specific neurodegeneration of the basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS). Here, we studied the between-center reliability and diagnostic accuracy of MRI-based BFCS volumetry in a large multicenter data set, including participants with prodromal (n = 41) or clinically manifest AD (n = 134) and 148 cognitively healthy controls. Atrophy was determined using voxel-based and region-of-interest based analyses of high-dimensionally normalized MRI scans using a newly created map of the BFCS based on postmortem in cranio MRI and histology. The AD group showed significant volume reductions of all subregions of the BFCS, which were most pronounced in the posterior nucleus basalis Meynert (NbM). The mild cognitive impairment-AD group showed pronounced volume reductions in the posterior NbM, but preserved volumes of anterior-medial regions. Diagnostic accuracy of posterior NbM volume was superior to hippocampus volume in both groups, despite higher multicenter variability of the BFCS measurements. The data of our study suggest that BFCS morphometry may provide an emerging biomarker in AD. PMID:24503619

  4. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guber, Robert D; Takyar, Varun; Kokkinis, Angela; Fox, Derrick A; Alao, Hawwa; Kats, Ilona; Bakar, Dara; Remaley, Alan T; Hewitt, Stephen M; Kleiner, David E; Liu, Chia-Ying; Hadigan, Colleen; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Rotman, Yaron; Grunseich, Christopher

    2017-12-12

    To determine the prevalence and features of fatty liver disease in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Two groups of participants with SBMA were evaluated. In the first group, 22 participants with SBMA underwent laboratory analysis and liver imaging. In the second group, 14 participants with SBMA were compared to 13 female carriers and 23 controls. Liver biopsies were done in 4 participants with SBMA. Evidence of fatty liver disease was detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in all participants with SBMA in the first group, with an average dome intrahepatic triacylglycerol of 27% (range 6%-66%, ref ≤5.5%). Liver dome magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements were significantly increased in participants with SBMA in the second group relative to age- and sex-matched controls, with average disease and male control measurements of 17% and 3%, respectively. Liver biopsies were consistent with simple steatosis in 2 participants and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in 2 others. We observed evidence of nonalcoholic liver disease in nearly all of the participants with SBMA evaluated. These observations expand the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and provide a potential biomarker that can be monitored in future studies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Emerging therapies and challenges in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Michelle A; Park, Susanna B; Vucic, Steve; Carey, Kate A; Turner, Bradley J; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2017-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease with severity ranging from progressive infantile paralysis and premature death (type I) to limited motor neuron loss and normal life expectancy (type IV). Without disease-modifying therapies, the impact is profound for patients and their families. Improved understanding of the molecular basis of SMA, disease pathogenesis, natural history, and recognition of the impact of standardized care on outcomes has yielded progress toward the development of novel therapeutic strategies and are summarized. Therapeutic strategies in the pipeline are appraised, ranging from SMN1 gene replacement to modulation of SMN2 encoded transcripts, to neuroprotection, to an expanding repertoire of peripheral targets, including muscle. With the advent of preliminary trial data, it can be reasonably anticipated that the SMA treatment landscape will transform significantly. Advancement in presymptomatic diagnosis and screening programs will be critical, with pilot newborn screening studies underway to facilitate preclinical diagnosis. The development of disease-modifying therapies will necessitate monitoring programs to determine the long-term impact, careful evaluation of combined treatments, and further acceleration of improvements in supportive care. In advance of upcoming clinical trial results, we consider the challenges and controversies related to the implementation of novel therapies for all patients and set the scene as the field prepares to enter an era of novel therapies. Ann Neurol 2017;81:355-368. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  6. Cerebral atrophy as outcome measure in short-term phase 2 clinical trials in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elskamp, I.J. van den; Boden, B.; Barkhof, F.; Dattola, V.; Knol, D.L.; Filippi, M.; Kappos, L.; Fazekas, F.; Wagner, K.; Pohl, C.; Sandbrink, R.; Polman, C.H.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral atrophy is a compound measure of the neurodegenerative component of multiple sclerosis (MS) and a conceivable outcome measure for clinical trials monitoring the effect of neuroprotective agents. In this study, we evaluate the rate of cerebral atrophy in a 6-month period, investigate the predictive and explanatory value of other magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures in relation to cerebral atrophy, and determine sample sizes for future short-term clinical trials using cerebral atrophy as primary outcome measure. One hundred thirty-five relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients underwent six monthly MRI scans from which the percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and the number and volume of gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesions, T2 lesions, and persistent black holes (PBH) were determined. By means of multiple linear regression analysis, the relationship between focal MRI variables and PBVC was assessed. Sample size calculations were performed for all patients and subgroups selected for enhancement or a high T2 lesion load at baseline. A significant atrophy occurred over 6 months (PBVC = -0.33%, SE = 0.061, p < 0.0001). The number of baseline T2 lesions (p = 0.024), the on-study Gd-enhancing lesion volume (p = 0.044), and the number of on-study PBHs (p = 0.003) were associated with an increased rate of atrophy. For a 50% decrease in rate of atrophy, the sample size calculations showed that approximately 283 patients per arm are required in an unselected sampled population and 185 patients per arm are required in a selected population. Within a 6-month period, significant atrophy can be detected and on-study associations of PBVC and PBHs emphasizes axonal loss to be a driving mechanism. Application as primary outcome measure in short-term clinical trials with feasible sample size requires a potent drug to obtain sufficient power. (orig.)

  7. Atrophy patterns in early clinical stages across distinct phenotypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; La Joie, Renaud; Vogel, Jacob W; Möller, Christiane; Lehmann, Manja; van Berckel, Bart N M; Seeley, William W; Pijnenburg, Yolande A; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L; Kramer, Joel H; Barkhof, Frederik; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Jagust, William J; Miller, Bruce L; Scheltens, Philip; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can present with distinct clinical variants. Identifying the earliest neurodegenerative changes associated with each variant has implications for early diagnosis, and for understanding the mechanisms that underlie regional vulnerability and disease progression in AD. We performed voxel-based morphometry to detect atrophy patterns in early clinical stages of four AD phenotypes: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, "visual variant," n=93), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, "language variant," n=74), and memory-predominant AD categorized as early age-of-onset (EOAD, 65 years, n=114). Patients with each syndrome were stratified based on: (1) degree of functional impairment, as measured by the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and (2) overall extent of brain atrophy, as measured by a neuroimaging approach that sums the number of brain voxels showing significantly lower gray matter volume than cognitively normal controls (n=80). Even at the earliest clinical stage (CDR=0.5 or bottom quartile of overall atrophy), patients with each syndrome showed both common and variant-specific atrophy. Common atrophy across variants was found in temporoparietal regions that comprise the posterior default mode network (DMN). Early syndrome-specific atrophy mirrored functional brain networks underlying functions that are uniquely affected in each variant: Language network in lvPPA, posterior cingulate cortex-hippocampal circuit in amnestic EOAD and LOAD, and visual networks in PCA. At more advanced stages, atrophy patterns largely converged across AD variants. These findings support a model in which neurodegeneration selectively targets both the DMN and syndrome-specific vulnerable networks at the earliest clinical stages of AD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Apical atrophy of retinal pigment epithelial detachments in central serous chorioretinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Anders; Hamann, Steffen; Larsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    compatible with CSC. RESULTS: A juxtafoveal retinal pigment epithelial detachment with apical atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium with corresponding severe attenuation of the pigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium was observed in both patients. One of the patients presented with a serous...... neurosensory retinal detachment with smokestack leakage 7 years after first being seen. The other patient was never seen with a neurosensory detachment. CONCLUSION: Isolated pigment epithelial detachment with apical retinal pigment epithelial atrophy may represent a precursor stage of CSC....

  9. Klinefelter′s syndrome associated with progressive muscular atrophy simulating Kennedy′s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Enrique Jiménez Caballero

    2012-01-01

    Kennedy′s disease, an X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is characterized by loss of lower motor neurons. Mild sensory deficits, gynecomastia and infertility may be observed. Klinefelter′s syndrome is a variation of sex chromosome disorder characterized by hypogonadism, gynecomastia and azoospermia, and the most frequent karyotype is XXY. A 55-year-old man who presented with slowly progressive and diffuse neurogenic muscle atrophy without bulbar or sensory symptoms. He also had Klin...

  10. Patterns of gray matter atrophy in dementia with Lewy bodies: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Rosie; O'Brien, John T; Barber, Robert; Blamire, Andrew M

    2012-04-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a common form of dementia characterized by visual hallucinations, cognitive fluctuation and parkinsonism. We aimed to compare the patterns of gray matter atrophy in DLB with those in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and normal aging, and to investigate the relationship between atrophy and cognitive measures. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate gray matter (GM) loss in DLB (n = 35; mean age = 78.4; MMSE = 20.3), AD (n = 36; mean age = 78.3; MMSE = 19.5) and similar aged controls (n = 35; mean age = 76.7; MMSE = 29.1). T1 weighted MRI scans were acquired at 3 Tesla from all subjects and analyzed using VBM-DARTEL in SPM8. Cognitive function was assessed using the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG). We found reduced gray matter in temporal, parietal, occipital, and subcortical structures in DLB when compared to normal controls. The degree of atrophy was less than that observed in AD. There was significantly more medial temporal lobe atrophy in the AD group when compared with DLB. We did not find a correlation between total CAMCOG score and atrophy, but the CAMCOG memory subscale score correlated with temporal lobe atrophy in both the DLB and combined DLB/AD group. DLB is associated with less gray matter atrophy and relative preservation of the medial temporal lobe when compared to AD. Degree of medial temporal atrophy may be a useful imaging biomarker and our results provide support for its inclusion in the revised consensus criteria for DLB.

  11. Bilateral spontaneous dislocation of posterior chamber intraocular lens in a patient with gyrate atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kinori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with gyrate atrophy, a rare metabolic disease, who had bilateral late spontaneous posterior dislocation of in-the-bag posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL. He underwent pars plana vitrectomy, PCIOL retrieval and anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in both eyes. This report may imply that patients with gyrate atrophy are at risk for spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lenses.

  12. SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY FROM NORTHERN IRAN: A CLINICAL AND GENETIC SPECTRUM OF TEN PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    M.R. Salehi Omran; A. Ghabeli Juibary

    2008-01-01

    AbstractObjectiveAutosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is, after cystic fibrosis, the second most common fatal monogenic disorder and the second most common hereditary neuromuscular disease after duchenne dystrophy. The disease is characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells leading to progressiveparalysis with muscular atrophy. Depending on the clinical type (Werdnig- Hoffmann = type I, intermediate form = type II, Kugelberg-Welander = type III), some workers also have de...

  13. CT measurement of age-related brain atrophy by two-dimensional measurement with a digitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitani, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Katsube, Tomoko; Okada, Kazunori; Murata, Akihiro; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro

    1984-01-01

    Various methods of the CT measurement of brain atrophy have been reported. The cranio-ventricular indices (CVI) are most popular, but these indices cannot be used for cortical atrophy. Recently, the computerized three-dimensional CT measurement of the cerebral volume has seemed a reasonable method, but a special computer system is required. The two-dimensional CT measurement of the ventricular system with a tracing method on the computer display or with planimetry has been reported, but it seems far from useful as a routine clinical CT-measurement method. We have here proposed a new method for the two-dimensional CT measurement of brain atrophy using a digitizer connected with a personal computer (Fig. 2). This system is simple, accurate, and economical. We calculated the ventricular area index (VAI) and the brain-atrophy index (BAI) as is shown in Fig. 3. Using this method, we studied age-related brain atrophy in 100 normal subjects (14-90 years) and compared the results with conventional cranio-ventricle indices. Results: 1) There were significant correlations between age and all the indices (CVI, VAI and BAI), but of these indices BAI showed the best correlation (the simple correlation coefficient was -0.67; the partial correlation coefficient was 0.38). 2) A significant acceleration of the brain atrophy from the age of 60 was observed by BAI and VAI. 3) It is suggested that the brain atrophy measured by BAI and VAI might begin earlier in men than in women. 4) A multiregression analysis of these indices to age showed the better contributional rate of the multiple correlation in VAI and BAI (52%) than that of CVI (32.6%). Conclusion: The two-dimensional CT measurement method using a digitizer is practically useful, and VAI and BAI may be more sensitive indices for brain atrophy than the conventional CVI. (author)

  14. A survey of the therapeutic effects of Vitamin E suppositories on vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Aazam Parnan Emamverdikhan; Nahid Golmakani; Sayyed ASajadi Tabassi; Malihe Hassanzadeh; Nooriyeh Sharifi; Mohammad Taghi Shakeri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Menopause is associated with various complications such as depression, sleep disorders, and genitourinary atrophy. Vaginal atrophy occurs due to the loss of steroid hormones, and its major symptoms include vaginal dryness, itching, dyspareunia, and bleeding after intercourse. According to the literature, vitamin E plays a key role in estrogen stability. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of vitamin E suppositories and conjugated estrogen vaginal cream on vaginal atro...

  15. Heterogeneous atrophy occurs within individual lower limb muscles during 60 days of bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miokovic, Tanja; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Felsenberg, Dieter; Belavý, Daniel L

    2012-11-01

    To better understand disuse muscle atrophy, via magnetic resonance imaging, we sequentially measured muscle cross-sectional area along the entire length of all individual muscles from the hip to ankle in nine male subjects participating in 60-day head-down tilt bed rest (2nd Berlin BedRest Study; BBR2-2). We hypothesized that individual muscles would not atrophy uniformly along their length such that different regions of an individual muscle would atrophy to different extents. This hypothesis was confirmed for the adductor magnus, vasti, lateral hamstrings, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, medial gastrocnemius, lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis posterior, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, peroneals, and tibialis anterior muscles (P ≤ 0.004). In contrast, the hypothesis was not confirmed in the soleus, adductor brevis, gracilis, pectineus, and extensor digitorum longus muscles (P ≥ 0.20). The extent of atrophy only weakly correlated (r = -0.30, P muscles (P muscles recovered to their baseline size between 14 and 90 days after bed rest, but flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and lateral gastrocnemius required longer than 90 days before recovery occurred. On the basis of findings of differential atrophy between muscles and evidence in the literature, we interpret our findings of intramuscular atrophy to reflect differential disuse of functionally different muscle regions. The current work represents the first lower-limb wide survey of intramuscular differences in disuse atrophy. We conclude that intramuscular differential atrophy occurs in most, but not all, of the muscles of the lower limb during prolonged bed rest.

  16. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Chinese Patients with Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Wang; Chen, Sheng; Qiao, Kai; Wang, Ning; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked recessive motor neuron disease characterized by slowly progressive weakness and atrophy of proximal limbs and bulbar muscles. To assess the genotype-phenotype correlation in Chinese patients, we identified 155 patients with SBMA and retrospectively examined available data from laboratory tests and neurophysiological analyses. Correlations between genotype and phenotype were analyzed. There was an inverse correlation between the length o...

  17. Influence of passive stretching on inhibition of disuse atrophy and hemodynamics of rat soleus muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Shigefumi; Inaoka, Pleiades Tiharu; Yamazaki, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the infl uence of passive stretching on inhibition of disuse atrophy and hemodynamics among longitudinal regions of the rat soleus muscle. Disuse muscle atrophy was induced by hindlimb suspension for two weeks. Muscle blood flow was evaluated using thallium-201 (201Tl) which is a radiotracer that has been reported to be useful to assess blood perfusion in skeletal muscle. Thirty-nine male Wistar rats were divided randomly into 5 groups: control (C: n...

  18. Vaginal atrophy in breast cancer survivors: role of vaginal estrogen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Luciano; Gadducci, Angiolo; Vizza, Enrico; Tomao, Silverio; Vici, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Early menopause and related vaginal atrophy is a well known side-effect of hormone adjuvant treatment in breast cancer patients, particularly during aromatase-inhibitors therapy. Due to estrogens contra-indication, proper therapy for such symptom remains often an inadequately addressed clinical problem. After an accurate assessment of the risk/benefit ratio, vaginal low-dose estrogen treatment (better with estriol) [corrected] may have a role in controlling vaginal atrophy in selected and informed breast cancer women.

  19. Brain Atrophy and Hypomyelination Associated with Iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome in an Infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Sumeyra; S Dogan, Mehmet; Tutunculer, Filiz; Yapiciugurlar, Ozge; Genchellac, Hakan

    2018-01-01

    Prolonged use of topical corticosteroids, particularly in infants, albeit rare, may lead to Cushing syndrome. Central nervous system abnormalities including brain atrophy and delayed myelination on cranial magnetic resonance imaging has been reported in patients with corticosteroid treatment. We herein report a 5-month-old female infant referred to Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Edirne, Turkey with brain atrophy and myelination delay that might be due to iatrogenic Cushing syndrome caused by topical corticosteroid use.

  20. Corticobasal degeneration with olivopontocerebellar atrophy and TDP-43 pathology: an unusual clinicopathologic variant of CBD

    OpenAIRE

    Kouri, Naomi; Oshima, Kenichi; Takahashi, Makio; Murray, Melissa E.; Ahmed, Zeshan; Parisi, Joseph E.; Yen, Shu-Hui C.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2013-01-01

    CBD is a disorder affecting cognition and movement due to a progressive neurodegeneration associated with distinctive neuropathologic features, including abnormal phosphorylated tau protein in neurons and glia in cortex, basal ganglia, diencephalon and brainstem, as well as ballooned neurons and astrocytic plaques. We identified three cases of CBD with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (CBD-OPCA) that did not have α-synuclein-positive glial cytoplasmic inclusions of multiple system atrophy (MSA). ...

  1. Multidimensional Analysis on the Effect of Vocal Function Exercises on Aged Vocal Fold Atrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Mami; Hirano, Shigeru; Tateya, Ichiro; Kishimoto, Yo; Hiwatashi, Nao; Fujiu-Kurachi, Masako; Ito, Juichi

    2015-01-01

    Age-related voice change is characterized as weak, harsh, and breathy. These changes are caused by histologic alteration of the lamina propria of the vocal fold mucosa as well as atrophy of the thyroarytenoid muscle. Several therapeutic strategies involving laryngeal framework surgery and injection laryngoplasty have been tried, but effects have been limited. Vocal function exercises (VFE) have been used to treat age-related vocal fold atrophy although the effectiveness has been shown with li...

