WorldWideScience

Sample records for prevent skin burns

  1. Skin Burn Associated With Photochemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazyakan, Emre; Hirche, Christoph; Engel, Holger; Kneser, Ulrich; Bigdeli, Amir K

    2018-04-01

    psoralen and ultraviolet A (PUVA) phototherapy (PT) has become a standard treatment for several severe skin diseases. Photosensitization is done by oral psoralen intake. In minor cases, PUVA can lead to skin changes like erythema and hyperpigmentation. However, it can also lead to severe burn injuries when exposed to extensive UV light. This makes the treatment in a burn center inevitable. We report the clinical observation of a 38-year-old man presenting with an extensive burn injury caused by sun tanning after PUVA PT. There are just few cases of extensive burns induced by PUVA PT. Prevention becomes manifest in patient information, correct calculation of dosage, evaluation of photosensitivity, and close observation. In cases of severe burn injuries, patients should be referred to a burn center for optimal conservative treatment. Surgical intervention is usually not necessary.

  2. Porcine wound models for skin substitution and burn treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkoop, E.; Bogaerdt, A.J. van den; Lamme, E.N.; Hoekstra, M.J.; Brandsma, K.; Ulrich, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Skin regeneration is an important field of tissue engineering. Especially in larger burns and chronic wounds, present treatments are insufficient in preventing scar formation and promoting healing. Initial screening of potentially interesting products for skin substitution is usually done by in

  3. Live Skin Allograft in the Management of Severe Burns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    skin substitutes to promote wound healing, reduce pain, and prevent ... into the healing wound as happens with allografts and xenografts (2). ... burns included open flames in two and hot water, hot tea and petrol in one patient each. Both children and one adult had the mothers as skin donors (Figure 1), while two adults had ...

  4. 'Getting under our skin': Introducing banked allograft skin to burn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deceased donor skin possesses many of the properties of the ideal biological dressing, and a well-stocked skin bank has become a critically important asset for the modern burn surgeon. Without it, managing patients with extensive burns and wounds becomes far more challenging, and outcomes are significantly worse.

  5. Ultrasonic technique for characterizing skin burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goans, Ronald E.; Cantrell, Jr., John H.; Meyers, F. Bradford; Stambaugh, Harry D.

    1978-01-01

    This invention, a method for ultrasonically determining the depth of a skin burn, is based on the finding that the acoustical impedance of burned tissue differs sufficiently from that of live tissue to permit ultrasonic detection of the interface between the burn and the underlying unburned tissue. The method is simple, rapid, and accurate. As compared with conventional practice, it provides the important advantage of permitting much earlier determination of whether a burn is of the first, second, or third degree. In the case of severe burns, the usual two - to three-week delay before surgery may be reduced to about 3 days or less.

  6. Treating and Preventing Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  7. [Compression treatment for burned skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Fadhel; Lassoued, Mohamed A; Sahnoun, Mahdi; Sfar, Souad; Cheikhrouhou, Morched

    2012-02-01

    The regularity of a compressive knit is defined as its ability to perform its function in a burnt skin. This property is essential to avoid the phenomenon of rejection of the material or toxicity problems But: Make knits biocompatible with high burnet of human skin. We fabric knits of elastic material. To ensure good adhesion to the skin, we made elastic material, typically a tight loop knitted. The Length of yarn absorbed by stitch and the raw matter are changed with each sample. The physical properties of each sample are measured and compared. Surface modifications are made to these samples by impregnation of microcapsules based on jojoba oil. Knits are compressif, elastic in all directions, light, thin, comfortable, and washable for hygiene issues. In addition, the washing can find their compressive properties. The Jojoba Oil microcapsules hydrated the human burnet skin. This moisturizer is used to the firmness of the wound and it gives flexibility to the skin. Compressive Knits are biocompatible with burnet skin. The mixture of natural and synthetic fibers is irreplaceable in terms comfort and regularity.

  8. Prevention and management of outpatient pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Shannon P; Billmire, David A

    2008-07-01

    Burns are common injuries in the pediatric population, with an estimated 250,000 pediatric burn patients seeking medical care annually. A relative few require inpatient management. This article discusses suggestions for burn prevention, as well as acute burn care and long-term management of small burns.

  9. Preventing Skin Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-18

    A man and a woman talk about how they’ve learned to protect their skin from the sun over the years. .  Created: 5/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/18/2016.

  10. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn ... know about burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. Read our burn prevention tips | ...

  11. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. [Meek technique skin graft for treating exceptionally large area burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinglian; Cai, Chen; Yu, Youxin; Tang, Yizhong; Hu, Delin; Liu, Sheng; Qi, Weiwei; Shi, Jie

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the clinical effect of Meek technique skin graft in treating exceptionally large area burns. The clinical data were retrospectively analysed from 10 cases of exceptionally large area burns treated with Meek technique skin graft from April 2009 to February 2010 (Meek group), and were compared with those from 10 cases of exceptionally large area burns treated with the particle skin with large sheet of skin allograft transplantation from January 2002 to December 2006 (particle skin group). In Meek group, there were 8 males and 2 females with an average age of 34.5 years (range, 5-55 years), including 6 cases of flame burns, 2 cases of hot liquid burns, 1 case of electrical burn, and 1 case of high-temperature dust burn. The burn area was 82.6% +/- 3.1% of total body surface area (TBSA). The most were deep II degree to III degree burns. The time from burn to hospitalization was (3.5 +/- 1.3) hours. In particle skin group, there were 8 males and 2 females with an average age of 36.8 years (range, 18-62 years), including 5 cases of flame burns, 2 cases of hot liquid burns, and 3 cases of gunpowder explosion injury. The burn area was 84.1% +/- 7.4% of TBSA. The most were deep II degree to III degree burns. The time from burn to hospitalization was (4.9 +/- 2.2) hours. There was no significant difference in general data between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The skin graft survival rate, the time of skin fusion, the systemic wound healing time, and the treatment cost of 1% of burn area were 91.23% +/- 5.61%, (11.14 +/- 2.12) days, (38.89 +/- 10.36) days, and (5113.28 +/- 552.44) yuan in Meek group, respectively; and were 78.65% +/- 12.29%, (18.37 +/- 4.63) days, (48.73 +/- 16.92) days, and (7386.36 +/- 867.64) yuan in particle skin group; showing significant differences between 2 groups (P Meek technique skin graft has good effect in treating exceptionally large area burns with the advantages of high survival rate of skin graft, short time of skin fusion, and low

  13. Improving burn care and preventing burns by establishing a burn database in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzaylov, Gennadiy; Murthy, Sushila; Dunaev, Alexander; Savchyn, Vasyl; Knittel, Justin; Zabolotina, Olga; Dylewski, Maggie L; Driscoll, Daniel N

    2014-08-01

    Burns are a challenge for trauma care and a contribution to the surgical burden. The former Soviet republic of Ukraine has a foundation for burn care; however data concerning burns in Ukraine has historically been scant. The objective of this paper was to compare a new burn database to identify problems and implement improvements in burn care and prevention in this country. Retrospective analyses of demographic and clinical data of burn patients including Tukey's post hoc test, analysis of variance, and chi square analyses, and Fisher's exact test were used. Data were compared to the American Burn Association (ABA) burn repository. This study included 1752 thermally injured patients treated in 20 hospitals including Specialized Burn Unit in Municipal Hospital #8 Lviv, Lviv province in Ukraine. Scald burns were the primary etiology of burns injuries (70%) and burns were more common among children less than five years of age (34%). Length of stay, mechanical ventilation use, infection rates, and morbidity increased with greater burn size. Mortality was significantly related to burn size, inhalation injury, age, and length of stay. Wound infections were associated with burn size and older age. Compared to ABA data, Ukrainian patients had double the length of stay and a higher rate of wound infections (16% vs. 2.4%). We created one of the first burn databases from a region of the former Soviet Union in an effort to bring attention to burn injury and improve burn care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Live Skin Allograft in the Management of Severe Burns | Saidi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Deep burn injuries lead to dermal damage that impairs the ability of the skin to heal and regenerate on its own. Skin autografting is considered the current gold standard of care, but lack of patient's own donor skin may require the temporary use of skin substitutes to promote wound healing, reduce pain, and ...

  15. Skin bioengineering and stem cells for severe burn treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lataillade, J.J.; Trouillas, M.; Alexaline, M.; Brachet, M.; Bey, E.; Duhamel, P.; Leclerc, T.; Bargues, L.

    2015-01-01

    Severely burned patients need definitive and efficient wound coverage. The outcome of massive burns has improved with cultured epithelial auto-grafts (CEA). In spite of its fragility, percentage of success, cost of treatment and long-term tendency to contracture, this surgical technique has been developed in some burn centres. The first improvements involved combining CEA and dermis-like substitutes. Cultured skin substitutes provide faster skin closure and satisfying functional results. These methods have been used successfully in massive burns. A second improvement was to enable skin regeneration by using epidermal stem cells. Stem cells can differentiate into keratinocytes, to promote wound repair and to regenerate skin appendages. Human mesenchymal stem cells foster wound healing and were used in cutaneous radiation syndrome. Skin regeneration and tissue engineering methods remain a complex challenge and offer the possibility of new treatment for injured and burned patients. (authors)

  16. Skin contamination - prevention and decontaminating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the structure of human skin. Measures were drawn up to prevent skin contamination in nuclear installations as well as contaminated skin was decontaminated from the personnel. By systematically applying these measures a significant level of success was achieved in preventing contamination in nuclear installations. Cases where more far-reaching chemical methods had to be used were kept to a minimum. (R.P.)

  17. National programme for prevention of burn injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The estimated annual burn incidence in India is approximately 6-7 million per year. The high incidence is attributed to illiteracy, poverty and low level safety consciousness in the population. The situation becomes further grim due to the absence of organized burn care at primary and secondary health care level. But the silver lining is that 90% of burn injuries are preventable. An initiative at national level is need of the hour to reduce incidence so as to galvanize the available resources for more effective and standardized treatment delivery. The National Programme for Prevention of Burn Injuries is the endeavor in this line. The goal of National programme for prevention of burn injuries (NPPBI would be to ensure prevention and capacity building of infrastructure and manpower at all levels of health care delivery system in order to reduce incidence, provide timely and adequate treatment to burn patients to reduce mortality, complications and provide effective rehabilitation to the survivors. Another objective of the programme will be to establish a central burn registry. The programme will be launched in the current Five Year Plan in Medical colleges and their adjoining district hospitals in few states. Subsequently, in the next five year plan it will be rolled out in all the medical colleges and districts hospitals of the country so that burn care is provided as close to the site of accident as possible and patients need not to travel to big cities for burn care. The programme would essentially have three components i.e. Preventive programme, Burn injury management programme and Burn injury rehabilitation programme.

  18. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch ... learn what you need to know about burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. ...

  19. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs ... to learn what you need to know about burn prevention if you have a child with special ...

  20. A novel dermal matrix generated from burned skin as a promising substitute for deep-degree burns therapy

    OpenAIRE

    YU, GUANYING; YE, LAN; TAN, WEI; ZHU, XUGUO; LI, YAONAN; JIANG, DUYIN

    2016-01-01

    The extensive skin defects induced by severe burns are dangerous and can be fatal. Currently, the most common therapy is tangential excision to remove the necrotic or denatured areas of skin, followed by skin grafting. Xenogeneic dermal substitutes, such as porcine acellular dermal matrix (ADM), are typically used to cover the burn wounds, and may accelerate wound healing. It is assumed that burned skin that still maintains partial biological activity may be recycled to construct an autologou...

  1. Integra artificial skin dermal regeneration templates in burn scar surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rexon Ngim

    1999-01-01

    Integra artificial skin is a porous matrix used as a permanent dermal replacement. Developed in the 1970's, it has been used successfully in the treatment of acute bums requiring full or deep partial thickness skin replacement. Three patients with burn scars received Integra Artificial Skin to resurface various areas of burn scars and also contractures. The first was a 24-year-old woman who had two pieces of Integra to resurface a forearm/elbow/wrist defect. The second was a 28-year-old woman who had two pieces of Integra to resurface a neck contracture. The third was a 44 year-old woman who had two pieces to correct severe burn contractures/ scars of her hands. The results of these three patients, probably the first time Integra was used for bum scar and contracture revision, indicate that there is a place for Integra in Burn Scar surgery. However, the basic principle of its application must be adhered to. These include excision to remove the complete scar, recreation of original size of skin defect and meticulous application of the Artificial Skin and its care post-operatively. Details of its application will be highlighted

  2. Skin cancer prevention in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, C; Foley, P

    2009-11-01

    Australia has one of the highest skin cancer incidence and mortality rates in the world. The reason for these high rates is due in part to the high ambient UV radiation levels, combined with a predominantly susceptible fair-skinned population. To address this problem, since 1980 Australians have been exposed to social marketing campaigns to raise awareness of skin cancer prevention. These campaigns have used mass media alongside interventions in schools, workplaces, and in community and leisure settings to motivate sun protective behaviour. As a result of these interventions it can be demonstrated that social marketing campaigns can be a very effective method to not only motivate behaviour change, reduce sunburn, and increase awareness but more importantly, reduce melanoma rates and bring positive economic returns to government. However long term investment in this area is required otherwise any population gains in behaviour are very likely to be quickly eroded.

  3. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn what you need ... burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. Read our burn prevention tips | Visit our YouTube ...

  4. Targeting burn prevention in Ukraine: evaluation of base knowledge in burn prevention and first aid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamelli, Liza; Mykychack, Iryna; Kushnir, Antin; Driscoll, Daniel N; Fuzaylov, Gennadiy

    2015-01-01

    Burn prevention has been identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a topic in need of further investigation and education throughout the world, with an increased need in low-income countries. It has been noted that implementing educational programs for prevention in high income countries has aided in lowering the rate of burn injuries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the current education level of knowledge of prevention and first aid treatment of scald burns. A prevention campaign will target these educational needs as a part of an outreach program to improve burn care in Ukraine. The research team evaluated the current health structure in Ukraine and how it could benefit from the increased knowledge of burn prevention and first aid. A test was designed to assess the baseline level of knowledge with regard to first aid and scald prevention in parents, pregnant woman, and healthcare and daycare providers. A total of 14,456 tests were sent to pediatric clinics, obstetrician clinics, and daycare facilities to test respondents. A total of 6,120 completed tests were returned. Doctors presented with the highest level of knowledge averaging 77.0% on prevention and 67.5% on first aid while daycare workers presented the largest gap in knowledge at 65.0% in prevention and 54.3% in first aid. Interest in further educational materials was reported by 92% of respondents. The results of this study clearly show a lack of knowledge in first aid and prevention of scald burn injury in all the populations tested.

  5. [Prevention and treatment strategy for burn wound sepsis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xihua; Li, Xiaoling

    2016-02-01

    Wound sepsis is one of the main causes of death in patients with severe burn and trauma. The high incidence of burn wound sepsis in children is attributed to their imperfect immune system function, poor resistance against infection, and the weakened skin barrier function after burn. The key to reduce the mortality of pediatric patients with burn wound sepsis is to enhance the understanding of its etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and diagnostic criteria, in order to improve its early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn ... injury-related death in the United States for children ages 5 to 19. Learn More » About Us ...

  7. Best Practices for Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the Burn Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Julia; Ann Raible, Mary; Hajduk, Gina; Collavo, Jacqueline

    The State of Pennsylvania Hospital Engagement Network, in collaboration with a hospital system in Southwestern Pennsylvania, established a goal of reducing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers by 20%. A 6-month unfavorable trend of nurse-sensitive clinical indicators called for immediate process improvement. A retrospective chart review resulted in identification of predominant risk factors placing the burn patient at high risk for pressure ulcer formation. Implementations of pressure ulcer prevention measures were inconsistent. Nurses demonstrated varied levels of knowledge about products used for prevention. It became imperative to examine processes within the unit and provide nursing with education, access to skin care supplies, and advanced skin/wound care products for maintaining skin integrity. Creation of evidence-based guidelines was necessary to improve patient outcomes. A collaborative team approach influenced nursing and physician awareness of pressure ulcer risk. Evidence-based prevention guidelines were developed, and consistency in early intervention was achieved, supporting our culture of safety. A change in interprofessional collaborative practice and positive trend in pressure ulcer incidence data supports the success of our program.

  8. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Age Group Special Needs Space and Place Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type Video Audience Parents You are here Home Safety Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch ...

  9. A profile of skin cancer prevention media coverage in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokkinides, Vilma; Kirkland, Deborah; Andrews, Kimberly; Sullivan, Kristen; Lichtenfeld, J Leonard

    2012-10-01

    Little is known about the coverage of skin cancer prevention messages in news print media. To perform a content analysis of mass-media articles from newspaper and magazines pertaining to skin cancer prevention in 4 specific months (January, May, July, and October) in 2009 and assess the extent of coverage of skin cancer prevention messages. We conducted a content analysis of 144 articles related to skin cancer prevention extracted from strategic media scans of selected months in 2009. We sought to provide the frequency of mass-media content categorized by theme and focus related to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) protection and risk-reducing behaviors. The audience for the vast majority (78%) of the articles was the general public. Among the assessed articles, more were published in May (49%) and July (35%) than in the remaining other months. The two most frequent themes focused on 'protection of the skin' (32%) and on 'skin cancer prevention' (23%) via risk reduction behavioral practices. Analysis of message content regarding UVR reduction practices showed that many mentioned 'use of sunscreen' (65% of messages) with the least-often mentioned behaviors being 'seek shade' (6.3%) and 'do not burn' (1.4%). In addition, a quarter of the articles lacked any content mentioning recommended UVR reduction behaviors. This study was limited to the narrow scope of articles published in 2009 and for selected months. This profile of mass-media content regarding skin cancer prevention revealed gaps in coverage of UVR reduction behaviors with possible room for improvement. Strategies for improving and comprehensiveness of coverage of recommended skin cancer prevention behaviors in the media are discussed. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Behavioral Counseling ...

  11. Treatment of radioinduced skin burns by adult stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lataillade, J.J.; Prat, M.; Gourmelon, P.; Bey, E.

    2009-01-01

    In the area of skin injuries caused by ionizing radiations; the recent opportunity give us the the possibility to manage victims of radiation accidents with skin acute symptoms of irradiation. The approach of cell therapy developed for these patients could be in a second time, used for other types of injuries as thermal burns and the injuries linked to overexposure in radiotherapy. In spite of the diversity of approaches of allogeneic and autologous transplantation, the prognosis of deep and extended radioinduced burns is not completely satisfying because of inflammatory recurrences, origin of graft failures. The stem cells have been used in association. The stem cells were got from sampling of autologous bone marrow after an expansion in vitro from 15 to 17 days. The cultures were realised in medium with 8% of platelet lysate (clinical grade). The cells have been given by injection in complement of epidermis auto graft. A spectacular effect was noticed the day after the injection, but disappearing in some days encouraging to realize supplementary injections. An effect of the quickness and the quality of the graft success is appeared significant too. no necrosis recurrence for the patients after four years for the first one of them. We think that the stem cells participate to the local control of inflammation. (N.C.)

  12. Personnel decontamination and preventive skin care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Skin contamination arises from contact with contaminated aqueous solutions and from transmission of radioactively contaminated dirt particles. As long as the surface of the skin is neither inflamed nor showing any lesions, normally only a limited part of the top layer (epidermis), i.e. the upper layers of the stratum corneum, is contaminated. The intact horny layer has a barrier function protecting against the penetration of chemicals and dirt particles. The horny layer can be damaged by water, solvents, alkaline substances, and acids. In general, it is safe to say that the horny layer acts as a natural barrier to the penetration of liquid and particulate impurities into lower layers of the skin. As long as the horny layer is intact and free from lesions, the risk of incorporation can be considered low. When decontaminating and cleansing the skin, also in daily skin cleansing, care must be taken to prevent the acid protective layer and the horny layer from being compromised. Daily cleansing and cleansing for decontamination must be carried out with a mild, weakly acidic detergent. In addition, prevention should be achieved daily by applying a non-greasy skin lotion to protect the skin. Following a systematic regular regimen in skin cleansing and preventive skin care as well as a specific approach in skin decontamination and cleansing will avoid damage to the skin and remove any contamination incurred. This approach comprises a three-pronged concept, namely skin protection, cleansing and care. (orig.)

  13. Rationalization of thermal injury quantification methods: application to skin burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglianti, Benjamin L; Dewhirst, Mark W; Abraham, John P; Gorman, John M; Sparrow, Eph M

    2014-08-01

    Classification of thermal injury is typically accomplished either through the use of an equivalent dosimetry method (equivalent minutes at 43 °C, CEM43 °C) or through a thermal-injury-damage metric (the Arrhenius method). For lower-temperature levels, the equivalent dosimetry approach is typically employed while higher-temperature applications are most often categorized by injury-damage calculations. The two methods derive from common thermodynamic/physical chemistry origins. To facilitate the development of the interrelationships between the two metrics, application is made to the case of skin burns. This thermal insult has been quantified by numerical simulation, and the extracted time-temperature results served for the evaluation of the respective characterizations. The simulations were performed for skin-surface exposure temperatures ranging from 60 to 90 °C, where each surface temperature was held constant for durations extending from 10 to 110 s. It was demonstrated that values of CEM43 at the basal layer of the skin were highly correlated with the depth of injury calculated from a thermal injury integral. Local values of CEM43 were connected to the local cell survival rate, and a correlating equation was developed relating CEM43 with the decrease in cell survival from 90% to 10%. Finally, it was shown that the cell survival/CEM43 relationship for the cases investigated here most closely aligns with isothermal exposure of tissue to temperatures of ~50 °C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Pediatric Treadmill Burns: Assessing the effectiveness of prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsman, David; Li, Zhe; Connolly, Siobhan; Meyerowitz-Katz, Daniel; Allan, James; Maitz, Peter K M

    2016-11-01

    Legislative changes in 2008 in Australia mandated that all new treadmills display a warning sticker about the risk of friction burns in children. This was accompanied by a health promotion campaign advising of the risks of treadmills to children. Analyses of pediatric burns data identified all cases of treadmill burns occurring between 2005 and 2014. The incidence of treadmill burns, associations with age and gender, characteristics of the burns and the adequacy of first aid provided immediately after the burn was examined. There were 298 cases of treadmill burns over the 10-year period (3.5% of all pediatric burns). The incidence rose until the introduction of legislation and health promotion in 2008, and then declined over the remaining study period. The majority of treadmill burns in children were inflicted on the upper limbs (91%), and 93% involved the hands. Most burns were full thickness (62%, n=182) and 49% (n=148) required skin grafts. Approximately one-third of treadmill burns (35%, n=105) occurred while someone else was using the treadmill. In the vast majority of treadmill burn injuries (74%, n=223), there was either no first aid or inadequate first aid provided immediately after the injury. A significant number of treadmill burns occur in children, and these often result in serious injuries that are not treated with appropriate first aid. A reduction in the incidence of these burns was associated with the introduction of legislation and health promotion targeted at child safety around treadmills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Migration of labeled bone marrow MSCs and skin fibroblasts after systemic and local transplantation in rat burn wound model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shchegelskaya E. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study migration of syngeneic bone marrow MSCs and skin fibroblasts (FB, labeled by fluorochromes, after intravenous (IV and local transplantation in a rat burn wound model (BWM. Methods. Rats were divided into 3 groups: C – without burn + IV injection of labeled MSCs and FBs mixture; O1 – BWM + IV injection of labeled MSCs and FBs mixture; O2 – BWM + fibrin matrix filled with labeled cell mixture. MSCs were labeled by green fluorochrome, and fibroblasts – by red one. The presence of labeled cells in cryocuts of the skin, liver, kidney and bone marrow was assessed on the 3 and 7 days after transplantation. Results. Skin FBs selective migration to the regenerating burn wound and MSCs accumulation in the kidneys were found in rats of group O1 on day 7 after the IV injection. The labeled cells proliferated in the transplanted fibrin matrix and participated in the wound regeneration. MSCs partly migrated to the bone marrow after the IV injections. Conclusions. IV transplanted syngeneic bone marrow MSCs and skin FBs (passage 0 migrate to the burn wound and participate in the healing. Migration of bone marrow MSCs in the kidneys can prevent kidney failure after burn.

  16. Successful skin homografting from an identical twin in a severely burned patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Emin; Karagulle, Erdal; Turan, Hale; Oguz, Hakan; Abali, Ebru Sakallioglu; Ozcay, Necdet; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Flame burns are a serious condition and usually have high morbidity and mortality because they affect large areas of the body surface as well as the lungs. In these patients, it is especially difficult to find healthy skin for grafting if they have more than 70% third-degree burns. Repeated autografting or synthetic wound care materials are the only treatment options to cover burned areas. Partial-thickness skin grafting from the patient's identical twin sibling may be an alternative treatment option, if possible. Here, we report a patient with severe flame injury treated with skin from his identical twin. The patient had third-degree burns covering 70% of his body surface. Initial treatment consisted of fluid and electrolyte replacement, daily wound care, and surgical debridements, as well as nutritional support. After initial treatment, we performed a successful skin grafting from his identical twin. Skin grafting between identical twins might be an alternate method for severely burned patients.

  17. Gasoline burns: the preventable cause of thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J B; Ahrenholz, D H; Solem, L D; Warren, W

    1990-01-01

    Gasoline related burns are a significant cause of thermal injuries each year in the United States. In this retrospective review of 1858 admissions to our Regional Burn Center from 1979 to 1988, 270 (14.5%) were persons with gasoline-related injuries. Natural gas and other distillates were excluded. Most victims were male (228 of 270); mean age was 27 years; mean burn size was 25% total body surface area. There were 299 skin grafts performed on 172 patients, and there were 16 deaths. The mean length of stay decreased from 38 to 17 days (p less than 0.001) between the first and second 5-year time periods, even though there was no significant change in age or mean burn size. The majority (59%) of gasoline-related burns were the result of inappropriate or unsupervised use of gasoline. The general public is largely unaware of the dangers of gasoline, and further education in this area is needed.

  18. Venous malformations: MR imaging features that predict skin burns after percutaneous alcohol embolization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Hazirolan, Tuncay; Carrino, John A.; Bluemke, David A.; Mitchell, Sally

    2008-01-01

    To examine the value of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for predicting the occurrence of skin burns in patients with venous malformations who undergo percutaneous alcohol embolization was the objective of the study. Pre-procedural MR imaging at 1.5 T from 40 patients with venous malformations who had undergone percutaneous alcohol embolization was retrospectively reviewed by two observers for these features: anatomic location, definition (well-defined or ill-defined), and the presence of skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscle, tendon, bone, joint, and deep venous system involvement. One observer recorded the length of skin involvement and volume of the malformation. Univariate and multivariate analysis tests were used to determine whether an association between the occurrence of skin burns and MR imaging features existed. The anatomic locations of the venous malformations were the lower extremity (20 out of 40), upper extremity (11 out of 40), trunk (four out of 40), head/neck (three out of 40) and pelvis (two out of 40). Of the 40 subjects, 15% (six out of 40) experienced skin burns. There was a significant association between the absence of muscle involvement (p=0.0198) as well as the length of skin involvement (p=0.027), with the occurrence of skin burns. Malformation size and all other features were not significantly associated with skin burns. Skin burns in patients with venous malformations treated with alcohol embolization are associated with the length of skin involvement and with the absence of deeper tissue involvement, as depicted on MR imaging. (orig.)

  19. A novel dermal matrix generated from burned skin as a promising substitute for deep-degree burns therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guanying; Ye, Lan; Tan, Wei; Zhu, Xuguo; Li, Yaonan; Jiang, Duyin

    2016-03-01

    The extensive skin defects induced by severe burns are dangerous and can be fatal. Currently, the most common therapy is tangential excision to remove the necrotic or denatured areas of skin, followed by skin grafting. Xenogeneic dermal substitutes, such as porcine acellular dermal matrix (ADM), are typically used to cover the burn wounds, and may accelerate wound healing. It is assumed that burned skin that still maintains partial biological activity may be recycled to construct an autologous acellular dermal matrix, termed 'deep‑degree burned dermal matrix (DDBDM)'. In theory, DDBDM may avoid the histoincompatibility issues associated with foreign or xenogeneic dermal matrices, and reduce therapy costs by making full use of discarded skin. In the present study, the collagens within prepared DDBDM were thickened, disorganized and partially fractured, however, they still maintained their reticular structure and tensile strength (Pburn toxins. Following 4 weeks of subcutaneous implantation, ADM and DDBDM were incompletely degraded and maintained good integrity. No significant inflammatory reaction or rejection were observed, which indicated that ADM and DDBDM have good histocompatibility. Therefore, DDBDM may be a useful material for the treatment of deep‑degree burns.