  2. Putaminal lesion in multiple system atrophy: postmortem MR-pathological correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsusue, Eiji; Fujii, Shinya; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Sugihara, Shuji; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan); Miyata, Hajime; Ohama, Eisaku [Tottori University, Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan)

    2008-07-15

    Posterior putaminal atrophy, putaminal T2-hyper and/or hyposignal changes have been observed in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) with parkinsonism. Postmortem T2-weighted images were compared with histological findings in seven autopsy-proven cases of putaminal lesions of MSA. All cases were evaluated on 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners and three cases were evaluated on 3T scanners. There were three types of putaminal changes: Type 1, mild putaminal atrophy and isointensity; Type 2, putaminal atrophy and diffuse hyperintensity with a hyperintense putaminal rim (HPR); Type 3, putaminal atrophy and iso-or-hypointensity with HPR. The signal intensities of the putamen in Types 1 and 3 were more hypointense on 3T images than on 1.5T images. In Type 1, mild putaminal atrophy showed mild neuronal loss and gliosis and diffuse ferritin deposition. In Types 2 and 3, the areas of putaminal atrophy, severe in the posterior region, showed severe neuronal loss and gliosis, many pigments that were positive for ferritin and Fe {sup 3+} and diffuse ferritin deposition. Although, tissue rarefaction was more severe in Type 2 than in Type 3, pigment deposition was more severe in Type 3. The HPR showed a severe loss of myelin and axons with tissue rarefaction of the external capsule or putaminal rim in Types 2 and 3. Posterior putaminal atrophy reflects neuronal loss and gliosis. While putaminal iso-or -hypointensity reflects diffuse ferritin and Fe{sup 3+} deposition, hyperintensity reflects tissue rarefaction. The HPR reflects degeneration of the putaminal lateral margin and/or external capsule. These findings reflect characteristic histological findings of MSA with parkinsonism. (orig.)

  3. Putaminal lesion in multiple system atrophy: postmortem MR-pathological correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusue, Eiji; Fujii, Shinya; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Sugihara, Shuji; Miyata, Hajime; Ohama, Eisaku; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2008-07-01

    Posterior putaminal atrophy, putaminal T2-hyper and/or hyposignal changes have been observed in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) with parkinsonism. Postmortem T2-weighted images were compared with histological findings in seven autopsy-proven cases of putaminal lesions of MSA. All cases were evaluated on 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners and three cases were evaluated on 3T scanners. There were three types of putaminal changes: Type 1, mild putaminal atrophy and isointensity; Type 2, putaminal atrophy and diffuse hyperintensity with a hyperintense putaminal rim (HPR); Type 3, putaminal atrophy and iso-or-hypointensity with HPR. The signal intensities of the putamen in Types 1 and 3 were more hypointense on 3T images than on 1.5T images. In Type 1, mild putaminal atrophy showed mild neuronal loss and gliosis and diffuse ferritin deposition. In Types 2 and 3, the areas of putaminal atrophy, severe in the posterior region, showed severe neuronal loss and gliosis, many pigments that were positive for ferritin and Fe (3+) and diffuse ferritin deposition. Although, tissue rarefaction was more severe in Type 2 than in Type 3, pigment deposition was more severe in Type 3. The HPR showed a severe loss of myelin and axons with tissue rarefaction of the external capsule or putaminal rim in Types 2 and 3. Posterior putaminal atrophy reflects neuronal loss and gliosis. While putaminal iso-or -hypointensity reflects diffuse ferritin and Fe(3+) deposition, hyperintensity reflects tissue rarefaction. The HPR reflects degeneration of the putaminal lateral margin and/or external capsule. These findings reflect characteristic histological findings of MSA with parkinsonism.

  4. Functional Connectivity of Ventral and Dorsal Visual Streams in Posterior Cortical Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Raffaella; Gallea, Cécile; Kas, Aurélie; Perlbarg, Vincent; Samri, Dalila; Trotta, Laura; Michon, Agnès; Lacomblez, Lucette; Dubois, Bruno; Lehericy, Stéphane; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) induces progressive dysfunction of ventral and dorsal visual networks. Little is known, however, about corresponding changes in functional connectivity (FC). To investigate FC changes in the visual networks, their relationship with cortical atrophy, and the association with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Ten PCA patients and 28 age-matched controls participated in the study. Using resting state fMRI, we measured FC in ventral and dorsal cortical visual networks, defined on the basis of a priori knowledge of long-range white matter connections. To assess the relationships with AD, we determined AD biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid and FC in the default mode network (DMN), which is vulnerable to AD pathology. Voxel-based morphometry analysis assessed the pattern of grey matter (GM) atrophy. PCA patients showed GM atrophy in bilateral occipital and inferior parietal regions. PCA patients had lower FC levels in a ventral network than controls, but higher FC in inferior components of the dorsal network. In particular, the increased connectivity correlated with greater GM atrophy in occipital regions. All PCA patients had positive cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for AD; however, FC in global DMN did not differ from controls. FC in PCA reflects brain structure in a non-univocal way. Hyperconnectivity of dorsal networks may indicate aberrant communication in response to posterior brain atrophy or processes of neural resilience during the initial stage of brain dysfunction. The lack of difference from controls in global DMN FC highlights the atypical nature of PCA with respect to typical AD.

  5. A visual MRI atrophy rating scale for the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal dementia continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambikairajah, Ananthan; Devenney, Emma; Flanagan, Emma; Yew, Belinda; Mioshi, Eneida; Kiernan, Matthew C; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to distinguish ALS, ALS-FTD and bvFTD via a novel visual MRI cortical atrophy scale that can be employed in a clinical setting. MRI images of 100 participants (33 ALS, 11 ALS-FTD, 22 bvFTD and 34 controls) were rated in four brain areas: orbitofrontal cortex, anterior temporal pole, anterior cingulate, and motor cortex. Areas were rated on a 5- point Likert scale by two raters blinded to the diagnosis. Results demonstrated that bvFTD patients showed the highest levels of atrophy across all regions, while ALS patients had the lowest atrophy scores. ALS-FTD patients have higher atrophy ratings compared to ALS patients for the motor cortex, anterior cingulate and anterior temporal lobe, with a statistical trend for the orbitofrontal cortex. ALS-FTD patients were not significantly different from bvFTD for any of the brain regions. These findings were confirmed in a post hoc VBM analysis of the same participants. Our study demonstrates that a simple visual MRI rating scale can reliably distinguish ALS, ALS-FTD and bvFTD atrophy patterns in a clinical setting. Motor cortex, anterior cingulate and anterior temporal atrophy emerged as good diagnostic markers for ALS-FTD. Employment of this MRI rating scale can complement clinical diagnostics of patients in the ALS-FTD continuum.

  6. Spinal cord anteroposterior atrophy in HAM/TSP: Magnetic resonance imaging and neuropathological analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Akitoshi; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Atsushi; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Asada, Yujiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2017-10-15

    To evaluate the spinal cord atrophy that occurs in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), we conducted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathological analyses. In the MRI study, 15 patients with HAM/TSP and 20 age-matched normal control subjects were enrolled. Anteroposterior and transverse distances and cross-sectional areas were measured and calculated at the C2, C4, C6, T2, and T6 vertebral levels. In the pathological study, spinal cord autopsy specimens were compared between a HAM/TSP case and an adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma case. In both the MRI and pathological studies, HAM/TSP spinal cords demonstrated more severe atrophy in the anteroposterior direction than those of controls. The spinal cord atrophy and pathological changes in HAM/TSP occurred predominantly in the white matter, especially in the lateral columns. This is the first report indicating spinal cord atrophy in the anteroposterior direction using MRI. In pathological analysis, atrophy and pathological changes were prominent in areas of the spinal cord with slow blood flow. Hemodynamic and anatomical factors are speculated to be among the main mechanisms of atrophy in the anteroposterior direction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy in senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Shoutai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Kitani, Mituhiro; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the reduction of cerebal blood flow and brain atrophy in SDAT, these were measured in 13 cases of senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and compared to 15 cases of multi-infarct Dementia, 39 cases of lacunar infarction without dementia (non-demented CVD group) and 69 cases of aged normal control. Brain atrophy was evaluated by two-dimensional method on CT film by digitizer and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by 133 Xe inhalation method. The degree of brain atrophy in SDAT was almost similar of that of MID. But it was more severe than that of non-demented group. MID showed the lowest rCBF among these groups. SDAT showed significantly lower rCBF than that of aged control, but rCBF in SDAT was equal to that of lacunar stroke without dementia. Focal reduction of cerebral blood flow in bilateral fronto-parietal and left occipital regions were observed in SDAT. Verbal intelligence score (Hasegawa's score) correlated with rCBF and brain atrophy index in MID, and a tendency of correlation between rCBF and brain atrophy in MID was also observed. However, there was no correlation among those indices in SDAT. These findings suggest that the loss of brain substance dose not correspond to the reduction of rCBF in SDAT and simultaneous measurement of rCBF and brain atrophy was useful to differ SDAT from MID. (author)

  8. Systems-based discovery of tomatidine as a natural small molecule inhibitor of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyle, Michael C; Ebert, Scott M; Cook, Daniel P; Kunkel, Steven D; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2014-05-23

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Brain atrophy and trunk stability during dual-task walking among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Takehiko; Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Daisuke; Ito, Kengo; Kato, Takashi; Ando, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Takao

    2012-06-01

    Dual-task walking is believed to be more cognitively demanding than normal walking and alters trunk movement among older adults. However, the possible association between brain atrophy and spatiotemporal gait parameters, particularly during dual-task walking, is poorly understood. In this study, we examined the relationship between dual-task walking and brain atrophy. One hundred ten elderly adults (aged 65-94 years, women n = 55) underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning and gait experiments under normal and dual-task walking conditions. Linear accelerations of the trunk were measured in vertical, anteroposterior, and mediolateral directions using a triaxial accelerometer attached to the lower trunk. Gait speed, stride length, and cadence were recorded. The harmonic ratio, a measure of trunk stability, was computed separately in each direction to evaluate the smoothness of trunk movement during walking. Brain atrophy was quantitatively assessed using magnetic resonance image data. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and harmonic ratio in all directions were lower in dual-task walking than in normal walking (p brain atrophy adjusted for subject characteristics only in the vertical direction (p trunk stability during dual-task walking is associated with brain atrophy. Additional studies are necessary to elucidate the effects of regional brain atrophy on the control of walking.

  10. Atrophy of muscles surrounding the shoulder in hemiplegia. Analysis with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Fumio; Kobayashi, Tsunesaburo; Matsumoto, Shinichi

    1996-01-01

    Decrease of range of motion and subluxation of shoulders are common secondary dysfunctions after the stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the atrophy of muscles surrounding shoulders in hemiplegic patients and to delineate the correlations between those atrophies and shoulder functions. MRI studies were done on bilateral shoulders in 13 hemiplegic patients with shoulder pain. The cross sectional areas of muscles surrounding shoulder, i.e., subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and deltoid muscle were measured on those images obtained. The degree of atrophies were evaluated by dividing cross-sectional area of the muscle on affected shoulder by that of non-affected shoulder, that is muscle atrophy ratio [MAR], for each muscle in every case. Also, the range of movements [ROM], the degree of subluxation and muscle strength of shoulder flexion were evaluated. All muscle cross-sectional areas on the affected side were significantly smaller than those of muscles on the unaffected side (p<0.01). The means of MARs were 0.68, 0.69, 0.86, 0.72 and 0.69 for subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and deltoid muscle. The pattern of muscle atrophies, however, varies from case to case. Both correlations of ROM versus supraspinatus MAR and degree of shoulder subluxation versus deltoid MAR were statistically significant (p<0.05). These results indicate the contribution of muscle atrophy to the shoulder dysfunction in hemiplegic patients. (author)

  11. Atrophy of muscles surrounding the shoulder in hemiplegia. Analysis with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Fumio; Kobayashi, Tsunesaburo; Matsumoto, Shinichi [Fukushima Rosai Hospital, Iwaki (Japan)

    1996-01-01

    Decrease of range of motion and subluxation of shoulders are common secondary dysfunctions after the stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the atrophy of muscles surrounding shoulders in hemiplegic patients and to delineate the correlations between those atrophies and shoulder functions. MRI studies were done on bilateral shoulders in 13 hemiplegic patients with shoulder pain. The cross sectional areas of muscles surrounding shoulder, i.e., subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and deltoid muscle were measured on those images obtained. The degree of atrophies were evaluated by dividing cross-sectional area of the muscle on affected shoulder by that of non-affected shoulder, that is muscle atrophy ratio [MAR], for each muscle in every case. Also, the range of movements [ROM], the degree of subluxation and muscle strength of shoulder flexion were evaluated. All muscle cross-sectional areas on the affected side were significantly smaller than those of muscles on the unaffected side (p<0.01). The means of MARs were 0.68, 0.69, 0.86, 0.72 and 0.69 for subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and deltoid muscle. The pattern of muscle atrophies, however, varies from case to case. Both correlations of ROM versus supraspinatus MAR and degree of shoulder subluxation versus deltoid MAR were statistically significant (p<0.05). These results indicate the contribution of muscle atrophy to the shoulder dysfunction in hemiplegic patients. (author).

  12. Evolution of Cerebral Atrophy in a Patient with Super Refractory Status Epilepticus Treated with Barbiturate Coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Newey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Status epilepticus is associated with neuronal breakdown. Radiological sequelae of status epilepticus include diffusion weighted abnormalities and T2/FLAIR cortical hyperintensities corresponding to the epileptogenic cortex. However, progressive generalized cerebral atrophy from status epilepticus is underrecognized and may be related to neuronal death. We present here a case of diffuse cerebral atrophy that developed during the course of super refractory status epilepticus management despite prolonged barbiturate coma. Methods. Case report and review of the literature. Case. A 19-year-old male with a prior history of epilepsy presented with focal clonic seizures. His seizures were refractory to multiple anticonvulsants and eventually required pentobarbital coma for 62 days and midazolam coma for 33 days. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed development of cerebral atrophy at 31 days after admission to our facility and progression of the atrophy at 136 days after admission. Conclusion. This case highlights the development and progression of generalized cerebral atrophy in super refractory status epilepticus. The cerebral atrophy was noticeable at 31 days after admission at our facility which emphasizes the urgency of definitive treatment in patients who present with super refractory status epilepticus. Further research into direct effects of therapeutic coma is warranted.

  13. Choking Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  14. Association between anti-endomysial antibody and total intestinal villous atrophy in children with coeliac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgenc F

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing evidence to suggest that detection of anti-gliadin antibody (AGA and anti-endomysial antibody (EmA can serve as sensitive markers of the degree of histological abnormalities in patients with coeliac disease. AIM: To evaluate the association between the presence of AGA and EmA and villous atrophy in intestinal biopsies of children with suspected coeliac disease. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Intestinal samples of 46 children with failure to thrive, chronic diarrhoea, malabsorption and short stature with either AGA and/or EmA positivity were evaluated, retrospectively. The diagnosis of coeliac disease was based on ESPGHAN criteria. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Patients with total villous atrophy who fulfilled the ESPGHAN criteria for the diagnosis of coeliac disease were diagnosed to have coeliac disease. Nine patients without villous atrophy were taken as negative controls for this study. AGA-IgA was measured both by immunoflourescence (IF and ELISA and EmA-IgA by IF while patients were on normal diet. Relationship between autoantibody positivity and intestinal total villous atrophy was evaluated. RESULTS: Overall positivity for AGA IgA was 85% (39/46 by IF+ELISA and EmA positivity was 85% (39/46 by IF within the study group. Histological examination revealed total villous atrophy with lymphocyte infiltration and crypt hyperplasia in 37 (80% patients. AGA IgA was positive in 14 (38% and 31 (84% of these children by ELISA and IF, respectively. EmA positivity was detected in 35/37 (95% cases with atrophy and 4/9 (44% without atrophy (p=0.002. Thirty out of 37 (81% patients with villous atrophy had both AGA IgA (IF and EmA positivity (p=0.186. All of the sixteen patients that had both positive AGA IgA (ELISA+IF and EmA had total villous atrophy (p=0.037. CONCLUSION: A significant association between total villous atrophy and EmA positivity has been documented in this study.

  15. αA crystallin may protect against geographic atrophy-meta-analysis of cataract vs. cataract surgery for geographic atrophy and experimental studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cataract and geographic atrophy (GA, also called advanced "dry" age-related macular degeneration are the two major causes of visual impairment in the developed world. The association between cataract surgery and the development of GA was controversial in previous studies. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a meta-analysis by pooling the current evidence in literature and found that cataract is associated with an increased risk of geographic atrophy with a summary odds ratio (OR of 3.75 (95% CI: 95% CI: 1.84-7.62. However, cataract surgery is not associated with the risk of geographic atrophy (polled OR=3.23, 95% CI: 0.63-16.47. Further experiments were performed to analyze how the αA-crystallin, the major component of the lens, influences the development of GA in a mouse model. We found that theαA-crystallin mRNA and protein expression increased after oxidative stress induced by NaIO(3 in immunohistochemistry of retinal section and western blot of posterior eyecups. Both functional and histopathological evidence confirmed that GA is more severe in αA-crystallin knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, αA-crystallin may protect against geographic atrophy. This study provides a better understanding of the relationship between cataract, cataract surgery, and GA.

  16. Clinical and biochemical polymorphism of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Sokolova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to conduct clinical laboratory studies of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA for the clarification of the pathogenetic features and role of neurotrophic factors in the formation of polymorphism of this diseasePatients and methods. Thirty-five patients aged 9 months to 53 years (mean age, 14.5 years with different inherited forms of SMA were examined. Clinical, genealogical, and laboratory tests were carried out. A control group consisted of 40 healthy individuals aged 7–45 years (mean age, 16.5 years. The levels of neurotrophins, such as brain-derived growth factor (BDGF, nerve growth factor (NGF, and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF in serum samples were determined by enzyme immunoassay.Results. Changes in the expression of the neurotrophic factors were found in patients with SMA. The enzyme immunoassay data suggest that the serum concentrations of BDGF, NGF, and CNTF in patients with SMA were significantly higher than those in healthy controls. The group of SMA patients aged under 18 years showed a statistically significant (p<0.001 increase in NGF concentrations (3680±936 ng/ml versus the control group of the same age (625±444 pg/ml.Conclusion. In our opinion, the clinical polymorphism of SMA can be explained by the polymorphism of various pathogenic factors: genetic, morphofunctional, and biochemical ones. Overexpression of neurotrophins was first noticed to play a role in the development of more severe clinical types of SMA (proximal SMA, which may be related to both the ontogenetic features of children's age and disease duration. The study results can be further used to choose pathogenetic personalized therapy for SMA.