  20. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

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    Full Text Available ... Blog Videos Newsletter facebook twitter instagram pinterest gplus youtube Search Menu Why It Matters Who We Are ... needs. Read our burn prevention tips | Visit our YouTube channel To embed this Safety Tip in your ...

  1. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn what you need to know about burn prevention ... death of 16 children in the United States. Learn More » About Us Mission Programs Public Policy Research ...

  2. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Menu Why It Matters Who We Are What We Do Find Your Safe Kids Safe Kids ... With Special Needs Watch this video to learn what you need to know about burn prevention if ...

  3. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn what you need to know about burn prevention ... coins and 19 percent involved candy or gum. Learn More » About Us Mission Programs Public Policy Research ...

  4. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn what you need to know about burn prevention ... button batteries. That's one child every three hours. Learn More » About Us Mission Programs Public Policy Research ...

  5. Characteristics of paediatric burns in Sichuan province: epidemiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Cen, Ying; Chen, Jun-Jie; Xu, Xue-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Xue

    2012-02-01

    This study analysed the epidemiology of paediatric burns in Sichuan province, China, for the formulation of prevention programmes for this population. A retrospective review was performed of paediatric patients admitted to the Burn Centre of West China Hospital during 2003-2009, including patient demographics, burn aetiology, time and place of burn, rural or urban population, and education level and burn knowledge of the patients' guardians. A total of 1387 paediatric burn patients, mean age 3.21 years (range 0-14 years) were admitted. The majority (72.1%) were 0-3 years old, and the male/female ratio was 2.39:1. Most common aetiologies were scalds (81.3%), flames (17.1%), and electricity (1.3%), while chemical burns were rare. The ratio of indoor versus outdoor location was 4.93:1, and the rural/urban ratio was 4.03:1. Burns were classified as: total burn surface area (TBSA) ranging from 0% to 5%, (23.9% of patients); TBSA between 5% and 15% (33.2%); TBSA between 15% and 25% (29.8%); TBSA greater than 25% (13.1%). There was a higher prevalence from April to September, and the peak times were mealtime and bathtime. The education level was lower in the rural group. Both urban and rural groups had little knowledge of first aid for burns. Burn prevention programmes should promote improved living conditions, with prevention education addressed directly to the guardians of children. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Effect of piracetam and nimodipine on full-thickness skin burns in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Elif; Dincel, Gungor C

    2016-08-01

    The potential of several drugs for full-thickness skin burns has been investigated, but the treatment of such burns remains a challenge in plastic surgery. The present study was designed to determine the effect of systemic and topical administration of piracetam and nimodipine on full-thickness skin burn wound healing. A total of 36 New Zealand male rabbits were divided into six groups. Full-thickness skin burns were produced in all the groups, except the control group. Piracetam was administered systemically (piracetam-IV) and topically (piracetam-C) for 14 days, and nimodipine was administered systemically (nimodipine-IV) and topically (nimodipine-C) over the burn wounds for 14 days. The sham group underwent burn injury but was not administered any drug. After 21 days, gross examination and histopathological analysis were performed and the results were compared statistically. Nimodipine-C and nimodipine-IV had no effect on burn wound healing. However, both piracetam-IV and piracetam-C significantly enhanced the healing of the full-thickness skin burn wounds, although the latter was more effective, useful and practical in burn wound healing. The histopathological features of the wounds in the piracetam-C group were closer to those of the control group than those of the other groups. Piracetam-C rather than piracetam-IV may promote full-thickness burn wound healing in rabbits. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The treatment of extensively burned patents and β irradiational injury skin burn patients with irradiated pigskin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhongyi; Lu Xingan; Jing Ling; Qi Qiang

    1994-01-01

    Obvious therapeutic effects achieved by the covering of irradiation sterilized pigskin on burn wounds, escarectomized 3rd degree burn wounds β injured burns are discussed. The article also describes the manufacture processes of irradiated pigskins and the selection of surgical treatments of various burns. 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  8. [Application of skin and soft tissue expansion in treatment of burn injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N Z; Shen, Z Y; Ma, C X

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the application of skin and soft tissue expansion in the treatment of deformity due to extensive severe burn injury and repair of severe deep electrical burned scalp and skull with fresh wound. From 1988, 83 cases of application of skin and soft tissue expansion were reported. In those patients with deformity due to severe burn of large area and with whole nasal defect, soft tissue expander was used under the forehead skin graft and venter frontalis, followed by reconstruction of nose with the expanded vascularized skin flap and carved cartilago costalis as nasal frame. In patients of severe deep electrical burned scalp and skull with fresh wound, skin and soft tissue expansion were used to repair the wound simultaneously with scalp burn alopecia, anesthetics and antibiotics injected into the extracapsular space of the expander in case of pain and infection. All of the cases were successfully treated with little pain and minimized infection. Skin and soft tissue expansion in a safe and reliable measure in the treatment of deformity due to extensive severe burn injury and repair of severe deep electrical burned scalp and skull with fresh wound.

  9. Skin resurfacing in a circumferential full thickness burn to the penis: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabir, Shehab; Frew, Quentin; Thompson, Richard; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-08-13

    A circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis is a rarely encountered injury. However, when it does occur, it proves a management challenge to the plastic and burns surgeon in terms of reconstruction. This is due to the need of not only regaining adequate function of the organ, but also because of the need for a pleasing aesthetic outcome. Split-skin grafts have been utilised successfully to resurface full thickness burns of the penis and have given good results. Yet the success of split-skin grafts, especially those applied to an anatomically challenging region of the body such as the penis, depends on a number of carefully thought-out steps. We discuss the case of a circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis which was treated with split-skin grafting and highlight important pitfalls that the plastic and burns surgeon need to be aware of to ensure a successful outcome.

  10. The Use of Glabrous Skins Grafts in the Treatment of Pediatric Palmar Hand Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Michael T; Duquette, Steve P; Ranganath, Bharat; Burkey, Brooke A; Glat, Paul M; Davis, Wellington J

    2015-08-01

    An often overlooked, yet useful, technique in the treatment of palmar hand burns is the use of glabrous skin grafting, particularly in dark-skinned individuals. Pediatric palmar burns are a particularly unique subset of burns. The typical split-thickness or full-thickness skin grafts leave a notably different skin texture and pigmentation. It is also known that the psychological aspects of a pediatric burn can be quite burdensome for a child as he or she progresses through childhood and adolescence. For a dark-skinned patient the placement a standard full-thickness skin graft in a nonpigmented palm provides for a constant reminder of a traumatic event. We report a case series of pediatric patients who were managed with glabrous skin grafting from the plantar aspect of the foot. A retrospective review of palmar skin burns requiring grafting at a single pediatric burn center experience over a 2 and a half year time period was performed. Seventeen patients were identified. Our treatment algorithm for deep partial thickness burns first relies on a combination of operative and nonoperative measures to expedite the demarcation of the burn injury. If the burn is full thickness in nature or if a lack of progression of healing is identified within the first 14 days of injury, then skin grafting is recommended. Our technique for performing the graft is described. The average age at time of surgery was 2.05 years (6 months to 6.8 years). Fourteen of the 17 patients had darker skin types (Fitzpatrick Type III-VI) and identified themselves as either Hispanic or African American. The average size of the area requiring skin graft after debridement was 0.94% total body surface area (0.5%-2.0%). Of the patients that were not lost to follow-up, 1 patient required additional grafting after developing a finger contracture for splint noncompliance. Aesthetically, the wounds went on to heal with an excellent pigment match and an inconspicuous donor site. In the management of deep

  11. Alternative animal model for studies of total skin thickness burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ana Laura Martins de; Parisi, Julia Risso; Brassolatti, Patrícia; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2017-10-01

    To present an alternative experimental model of third degree burn of easy reproducibility. Eighteen male Wister rats were randomly divided into three groups, 6 of which were allocated to each group. A soldering iron coupled to an aluminum plate was used to produce burn, at a temperature of 150ºC, with different exposure times per group. Group 5 (G5) animals were burned at 150°C with exposure time of 5 seconds; Group 10 (G10) the animals were burned at 150°C with exposure time of 10 seconds and group 15 (G15) the animals were burned at 150°C with exposure time of 15 seconds. Histopathological analyzes showed that all three groups had similar morphological characteristics, with total thickness involvement. The technique is effective to reproduce a third degree burn and suggests the temperature of 150ºC with 5 seconds of exposure in order to minimize the risks to the animals.

  12. Alternative animal model for studies of total skin thickness burns

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Ana Laura Martins de; Parisi, Julia Risso; Brassolatti, Patrícia; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To present an alternative experimental model of third degree burn of easy reproducibility. Methods: Eighteen male Wister rats were randomly divided into three groups, 6 of which were allocated to each group. A soldering iron coupled to an aluminum plate was used to produce burn, at a temperature of 150ºC, with different exposure times per group. Group 5 (G5) animals were burned at 150°C with exposure time of 5 seconds; Group 10 (G10) the animals were burned at 150°C with e...

  13. Effects of Topical Tamoxifen on Wound Healing of Burned Skin in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaban Mehrvarz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background This study aimed to assess the effects of the topical application of tamoxifen on wound healing of burned skin in Wistar rats by evaluating 3 healing characteristics: fibrotic tissue thickness (FTT, scar surface area (SSA, and angiogenesis in the healed scar tissue. Methods Eighteen male Wistar rats were used in this study. A third-degree burn wound was made on the shaved animals’ back, measuring 2×2×2 cm. In the first group, a 2% tamoxifen ointment was applied to the wound twice daily for 8 weeks. The second group received a placebo ointment during the same period. The third group did not receive any treatment and served as the control group. Results The median (interquartile range=[Q1, Q3] FTT was 1.35 (1.15, 1.62 mm, 1.00 (0.95, 1.02 mm, and 1.25 (0.8, 1.5 mm in the control, tamoxifen, and placebo groups, respectively (P=0.069. However, the FTT in the tamoxifen group was less than in the placebo and control groups. The median angiogenesis was 3.5 (3.00, 6.25, 8.00 (6.75, 9.25, and 7.00 (5.50, 8.25 vessels per high-power field for the control, tamoxifen, and placebo groups, respectively (P=0.067. However, the median angiogenesis was higher in the tamoxifen group than in the control group. No significant difference was observed in the mean SSA between the tamoxifen group and the control group (P=0.990. Conclusions Local application of tamoxifen increased angiogenesis and decreased the FTT, with no change in the SSA in burned skin areas. These effects are expected to expedite the wound healing process, reducing contracture and preventing hypertrophic scar and keloid formation.

  14. Multicenter assessment of burn team injury prevention knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klas, Karla S; Smith, Sue Jane; Matherly, Annette F; Dillard, B Daniel; Grant, Ernest J; Cusick-Jost, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Engaging burn professionals to utilize "teachable moments" and provide accurate fire safety and burn prevention (FSBP) education is essential in reducing injury incidence. Minimal data is available regarding burn clinicians' evidence-based FSBP knowledge. A committee of prevention professionals developed, pilot-tested, and distributed a 52-question online survey assessing six major categories: demographical information (n = 7); FSBP knowledge (n = 24); home FSBP practices (n = 6); burn center FSBP education (n = 7); self-assessed competence and confidence in providing FSBP education (n = 2); and improving ABA reach (n = 6). Responses with 50% of TG. ANOVA showed self-reported competence and confidence in providing FSBP education were not good predictors of FSBP scores, but staff with competence and confidence in their ability to provide FSBP education. However, this multicenter survey demonstrates the need for professional training on best practices in injury prevention, specifically targeting knowledge gaps on: smoke alarms, fire-safe cigarettes, children's sleepwear, burn/fire epidemiology, fireworks, bathing/scald injuries, and residential sprinklers. Based on these findings, FSBP educational materials will be created.

  15. Significant skin burns may occur with the use of a water balloon in HIFU treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Robert; Collin, Jamie; Wu, Feng; Coussios, Constantin; Leslie, Tom; Cranston, David

    2012-10-01

    HIFU is a minimally-invasive therapy suitable for treating selected intra-abdominal tumors. Treatment is safe although skin burns may occur due to pre-focal heating. HIFU treatment of a renal transplant tumor located in the left lower abdomen was undertaken in our centre. Treatment was performed prone, requiring displacement of the abdominal wall away from the treatment field using a water balloon, constructed of natural rubber latex and filled with degassed water. Intra-operatively, ultrasound imaging and physical examination of the skin directly over the focal region was normal. Immediately post-operative, a full-thickness skin burn was evident at the periphery of the balloon location, outside the expected HIFU path. Three possibilities may account for this complication. Firstly, the water balloon may have acted as a lens, focusing the HIFU to a neo-focus off axis. Secondly, air bubbles may have been entrapped between the balloon and the skin, causing heating at the interface. Finally, heating of the isolated water within the balloon may have been sufficient to cause burning. In this case, the placement of a water balloon caused a significant skin burn. Care should be taken in their use as burns, situated off axis, may occur even if the overlying skin appears normal.

  16. Biotechnological Management of Skin Burn Injuries: Challenges and Perspectives in Wound Healing and Sensory Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Dorothée; Laverdet, Betty; Buhé, Virginie; Trouillas, Marina; Ghazi, Kamélia; Alexaline, Maïa M; Egles, Christophe; Misery, Laurent; Coulomb, Bernard; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Berthod, François; Desmoulière, Alexis

    2017-02-01

    Many wound management protocols have been developed to improve wound healing after burn with the primordial aim to restore the barrier function of the skin and also provide a better esthetic outcome. Autologous skin grafts remain the gold standard in the treatment of skin burn, but this treatment has its limitation especially for patients presenting limited donor sites due to extensive burn areas. Deep burn injuries also alter the integrity of skin-sensitive innervation and have an impact on patient's quality of life by compromising perceptions of touch, temperature, and pain. Thus, patients can suffer from long-term disabilities ranging from cutaneous sensibility loss to chronic pain. The cellular mechanisms involved in skin reinnervation following injury are not elucidated yet. Depending on the depth of the burn, nerve sprouting can occur from the wound bed or the surrounding healthy tissue, but somehow this process fails to provide correct reinnervation of the wound during scarring. In addition, several clinical observations indicate that damage to the peripheral nervous system influences wound healing, resulting in delayed wound healing or chronic wounds, underlining the role of innervation and neuromediators for normal cutaneous tissue repair development. Promising tissue engineering strategies, including the use of biomaterials, skin substitutes, and stem cells, could provide novel alternative treatments in wound healing and help in improving patient's sensory recovery.

  17. Risks for skin and other cancers up to 25 years after burn injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellemkjaer, Lene; Hölmich, Lisbet R; Gridley, Gloria

    2006-01-01

    with that in the general population of Denmark. RESULTS: Patients with burn had 139 skin cancers, with 189 expected, yielding a standardized incidence ratio of 0.7 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-0.9). This reduced risk was due mainly to deficits of basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, whereas the number...... of squamous cell carcinomas observed was close to expected. We saw no consistent increases in risk for skin cancer in the subgroups of patients with the most severe injuries or with the longest periods of follow up. CONCLUSIONS: The tendency to malignant degeneration of burn scars, described in previous...... reports of case series, did not result in an excess of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin or of any other type of skin cancer during up to 25 years' follow up of a large unselected cohort of patients hospitalized for burn injuries....

  18. Histological and immunohistochemical study of cutaneous angiogenesis process in experimental third-degree skin burns treated with allograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Popescu, Florina Carmen; Mogoşanu, G D; Pârvănescu, H; Streba, Liliana; Mogoantă, L

    2012-01-01

    Skin burns are a rather high incidence lesions which, depending on their depth and extension, can severely affect not only the skin but the entire organism. Third-degree skin burns extended on over 20% of the body surface often require skin graft. Skin allograft is a therapeutic alternative when autograft cannot be used. We investigated the allograft influence on the angiogenesis process in third-degree skin burns, using an experimental model. We noticed that the allograft induces a stronger inflammatory reaction associated with intense angiogenesis process by about 10-15% compared to control group.

  19. Use of preputial skin for coverage of post-burn contractures of fingers in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed I Zaroo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hand burns are common injuries. Children frequently sustain burn injuries, especially to their hands. Contractures are a common sequel of severe burns around joints. The prepuce, or foreskin, has been used as a skin graft for a number of indications. We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of utilising the preputial skin for the management of post-burn contractures of fingers in uncircumcised male children. Materials and Methods: Preputial skin was used for the coverage of released contractures of fingers in 12 patients aged 2-6 years. The aetiology of burns was "Kangri" burn in eight patients and scalding in four patients. Six patients had contracture in two fingers, four patients in one finger, and two patients had contractures in three fingers. Results: None of the patients had graft loss, and all the wounds healed within 2 weeks. All patients had complete release of contractures without any recurrence. Hyperpigmentation of the grafts was observed over a period of time, which was well accepted by the parents. Conclusions: Preputial skin can be used successfully for male children with mild-to-moderate contractures of 2-3 fingers for restoration of the hand function, minimal donor site morbidity.

  20. Effect of blood transfusion and skin grafting on rats with combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongtang; Ran Xinze; Wei Shuqing

    1990-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of escharectomy and skin grafting at different times on rats with combined radiation-burn injuries (5 Gy total body irradiation plus flash radiation from a 5 kW bromotungstenic lamp to induce a 15% TBSA full thickness burn on back) treated with blood transfusion (BT) were studied. The treatment with BT and escharectomy plus skin grafting at 24, 48, and 72 h after injury showed significant therapeutic effects. In these treated groups, early recovery of WBC counts, the granulocytes and total lymphocytes, T, B-cells, bone marrow cells or CFU-F counts were evident within 30 days after injury. The 30-day survival rates of the skin grafts in the group treated with BT and skin grafting at 24 h after injury was 80%, in the group with skin grafting alone was 50%, while all the skin grafts sloughted within 30 days when the grafting was performed 48 and 72 h after injury. The 30-day survival rate of the recipients treated with skin grafting plus BT was higher than that of the animals with skin grafting alone. The results showed that satisfactory results were achieved with BT plus escharectomy and skin grafting within 24 h after injury, while skin grafting performed at 48 or 72 h after injury was ineffective for the survival of skin grafts

  1. Skin banking at a regional burns centre-The way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Sunil Manohar; Mishra, Mukesh Gopinath; Karnik, Shilpa; Dutta, Shruti; Mishra, Mamata; Panda, Sangita; Varghese, Reshmi; Virkar, Tanvi; Upendran, Vaishna

    2018-04-13

    In India approximately 1 million people get burnt every year and most of them are from the lower or middle income strata. Therefore it is obligatory to find out an economic way of treatment for the affected populace. Since use of human skin allograft is the gold standard for the treatment of burn wound, in-house skin banking for a burn unit hospital is prerequisite to make the treatment procedure affordable. Although, there was one skin bank at India till 2009, but it was difficult for a single bank to cover the entire country's need. Looking at the necessities, National Burns Centre (a tertiary burn care centre) along with Rotary International and Euro Skin Bank collaborated and developed an effective cadaveric skin banking model in Mumbai, Maharashtra in 2009. Initial two to three years were formation phase; by the year 2013 the entire system was organized and started running full fledged. The model has also been replicated in other states of India to accommodate the large burn population of the country. This paper therefore, gives a step by step account of how the bank evolved and its present status. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Influence of body mass index on skin grafting in pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Nicole E; Thomas, Priscilla G; Sherman, Ashley K; St Peter, Shawn D; Juang, David

    2015-03-01

    There is heterogeneous literature on the association of obese and underweight body habitus on burn outcomes in adult and pediatric literature. We examine the effect of standardized pediatric body mass index (BMI) categories skin graft utilisation. A retrospective chart review was performed on children who underwent burn treatment from January 1995 to November 2011. BMI was categorized by standard definitions: underweight (95%). There were 1164 patients: 77 underweight, 604 normal, 215 overweight, and 268 obese patients. No differences existed between group demographics. Grafts were performed in 39% of underweight, 27% of normal, 22% of overweight, and 27% of obese patients. Underweight children had nearly a 2 fold increase in their risk of full thickness burns and were 1.8 times more likely to undergo skin grafting than normal BMI children. Overweight children had a significant decrease in the incidence skin grafting by 23% then compared to normal weight children. There were no differences in percent TBSA burned or percent TBSA grafted using ANOVA. Underweight pediatric burn victims have an increased risk for skin grafting while mildly overweight children are slightly protected from skin grafting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Third Degree Skin Burns Caused by an MRI Compatible Electrocardiographic Monitoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau; Isaksen, Christin Rosendahl Graff; Kristensen, Birgitte Hornbæk

    of the assigned compatibility specifications of the leads due to the use of TFE sequences with high SAR values. MRI compatible monitoring systems are only safe when used with proper care. The presented burn cases may have been avoided if space had been provided between the ECG leads and the skin using a cloth......Introduction: The combination of increased magnetic field strength, field gradients and RF power, augments the risk of tissue heating in patients undergoing an MRI examination. This is especially important when the patients have implants or when external devices are in direct contact with the skin....... This holds true even in cases in which the devices are MRI compatible and therefore safe in specified MRI environments. Of particular interest to this case report is skin burns caused by the ECG monitoring equipment. In this context, several cases of ECG electrode related burns have been reported, while...

  4. Development of a Skin Burn Predictive Model adapted to Laser Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneck-Museux, N.; Scheer, E.; Perez, L.; Agay, D.; Autrique, L.

    2016-12-01

    Laser technology is increasingly used, and it is crucial for both safety and medical reasons that the impact of laser irradiation on human skin can be accurately predicted. This study is mainly focused on laser-skin interactions and potential lesions (burns). A mathematical model dedicated to heat transfers in skin exposed to infrared laser radiations has been developed. The model is validated by studying heat transfers in human skin and simultaneously performing experimentations an animal model (pig). For all experimental tests, pig's skin surface temperature is recorded. Three laser wavelengths have been tested: 808 nm, 1940 nm and 10 600 nm. The first is a diode laser producing radiation absorbed deep within the skin. The second wavelength has a more superficial effect. For the third wavelength, skin is an opaque material. The validity of the developed models is verified by comparison with experimental results (in vivo tests) and the results of previous studies reported in the literature. The comparison shows that the models accurately predict the burn degree caused by laser radiation over a wide range of conditions. The results show that the important parameter for burn prediction is the extinction coefficient. For the 1940 nm wavelength especially, significant differences between modeling results and literature have been observed, mainly due to this coefficient's value. This new model can be used as a predictive tool in order to estimate the amount of injury induced by several types (couple power-time) of laser aggressions on the arm, the face and on the palm of the hand.

  5. Skin contamination resulting from an uranyl nitrate burn. An incident study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesne, B.; Auriol, B.; Berard, P.; Chalabreysse, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe the circumstances of a burn incident on hand by a mixture of diluted nitric acid and uranyl nitrate. The burn is located on the left hand fingers. After important washings uranium remains on the fingers. During about ten days, the worker is examined and the therapy is going on till the total radioactivity disappearance. Urine collection of twenty four hours is prescribed during the treatment. The whole activity is kept on the burnt skin. The quick desquamation is the elimination way of the skin retention. 6 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Bilayered nanofibrous 3D hierarchy as skin rudiment by emulsion electrospinning for burn wound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Pallabi; Dadhich, Prabhash; Srivas, Pavan Kumar; Das, Bodhisatwa; Maulik, Dhrubajyoti; Dhara, Santanu

    2017-08-22

    Mimicking skin extracellular matrix hierarchy, the present work aims to develop a bilayer skin graft comprising a porous cotton-wool-like 3D layer with membranous structure of PCL-chitosan nanofibers. Emulsion electrospinning with differential stirring periods of PCL-chitosan emulsion results in development of a bilayer 3D structure with varied morphology. The electrospun membrane has fiber diameter ∼274 nm and pore size ∼1.16 μm while fluffy 3D layer has fiber diameter ∼1.62 μm and pore size ∼62 μm. The 3D layer was further coated with collagen I isolated from Cirrhinus cirrhosus fish scales to improve biofunctionality. Surface coating with collagen I resulted in bundling the fibers together, thereby increasing their average diameter to 2.80 μm and decreasing pore size to ∼45 μm. The architecture and composition of the scaffold promotes efficient cellular activity where interconnected porosity with ECM resembling collagen I coating assists cellular adhesion, infiltration, and proliferation from initial days of fibroblast seeding, while keratinocytes migrate on the surface only without infiltrating in the membranous nanofiber layer. Anatomy of the scaffold arising due to variation in pore size distribution at different layers thereby facilitates compartmentalization and prevents initial cellular transmigration. The scaffold also assists in extracellular matrix protein synthesis and keratinocyte stratification in vitro. Further, the scaffold effectively integrates and attaches with third-degree burn wound margins created in rat models and accelerates healing in comparison to standard Tegaderm dressing™. The bilayer scaffold is thus a promising, readily available, cost-effective, off-the-shelf matrix as a skin substitute.

  7. β-Adrenergic blockade does not impair the skin blood flow sensitivity to local heating in burned and nonburned skin under neutral and hot environments in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Eric; McEntire, Serina J; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Suman, Oscar E

    2017-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that propranolol, a drug given to burn patients to reduce hypermetabolism/cardiac stress, may inhibit heat dissipation by changing the sensitivity of skin blood flow (SkBF) to local heating under neutral and hot conditions. In a randomized double-blind study, a placebo was given to eight burned children, while propranolol was given to 13 burned children with similar characteristics (mean±SD: 11.9±3 years, 147±20 cm, 45±23 kg, 56±12% Total body surface area burned). Nonburned children (n=13, 11.4±3 years, 152±15 cm, 52±13 kg) served as healthy controls. A progressive local heating protocol characterized SkBF responses in burned and unburned skin and nonburned control skin under the two environmental conditions (23 and 34°C) via laser Doppler flowmetry. Resting SkBF was greater in burned and unburned skin compared to the nonburned control (main effect: skin, Pheating between groups. Additionally, dose-response curves for the sensitivity of SkBF to local heating were not different among burned or unburned skin, and nonburned control skin (EC 50 , P>.05) under either condition. Therapeutic propranolol does not negatively affect SkBF under neutral or hot environmental conditions and further compromise temperature regulation in burned children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [Recognizing prevention and treatment of burn sepsis with the concept of holistic integrative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, J N

    2017-04-20

    Sepsis remains a major cause of death in severe burns. The effect of sepsis management is influenced by its complicated pathophysiologic changes. In order to improve the outcome of burn sepsis, the predisposing factor of sepsis after burn analyzed by advanced technology, the early prevention, antibiotics therapy, and combined treatment in severe burns with sepsis are discussed using the concept of holistic integrative medicine.

  9. The fire-safe cigarette: a burn prevention tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillo, D J; Brigham, P A; Kayden, D A; Heck, R T; McManus, A T

    2000-01-01

    Cigarettes are the most common ignition source for fatal house fires, which cause approximately 29% of the fire deaths in the United States. A common scenario is the delayed ignition of a sofa, chair, or mattress by a lit cigarette that is forgotten or dropped by a smoker whose alertness is impaired by alcohol or medication. Cigarettes are designed to continue burning when left unattended. If they are dropped on mattresses, upholstered furniture, or other combustible material while still burning, their propensity to start fires varies depending on the cigarette design and content. The term "fire-safe" has evolved to describe cigarettes designed to have a reduced propensity for igniting mattresses and upholstered furniture. Legislative interest in the development of fire-safe smoking materials has existed for more than 50 years. Studies that showed the technical and economic feasibility of commercial production of fire-safe cigarettes were completed more than 10 years ago. Despite this, commercial production of fire-safe smoking materials has not been undertaken. The current impasse relates to the lack of consensus on a uniform test method on which to base a standard for fire-safe cigarettes. Although the fire-safe cigarette is a potentially important burn prevention tool, commercial production of such cigarettes will not occur until a standard against which fire-starting performance can be measured has been mandated by law at the state or federal level. The burn care community can play a leadership role in such legislative efforts.

  10. Introducing banked allograft skin to burn surgery in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that person's donation preference.[14]. It is apparent that campaigns need to be initiated that are inclusive of organs and tissue, and that target both the private and state healthcare sectors. There needs to be a collaborative effort to develop systems in hospitals for referral of tissue donors to the tissue bank (for skin, cornea, ...