  17. Acoustic Characteristics of Stridor in Multiple System Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Young; Joo, Eun Yeon; Nam, Hyunwoo

    2016-01-01

    Nocturnal stridor is a breathing disorder prevalent in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA). An improved understanding of this breathing disorder is essential since nocturnal stridor carries a poor prognosis (an increased risk of sudden death). In this study, we aimed to classify types of stridor by sound analysis and to reveal their clinical significance. Patients who met the criteria for probable MSA and had undergone polysomnography (PSG) were recruited. Patients were then assessed clinically with sleep questionnaires, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Nocturnal stridor and snoring were analyzed with the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program. Nocturnal stridor was recorded in 22 patients and snoring in 18 patients using the PSG. Waveforms of stridors were classified into rhythmic or semirhythmic after analysis of the oscillogram. Formants and harmonics were observed in both types of stridor, but not in snoring. Of the 22 patients diagnosed with stridor during the present study, fifteen have subsequently died, with the time to death after the PSG study being 1.9 ± 1.4 years (range 0.8 to 5.0 years). The rhythmic waveform group presented higher scores on the Hoehn and Yahr scale and the survival outcome of this group was lower compared to the semirhythmic waveform group (p = 0.030, p = 0.014). In the Kaplan Meier’s survival curve, the outcome of patients with rhythmic waveform was significantly less favorable than the outcome of patients with semirhythmic waveform (log-rank test, p < 0.001). Stridor in MSA can be classified into rhythmic and semirhythmic types and the rhythmic component signifies a poorer outcome. PMID:27093692

  18. Acoustic Characteristics of Stridor in Multiple System Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Lim Koo

    Full Text Available Nocturnal stridor is a breathing disorder prevalent in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA. An improved understanding of this breathing disorder is essential since nocturnal stridor carries a poor prognosis (an increased risk of sudden death. In this study, we aimed to classify types of stridor by sound analysis and to reveal their clinical significance. Patients who met the criteria for probable MSA and had undergone polysomnography (PSG were recruited. Patients were then assessed clinically with sleep questionnaires, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Nocturnal stridor and snoring were analyzed with the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program. Nocturnal stridor was recorded in 22 patients and snoring in 18 patients using the PSG. Waveforms of stridors were classified into rhythmic or semirhythmic after analysis of the oscillogram. Formants and harmonics were observed in both types of stridor, but not in snoring. Of the 22 patients diagnosed with stridor during the present study, fifteen have subsequently died, with the time to death after the PSG study being 1.9 ± 1.4 years (range 0.8 to 5.0 years. The rhythmic waveform group presented higher scores on the Hoehn and Yahr scale and the survival outcome of this group was lower compared to the semirhythmic waveform group (p = 0.030, p = 0.014. In the Kaplan Meier's survival curve, the outcome of patients with rhythmic waveform was significantly less favorable than the outcome of patients with semirhythmic waveform (log-rank test, p < 0.001. Stridor in MSA can be classified into rhythmic and semirhythmic types and the rhythmic component signifies a poorer outcome.

  19. Alveolar ridge atrophy related to facial morphology in edentulous patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuć J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Joanna Kuć,1 Teresa Sierpińska,2 Maria Gołębiewska1 1Department of Prosthodontics, 2Department of Dental Technology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland Objectives: The morphology of the alveolar process determines the retention and stability of prosthetic restorations, thereby determining the result of the therapy. Considering that the edentulous jaws may be affected by the atrophy process, it was hypothesized that the morphology of the alveolar process of the maxilla may be dependent on the anterior facial height and anatomy of the mandible. Subjects and methods: Twenty-five healthy edentulous Caucasian individuals were randomly chosen. Each subject underwent a lateral cephalogram before and after prosthetic rehabilitation. During exposition, newly made prostheses were placed in the patient’s mouth. Teeth remained in maximal intercuspidation. Morphological parameters were evaluated according to the Ricketts, McNamara, and Tallgren’s method. Results: An inversely proportional association was observed between patient age and the distal part of the maxilla. A statistically significant connection was noted between the vertical dimension of alveolar ridge and anterior total and lower facial height conditioned by prosthetic rehabilitation. Conclusion: The height of the lateral part of the alveolar ridge of the maxilla remains in connection with the anterior total and lower facial height obtained in the course of prosthetic rehabilitation. The vertical dimension of the alveolar ridge of the maxilla seems to be in close relationship with the morphology of the lower jaw. Keywords: anterior facial height, cephalometric analysis, complete dentures, vertical occlusal dimension

  20. Natural history of infantile-onset spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Stephen J; Coffey, Christopher S; Yankey, Jon W; Krosschell, Kristin; Arnold, W David; Rutkove, Seward B; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Reyna, Sandra P; Sakonju, Ai; Darras, Basil T; Shell, Richard; Kuntz, Nancy; Castro, Diana; Parsons, Julie; Connolly, Anne M; Chiriboga, Claudia A; McDonald, Craig; Burnette, W Bryan; Werner, Klaus; Thangarajh, Mathula; Shieh, Perry B; Finanger, Erika; Cudkowicz, Merit E; McGovern, Michelle M; McNeil, D Elizabeth; Finkel, Richard; Iannaccone, Susan T; Kaye, Edward; Kingsley, Allison; Renusch, Samantha R; McGovern, Vicki L; Wang, Xueqian; Zaworski, Phillip G; Prior, Thomas W; Burghes, Arthur H M; Bartlett, Amy; Kissel, John T

    2017-12-01

    Infantile-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality, typically resulting in death preceding age 2. Clinical trials in this population require an understanding of disease progression and identification of meaningful biomarkers to hasten therapeutic development and predict outcomes. A longitudinal, multicenter, prospective natural history study enrolled 26 SMA infants and 27 control infants aged <6 months. Recruitment occurred at 14 centers over 21 months within the NINDS-sponsored NeuroNEXT (National Network for Excellence in Neuroscience Clinical Trials) Network. Infant motor function scales (Test of Infant Motor Performance Screening Items [TIMPSI], The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Infant Test for Neuromuscular Disorders, and Alberta Infant Motor Score) and putative physiological and molecular biomarkers were assessed preceding age 6 months and at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months with progression, correlations between motor function and biomarkers, and hazard ratios analyzed. Motor function scores (MFS) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) decreased rapidly in SMA infants, whereas MFS in all healthy infants rapidly increased. Correlations were identified between TIMPSI and CMAP in SMA infants. TIMPSI at first study visit was associated with risk of combined endpoint of death or permanent invasive ventilation in SMA infants. Post-hoc analysis of survival to combined endpoint in SMA infants with 2 copies of SMN2 indicated a median age of 8 months at death (95% confidence interval, 6, 17). These data of SMA and control outcome measures delineates meaningful change in clinical trials in infantile-onset SMA. The power and utility of NeuroNEXT to provide "real-world," prospective natural history data sets to accelerate public and private drug development programs for rare disease is demonstrated. Ann Neurol 2017;82:883-891. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  1. Cortical atrophy rates in Alzheimer's patients and subjects with mild cognitive impairment from the AddNeuroMed data collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Westman, Eric; Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida

    2010-01-01

    Background: The AddNeuroMed project is a multi-centre European project which aims to identify biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study we measured the rate of cortical atrophy in AD patients, subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy controls (HC) using MRI. Methods...... higher atrophy rates in the left and right occipital lobes compared to HC at three months follow-up (p accelerated atrophy...... rates can be found in AD patients compared to HC and MCI. Even three months after baseline accelerated atrophy can be observed in AD compared to HC, however, the results indicate that three months is too short a period to distinguish the atrophy rates in AD and MCI. The results suggest that atrophy...

  2. ROCK inhibition as a therapy for spinal muscular atrophy: understanding the repercussions on multiple cellular targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coque, Emmanuelle; Raoul, Cédric; Bowerman, Mélissa

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetic disease causing infant death, due to an extended loss of motoneurons. This neuromuscular disorder results from deletions and/or mutations within the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to a pathological decreased expression of functional full-length SMN protein. Emerging studies suggest that the small GTPase RhoA and its major downstream effector Rho kinase (ROCK), which both play an instrumental role in cytoskeleton organization, contribute to the pathology of motoneuron diseases. Indeed, an enhanced activation of RhoA and ROCK has been reported in the spinal cord of an SMA mouse model. Moreover, the treatment of SMA mice with ROCK inhibitors leads to an increased lifespan as well as improved skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junction pathology, without preventing motoneuron degeneration. Although motoneurons are the primary target in SMA, an increasing number of reports show that other cell types inside and outside the central nervous system contribute to SMA pathogenesis. As administration of ROCK inhibitors to SMA mice was systemic, the improvement in survival and phenotype could therefore be attributed to specific effects on motoneurons and/or on other non-neuronal cell types. In the present review, we will present the various roles of the RhoA/ROCK pathway in several SMA cellular targets including neurons, myoblasts, glial cells, cardiomyocytes and pancreatic cells as well as discuss how ROCK inhibition may ameliorate their health and function. It is most likely a concerted influence of ROCK modulation on all these cell types that ultimately lead to the observed benefits of pharmacological ROCK inhibition in SMA mice. PMID:25221469

  3. α-Synuclein-induced myelination deficit defines a novel interventional target for multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettle, Benjamin; Kerman, Bilal E; Valera, Elvira; Gillmann, Clarissa; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Reiprich, Simone; Büttner, Christian; Ekici, Arif B; Reis, André; Wegner, Michael; Bäuerle, Tobias; Riemenschneider, Markus J; Masliah, Eliezer; Gage, Fred H; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare atypical parkinsonian disorder characterized by a rapidly progressing clinical course and at present without any efficient therapy. Neuropathologically, myelin loss and neurodegeneration are associated with α-synuclein accumulation in oligodendrocytes, but underlying pathomechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the impact of oligodendrocytic α-synuclein on the formation of myelin sheaths to define a potential interventional target for MSA. Post-mortem analyses of MSA patients and controls were performed to quantify myelin and oligodendrocyte numbers. As pre-clinical models, we used transgenic MSA mice, a myelinating stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte-neuron co-culture, and primary oligodendrocytes to determine functional consequences of oligodendrocytic α-synuclein overexpression on myelination. We detected myelin loss accompanied by preserved or even increased numbers of oligodendrocytes in post-mortem MSA brains or transgenic mouse forebrains, respectively, indicating an oligodendrocytic dysfunction in myelin formation. Corroborating this observation, overexpression of α-synuclein in primary and stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes severely impaired myelin formation, defining a novel α-synuclein-linked pathomechanism in MSA. We used the pro-myelinating activity of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist benztropine to analyze the reversibility of the myelination deficit. Transcriptome profiling of primary pre-myelinating oligodendrocytes demonstrated that benztropine readjusts myelination-related processes such as cholesterol and membrane biogenesis, being compromised by oligodendrocytic α-synuclein. Additionally, benztropine restored the α-synuclein-induced myelination deficit of stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes. Strikingly, benztropine also ameliorated the myelin deficit in transgenic MSA mice, resulting in a prevention of neuronal cell loss. In conclusion, this study defines the

  4. Palladium and platinum nanoparticles attenuate aging-like skin atrophy via antioxidant activity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Shibuya

    Full Text Available Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1 loss causes a redox imbalance as it leads to excess superoxide generation, which results in the appearance of various aging-related phenotypes, including skin atrophy. Noble metal nanoparticles, such as palladium (Pd and platinum (Pt nanoparticles, are considered to function as antioxidants due to their strong catalytic activity. In Japan, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles called PAPLAL has been used to treat chronic diseases over the past 60 years. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of PAPLAL against aging-related skin pathologies in mice. Transdermal PAPLAL treatment reversed skin thinning associated with increased lipid peroxidation in Sod1-/- mice. Furthermore, PAPLAL normalized the gene expression levels of Col1a1, Mmp2, Has2, Tnf-α, Il-6, and p53 in the skin of the Sod1-/- mice. Pt nanoparticles exhibited marked SOD and catalase activity, while Pd nanoparticles only displayed weak SOD and catalase activity in vitro. Although the SOD and catalase activity of the Pt nanoparticles significantly declined after they had been oxidized in air, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation. Importantly, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles with a molar ratio of 3 or 4 to 1 continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation, indicating that Pd nanoparticles prevent the oxidative deterioration of Pt nanoparticles. These findings indicate that PAPLAL stably suppresses intrinsic superoxide generation both in vivo and in vitro via SOD and catalase activity. PAPLAL is a potentially powerful tool for the treatment of aging-related skin diseases caused by oxidative damage.

  5. ROCK inhibition as a therapy for spinal muscular atrophy: understanding the repercussions on multiple cellular targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle eCoque

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is the most common genetic disease causing infant death, due to an extended loss of motoneurons. This neuromuscular disorder results from deletions and/or mutations within the surviving motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, leading to a pathological decreased expression of functional full-length SMN protein. Emerging studies suggest that the small GTPase RhoA and its major downstream effector Rho kinase (ROCK, which both play an instrumental role in cytoskeleton organization, contribute to the pathology of motoneuron diseases. Indeed, an enhanced activation of RhoA and ROCK has been reported in the spinal cord of an SMA mouse model. Moreover, the treatment of SMA mice with ROCK inhibitors leads to an increased lifespan as well as improved skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junction pathology, without preventing motoneuron degeneration. Although motoneurons are the primary target in SMA, an increasing number of reports show that other cell types inside and outside the central nervous system contribute to SMA pathogenesis. As administration of ROCK inhibitors to SMA mice was systemic, the improvement in survival and phenotype could therefore be attributed to specific effects on motoneurons and/or on other non-neuronal cell types. In the present review, we will present the various roles of the RhoA/ROCK pathway in several SMA cellular targets including neurons, myocytes, glial cells, cardiomyocytes and pancreatic cells as well as discuss how ROCK inhibition may ameliorate their health and function. It is most likely a concerted influence of ROCK modulation on all these cell types that ultimately lead to the observed benefits of pharmacological ROCK inhibition in SMA mice.

  6. Petri net-based prediction of therapeutic targets that recover abnormally phosphorylated proteins in muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinmyung; Kwon, Mijin; Bae, Sunghwa; Yim, Soorin; Lee, Doheon

    2018-03-05

    Muscle atrophy, an involuntary loss of muscle mass, is involved in various diseases and sometimes leads to mortality. However, therapeutics for muscle atrophy thus far have had limited effects. Here, we present a new approach for therapeutic target prediction using Petri net simulation of the status of phosphorylation, with a reasonable assumption that the recovery of abnormally phosphorylated proteins can be a treatment for muscle atrophy. The Petri net model was employed to simulate phosphorylation status in three states, i.e. reference, atrophic and each gene-inhibited state based on the myocyte-specific phosphorylation network. Here, we newly devised a phosphorylation specific Petri net that involves two types of transitions (phosphorylation or de-phosphorylation) and two types of places (activation with or without phosphorylation). Before predicting therapeutic targets, the simulation results in reference and atrophic states were validated by Western blotting experiments detecting five marker proteins, i.e. RELA, SMAD2, SMAD3, FOXO1 and FOXO3. Finally, we determined 37 potential therapeutic targets whose inhibition recovers the phosphorylation status from an atrophic state as indicated by the five validated marker proteins. In the evaluation, we confirmed that the 37 potential targets were enriched for muscle atrophy-related terms such as actin and muscle contraction processes, and they were also significantly overlapping with the genes associated with muscle atrophy reported in the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (p-value net. We generated a list of the potential therapeutic targets whose inhibition recovers abnormally phosphorylated proteins in an atrophic state. They were evaluated by various approaches, such as Western blotting, GO terms, literature, known muscle atrophy-related genes and shortest path analysis. We expect the new proposed strategy to provide an understanding of phosphorylation status in muscle atrophy and to provide assistance towards

  7. DIR-visible grey matter lesions and atrophy in multiple sclerosis: partners in crime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pavert, Steven H P; Muhlert, Nils; Sethi, Varun; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Ron, Maria; Yousry, Tarek A; Thompson, Alan J; Miller, David H; Chard, Declan T; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Background The extent and clinical relevance of grey matter (GM) pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) are increasingly recognised. GM pathology may present as focal lesions, which can be visualised using double inversion recovery (DIR) MRI, or as diffuse pathology, which can manifest as atrophy. It is, however, unclear whether the diffuse atrophy centres on focal lesions. This study aimed to determine if GM lesions and GM atrophy colocalise, and to assess their independent relationship with motor and cognitive deficits in MS. Methods Eighty people with MS and 30 healthy controls underwent brain volumetric T1-weighted and DIR MRI at 3 T, and had a comprehensive neurological and cognitive assessment. Probability mapping of GM lesions marked on the DIR scans and voxel- based morphometry (assessing GM atrophy) were carried out. The associations of GM lesion load and GM volume with clinical scores were tested. Results DIR-visible GM lesions were most commonly found in the right cerebellum and most apparent in patients with primary progressive MS. Deep GM structures appeared largely free from lesions, but showed considerable atrophy, particularly in the thalamus, caudate, pallidum and putamen, and this was most apparent in secondary progressive patients with MS. Very little co-localisation of GM atrophy and lesions was seen, and this was generally confined to the cerebellum and postcentral gyrus. In both regions, GM lesions and volume independently correlated with physical disability and cognitive performance. Conclusions DIR-detectable GM lesions and GM atrophy do not significantly overlap in the brain but, when they do, they independently contribute to clinical disability. PMID:25926483

  8. Long-term therapy with sorafenib is associated with pancreatic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Zhao, Jing; Spolverato, Gaya; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Li, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Min-Shan; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2015-12-01