  11. Early burn wound excision and skin grafting postburn trauma restores in vivo neutrophil delivery to inflammatory lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchervenkov, J.I.; Epstein, M.D.; Silberstein, E.B.; Alexander, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of early vs delayed postburn wound excision and skin grafting on the in vivo neutrophil delivery to a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction and a bacterial skin lesion (BSL). Male Lewis rats were presensitized to keyhole-limpet hemocyanin. Group 1 comprised sham controls. Groups 2 through 4 were given a 30% 3 degrees scald burn, but the burn wounds were excised, and skin was grafted on days 1, 3, and 7, respectively, after the burn. Group 5 comprised burn controls. Twelve days after burn trauma, all rats were injected at different intervals (during a 24-hour period) with a trio of intradermal injections of keyhole-limpet hemocyanin, Staphylococcus aureus 502A, and saline at different sites. In vivo neutrophil delivery to these dermal lesions was determined by injecting indium in 111 oxyquinoline-labeled neutrophils isolated from similarly treated groups of rats. Neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL lesions was restored to normal by excision and skin grafting of the burn wound one day after burn trauma. Waiting three days after burn trauma to excise and skin graft the wound partially, but not completely, restored the in vivo neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL lesions. Waiting one week to excise and skin graft a burn wound resulted in no improvement in neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL dermal lesions. It was concluded that burn wound excision and skin grafting immediately after burn trauma restored in vivo neutrophil delivery to a BSL and DTH dermal lesion. This may, in part, explain the beneficial effect of early aggressive burn wound debridement in patients with burn injuries

  12. Spotlight on Psoriasis: Preventing Patches of Itchy, Sore Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe August 2016 Print this issue Spotlight on Psoriasis Preventing Patches of Itchy, Sore Skin En español ... Sun Damage Sun and Skin Wise Choices Avoid Psoriasis Triggers Factors that may trigger psoriasis or make ...

  13. An Exploration of Molecular Correlates Relevant to Radiation Combined Skin-Burn Trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminul Islam

    Full Text Available Exposure to high dose radiation in combination with physical injuries such as burn or wound trauma can produce a more harmful set of medical complications requiring specialist interventions. Currently these interventions are unavailable as are the precise biomarkers needed to help both accurately assess and treat such conditions. In the present study, we tried to identify and explore the possible role of serum exosome microRNA (miRNA signatures as potential biomarkers for radiation combined burn injury (RCBI.Female B6D2F1/J mice were assigned to four experimental groups (n = 6: sham control (SHAM, burn injury (BURN, radiation injury (RI and combined radiation skin burn injury (CI. We performed serum multiplex cytokine analysis and serum exosome miRNA expression profiling to determine novel miRNA signatures and important biological pathways associated with radiation combined skin-burn trauma.Serum cytokines, IL-5 and MCP-1, were significantly induced only in CI mice (p<0.05. From 890 differentially expressed miRNAs identified, microarray analysis showed 47 distinct miRNA seed sequences significantly associated with CI mice compared to SHAM control mice (fold change ≥ 1.2, p<0.05. Furthermore, only two major miRNA seed sequences (miR-690 and miR-223 were validated to be differentially expressed for CI mice specifically (fold change ≥ 1.5, p<0.05.Serum exosome miRNA signature data of adult mice, following RCBI, provides new insights into the molecular and biochemical pathways associated with radiation combined skin-burn trauma in vivo.

  14. Light attenuation in rat skin following low level laser therapy on burn healing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira Silva, Daniela Fátima; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2010-04-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to accelerate wound healing. Besides, the technique of imaging the light distribution inside biological tissues permits us to understand several effects about light-tissue interaction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative attenuation coefficient of the light intensity in healthy and burned skin rats during cutaneous repair following LLLT or not. Two burns about 6mm in diameter were cryogenerated using liquid N2 on the back of 15 rats. Lesion L was irradiated by a He-Ne laser (λ= 632.8nm) and fluence 1.0J/cm2; Lesion C was control and received sham irradiation. A healthy skin area (H) was also analyzed. The lesions were irradiated at days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-burning. The animals were euthanized at days 3, 10 and 31 and skin samples were carefully removed and placed between two microscope slides, spaced by z= 1mm. A laser beam irradiated the sandwiched tissue from epidermis to dermis. A CCD camera was placed orthogonal to the beam path and it photographed the distribution of the scattered light. The light decay occurred according to the Beer's Law. Significance was accepted at p Student test. Our results show that the light decay along any direction was close to an exponential. Burned skin samples presented decay significantly faster than healthy skin samples. Besides, attenuation coefficient changed during burning healing comparing treated and control lesions. These findings suggest that the relative attenuation coefficient is a suitable parameter to optimize LLLT during wound healing.

  15. Skin allograft procurement and transplantation in Mashhad, Iran: Are burn patients' needs being met?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavousi, Seyed Hassan; Ahmadabadi, Ali; Sedaghat, Alireza; Khaleghi, Ebrahim; Rashchi, Maryam; Bonakdaran, Zohreh

    2017-09-01

    Only a single donor's tissue may save or improve lives of one hundred patients. Unfortunately, low governmental and media support of tissue procurement and transplantation programs is a worldwide problem. Loss of an effective tissue procurement program in many countries like Iran, may lead to loss of many thousands valuable tissues each year. To evaluate the rate of skin donation in Mashhad in comparison to other organs and tissues, we extracted the data related to tissue and organ procurement in Mashhad from 2001. Then we evaluated the annual skin allograft needs in the Burn Department of Imam Reza Hospital as the only referral burn center in the northeast of Iran. Brain dead potential donation rate per million populations of Mashhad in the years 2007-2014 was about 33. The mean refusal rate was 51%. Of patients who have consent for donation, more than 86% have consent for skin donation. Skin allograft procured from 119 (35.5%) candidates. Average of skin retrieval per cadaveric was 1525 cm 2 with a gradual increase from 1400 cm 2 in the first year to 1800 cm 2 in the last year. The recipient to donor ratio was 1.14. It is estimated that about 1 cm 2 of skin allograft is needed for any cm 2 burnt body surface area. Considering more than 700 acute burn hospitalization in our burn unit, the patients need for skin allograft would be more than 3.5 million cm 2 , annually. The annual amount of skin procurement in Mashhad has been currently about 20,000 cm 2 . It shows that our patients demand is higher than supply. Skin procurement and transplantation is a simple procedure which can be as lifesaving as organ procurement and transplantation. But there isn't any national organization to regulate tissue procurement, banking and transplantation. Governmental support of skin procurement and transplantation programs especially nonprofit programs may improve skin procurement rate and save more lives of severely burnt patients.

  16. Biomedical implications from a morphoelastic continuum model for the simulation of contracture formation in skin grafts that cover excised burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenol, Daniël C; Vermolen, Fred J

    2017-08-01

    A continuum hypothesis-based model is developed for the simulation of the (long term) contraction of skin grafts that cover excised burns in order to obtain suggestions regarding the ideal length of splinting therapy and when to start with this therapy such that the therapy is effective optimally. Tissue is modeled as an isotropic, heterogeneous, morphoelastic solid. With respect to the constituents of the tissue, we selected the following constituents as primary model components: fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen molecules, and a generic signaling molecule. Good agreement is demonstrated with respect to the evolution over time of the surface area of unmeshed skin grafts that cover excised burns between outcomes of computer simulations obtained in this study and scar assessment data gathered previously in a clinical study. Based on the simulation results, we suggest that the optimal point in time to start with splinting therapy is directly after placement of the skin graft on its recipient bed. Furthermore, we suggest that it is desirable to continue with splinting therapy until the concentration of the signaling molecules in the grafted area has become negligible such that the formation of contractures can be prevented. We conclude this study with a presentation of some alternative ideas on how to diminish the degree of contracture formation that are not based on a mechanical intervention, and a discussion about how the presented model can be adjusted.

  17. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carriers serve as reservoirs for transmission; therefore, a household approach to decolonization is more effective than measures performed by individuals alone. Other factors, such as environmental surface contamination, may also be considered. Novel strategies for the prevention of recurrent SSTI are needed. PMID:26311356

  18. Local cooling does not prevent hyperalgesia following burn injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Lassen, Birgit Vibeke; Pedersen, Juri L

    2002-01-01

    on the burns. One of the thermodes cooled the burn (8 degrees C for 30 min) whereas the other thermode was a non-active dummy on the control burn. Inflammatory and sensory variables were followed for 160 min after end of the cooling procedure. The burn injury induced significant increases in skin temperature......-inflammatory or anti-hyperalgesic potential of early cooling after thermal injury. Twenty-four healthy volunteers participated in this randomized, single-blinded study. Following baseline measurements, which included inflammatory variables (skin temperature, erythema index) and sensory variables (thermal...... (Pskin temperature (P>0...

  19. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaghiele, Marta; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair), which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  20. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Madaghiele

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair, which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  1. Pericytes and myofibroblasts reaction in experimental thermal third degree skin burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Florina Carmen; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Mogoşanu, G D; Pop, O T; Pârvănescu, H; Lascăr, I; Nicolae, Corina Ivona; Mogoantă, L

    2011-01-01

    Pericytes and myofibroblasts are two types of connective cells that appear in large quantities in reparative processes. In order to evaluate their response and any relationships between them, we have inflicted third degree skin burns to seven groups of five common Wistar rats each from which we sampled granulation tissue at three days interval for histological and immunohistochemical studies. Alpha-SMA and CD34 antibodies revealed that granulation tissue myofibroblasts do not express CD34 and do not arise from pericytes. The parallel arrangement of myofibroblasts in relation to the burned wound surface suggests that their main function is mechanical traction on granulation tissue and wound edges.

  2. Effects of Topical Tamoxifen on Wound Healing of Burned Skin in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrvarz, Shaban; Ebrahimi, Ali; Sahraei, Hedayat; Bagheri, Mohammad Hasan; Fazili, Sima; Manoochehry, Shahram; Rasouli, Hamid Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess the effects of the topical application of tamoxifen on wound healing of burned skin in Wistar rats by evaluating 3 healing characteristics: fibrotic tissue thickness (FTT), scar surface area (SSA), and angiogenesis in the healed scar tissue. Methods Eighteen male Wistar rats were used in this study. A third-degree burn wound was made on the shaved animals’ back, measuring 2×2×2 cm. In the first group, a 2% tamoxifen ointment was applied to the wound twice...

  3. Burn Scar Reconstruction of the Neck with FTSG Obtained from Lower Abdominal Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadrollah Motamed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Burns account for a significant proportion of injuries, and of these the face, neck, and anterior torso are commonly affected. Burn scars remain a lasting reminder of the insult both for the patient and the outside world. There is little doubt that the change in appearance and the limitation imposed by a burn scar contribute to negative body image. Treatment of hypertrophic scars in the neck has been quite challenging if there is no intact tissue for local flaps. So application of full-thickness skin grafts could be of great value. We applied full-thickness grafts obtained from lower abdominal skin for treatment of severe neck contractures in four patients when other treatment modalities such as local flaps could not be used. Full-thickness skin graft of the neck is a safe and reliable treatment option with fairly good functional and aesthetic results. It has little donor site morbidity in spite of providing a large surface area of full-thickness skin.

  4. Local cooling does not prevent hyperalgesia following burn injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Lassen, Birgit Vibeke; Pedersen, Juri L

    2002-01-01

    and mechanical detection thresholds, thermal and mechanical pain responses, area of secondary hyperalgesia), first degree burn injuries were induced on both calves by contact thermodes (12.5 cm(2), 47 degrees C for 7 min). Eight minutes after the burn injury, contact thermodes (12.5 cm(2)) were again applied...... on the burns. One of the thermodes cooled the burn (8 degrees C for 30 min) whereas the other thermode was a non-active dummy on the control burn. Inflammatory and sensory variables were followed for 160 min after end of the cooling procedure. The burn injury induced significant increases in skin temperature.......0001). In conclusion, cooling with 8 degrees C for 30 min following a first degree burn injury in humans does not attenuate inflammatory or hyperalgesic responses compared with a placebo-treated control burn....

  5. Algorithm for Primary Full-thickness Skin Grafting in Pediatric Hand Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Seo Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPediatric hand burns are a difficult problem because they lead to serious hand deformities with functional impairment due to rapid growth during childhood. Therefore, adequate management is required beginning in the acute stage. Our study aims to establish surgical guidelines for a primary full-thickness skin graft (FTSG in pediatric hand burns, based on long-term observation periods and existing studies.MethodsFrom January 2000 to May 2011, 210 patients underwent primary FTSG. We retrospectively studied the clinical course and treatment outcomes based on the patients' medical records. The patients' demographics, age, sex, injury site of the fingers, presence of web space involvement, the incidence of postoperative late deformities, and the duration of revision were critically analyzed.ResultsThe mean age of the patients was 24.4 months (range, 8 to 94 months, consisting of 141 males and 69 females. The overall observation period was 6.9 years (range, 1 to 11 years on average. At the time of the burn, 56 cases were to a single finger, 73 to two fingers, 45 to three fingers, and 22 to more than three. Among these cases, 70 were burns that included a web space (33.3%. During the observation, 25 cases underwent corrective operations with an average period of 40.6 months.ConclusionsIn the volar area, primary full-thickness skin grafting can be a good indication for an isolated injured finger, excluding the web spaces, and injuries of less than three fingers including the web spaces. Also, in the dorsal area, full-thickness skin grafting can be a good indication. However, if the donor site is insufficient and the wound is large, split-thickness skin grafting can be considered.

  6. A 12-year retrospective study of non-burn skin loss (burn-like syndromes) at a tertiary burns unit in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugburo, A O; Temiye, E O; Ilombu, C A

    2008-08-01

    A retrospective study of the presentation, etiology, and prognosis of non-burn epidermal loss managed at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital Nigeria over a 12-year period. Admission records of patients managed for non-burn skin loss were retrieved from the medical records. Demographic details of the patients, the initial diagnosis, final diagnosis, treatment and outcome of treatment was noted. A total of 23 patients were identified, 17 (74%) had idiosyncratic drug reactions. Of this 17, 6 (26%) had Steven Johnson Syndrome, 6 (26%) had Steven Johnson Syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis while 5 (22%) presented with toxic epidermal necrolysis. Three of the five patients with toxic epidermal necrolysis died. The age range of patients with idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions was 2-28 years, mean, 10.18+/-1.44 years and male to female ratio of 1:1.83. The body surface area involved ranged from 8 to 78%; mean 26.65+/-6.08%. The agents suspected for the reactions were Co-trimoxazole (41.2%) and combination of Co-trimoxazole, and Fansidar (17.6%). Other conditions seen were two (9%) Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome, three (13%) had Necrotizing Faciitis, one of whom was HIV positive and died. One (4%) patient presented with pemphigus vulgaris. The presentation and management of the patients was discussed.

  7. Effects of Topical Emu Oil on Burn Wounds in the Skin of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Afshar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine the effect of topical Emu oil on the healing of burn wounds and hair follicle restoration in superficial II-degree burns in the skin of Balb/c mice. Thirty-two male Balb/c mice with burns on the back of the neck were divided into two groups: The Emu oil group received topical Emu oil twice daily, whereas the control was left untreated. Skin biopsies were obtained on days 4, 7, 10, and 14 of the experiment. Then the specimens were viewed with Olympus SZX research microscope. The Emu oil treated burns were found to heal more slowly and inflammation lasted longer in this group. The number of hair follicles in the margins of the wounds increased through time in the Emu oil group compared to the control group. Also, the hair follicles in the Emu oil group were in several layers and seemed to be more active and mature. Moreover, Emu oil had a positive effect on fibrogenesis and synthesis of collagen. The findings indicate that although Emu oil delays the healing process, it has a positive effect on wound healing and it increases the number of hair follicles in the margins of the wound.

  8. Immunosuppression and temporary skin transplantation in the treatment of massive third degree burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J F; Quinby, W C; Bondoc, C C; Cosimi, A B; Russell, P S; Szyfelbein, S K

    1975-01-01

    A method of burn treatment (immunosuppression and temporary skin transplantation) for patients suffering from massive third degree burns is evaluated. The method is based on the prompt excision of all dead tissue (burn eschar) and immediate closure of the wound by skin grafts. Total wound closure is achieved before bacterial infection or organ failure takes place by carrying out all initial excision and grafting procedures within the first ten days post burn and supplementing the limited amount of autograft with allograft. Continuous wound closure is maintained for up to 50 days through immunosuppression. Both azathioprine and ATG have been used but ATG is preferred. During the period of immunosuppression, allograft is stepwise excised and replaced with autograft donor sites regenerate for recropping. Bacterial complications are minimized by housing the patient in the protected environment of the Bacteria Controlled Nursing Unit. Intensive protein and calorie alimentation are provided, and 0.5% aqueous AgNO3 dressings are used. A swinging febrile illness has been associated with large areas of allograft rejection. Eleven children have been treated and seven have been returned to normal, productive schooling. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:809014

  9. Live sibling skin allografts for severe burns in a paediatric patient: A viable option in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil Leodoro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Severe burns in the paediatric population are associated with high mortality and morbidity in any developing countries. Children with more than 40% total body surface area burns in Fiji will succumb from complications and as a direct result of inadequate treatment and lack of resources. The surgical treatment of any severely burnt patient is not only laborious but very costly to the Fiji health system and depletes existing resources with few options for skin coverage. This is the first case report of live sibling skin allograft for severe paediatric burns and one of only few patients to have survived more than 50% burns in Fiji. We describe the technique and the role of using live sibling skin allograft as an option to improve survival in patients with severe burns in a developing country.

  10. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    A burn is damage to your body's tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or radiation. Scalds from hot ... and gases are the most common causes of burns. Another kind is an inhalation injury, caused by ...

  11. β-lapachone accelerates the recovery of burn-wound skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shih-Chen; Chau, Yat-Pang; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Kung, Hsiu-Ni

    2011-07-01

    β-lapachone is a quinone of lapachol extracted from the bark of lapacho tree. Recent findings demonstrated that punched skin wounds of mice healed faster with β-lapachone treatment. The present study investigates the effects of β-lapachone on burn-wound skin of C57BL/6 mice injured by a 100 °C iron stick. Our results indicated that wounds treated with β-lapachone recovered faster than those treated with control ointment containing no β-lapachone. On the third day after burning, the area of β-lapachone treated-wound was 30% smaller than wound treated with control ointment. H&E and immunohistochemistry staining showed that burn-wound skin treated with ointment containing β-lapachone healed faster in its epidermis, dermis, and underlying connective tissues with more macrophages appeared than those treated with control ointment alone. RAW264.7 cell, a macrophage-like cell line derived from BALB/C mice, was used as a model for scrutinizing the effect of β-lapachone on macrophages. We found that the proliferation and the secretion of EGF and VEGF by macrophages were higher in cultures treated with β-lapachone and that ß-lapachone can also increase the release of EGF with TNF-α pretreatment. We conclude that β-lapachone plays an important role in accelerating burn wound healing, and that β-lapachone not only can raise the proliferation of macrophages but also increase the release of VEGF from macrophages.

  12. Algorithm for Primary Full-thickness Skin Grafting in Pediatric Hand Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Seo Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Pediatric hand burns are a difficult problem because they lead to serious handdeformities with functional impairment due to rapid growth during childhood. Therefore,adequate management is required beginning in the acute stage. Our study aims to establishsurgical guidelines for a primary full-thickness skin graft (FTSG in pediatric hand burns, basedon long-term observation periods and existing studies.Methods From January 2000 to May 2011, 210 patients underwent primary FTSG. Weretrospectively studied the clinical course and treatment outcomes based on the patients’medical records. The patients’ demographics, age, sex, injury site of the fingers, presence ofweb space involvement, the incidence of postoperative late deformities, and the duration ofrevision were critically analyzed.Results The mean age of the patients was 24.4 months (range, 8 to 94 months, consisting of141 males and 69 females. The overall observation period was 6.9 years (range, 1 to 11 yearson average. At the time of the burn, 56 cases were to a single finger, 73 to two fingers, 45 tothree fingers, and 22 to more than three. Among these cases, 70 were burns that included aweb space (33.3%. During the observation, 25 cases underwent corrective operations withan average period of 40.6 months.Conclusions In the volar area, primary full-thickness skin grafting can be a good indicationfor an isolated injured finger, excluding the web spaces, and injuries of less than three fingersincluding the web spaces. Also, in the dorsal area, full-thickness skin grafting can be a goodindication. However, if the donor site is insufficient and the wound is large, split-thicknessskin grafting can be considered.

  13. Differences between intentional and non-intentional burns in India: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Mangai

    2014-08-01

    Non-intentional and deliberate burns in India and other developing countries present particular challenges of prevention and treatment. This exploratory study sought improved understanding of burns in order to inform treatment and prevention. It gathered data in 2011/2012 on burns from the hospital registry (N=768) of a government hospital in India and from interviews with women patients (N=60) admitted to the burns ward. Analysis indicated that: (1) the conditions that facilitate intentional and non-intentional burns are similar, but intentional burns involve additional contributory factors; (2) a high proportion of patients subjected to burns are young women in domestic situations; and (3) a higher proportion of their TBSA was burned, with consequent higher mortality than for men. It was concluded that: (1) Haddon's matrix and the situational crime prevention framework of criminology assist in understanding the etiology of intentional burns and in identifying preventive measures; (2) social service and criminal justice agencies have important roles in dealing with victims of intentional burns during and after treatment; (3) full account should be taken of gender-related physical, psychological and family factors in planning treatment; and (4) maintaining careful records of burns cases is vital for estimating the prevalence and incidence of intentional injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Temporal expression of wound healing-related genes in skin burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hidemichi; Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Kanekura, Takuro; Ogata, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the age of burns, as well as of wounds induced mechanically, is essential in forensic practice, particularly in cases of suspected child abuse. Here, we investigated temporal changes in the expression of 13 genes during wound healing after a burn. The expression of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ), chemokines (KC, MCP-1), proliferative factors (TGF-β, VEGF), proteases (MMP-2, 9, 13) and type I collagen in murine skin was examined by real-time PCR at 3, 6, 9, and 12 h and 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after a burn. Based on macroscopic and histological appearance, the healing process of a burn consists of 3 phases: inflammatory (from 3 h to 1 day after the burn), proliferative (from 1 to 7 days), and maturation (from 7 to 14 days). Expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and KC increased significantly in a biphasic pattern from 3 or 6 h to 12 h or 1 day and from 3 or 5 days to 7 days. Expression of MCP-1 increased significantly from 6 h to 5 days. Expression of both IL-10 and TGF-β increased significantly from 12 h to 7 days. Expression of VEGF, MMP-2, MMP-13 and type I collagen increased significantly from 3 days to 7 or 14 days. Expression of MMP-9 increased significantly from 6 h to 14 days. Our results suggest that evaluating the expression of a combination of these genes would enable the exact estimation of the age of a burn. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. How to Prevent Skin Conditions in Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  16. Chemical and Common Burns in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shan

    2017-05-01

    Burns are a common cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in children. Thermal and chemical burns are the most common types of burns. Their clinical appearance can be similar and the treatment is largely similar. Thermal burns in children occur primarily after exposure to a hot surface or liquid, or contact with fire. Burns are typically classified based on the depth and total body surface area, and the severity and onset of the burn can also depend on the temperature and duration of contact. Chemical burns are caused by chemicals-most commonly acids and alkalis-that can damage the skin on contact. In children, the most common cause of chemical burns is from household products such as toilet bowl cleaners, drain cleaners, detergents, and bleaches. Mild chemical burns generally cause redness and pain and can look similar to other common rashes or skin infections, whereas severe chemical burns are more extreme and may cause redness, blistering, skin peeling, and swelling.

  17. Collagen-chitosan scaffold - Lauric acid plasticizer for skin tissue engineering on burn cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiyanti, Prihartini; Setyadi, Ewing Dian; Rudyardjo, Djony Izak

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of burns in the world is more than 800 cases per one million people each year and this is the second highest cause of death due to trauma after traffic accident. Many studies are turning to skin substitute methods of tissue engineering. The purpose of this study is to determine the composition of the collagen, chitosan, and lauric acid scaffold, as well as knowing the results of the characterization of the scaffold. The synthesis of chitosan collagen lauric acid scaffold as a skin tissue was engineered using freeze dried method. Results from making of collagen chitosan lauric acid scaffold was characterized physically, biologically and mechanically by SEM, cytotoxicity, biodegradation, and tensile strength. From the morphology test, the result obtained is that pore diameter size ranges from 94.11 to 140.1 µm for samples A,B,C,D, which are in the range of normal pore size 63-150 µm, while sample E has value below the standard which is about 37.87 to 47.36 µm. From cytotoxicity assay, the result obtained is the percentage value of living cells between 20.11 to 21.51%. This value is below 50% the standard value of living cells. Incompatibility is made possible because of human error mainly the replication of washing process over the standard. Degradation testing obtained values of 19.44% - 40% by weight which are degraded during the 7 days of observation. Tensile test results obtained a range of values of 0.192 - 3.53 MPa. Only sample A (3.53 MPa) and B (1.935 MPa) meet the standard values of skin tissue scaffold that is 1-24 MPa. Based on the results of the characteristics of this study, composite chitosan collagen scaffold with lauric acid plasticizer has a potential candidate for skin tissue engineering for skin burns cases.

  18. The Potential of Plant Phenolics in Prevention and Therapy of Skin Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Działo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds constitute a group of secondary metabolites which have important functions in plants. Besides the beneficial effects on the plant host, phenolic metabolites (polyphenols exhibit a series of biological properties that influence the human in a health-promoting manner. Evidence suggests that people can benefit from plant phenolics obtained either by the diet or through skin application, because they can alleviate symptoms and inhibit the development of various skin disorders. Due to their natural origin and low toxicity, phenolic compounds are a promising tool in eliminating the causes and effects of skin aging, skin diseases, and skin damage, including wounds and burns. Polyphenols also act protectively and help prevent or attenuate the progression of certain skin disorders, both embarrassing minor problems (e.g., wrinkles, acne or serious, potentially life-threatening diseases such as cancer. This paper reviews the latest reports on the potential therapy of skin disorders through treatment with phenolic compounds, considering mostly a single specific compound or a combination of compounds in a plant extract.

  19. Angiogenesis assessment in experimental third degree skin burns: a histological and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Popescu, Florina Carmen; Mogoşanu, G D; Lascăr, I; Pirici, Ionica; Pop, O T; Mogoantă, L

    2011-01-01

    In the past 30 years, after the discovery of vascular proliferation factors, angiogenesis is one of the most intensively studied fields. Restoring the vascular network after burn injury is essential for healing, as it brings oxygen and nutrients to injured tissues, improves the contribution of inflammatory cells and prepares the damaged area for repair and tissue regeneration. To study the process of angiogenesis we used seven groups of five animals, each of adult Wistar rats, which were inflicted with third degree skin burns. From each group of animals, we sampled at successive intervals of three days the entire burnt wound with a ring of surrounding normal skin. Sampled skin fragments were processed for paraffin inclusion, sectioned with a microtome and stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin or Masson trichrome. The samples were also analyzed using single chromogenic immunohistochemistry or double immunofluorescence for the presence of CD34 and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Angiogenesis process started at about three days after the burn infliction, with the appearance of tubular structures lined by CD34-positive cells. Subsequently, these cells showed intense proliferative activity that generated a network that included progressive neovascularization around the wound surface. Maximum vascular proliferation occurred at 9-15 days after injury, when the number of capillaries reached 229/mm², and the total area of capillary angiogenesis at 100.27 μm² (about 10% of the section area). Subsequently, the process of angiogenesis was gradually reduced, but remained at moderate levels after wound healing. During the process of angiogenesis, there was a very close relationship between CD34-positive cells and pericytes (as α-SMA-positive).

  20. Palmar crease release and secondary full-thickness skin grafts for contractures in primary full-thickness skin grafts during growth spurts in pediatric palmar hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Suk-Joon; Kim, Seon Gyu; Cho, Jin Kyung; Sung, Chang Min

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric palmar hand burns are a difficult problem because of the serious hand deformity, with functional impairment resulting from rapid growth. In cases of severe pediatric palmar hand burns, a secondary full-thickness skin graft after a primary full-thickness skin graft offers a reliable way of obtaining the required functional and aesthetic outcomes.This study retrospectively evaluated 28 children who required palmar crease releases and secondary full-thickness skin grafts during the past 12 years. The case records were reviewed for sex and age distributions, injury mechanism, and time interval between the primary and secondary full-thickness skin grafts. Surgical procedures included secondary full-thickness skin grafts and incisional releases of grafted skin on the involved creases. There were 19 men and 9 women. The mean age at the time of the burn injury was 10.1 months (range, 5-19 months). The mean age at the time of the secondary full-thickness skin graft was 8.3 years (range, 3-17 years). The most common mechanism of burn injury was steam (n = 24). The median time interval from the primary to the secondary full-thickness skin graft was 67 months (range, 8-156 months). The number of released creases was 81. The number of palmar web contractures in 23 patients was 52. A secondary full-thickness skin graft was more frequently necessary in patients with a primary full-thickness skin graft in the proximal digital crease and palmar web areas. All patients achieved adequate digital length and palmar web contour after surgery. Our patients should be observed until the rapid pubertal growth period.