    Although the short-term adverse effects of sorafenib are well known, few data exist on long-term toxicity. The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of pancreatic atrophy among a cohort of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who were treated with sorafenib for ≥2 y. Between March 2007 and December 2013, 31 patients with HCC who were treated with sorafenib for ≥2 y were identified. The effect of pancreatic atrophy and enhancement on incidence of adverse events, tumor response, and overall survival (OS) were assessed. Thirty-one patients with HCC were treated with sorafenib for ≥2 y and met inclusion criteria; 11 patients (35.5%) were Barcelona-clinic liver cancer stage B, whereas 20 patients (64.5%) were Barcelona-clinic liver cancer stage C. Median duration of treatment with sorafenib was 35.2 mo. Pancreatic atrophy and a decrease in pancreatic enhancement occurred in 24 patients (77.4%) and 15 patients (48.4%), respectively. On the basis of the modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors, four patients (12.9%) had a complete response, 10 patients (32.3%) had a partial response, and 17 patients (54.8%) had stable disease. Patients treated with sorafenib with pancreatic atrophy had a median OS of 49.4 mo (95% confidence interval, 41.2-57.5 mo) compared with 31.2 mo (95% confidence interval, 25.7-36.7 mo) among patients who did not develop pancreatic atrophy (P = 0.009). In contrast, survival was not associated with decreased versus normal enhancement of the pancreas (OS, 47.7 mo versus 41.7 mo, respectively; P = 0.739). Pancreatic atrophy occurred in many HCC patients after 2 y of treatment with sorafenib. Patients who experienced pancreatic atrophy had a better tumor response and OS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Distinct white matter injury associated with medial temporal lobe atrophy in Alzheimer's versus semantic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejanin, Alexandre; Desgranges, Béatrice; La Joie, Renaud; Landeau, Brigitte; Perrotin, Audrey; Mézenge, Florence; Belliard, Serge; de La Sayette, Vincent; Eustache, Francis; Chételat, Gaël

    2017-04-01

    This study aims at further understanding the distinct vulnerability of brain networks in Alzheimer's disease (AD) versus semantic dementia (SD) investigating the white matter injury associated with medial temporal lobe (MTL) atrophy in both conditions. Twenty-six AD patients, twenty-one SD patients, and thirty-nine controls underwent a high-resolution T1-MRI scan allowing to obtain maps of grey matter volume and white matter density. A statistical conjunction approach was used to identify MTL regions showing grey matter atrophy in both patient groups. The relationship between this common grey matter atrophy and white matter density maps was then assessed within each patient group. Patterns of grey matter atrophy were distinct in AD and SD but included a common region in the MTL, encompassing the hippocampus and amygdala. This common atrophy was associated with alterations in different white matter areas in AD versus SD, mainly including the cingulum and corpus callosum in AD, while restricted to the temporal lobe - essentially the uncinate and inferior longitudinal fasciculi - in SD. Complementary analyses revealed that these relationships remained significant when controlling for global atrophy or disease severity. Overall, this study provides the first evidence that atrophy of the same MTL region is related to damage in distinct white matter fibers in AD and SD. These different patterns emphasize the vulnerability of distinct brain networks related to the MTL in these two disorders, which might underlie the discrepancy in their symptoms. These results further suggest differences between AD and SD in the neuropathological processes occurring in the MTL. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1791-1800, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Deep gray matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis: a tensor based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Guozhi; Datta, Sushmita; He, Renjie; Nelson, Flavia; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2009-07-15

    Tensor based morphometry (TBM) was applied to determine the atrophy of deep gray matter (DGM) structures in 88 relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. For group analysis of atrophy, an unbiased atlas was constructed from 20 normal brains. The MS brain images were co-registered with the unbiased atlas using a symmetric inverse consistent nonlinear registration. These studies demonstrate significant atrophy of thalamus, caudate nucleus, and putamen even at a modest clinical disability, as assessed by the expanded disability status score (EDSS). A significant correlation between atrophy and EDSS was observed for different DGM structures: (thalamus: r=-0.51, p=3.85 x 10(-7); caudate nucleus: r=-0.43, p=2.35 x 10(-5); putamen: r=-0.36, p=6.12 x 10(-6)). Atrophy of these structures also correlated with 1) T2 hyperintense lesion volumes (thalamus: r=-0.56, p=9.96 x 10(-9); caudate nucleus: r=-0.31, p=3.10 x 10(-3); putamen: r=-0.50, p=6.06 x 10(-7)), 2) T1 hypointense lesion volumes (thalamus: r=-0.61, p=2.29 x 10(-10); caudate nucleus: r=-0.35, p=9.51 x 10(-4); putamen: r=-0.43, p=3.51 x 10(-5)), and 3) normalized CSF volume (thalamus: r=-0.66, p=3.55 x 10(-12); caudate nucleus: r=-0.52, p=2.31 x 10(-7), and putamen: r=-0.66, r=2.13 x 10(-12)). More severe atrophy was observed mainly in thalamus at higher EDSS. These studies appear to suggest a link between the white matter damage and DGM atrophy in MS.

  11. Ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and MAFbx in human skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Palma, Luigi; Marinelli, Mario; Pavan, Matteo; Orazi, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Several pathological conditions can induce skeletal muscle atrophy and seem to share common enzyme pathways. In catabolic states where proteolysis is increased, two genes specific to muscle atrophy, MuRf1 and MAFbx, are upregulated. These encode ubiquitin ligases, which bind to and mediate ubiquitination of myofibrillar proteins for subsequent degradation during muscle atrophy. Fifteen patients undergoing leg amputation were divided into two groups. Group A included 12 elderly patients (mean age 79years) amputated for vascular disease (complicated by diabetes in four), chronic osteomyelitis or squamous cell carcinoma. Group B included three car accident victims (mean age 32years) amputated due to acute arterial insufficiency. Gastrocnemius muscle biopsies were collected for a histochemical and immunohistochemical (anti-MuRf1, anti-MAFbx) study. Group A specimens showed a decreased cross-sectional fiber area and length, adipose tissue replacement, and MuRf1 and MAFbx immunoreactivity. Muscle cells showed MuRf1 and MAFbx subsarcolemmal immunoreactivity and weak extracellular matrix immunoreactivity. Group B samples exhibited mild muscle structural changes; they did not stain with anti-MuRf1 or anti-MAFbx, and neither did sections showing muscle degeneration and adipose tissue replacement. Results of our preliminary study showed upregulation of MuRf1 and MAFbx in atrophied muscle and support their role as regulatory peptides in various conditions that lead to muscle atrophy. Data suggest that the study of cellular pathways can help identify promising targets for effective new treatments for skeletal muscle atrophy. The treatment of several orthopedic conditions is complicated by muscle atrophy; potential treatments could be directed to specific sites where these proteins are localized.

  12. Studies of cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow in patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Shin

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of 25 patients with Parkinson's disease were studied. The rCBF was measured with the intra-arterial Xe-133 injection method. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Sixty four % of Parkinson's disease patients showed ventricular dilation, and 76% of Parkinson's disease patients showed cortical atrophy on the CT scan, but we had to allow for the effects of the natural aging process on these results. 2) No correlation was recognized either between cerebral atrophy and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between cerebral atrophy and the duration of Parkinson's disease. 3) In Parkinson's disease patients, the mean rCBF was lower than that of normal control subjects. The difference was even more remarkable in older patients. Only 40% of Parkinson's disease patients showed hyperfrontal pattern. 4) There was no correlation either between the mean rCBF and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between the mean rCBF and the duration of Parkinson's disease. There was no significant difference between the mean rCBF of Parkinson's disease patients receiving levodopa and that of untreated patients. 5) The mean rCBF decreased in patients with cerebral atrophy on the CT scan. 6) Parkinson's disease patients with intellectual impairment showed cerebral atrophy and a remarkable decrease of the mean rCBF. 7) The effect of aging on cerebral atrophy on the CT scan had to be allowed for, but judging from the decrease of the mean rCBF, the cerebral cortex is evidently involved in Parkinson's disease. 8) The rCBF decline in Parkinson's disease patients may be related with the diminished cortical metabolic rate due to a remote effect of striatal dysfunction and a disturbance of mesocortical dopaminergic pathways. (J.P.N.)

  13. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoto, Masafumi, E-mail: mkanoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki, E-mail: thosoya@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Toyoguchi, Yuuki, E-mail: c-elegans_0201g@mail.goo.ne.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Oda, Atsuko, E-mail: a.oda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis.

  14. Constitutive expression of Yes-associated protein (Yap in adult skeletal muscle fibres induces muscle atrophy and myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N Judson

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the Hippo pathway member Yes-associated protein (Yap, gene name Yap1 in skeletal muscle fibres in vivo. Specifically we bred an inducible, skeletal muscle fibre-specific knock-in mouse model (MCK-tTA-hYAP1 S127A to test whether the over expression of constitutively active Yap (hYAP1 S127A is sufficient to drive muscle hypertrophy or stimulate changes in fibre type composition. Unexpectedly, after 5-7 weeks of constitutive hYAP1 S127A over expression, mice suddenly and rapidly lost 20-25% body weight and suffered from gait impairments and kyphosis. Skeletal muscles atrophied by 34-40% and the muscle fibre cross sectional area decreased by ≈40% when compared to control mice. Histological analysis revealed evidence of skeletal muscle degeneration and regeneration, necrotic fibres and a NADH-TR staining resembling centronuclear myopathy. In agreement with the histology, mRNA expression of markers of regenerative myogenesis (embryonic myosin heavy chain, Myf5, myogenin, Pax7 and muscle protein degradation (atrogin-1, MuRF1 were significantly elevated in muscles from transgenic mice versus control. No significant changes in fibre type composition were detected using ATPase staining. The phenotype was largely reversible, as a cessation of hYAP1 S127A expression rescued body and muscle weight, restored muscle morphology and prevented further pathological progression. To conclude, high Yap activity in muscle fibres does not induce fibre hypertrophy nor fibre type changes but instead results in a reversible atrophy and deterioration.

  15. Astrocyte-produced miR-146a as a mediator of motor neuron loss in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison, Samantha L; Patitucci, Teresa N; Seminary, Emily R; Villalon, Eric; Lorson, Christian L; Ebert, Allison D

    2017-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading genetic cause of infant mortality, is caused by the loss of the survival motor neuron-1 (SMN1) gene, which leads to motor neuron loss, muscle atrophy, respiratory distress, and death. Motor neurons exhibit the most profound loss, but the mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis are not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests that motor neuron extrinsic influences, such as those arising from astrocytes, contribute to motor neuron malfunction and loss. Here we investigated both loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function astrocyte mechanisms that could play a role in SMA pathology. We had previously found that glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is reduced in SMA astrocytes. However, reduced GDNF expression does not play a major role in SMA pathology as viral-mediated GDNF re-expression did not improve astrocyte function or motor neuron loss. In contrast, we found that SMA astrocytes increased microRNA (miR) production and secretion compared to control astrocytes, suggesting potential toxic gain-of-function properties. Specifically, we found that miR-146a was significantly upregulated in SMA induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived astrocytes and SMNΔ7 mouse spinal cord. Moreover, increased miR-146a was sufficient to induce motor neuron loss in vitro, whereas miR-146a inhibition prevented SMA astrocyte-induced motor neuron loss. Together, these data indicate that altered astrocyte production of miR-146a may be a contributing factor in astrocyte-mediated SMA pathology. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Food strategies of renal atrophy based on Avicenna and conventional medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Mahjour

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Kidneys have an important role in the body. Any damage to kidney role can damage many organs of the body. Traditional Persian Medicine (TPM or Iranian traditional medicine (ITM is an ancient temperamental medicine with many literatures about kidney diseases and Avicenna (980–1025 AD describes kidney diseases in details. This is a review study by searching of the most important clinical and pharmaceutical TPM textbooks such as The Canon of Medicine by Avicenna and scientific data banks using keywords such as “Hozal-e-Kolye”, renal atrophy, tubular atrophy, kidney, chronic kidney disease, and end stage renal disease. This paper found that “Hozal-e-Kolye” in TPM texts is the same tubular atrophy in conventional medicine due to some similar symptoms between them. Lifestyle modification and use of proposed foodstuffs can be considered as a complementary medicine in addition to conventional treatments to manage these patients. TPM scholars prescribed some foodstuffs such as camel milk, sheep's milk and Ficus carica for this disease as a complementary management. This study aimed to explain HK (the same tubular atrophy considering their similar symptoms and introduce some foodstuffs. It seems using of foodstuffs affecting tubular atrophy based on TPM literatures can has a role as a supplemental method in company with conventional medicine management.

  17. Atrophying pityriasis versicolor as an idiosyncratic T cell-mediated response to Malassezia: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jonathan Michael Stephen; Magro, Cynthia

    2017-04-01

    Atrophying pityriasis versicolor (PV), first described in 1971, is a rare variant in which lesions appear atrophic. We sought to determine the pathophysiology of atrophying PV. A retrospective chart review identified 6 cases of atrophying PV. In all cases, routine light microscopy, an elastic tissue stain, and immunohistochemical assessment for the expression of CD3, CD4, CD8, GATA3 and CXCR3 was performed. All cases demonstrated hyperkeratosis with intracorneal infiltration by pathogenic hyphal forms as well as epidermal attenuation and papillary dermal elastolysis. A supervening, mild-to-moderate, superficial lymphocytic infiltrate was noted and characterized by a focal CD8 + T cell-mediated interface dermatitis along with a mixed T-cell infiltrate composed of GATA3 + and CXCR3 + T cells. Small sample size and the loss of some patients to follow-up. Atrophying PV represents the sequelae of a mixed helper T-cell (T H 1 and T H 2) idiosyncratic immune response to Malassezia and can present as a protracted dermatosis that may clinically mimic an atypical lymphocytic infiltrate. T H 1 cytokines can recruit histiocytes, a source of elastases, and upregulate matrix metalloproteinase activity, which may contribute to epidermal atrophy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Longitudinal assessment of global and regional atrophy rates in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B.; Watson, Rosie; Firbank, Michael; Blamire, Andrew M.; O'Brien, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objective Percent whole brain volume change (PBVC) measured from serial MRI scans is widely accepted as a sensitive marker of disease progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the utility of PBVC in the differential diagnosis of dementia remains to be established. We compared PBVC in AD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and investigated associations with clinical measures. Methods 72 participants (14 DLBs, 25 ADs, and 33 healthy controls (HCs)) underwent clinical assessment and 3 Tesla T1-weighted MRI at baseline and repeated at 12 months. We used FSL-SIENA to estimate PBVC for each subject. Voxelwise analyses and ANCOVA compared PBVC between DLB and AD, while correlational tests examined associations of PBVC with clinical measures. Results AD had significantly greater atrophy over 1 year (1.8%) compared to DLB (1.0%; p = 0.01) and HC (0.9%; p atrophy rates (r = 0.49, p atrophy compared to DLB, which had similar rates of atrophy to HC. Among dementia subjects, younger age was associated with accelerated atrophy, reflecting more aggressive disease in younger people. PBVC could aid in differentiating between DLB and AD, however its utility as an outcome marker in DLB is limited. PMID:25685712

  19. Pattern of Brain Atrophy Rates in Autopsy-Confirmed Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelska, Zuzana; Ferman, Tanis J.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Lesnick, Timothy L.; Murray, Melissa E.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Vemuri, Prashanti; Smith, Glenn E.; Geda, Yonas E.; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Kantarci, Kejal

    2014-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is characterized by preserved whole brain and medial temporal lobe volumes compared to Alzheimer’s disease dementia (AD) on MRI. However, frequently coexistent AD-type pathology may influence the pattern of regional brain atrophy rates in DLB patients. We investigated the pattern and magnitude of the atrophy rates from two serial MRIs in autopsy-confirmed DLB (n=20) and mixed DLB/AD patients (n=22), compared to AD (n=30) and elderly non-demented controls (n=15), followed antemortem. DLB patients without significant AD-type pathology were characterized by lower global and regional rates of atrophy, similar to controls. The mixed DLB/AD patients displayed greater rates in the whole brain, temporo-parietal cortices, hippocampus and amygdala, and ventricle expansion, similar to AD patients. In the DLB and DLB/AD patients, the atrophy rates correlated with Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage, cognitive decline and progression of motor symptoms. Global and regional atrophy rates are associated with AD-type pathology in DLB, and can be used as biomarkers of AD progression in patients with LB pathology. PMID:25128280

  20. Grey matter atrophy in prodromal stage of dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frederic; Colloby, Sean J; Cretin, Benjamin; de Sousa, Paulo Loureiro; Demuynck, Catherine; O'Brien, John T; Martin-Hunyadi, Catherine; McKeith, Ian; Philippi, Nathalie; Taylor, John-Paul

    2016-07-20

    Little is known about the patterns of brain atrophy in prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies (pro-DLB). In this study, we used SPM8 with diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated lie algebra to measure grey matter (GM) volume and investigate patterns of GM atrophy in pro-DLB (n = 28) and prodromal Alzheimer's disease (pro-AD) (n = 27) and compared and contrasted them with those in elderly control subjects (n = 33) (P ≤ 0.05 corrected for family-wise error). Patients with pro-DLB showed diminished GM volumes of bilateral insulae and right anterior cingulate cortex compared with control subjects. Comparison of GM volume between patients with pro-AD and control subjects showed a more extensive pattern, with volume reductions in temporal (hippocampi and superior and middle gyri), parietal and frontal structures in the former. Direct comparison of prodromal groups suggested that more atrophy was evident in the parietal lobes of patients with pro-AD than patients with pro-DLB. In patients with pro-DLB, we found that visual hallucinations were associated with relative atrophy of the left cuneus. Atrophy in pro-DLB involves the insulae and anterior cingulate cortex, regions rich in von Economo neurons, which we speculate may contribute to the early clinical phenotype of pro-DLB.

  1. Patterns of brain atrophy associated with episodic memory and semantic fluency decline in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Amandine; Bernard, Charlotte; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Helmer, Catherine; Le Goff, Melanie; Chanraud, Sandra; Dartigues, Jean-François; Allard, Michèle; Amieva, Hélène; Catheline, Gwénaëlle

    2017-03-09

    The cerebral substratum of age-related cognitive decline was evaluated in an elderly-cohort followed for 12 years (n=306). Participants, free of dementia, received neuropsychological assessments every two years and an MRI exam at baseline and four years later. Cognitive decline was evaluated on two broadly used tests to detect dementia: the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT), a verbal episodic memory task, and the Isaacs Set Test (IST), a semantic fluency task. Using voxel-based approach, the relationship between cognitive decline with 1/ baseline grey matter volumes and 2/ grey matter volume loss between the two scans was explored. Baseline volumes analysis revealed that FCSRT and IST declines were both associated with lower volumes of the medial temporal region. Volumes loss analysis confirmed that both declines are related to medial temporal lobe atrophy and revealed that FCSRT decline was specifically associated with atrophy of the posterior cingulate cortex whereas IST decline was specifically related to temporal pole atrophy. These results suggest that cognitive decline across aging is firstly related to structural modifications of the medial temporal lobe, followed by an atrophy in the posterior midline structures for episodic memory and an atrophy of the temporal pole for semantic fluency.

  2. Neurosyphilis with dementia and bilateral hippocampal atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrabian, S.; Raycheva, M.; Traykova, M.; Stankova, T.; Penev, L.; Georgieva-Kozarova, G.; Grigorova, O.; Traykov, L.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Background: This article reports a rare case of active neurosyphilis in a 33-years-old man with mild to moderate dementia and marked hippocampal atrophy, mimicking early onset Alzheimer's disease. Few number of cases described bilateral hippocampal atrophy mimicking Alzheimer's disease in neurosyphilis. Case presentation: The clinical feature is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and behavioral changes for the last 18 months. Neuropsychological examination revealed mild to moderate dementia (MMSE=16) with impaired memory, attention and executive dysfunction. Pyramidal, extrapyramidal signs, dysarthria and impairment in coordination were documented. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy with marked bilateral hippocampal atrophy. The diagnosis of active neurosyphilis was based on positive results of Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test - Treponema Pallidum. Hemagglutination reactions in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and elevated protein levels. High dose intravenous penicillin therapy was administered. During the follow up examination at 6 month, the clinical signs, and neuropsychological examinations, and cerebrospinal fluid samples showed improvement. Conclusion: This case underlines the importance of early diagnosis of neurosyphilis. The results suggest that neurosyphilis should be considered when magnetic resonance imaging results indicate mesiotemporal abnormalities and hippocampal atrophy. Neurosyphilis is a treatable condition and needs early aggressive antibiotic therapy

  3. The myonuclear domain is not maintained in skeletal muscle during either atrophy or programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lawrence M; Brown, Christine; McLaughlin, Kevin; Smith, Wendy; Bigelow, Carol

    2016-10-01

    Skeletal muscle mass can increase during hypertrophy or decline dramatically in response to normal or pathological signals that trigger atrophy. Many reports have documented that the number of nuclei within these cells is also plastic. It has been proposed that a yet-to-be-defined regulatory mechanism functions to maintain a relatively stable relationship between the cytoplasmic volume and nuclear number within the cell, a phenomenon known as the "myonuclear domain" hypothesis. While it is accepted that hypertrophy is typically associated with the addition of new nuclei to the muscle fiber from stem cells such as satellite cells, the loss of myonuclei during atrophy has been controversial. The intersegmental muscles from the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta are composed of giant syncytial cells that undergo sequential developmental programs of atrophy and programmed cell death at the end of metamorphosis. Since the intersegmental muscles lack satellite cells or regenerative capacity, the tissue is not "contaminated" by these nonmuscle nuclei. Consequently, we monitored muscle mass, cross-sectional area, nuclear number, and cellular DNA content during atrophy and the early phases of cell death. Despite a ∼75-80% decline in muscle mass and cross-sectional area during the period under investigation, there were no reductions in nuclear number or DNA content, and the myonuclear domain was reduced by ∼85%. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is not an intrinsic property of skeletal muscle and that nuclei persist through atrophy and programmed cell death. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Muscle proteolytic system modulation through the effect of taurine on mice bearing muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Rania M; Abdo, Walied S; Saad, Ahmed; Khedr, Eman G

    2017-12-02

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs in different catabolic conditions and mostly accompanied with upregulation of Muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) gene which is one of the master regulatory genes in muscle atrophy. Taurine amino acid is widely distributed in different tissues and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. This study aimed to investigate the potential influence of taurine on muscle atrophy induced by reduced mechanical loading. Twenty-eight Albino mice were used, and divided equally into four groups: group I (control); group II (immobilization); group III (immobilization + taurine); and group IV (taurine). Quadriceps muscle sections were taken for histopathology, immunohistochemical analysis of caspase 3 expression, and qRT-PCR of MuRF1 gene. Our data revealed Zenker necrosis associated with axonal injury of the nerve trunk of the immobilized muscle together with increase of caspase 3 expression and upregulation of MuRF1 gene. While, taurine supplementation alleviated the muscular and neural tissues damage associated with disuse skeletal muscle atrophy through downregulation of MuRF1 gene and decrease of tissue caspase 3 expression. In conclusion, taurine may be helpful to counteract apoptosis and up-regulated MuRF1 gene expression related to muscle atrophy, which might be hopeful for a large number of patients.

  5. Food strategies of renal atrophy based on Avicenna and conventional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjour, Marjan; Khoushabi, Arash; Miri Ghale Novi, Maryam; Feyzabadi, Zohre

    2017-10-01

    Kidneys have an important role in the body. Any damage to kidney role can damage many organs of the body. Traditional Persian Medicine (TPM) or Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) is an ancient temperamental medicine with many literatures about kidney diseases and Avicenna (980-1025 AD) describes kidney diseases in details. This is a review study by searching of the most important clinical and pharmaceutical TPM textbooks such as The Canon of Medicine by Avicenna and scientific data banks using keywords such as "Hozal-e-Kolye", renal atrophy, tubular atrophy, kidney, chronic kidney disease, and end stage renal disease. This paper found that "Hozal-e-Kolye" in TPM texts is the same tubular atrophy in conventional medicine due to some similar symptoms between them. Lifestyle modification and use of proposed foodstuffs can be considered as a complementary medicine in addition to conventional treatments to manage these patients. TPM scholars prescribed some foodstuffs such as camel milk, sheep's milk and Ficus carica for this disease as a complementary management. This study aimed to explain HK (the same tubular atrophy considering their similar symptoms) and introduce some foodstuffs. It seems using of foodstuffs affecting tubular atrophy based on TPM literatures can has a role as a supplemental method in company with conventional medicine management.

  6. Striatal and extrastriatal atrophy in Huntington's disease and its relationship with length of the CAG repeat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. Ruocco

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that affects the striatum most severely. However, except for juvenile forms, relative preservation of the cerebellum has been reported. The objective of the present study was to perform MRI measurements of caudate, putamen, cerebral, and cerebellar volumes and correlate these findings with the length of the CAG repeat and clinical parameters. We evaluated 50 consecutive patients with HD using MRI volumetric measurements and compared them to normal controls. Age at onset of the disease ranged from 4 to 73 years (mean: 43.1 years. The length of the CAG repeat ranged from 40 to 69 (mean: 47.2 CAG. HD patients presented marked atrophy of the caudate and putamen, as well as reduced cerebellar and cerebral volumes. There was a significant correlation between age at onset of HD and length of the CAG repeat, as well as clinical disability and age at onset. The degree of basal ganglia atrophy correlated with the length of the CAG repeat. There was no correlation between cerebellar or cerebral volume and length of the CAG repeat. However, there was a tendency to a positive correlation between duration of disease and cerebellar atrophy. While there was a negative correlation of length of the CAG repeat with age at disease onset and with striatal degeneration, its influence on extrastriatal atrophy, including the cerebellum, was not clear. Extrastriatal atrophy occurs later in HD and may be related to disease duration.

  7. Functional overload attenuates plantaris atrophy in tumor-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otis, Jeffrey S; Lees, Simon J; Williams, Jay H

    2007-01-01

    Late stage cancer malignancies may result in severe skeletal muscle wasting, fatigue and reduced quality of life. Resistance training may attenuate these derangements in cancer patients, but how this hypertrophic response relates to normal muscle adaptations in healthy subjects is unknown. Here, we determined the effect of resistance training on muscle mass and myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition in plantaris muscles from tumor-bearing (TB) rats. Age- and gender-matched Buffalo rats were used for all studies (n = 6/group). Suspensions of Morris Hepatoma MH7777 cells or normal saline were injected subcutaneously into the dorsum. Six weeks after cell implantation, muscles from TB rats were harvested, weighed and processed for ATP-independent proteasome activity assays. Once tumor-induced atrophy had been established, subgroups of TB rats underwent unilateral, functional overload (FO). Healthy, sham-operated rats served as controls. After six weeks, the extent of plantaris hypertrophy was calculated and MHC isoform compositions were determined by gel electrophoresis. Six weeks of tumor growth reduced body mass and the relative masses of gastrocnemius, plantaris, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm muscles (p ≤ 0.05). Percent reductions in body mass had a strong, negative correlation to final tumor size (r = -0.78). ATP-independent proteasome activity was increased in plantaris muscles from TB rats (p ≤ 0.05). In healthy rats, functional overload (FO) increased plantaris mass ~44% compared to the contralateral control muscle, and increased the relative percentage of MHC type I and decreased the relative percentage of MHC type IIb compared to the sham-operated controls (p ≤ 0.05). Importantly, plantaris mass was increased ~24% in TB-FO rats and adaptations to MHC isoform composition were consistent with normal, resistance-trained muscles. Despite significant skeletal muscle derangements due to cancer, muscle retains the capacity to

  8. Thymus Atrophy and Double-Positive Escape Are Common Features in Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Meis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thymus is a primary lymphoid organ in which bone marrow-derived T-cell precursors undergo differentiation, leading to migration of positively selected thymocytes to the T-cell-dependent areas of secondary lymphoid organs. This organ can undergo atrophy, caused by several endogenous and exogenous factors such as ageing, hormone fluctuations, and infectious agents. This paper will focus on emerging data on the thymic atrophy caused by infectious agents. We present data on the dynamics of thymus lymphocytes during acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection, showing that the resulting thymus atrophy comprises the abnormal release of thymic-derived T cells and may have an impact on host immune response.

  9. Plantar fat pad atrophy after corticosteroid injection for an interdigital neuroma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basadonna, P T; Rucco, V; Gasparini, D; Onorato, A

    1999-01-01

    A case of bilateral interdigital (Morton's) neuroma treated with steroid injection therapy developed plantar fat pad atrophy, shown on magnetic resonance imaging. Some pathologic changes at the site of injection (such as subcutaneous fat atrophy, depigmentation of the skin, and telangiectasias) are well known disadvantages of local steroid injection for the treatment of the Morton's neuroma. Scientific literature reports these problems (mainly as an aesthetic problem) in the dorsal aspect of the foot. In this work, the authors describe a case in which the steroid injection therapy has caused some changes in the plantar aspect of the feet, with serious functional problems. Fat pad atrophy is a serious problem in the foot and can cause a painful metatarsal syndrome with some important effects on the gait.

  10. Hippocampal atrophy and developmental regression as first sign of linear scleroderma "en coup de sabre".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, Helene E; Beele, Hilde; Joos, Rik; Vanneuville, Benedicte; Van Coster, Rudy N

    2008-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl with linear scleroderma "en coup de sabre" is reported who, at preschool age, presented with intractable simple partial seizures more than 1 year before skin lesions were first noticed. MRI revealed hippocampal atrophy, controlaterally to the seizures and ipsilaterally to the skin lesions. In the following months, a mental and motor regression was noticed. Cerebral CT scan showed multiple foci of calcifications in the affected hemisphere. In previously reported patients the skin lesions preceded the neurological signs. To the best of our knowledge, hippocampal atrophy was not earlier reported as presenting symptom of linear scleroderma. Linear scleroderma should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with unilateral hippocampal atrophy even when the typical skin lesions are not present.

  11. Atrophy-specific MRI brain template for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonov, Vladimir; Coupe, Pierrick; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed

    and MCI makes use of a single disease-specific template challenging. We propose a novel approach to generate a continuous four-dimensional template, where the 4th dimension is a surrogate measure of overall brain atrophy. Methods We used MRI scans obtained from the ADNI database (www...... of the brain and the contrast between different tissue types for the given level of atrophy. Figure 1 shows images through 6 example values of increasing RLVV. Conclusions The proposed method and resulting template will be useful tools for the development of robust automatic image processing methods targeted.......loni.ucla.edu/ADNI). Automated methods to estimate intracranial capacity (ICC) and lateral ventricles volume (LVV) [2] was applied to all available datasets at base line. The ratio between LVV and ICC (RLVV) was used as a surrogate measure of overall brain atrophy with mean(standard deviation) value of 2.46(0.87)%. Subsets from...

  12. White matter changes contribute to corpus callosum atrophy in the elderly: The LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, C.; Rostrup, E.; Sjöstrand, Karl

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The corpus callosum (CC) is the most important structure involved in the transmission of interhemispheric information. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential correlation between regional age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) and atrophy of CC in elderly...... by using a semiautomated technique and segmented into 6 brain regions.RESULTS: Significant correlation between the area of the rostrum and splenium regions of the CC and the ARWMC load in most brain regions was identified. This correlation persisted after correction for global atrophy.......CONCLUSION: Increasing loads of ARWMC volume were significantly correlated with atrophy of the CC and its subregions in nondisabled elderly subjects with leukoaraiosis. However, the pattern of correlation between CC subregions and ARWMC was not specifically related to the topographic location of ARWMC. The results...

  13. Clinical Report of Oriental Medicine Treatment with Bee Venom Therapy of Progressive muscle atrophy 1 Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Young-Ho

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The authors reports in order to study the effect of Bee Venom therapy of progressive muscle atrophy. The authors investigated 1 patient who is treated at Woosuk University Oriental Medical Hospital. The patient diagnosed by MRI EMG Hematology Muscle biopsy as progressive muscle atrophy is administered by Bee Venom therapy for 4 months. Bee Venom therapy is operated by 2 times per a week(every 3 days, 0.1cc per one operation, 0.05cc per one acupuncture point. The authors checked changes of this patient's chief symptoms by comparing before and after Bee Venom therapy is operated at 30 times. After Bee Venom therapy, the patient increased motor power & ROM, decreased general cooling sense & swallowing disorder. As above, the authors conclude that better results can be obtained Oriental Medical Treatment with Bee Venom therapy in progressive muscle atrophy

  14. Atrophy of the brachialis muscle after a displaced clavicle fracture in an Ironman triathlete: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knechtle Patrizia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clavicle fractures are frequent injuries in athletes and midshaft clavicle fractures in particular are well-known injuries in Ironman triathletes. In 2000, Auzou et al. described the mechanism leading to an isolated truncular paralysis of the musculocutaneous nerve after a shoulder trauma. It is well-known that nerve palsies can lead to an atrophy of the associated muscle if they persist for months or even longer. In this case report we describe a new case of an Ironman triathlete suffering from a persistent isolated atrophy of the brachialis muscle. The atrophy occurred following a displaced midshaft clavicle fracture acquiring while falling off his bike after hitting a duck during a competition.

  15. An unusual organ involvement in a case of Werner Syndrome: thyroid atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Altay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Werner Syndrome (WS is a premature aging disease that begins in adolescence or early adulthood and results in the appearance of old age by 30-40 years of age. Some endocrinological abnormalities were manifested in this rare disease, such as hypogonadism, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia. In this article, we present a nineteen years-old female patient who had been diagnosed as WS two years ago because of type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteopenia, hyperlipidemia, cataract, gray hair, and skin atrophy. Subclinical hypothyroidism was detected at her laboratory tests. Thyroid ultrasonography (USG showed thyroid atrophy. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of both lobes confirmed this diagnose and excluded some infiltrative diseases such as amyloidosis. It should be kept in mind that thyroid atrophy could be seen in WS and, therefore, detailed thyroid examination including thyroid USG and close follow up should be performed in all patients with WS. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(2.000: 144-146

  16. Optical coherence tomography of macular atrophy associated with microcephaly and presumed intrauterine Zika virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Gondim de Moura Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This case report describes the retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT findings in a microcephalic infant with macular atrophy presumably caused by intrauterine Zika virus infection. OCT demonstrated atrophy of the outer retinal layers and choriocapillaris, including the outer nuclear layer and ellipsoid zone, associated with retinal pigment epithelium hyper-reflectivity and increased OCT penetration into deeper layers of the choroid and sclera. A major concern associated with this infection is the apparent increased incidence of microcephaly in fetuses born to mothers infected with the Zika virus. It is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore the upsurge in congenital microcephaly observed in Brazil. Recently, ocular findings in infants with microcephaly associated with intrauterine Zika virus infection have been described. This is the first report of OCT imaging of macular atrophy in a child with presumed Zika virus infection-associated microcephaly.

  17. Role of calcium-dependent proteinase in molt-induced claw muscle atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The claw closer muscle of the Bermuda land crab Gecarcinus lateralis undergoes a sequential atrophy and restoration during each intermolt cycle. Muscle protein decreases 40% during proecdysis and is restored following ecdysis. Amino acid incorporation into protein of postecdysial muscle is five times greater than that in anecdysial muscle. Since the rates of protein synthesis in anecdysial and proecdysial muscle are the same it appears that proecdysial muscle atrophy is caused primarily by an increase in protein degradation. A calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) active at neutral pH has been implicated in the nonlysosomal hydrolysis of myofibrillar proteins. We have examined the role of a CDP in atrophy of the claw closer muscle. The many similarities between crustacean and vertebrate CDPs have established this crustacean system as a simple and convenient model for the role of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteolysis in myofibrillar protein turnover and its manifestation in the structure of the sarcomere. 16 references, 8 figures. (ACR)

  18. Prevalence and pattern of gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Andrew S. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Long, Suzanne S.; Zoga, Adam C.; Read, Paul J.; Deely, Diane M.; Parker, Laurence; Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI. A retrospective MRI study of 185 individuals was performed. The inclusion criterion was age ≥50. Exclusion criteria were hip surgery, fracture, infection, tumor, or inadequate image quality. Greater trochanteric bursitis was graded none, mild, moderate, or severe. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and iliopsoas tendinopathy was graded normal, tendinosis, low-grade partial tear, high-grade partial tear, or full thickness tear. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, tensor fascia lata, and iliopsoas muscle atrophy was scored using a standard scale. Insertion site of tendinopathy and location of muscle atrophy were assessed. Descriptive and statistical analysis was performed. There was increasing greater trochanteric bursitis and gluteus medius and minimus tendinopathy and atrophy with advancing age with moderate to strong positive associations (p < 0.0001) for age and tendinopathy, age and atrophy, bursitis and tendinopathy, and tendinopathy and atrophy for the gluteus medius and minimus. There is a weak positive association (p < 0.0001) for age and tensor fascia lata atrophy, and no statistically significant association between age and tendinopathy or between age and atrophy for the iliopsoas. Fisher's exact tests were statistically significant (p < 0.0001) for insertion site of tendon pathology and location of muscle atrophy for the gluteus medius. Gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy increase with advancing age with progression of tendinosis to low-grade tendon tears to high-grade tendon tears. There is an associated progression in atrophy of these muscles, which may be important in fall-related hip fractures. (orig.)