  1. A system for 3D representation of burns and calculation of burnt skin area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, María Felicidad; Acha, Begoña; Gómez-Cía, Tomás; Fondón, Irene; Serrano, Carmen

    2011-11-01

    In this paper a computer-based system for burnt surface area estimation (BAI), is presented. First, a 3D model of a patient, adapted to age, weight, gender and constitution is created. On this 3D model, physicians represent both burns as well as burn depth allowing the burnt surface area to be automatically calculated by the system. Each patient models as well as photographs and burn area estimation can be stored. Therefore, these data can be included in the patient's clinical records for further review. Validation of this system was performed. In a first experiment, artificial known sized paper patches were attached to different parts of the body in 37 volunteers. A panel of 5 experts diagnosed the extent of the patches using the Rule of Nines. Besides, our system estimated the area of the "artificial burn". In order to validate the null hypothesis, Student's t-test was applied to collected data. In addition, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated and a value of 0.9918 was obtained, demonstrating that the reliability of the program in calculating the area is of 99%. In a second experiment, the burnt skin areas of 80 patients were calculated using BAI system and the Rule of Nines. A comparison between these two measuring methods was performed via t-Student test and ICC. The hypothesis of null difference between both measures is only true for deep dermal burns and the ICC is significantly different, indicating that the area estimation calculated by applying classical techniques can result in a wrong diagnose of the burnt surface. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Diet and Skin Cancer: The Potential Role of Dietary Antioxidants in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Katta, Rajani; Brown, Danielle Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer among Americans. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure is the major risk factor for the development of NMSC. Dietary AOs may prevent free radical-mediated DNA damage and tumorigenesis secondary to UV radiation. Numerous laboratory studies have found that certain dietary AOs show significant promise in skin cancer prevention. These results have been substantiated by animal studies. In human studies, researchers have evaluated both oral AO...

  3. Nanomedicine and advanced technologies for burns: Preventing infection and facilitating wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofazzal Jahromi, Mirza Ali; Sahandi Zangabad, Parham; Moosavi Basri, Seyed Masoud; Sahandi Zangabad, Keyvan; Ghamarypour, Ameneh; Aref, Amir R; Karimi, Mahdi; Hamblin, Michael R

    2018-01-01

    According to the latest report from the World Health Organization, an estimated 265,000 deaths still occur every year as a direct result of burn injuries. A widespread range of these deaths induced by burn wound happens in low- and middle-income countries, where survivors face a lifetime of morbidity. Most of the deaths occur due to infections when a high percentage of the external regions of the body area is affected. Microbial nutrient availability, skin barrier disruption, and vascular supply destruction in burn injuries as well as systemic immunosuppression are important parameters that cause burns to be susceptible to infections. Topical antimicrobials and dressings are generally employed to inhibit burn infections followed by a burn wound therapy, because systemic antibiotics have problems in reaching the infected site, coupled with increasing microbial drug resistance. Nanotechnology has provided a range of molecular designed nanostructures (NS) that can be used in both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in burns. These NSs can be divided into organic and non-organic (such as polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) and silver NPs, respectively), and many have been designed to display multifunctional activity. The present review covers the physiology of skin, burn classification, burn wound pathogenesis, animal models of burn wound infection, and various topical therapeutic approaches designed to combat infection and stimulate healing. These include biological based approaches (e.g. immune-based antimicrobial molecules, therapeutic microorganisms, antimicrobial agents, etc.), antimicrobial photo- and ultrasound-therapy, as well as nanotechnology-based wound healing approaches as a revolutionizing area. Thus, we focus on organic and non-organic NSs designed to deliver growth factors to burned skin, and scaffolds, dressings, etc. for exogenous stem cells to aid skin regeneration. Eventually, recent breakthroughs and technologies with substantial potentials in tissue

  4. Prevention of Infections Associated with Combat-Related Burn Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    that resulted from the bombing of Hiroshima would characterize future conflicts.7 Once estab- lished, the US Army Burn Center focused research efforts...et al. Burn infections. In: Holzheimer RG, Mannick JA, eds. Surgical Treatment-Evidence Based and Problem Oriented. Bern -Weun, New York: W

  5. [Skin burns, necrosis and ulcers caused by wet cement, ready-mixed concrete and lime. 8 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, P

    1996-01-01

    Skin burns and caustic ulcers caused by wet cement, due to calcium hydroxyde, are rarely reported in the literature. They occur mostly among amateur cement users. We report seven cases of skin burns, necrosis and ulcerations after use of wet cement and ready-mixed concrete, and one case of caustic ulcers induced by wet lime. Even short skin contacts to wet cement or concrete may induce extensive lesions in some cases. However, we were not able to incriminate with certainty any special concrete additives which could increase skin penetration of calcium hydroxyde. Warning notices about the danger of skin contact should be prominent on sacked cement. When ready-mixed concrete is delivered, the purchaser should be handed a note explaining the risk of kneeling in wet concrete and the importance of protective measures. This may probably contribute to reduce the frequency of those accidents.

  6. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carr...

  7. [The advantages in using cyanoacrylate glue over skin staples as a method of skin graft fixation in the pediatric burns population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curings, P; Vincent, P-L; Viard, R; Gir, P; Comparin, J-P; Voulliaume, D

    2017-11-23

    Local postoperative care and burn wound management can present with a certain degree of difficulty in the pediatric population. While the use of skin staples as a method of skin graft fixation is a well-known, rapid and simple method, their removal can be painful and may necessitate some sedation or even general anesthesia. We studied in this article the advantages and economic value of using the cyanoacrylate glue as a fixation method for skin grafts. A comparative study was carried out from 2012 to 2016. Hundred and eighteen infants with burns up to 5% of total body surface area were included in the study. Seventy-two infants had split thickness skin grafts fixed with skin staples. Forty-six infants had split thickness skin grafts fixed with cyanoacrylate glue. We compared the quality of graft, the sedation used during the first postoperative dressing, the length of hospital stay, the amount of glue used and the presence of complications. There is a difference between the two groups studied in terms of age and total burn surface area. The rate of graft take was 100% in both groups. The first postoperative dressing was carried out without the use of powerful analgesia in the cyanoacrylate group, while it was necessary to use general anesthesia in 64% of the skin staples group. The average length of stay in hospital after skin grafting was 4.9 days for the cyanoacrylate glue versus 6.5 days in the skin staples group. No complications were noted in the 2 groups. The use of cyanoacrylate glue allows rapid fixation of skin grafts and avoid general anesthesia for postoperative cares. Subsequently the length of hospital stay is reduced within 25%. The medico-economic value of glue protocol is highly significant compared to skin staples, while having similar good results and without significant problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidemiology of burns in the United Arab Emirates: lessons for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivna, Michal; Eid, Hani O; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2014-05-01

    To study mechanism, risk factors and outcome of hospitalized burns so as to give recommendations for prevention. Burn patients admitted to Al Ain hospital for more than 24h or who died after arrival were studied over 4 years. Demographics, burn type, location and time of injury, total body burned surface area (TBSA), body region, hospital and ICU stay and outcome were analyzed. 203 patients were studied, 69% were males and 25% were children under 5 years old. The most common location for burn was home. Women were burned more at home (pburns at work were from gas and flame. Burns caused by gas and flame had larger TBSA and longer ICU stay. Six (3%) patients died and nine (4%) were transferred to the specialized burn center. Safety education for caregivers and close supervision of young children is important to reduce pediatric burns. Occupational safety education of young men could prevent burns caused by gas and flame. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of topically applied L-ascorbic acid in ex-vivo examination of burn-injured human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna; Biniaś, Dorota; Bobiński, Rafał; Sarna, Ewa; Paluch, Jadwiga; Waksmańska, Wioletta

    2017-10-01

    Wound treatment and healing is complex and is comprised of an elaborate set of processes including cellular, spectroscopic and biochemical ones as well as the ;reaction; of local tissue to thermal injury. Vitamin C as L-ascorbic acid (LA) prevents injurious effects of oxidants because it reduces reactive oxygen species to stable molecules, it becomes oxidized to the short-lived ascorbyl radical. As a result, antioxidant treatment may contribute to minimizing injury in burn patients. The aim of this study is to assess changes in molecular structure of collagen extracted from human epidermis burn wound scab during incubation of the epidermis in L-ascorbic acid solution. The study will be performed using FTIR and FT Raman spectroscopies. During this research it was observed that the intensity of Raman peaks increased where healing was being modified by LA. The intensity of the amide III band at 1247 cm- 1 relative to the intensity at 1326 cm- 1 was used to test tissue repair degree at the incision site. FTIR spectra were recorded from frozen specimens of serum modified by LA; an analysis of shifts in the amide I band position was conducted. The appearance of a new band for frozen samples modified by LA was observed around 1149-1220 cm- 1. The above conclusions confirmed the creation of hydrogen bonds between Nsbnd H stretch and Cdbnd O. Samples being incubated in solutions of L-ascorbic acid demonstrated the absence of electrophoretic bands of albumin. Alterations in the surface of the skin incubated in L-ascorbic acid were investigated with the use of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). A decrease in external symptoms of burn injury was noted in the damaged epidermis incubated in L-ascorbic acid.

  10. [Prevention of skin cancer: considerations on strategic communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, M P; Baumann, E; Breitbart, E W

    2014-03-01

    In recent decades the numbers of cases of skin cancer have been increasing worldwide in light skinned populations. In Germany skin cancer is the most common form of cancer. To reduce the burden of skin cancer protection from ultraviolet radiation (primary prevention) and early detection (secondary prevention) of the disease play a decisive role. In this context information to the population about preventive behavior and the support of informed decision-making in skin cancer screening are important aspects in communication. This paper gives an overview about communicational aspects in the promotion of skin cancer prevention. In the development of communicational interventions it is important to identify the relevant target groups. Relevant key opinion leaders have to be included in the information process. Additionally, interventions should be based on a theoretical framework and be designed for the respective target group. Furthermore, different forms of communication and communication tools are provided for the realization of an information intervention. To appraise the intervention elements of summative and formal evaluation are available. The current results provide important findings about different effects of communicational aspects on knowledge and behavior of the population; however, due to the complexity of information interventions a particular effect cannot be explained by a single communicational element.

  11. Raman Spectroscopy Studies of Normal and Burned Biological Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnani, Faranak; Maass, David; Idris, Ahamed; Glosser, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Burn injuries are a significant medical problem, and need to be treated quickly and precisely. Burned skin needs to be removed early, within hours (less than 24 hrs) of injury, when the margins of the burn are still hard to define. Studies show that treating and excising burn wounds soon after the injury prevents the wound from becoming deeper, reduces the release of proinflammatory mediators, and reduces or prevents the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome. Also, removing burned skin prepares the affected region for skin grafting. Raman spectroscopy could be used as an objective diagnostic method that will assist burn surgeons in removing burned skin precisely. As a first step in developing a diagnostic tool, we present Raman spectroscopy information from normal and burned ex vivo rat skin, and a comparison of our findings. Raman spectroscopy is explored for its specificity and sensitivity.

  12. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laws Donate Safety Tips Age Group Special Needs Space and Place Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type ... emergency room. Learn More » About Us Mission Programs Public Policy Research Safe Kids Near You Join Our ...

  13. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Involved 4 Star Charity Donate Safety Tips Age Group Special Needs Space and Place Home Risks Burns ... Policy Research Safe Kids Near You Join Our Team Staying Safe Safety by Age Safety by Risk ...

  14. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laws Donate Safety Tips Age Group Special Needs Space and Place Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type ... related injuries. Learn More » About Us Mission Programs Public Policy Research Safe Kids Near You Join Our ...

  15. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Charity Donate Safety Tips Age Group Special Needs Space and Place Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type ... to 19. Learn More » About Us Mission Programs Public Policy Research Safe Kids Near You Join Our ...

  16. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Global Road Safety Sponsors Recalls Media Center Blog Videos Newsletter facebook twitter instagram pinterest gplus youtube Search ... and Place Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type Video Audience Parents You are here Home Safety Tips ...

  17. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type Video Audience Parents You are here Home Safety Tips Video Special ... Seat Checked Safety Tips Safety Laws Tools For Parents For Safety Professionals For Educators For Press Latest ...

  18. [Effects of Meek skin grafting on patients with extensive deep burn at different age groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, H P; Niu, X H; Li, Q; Li, X L; Xue, J D; Cao, D Y; Han, D W; Xia, C D

    2017-03-20

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Meek skin grafting on patients with extensive deep burn at different age groups. Methods: Eighty-four patients with extensive deep burns conforming to the study criteria were hospitalized in our unit from April 2011 to April 2015. Patients were divided into children group (C, with age less than 12 years old), young and middle-aged group (YM, with age more than 18 years and less than 50 years old), and old age group (O, with age more than 55 years old) according to age, with 28 patients in each group. All patients received Meek skin grafting treatment. The use of autologous skin area, operation time, wound healing time, and hospitalization time were recorded. The survival rate of skin graft on post operation day 7, complete wound healing rate in post treatment week 2, and the mortality were calculated. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, t test, and χ (2) test. Results: The use of autologous skin area of patients in group C was (5.1±1.0)% total body surface area (TBSA), significantly less than (8.3±1.0)%TBSA and (8.3±1.4)%TBSA in groups YM and O, respectively (with t values 32.900 and 52.624, respectively, P values below 0.05). The operation time, wound healing time, and hospitalization time of patients in group C were (1.368±0.562) h, (9.6±0.6) and (32±11) d, significantly shorter than those in group YM [(3.235±0.011) h, (16.9±2.6) and (48±12) d, respectively] and group O [(3.692±0.481) h, (17.3±2.6) and (46±13) d, respectively, with t values from 4.350 to 21.160, P values below 0.05]. The survival rate of skin graft of patients on post operation day 7 in group C was (92±15)%, significantly higher than (81±10)% and (72±12)% in groups YM and O, respectively (with t values 5.509 and 3.229, respectively, P values below 0.05). The above indexes in groups YM and O were similar (with t values from 0.576 to 22.958, P values above 0.05). Complete wound healing rate in post treatment week 2 and the

  19. Macrophage response in experimental third-degree skin burns treated with allograft. Histological and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Florina Carmen; Mogoşanu, G D; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Pârvănescu, H; Lascăr, I; Mogoantă, L

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are some of the innate immune cells with a central role in inflammatory and immune responses. Studies in the last 20 years have shown that these cells have a particular influence in the reparative processes also. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the macrophage response in third-degree skin burns treated with allograft in an experimental model. Macrophages were specifically highlighted by immunohistochemical staining with anti-CD68 antibody. In the first evolutive part of the reparatory process, macrophages rapidly increased both numerically and as a relative area with about 300%, and then decreased progressively along with the granulation tissue maturation. Macrophage overall response curve was similar in animals treated with allograft and in the control group (untreated), which leads us to believe that the allograft does not induce a more ample immune response that could be regarded as pathological.

  20. Comparison of propolis skin cream to silver sulfadiazine: a naturopathic alternative to antibiotics in treatment of minor burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Scott R; Piccolo, Nelson; Piccolo, Maria T; Piccolo, Monica S; Heggers, John P

    2002-02-01

    Propolis, a naturopathic substance derived from bees wax extract, has recently been praised for its antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and cicatrization-enhancing properties. In our study, we compare these properties in a high-grade Brazilian propolis skin cream directly with silver sulfadiazene (SSD) in the treatment of minor burns (superficial second degree) in the ambulatory care setting (less than 20% total body surface area burned). The study was conducted at the burn clinic in Pronto Socorro para Queimaduras, Gioania, Brazil. Patients were admitted to the study only if their initial presentation for burn care was within 48 hours postinjury and if bilateral wounds of similar depth and quality were present. Patients had propolis skin cream applied to one wound and SSD applied to the other selected wound on initial presentation and underwent debridement and dressings change the following morning. Patients subsequently returned to the clinic every 3 days to have the wounds checked and dressings changed. At these check-ups, wounds were cultured for microbial growth and photographed to document inflammation and cicatrization. Patients were instructed not to disturb their wounds or change their dressings at home, thus propolis skin cream and SSD were applied to the wounds only at the specified 3-day intervals. Our preliminary results do not show any significant difference in microbial colonization between wounds treated with SSD and propolis skin cream, however, wounds treated with propolis skin cream consistently showed less inflammation and more rapid cicatrization then those treated with SSD. Propolis skin cream appears to have a beneficial effects on the healing of partial thickness burn wounds. If dressings had been changed more frequent the antimicrobial and wound healing effects would have been enhanced.

  1. Experience from community based childhood burn prevention programme in Bangladesh: implication for low resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashreky, S R; Rahman, A; Svanström, L; Linnan, M J; Shafinaz, S; Rahman, F

    2011-08-01

    A comprehensive community-based burn prevention framework was developed for rural Bangladesh taking into consideration the magnitude, consequences of burns, risk factors of childhood burn, health seeking behaviour of parents after a burn injury of a child and the perception of community people. This paper explains the comprehensive framework of the childhood burn prevention programme and describes its acceptability, feasibility and sustainability. A number of methodologies were adopted in developing the framework, such as, (i) building up relevant information on childhood burn and prevention methods, (ii) arranging workshops and consultation meetings with experts and related stakeholders and (iii) piloting components of the framework on a small scale. Lack of supervision of the children, hazardous environment at home and the low level awareness about childhood burn and other injuries were identified as the major attributes of childhood burn in Bangladesh. To address these factors "Triple S" strategies were identified for the prevention framework. These strategies are: Safe environment. Supervision. Skill development. According to these strategies, home safety, community crèche, school safety, formation of community groups and general awareness activities were identified as the different components of the childhood burn prevention framework in rural Bangladesh. The framework was piloted in a small scale to explore its feasibility acceptability and sustainability. The framework was found to be acceptable by the community. It is also expected to be feasible and sustainable as very low cost and locally available technology and resources were utilized in the framework. Large scale piloting is necessary to explore its effectiveness and ability to scale up all over the whole country. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Biomedical implications from a morphoelastic continuum model for the simulation of contracture formation in skin grafts that cover excised burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppenol, D.C.; Vermolen, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    A continuum hypothesis-based model is developed for the simulation of the (long term) contraction of skin grafts that cover excised burns in order to obtain suggestions regarding the ideal length of splinting therapy and when to start with this therapy such that the therapy is effective

  3. Use of skin stretching techniques before bilateral caudal superficial epigastric axial flaps in a dog with severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingel, Michelle M; Sakals, Sherisse A

    2017-08-01

    This report describes how 2 days of skin stretching facilitated a tension-free closure of single event bilateral caudal superficial epigastric flaps in a dog with severe hindquarter burns. Full healing at all surgical sites with only minor dehiscence and without further treatment or abnormalities of gait or coat regrowth was achieved.

  4. Gaps in Workplace Education For Prevention of Occupational Skin Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tanya; Arrandale, Victoria H; Kudla, Irena; Holness, D Linn

    2018-02-13

    Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is a common occupational disease. Evidence suggests that education and training are effective prevention strategies. In spite of these known prevention strategies, workers continue to develop OCD. Little is reported regarding the actual training experience of workers. To examine the training experience of workers with contact dermatitis to identify areas for improvement. Participants were workers being assessed for contact dermatitis in an occupational health clinic. The anonymous survey collected demographics, workplace characteristics, and education and prevention practices. Approximately 80% reported general occupational health and safety training; however, only 49% reported skin-specific training (SST). For workers reporting SST, most received information regarding exposure avoidance, hand washing, and glove use. This content was reported as helpful by at least 50%. Workers who did not receive SST indicated the most important content would be warning signs of skin problems, how to avoid exposure and skin care while using gloves. While the study was anonymous and used self-reported of training experience, the study suggests there are gaps in skin protection training. Addressing these gaps may lead to improved prevention and reduction in OCD. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  5. View and practices of dermatologists regarding preventable skin diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, N.; Seir, F.; Qadir, S.N.R.

    2014-01-01

    To find out views and practice of dermatologists regarding prevention of preventable skin diseases. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was set up in Apr-May 2010 at PAF Hospital Faisal, Karachi, Pakistan. Material and Methods: A close-ended questionnaire was sent to 100 dermatologists through resource persons at different places throughout the country. It included basic information about them, their views and practice regarding prevention of these diseases. Data was managed and analyzed using SPSS-17. Results: Fifty dermatologists thought that frequency of preventable skin diseases in their clinical practice is 26-50%. Fifty-six observed educated community as the most important link for prevention, 46 held governments responsible and 42 consider busy schedule as barrier to educate community. Thirty dermatologists delivered talk to general public, 11 at schools, colleges and factories, 07 appeared on mass media and 08 prepared leaflets, pamphlets and brochures regarding preventive aspects of skin diseases at least once during last one year. Conclusion: Dermatologists in Pakistan are aware of magnitude of the problem and understand importance of public education; however only a few dermatologists have endeavored to take up this task. (author)

  6. In vivo classification of human skin burns using machine learning and quantitative features captured by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Neeru; Srivastava, Vishal; Singh Mehta, Dalip

    2018-02-01

    We report the first fully automated detection of human skin burn injuries in vivo, with the goal of automatic surgical margin assessment based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Our proposed automated procedure entails building a machine-learning-based classifier by extracting quantitative features from normal and burn tissue images recorded by OCT. In this study, 56 samples (28 normal, 28 burned) were imaged by OCT and eight features were extracted. A linear model classifier was trained using 34 samples and 22 samples were used to test the model. Sensitivity of 91.6% and specificity of 90% were obtained. Our results demonstrate the capability of a computer-aided technique for accurately and automatically identifying burn tissue resection margins during surgical treatment.

  7. Comparative study of microvascular density in experimental third-degree skin burns treated with topical preparations containing herbal extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogoşanu, G D; Popescu, Florina Carmen; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Lascăr, I; Mogoantă, L

    2013-01-01

    During the healing process of third-degree skin burns, a very complex response involves different cells and tissues linked together by intra- and extra-cellular mechanisms. For the restoration of damaged tissues, angiogenesis is the key point in the formation of new blood vessels. By their emollient, astringent, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, biostimulator, epithelizing and cicatrizing effect, active principles from natural products contribute to the acceleration of the wound-healing process. In our study, we investigated the angiogenesis process in experimental model of third-degree skin burns treated with three topical preparations (cold-creams) containing 10% herbal extracts, comparing with 1% sulfadiazine cream and cold-cream base respectively. By their biostimulator, epithelizing and cicatrizing effect, cold-creams with herbal extracts are locally modulators of the cellular response and support the wound healing. The phytocomplex stimulates the favorable evolution of the burnt skin wounds and the development of neoangiogenesis capillaries.

  8. Preventing Occupational Skin Disease: A Review of Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zack, Bethany; Arrandale, Victoria H; Holness, D Linn

    Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is a common occupational disease that impacts a variety of worker groups. Skin protection and disease prevention training programs have shown promise for improving prevention practices and reducing the incidence of OCD. This review details the features of training programs for primary prevention of OCD and identifies gaps in the literature. Twelve studies were identified for in-depth review: many studies included wet workers employed in health care, hairdressing, cleaning, and food preparation; 1 program featured manufacturing workers. Few programs provided content on allergic contact dermatitis, and only 1 was evaluated for long-term effectiveness. Effective programs were similar in content, delivery method, and timing and were characterized by industry specificity, multimodal learning, participatory elements, skin care resource provision, repeated sessions, and management engagement. Long-term effectiveness, generalizability beyond OCD, workplace health and safety culture impact, and translation of programs in the North American context represent areas for future research.

  9. Phytochemicals in Skin Cancer Prevention and Treatment: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau Yee Ng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin is the largest human organ, our protection against various environmental assaults and noxious agents. Accumulation of these stress events may lead to the formation of skin cancers, including both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Although modern targeted therapies have ameliorated the management of cutaneous malignancies, a safer, more affordable, and more effective strategy for chemoprevention and treatment is clearly needed for the improvement of skin cancer care. Phytochemicals are biologically active compounds derived from plants and herbal products. These agents appear to be beneficial in the battle against cancer as they exert anti-carcinogenic effects and are widely available, highly tolerated, and cost-effective. Evidence has indicated that the anti-carcinogenic properties of phytochemicals are due to their anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and anti-angiogenic effects. In this review, we discuss the preventive potential, therapeutic effects, bioavailability, and structure–activity relationship of these selected phytochemicals for the management of skin cancers. The knowledge compiled here will provide clues for future investigations on novel oncostatic phytochemicals and additional anti-skin cancer mechanisms.

  10. PRIMARY PREVENTION OF MALIGNANT SKIN TUMORS – PHOTOPROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Benedičič - Pilih

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of skin cancer is increasing in the world as well as in our country. Decades of research have increased the understanding of the ethiopathogenetic influences and risk factors for development of malignant skin tumors and stimulated efforts to promote their prevention. There are successes of prevention programs in some places in the world expressing with the reduction of mortality because of the cutaneous malignant melanoma. A primary prevention of a skin cancer attempts to change population knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about sunlight, leading to reduce of sunlight exposure.Conclusions. In this article we are discussing guidelines for photoprevention. The best approach to it is a reduction in the overall exposure to sunlight. The natural protection with the use of shade, clothing and hats is promoted as the best protection. Sunscreens are assumed as an important component of adjuvant photoprotection based on their convenience of use and also on their widespread promotion. While it has been argued that all tanning is a manifestation of skin injury, avoiding of artificial tanning devices is proposed also.

  11. Minor burns - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aid. There are different levels of burns . First-degree burns are only on the top layer of the ... skin can: Turn red Swell Be painful Second-degree burns go one layer deeper than first-degree burns. ...

  12. Comparing rich and poor: burn prevention in Wales, Pakistan, India, Botswana and Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, Peter; Hodgins, Peter; Potokar, Tom; Price, Patricia

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide, over 95% of fire-related burns occur in 'low and middle income countries' (LMIC) [1]. The majority of research, investment and expertise into the prevention and treatment of burns occurs in high income countries (HIC) [2]. Bearing that in mind, this study was conducted in four different LMIC and one HIC, with a view to comparing the knowledge of, and previous exposure to, burn prevention and first aid. A 25 question survey was devised at the Welsh Centre for Burns and Plastics, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, to ascertain the knowledge, attitude, and practice of individuals in five countries, in relation to burns. Overall 1146 participants took part in the survey: 191 from Botswana, 492 from India, 198 from Pakistan, 196 from Wales and 69 from Zambia. The results show a disparity between the UK and the four LMIC. A higher proportion of those in the UK received information on prevention and on first aid (51.4% vs. 38.1% and 70.9% vs. 40.1%, respectively). In addition, more of those questioned in the UK were able to identify the correct course of action should their clothing catch fire or should they spill hot oil on their arm (54.1% vs. 24.9% and 75% vs. 25.9%, respectively). The results show a discrepancy in the first aid provision, and level of education about burn prevention between a HIC and four LMIC. In addition they suggest an association between an increase in knowledge with better practice in relation to burn prevention and first aid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. Local cooling does not prevent hyperalgesia following burn injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Lassen, Birgit Vibeke; Pedersen, Juri L

    2002-01-01

    One of the oldest methods of pain relief following a burn injury is local application of ice or cold water. Experimental data indicate that cooling may also reduce the severity of tissue injury and promote wound healing, but there are no controlled studies in humans evaluating the anti......-inflammatory or anti-hyperalgesic potential of early cooling after thermal injury. Twenty-four healthy volunteers participated in this randomized, single-blinded study. Following baseline measurements, which included inflammatory variables (skin temperature, erythema index) and sensory variables (thermal...... and mechanical detection thresholds, thermal and mechanical pain responses, area of secondary hyperalgesia), first degree burn injuries were induced on both calves by contact thermodes (12.5 cm(2), 47 degrees C for 7 min). Eight minutes after the burn injury, contact thermodes (12.5 cm(2)) were again applied...