  19. Prevalence and pattern of gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Andrew S.; Long, Suzanne S.; Zoga, Adam C.; Read, Paul J.; Deely, Diane M.; Parker, Laurence; Morrison, William B.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI. A retrospective MRI study of 185 individuals was performed. The inclusion criterion was age ≥50. Exclusion criteria were hip surgery, fracture, infection, tumor, or inadequate image quality. Greater trochanteric bursitis was graded none, mild, moderate, or severe. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and iliopsoas tendinopathy was graded normal, tendinosis, low-grade partial tear, high-grade partial tear, or full thickness tear. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, tensor fascia lata, and iliopsoas muscle atrophy was scored using a standard scale. Insertion site of tendinopathy and location of muscle atrophy were assessed. Descriptive and statistical analysis was performed. There was increasing greater trochanteric bursitis and gluteus medius and minimus tendinopathy and atrophy with advancing age with moderate to strong positive associations (p < 0.0001) for age and tendinopathy, age and atrophy, bursitis and tendinopathy, and tendinopathy and atrophy for the gluteus medius and minimus. There is a weak positive association (p < 0.0001) for age and tensor fascia lata atrophy, and no statistically significant association between age and tendinopathy or between age and atrophy for the iliopsoas. Fisher's exact tests were statistically significant (p < 0.0001) for insertion site of tendon pathology and location of muscle atrophy for the gluteus medius. Gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy increase with advancing age with progression of tendinosis to low-grade tendon tears to high-grade tendon tears. There is an associated progression in atrophy of these muscles, which may be important in fall-related hip fractures. (orig.)

  20. Interleukin-17A Promotes Parietal Cell Atrophy by Inducing ApoptosisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A. Bockerstett

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Atrophic gastritis caused by chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa leads to the loss of gastric glandular cells, including acid-secreting parietal cells. Parietal cell atrophy in a setting of chronic inflammation induces spasmolytic polypeptide expressing metaplasia, a critical step in gastric carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms by which inflammation causes parietal cell atrophy and spasmolytic polypeptide expressing metaplasia are not well defined. We investigated the role of interleukin-17A (IL-17A in causing parietal cell atrophy. Methods: A mouse model of autoimmune atrophic gastritis was used to examine IL-17A production during early and late stages of disease. Organoids derived from corpus glands were used to determine the direct effects of IL-17A on gastric epithelial cells. Immunofluorescent staining was used to examine IL-17A receptors and the direct effect of signaling on parietal cells. Mice were infected with an IL-17A-producing adenovirus to determine the effects of IL-17A on parietal cells in vivo. Finally, IL-17A neutralizing antibodies were administered to mice with active atrophic gastritis to evaluate the effects on parietal cell atrophy and metaplasia. Results: Increased IL-17A correlated with disease severity in mice with chronic atrophic gastritis. IL-17A caused caspase-dependent gastric organoid degeneration, which could not be rescued with a necroptosis inhibitor. Parietal cells expressed IL-17A receptors and IL-17A treatment induced apoptosis in parietal cells. Overexpressing IL-17A in vivo induced caspase-3 activation and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling staining in parietal cells. Finally, IL-17A neutralizing antibody decreased parietal cell atrophy and metaplasia in mice with chronic atrophic gastritis. Conclusions: These data identify IL-17A as a cytokine that promotes parietal cell apoptosis during atrophic gastritis, a

  1. Aging affects the transcriptional regulation of human skeletal muscle disuse atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Suetta

    Full Text Available Important insights concerning the molecular basis of skeletal muscle disuse-atrophy and aging related muscle loss have been obtained in cell culture and animal models, but these regulatory signaling pathways have not previously been studied in aging human muscle. In the present study, muscle atrophy was induced by immobilization in healthy old and young individuals to study the time-course and transcriptional factors underlying human skeletal muscle atrophy. The results reveal that irrespectively of age, mRNA expression levels of MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1 increased in the very initial phase (2-4 days of human disuse-muscle atrophy along with a marked reduction in PGC-1α and PGC-1β (1-4 days and a ~10% decrease in myofiber size (4 days. Further, an age-specific decrease in Akt and S6 phosphorylation was observed in young muscle within the first days (1-4 days of immobilization. In contrast, Akt phosphorylation was unchanged in old muscle after 2 days and increased after 4 days of immobilization. Further, an age-specific down-regulation of MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1 expression levels was observed following 2 weeks of immobilization, along with a slowing atrophy response in aged skeletal muscle. Neither the immediate loss of muscle mass, nor the subsequent age-differentiated signaling responses could be explained by changes in inflammatory mediators, apoptosis markers or autophagy indicators. Collectively, these findings indicate that the time-course and regulation of human skeletal muscle atrophy is age dependent, leading to an attenuated loss in aging skeletal muscle when exposed to longer periods of immobility-induced disuse.

  2. Little effects of Insulin-like Growth Factor-I on testicular atrophy induced by hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casares Amelia

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I supplementation restores testicular atrophy associated with advanced liver cirrhosis that is a condition of IGF-I deficiency. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of IGF-I in rats with ischemia-induced testicular atrophy (AT without liver disease and consequently with normal serum level of IGF-I. Methods Testicular atrophy was induced by epinephrine (1, 2 mg/Kg intra-scrotal injection five times per week during 11 weeks. Then, rats with testicular atrophy (AT were divided into two groups (n = 10 each: untreated rats (AT receiving saline sc, and AT+IGF, which were treated with IGF-I (2 μg.100 g b.w.-1.day-1, sc. for 28d. Healthy controls (CO, n = 10 were studied in parallel. Animals were sacrificed on day 29th. Hypophyso-gonadal axis, IGF-I and IGFBPs levels, testicular morphometry and histopathology, immuno-histochemical studies and antioxidant enzyme activity phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx were assessed. Results Compared to controls, AT rats displayed a reduction in testicular size and weight, with histological testicular atrophy, decreased cellular proliferation and transferrin expression, and all of these alterations were slightly improved by IGF-I at low doses. IGF-I therapy increased signifincantly steroidogenesis and PHGPx activity (p Conclusion In testicular atrophy by hypoxia, condition without IGF-I deficiency, IGF-treatment induces only partial effects. These findings suggest that IGF-I therapy appears as an appropriate treatment in hypogonadism only when this is associated to conditions of IGF-I deficiency (such as Laron Syndrom or liver cirrhosis.

  3. A meta-analysis on progressive atrophy in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: Time is brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caciagli, Lorenzo; Bernasconi, Andrea; Wiebe, Samuel; Koepp, Matthias J; Bernasconi, Neda; Bernhardt, Boris C

    2017-08-01

    It remains unclear whether drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is associated with cumulative brain damage, with no expert consensus and no quantitative syntheses of the available evidence. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of MRI studies on progressive atrophy, searching PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE databases for cross-sectional and longitudinal quantitative MRI studies on drug-resistant TLE. We screened 2,976 records and assessed eligibility of 248 full-text articles. Forty-two articles met the inclusion criteria for quantitative evaluation. We observed a predominance of cross-sectional studies, use of different clinical indices of progression, and high heterogeneity in age-control procedures. Meta-analysis of 18/1 cross-sectional/longitudinal studies on hippocampal atrophy (n = 979 patients) yielded a pooled effect size of r = -0.42 for ipsilateral atrophy related to epilepsy duration (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.51 to -0.32; p atrophy (n = 1,504 patients) indicated that >80% of articles reported duration-related progression in extratemporal cortical and subcortical regions. Detailed analysis of study design features yielded low to moderate levels of evidence for progressive atrophy across studies, mainly due to dominance of cross-sectional over longitudinal investigations, use of diverse measures of seizure estimates, and absence of consistent age control procedures. While the neuroimaging literature is overall suggestive of progressive atrophy in drug-resistant TLE, published studies have employed rather weak designs to directly demonstrate it. Longitudinal multicohort studies are needed to unequivocally differentiate aging from disease progression. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Regional Gray Matter Atrophy in Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Baseline Analysis of Multi-Center Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sushmita; Staewen, Terrell D.; Cofield, Stacy S.; Cutter, Gary R.; Lublin, Fred D.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2015-01-01

    Regional gray matter (GM) atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) at disease onset and its temporal variation can provide objective information regarding disease evolution. An automated pipeline for estimating atrophy of various GM structures was developed using tensor based morphometry (TBM) and implemented on a multi-center sub-cohort of 1008 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial. Four hundred age and gender matched healthy controls were used for comparison. Using the analysis of covariance, atrophy differences between MS patients and healthy controls were assessed on a voxel-by-voxel analysis. Regional GM atrophy was observed in a number of deep GM structures that included thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and cortical GM regions. General linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the effects of age, gender, and scanner field strength, and imaging sequence on the regional atrophy. Correlations between regional GM volumes and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores, disease duration (DD), T2 lesion load (T2 LL), T1 lesion load (T1 LL), and normalized cerebrospinal fluid (nCSF) were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Thalamic atrophy observed in MS patients compared to healthy controls remained consistent within subgroups based on gender and scanner field strength. Weak correlations between thalamic volume and EDSS (r = −0.133; p < 0.001) and DD (r = −0.098; p = 0.003) were observed. Of all the structures, thalamic volume moderately correlated with T2 LL (r = −0.492; p-value < 0.001), T1 LL (r = −0.473; p-value < 0.001) and nCSF (r = −0.367; p-value < 0.001). PMID:25787188

  5. Clinicopathological correlation of parapapillary atrophy in monkeys with experimental glaucoma and temporary central retinal artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost B Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the clinicopathological correlation of parapapillary atrophy. Materials and Methods: The study included 16 eyes of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta - 4 eyes with experimental glaucoma, 11 eyes after experimental temporary occlusion of the central retinal artery, and 1 normal eye. On histological sections, we measured zones with different histological characteristics.On fundus photographs, alpha zone and beta zone of parapapillary atrophy were measured and correlated with the histological data. Results: The size of the clinical alpha zone of parapapillary atrophy was significantly correlated with the size of the histological region with irregularities of the retinal pigment epithelium (P = 0.05; correlation coefficient r = 0.49 and with the size of the histological region with a decreased density of retinal photoreceptors (P = 0.01; r = 0.60. The size of clinical beta zone of parapapillary atrophy significantly correlated with the size of the histological region with complete loss of the retinal pigment epithelium (P <0.001; r = 0.91, with the size of the histological zone with a complete loss of photoreceptors (P <0.001; r = 0.81, and with the size of the histological zone with a closed choriocapillaris (P <0.001; r = 0.89. Conclusions: The clinically seen alpha zone of parapapillary atrophy correlates with histological parapapillary irregularities of the retinal pigment epithelium and decreased density of retinal photoreceptors. The clinically seen beta zone of parapapillary atrophy correlates with histological complete loss of the retinal pigment epithelium and of the photoreceptors, and a closure of the choriocapillaris.

  6. Synaptic defects in type I spinal muscular atrophy in human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernández, Rebeca; Bernal, Sara; Also-Rallo, Eva; Alías, Laura; Barceló, María Jesús; Hereu, Marta; Esquerda, Josep E; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2013-01-01

    Childhood spinal muscular atrophy is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by alterations in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 gene that triggers degeneration of motor neurons within the spinal cord. Spinal muscular atrophy is the second most common severe hereditary disease of infancy and early childhood. In the most severe cases (type I), the disease appears in the first months of life, suggesting defects in fetal development. However, it is not yet known how motor neurons, neuromuscular junctions, and muscle interact in the neuropathology of the disease. We report the structure of presynaptic and postsynaptic apparatus of the neuromuscular junctions in control and spinal muscular atrophy prenatal and postnatal human samples. Qualitative and quantitative data from confocal and electron microscopy studies revealed changes in acetylcholine receptor clustering, abnormal preterminal accumulation of vesicles, and aberrant ultrastructure of nerve terminals in the motor endplates of prenatal type I spinal muscular atrophy samples. Fetuses predicted to develop milder type II disease had a similar appearance to controls. Postnatal muscle of type I spinal muscular atrophy patients showed persistence of the fetal subunit of acetylcholine receptors, suggesting a delay in maturation of neuromuscular junctions. We observed that pathology in the severe form of the disease starts in fetal development and that a defect in maintaining the initial innervation is an early finding of neuromuscular dysfunction. These results will improve our understanding of the spinal muscular atrophy pathogenesis and help to define targets for possible presymptomatic therapy for this disease. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Brain atrophy rates in first degree relatives at risk for Alzheimer's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika J. Lampert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A positive family history (FH raises the risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease though, other than the known risk conferred by apolipoprotein ε4 (ApoE4, much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. We examined the effect of family history on longitudinal regional brain atrophy rates in 184 subjects (42% FH+, mean age 79.9 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI enrolled in a national biomarker study. An automated image analysis method was applied to T1-weighted MR images to measure atrophy rates for 20 cortical and subcortical regions. Mixed-effects linear regression models incorporating repeated-measures to control for within-subject variation over multiple time points tested the effect of FH over a follow-up of up to 48 months. Most of the 20 regions showed significant atrophy over time. Adjusting for age and gender, subjects with a positive FH had greater atrophy of the amygdala (p < 0.01, entorhinal cortex (p < 0.01, hippocampus (p < 0.053 and cortical gray matter (p < 0.009. However, when E4 genotype was added as a covariate, none of the FH effects remained significant. Analyses by ApoE genotype showed that the effect of FH on amygdala atrophy rates was numerically greater in ε3 homozygotes than in E4 carriers, but this difference was not significant. FH+ subjects had numerically greater 4-year cognitive decline and conversion rates than FH− subjects but the difference was not statistically significant after adjusting for ApoE and other variables. We conclude that a positive family history of AD may influence cortical and temporal lobe atrophy in subjects with mild cognitive impairment, but it does not have a significant additional effect beyond the known effect of the E4 genotype.

  8. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeki, Daisuke; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Okumura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB) induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX)-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition. We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1) expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and calcineurin pathway) and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO) pathway and myostatin expression) in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB. Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth), and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  9. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Umeki

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition.We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1 expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and calcineurin pathway and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO pathway and myostatin expression in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB.Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth, and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  10. Multidimensional Analysis on the Effect of Vocal Function Exercises on Aged Vocal Fold Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mami; Hirano, Shigeru; Tateya, Ichiro; Kishimoto, Yo; Hiwatashi, Nao; Fujiu-Kurachi, Masako; Ito, Juichi

    2015-09-01

    Age-related voice change is characterized as weak, harsh, and breathy. These changes are caused by histologic alteration of the lamina propria of the vocal fold mucosa as well as atrophy of the thyroarytenoid muscle. Several therapeutic strategies involving laryngeal framework surgery and injection laryngoplasty have been tried, but effects have been limited. Vocal function exercises (VFE) have been used to treat age-related vocal fold atrophy although the effectiveness has been shown with limited analysis. The present study aims to determine the effectiveness of VFE for the treatment of aged atrophy using multidimensional analysis. This is a retrospective study. Sixteen patients with vocal fold atrophy aged 65-81 years underwent voice therapy using VFE. Six patients with vocal fold atrophy aged 65-85 years were involved as a historical control group. The grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, strain (GRBAS) scale, stroboscopic examinations, aerodynamic assessment, acoustic analysis, and Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) were performed before and after VFE. Normalized mucosal wave amplitude (NMWA), normalized glottal gap (NGG), and bowing index (BI) were measured by image analysis during stroboscopic examinations. After VFE, significant improvements were shown in GRBAS, maximum phonation time, jitter, NMWA, NGG, and VHI-10 although BI has not changed significantly. There were no significant improvements in the historical control. The data suggest that VFE produces significant improvement in subjective, objective, and patient self-evaluation and deserves further attention as a treatment for aged atrophy of the vocal fold. It was also suggested that VFE does not improve the vocal fold bowing but may improve muscular function during voicing. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Congenital high myopia and central macular atrophy: a report of 3 families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, S; Kalhoro, A; Marr, J; Thompson, D A; Holder, G E; Robson, A G; Moore, A T

    2015-07-01

    To report the clinical phenotype in a series of four children from three families with the rare association of high myopia, central macular atrophy, and normal full-field electroretinography (ERG). Four male patients were ascertained with reduced vision, nystagmus, and atrophy of the macula from early childhood. Patients underwent full ophthalmic examination, electrophysiological testing, and retinal imaging. Minimum duration of follow-up was 8 years. At last review, visual acuity ranged from 0.22 to 1.20 logMAR (6/9.5-6/95 Snellen) at a mean age of 10.5 years (median 9.5 years, range 9-14 years). Refractive error ranged from a spherical equivalent of -7.40 D to -24.00 D. Three had convergent squint. Fundus examination and imaging demonstrated bilateral macular atrophy in all patients that varied from mild atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to well-demarcated, punched-out atrophic lesions of retina, RPE, and choroid. Flash ERG was normal under photopic and scotopic conditions in all patients. Pattern ERG, performed in three patients, was consistent with mild to severe macular dysfunction. Progression of the area of atrophy was evident in one patient and of the myopia in two patients but all patients had stable visual acuity. Patients with congenital high myopia and macular atrophy present in infancy with reduced visual acuity and nystagmus. The macular atrophic lesions vary in size and severity but electrophysiological testing is consistent with dysfunction confined to the macula. There was no deterioration in visual acuity over 8-10 years of monitoring.

  12. MRT measurements of the CSF spaces in HIV associated cerebral atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handwerker, M.; Krahe, T.; Klinker, H.; Schindler, R.