  14. Scald burns in young children--a review of Arizona burn center pediatric patients and a proposal for prevention in the Hispanic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Ruth B; Weigand, Shannon; Foster, Kevin N; Wadsworth, Michelle M; Jacober, Katie; Matthews, Marc R; Drachman, David; Caruso, Daniel M

    2008-01-01

    Arizona Burn Center staff observed an increasing number of pediatric scald burn admissions. Therefore, a retrospective study was conducted to identify scald demographics and etiologies. Focus groups were subsequently conducted to determine burn prevention knowledge in the target community. Arizona Burn Center scald admission variables (ages 0-5 years) reviewed included age, sex, ethnicity, TBSA, body parts burned, occurrence month and location, caregiver present, child and caregiver activities when injured, payor source, length of stay, parental language, and zip code. High-risk zip code area focus groups were then conducted. There were a total of 170 pediatric patients, aged 0 to 5 years, admitted to the burn center during 2005 to 2006. Of this total, 124 of the patients were admitted for scald burns, accounting for 59% of all pediatric burn admissions. Scald burn patient's demographics included male (52%), female (48%) with a mean age of 1.7 years. Majority ethnicity was Hispanic (63%). The mean TBSA was 8% with mean length of stay of 8 days. The remaining pediatric admissions for children aged 0 to 5 were for burns caused by fire or flame 15%, contact with a hot object 13%, friction burns 7%, chemical burns 3%, and electrical burns 3%. Demographics for the combined etiologies included an identical sex breakdown with male (52%) and female (48%). The majority ethnicity in the nonscald group was also Hispanic at 59% with a mean length of stay of 7 days and an average TBSA of 9.5%. Main etiologies of scald burns included hot water (25%), soup (24%), and coffee or tea (21%). Most common child behaviors were pulling hot substance from stove (24%), from countertop (13%), and having liquid spilled on them (13%) typically while caregiver was cooking. Mean TBSA was 8% with mean length of stay (8 days). Scalds occurred in the kitchen (83%) and mainly in child's home (94%). Mother was primary caregiver (78%). Payor source was Medicaid (86%) and the average admission cost

  15. [Efficacies of treating large area third-degree burns by tangential excision and skin grafting for subcutaneous tissue wounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guodong; Jia, Jun; Ma, Yindong; Shi, Wen; Wang, Fang; Li, Peilong; Gao, Cong; Zuo, Haibin; Fan, Chunjie; Yang, Tao; Wu, Qiuhe; Shao, Yang

    2014-12-02

    To explore the efficacies of treating patients with large area third-degree burns by tangential excision and skin grafting for subcutaneous tissue wounds. From January 2002 to December 2013, the medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 31 consecutive adult patients with a third-degree burn area exceeding 70% and undergoing tangential excision and skin grafting on subcutaneous tissue wound (TESGSTW) for the first time within 7 days postburn at Burn Center, Affiliated Jinan Central Hospital, Shandong University. For 31 patients, wounds with relative integrity eschar underwent TESGSTW by stages. Tourniquet was not used in some extremities. The relevant clinical data including patient condition on admission, causes of death, blood loss of tangential excision wound, surgical procedures and efficacies in cured group were analyzed. Average age, burn total area and third-degree burn area of 31 patients were (32.4 ± 12.8) years, (89.0 ± 6.2)% and (80.4 ± 7.6)% respectively. There were inhalation injury (n = 25, 80.6%) and early-stage shock before hospitalization (n = 22, 71.0%). Among 18 cured ones (58.1%), 2 patients had a third-degree burn area ≥ 90%. And 13 patients (41.9%) died and 10 of them died at 4 to 19 days postburn. Burn area was a risk factor of burn mortality. Sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) were major mortality causes. Four patients died from early-stage sepsis. Within 14 days postburn, average blood loss volume per 1% tangential excision area in non-tourniquet group was slightly higher than that in the tourniquet group, but the difference was insignificant. For 18 cured patients, TESGSTW were performed 41 times. For 14 patients (77.8%), TESGSTW was performed twice. The average time of the first tangential excision was (4.1 ± 0.6) days postburn, the time interval between the first two tangential excisions was (6.4 ± 2.0) days, the first tangential excision area (33.8 ± 7.6)% and accumulated tangential excision area (58

  16. Photocarcinogenesis and Skin Cancer Prevention Strategies: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marie Christine; Seebode, Christina; Lehmann, Janin; Emmert, Steffen

    2018-02-01

    UV radiation is acknowledged as the primary cause of photocarcinogenesis and therefore contributes to the development of skin cancer entities such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and melanoma. Typical DNA photoproducts and indirect DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species are the result of UV radiation. UV-induced DNA damage is repaired by nucleotide excision repair, which consequently counteracts the development of mutations and skin carcinogenesis. Tumour-suppressor genes are inactivated by mutation and growth-promoting pathways are activated leading to disruption of cell-cycle progression. Depending on the skin cancer entity, some genes are more frequently affected than others. In BCC mutations in Patched or Smoothened are common and affect the Sonic hedgehog pathway. In SCC, cell regulator protein p53 (TP53) mutations are prevalent, as well as mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclin-dependent kinase 2A (CDKN2A), Rat sarcoma (RAS), or the tyrosine kinase Fyn (FYN). UV-induced mutations in TP53 and CDKN2A are frequent in melanoma. UV-induced inflammatory processes also facilitate photocarcinogenesis. Recent studies showed a connection between photocarcinogenesis and citrus consumption, phytochemicals, alcohol consumption, hormone replacement therapy, as well as oral contraceptive use. Preventative measures include adequate use of sun protection and skin cancer screening at regular intervals, as well as the use of chemopreventative agents. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Skin penetration and UV-damage prevention by nanoberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Paula; Prieto, María Jimena; Milla, Laura; Calienni, María Natalia; Martinez, Luis; Rivarola, Viviana; Alonso, Silvia; Montanari, Jorge

    2017-10-03

    Ethanolic extract from blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) is rich in anthocyanins and thus exhibits antioxidant activity. On the other hand, ultradeformable liposomes are capable of penetrating to the impermeable barrier of skin. Nanoberries are ultradeformable liposomes carrying blueberry extract. In this study, their capacity to penetrate the stratum corneum and photodamage prevention were tested, with the aim of developing a topical formulation for skin protection from environmental damage. Nanoberries were prepared by lipid film resuspension with ethanolic extract from blueberry, followed by sonication and incorporation to a gel. Size, zeta potential, deformability, rheology, and viscoelasticity were determined. Toxicity was assessed in vivo in zebrafish model, while in vitro cytotoxicity assay was performed on HaCaT and HEK-293T cell lines. Skin penetration was evaluated with the Saarbrücken penetration model followed by tape stripping, cryosection, or optical sectioning. UV-damage protection and photoprotection were determined by ad hoc methods with UVA, UVB, and UVC radiation on HaCaT cells. Wound assay was performed on HaCaT cells. Nanoberries of about 100 nm, with differential elastic properties, did penetrate the stratum corneum, with low toxicity. When HaCaT cells were exposed to UV radiation in the presence of nanoberries, their viability was maintained. Nanoberries could be effective to protect the skin from sun photodamage. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. An Integrative Suicide Prevention Program for Visitor Charcoal Burning Suicide and Suicide Pact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Paul W. C.; Liu, Patricia M. Y.; Chan, Wincy S. C.; Law, Y. W.; Law, Steven C. K.; Fu, King-Wa; Li, Hana S. H.; Tso, M. K.; Beautrais, Annette L.; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2009-01-01

    An integrative suicide prevention program was implemented to tackle an outbreak of visitor charcoal burning suicides in Cheung Chau, an island in Hong Kong, in 2002. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the program. The numbers of visitor suicides reduced from 37 deaths in the 51 months prior to program implementation to 6 deaths in the 42…

  19. Fire Safety's My Job. Eighth Grade. Fire Safety for Texans: Fire and Burn Prevention Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Commission on Fire Protection, Austin.

    This booklet comprises the eighth grade component of a series of curriculum guides on fire and burn prevention. Designed to meet the age-specific needs of eighth grade students, its objectives include: (1) focusing on technical aspects of fire hazards and detection, and (2) exploring fire hazards outside the home. Texas essential elements of…

  20. Implications of climate change for skin cancer prevention in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, Jen

    2011-12-01

    It is estimated that nearly 450,000 Australians get skin cancer every year. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight has been identified as the cause of more than 95% of skin cancers in Australia. Accordingly, the focus of skin cancer prevention programs is reducing exposure to UV radiation. In Victoria, improvements in sun protection behaviours and reductions in sunburn and melanoma incidence rates among younger people have been observed since the SunSmart program was established in 1988. However, climate change has the potential to undermine these successes. First, surface UVB radiation is dependent on stratospheric total ozone amounts. While signs of impact of international restrictions on the production of ozone-depleting substances have been observed, improvements have not yet returned ozone to pre-1970s levels. Interactions between ozone depletion and climate change may slow the recovery of the ozone layer and compound increases in UV radiation at some latitudes. Before recovery, it is expected that higher levels of UV radiation will continue in most Australian regions, with an associated higher risk of skin cancer. Indeed, recent data show increases in surface UV radiation throughout Australia since the 1970s. Second, mean temperatures in Australia have increased over the past 30 years and are projected to rise further by 2030. Australian data shows that with higher temperatures, adults spend more time outdoors, are less likely to wear covering clothing and more likely to be sunburnt. Hence, rising temperatures can be expected to result in increases in sun exposure, sunburn and correspondingly, skin cancer risk.

  1. Phases of the cutaneous angiogenesis process in experimental third-degree skin burns: histological and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Mogoşanu, G D; Popescu, Florina Carmen; Lascăr, I; Pârvănescu, H; Mogoantă, L

    2013-01-01

    Skin burns represent a major problem of public health because of their frequency and because of their seriousness, too. The healing process of the burnt wound is extremely complex, as it requires a well-coordinated collaboration among different tissues and cellular strings. From the morphological point of view, the stages of the repairing process of the skin wounds include processes of inflammation, proliferation and tissular remodeling. Angiogenesis has a role of extreme importance within the healing process of third-degree skin burns. That is because the vascularization remake is necessary for feeding the tissue of granulation with nutritive substances and oxygen. The angiogenesis started relatively fast. Three days after the producing of the burn, there could be identified strings of CD34+ endothelial precursor cells at the edges and deep into the wound, all these having contact with the normal blood vessels or with those lees affected by the thermal aggression. After the lumenization of the newly-formed capillary vessels, there appeared the pericytes within their membrane. The CD34+ endothelial precursor cells (EPc), as well as the pericytes, participate at the synthesis of the base membrane of the angiogenesis vessels. The density of the angiogenesis vessels on the surface unit within the tissue of granulation grew from three to 12 days. After that, they reduced progressively while the tissue of granulation was becoming mature. The angiogenesis vessels go through a process of reshuffling and maturation at the same time with the maturation of the tissue of granulation, but these processes did not appear to be finished when the skin was completely healed, and the epidermis was totally recovered.

  2. Development of an effective communication strategy for the prevention of burns in children: the PRIUS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedri, S.; Briguglio, E.; Cedri, C.; Masellis, A.; Crenca, A.; Pitidis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study has developed a learning kit for the prevention of domestic burns in childhood. The main objective was to trial an educational package for children (nursery and primary classes), for the prevention of burns, to be implemented through education in schools. The educational kit comprises posters, information leaflets, comic books, and pre and post education evaluation materials for school children, parents and teachers. Recipients of the preliminary study were the students of nine schools in the eight Italian cities where Burn Centers are located. In order to reach the target groups of children, it was necessary to identify the most effective communication strategy to convey the burn prevention message. For nursery school children, it was not possible to use tools with written texts alone, as they were not yet literate. Moreover, even for older children, it was necessary to find an attractive tool to catch their attention and interest, promoting the understanding and memorization of lessons learned. The most suitable means was found to be comic strips, allowing the messages to be conveyed through images as well as words. A total of 370 children (195 from nurseries and 175 from primary schools) participated in the trial of the educational kit. Overall, for every environment represented in the evaluation table, the ability to recognize the dangers among both the pre-school and primary school children increased significantly after the training activity. In conclusion, the educational kit has been positively assessed. PMID:27252606

  3. Scar prevention using Laser-Assisted Skin Healing (LASH) in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capon, Alexandre; Iarmarcovai, Gwen; Gonnelli, David; Degardin, Nathalie; Magalon, Guy; Mordon, Serge

    2010-08-01

    The use of lasers has been proposed for scar revision. A recent pilot clinical study demonstrated that lasers could also be used immediately after surgery to reduce the appearance of scars. The LASH (Laser-Assisted Skin Healing) technique induces a temperature elevation in the skin which modifies the wound-healing process. We report a prospective comparative clinical trial aimed at evaluating an 810-nm diode-laser system to accelerate and improve the healing process in surgical scars immediately after skin closure. Twenty-nine women and 1 man (mean age = 41.4 years; Fitzpatrick skin types I-IV) were included to evaluate the safety and performance of the laser system. The laser dose (or fluence in J/cm(2)) was selected as a function of phototype and skin thickness. Each surgical incision (e.g., abdominoplasty) was divided into two parts. An 8-cm segment was treated with the laser immediately after skin closure. A separate 8-cm segment was left untreated as a control. Clinical evaluations (overall appearance ratings, comparative scar scale) of all scars were conducted at 10 days, 3 months, and 12 months by both surgeon and patients. Profilometry analysis from silicone replicas of the skin was done at 12 months. Wilcoxon signed-rank test analyses were performed. Twenty-two patients were treated using a high dose (80-130 J/cm(2)) and 8 patients with a low dose (115 J/cm(2)) experienced superficial burns on the laser-treated segment, which resolved in about 5-7 days. For the eight patients treated at low dosage (side effects were observed. This prospective comparative trial demonstrates that an 810-nm diode laser treatment, performed immediately after surgery, can improve the appearance of a surgical scar. The dose plays a great role in scar improvement and must be well controlled. There is interest in LASH for hypertrophic scar revision. LASH can be used to prevent and reduce scars in plastic surgery.

  4. Development of a gesture and voice controlled system for burn injury prevention in individuals with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanepoel, Liam; van den Heever, Dawie; Dellimore, Kiran

    2017-07-01

    Burn injury is a major public health issue in developing countries, with most injuries being largely associated with the use of kitchen stoves. This study details the development of a cost-effective gesture and voice recognition controlled (GVC) system to be used by individuals with disabilities to reduce the likelihood of burn injury and improve their quality of life. The device replaces conventional dial controls with voice and hand gesture recognition sensors and software which are designed to be easily implemented into a household kitchen. Preliminary evaluation of the GVC system's performance in gesture and voice recognition, gas leak detection and ignition control tests were conducted using a Bunsen burner as a stove top surrogate. The voice and gesture recognition tests yielded sensitivities of 88% and 100%, respectively. These results suggest that the GVC system may be a promising solution for burn injury prevention pending further work to improve its reliability and robustness.

  5. Effect of low-level laser therapy (660 nm) on the healing of second-degree skin burns in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; Iwama, Angela May; Shima, Patricia; Fernandes, Kelly Rossetti; Carvalho, Juliana Gonçalves; De Oliveira, Poliani; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 660 nm laser on the healing of burn wounds made on the backs of rats. Thirty-two Wistar male rats were used. The animals were randomly distributed into 2 groups of 16 animals each: control group (burned rats without treatment) and laser-treated group (burned rats treated with laser therapy). Each group was divided into two different subgroups, euthanized in different periods (subgroup A: 7 days post-surgery and subgroup B: 14 days post-surgery). Histopathological analysis revealed a significant decrease in the necrotic area in the laser-treated group compared to the controls at days 7 and 14 post-injury. COX-2 positive cells were found in a strong pattern in the group submitted to laser therapy after 7 days. Regarding VEGF immunomarker, a significant VEGF immunoexpression was detected in the laser-exposed group after 14 days when compared to the negative control group. Taken together, our results demonstrate that laser therapy is able to promote skin repair of burned rats as a result of decreasing necrotic area and an up-regulation of COX-2 and VEGF immunoexpression.

  6. [Facial burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, F E

    1984-01-01

    Deep partial and full thickness facial burns require early skin grafting. Pressure face masks and local steroids reduce hypertrophic scarring. Split skin and Z-plasties are used for early reconstructive surgery. Only after softening of the scar tissue definite reconstructive work should be undertaken. For this period full thickness skin grafts and local flaps are preferred. Special regional problems require skilled plastic surgery. Reconstructive surgery is the most essential part of the rehabilitation of severe facial burns.

  7. Raman Micro-spectroscopy Study of Healthy and Burned Biological Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnani, Faranak; Glosser, Robert; Idris, Ahamed

    2011-10-01

    Burn injuries are a significant medical problem, and need to be treated quickly and precisely. Burned skin needs to be removed early, within hours (less than 24 hrs) of injury, when the margins of the burn are still hard to define. Studies show that treating and excising burn wounds soon after the injury prevents the wound from becoming deeper, reduces the release of proinflammatory mediators, and reduces or prevents the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome. Also, removing burned skin prepares the affected region for skin grafting. Raman micro-spectroscopy could be used as an objective diagnostic method that will assist burn surgeons in distinguishing unburned from burned areas. As a first step in developing a diagnostic tool, we present Raman micro-spectroscopy information from normal and burned ex vivo rat skin.

  8. Early detection of skin cancer: experience of a skin cancer prevention campaign in Piauí-Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Bandeira Lages; Patrícia Barros Barbosa; Isabella Parente Almeida; Lauro Rodolpho Soares Lopes; Lauro Lourival Lopes Filho

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the correlation between the diagnoses of skin cancer and known risk factors through analysis of data from the National Skin Cancer Prevention Campaign held by Brazilian Society of Dermatology in the state of Piauí, Brazil, in recent years. Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive and analytical report using quantitative data obtained from a prevention campaign in the state of Piauí, in 2009 and 2010. Collected data was submitted to a descriptive analysis, and multivari...

  9. Can Skin Exposure to Sunlight Prevent Liver Inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Gorman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Liver inflammation contributes towards the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Here we discuss how skin exposure to sunlight may suppress liver inflammation and the severity of NAFLD. Following exposure to sunlight-derived ultraviolet radiation (UVR, the skin releases anti-inflammatory mediators such as vitamin D and nitric oxide. Animal modeling studies suggest that exposure to UVR can prevent the development of NAFLD. Association studies also support a negative link between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and NAFLD incidence or severity. Clinical trials are in their infancy and are yet to demonstrate a clear beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation. There are a number of potentially interdependent mechanisms whereby vitamin D could dampen liver inflammation, by inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis and liver fibrosis, modulating the gut microbiome and through altered production and transport of bile acids. While there has been a focus on vitamin D, other mediators induced by sun exposure, such as nitric oxide may also play important roles in curtailing liver inflammation.

  10. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10μM HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at λ=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  11. Early detection of skin cancer: experience of a skin cancer prevention campaign in Piauí-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Bandeira Lages

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the correlation between the diagnoses of skin cancer and known risk factors through analysis of data from the National Skin Cancer Prevention Campaign held by Brazilian Society of Dermatology in the state of Piauí, Brazil, in recent years. Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive and analytical report using quantitative data obtained from a prevention campaign in the state of Piauí, in 2009 and 2010. Collected data was submitted to a descriptive analysis, and multivariate logistic regression, using as dependent variable the skin cancer diagnosis. Results: In 2009 and 2010, this campaign was responsible for 1141 consultations, diagnosing 122 (10.7% cases of skin cancer: 108 basal cell carcinomas (BCC, 10 squamous cell (SCC and four melanomas. Of those examined, 35.4% were male, 73.1% reported inadequate sun protection, 16.4% had a family history of skin cancer and 7.2% had personal history. Those with history of skin cancer were 5.24 times more likely to have a new diagnosis of cancer, while those presenting non-black skin were 4.91 times more likely to diagnosis. Conclusion: Personal or family history of epithelial neoplasia, non-colored black skin and the male gender were associated to higher chances of developing skin cancer. In addition, unprotected sun exposure remains routine.

  12. Incidence and characteristics of chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Lee, Sang-Gil; Kim, Hwan-Cheol

    2017-05-01

    Chemical burns can lead to serious health outcomes. Previous studies about chemical burns have been performed based on burn center data so these studies have provided limited information about the incidence of chemical burns at the national level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns using nationwide databases. A cohort representing the Korean population, which was established using a national health insurance database, and a nationwide workers' compensation database were used to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns. Characteristics of the affected body region, depth of burns, industry, task, and causative agents were analyzed from two databases. The incidence of chemical burns was calculated according to employment status. The most common regions involving chemical burns with hospital visits were the skin followed by the eyes. For skin lesions, the hands and wrists were the most commonly affected regions. Second degree burns were the most common in terms of depth of skin lesions. The hospital visit incidence was 1.96 per 10,000 person-year in the general population. The compensated chemical burns incidence was 0.17 per 10,000 person-year. Employees and the self-employed showed a significantly increased risk of chemical burns undergoing hospital visits compared to their dependents. Chemical burns on the skin and eyes are almost equally prevalent. The working environment was associated with increased risk of chemical burns. Our results may aid in estimating the size of the problem and prioritizing prevention of chemical burns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. Epidemiology of pediatric burns and future prevention strategies-a study of 475 patients from a high-volume burn center in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhopte, Amol; Tiwari, V K; Patel, Pankaj; Bamal, Rahul

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric burns have a long-term social impact. This is more apparent in a developing country such as India, where their incidence and morbidity are high. The aim of this study was to provide recent prospective epidemiological data on pediatric burns in India and to suggest future preventive strategies. Children up to 18 years old admitted to the Department of Burns, Plastic & Maxillofacial Surgery, VMMC & Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, between January and December 2014 were included in the study. Data regarding age, sex, etiology, total body surface area (TBSA), circumstances of injury, and clinical assessment were collected. The Mann-Whitney test or Kruskal-Wallis test or ANOVA was used to compare involved TBSA among various cohort groups accordingly. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to determine the predictors of TBSA. There were a total of 475 patients involved in the study, including seven suicidal burns, all of whom were females with a mean age greater than the cohort average. Age, type of burns, mode of injury, presence or absence of inhalation injury, gender, and time of year (quarter) for admission were found to independently affect the TBSA involved. Electrical burns also formed an important number of presenting burn patients, mainly involving teenagers. Several societal issues have come forth, e.g., child marriage, child labor, and likely psychological problems among female children as suggested by a high incidence of suicidal burns. This study also highlights several issues such as overcrowding, lack of awareness, dangerous cooking practices, and improper use of kerosene oil. There is an emergent need to recognize the problems, formulate strategies, spread awareness, and ban or replace hazardous substances responsible for most burn accidents.

  14. Skin preparation for preventing infection following caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadiati, Diah R; Hakimi, Mohammad; Nurdiati, Detty S; Ota, Erika

    2014-09-17

    The risk of maternal mortality and morbidity (particularly postoperative infection) is higher for caesarean section than for vaginal birth. With the increasing rate of caesarean section, it is important that the risks to the mother are minimised as far as possible. This review focuses on different forms and methods for preoperative skin preparation to prevent infection. To compare the effects of different agent forms and methods of preoperative skin preparation for preventing postcaesarean infection. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (26 June 2014) and the reference lists of all included studies and review articles. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials, including cluster-randomised trials, evaluating any type of preoperative skin preparation agents, forms and methods of application for caesarean section. Three review authors independently assessed all potential studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and extracted the data using a predesigned form. Data were checked for accuracy. We included six trials with a total of 1522 women. No difference was found in the primary outcomes of either wound infection or endometritis. Two trials of 1294 women, compared drape with no drape (one trial using iodine and the other using chlorhexidine) and found no significant difference in wound infection (risk ratio (RR) 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97 to 1.71). One trial of 79 women comparing alcohol scrub and iodophor drape with iodophor scrub without drape reported no wound infection in either group. One trial of 50 women comparing parachlorometaxylenol plus iodine with iodine alone reported no significant difference in wound infection (RR 0.33; 95% CI 0.04 to 2.99).Two trials reported endometritis, one trial comparing alcohol scrub and iodophor drape with iodophor scrub only found no significant difference (RR 1.62; 95% CI 0.29 to 9.16). The other trial of 50 women comparing parachlorometaxylenol plus iodine with iodine alone

  15. Ablation of burned skin with ultra-short pulses laser to promote healing: evaluation by optical coherence tomography, histology, μATR-FTIR and Nonlinear Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Moises Oliveira dos

    2012-01-01

    Burns cause changes in the anatomical structure of the skin associated with trauma. The severity of the burn injury is divided into first, second and third-degree burns. The third-degree burns have been a major focus of research in search of more conservative treatments and faster results in repair for a functional and cosmetically acceptable. The conventional treatment is the use of topical natural or synthetic skin graft. An alternative therapy is the laser ablation process for burned tissue necrosis removal due to the no mechanical contact, fast application and access to difficult areas. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using high intensity femtosecond lasers as an adjunct treatment of burned patients. For this study, 65 Wistar rats were divided into groups of five animals: healthy skin, burned skin, two types of treatment (surgical debridement or femtosecond laser ablation) and four different times in the healing process monitoring. Three regions of the back of the animals were exposed to steam source causing third-degree burn. On the third day after the burn, one of the regions was ablated with high intensity ultrashort laser pulses (λ = 785 nm, 90 fs, 2 kHz and 10 μJ/ pulse), the other received surgical debridement, and the last was considered the burn control. The regions were analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT), histology, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy using Fourier transform (μ-ATR-FTIR), two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) and second harmonic generation technique (SHG) on days 3, 5, 7 and 14 pos-treatments. The results showed that with the laser irradiation conditions used it was possible to remove debris from third degree burn. The techniques used to characterize the tissue allowed to verify that all treatments promoted wound healing. On the fourteenth day, the regeneration curve showed that the attenuation coefficient of laser ablated tissue converges to the values of

  16. Analysis of the collagen birefringence and the relative attenuation coefficient of health and burned skin irradiated with linearly polarized He-Ne laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Daniela de Fatima Teixeira da

    2002-01-01

    Low-intensity laser therapy is characterized by its ability to induce athermic effects and nondestructive photobiological processes. Although it has been in use for more than 40 years, this phototherapy is still not an established therapeutic modality. The objectives of this study were: to quantify the collagen fibers organization by polarized light microscopy in normal and burned skin samples at day 17 post-injury considering preferential axis as the animal's spinal column and aligning the linear laser polarization in two directions of polarization, parallel or perpendicular to this axis; to determine the relative attenuation coefficient for the intensity light by the technique of imaging the light distribution in normal and burned skin during wound healing process taking only parallel direction of polarization. To reach the objectives, burns about 6 mm in diameter were created with liquid N 2 on the back of the rats and the lesions were irradiated on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-wounding, D= 1 J/cm 2 , to investigate the effects of low-intensity linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam on skin wounds healing. Control lesions were not irradiated. The results have demonstrated that: the skin samples irradiated with linearly parallel polarized He-Ne laser beam showed collagen fibers more organized; burned skin samples presents a higher attenuation coefficient than normal skin samples. These results are important to optimize low intensity laser therapy dosimetry on acceleration wound healing. (author)

  17. Qualitative analysis of emergency department reports applied to a pilot project for the prevention of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, E; Masellis, M; Fondi, G; Cedri, C; Debbia, C; Pitidis, A

    2015-12-31

    Accidents and burns are a major problem in Italy and in industrialized countries, due to the consequences they have on health, especially in children aged 0-4 years. In Italy, about 400 people die each year from burns, with over 70% of these occurring in the home. In the European Union, burns are one of the top five causes of death from accidents, accounting for 3% of all deaths from accidents and violence in those age groups. One percent of all deaths in children are due to burns. In this paper, we illustrate the results of qualitative analysis, conducted according to the methodology of content analysis, on narratives included in the anamnesis of clinical papers at the ED in 738 cases of burns in children (0-14 years) observed in a sample of Emergency Departments in the years 2005-2009. The results of content analysis show that the most frequent mechanism that leads to burns is contact with hot liquids and heating surfaces. Much of preventive action should be directed at controlling the child. The accidental event descriptions for the younger age group (0-4 years) reveal an unequivocal responsibility of the parents. The qualitative analysis of narratives was carried out to produce scientific evidence to identify the more frequent and severe burn accidents for specific target/age groups and to establish specific preventive measures. The study of qualitative analysis of burns observed at the ED was introductory to the pilot project PRIUS (Preventing burns among school-aged children). The objective of PRIUS is to increase awareness of the risks of burns in children and adults through a learning path tailored towards their prevention, and the promotion of appropriate standards of personal safe behaviour and first aid actions.

  18. Management of partial thickness burn of the dorsum skin in a 3-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This lesion was painful to touch. Anaesthesia was achieved using 6mg/kg Propofol® (Dongkook pharmaceutical, Korea) administered intravenously and 30ml of lignocaine HCL® (AzraZeneca,UK) infiltrated around the wound edge from the c-spine to the sacral bone. The hair around the burns area was clipped, the wound ...

  19. Efficacy of Skin Stretching for Burn Scar Excision: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegen, P.D.H.M.; van Trier, A.J.M.; Jongen, S.J.M.; Vlig, M.; Nieuwenhuis, M.K.; Middelkoop, E.; van Zuijlen, P.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Burn survivors are frequently faced with disfiguring scars. Various techniques exist to improve scar appearance, such as laser treatment and dermabrasion. Next to that, surgical reconstruction, such as scar excision is an option. This randomized controlled trial investigates whether a

  20. Major Full Skin Thickness Burn Injuries in an Infant due to an Incubator: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhan Ciftci

    2011-06-01

    We conclude that in neonates and infants, relatively low temperatures may cause deep burn injuries. We therefore recommend the delivery of preterm childbirths at well equipped facilities with staff who are qualified to nurse premature neonates. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 85-88

  1. From skin allograft coverage to allograft-micrograft sandwich method: A retrospective review of severe burn patients who received conjunctive application of cultured epithelial autografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Alvin Wen Choong; Khoo, Yik Cheong; Truong, Thi Thu Ha; Woo, Evan; Tan, Bien Keem; Chong, Si Jack

    2018-02-20

    A 12-year retrospective review of severe burn patients who received cultured epithelial autografts (CEA) at the Singapore General Hospital Burns Centre from January 2005 to December 2016 was carried out. During this period, two different surgical modalities were employed to manage these burn injuries. In the earlier period, following early excision of the burn wounds, exposed surfaces were covered with a combination of split thickness skin autografts (STSG) and allografts. Surfaces covered with skin allografts were subsequently debrided of the allo-epidermis in about 3 weeks later, exposing the allodermis with granulating tissues for grafting of CEA; a technique known as the Cuono's method. In the later period, allograft-autologous micrograft sandwich technique was used to graft on the early excised burns with subsequent CEA grafting. The former and latter groups represented by STSG/C (n=10) and M/CEA (n=14) respectively, were compared in terms of clinical profiles, outcomes, allograft/CEA usage and total graft cost. No significant differences were found based on mean age and presence of inhalation burns between the two treatment methods However, percentage total body surface area (TBSA) and Revised Baux Score were significantly higher (pmicrografts which seemed to improve stabilization of the wound bed resulting in less operating procedures and improving CEA take. To conclude, the M/CEA method introduced was able to treat more severe burn patients at lower graft costs without compromising critical clinical outcomes significantly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Burning Issue: Handling Household Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to injury. , as your immune system shifts into gear. “The immune system response is intended to limit ... maintain blood pressure. Grafting—placing healthy skin on top of the burn wound—might help promote new ...

  3. A 2000 patient retrospective assessment of a new strategy for burn wound management in view of infection prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glik, Justyna; Łabuś, Wojciech; Kitala, Diana; Mikuś-Zagórska, Karolina; Roberts, Christopher D; Nowak, Mariusz; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Kawecki, Marek

    2017-12-15

    Infections in burn patients are still the principal cause of complications in burn injuries. The aim of this study is to assess a new strategy for burn wound management in view of infection prevention and treatment in the experience of the Burn Treatment Center in Siemianowice Śląskie. The applied methodology involved the analysis of patient records describing the hospital's epidemiological situation between 2014 and 2016. The analysis also included the use and cost of antibiotics, silver-containing dressings, and other antiseptics relative to the number of sepsis cases, including those caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as the mortality ratio. The total costs of prevention and treatment of infections were reduced, while the use of silver-containing dressings and antiseptics increased. The number of patients with sepsis decreased, including cases caused by P. aeruginosa, and the mortality ratio was reduced. Introducing a strategy for burn wound-oriented infection prevention and treatment in burn patients provides a number of benefits. It is also cost-effective. Using locally applied active dressings and antiseptics can be a welcome choice for often-unnecessary antibiotic therapy of a suspected or existing burn wound infection. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Prevention of occupational solar UV radiation-induced epithelial skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A; Beissert, S; Knuschke, P

    2015-03-01

    Malignancies of the skin, with an incidence of more than 200,000 newly registered cases/year, are the most frequently notified malignances in Germany. In Europe, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) account for about 30 cases/100,000 persons and 50-100 cases/100,000 persons, respectively. Ultraviolet (UV) exposure is the main risk factor to induce these cancers. Increased incidence rates were shown for persons having red/blonde hair as well as light eye colour, acquire sun burns easily, hardly tan and develop freckles. The majority of the malignancies and precursor lesions are acquired by UV exposure in leisure time. However, in highly occupationally UV-exposed outdoor workers, UV monitoring revealed that exposure levels are 2-3 times higher compared to the general population. Occupations likely to be highly exposed are farmers, forestry workers, gardeners, landscapers, fishermen and seafarers, construction workers, builders, tin smiths, sport teachers, mountain guides, etc. Recent metaanalyses showed that occupational UV exposure is a relevant and independent risk factor for SCC and to a lesser extent also for BCC. To prevent occupationally caused malignancies of the skin a significant reduction of occupationally acquired UV dosages in outdoor workers is mandatory. Relevant factors influencing the cumulative sun exposure in outdoor workers are the amount of UV exposure, the specific tasks to be performed in the sun as well as the UV protection habits of the workers. Besides adequate behavior, textile protection by headgear and clothing as well as the regular use of sunscreens and sun glasses are important.

  5. Interleukin-17 receptor A maintains and protects the skin barrier to prevent allergic skin inflammation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floudas, Achilleas; Saunders, Sean P.; Moran, Tara; Schwartz, Christian; Hams, Emily; Fitzgerald, Denise C.; Johnston, James A.; Ogg, Graham S.; McKenzie, Andrew N.; Walsh, Patrick T.; Fallon, Padraic G.

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease affecting up to 20% of children and 3% of adults worldwide and is associated with dysregulation of the skin barrier. While type 2 responses are implicated in AD, emerging evidence indicates potential role for the IL-17A signalling axis in AD pathogenesis. In this study we show that in the filaggrin mutant mouse model of spontaneous AD, IL-17RA deficiency (Il17ra-/-) resulted in severe exacerbation of skin inflammation. Interestingly, Il17ra-/- mice without the filaggrin mutation also developed spontaneous progressive skin inflammation with eosinophilia, increased levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and IL-5 in the skin. Il17ra-/- mice have a defective skin barrier with altered filaggrin expression. The barrier dysregulation and spontaneous skin inflammation in Il17ra-/- mice was dependent on TSLP, but not the other alarmins IL-25 and IL-33. The associated skin inflammation was mediated by IL-5 expressing pathogenic effector (pe) Th2 cells and was independent of TCRγδ T cells and IL-22. An absence of IL-17RA in non-hematopoietic cells, but not in the hematopoietic cells, was required for the development of spontaneous skin inflammation. Skin microbiome dysbiosis developed in the absence of IL-17RA, with antibiotic intervention resulting in significant amelioration of skin inflammation and reductions in skin infiltrating peTh2 cells and TSLP. This study describes a previously unappreciated protective role for IL-17RA signalling in regulation of the skin barrier and maintenance of skin immune homeostasis. PMID:28615416

  6. The Paediatric skin at risk: Challenges in burns, surgery and specific infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.A. Baartmans (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe skin, the largest human organ, provides the body shape and is the main organ that protects our body against intruders such as heat, cold, trauma, or infections. A number of important functions are listed here: - Regulation of body temperature - Sensory function: touch, feel and pain

  7. The establishment of animal model of radiation-skin-burn and its changes of tissue metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xingan; Wu Shiliang; Wang Xiuzhen; Zhou Yinghui; Feng Yizhong; Tian Ye; Peng Miao

    2001-01-01

    The biochemistry metabolic changes of the tissues induced by 60 Co γ radiation or by accelerator β radiation on the animal local tissues were observed. The experiment results were shown as follows: (1) 60 Co γ radiation can induce the metabolic changes of the local tissue and led to ulcer or death. (2) Accelerator β radiation at the same dose of γ radiation can only produce ulcer but no death. (3) The biochemistry metabolic changes of the tissues induced by 60 Co γ radiation are similar to that by β radiation, but as a radiation-burn animal model, the latter is better

  8. Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Canada Chapter 2: Primary Prevention of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Kirk; Searles, Gordon E; Vender, Ronald; Teoh, Hwee; Ashkenas, John

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal and squamous cell carcinoma (BCC and SCC), represents the most common malignancy. To provide guidance to Canadian health care practitioners regarding primary prevention of NMSC. Structured literature searches were conducted, using search terms including prevention, sunscreen, and sun prevention factor. All recommendations concern guidance that physicians should regularly discuss with their patients to help establish photoprotection habits. The GRADE system was used to assign strength to each recommendation. Ultraviolet exposure is the major modifiable risk factor for NMSC. Aspects of photoprotection, including effective sunscreen use and avoidance of both the midday sun and artificial tanning, are discussed. Several widespread misunderstandings that undermine responsible public health measures related to sun safety are addressed. Photoprotection represents both an individual priority and a public health imperative. By providing accurate information during routine patient visits, physicians reinforce the need for ongoing skin cancer prevention. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. The Effects of Punica granatum Flower Extract on Skin Injuries Induced by Burn in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Ebrahim; Akbari, Jafar; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Azizi, Soheil

    2017-01-01

    Background. We compared the efficacy of P. granatum (P) flower extract with that of silver sulfadiazine (SSD) for treating thermal burn injuries in rats. Methods. Ten Wistar rats in each group were topically given base cream, normal saline, cream containing 1% SSD, or creams containing 5% or 10% Punica granatum flower extract. The treatments were administered once daily until complete wound healing was observed. The wound area and healing time were assessed. In addition, percentage wound contraction and histopathological characteristics such as neovascularization and collagen formation were determined. The tannin content in P. granatum extract was determined. Results. The decrease in the average size of wounds on day 15 of the treatment was higher in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum extract than in rats treated with cream containing SSD (2.8 ± 0.9 cm2 versus 8.4 ± 3.2 cm2). The wounds completely healed on day 25 of the treatment in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum flower extract compared with those in rats treated with the other agents. Conclusion. These results indicated that P. granatum flower extract promoted wound healing in rats and could be used for managing burn injuries. PMID:28203250

  10. The Effects of Punica granatum Flower Extract on Skin Injuries Induced by Burn in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Nasiri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We compared the efficacy of P. granatum (P flower extract with that of silver sulfadiazine (SSD for treating thermal burn injuries in rats. Methods. Ten Wistar rats in each group were topically given base cream, normal saline, cream containing 1% SSD, or creams containing 5% or 10% Punica granatum flower extract. The treatments were administered once daily until complete wound healing was observed. The wound area and healing time were assessed. In addition, percentage wound contraction and histopathological characteristics such as neovascularization and collagen formation were determined. The tannin content in P. granatum extract was determined. Results. The decrease in the average size of wounds on day 15 of the treatment was higher in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum extract than in rats treated with cream containing SSD (2.8±0.9 cm2 versus 8.4±3.2 cm2. The wounds completely healed on day 25 of the treatment in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum flower extract compared with those in rats treated with the other agents. Conclusion. These results indicated that P. granatum flower extract promoted wound healing in rats and could be used for managing burn injuries.

  11. The Effects of Punica granatum Flower Extract on Skin Injuries Induced by Burn in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Ebrahim; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Akbari, Jafar; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Azizi, Soheil

    2017-01-01

    Background . We compared the efficacy of P. granatum (P) flower extract with that of silver sulfadiazine (SSD) for treating thermal burn injuries in rats. Methods . Ten Wistar rats in each group were topically given base cream, normal saline, cream containing 1% SSD, or creams containing 5% or 10% Punica granatum flower extract. The treatments were administered once daily until complete wound healing was observed. The wound area and healing time were assessed. In addition, percentage wound contraction and histopathological characteristics such as neovascularization and collagen formation were determined. The tannin content in P. granatum extract was determined. Results . The decrease in the average size of wounds on day 15 of the treatment was higher in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum extract than in rats treated with cream containing SSD (2.8 ± 0.9 cm 2 versus 8.4 ± 3.2 cm 2 ). The wounds completely healed on day 25 of the treatment in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum flower extract compared with those in rats treated with the other agents. Conclusion . These results indicated that P. granatum flower extract promoted wound healing in rats and could be used for managing burn injuries.

  12. 0.2% chlorhexidine acetate as skin disinfectant prevents skin lesions in extremely preterm infants: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Lisanne M A; Tostmann, Alma; Hopman, Joost; Liem, Kian D

    2018-03-01

    The skin disinfectant '0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% alcohol' (0.5% CHG-70% alc) may cause skin lesions in extremely preterm infants (gestational age chlorhexidine gluconate solution in acetate (0.2% CHG-acetate) was introduced as skin disinfectant for extremely preterm infants in our neonatal intensive care units. We aimed to compare the incidence of skin lesions and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) among extremely preterm infants when using 0.5% CHG-70% alc and 0.2% CHG-acetate. Retrospective pre-post comparison cohort study. All electronic patient records of extremely preterm infants born between January 2011-March 2013 ('0.5% CHG-70% alc' cohort) and April 2013-October 2015 ('0.2% CHG-acetate' cohort) were reviewed. The incidence of skin lesions and CLABSI. Skin lesions were defined as the presence of erythema, blisters, excoriation, oedema or induration. CLABSI was defined according to the definition of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The incidence of skin lesions was 22% (95% CI 11% to 37%) in the '0.5% CHG-70% alc' cohort (n=41) and 5% (95% CI 1% to 15%; p=0.02) in the '0.2% CHG-acetate' cohort (n=41). The incidence of CLABSI was the same in both groups (28%; 95% CI 14% to 46% in '0.5% CHG-70% alc' vs 27%; 95% CI 14% to 44% in '0.2% CHG-acetate'; p=0.98). Using 0.2% CHG-acetate as skin disinfectant in extremely preterm infants resulted in statistically significant reduction of skin lesions, without increasing the risk of CLABSI as compared with 0.5% CHG-70% alc. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Wound management and outcome of 595 electrical burns in a major burn center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haisheng; Tan, Jianglin; Zhou, Junyi; Yuan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jiaping; Peng, Yizhi; Wu, Jun; Luo, Gaoxing

    2017-06-15

    Electrical burns are important causes of trauma worldwide. This study aims to analyze the clinical characteristics, wound management, and outcome of electric burns. This retrospective study was performed at the Institute of Burn Research of the Third Military Medical University during 2013-2015. Data including the demographics, injury patterns, wound treatment, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. A total of 595 electrical burn patients (93.8% males) were included. The average age was 37.3 ± 14.6 y, and most patients (73.5%) were aged 19∼50 years. Most patients (67.2%) were injured in work-related circumstances. The mean total body surface area was 8.8 ± 11.8% and most wounds (63.5%) were full-thickness burns. Operation times of high-voltage burns and current burns were higher than those of low-voltage burns and arc burns, respectively. Of the 375 operated patients, 83.2% (n = 312) underwent skin autografting and 49.3% (n = 185) required skin flap coverage. Common types of skin flaps were adjacent (50.3%), random (42.2%), and pedicle (35.7%). Amputation was performed in 107 cases (18.0%) and concentrated on the hands (43.9%) and upper limbs (39.3%). The mean length of stay was 42.9 ± 46.3 d and only one death occurred (0.2%). Current burns and higher numbers of operations were major risk factors for amputation and length of stay, respectively. Electrical burns mainly affected adult males with occupational exposures in China. Skin autografts and various skin flaps were commonly used for electric burn wound management. More standardized and effective strategies of treatment and prevention are still needed to decrease amputation rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a long-term ovine model of cutaneous burn and smoke inhalation injury and the effects of early excision and skin autografting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yusuke; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Rehberg, Sebastian; Asmussen, Sven; Ito, Hiroshi; Sousse, Linda E.; Cox, Robert A.; Deyo, Donald J.; Traber, Lillian D.; Traber, Maret G.; Herndon, David N.; Traber, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury frequently increases the risk of pneumonia and mortality in burn patients. The pathophysiology of acute lung injury secondary to burn and smoke inhalation is well studied, but long-term pulmonary function, especially the process of lung tissue healing following burn and smoke inhalation, has not been fully investigated. By contrast, early burn excision has become the standard of care in the management of major burn injury. While many clinical studies and small-animal experiments support the concept of early burn wound excision, and show improved survival and infectious outcomes, we have developed a new chronic ovine model of burn and smoke inhalation injury with early excision and skin grafting that can be used to investigate lung pathophysiology over a period of 3 weeks. Materials and methods Eighteen female sheep were surgically prepared for this study under isoflurane anesthesia. The animals were divided into three groups: an Early Excision group (20% TBSA, third-degree cutaneous burn and 36 breaths of cotton smoke followed by early excision and skin autografting at 24 h after injury, n = 6), a Control group (20% TBSA, third-degree cutaneous burn and 36 breaths of cotton smoke without early excision, n = 6) and a Sham group (no injury, no early excision, n = 6). After induced injury, all sheep were placed on a ventilator and fluid-resuscitated with Lactated Ringers solution (4 mL/% TBS/kg). At 24 h post-injury, early excision was carried out to fascia, and skin grafting with meshed autografts (20/1000 in., 1:4 ratio) was performed under isoflurane anesthesia. At 48 h post-injury, weaning from ventilator was begun if PaO2/FiO2 was above 250 and sheep were monitored for 3 weeks. Results At 96 h post-injury, all animals were weaned from ventilator. There are no significant differences in PaO2/FiO2 between Early Excision and Control groups at any points. All animals were survived for 3 weeks without infectious complication in Early Excision

  15. Functional and cosmetic outcome of full- versus split-thickness skin grafts in pediatric palmar surface burns: a prospective, independent evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Queenie E; Barzi, Federica; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2013-01-01

    Palmar hand burns continue to be a common injury in the pediatric population, with long-term implications for function, hand rehabilitation, and psychosocial well-being in a growing child. Debate over the choice of full-thickness skin grafts (FTSG) and split skin grafts (SSG) for optimal subsequent functional and cosmetic outcomes continues. This study prospectively evaluated children who required skin grafting of palmar burns at our institution between January 2008 and December 2009. A clinical assessment of the grafted area and donor site using the Vancouver Scar Scale, together with assessment of sensation, hair growth, and the development of contracture was performed by an independent clinician. Thirty-four (16%) of 214 palm burns that presented to our institution during this period required grafting, of which 26 (77%) agreed to participate in this study. At a mean 13.5 months postsurgery, pliability was significantly enhanced in FTSG compared with SSG (P burns after FTSG, although with the exception of scar pliability these differences were small.

  16. Repair of deep tissue defects in the posterior talocrural region using a superficial temporal fascia free flap plus thin split-skin grafting in extensively burned patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuekang; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Mengdong; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Qiaohua; Li, Zhiqiang; Han, Juntao; Hu, Dahai

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to describe the scheme, surgical procedures, and clinical outcomes for the early repair of deep wounds of the posterior talocrural region in extensively burned patients with a method combining a superficial temporal fascia free flap with thin split-skin grafting. From January 2013 to February 2016, 9 extensively burned patients with deep tissue defects of the posterior talocrural region were treated in our department (2 patients had bilateral deep tissue defects of the posterior talocrural region). All 11 wounds were repaired using a superficial temporal fascia free flap and thin split-skin grafting. After the operation, survival of the fascia flaps and grafted skin was observed, and the appearance and functional recovery of the grafts were evaluated. Follow-up information was reviewed, and complications were documented. All 11 fascia flaps survived completely. Two cases of partial skin necrosis healed after the second application of skin grafts. The appearance and function of recipient sites were well restored in all patients over a follow-up period of 5 to 14 months. Deep tissue defects of the posterior talocrural region can be effectively repaired with our method combining a superficial temporal fascia free flap with thin split-skin grafting. This method offers the advantages of a good appearance, strong resistance to infection, minimal damage at the donor site, short course of disease, and good prognosis. PMID:29504968

  17. Prescribed burning experiences in Italy: an integrated approach to prevent forest fires

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    Ascoli D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Prescribed burning is used in many geographical areas for multiple and integrated objectives (wildfire prevention, habitat conservation, grazing management. In Europe the collaboration between researchers and fire professionals has brought to implement this technique over increasing areas (~104 ha year-1, effectively and efficiently. In Italy prescribed burning has not been much studied and it is rarely applied. A new interest is recently rising. Some Regions particularly threatened by wildfires have updated their legislation and set up procedures to authorize prescribed fire experiments and interventions. From 2004 to 2011 several scientific, operative and training experiences have been carried out at a regional level (Basilicata, Campania, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Piemonte, Sardegna, Toscana. The present paper aims to: (i document and compare these regional programs; (ii discuss their frameworks and limitations; (iii provide information about objectives, prescriptions, methods and results. The study has involved Universities, Forest Corps, Civil Protection, Municipalities, Parks and professionals from Italy and other Countries. Interventions have regarded integrated objectives (fire hazard reduction; habitat conservation; forest and grazing management, and involved several vegetation types (broadleaved and conifer forests; Mediterranean and Continental shrublands; grasslands. Studies on fire behaviour and ecology have helped to set prescriptions for specific objectives and environments. Results have been transferred to professionals through training sessions. Several common elements are outlined: integrated objectives, multidisciplinary character, training and research products. Ecological questions, certification to the use of fire, communication to local communities and the proposal of new studies, are some of the issues outlined in the discussion. The present study is the first review at national level and we hope it will help to deepen the

  18. Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevention: a burn surgeon's team approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguiña, Pirko; Kirkland-Walsh, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) are a problem that has been under increased scrutiny in recent years. To help reduce the incidence of HAPUs and to improve their management, a burn unit-centered wound care team was established. The team decided to pursue two goals: to identify opportunities for improvement that may help prevent HAPUs and to evaluate all available support surfaces to identify those that might best help with pressure redistribution. To identify opportunities for improvement, the team studied each new case of HAPUs throughout our hospital with a forensic chart review for a 3-year period. To identify the best support surfaces to help reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers, we evaluated all support surfaces available at our institution by pressure mapping in healthy volunteers. From 3 years of collecting and reporting data for quality improvement, we identified 23 patients with HAPUs and obtained more than 800 data sets from pressure mapping in healthy volunteers. Most (23/24; 96%) patients with HAPUs identified in this series had undergone a surgical procedure. The results of the quality improvement studies are presented. We conclude that prevention planning of HAPUs needs to be improved in patients undergoing surgery, in particular. No single support surface can prevent pressure ulcers, but use of overlays may help reduce peak pressures over bony prominences.

  19. International Skin Tear Advisory Panel: a tool kit to aid in the prevention, assessment, and treatment of skin tears using a Simplified Classification System ©.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Kimberly; Baranoski, Sharon; Christensen, Dawn; Langemo, Diane; Sammon, Mary Ann; Edwards, Karen; Holloway, Samantha; Gloeckner, Mary; Williams, Ann; Sibbald, R Gary; Regan, Mary

    2013-10-01

    To enhance the learner's competence with knowledge regarding utilization of a tool kit to aid in the prevention, assessment, and treatment of skin tears. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Demonstrate knowledge of skin tear prevention and classification as presented in the International Skin Tear Advisory Panel's tool kit.2. Apply information from the skin tear tool kit to patient care scenarios. The International Skin Tear Advisory Panel has created a tool kit for the prevention, identification, and treatment of skin tears. The tool kit is based on extensive literature reviews, international input from healthcare professionals, and on expert opinion. It has undergone a modified Delphi process.

  20. Adult burn patients with more than 60% TBSA involved-Meek and other techniques to overcome restricted skin harvest availability--the Viennese Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumenta, David B; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Frey, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fact that early excision and grafting has significantly improved outcome over the last decades, the management of severely burned adult patients with >/=60% total body surface area (% TBSA) burned still represents a challenging task for burn care specialists all over the world. In this article, we present our current treatment concept for this entity of severely burned patients and analyze its effect in a comparative cohort study. Surgical strategy comprised the use of split-thickness skin grafts (Meek, mesh) for permanent coverage, fluidized microsphere bead-beds for wound conditioning, temporary coverage (polyurethane sheets, Epigard; nanocrystalline silver dressings, Acticoat; synthetic copolymer sheets based on lactic acid, Suprathel; acellular bovine derived collagen matrices, Matriderm; allogeneic cultured keratinocyte sheets; and allogeneic split-thickness skin grafts), and negative-pressure wound therapy (vacuum-assisted closure). The autologous split-thickness skin graft expansion using the Meek technique for full-thickness burns and the delayed approach for treating dorsal burn wounds is discussed in detail. To demonstrate differences before and after the introduction of the Meek technique, we have compared patients of 2007 with >/=60% TBSA (n = 10) to those in a matched observation period (n = 7). In the first part of the comparative analysis, all patients of the two samples were analyzed with regard to age, abbreviated burn severity index, Baux, different entities of % TBSA, and survival. In the second step, only the survivors of both years were separated in two groups as follows: patients receiving skin grafts, using the Meek technique (n = 6), were compared with those without Meek grafting (n = 4). When comparing the severely burned patients of 2007 with a cohort of 2006, there were no differences for age (2007: 46.4 +/- 13.4 vs. 2006: 39.1 +/- 14.8 years), abbreviated burn severity index score (2007: 12.2 +/- 1.0 vs. 2006: 12.1 +/- 1

  1. [Skin cancer and sun radiation: peruvian experience in the prevention and early detection of skin cancer and melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo, Carlos; Gutiérrez, César

    2013-03-01

    The excessive exposure to sun radiation, especially to ultraviolet radiation (UV), has led to various diseases, in particular to skin cancer. In 1995, the Peruvian Dermatological Association conducted the first "Campaign for Education, Prevention and Early Detection of Skin Cancer and Melanoma" called "Mole's Day". The Ministry of Health has turned it into an official event, and the Health Social Security (EsSalud) also participates. This is a free campaign that takes place every year nationwide. 118,092 people attended from 1995 to 2011 in 76 sites distributed in 18 cities throughout the country. A cutaneous lesion were malignancy was suspected was identified in 2.8% of people attending, out of which 64.9% corresponded to basal cell carcinoma, 26.7% to cutaneous melanoma, and 8.4% to squamous cell carcinoma. These campaigns are highly important not only because of the assistance given, but also because of the educational activities aimed at promoting a prevention culture in favor of the most vulnerable populations. Finally, we believe it is important to continue educating the population on skin cancer prevention, to build awareness among the authorities so that they actively participate in the performance of these activities, and to ask all physicians to coordinately join this initiative, in order to continue growing, and to improve all that has been attained for the benefit of our country.

  2. Captopril Increases Survival after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation but Decreases Survival when Combined with Skin-Burn Trauma in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Aminul; Bolduc, David L; Zhai, Min; Kiang, Juliann G; Swift, Joshua M

    2015-09-01

    Past and recent radiation events have involved a high incidence of radiation combined injury where victims often succumb to serious infections as a consequence of bacterial translocation and subsequent sepsis. The risk of infection is exacerbated in radiation combined skin-burn injury (RCI), which increase vulnerability. Furthermore, no suitable countermeasures for radiation combined skin-burn injury have been established. In this study, we evaluated captopril as a potential countermeasure to radiation combined skin-burn injury. Captopril is an FDA-approved angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor that was previously reported to stimulate hematopoietic recovery after exposure to ionizing radiation. Female B6D2F1/J mice were whole-body bilateral (60)Co gamma-photon irradiated (dose rate of 0.4 Gy/min) with 9.5 Gy (LD70/30 for RCI), followed by nonlethal dorsal skin-burn injury under anesthesia (approximately 15% total-body surface-area burn). Mice were provided with acidified drinking water with or without dissolved captopril (0.55 g/l) for 30 days immediately after injury and were administered topical gentamicin (0.1% cream; day 1-10) and oral levofloxacin (90-100 mg/kg; day 3-16). Surviving mice were euthanized on day 30 after analyses of water consumption, body weight and survival. Our data demonstrate that, while treatment with captopril did mitigate mortality induced by radiation injury (RI) alone (55% captopril vs. 80% vehicle; n = 20, P captopril vs. 41% vehicle; n = 22, P captopril administration via drinking water produced an uneven dosage pattern among the different injury groups ranging from 74 ± 5.4 to 115 ± 2.2 mg/kg/day. Captopril treatment also did not counteract the negative alterations in hematology, splenocytes or bone marrow cellularity after either radiation injury or radiation combined skin-burn injury. These data suggest that captopril may exert its actions differently between the two injury models (RI vs. RCI) and that captopril dosing, when

  3. A randomized controlled trial of sertraline to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder in burned children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Frederick J; Luthra, Rohini; Sorrentino, Erica A; Saxe, Glenn N; Drake, Jennifer; Chang, Yuchiao; Levine, John B; Chedekel, David S; Sheridan, Robert L

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefits of a centrally acting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, sertraline, versus placebo for prevention of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression in burned children. This is the first controlled investigation based on our review of the early use of a medication to prevent PTSD in children. Twenty-six children aged 6-20 were assessed in a 24-week double-blind placebo-controlled design. Each child received either flexibly dosed sertraline between 25-150 mg/day or placebo. At each reassessment, information was collected in compliance with the study medication, parental assessment of the child's symptomatology and functioning, and the child's self-report of symptomatology. The protocol was approved by the Human Studies Committees of Massachusetts General Hospital and Shriners Hospitals for Children. The final sample was 17 subjects who received sertraline versus 9 placebo control subjects matched for age, severity of injury, and type of hospitalization. There was no significant difference in change from baseline with child-reported symptoms; however, the sertraline group demonstrated a greater decrease in parent-reported symptoms over 8 weeks (-4.1 vs. -0.5, p=0.005), over 12 weeks (-4.4 vs. -1.2, p=.008), and over 24 weeks (-4.0 vs. -0.2, p=0.017). Sertraline was a safe drug, and it was somewhat more effective in preventing PTSD symptoms than placebo according to parent report but not child report. Based on this study, sertraline may prevent the emergence of PTSD symptoms in children.