    1992-01-01

    The CSF volume of 45 patients with HIV infection was measured at various clinical stages and the results compared with 24 normals. 60% of all patients showed increased CSF spaces as an indication of cerebral atrophy. Serial measurements were particularly valuable during the early stages of atrophy since there is marked variation in the normal CSF volume. Conventional measurements, with the exception of the width of the third ventricle, were much less sensitive than these quantitative measurements. Classification of HIF infection according to the clinical stage was useful since CSF volume and volume increase correlated with the stage of HIV infection. (orig.) [de

  13. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and medial temporal lobe atrophy: the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korf, E S C; van Straaten, E C W; de Leeuw, F-E

    2007-01-01

    was visually scored for the left and right medial temporal lobe (score 0-4), and meaned. RESULTS: Mean age was 73.5 years (sd 5.1), 54% was female. Of the subjects, 15% had DM, and 70% had a history of hypertension. The likelihood of having MTA score 3 was significantly higher in subjects with DM (OR 2.9; 95......HYPOTHESIS: Based on recent findings on the association between vascular risk factors and hippocampal atrophy, we hypothesized that hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) in subjects without disability, independent of the severity of white...

  14. The Progression of Posterior Cortical Atrophy to Corticobasal Syndrome: Lumping or Splitting Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Giorelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior cortical atrophy is a clinical syndrome that is characterized by the progressive loss of visuospatial integration and is associated with neurodegenerative conditions.Case Report: We describe a 60‐year‐old female with simultanagnosia, oculomotor apraxia, and optic ataxia for which she received an initial clinical diagnosis of posterior cortical atrophy. Three years later, she developed Balint's syndrome, Gerstmann's syndrome, left alien hand syndrome, smooth asymmetric (left rigidity, cortical sensory loss, and spontaneous myoclonic jerks of the left arm, which suggested a final diagnosis of corticobasal syndrome.Discussion: This case report indicates that corticobasal syndrome may present with visuospatial deficits.

  15. Mitochondrial Myopathy: A Rare Cause of Early-Onset Vocal Fold Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Bock, Jonathan M.; Peltier, Amanda C.; Oh, Shin J.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We present the second published case of laryngeal involvement in mitochondrial myopathy. Methods A patient with laryngeal involvement of mitochondrial myopathy is presented, together with a literature review. Results A 41-year-old man presented with progressive breathy dysphonia. His brother had mitochondrial myopathy. Biopsy of the biceps muscle demonstrated cytochrome C oxidase–negative ragged blue fibers confirming mitochondrial myopathy. Videostroboscopy showed marked vocal fold atrophy, but subsequent injection laryngoplasty did not significantly improve the patient’s voice, despite improved postoperative glottic closure. Conclusions Mitochondrial myopathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe early-onset vocal fold atrophy. PMID:23577570

  16. Clinical Report of Oriental Medicine Treatment with Bee Venom Therapy of Progressive muscle atrophy 1 Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Young-Ho; Yuk Tae-Han; Lee Dong-Ho

    2000-01-01

    The authors reports in order to study the effect of Bee Venom therapy of progressive muscle atrophy. The authors investigated 1 patient who is treated at Woosuk University Oriental Medical Hospital. The patient diagnosed by MRI EMG Hematology Muscle biopsy as progressive muscle atrophy is administered by Bee Venom therapy for 4 months. Bee Venom therapy is operated by 2 times per a week(every 3 days, 0.1cc per one operation, 0.05cc per one acupuncture point). The authors checked changes of th...

  17. Retinal pigment epithelial atrophy following indocyanine green dye-assisted surgery for serous macular detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Nazimul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To report subretinal migration of indocyanine green dye (ICG and subsequent retinal pigment epithelial (RPE atrophy during macular surgery for serous macular detachment. A 65-year-old woman presented with residual epiretinal membrane and serous detachment of the macula following vitreoretinal surgery for epiretinal membrane. She underwent resurgery with ICG-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling and intraocular tamponade. Intraoperatively a large area of subretinal ICG was seen with subsequent RPE mottling and atrophy of the macula in the area involved during follow-up. This case demonstrates that subretinal migration of ICG is possible and can be toxic to RPE.

  18. Hepatic atrophy following preoperative chemotherapy predicts hepatic insufficiency after resection of colorectal liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Suguru; Shindoh, Junichi; Mizuno, Takashi; Chun, Yun Shin; Conrad, Claudius; Aloia, Thomas A; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    For patients with colorectal liver metastases (CLM) undergoing major hepatectomy, extensive preoperative chemotherapy has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The impact of extensive chemotherapy on total liver volume (TLV) change is unclear. The aims of the current study were twofold: (1) to determine the change of TLV following preoperative chemotherapy in patients undergoing resection for CLM and (2) to investigate the correlations among TLV change, postoperative hepatic insufficiency (PHI), and death from liver failure. Clinicopathological features of patients with CLM who underwent preoperative chemotherapy and curative resection were reviewed (2008-2015). TLV change (degree of atrophy) was defined as the percentage difference of TLV (estimated by manual volumetry)/standardized liver volume (SLV) ratio: ([Pre-chemotherapy TLV]-[Post-chemotherapy TLV])×100÷SLV (%). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to decide the accurate cut-off value of degree of atrophy to predict PHI. The Cox proportional hazard model was performed to identify the predictors of severe degree of atrophy and PHI. The study cohort consisted of 459 patients, of which 154 patients (34%) underwent extensive preoperative chemotherapy (≥7 cycles). ROC analysis identified the degree of atrophy ≥10% as an accurate cut-off to predict PHI, which was significantly correlated with ≥7 cycles of preoperative chemotherapy. Four factors independently predicted PHI: standardized future liver remnant ≤30% (odds ratio [OR] 4.03, p=0.019), high aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (OR 5.27, p=0.028), degree of atrophy ≥10% (OR 43.5, ppreoperative chemotherapy induced significant atrophic change of TLV. Degree of atrophy ≥10% is an independent predictor of PHI and death in patients with CLM undergoing preoperative chemotherapy and resection. Extensive preoperative chemotherapy for patients with colorectal liver metastases (CLM) could

  19. Novel SIL1 mutations cause cerebellar ataxia and atrophy in a French-Canadian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreau, Anne; La Piana, Roberta; Marcoux, Camille; Dion, Patrick A; Brais, Bernard; Bernard, Geneviève; Rouleau, Guy A

    2015-10-01

    Two French-Canadian sibs with cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria were seen in our neurogenetics clinic. The older brother had global developmental delay and spastic paraplegia. Brain MRIs from these two affected individuals showed moderate to severe cerebellar atrophy. To identify the genetic basis for their disease, we conducted a whole exome sequencing (WES) investigation using genomic DNA prepared from the affected sibs and their healthy father. We identified two mutations in the SIL1 gene, which is reported to cause Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome. This study emphasizes how the diagnosis of patients with ataxic gait and cerebellar atrophy may benefit from WES to identify the genetic cause of their condition.

  20. REHABILITATION OF SEVERELY ATROPHIED UPPER JAW WITH INTRAOSSAL DENTAL IMPLANTS - clinical case

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Chenchev; Radka Cholakova; Cvetan Cvetanov; Ir. Mitarcheva

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this presentation is to show the difficulty in prosthetization of a clinical case with a pronounced atrophy of the upper jaw and the various types and nature of restrictions imposed by the requirements of the patient. Methods: The clinical analysis, surgical protocol and prosthetic solution are presented in the treatment of 72 year-old woman with a pronounced atrophy of the upper jaw. OPG, standard CT of the upper jaw was used in the planning and a special surgical t...

  1. Rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms in a patient with spinobulbar muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease affects muscles and motor neurons, manifesting as weakness and wasting of bulbar, facial, and proximal limb muscles due to loss of anterior horn cells in the brain and spinal cord. We present the case of a patient with X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy with rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms caused by laryngopharyngeal irritation associated with a viral upper respiratory tract infection, seasonal allergies and laryngopharyngeal reflux, who dramatically improved with multimodality therapy.

  2. Forkhead box O3 plays a role in skeletal muscle atrophy through expression of E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seol-Hee; Lee, Hae-Ahm; Kim, Mina; Lee, Eunjo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Kim, Inkyeom

    2017-06-01

    Cushing's syndrome is caused by overproduction of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which stimulates the adrenal grand to make cortisol. Skeletal muscle wasting occurs in pathophysiological response to Cushing's syndrome. The forkhead box (FOX) protein family has been implicated as a key regulator of muscle loss under conditions such as diabetes and sepsis. However, the mechanistic role of the FOXO family in ACTH-induced muscle atrophy is not understood. We hypothesized that FOXO3a plays a role in muscle atrophy through expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle RING finger protein-1 (MuRF-1), and atrogin-1 in Cushing's syndrome. For establishment of a Cushing's syndrome animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps containing ACTH (40 ng·kg -1 ·day -1 ). ACTH infusion significantly reduced muscle weight. In ACTH-infused rats, MuRF-1, atrogin-1, and FOXO3a were upregulated and the FOXO3a promoter was targeted by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Transcriptional activity and expression of FOXO3a were significantly decreased by the GR antagonist RU486. Treatment with RU486 reduced MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 expression in accordance with reduced enrichment of FOXO3a and Pol II on the promoters. Knockdown of FOXO3a prevented dexamethasone-induced MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 expression. These results indicate that FOXO3a plays a role in muscle atrophy through expression of MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 in Cushing's syndrome. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Rape prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date rape - prevention; Sexual assault - prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Sexual assault and abuse and STDs. In: 2015 sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2015. www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/sexual- ...

  4. Dengue Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This photograph ... medications to treat a dengue infection. This makes prevention the most important step, and prevention means avoiding ...

  5. Comparison of precancerous conditions: atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in Helicobacter pylori gastritis among Chinese and Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X. Y.; van der Hulst, R. W.; Shi, Y.; Xiao, S. D.; Tytgat, G. N.; ten Kate, F. J.

    2001-01-01

    AIM-Atrophy and intestinal metaplasia (IM) as precancerous conditions consistently begin in the antrum and are most severe along the lesser curvature. The aim of this study was to investigate discrepancies in the prevalence, the severity of atrophy, and IM in antral mucosa of Helicobacter pylori

  6. Additional corpus biopsy enhances the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in a background of gastritis with atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The best sites for biopsy-based tests to evaluate H. pylori infection in gastritis with atrophy are not well known. This study aimed to evaluate the site and sensitivity of biopsy-based tests in terms of degree of gastritis with atrophy. Methods One hundred and sixty-four (164) uninvestigated dyspepsia patients were enrolled. Biopsy-based tests (i.e., culture, histology Giemsa stain and rapid urease test) and non-invasive tests (anti-H. pylori IgG) were performed. The gold standard of H. pylori infection was defined according to previous criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive rate and negative predictive rate of biopsy-based tests at the gastric antrum and body were calculated in terms of degree of gastritis with atrophy. Results The prevalence rate of H. pylori infection in the 164 patients was 63.4%. Gastritis with atrophy was significantly higher at the antrum than at the body (76% vs. 31%; pgastritis with atrophy increased regardless of biopsy site (for normal, mild, moderate, and severe gastritis with atrophy, the sensitivity of histology Giemsa stain was 100%, 100%, 88%, and 66%, respectively, and 100%, 97%, 91%, and 66%, respectively, for rapid urease test). In moderate to severe antrum or body gastritis with atrophy, additional corpus biopsy resulted in increased sensitivity to 16.67% compare to single antrum biopsy. Conclusions In moderate to severe gastritis with atrophy, biopsy-based test should include the corpus for avoiding false negative results. PMID:23272897

  7. Recommendations to improve imaging and analysis of brain lesion load and atrophy in longitudinal studies of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrenken, H.; Jenkinson, M.; Horsfield, M.A.; Battaglini, M.; van Schijndel, R.A.; Rostrup, E.; Geurts, J.J.G.; Fisher, E.; Zijdenbos, A.; Ashburner, J.; Miller, D. H.; Filippi, M.; Fazekas, F.; Rovaris, M.; Rovira, A.; Barkhof, F.; De Stefano, N.

    2013-01-01

    Focal lesions and brain atrophy are the most extensively studied aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the image acquisition and analysis techniques used can be further improved, especially those for studying within-patient changes of lesion load and atrophy longitudinally. Improved accuracy and

  8. Association of Gluteus Medius and Minimus Muscle Atrophy and Fall-Related Hip Fracture in Older Individuals Using Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Andrew S; Long, Suzanne S; Zoga, Adam C; Parker, Laurence; Morrison, William B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine an association between fall-related hip and/or pelvic fractures and gluteus medius and minimus atrophy. Retrospective review of 64 patients with fall-related hip/pelvic fractures and 96 age- and sex-stratified controls was performed. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, tensor fascia lata, and iliopsoas atrophy was scored using a standard scale. Statistical analysis was performed. There is a significant difference (P gluteus medius and minimus atrophy in the fracture versus control groups. Presence of gluteus atrophy was predictive of fall-related fracture (odds ratio, 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-4.31). There is no significant difference in tensor fascia lata (P = 0.47) or iliopsoas (P = 0.15) atrophy between the 2 groups. Gluteus atrophy increased with age (r = 0.41, P gluteus medius atrophy. Gluteus medius and minimus muscle atrophy is greater in fall-related hip/pelvic fractures, which may predispose the elderly to falls.

  9. Microglial imaging with positron emission tomography and atrophy measurements with magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis : a correlative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versijpt, J; Debruyne, JC; Van Laere, KJ; De Vos, F; Keppens, J; Strijckmans, K; Achten, E; Slegers, G; Dierckx, RA; Korf, J; De Reuck, JL

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of the present study were to assess brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients during different disease stages and to investigate by PET and [C-11]PK11195, a marker of microglial activation, the relationship between inflammation, atrophy and clinically relevant

  10. Plague Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Clinicians Public Health Officials Veterinarians Prevention History of Plague Resources FAQ Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Reduce rodent habitat around your ...

  11. Neither retinal nor brain atrophy can be shown in patients with isolated unilateral optic neuritis at the time of presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, Klaus; Sander, Birgit; Tsakiri, Anna

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) may be the earliest manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Atrophy has been shown to be a prominent feature of MS with great impact on disability. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate retinal and brain atrophy and possi......BACKGROUND: Acute monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) may be the earliest manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Atrophy has been shown to be a prominent feature of MS with great impact on disability. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate retinal and brain atrophy...... were calculated based on MRI. Additionally, visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded. RESULTS: Neither OCT measurements nor brain volume measures revealed signs of localized or generalized atrophy in patients compared with healthy volunteers. Stratification of patients into high risk based...

  12. Recommendations to improve imaging and analysis of brain lesion load and atrophy in longitudinal studies of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrenken, H; Jenkinson, M; Horsfield, M A

    2013-01-01

    Focal lesions and brain atrophy are the most extensively studied aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the image acquisition and analysis techniques used can be further improved, especially those for studying within-patient changes of lesion load and atrophy longitudinally. Improved accuracy...... resonance image analysis methods for assessing brain lesion load and atrophy, this paper makes recommendations to improve these measures for longitudinal studies of MS. Briefly, they are (1) images should be acquired using 3D pulse sequences, with near-isotropic spatial resolution and multiple image...... contrasts to allow more comprehensive analyses of lesion load and atrophy, across timepoints. Image artifacts need special attention given their effects on image analysis results. (2) Automated image segmentation methods integrating the assessment of lesion load and atrophy are desirable. (3) A standard...

  13. Dominant optic atrophy in Denmark - report of 15 novel mutations in OPA1, using a strategy with a detection rate of 90%

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Ek, Jakob; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of the OPA1 mutation spectrum in autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) in Denmark.......Investigation of the OPA1 mutation spectrum in autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) in Denmark....

  14. Corpus callosum atrophy is associated with mental slowing and executive deficits in subjects with age-related white matter hyperintensities: the LADIS Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokinen, Hanna; Ryberg, Charlotte; Kalska, Hely

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous research has indicated that corpus callosum atrophy is associated with global cognitive decline in neurodegenerative diseases, but few studies have investigated specific cognitive functions. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of regional corpus callosum atrophy in mental spee...