  4. Cografts of artificial dermis matrix and autogenetic split-thickness of repaired skin in severe hand wounds in patients with deep burns

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    Liu Hongqi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effect of using artificial dermis matrix plus autologous split-thickness skin (ADM and ASTS in the treatment of deep-burns in hands of severely burned patients.We recruited a total of 58 patients with large area burns greater than 80% that were eschar-excised. Twenty-eight of them were treated with ADM and ASTS (test group; 30 were treated with autologous medium-thickness skin (AMTS (control group. The healing time of the hand wound was noted, clinical and photographic evaluations were performed, and a Jebsen-Taylor hand function test was compared and analyzed in the two groups. The wound healing time in the test group (24.22±3.34 days were longer than that of the control group (13.42±3.36 days and statistically significant. The healing time of skin graft donor sites was shorter than that of the control group (7.14±1.63 vs. 14.28±2.37 days and statistically significant (P<0.05. The 3rd and 6th month follow-up with clinical and functional evaluations revealed no differences between the two groups. In addition, there was no obvious scar formation and less pigmentation in either group. The repair of deeply burned hands with artificial dermis matrix was beneficial to both wound healing and the donor site, and was beneficial to the whole body rehabilitation of severely burned patients.

  5. Perineal burn care: French working group recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, Julien; Le Floch, Ronan; Bourdais, Ludovic; Gamelin, Alexandre; Lebreton, Françoise; Perro, Gérard

    2014-06-01

    Burns to the perineum are frequently exposed to faeces. Diverting colostomy is often described to prevent faecal soiling. Because this technique is invasive with frequent complications, use of non-surgical devices including specifically designed faecal management systems has been reported in perineal burns. In order to standardise the faecal management strategy in patients with perineal burns, a group of French experts was assembled. This group first evaluated the ongoing practice in France by analysing a questionnaire sent to every French burn centre. Based on the results of this study and on literature data, the experts proposed recommendations on the management of perineal burns in adults. Specifically designed faecal management systems are the first-line method to divert faeces in perineal burns. The working group proposed recommendations and an algorithm to assist in decisions in the management of perineal burns in four categories of patients, depending on total burn skin area, depth and extent of the perineal burn. In France, non-surgical devices are the leading means of faecal diversion in perineal burns. The proposed algorithm may assist in decisions in the management of perineal burns. The expert group emphasises that large clinical studies are needed to better evaluate these devices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. An optimized animal model for partial and total skin thickness burns studies Um modelo animal aperfeiçoado para estudo de queimaduras superficiais e profundas da pele

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    Ana Paula Bomfim Soares Campelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Development of an improved animal model for studying skin burns in rats. METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n=6: G1-Control, G2- T100°C, G3-T150°C and G4-T200°C. Two 10 x 10 mm squares were outlined with a sterile surgical marker on each side and along the vertebral column using a prepared template positioned between the anterior and posterior limbs. G2-G4 rats were subjected to 100°C, 150°C and 200ºC thermal burns, respectively. G1 rats served as controls. Burns were inflicted by applying a copper plate connected to an electronic temperature controlling device to the dorsal skin of anesthetized rats. Four burns were produced on each animal (total area: 4 cm²/animal leaving about 1 cm of undamaged skin between burn areas. Analgesia was administered during 24 h after burn injury by adding 30 mg codeine phosphate hemihydrate to 500 ml tap water. RESULTS: The application of 100°C and 150ºC resulted in partial thickness skin burns with central reepithelialization of the burned area only at 100°C. In G4 group the whole thickness of the skin was injured without central reepithelialization. However, there was marginal reepithelialization in all groups. CONCLUSION: The model studied is inexpensive and easily reproducible, enabling the achievement of controlled burns with partial or total impairment of the skin in experimental animals.OBJETIVO: Desenvolvimento de um modelo animal aperfeiçoado para estudo de queimaduras cutâneas em ratos. MÉTODOS: Vinte e quatro ratos Wistar, machos, foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos (n=6: G1-Controle, G2-T100°C, G3-T150°C e G4-T200°C. Dois quadrados medindo 10x10 mm foram delineados com um marcador cirúrgico estéril em cada lado e ao longo da coluna vertebral e posicionados entre os membros anteriores e posteriores, utilizando um molde previamente preparado. Os ratos dos grupos G2-G4 foram submetidos a queimaduras térmicas de 100

  7. The Volume Limit in Fluid Resuscitation to Prevent Respiratory Failure in Massively Burned Children without Inhalation Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Okabayashi, Kiyoshi; Ohtani, Minako; Yamanoue, Takao; Sera, Akihiko; Wada, Seishi; Inoue, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Yasumasa

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the accurate fluid requirement to prevent respiratory failure during the postresuscitation period in the resuscitation of massively burned children without inhalation injury. Forty-nine children were treated by similar fluid resuscitation and physiologic support protocols. Using a retrospective chart review, the children were divided into three groups as follows: Group N (no lung injury, n = 33, 41.4 ± 18. 7%TBSA burned), Group M (mild-to-moderate lung injury, n = 11, 73.7 ± 17.1...

  8. Post-Burn Skin Deformities of the Face and Neck Region in Pediatric Patients: Single-Stage Treatment Using Collagen Elastin Matrix

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    Çağlayan Yağmur

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Treating severe post-burn deformities of the face and neck region in pediatric populations is challenging because of technical difficulties (e.g., limited full thickness skin graft donor site, limited flap options, unavailability for expander placement and increased donor site morbidity (e.g., related to flap and graft donor sites. In this study, we present the single-stage treatment of severe post-burn skin deformities of the face and neck region in pediatric patients using collagen-elastin matrix (Matriderm® combined with partial thickness skin grafts. Material and Methods: The total number of cases was eight (four females, four males, and the ages were between two and 11 years. All cases were operated on for only one region. Following the release of contractures and/or excision of wide excessive/ unfavorable dermal scars, defects were reconstructed using collagen- elastin matrix (Matriderm® combined with partial-thickness skin grafts. The final functional and aesthetic results were evaluated using photography and examination. Results: The deformities were in the form of contractures and/ or excessive dermal scarring. The involved regions were the face (n=3 and neck (n=5. The grafts yielded favorable plication and texture, and no recurrence of excessive dermal scarring was observed. All contractures healed unproblematically. Two patients were re-operated on for regrafting caused by minor graft loss (5% and 12% of the total area, respectively. Conclusion: In this study, we observed that collagen elastin matrix combined with partial-thickness skin grafts provides a favorable option for the treatment of pediatric late post-burn complications in the face and neck region with limited surgical options.

  9. Occupational skin diseases and prevention among sanitation workers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuehua; Wang, Xinggang; Wu, Jianbo; Xu, Li

    2015-09-01

    Little research has been focused on the health status or the occupational protection awareness of sanitation workers. The policy recommendations on the occupational safety and health of sanitation workers based on the scientific research are also insufficient in developing countries like China. To study the incidence of dermatoses and the relevance with occupational exposure, protection awareness and protective measures among sanitation workers for better management and protection of the sanitation workers. 273 sanitation workers and 113 administrative staff from 11 streets of Wuhan were recruited. Dermatological problems were evaluated and recorded by physical examination. Occupational exposure, protection awareness, the use of protective equipments and personal history of skin disease were assessed by questionnaires. Compared with administrative staff, sanitation workers had much more occupational dermatological problems and had a much higher rate of harmful ultraviolet ray exposure. Young sanitation workers were more aware of occupational self-protection and a relatively higher rate of them using protective equipments compared with old ones. Exposure to multiple health hazards and the poor use of protective equipments are related to skin diseases in sanitation workers. Prejob training of self-protection and the use of protective equipments are recommended.

  10. Identifying, managing and preventing skin maceration: a rapid review of the clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, F; Giampieri, S; Graham, T; Grocott, P

    2017-04-02

    To identify the clinical empirical evidence for identifying, managing and preventing skin maceration in human subjects. A rapid review of the current literature was undertaken between 5 September and 19 September 2016 using the electronic databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, PUBMED and Cochrane, with the key words: skin macerat*, wound macerat*, moisture associated skin damage, wound exudate and hyper-hydration of skin, Results: Of 526 papers found using an electronic database search, four were identified as fitting the search parameters, and a further two were retrieved from a manual search of reference lists. There were three themes that emerged: how to identify and measure maceration, how to manage and reduce maceration once it has already occurred, and how to prevent skin maceration. Hyper-hydration can reach greater skin depths than previously thought, thus engendering more extensive damage potential, which in turn can impact on treatments and healing time. Realistically, the deeper the hyper-hydration issue, the more extensive the damage and it will take longer to recover-a problem compounded if the hyper-hydration is due to incontinence and skin is also exposed to urine and/or faeces. In relation to wound management, the authors advocate the removal of moisture away from the wound or skin, either through superabsorbent dressings, or by allowing the excess moisture to evaporate through semi-permeable dressings to reduce maceration, enhance patient comfort and encourage healing. However, we found no evidence regarding the limits of hydration of the dermis and epidermis and thereby the optimal conditions for managing exuding wounds and promoting skin health. Each of the six papers in this review calls for further research to help identify, treat and prevent maceration. Maceration causes patients' discomfort and pain as well as prolonging healing time and deserves more focused research. This rapid review highlights how limited the clinical empirical research is on

  11. Awareness of Skin Cancer, Prevention, and Early Detection among Turkish University Students

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    Ziyafet Ugurlu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the awareness about skin cancer, prevention, and early detection among university students. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 404 students in a university located in Ankara, the capital city of Turkey. A 35-item questionnaire was used for data collection. Results: Less than half of the students (37.9% had knowledge about skin cancer mostly through the internet (24.5% and media (24.1%. Half of them aware of the risk factors; mostly as avoiding direct exposure to the Sun between 10 am and 4 pm (45.3%; smoking and alcohol (38.4%; having fair skin color (34.9%; and ultraviolet light exposure (25.7%. Only one-third of them (32.9% are knowledgeable about skin cancer signs and symptoms, such as a change in color and appearance of the nevus/moles (24%. The majority of the responders (77.3% did not know about screening tests for skin cancer and only 18 (4.5% students were practicing skin self-examination. Conclusions: This study showed a lack of knowledge about skin cancer, prevention, and early detection among university students and reported the need for educational interventions to raise awareness in this target group.

  12. Medial sural perforator plus island flap: a modification of the medial sural perforator island flap for the reconstruction of postburn knee flexion contractures using burned calf skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Seog; Kim, Eui Sik; Hwang, Jae Ha; Lee, Sam Yong

    2012-06-01

    The medial sural perforator island flap may be suitable for the reconstruction of postburn knee flexion contractures. However, postburn knee flexion contractures are usually associated with burns of the calf, which is the donor site of the medial sural perforator flap. Thus, there are concerns regarding the safety of raising medial sural perforator flaps from burned calves. Between 2005 and 2010, 12 patients (11 males and 1 female) with postburn knee flexion contractures associated with second-degree burns of the calf (that healed by secondary intention) underwent reconstruction using a medial sural perforator island flap (based on the medial sural perforator) or medial sural perforator plus island flap (based on the medial sural perforator and other vessels that are pedicles of the sural flaps). All 12 flaps, which ranged in size from 7 to 15 cm in width and from 9 to 23 cm in length, survived completely. Of the 12 flaps, three were medial sural perforator island flaps and nine were medial sural perforator plus island flaps. Of the nine medial sural perforator plus island flaps, two included the lesser saphenous vein, five included the lesser saphenous vein and its accompanying artery, and two included the lesser saphenous vein, the distal sural nerve and their accompanying arteries. Healing of all donor sites was uncomplicated. All patients were completely satisfied with their results. Although this series is not large, the authors are convinced that some reliable medial sural perforators are usually present under second-degree burned calf skin that healed by secondary intention, and that the medial sural perforator island flap or the medial sural perforator plus island flap can be safely used even though the skin may not be as pliable as normal skin. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Genetics ...

  14. Diagnostic multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections and detection of antibiotic susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashouf, Rasoul Y.; Farahani, Hadi S.; Zamani, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) and detection of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates from culture. We conducted the cross-sectional study in 140 patients with wound infections who admitted to referral burn center of Motahari, Tehran, Iran, during a 12-month period from 2005-2006. Skin biopsy specimens were aseptically taken from each patient, one for PCR and one for bacterial culture. A M-PCR test based on simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL, was used to directly detect fluorescent pseudomonades and P. aeruginosa in skin biopsy specimens. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa isolates to 16 antibiotics was determined using the disc diffusion method. Out of 140 biopsy specimens, M-PCR detected 66 (47.2%) isolates, while culture detected 57 (40.7%) isolates as P. aeruginosa. Positive results for both genes which observed only for P. aeruginosa, while only one gene, oprI, was amplified from other fluorescent pseudomonades (n=12) and all other bacterial tested (n=62) were negative by the amplification test. The most effective antibiotics against isolate of P. aeruginosa were cefepime (79%), azetreonam (76%), ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (68%), tobramycin (62%) and amikacin (61%). Multiplex PCR assay appears promising for the rapid and sensitive detection of P. aeruginosa from the burned skin biopsy specimens. Simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL could detect P. aeruginosa and oprI gene only for other fluorescent pseudomonades. (author)

  15. Penile inflammatory skin disorders and the preventive role of circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Morris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile inflammatory skin conditions such as balanitis and posthitis are common, especially in uncircumcised males, and feature prominently in medical consultations. We conducted a systematic review of the medical literature on PubMed, EMBASE, and Cohrane databases using keywords “balanitis,” “posthitis,” “balanoposthitis,” “lichen sclerosus,” “penile inflammation,” and “inflammation penis,” along with “circumcision,” “circumcised,” and “uncircumcised.” Balanitis is the most common inflammatory disease of the penis. The accumulation of yeasts and other microorganisms under the foreskin contributes to inflammation of the surrounding penile tissue. The clinical presentation of inflammatory penile conditions includes itching, tenderness, and pain. Penile inflammation is responsible for significant morbidity, including acquired phimosis, balanoposthitis, and lichen sclerosus. Medical treatment can be challenging and a cost burden to the health system. Reducing prevalence is therefore important. While topical antifungal creams can be used, usually accompanied by advice on hygiene, the definitive treatment is circumcision. Data from meta-analyses showed that circumcised males have a 68% lower prevalence of balanitis than uncircumcised males and that balanitis is accompanied by a 3.8-fold increase in risk of penile cancer. Because of the high prevalence and morbidity of penile inflammation, especially in immunocompromised and diabetic patients, circumcision should be more widely adopted globally and is best performed early in infancy.

  16. Psychological maintenance as an integrated approach to prevention and correction of professional burning out of the medical staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Kucher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of professional burning out is a complex of symptoms and signs evidenced in various negative psychic conditions at individual, interpersonal and organizational levels. It is formed owing to a long mismatch between the requirements of the professional environment and the resources of the expert. Analysis of the preventive and correctional programs as a psychological assistance showed insufficiency of such approach. Creation of preventive and correctional programs within psychological maintenance from the position of involution of professional resources, taking into account the theoretical - methodological basis (the concept, the purposes, tasks, system approach, criteria of efficiency and the subjective-personal resources of counteraction directed at activization to burning out at all stages of professional development is progressive.

  17. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn from chemicals ... in contact with the toxic substance Rash , blisters , burns on the skin Unconsciousness or other states of ... Make sure the cause of the burn has been removed. Try not to come ... yourself. If the chemical is dry, brush off any excess. Avoid ...

  18. Backyard burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, S M; Davidson, C; Kennedy, A M; Eadie, P A; Lawlor, C

    2008-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether changes had occurred in the numbers of burns that could be related to backyard burning subsequent to the introduction of the council tax throughout Eire for the collection of household refuse. Numbers of patients admitted to our unit who had sustained burns by burning rubbish were recorded prospectively over a period of 12 months. A random control group was taken as three years prior to this and results found by retrospective chart review. Between January and November 2005, 168 patients were admitted to the National Burns Unit, St James's Hospital Dublin, Ireland. Nineteen of these patients sustained flame burns from backyard burning. One hundred and seventy patients were admitted in the comparative period of 2002; Seven of these from backyard burning. The total number of inpatient days for these patients in 2005 (255) was significantly more than in 2002 (68) (p=0.024). The numbers in our study show a marked increase in the number of patients sustaining burns in this manner, and appear to correlate with the introduction of bin charges by a number of county councils around the country last year. This study demonstrates that the introduction of legislation can have an unforeseen adverse affect on the population if not introduced in correlation with appropriate public education. While the introduction of waste charges represents a very necessary move forward in waste disposal in Ireland, public awareness campaigns should be implemented to prevent further such injuries from occurring.

  19. Deep sole burns in several participants in a traditional festival of the firewalking ceremony in Kee-lung, Taiwan--clinical experiences and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shun-Cheng; Hsu, Chih-Kang; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Teng, Shou-Cheng; Fu, Ju-Peng; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo; Feng, Chun-Che

    2012-11-01

    Firewalking is a common Taoist cleansing ceremony in Taiwan, but burns associated with the practice have rarely been reported. We analyzed the patients with plantar burns from one firewalking ceremony. In one firewalking ceremony, 12 Taoist disciples suffered from contact burns to the soles of their feet while walking over burning coals. Eight of them had at least second-degree burns over areas larger than 1% of their total body surface areas (TBSAs). The age, sex, medical history, date of injury, time taken to traverse the fire pit, depth and TBSA of the burns, treatment, length of stay, and outcome were recorded and analyzed. Deep, disseminated second- to third-degree burns were noted and healing took as long as three weeks in some patients. Because disseminated hypertrophic scars form after burns, the soles involved regain much of their tensile strength while walking. The patients experienced only a few difficulties in their daily lives three months after injury. From our experience treating patients with deep disseminated second- to third-degree plantar burns caused by firewalking, we conclude that they should be treated conservatively, with secondary healing rather than a skin graft. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Solar radiation induced skin damage: review of protective and preventive options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svobodová, Alena; Vostálová, Jitka

    2010-12-01

    Solar energy has a number of short- and long-term detrimental effects on skin that can result in several skin disorders. The aim of this review is to summarise current knowledge on endogenous systems within the skin for protection from solar radiation and present research findings to date, on the exogenous options for such skin photoprotection. Endogenous systems for protection from solar radiation include melanin synthesis, epidermal thickening and an antioxidant network. Existing lesions are eliminated via repair mechanisms. Cells with irreparable damage undergo apoptosis. Excessive and chronic sun exposure however can overwhelm these mechanisms leading to photoaging and the development of cutaneous malignancies. Therefore exogenous means are a necessity. Exogenous protection includes sun avoidance, use of photoprotective clothing and sufficient application of broad-spectrum sunscreens as presently the best way to protect the skin. However other strategies that may enhance currently used means of protection are being investigated. These are often based on the endogenous protective response to solar light such as compounds that stimulate pigmentation, antioxidant enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, non-enzymatic antioxidants. More research is needed to confirm the effectiveness of new alternatives to photoprotection such as use of DNA repair and antioxidant enzymes and plant polyphenols and to find an efficient way for their delivery to the skin. New approaches to the prevention of skin damage are important especially for specific groups of people such as (young) children, photosensitive people and patients on immunosuppressive therapy. Changes in public awareness on the subject too must be made.

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Appearance-focused Intervention to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, Joel; Turrisi, Rob; Stapleton, Jerod; Robinson, June

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Skin cancer represents a significant health threat with over 1.3 million diagnoses, 8000 melanoma deaths, and more than $1 billion spent annually for skin cancer healthcare in the US. Despite findings from laboratory, case-control, and prospective studies that indicate a link between youthful indoor tanning (IT) and skin cancer, IT is increasing among US youth. Appearance-focused interventions represent a promising method to counteract these trends. METHODS A total of 430 female indoor tanners were randomized into intervention or no intervention control conditions. Intervention participants received an appearance-focused booklet based on decision-theoretical models of health behavior. Outcome variables included self-reports of IT behavior and intentions, as well as measures of cognitive mediating variables. RESULTS Normative increases in springtime IT rates were significantly lower (ie, over 35%) at 6-month follow-up in intervention versus control participants with similar reductions in future intentions. Mediation analyses revealed 6 cognitive variables (IT attitudes, fashion attitudes, perceived susceptibility to skin cancer and skin damage, subjective norms, and image norms) that significantly mediated change in IT behavior. CONCLUSIONS The appearance-focused intervention demonstrated strong effects on IT behavior and intentions in young indoor tanners. Appearance-focused approaches to skin cancer prevention need to present alternative behaviors as well as alter IT attitudes. Mediational results provide guides for strengthening future appearance-focused interventions directed at behaviors that increase risk of skin cancer. PMID:18937268

  2. A randomized controlled trial of an appearance-focused intervention to prevent skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, Joel; Turrisi, Rob; Stapleton, Jerod; Robinson, June

    2008-12-01

    Skin cancer represents a significant health threat with over 1.3 million diagnoses, 8000 melanoma deaths, and more than $1 billion spent annually for skin cancer healthcare in the US. Despite findings from laboratory, case-control, and prospective studies that indicate a link between youthful indoor tanning (IT) and skin cancer, IT is increasing among US youth. Appearance-focused interventions represent a promising method to counteract these trends. A total of 430 female indoor tanners were randomized into intervention or no intervention control conditions. Intervention participants received an appearance-focused booklet based on decision-theoretical models of health behavior. Outcome variables included self-reports of IT behavior and intentions, as well as measures of cognitive mediating variables. Normative increases in springtime IT rates were significantly lower (ie, over 35%) at 6-month follow-up in intervention versus control participants with similar reductions in future intentions. Mediation analyses revealed 6 cognitive variables (IT attitudes, fashion attitudes, perceived susceptibility to skin cancer and skin damage, subjective norms, and image norms) that significantly mediated change in IT behavior. The appearance-focused intervention demonstrated strong effects on IT behavior and intentions in young indoor tanners. Appearance-focused approaches to skin cancer prevention need to present alternative behaviors as well as alter IT attitudes. Mediational results provide guides for strengthening future appearance-focused interventions directed at behaviors that increase risk of skin cancer. (c) 2008 American Cancer Society

  3. Occupational Skin Disease Prevention: An Educational Intervention for Hairdresser Cosmetology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughtigan, Kara; Main, Eve; Bragg-Underwood, Tonya; Watkins, Cecilia

    2017-11-01

    Cosmetologists frequently develop occupational skin disease related to workplace exposures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an educational intervention to increase cosmetology students' occupational skin disease knowledge and use of preventive practices. A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate students' knowledge, behaviors, intentions, expectancies, and expectations. A 20-minute verbal presentation and printed two-page educational handout were provided for participants. Statistically significant increases in knowledge, frequency of glove use, and frequency of moisturizer use were found, but the frequency of handwashing did not increase. In addition, the Behavioral Strategies subscale, the Intention subscale, and the Expectancies subscale showed statistically significant improvements. The results of this study suggest an educational intervention can increase cosmetology students' knowledge of occupational skin diseases and their use of preventive strategies.

  4. An evaluation of costs and effects of a nutrient-based skin care program as a component of prevention of skin tears in an extended convalescent center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Marjorie; Shannon, Ronald J; Chakravarthy, Debashish; Fleck, Cynthia A

    2010-01-01

    A decision model was developed in a pilot study comparing a regimen using a skin care product line containing active ingredients and nutrients with a commercially available alternative skin care regimen in an elderly convalescent care hospital-based center. Using a decision-tree model, skin treatment with a nutrient-based skin care (NBSC) formulation was compared with products without nutrients. The number of skin-tear-free days was the primary outcome measure. A cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated for each skin treatment as the average cost for reaching a particular outcome. Incidence of skin tear data was collected from residents in a convalescent center from 2004 to 2005. An independent t test was used to compare differences in the number of skin tears between periods when NBSC and other formulations were used. All costs in the decision model were adjusted to 2007 dollars. Sensitivity analysis was used to test uncertain data. The NBSC provided more skin-tear-free days and was less costly than the use of non-NBSC products. The expected skin-tear-free days for a patient in the model treated with NBSC were 179.7 days compared with 154.6 days for non-NBSC products, yielding an incremental effect of 25.1 days. The expected cost of preventing skin tears and treatment via skin treatment per patient in the NBSC group was $281.00 versus $324.10 for periods when other products were used. The NBSC had a lower projected cost for prevention of skin tears and more skin-tear-free days when compared with non-NBSC products.

  5. Preventing and treating intertrigo in the large skin folds of adults: a literature overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mistiaen, P.; Poot, E.; Hickox, S.; Jochems, C.; Wagner, C.

    2004-01-01

    Intertrigo is an inflammatory dermatosis of the skin folds of the body, for which a large variety of topical medications may be recommended. A systematic literature review was performed to find scientific evidence for preventing and treating intertrigo within the nursing domain. Seven electronic

  6. 78 FR 47320 - Preventing Skin Cancer Through Reduction of UV Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ..., Epidemiology and Applied Research Branch, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease....regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Meg Watson, Epidemiologist, Epidemiology and Applied... approximately 8,500 deaths from melanoma. Melanoma, which causes more deaths than other types of skin cancer, is...

  7. Applying the community health worker model in dermatology: a curriculum for skin cancer prevention education training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Audrey A; Maisonet, Jezabel; Kirsner, Robert S; Strasswimmer, John

    2017-05-01

    Incidence of skin cancer is rising in Hispanic populations and minorities often have more advanced disease and experience higher mortality rates. Community health worker (CHW) programs to promote primary and secondary prevention show promise for many diseases, but an adequate training program in skin cancer prevention is not documented. We present a model for CHW specialty certification in skin cancer prevention for underserved, Hispanic communities. We designed a culturally appropriate CHW training program according to an empowerment model of education for skin cancer prevention and detection in underserved Hispanic communities. We partnered with a large nonprofit clinic in South Florida. Nineteen CHWs completed the 2-h training course. After the course, 82.4% (n = 14) strongly agreed with the statement "I feel confident I can educate others on the warning signs of melanoma." Eighty-eight percent (88.2%, n = 15) strongly agreed that they felt confident that they could educate others on the importance of sun safety. One hundred percent (n = 19) answered each question about how the sun affects the skin correctly while 84.2% (n = 16) were able to identify the "ABCDEs" of melanoma. Nearly 90% strongly agreed with "I plan to change my personal sun safety behaviors based on what I learned today". Our results indicate successful transfer of information and empowerment to CHWs with high levels of confidence. Disease specific "specialty certifications" are a component of effective CHW policies. An appropriate training tool for skin cancer education is an important addition to a growing list of CHW specialty certifications. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  8. Early detection of skin cancer: experience of a skin cancer prevention campaign in Piauí-Brazil - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.p221

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Bandeira Lages; Patrícia Barros Barbosa; Isabella Parente Almeida; Lauro Rodolpho Soares Lopes; Lauro Lourival Lopes Filho

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the correlation between the diagnoses of skin cancer and known risk factors through analysis of data from the National Skin Cancer Prevention Campaign held by Brazilian Society of Dermatology in the state of Piauí, Brazil, in recent years. Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive and analytical report using quantitative data obtained from a prevention campaign in the state of Piauí, in 2009 and 2010. Collected data was submitted to a descriptive analysis, and mul...

  9. Andrographolide Sodium Bisulfate Prevents UV-Induced Skin Photoaging through Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis Ya-Xian Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide sodium bisulfate (ASB, a water-soluble form made from andrographolide through sulfonating reaction, is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drug; however, the antiphotoaging effect of ASB has still not been revealed. Oxidative stress and inflammation are known to be responsible for ultraviolet (UV irradiation induced skin damage and consequently premature aging. In this study, we aimed at examining the effect of ASB on UV-induced skin photoaging of mice by physiological and histological analysis of skin and examination of skin antioxidant enzymes and immunity analyses. Results showed that topical administration of ASB suppressed the UV-induced skin thickness, elasticity, wrinkles, and water content, while ASB, especially at dose of 3.6 mg/mouse, increased the skin collagen content by about 53.17%, decreased the epidermal thickness by about 41.38%, and prevented the UV-induced disruption of collagen fibers and elastic fibers. Furthermore, ASB decreased MDA level by about 40.21% and upregulated the activities of SOD and CAT and downregulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α in UV-irradiated mice. Our study confirmed the protective effect of ASB against UV-induced photoaging and initially indicated that this effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo, suggesting that ASB may be a potential antiphotoaging agent.