  15. [From gene to disease; mutations in the WFS1-gene as the cause of juvenile type I diabetes mellitus with optic atrophy (Wolfram syndrome)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Dikkeschei, L.D.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Ouweland, J.M.W. van den

    2002-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome patients are mainly characterised by juvenile onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. A synonym is the acronym DIDMOAD: diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness. Diabetes insipidus and sensorineural high-frequency hearing impairment are important additional

  16. Relationship between external anal sphincter atrophy at endoanal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical, functional, and anatomic characteristics in patients with fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Deutekom, Marije; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; Engel, Alexander F.; Janssen, Lucas W. M.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E. E.; Dobben, Annette C.; Baeten, Cor G. M. I.; de Priester, Jacobus A.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Stoker, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: External anal sphincter atrophy at endoanal magnetic resonance imaging has been associated with poor outcome of anal sphincter repair. We studied the relationship between external anal sphincter atrophy on endoanal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical, functional, and anatomic

  17. Activation of the dopamine 1 and dopamine 5 receptors increase skeletal muscle mass and force production under non-atrophying and atrophying conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of skeletal muscle mass and force production is a complex physiological process involving numerous regulatory systems. Agents that increase skeletal muscle cAMP levels have been shown to modulate skeletal muscle mass and force production. The dopamine 1 receptor and its closely related homolog, the dopamine 5 receptor, are G-protein coupled receptors that are expressed in skeletal muscle and increase cAMP levels when activated. Thus we hypothesize that activation of the dopamine 1 and/or 5 receptor will increase skeletal muscle cAMP levels thereby modulating skeletal muscle mass and force production. Methods We treated isolated mouse tibialis anterior (TA and medial gastrocnemius (MG muscles in tissue bath with the selective dopamine 1 receptor and dopamine 5 receptor agonist SKF 81297 to determine if activation of skeletal muscle dopamine 1 and dopamine 5 receptors will increase cAMP. We dosed wild-type mice, dopamine 1 receptor knockout mice and dopamine 5 receptor knockout mice undergoing casting-induced disuse atrophy with SKF 81297 to determine if activation of the dopamine 1 and dopamine 5 receptors results in hypertrophy of non-atrophying skeletal muscle and preservation of atrophying skeletal muscle mass and force production. Results In tissue bath, isolated mouse TA and MG muscles responded to SKF 81297 treatment with increased cAMP levels. Treating wild-type mice with SKF 81297 reduced casting-induced TA and MG muscle mass loss in addition to increasing the mass of non-atrophying TA and MG muscles. In dopamine 1 receptor knockout mice, extensor digitorum longus (EDL and soleus muscle mass and force was not preserved during casting with SKF 81297 treatment, in contrast to significant preservation of casted wild-type mouse EDL and soleus mass and EDL force with SKF 81297 treatment. Dosing dopamine 5 receptor knockout mice with SKF 81297 did not significantly preserve EDL and soleus muscle mass and force

  18. Baseline Prostate Atrophy is Associated with Reduced Risk of Prostate Cancer in Men Undergoing Repeat Prostate Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Daniel M; Bostwick, David G; Andriole, Gerald L; Peterson, Bercedis L; Cohen, Harvey J; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Freedland, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated whether the presence and severity of baseline prostate atrophy in men with initial biopsy negative for prostate cancer was associated the risk of subsequent prostate cancer detection in a clinical trial with scheduled study mandated biopsies. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 3,084 men 50 to 75 years old with prostate specific antigen between 2.5 and 10 ng/ml, and a prior negative biopsy in the placebo arm of the REDUCE (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) study who completed at least 1 per-protocol biopsy. Prostate cancer (defined as present or absent) and prostate atrophy (graded as absent, mild or moderate/marked) was assessed by central pathology review. The association of baseline atrophy with positive 2 and 4-year repeat biopsies was evaluated with logistic regression, controlling for baseline covariates. Baseline prostate atrophy was detected in 2,143 men (70%) and graded as mild and moderate/marked in 1,843 (60%) and 300 (10%) baseline biopsies, respectively. Patients with atrophy were older and had a larger prostate, and more acute and chronic prostate inflammation. At 2-year biopsy the prostate cancer incidence was 17% (508 cases). Baseline atrophy was significantly associated with lower prostate cancer risk (univariable and multivariable OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.50-0.74 and OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54-0.83, p atrophy the prostate cancer risk at the 2-year repeat biopsy was lower for mild atrophy (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.55-0.86) and moderate/marked atrophy (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.34-0.76, each p atrophy in men with a prostate biopsy negative for prostate cancer was independently associated with subsequent lower prostate cancer detection. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. p53 and ATF4 mediate distinct and additive pathways to skeletal muscle atrophy during limb immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Daniel K.; Ebert, Scott M.; Bongers, Kale S.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Kunkel, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization causes skeletal muscle atrophy via complex signaling pathways that are not well understood. To better understand these pathways, we investigated the roles of p53 and ATF4, two transcription factors that mediate adaptations to a variety of cellular stresses. Using mouse models, we demonstrate that 3 days of muscle immobilization induces muscle atrophy and increases expression of p53 and ATF4. Furthermore, muscle fibers lacking p53 or ATF4 are partially resistant to immobilization-induced muscle atrophy, and forced expression of p53 or ATF4 induces muscle fiber atrophy in the absence of immobilization. Importantly, however, p53 and ATF4 do not require each other to promote atrophy, and coexpression of p53 and ATF4 induces more atrophy than either transcription factor alone. Moreover, muscle fibers lacking both p53 and ATF4 are more resistant to immobilization-induced atrophy than fibers lacking only p53 or ATF4. Interestingly, the independent and additive nature of the p53 and ATF4 pathways allows for combinatorial control of at least one downstream effector, p21. Using genome-wide mRNA expression arrays, we identified p21 mRNA as a skeletal muscle transcript that is highly induced in immobilized muscle via the combined actions of p53 and ATF4. Additionally, in mouse muscle, p21 induces atrophy in a manner that does not require immobilization, p53 or ATF4, and p21 is required for atrophy induced by immobilization, p53, and ATF4. Collectively, these results identify p53 and ATF4 as essential and complementary mediators of immobilization-induced muscle atrophy and discover p21 as a critical downstream effector of the p53 and ATF4 pathways. PMID:24895282

  20. Effects of Nandrolone in the Counteraction of Skeletal Muscle Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Muscle Disuse: Molecular Biology and Functional Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Maria Camerino

    Full Text Available Muscle disuse produces severe atrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotype transition in the postural Soleus (Sol muscle of rodents. Antioxidants, amino-acids and growth factors were ineffective to ameliorate muscle atrophy. Here we evaluate the effects of nandrolone (ND, an anabolic steroid, on mouse skeletal muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb unloading (HU. Mice were pre-treated for 2-weeks before HU and during the 2-weeks of HU. Muscle weight and total protein content were reduced in HU mice and a restoration of these parameters was found in ND-treated HU mice. The analysis of gene expression by real-time PCR demonstrates an increase of MuRF-1 during HU but minor involvement of other catabolic pathways. However, ND did not affect MuRF-1 expression. The evaluation of anabolic pathways showed no change in mTOR and eIF2-kinase mRNA expression, but the protein expression of the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF2 was reduced during HU and restored by ND. Moreover we found an involvement of regenerative pathways, since the increase of MyoD observed after HU suggests the promotion of myogenic stem cell differentiation in response to atrophy. At the same time, Notch-1 expression was down-regulated. Interestingly, the ND treatment prevented changes in MyoD and Notch-1 expression. On the contrary, there was no evidence for an effect of ND on the change of muscle phenotype induced by HU, since no effect of treatment was observed on the resting gCl, restCa and contractile properties in Sol muscle. Accordingly, PGC1α and myosin heavy chain expression, indexes of the phenotype transition, were not restored in ND-treated HU mice. We hypothesize that ND is unable to directly affect the phenotype transition when the specialized motor unit firing pattern of stimulation is lacking. Nevertheless, through stimulation of protein synthesis, ND preserves protein content and muscle weight, which may result advantageous to the affected skeletal muscle for functional recovery.

  1. Capacity of tTreg generation is not impaired in the atrophied thymus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jiyoung; Wang, Weikan; Thomas, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Postnatal thymic epithelial cell (TEC) homeostatic defect- or natural aging-induced thymic atrophy results in a decline in central T-cell tolerance establishment, which is constituted by thymocyte negative selection and cluster of differentiation (CD) 4+ thymic regulatory T (tTreg) cell generation. Emerging evidence shows this decline mainly results from defects in negative selection, but there is insufficient evidence regarding whether tTreg cell generation is also impaired. We mechanistically studied tTreg cell generation in the atrophied thymus by utilizing both postnatal TEC-defective (resulting from FoxN1-floxed conditional knockout [cKO]) and naturally aged mouse models. We found that the capacity of tTreg cell generation was not impaired compared to CD4+ thymic conventional T cells, suggesting thymic atrophy positively influences tTreg cell generation. This is potentially attributed to decreased T cell receptor (TCR) signaling strength due to inefficiency in promiscuous expression of self-antigens or presenting a neo-self-antigen by medullary TECs, displaying decreased negative selection-related marker genes (Nur77 and CD5high) in CD4 single positive (SP) thymocytes. Our results provide evidence that the atrophied thymus attempts to balance the defective negative selection by enhancing tTreg cell generation to maintain central T-cell tolerance in the elderly. Once the balance is broken, age-related diseases could take place. PMID:29117183

  2. Hippocampus atrophy and the longitudinal course of late-life depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Warren D; McQuoid, Douglas R; Payne, Martha E; Zannas, Anthony S; MacFall, James R; Steffens, David C

    2014-12-01

    Smaller hippocampal volumes are observed in depression but it remains unclear how antidepressant response and persistent depression relate to changes in hippocampal volume. We examined the longitudinal relationship between hippocampal atrophy and course of late-life depression. Academic medical center. Depressed and never-depressed cognitively intact subjects age 60 years or older. Depression severity was measured every three months with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Participants also completed cranial 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging every 2 years. We compared 2-year change in hippocampal volume based on remission status, then in expanded analyses examined how hippocampal volumes predicted MADRS score. In analyses of 92 depressed and 70 never-depressed subjects, over 2 years the cohort whose depression never remitted exhibited greater hippocampal atrophy than the never-depressed cohort. In expanded analyses of a broader sample of 152 depressed elders, depression severity was significantly predicted by a hippocampus × time interaction where smaller hippocampus volumes over time were associated with greater depression severity. Hippocampal atrophy is associated with greater and persistent depression severity. Neuropathological studies are needed to determine if this atrophy is related to the toxic effects of persistent depression or related to underlying Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct responses of protein turnover regulatory pathways in hypoxia- and semistarvation-induced muscle atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Theije, Chiel C.; Langen, Ramon C. J.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Köhler, S. Eleonore

    2013-01-01

    The balance of muscle protein synthesis and degradation determines skeletal muscle mass. We hypothesized that hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy and alterations in the regulation of muscle protein turnover include a hypoxia-specific component, in addition to the observed effects of reduction in food

  4. Bilateral optic atrophy caused by chronic oral ingestion and topical application of hexachlorophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamovits, T L; Burde, R M; Klingele, T G

    1980-05-01

    A 31-year-old woman ingested hexachlorophene (pHisoHex) over a ten-month period. She developed bilateral optic atrophy with no other systemic evidence of neurotoxicity. This cases supports pathologists' findings that the optic nerve and chiasm are particularly sensitive to the poisonous effects of hexachlorophene.

  5. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  6. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluimer, J.D.; van der Flier, W.M.; Karas, G.B.; van Schijndel, R.; Barnes, J.; Boyes, R.G.; Cover, K.S.; Olabarriaga, S.D.; Fox, N.C.; Scheltens, P.; Vrenken, H.; Barkhof, F.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 +/- 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate

  7. Screening of Toll-like receptors expression in multiple system atrophy brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Agander, Tina Klitmøller

    2013-01-01

    their deregulation may play a role in neurodegeneration. Multiple system atrophy (MSA) together with Parkinson's disease belongs to a diverse group of neurodegenerative conditions termed α-synucleinopathies. MSA is a fatal late onset disease characterized by the presence of α-synuclein positive glial cytoplasmic...

  8. Hippocampal, amygdalar, and global brain atrophy in different apolipoprotein E genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, T; Oudkerk, M; Launer, LJ; van Duijn, CM; Hofman, A; Breteler, MMB

    2002-01-01

    The epsilon4 allele of the APOE gene increases the risk for AD, whereas the epsilon2 allele may be protective. The authors assessed the impact of APOE genotype on hippocampal, amygdalar, and global brain atrophy as putative markers of preclinical AD in a nondemented population. Carriers Of epsilon4

  9. Appraisal of experimental and commercial Marek's disease vaccines to induce bursal and thymic atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, several experimental Marek’s disease (MD) vaccines were developed that appear to protect equally or better than the best commercial vaccines. However, some of the experimental vaccines were reported to induce transient bursal and thymic atrophies. We will report on two promising experiment...

  10. Genomic deletions in OPA1 in Danish patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Grønskov, Karen; Milea, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, Kjer disease, MIM #165500) is the most common form of hereditary optic neuropathy. Mutations in OPA1 located at chromosome 3q28 are the predominant cause for ADOA explaining between 32 and 89% of cases. Although deletions of OPA1 were recently reported...

  11. Transient Ischemic Attack Results in Delayed Brain Atrophy and Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivard, Andrew; Lillicrap, Thomas; Maréchal, Bénédicte; Garcia-Esperon, Carlos; Holliday, Elizabeth; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) initiates an ischemic cascade without resulting in frank infarction and, as such, represents a novel model to study the effects of this ischemic cascade and secondary neurodegeneration in humans. Patients with suspected TIA underwent acute brain perfusion imaging, and those with acute ischemia were enrolled into a prospective observational study. We collected baseline and 90-day magnetic resonance imaging, including MP-RAGE (high-resolution T1 sequence) and cognitive assessment with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Brain morphometry and within patient statistical analysis were performed to identify changes between baseline and 90-day imaging and clinical assessments. Fifty patients with TIA with acute perfusion lesions were studied. All patients experienced a decrease in global cortical gray matter ( P =0.005). Patients with anterior circulation TIA (n=31) also had a significant reduction in the volume of the pons ( P atrophy ( R 2 =0.28; P =0.009). In a prospective observational study, patients with TIA confirmed by acute perfusion imaging experienced a significant reduction in global gray matter and focal structural atrophy related to the area of acute ischemia. The atrophy also resulted in a proportional decreased cognitive performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Further studies are required to identify the mechanisms of this atrophy. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Marek’s disease virus induces transient atrophy of cecal tonsils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by an immunosupperessive alpha herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Clinical signs of MD include bursal/thymic atrophy and neurological disorders. The cecal tonsils (CT) are the largest lymphoid aggregates of avia...

  13. Degree of neutrophil, atrophy, and metaplasia intestinal were associate with malondialdehyde level in gastritis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, G. A.; Sari, D. K.; Sungkar, T.

    2018-03-01

    The main pathogenesis of gastritis is inflammation that closely related to free radicals. Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a free radical biomarker and is found to increase in gastritis patients. However, these studies are generally performed on experimental animals as well as MDA examination in gastric mucosa. This study aim was to determine the association of degrees of gastritis (degree of lymphocyte infiltration, neutrophil activity, atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia) with plasma MDA level. A cross-sectional study of 80 consecutive gastritis patients who came to an endoscopic unit of Adam Malik General Hospital in Medan, Indonesia, from May–September 2017. Assessed for severity of chronic inflammatory, neutrophil activity, atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia refers to Updated Sydney System. Plasma MDA levels were examined using an HPLC MDA kit. Univariate analysis, bivariate (chi-square and Fisher exact test), and multivariate (binary logistic regression test) were programmed with SPSS version 22. There was no significant association between degree of lymphocyte infiltration with MDA level. There were significant associations between degree of neutrophil activity, atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia with MDA level (p=0.039, 0.003, 0.021; respectively). The moderate+severe degree of neutrophil activity, atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia were associated with high level of MDA.

  14. Homocysteine and brain atrophy on MRI of non-demented elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, T; Vermeer, SE; Clarke, R; Oudkerk, M; Koudstaal, PJ; Hofman, A; Breteler, MMB

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have higher plasma homocysteine levels than controls, but it is uncertain whether higher plasma homocysteine levels are involved in the early pathogenesis of the disease. Hippocampal, amygdalar and global brain atrophy on brain MRI have been proposed as early

  15. Reply to: Can we avoid rectus abdominis muscle atrophy and midline shift after colostomy creation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Timmermans (Lucas); E.B. Deerenberg (Eva); S.M. van Dijk (Sven); B. Lamme (Bas); A.H.J. Koning (Anton); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); J. Jeekel (Johannes); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractWe read with interest the letter to the editor by Stephenson et al regarding our article “Abdominal rectus muscle atrophy and midline shift after colostomy creation.” Any attempt to decrease the risk of parastomal herniation should be applauded, because its incidence of greater than

  16. Marek’s disease virus induced transient atrophy of cecal tonsils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although bursal and thymic atrophy associated with Marek’s disease (MD) is well established and characterized, the effect of Marek's disease virus (MDV) infection on lymphoid aggregates within the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is not known. The cecal tonsils (CT) are the two largest lympho...

  17. Measurement of brain atrophy of aging using x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Shumpei; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1984-01-01

    We measured brain volume of 1,045 subjects with no brain damage using x-ray computed tomography and investigated brain atrophy of aging. Severity of brain atrophy was estimated by brain atrophy index (BAI): BAI (%)=100 (%)x(cerebrospinal fluid space volume/cranial cavity volume). Atrophy of the brain began with statistical significance in the forties in both sexes. In males 40-49 years of age the mean BAI was 1.0% greater (p<0.001) and the S.D. of BAI was 1.1% greater (p<0.001) than those in their thirties. In females of 40-49 years the mean BAI was 0.5% greater (p<0.001) than that in their thirties, but there was no statistical significance between the two S.D.'s of both decades. The BAI increased exponentially with the increasing age from thirties in both sexes. Correlation coefficients were 0.702 (p< 0.001, n=471) in males and 0.721 (p<0.001, n=480) in females. From the regression coefficients it was calculated that the BAI was doubled in 19.4 years in males and 17.4 years in females after thirties. (author)

  18. Atrophy of gray and white matters in the brain during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Shumpei; Matsuzawa, Taiju; Ito, Hisao.

    1984-01-01

    We studied atrophy of gray and white matter during aging in 57 males and 44 females with no neurological disturbances using x-ray computed tomography. The ages ranged from 12 to 80 years. Brain atrophy was expressed as brain volume index: 100% x [(brain volume/cranial cavity volume) in individual subjects]/[(brain volume/cranial cavity volume) in normal subjects of 20-39 years]. Atrophy of gray and white matter volume was expressed as gray and white matter volume indices: 100% x (apparent gray or white matter volume index in individual subjects)/(apparent gray or white matter volume index in normal subjects whose brain volume index was greater than 98%), where apparent gray and white matter volume indices were expressed as 100% x [(gray or white matter volume/cranial cavity volume) in individual subjects]/[(gray or white matter volume/cranial cavity volume) in normal subjects of 20-39 years]. Both the gray and white matter volume indices changed proportionally to the brain volume index (p<0.001). As the brain atrophy advanced, the gray matter volume index decreased more than the white matter volume index (P<0.001). Decrease in the gray and white matter volume indices was statistically significant only in seventies (P<0.002 for gray matter, P<0.05 for white matter). (author)

  19. Aquatic Therapy for a Child with Type III Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Yasser; Gropack, Stacy Jaffee

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons. This case report describes an aquatic therapy program and the outcomes for a 3-year-old girl with type III SMA. Motor skills were examined using the 88-item Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales…

  20. Cognitive dysfunction in lower motor neuron disease: executive and memory deficits in progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, J.; de Visser, M.; van Tol, M.-J.; Linssen, W.H.J.P.; van der Kooi, A.J.; de Haan, R.J.; van den Berg, L.H.; Schmand, B.

    2011-01-01

    Aim In contrast with findings in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), cognitive impairments have as yet not been shown in the lower motor neuron variant of motor neuron disease, progressive spinal muscular atrophy (PMA). The objective of this study was to investigate cognitive function in PMA and to