  10. Andrographolide Sodium Bisulfate Prevents UV-Induced Skin Photoaging through Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Janis Ya-Xian; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Liu, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Zhen-Biao; Wang, Lan; Chen, Jian-Nan; Huang, Song; Zeng, Hui-Fang; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Andrographolide sodium bisulfate (ASB), a water-soluble form made from andrographolide through sulfonating reaction, is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drug; however, the antiphotoaging effect of ASB has still not been revealed. Oxidative stress and inflammation are known to be responsible for ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced skin damage and consequently premature aging. In this study, we aimed at examining the effect of ASB on UV-induced skin photoaging of mice by physiological and histological analysis of skin and examination of skin antioxidant enzymes and immunity analyses. Results showed that topical administration of ASB suppressed the UV-induced skin thickness, elasticity, wrinkles, and water content, while ASB, especially at dose of 3.6 mg/mouse, increased the skin collagen content by about 53.17%, decreased the epidermal thickness by about 41.38%, and prevented the UV-induced disruption of collagen fibers and elastic fibers. Furthermore, ASB decreased MDA level by about 40.21% and upregulated the activities of SOD and CAT and downregulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α in UV-irradiated mice. Our study confirmed the protective effect of ASB against UV-induced photoaging and initially indicated that this effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo, suggesting that ASB may be a potential antiphotoaging agent. PMID:26903706

  11. A multicenter study of preventable contact burns from glass fronted gas fireplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibbenmeyer, Lucy; Gittelman, Michael A; Kluesner, Karen; Liao, Junlin; Xing, Yunfan; Faraklas, Iris; Anyan, Walter; Gamero, Chelsea; Moulton, Steven; Nederveld, Cindy; Banks, Ashley; Ryan, Colleen M; Conway, Jennifer A; Reilly, Debra A; Fish, Joel; Kelly, Charis; Peltier, George; Schwantke, Emily; Conrad, Peggie F; Caruso, Daniel M; Richey, Karen J; McCrory, Kristine; Elfar, Mohamed S A; Pittinger, Timothy; Sadie, Christine; Greenhalgh, David; Palmieri, Tina; Grossman, Peter H; Richards, Kurt M; Joyce, Teresa; Pozez, Andrea L; Savetamal, Alisa; Harrington, David T; Duncan, Kimberley; Pomerantz, Wendy J; Dillard, B Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Glass fronted gas fireplaces (GFGFs) have exterior surfaces that can reach extremely high temperatures. Burn injuries from contact with the glass front can be severe with long-term sequelae. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reported that these injuries are uncommon, whereas single-center studies indicate a much higher frequency. The purpose of this multi-institutional study was to determine the magnitude and severity of GFGF injuries in North America. Seventeen burn centers elected to participate in this retrospective chart review. Chart review identified 402 children ≤10 years of age who sustained contact burns from contact with GFGF, who were seen or admitted to the study hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Demographic, burn, treatment, and financial data were collected. The mean age of the study group was 16.8 ± 13.3 months. The majority suffered burns to their hands (396, 98.5%), with burns to the face being the second, much less common site (14, 3.5%). Two hundred and sixty-nine required rehabilitation therapy (66.9%). The number of GFGF injuries reported was 20 times greater than the approximately 30 injuries estimated by the Consumer Product Safety Commission's 10-year review. For the affected children, these injuries are painful, often costly and occasionally can lead to long-term sequelae. Given that less than a quarter of burn centers contributed data, the injury numbers reported herein support a need for broader safety guidelines for gas fireplaces in order to have a significant impact on future injuries.

  12. Early detection of skin cancer: experience of a skin cancer prevention campaign in Piauí-Brazil - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.p221

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Bandeira Lages

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the correlation between the diagnoses of skin cancer and known risk factors through analysis of data from the National Skin Cancer Prevention Campaign held by Brazilian Society of Dermatology in the state of Piauí, Brazil, in recent years. Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive and analytical report using quantitative data obtained from a prevention campaign in the state of Piauí, in 2009 and 2010. Collected data was submitted to a descriptive analysis, and multivariate logistic regression, using as dependent variable the skin cancer diagnosis. Results: In 2009 and 2010, this campaign was responsible for 1141 consultations, diagnosing 122 (10.7% cases of skin cancer: 108 basal cell carcinomas (BCC, 10 squamous cell (SCC and four melanomas. Of those examined, 35.4% were male, 73.1% reported inadequate sun protection, 16.4% had a family history of skin cancer and 7.2% had personal history. Those with history of skin cancer were 5.24 times more likely to have a new diagnosis of cancer, while those presenting non-black skin were 4.91 times more likely to diagnosis. Conclusion: Personal or family history of epithelial neoplasia, non-colored black skin and the male gender were associated to higher chances of developing skin cancer. In addition, unprotected sun exposure remains routine

  13. Skin cancer prevention and detection campaign at golf courses on Spain's Costa del Sol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Boz, J; Fernández-Morano, T; Padilla-España, L; Aguilar-Bernier, M; Rivas-Ruiz, F; de Troya-Martín, M

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer prevention and detection campaigns targeting specific groups are necessary and have proven to be more effective than those aimed at the general population. Interventions in outdoor tourist spots have proven successful, although none have specifically targeted golf courses. The aims of this study were to describe the risk profile of golfers and golf course workers and evaluate the impact of a skin cancer prevention and early detection intervention. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted at 6 golf courses. The intervention included a skin examination and completion of a questionnaire about demographic details, risk factors, and sun exposure and sun protection habits. Participants were also given advice on sun protection measures, self-examination, and use of sunscreens, and were asked about their satisfaction with the intervention and their intention to change their current behaviors. The effect was measured in terms of the diagnoses made, satisfaction with the intervention, reported intention to change, and potential effect in terms of existing risk factors. Of the 351 participants (57% golfers and 43% golf course workers), 70.4% had fair skin, 11.7% had a family history of skin cancer, and 8.5% had a personal history of skin cancer. Skin cancer and actinic keratoses were diagnosed in 10.7% and 40% of the golfers, respectively. The session was rated positively by 99.4% of the participants; 93.9% stated that they intended to improve their sun exposure habits and 93.4% said that they planned to examine their skin more frequently. Our findings confirm that golf course workers and, in particular, golfers are an important target for skin cancer prevention campaigns. This is the first intervention to specifically target golf courses, and it proved to be both feasible and useful. Its success appears to be attributable to numerous factors: it was conducted at golf courses, had multiple components, and was preceded by a motivational campaign

  14. Primary prevention of skin dysplasia in renal transplant recipients with photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Omland, S H; Wulf, H C

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at high risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); prevention includes early treatment of premalignant actinic keratosis (AK). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive field therapy that reduces new AKs in patients with existing AK...... and delays SCC development in mice. We investigated the effect of repeated PDT over 5 years for primary prophylaxis of skin dysplasia. These data represent an interim analysis of an on-going randomized controlled trial. During 2008-2011, 25 renal transplant recipients with clinically normal skin were...

  15. Gold standards for primary care of burn management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Zor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, about 2.5 million people are affected from burns in the world. In our country there is no reliable database related to this subject. There are ongoing studies about the epidemiology of burns in Turkey. After burn injury had represent many various complications, such as myocardial infarction, cardiac deficiency, acute hypertension, endocarditis, thromboembolism, pulmonary edema, pneumonia, respiratuar failure, renal failure, gastric ulcus, ileus, sepsis, coagulopathy and anemia. Such complications can preventable or treatable. In this respect, preventive management in the first step burn treatment had very importantly in burn cases. Skin is a barrier which protects evaporative heat loss. In cases of acute burn, hypothermia occurs related to skin loss. For these cases, care must be taken to keep the patient warm. In addition fluid resuscitation is very important in these cases. Furthermore, the damaged tissues are highly susceptible to infection in burned patients. Burn care and rehabilitation includes challenging and complex procedures. Briefly, treatments of burn cases require a multidisciplinary and meticulous approach.

  16. Covering techniques for severe burn treatment: lessons for radiological burn accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsin, H.; Stephanazzi, J.; Lambert, F.; Curet, P.M.; Gourmelon, P.

    2002-01-01

    Covering techniques for severe burn treatment: lessons for radiological burn accidents. After a severe burn, the injured person is weakened by a risk of infection and a general inflammation. The necrotic tissues have to be removed because they are toxic for the organism. The injured person also needs to be covered by a cutaneous envelope, which has to be done by a treatment centre for burned people. The different techniques are the following: - auto grafts on limited burned areas; - cutaneous substitutes to cover temporary extended burned areas. Among them: natural substitutes like xenografts (pork skin, sheep skin,..) or allografts (human skin), - treated natural substitutes which only maintain the extracellular matrix. Artificial skins belong to this category and allow the development of high quality scars, - cell cultures in the laboratory: multiplying the individual cells and grafting them onto the patient. This technique is not common but allows one to heal severely injured patients. X-ray burns are still a problem. Their characteristics are analysed: intensive, permanent, antalgic resistant pain. They are difficult to compare with heat burns. In spite of a small number of known cases, we can give some comments and guidance on radio necrosis cures: the importance of the patients comfort, of ending the pain, of preventing infection, and nutritional balance. At the level of epidermic inflammation and phlyctena (skin blisters), the treatment may be completed by the use of growth factors. At the level of necrosis, after a temporary cover, an auto graft can be considered only if a healthy basis is guaranteed. The use of cellular cultures in order to obtain harmonious growth factors can be argued. (author)

  17. Burn wound: Pathophysiology and its management by herbal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhirender Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In human body, wound healing is a normal biological phenomenon. Burns may be acute or chronic depending upon the source and its time of exposure. Burn wounds may be superficial, partial or full thickness wounds. When skin comes in contact with higher temperature, protein denaturation takes place due to which the plasma membrane integrity is lost. When skin is burned, a number of inflammatory mediators and releasing agents such as histamine, nitric oxide, oxygen free radicals, eicosanoid products, tumor necrosis factors, and interleukins etc., are released at the site. For wound healing mechanism, the keratinocytes has to move from uninjured site to the burned area. For deeper burns this process takes a long time. By some unknown mechanisms, burn wounds may convert from one form to another form. So burn wound depth must be accurately measured before starting the treatment to prevent the complications. Burns can be induced in experimental animals by using different models. Many treatments such as herbal drugs, topical agents, gene therapy, volume therapy, and rehabilitation can be employed. This review article mainly deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of burn wound healing. Some burn wound healing plants with their chemical constituents, plant part used, uses and animal models are described here.

  18. Skin graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused a large amount of skin loss Burns Cosmetic reasons or reconstructive surgeries where there has been skin damage or skin ... anesthesia are: Reactions to medicines Problems with breathing Risks for this surgery are: Bleeding Chronic pain (rarely) Infection Loss of ...

  19. A comparative study of histopathological effects of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with sulfadiazine on skin burn wound healing in rats infected with Pseudomonas aeuroginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Valilou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen, is the most common infective agent of burn wounds. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological effect of a mixture of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with silver sulfadiazine on the healing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected second grade skin burn wounds in rats. To this end, 60 male rats were randomly assigned to four experimental groups (15 rats in each group. After inducing anesthesia, second grade burn wound with the diameter of 12 mm was created in the dorsal region of rats. Then, 1.5×108 cfu/ml P. aeruginosa PA01was equally bestrewed on the wound of all rats. Every 12 hours, silver sulfadiazine (group 1, honey (group 2 and aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey (group 3 were applied to the wounds and group 4 was kept as control. On days 7, 14, and 21, five rats were selected from each group at each time point and after inducing anesthesia and measuring the diameter of the wound by coliseum, microbial and histopathological samples were taken from the wounds. Microbial studies showed that in all groups except the control group, the growth of the microbe was stopped. Histopathological observations regarding wound healing and diameter showed that there was a significant difference between treatment groups and the control group on days 7, 14 and 21 (p

  20. Treatment of radioinduced skin burns by adult stem cells;Traitement des brulures cutanees radio-induites par cellules souches adultes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lataillade, J.J.; Prat, M. [Hopital Militaire Percy, Centre de Transfusion Sanguine des Armees, Dept. Recherches et Therapies Cellulaires, 92 - Clamart (France); Gourmelon, P. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Bey, E. [Hopital Militaire Percy, Service de Chirurgie Plastique, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2009-12-15

    In the area of skin injuries caused by ionizing radiations; the recent opportunity give us the the possibility to manage victims of radiation accidents with skin acute symptoms of irradiation. The approach of cell therapy developed for these patients could be in a second time, used for other types of injuries as thermal burns and the injuries linked to overexposure in radiotherapy. In spite of the diversity of approaches of allogeneic and autologous transplantation, the prognosis of deep and extended radioinduced burns is not completely satisfying because of inflammatory recurrences, origin of graft failures. The stem cells have been used in association. The stem cells were got from sampling of autologous bone marrow after an expansion in vitro from 15 to 17 days. The cultures were realised in medium with 8% of platelet lysate (clinical grade). The cells have been given by injection in complement of epidermis auto graft. A spectacular effect was noticed the day after the injection, but disappearing in some days encouraging to realize supplementary injections. An effect of the quickness and the quality of the graft success is appeared significant too. no necrosis recurrence for the patients after four years for the first one of them. We think that the stem cells participate to the local control of inflammation. (N.C.)

  1. Prevention of incontinence-related skin breakdown for acute and critical care patients: comparison of two products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Mary; Droegemueller, Carol; Rivers, Sonja; Deuser, William E

    2012-01-01

    Perineal protection products were compared for their efficacy in preventing skin breakdown in the hospitalized patient with urinary and/or fecal incontinence. Each product was used for the duration of the hospital stay with daily observations for perineal skin condition. Results indicated the spray product and wipe product were comparable in rate of skin breakdown prevention. Findings suggest the wipe product is more cost-effective for use during hospitalization, and the spray product preserves skin integrity over a longer period of time, beyond average hospitalization duration.

  2. Gas fireplace contact burns in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettel, Julie C; Khambalia, Amina; Barden, Wendy; Murthy, Trisha; Macarthur, Colin

    2004-01-01

    Contact burns from domestic appliances are common in young children. Recently, gas fireplaces have been recognized as a potential cause of contact burns in young children. We sought to quantify the frequency of gas fireplace contact burns in young children, to identify the etiology of contact, to describe the clinical presentation, and to describe clinical outcomes. Children with gas fireplace contact burn injuries presenting to The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto (1999-2002) were identified using three data sources: the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program Database, the Burn Unit Registry, and the Rehabilitation Services Database. Demographic, clinical, and outcomes data were collected on all children. During the 4-year study period, 27 children presented to the hospital because of a gas fireplace contact burn (approximately 9% of all contact burns). The median age of the children was 14 months (range, 8-36 months), with 16 boys (59%). Most children were burned in their own home. With regard to etiology, 10 children (37%) lost their balance near the fireplace, 2 (7%) walked too close to the glass front, and 8 (30%) touched the glass front out of curiosity. Almost half (44%) of the children burned the palms and digits of both hands. The median total burn surface area was 1% (range, 0.2-2.5%). In total, 30% of children were admitted to hospital, and 11% required skin grafts. All children had full wound closure after 4 to 43 days. Given the etiology of these burns (loss of balance or curiosity), passive prevention, such as barriers or changes in the composition of glass panels, may be the most effective approach to combat them.

  3. SELECTIVE INTESTINAL DECONTAMINATION FOR PREVENTION OF WOUND COLONIZATION IN SEVERELY BURNED PATIENTS - A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANSON, WL; KLASEN, HJ; SAUER, EW; OLIEMAN, A

    In this study the effect of selective intestinal decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) on wound colonization was investigated. Ninety-one patients with at least 25 per cent total burned surface area (TBSA) were included in this study. All patients received oral polymyxin. In 63 patients oral

  4. Preventing and treating intertrigo in the large skin folds of adults: a literature overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Mistiaen, P.; Poot, E.; Hickox, S.; Jochems, C.; Wagner, C.

    2004-01-01

    Intertrigo is an inflammatory dermatosis of the skin folds of the body, for which a large variety of topical medications may be recommended. A systematic literature review was performed to find scientific evidence for preventing and treating intertrigo within the nursing domain. Seven electronic databases were searched with a simple broad-scope search strategy. The aim was to identify all publications that concerned intertrigo itself and other conditions that were related to intertriginous re...

  5. Biochemical mechanisms of skin radiation burns inhibition and healing by the volumetric autotransplantation of fibroblasts and of keratinocytes with fibroblasts composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Altukhova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of influence of volumetric autotransplantation of fibroblasts and of the mixture of fibroblasts and keratinocytes on the development of the local 3rd degree X-ray burn and the radiation skin ulcer in guinea pigs were investigated. We used deepadministration into the irradiation zone on its perimeter of 6 doses, which contained (150–160×103 fibroblasts and (130–140×103 keratinocytes in 100 µl. It is shown that this autotransplantation carried out 1 hour after the irradiation, and then every 24 hours, reduces the area of burn on the 35th day, compared to the control by 63%. Radiation ulcer appears on the 10th day after irradiation and is completely healed on the 25th day. With the same regimen of administration of only fibroblasts containing (200–210×103 cells in 100 µl, these parameters of treatment were equal to 31% on 4th and 35th day, respectively. It is shown that as a result of radiation in the area of burn the level of gene expression of collagen types I and III, elastin, fibronectin, vinculin, decorin, hyaluronansynthases 1, 2, 3, matrix metalloproteinases 1, 2, 3, 7, 9 and hyaluronidase is reduced. Besides, in the burn area the level of gene expression of transforming growth factor α, fibroblast growth factors 1, 2, 8 and anti-inflammatory cytokines – interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor-β1 – is reduced, while the level of gene expression of proinflammatory cytokine (interleykin1β increases. Both types of autotransplantation cause the growth of the expression level of all the structural genes and regulatory proteins of biopolymers and decrease in the expression level of interleukin 1β, which leads to activation of tissue regeneration and healing of the burn wound. Reasonsfor the higher efficiency of autotransplantation using the mixture of fibroblasts and keratinocytes compared to autotransplantation by fibroblasts only are both the larger total number of live cells regularly replacing dead cells in

  6. Prevention of burn wound conversion by allogeneic keratinocytes cultured on acellular xenodermis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušková, Eva; Brož, L.; Pokorná, Eva; Königová, R.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2002), s. 29-35 ISSN 1389-9333 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : human keratinocytes * tissue engineered skin * dried porcine dermis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Preoperative skin antiseptic preparations for preventing surgical site infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Chris; McGahan, Lynda; Polisena, Julie; Mierzwinski-Urban, Monika; Embil, John M

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of preoperative skin antiseptic preparations and application techniques for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). Systematic review of the literature using Medline, EMBASE, and other databases, for the period January 2001 to June 2011. Comparative studies (including randomized and nonrandomized trials) of preoperative skin antisepsis preparations and application techniques were included. Two researchers reviewed each study and extracted data using standardized tables developed before the study. Studies were reviewed for their methodological quality and clinical findings. Twenty studies (n = 9,520 patients) were included in the review. The results indicated that presurgical antiseptic showering is effective for reducing skin flora and may reduce SSI rates. Given the heterogeneity of the studies and the results, conclusions about which antiseptic is more effective at reducing SSIs cannot be drawn. The evidence suggests that preoperative antiseptic showers reduce bacterial colonization and may be effective at preventing SSIs. The antiseptic application method is inconsequential, and data are lacking to suggest which antiseptic solution is the most effective. Disinfectant products are often mixed with alcohol or water, which makes it difficult to form overall conclusions regarding an active ingredient. Large, well-conducted randomized controlled trials with consistent protocols comparing agents in the same bases are needed to provide unequivocal evidence on the effectiveness of one antiseptic preparation over another for the prevention of SSIs.

  8. Teens, Tweets, and Tanning Beds: Rethinking the Use of Social Media for Skin Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Ashley E; Brindis, Claire D; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Junn, Alexandra; Pagoto, Sherry; Wehner, Mackenzie; Linos, Eleni

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of skin cancer is rising in the U.S., and melanoma, the deadliest form, is increasing disproportionately among young white women. Indoor tanning is a modifiable risk factor for all skin cancers and continues to be used at the highest rates in young white women. Adolescents and young adults report personal appearance-based reasons for using indoor tanning. Previous research has explored the influences on tanning bed use, including individual factors as well as relationships with peers, family, schools, media influences, legislation, and societal beauty norms. Adolescents and young adults also have high rates of social media usage, and research is emerging on how best to utilize these platforms for prevention. Social media has the potential to be a cost-effective way to reach large numbers of young people and target messages at characteristics of specific audiences. Recent prevention efforts have shown that comprehensive prevention campaigns that include technology and social media are promising in reducing rates of indoor tanning among young adults. This review examines the literature on psychosocial influences on indoor tanning among adolescents and young adults, and highlights ways in which technology and social media can be used for prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Burns, new challenges to take on].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galí-Llàcer, Rosa; Sena-Fernández, Beatriz; Leyva-Moral, Juan Manuel

    2009-04-01

    This article concerns a transversal descriptive study which shows the characteristics of burns treated in a Primary Health Care Center in an urban environment in Barcelona from 19 July 2005 unti 11 August 2007 (N=93). Patients younger than 15 were excluded from this study. 88% (82; CI of 95% 81,47-94,59) of the burns treated were caused by a thermal agent. Kitchen cooking oil ranks first as the cause of burns (24; 27%, CI of 95% 17,99-36,01). 70% of the burns studied had signs of superficial skin damage (65, CI of 95% 60,70-79,30). 61% (57; CI of 95% 51,70-70,30) of these burns were located on upper extremities The average recorded body surface burned was 0.0076% (median = 0,005%, range = 0,0001-0,5000%). The greatest number of wounds were observed among men aged 31 to 45 (17%; 16; CI of 95% 9,38-24,62). Educational health programs which focus on prevention of, and first aid care for, burns are needed. Studies like this one may prove useful when starting preventive or educational strategies.

  10. Prevention and treatment of skin lesions associated with non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Recommendations of experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raurell-Torredà, M; Romero-Collado, A; Rodríguez-Palma, M; Farrés-Tarafa, M; Martí, J D; Hurtado-Pardos, B; Peñarrubia-San Florencio, L; Saez-Paredes, P; Esquinas, A M

    In the last two decades, non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) has been consolidated as an initial strategy for the management of respiratory failure in critical adult and paediatric patients. To identify risk factors and preventive strategies to reduce the incidence of skin lesions associated with clinical devices (LESADIC) related to NIV, as well as the most effective treatment for injuries that cannot be avoided. Review in the MEDLINE, CINAHL and Cochrane databases of studies published in the last 10years to reach consensus through an expert panel. Knowledge about how to measure correct mask size and protection of the skin with foam or hydrocolloids dressings are factors related to the incidence of LESADIC, as it conditions the degree of pressure-friction and shear that the interface exerts on the skin. The interface that causes fewer LESADIC and is better tolerated is the face mask. When there are injuries, the first thing is to remove the interface that causes pressure on damaged skin, recommending a Helmet ® hood as an alternative, treating the infection, managing the exudate and stimulating perilesional skin. The mask of choice is the facial, always using foam or hydrocolloid dressings on the nasal bridge. Evaluate the condition of the skin under the interface and harness every 4hours (recommended) and 11hours (maximum). Evaluate the rotation strategy of the interface at 24hours if the NIV is still needed on an ongoing basis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Malignant disease involving the skin represents a significant work load to the general radiotherapist and can involve interesting diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Primary skin cancer is also relatively common and there is a need to provide an efficient service in which the first treatment is successful in the majority of patients. The reward for careful attention to technique is very considerable both in terms of clinical cancer control and functional results. Squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and intra-epidermal carcinoma constitute the majority of the lesions dealt with clinically, but metastatic disease, lymphomas, and malignant melanomas are also referred regularly for opinions and may require radiotherapy. The general principle of the techniques of assessment and radiotherapeutic management to be described are equally applicable to any malignant skin tumour once the decision has been made to accept it for radiotherapy. Dosage and fractionation may have to be adjusted to allow for the nature of the disease process and the intent of the treatment

  12. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Genetics ...

  13. Teens, Tweets, and Tanning Beds: Rethinking the Use of Social Media for Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Ashley E.; Brindis, Claire D.; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Junn, Alexandra; Pagoto, Sherry; Wehner, Mackenzie; Linos, Eleni

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of skin cancer is rising in the U.S., and melanoma, the deadliest form, is increasing disproportionately among young white women. Indoor tanning is a modifiable risk factor for all skin cancers and continues to be used at the highest rates in young white women. Adolescents and young adults report personal appearance–based reasons for using indoor tanning. Previous research has explored the influences on tanning bed use, including individual factors as well as relationships with peers, family, schools, media influences, legislation, and societal beauty norms. Adolescents and young adults also have high rates of social media usage, and research is emerging on how best to utilize these platforms for prevention. Social media has the potential to be a cost-effective way to reach large numbers of young people and target messages at characteristics of specific audiences. Recent prevention efforts have shown that comprehensive prevention campaigns that include technology and social media are promising in reducing rates of indoor tanning among young adults. This review examines the literature on psychosocial influences on indoor tanning among adolescents and young adults, and highlights ways in which technology and social media can be used for prevention efforts. PMID:28818251

  14. The preventive effect of linalool on acute and chronic UVB-mediated skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaseelan, Srithar; Balupillai, Agilan; Govindasamy, Kanimozhi; Muthusamy, Ganesan; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2016-07-06

    In this study, we evaluated the role of linalool in acute ultraviolet-B (UVB; 280-320 nm) radiation-induced inflammation and chronic UVB-mediated photocarcinogenesis in mouse skin. Acute UVB-irradiation (180 mJ cm(-2)) causes hyperplasia, edema formation, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant depletion, and overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in mouse skin. Topical or intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of linalool prevented acute UVB-induced hyperplasia, edema formation, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant depletion in mouse skin. Further, linalool treatment prevented UVB-induced overexpression of COX-2 and ODC in mouse skin. In the chronic study, mice were subjected to UVB-exposure thrice weekly for 30 weeks. Chronic UVB-exposure induced tumor incidence and expression of proliferative markers such as NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-6, COX-2, VEGF, TGF-β1, Bcl-2 and mutated p53 in mouse skin. Treatment with linalool before each UVB-exposure significantly prevented the expression of these proliferative markers and subsequently decreased the tumor incidence in mice skin. Histopathological studies confirmed the development of dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the chronic UVB-exposed mouse skin; and this was prevented by both topical and i.p. linalool treatment. Therefore, linalool may be considered as a photochemopreventive agent against UVB radiation induced skin carcinogenesis.

  15. Prevention of Skin Tears in the Dependent Older Person: Contribution of the Humanitude Care Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Cândida Melo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aging is characterized by a decline in physical and cognitive functioning, increasing the older person’s vulnerability to dependence. The age factor and the associated physiological skin changes contribute to the occurrence of skin tears. This type of wounds is common in older people and often results from care delivery, hence the importance of caring with Humanitude and avoiding the use of force during interventions. Objectives: This study aims to identify and analyze the current scientific evidence on the contribution of the Humanitude care methodology toward reducing the agitation and preventing skin tears in dependent older people. Methods: Integrative literature review of articles published between 2011 and 2016, available in full text and written in Portuguese and English, in the EBSCOhost and Google Scholar databases. Results: Of a total of 75 articles, five articles were obtained after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conclusions: The studies showed that the application of the Humanitude care methodology, by using gentle caring techniques, is particularly effective in dependent older people by reducing their pathological agitation behaviors and opposition to treatment/refusal of care and preventing shearing, friction, and bruising.

  16. Burns and Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control Website. Unintentional fire/burn fatalities and nonfatal injuries, children ages 19 and under. Available from: http: / / www. ... Prevention and Control. Protect the ones you love: child injuries are preventable. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...

  17. Burn management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endorf, Frederick W; Ahrenholz, David

    2011-12-01

    To update critical care practitioners on the recent advancements in burn care. Particular topics discussed include airway management, acute resuscitation, issues within the intensive care unit, nutrition, and wound management. This is a concise review of the recent burn literature tailored to the critical care practitioner. Criteria for extubation of burn patients are examined, as is the need for cuffed endotracheal tubes in pediatric burn patients. Strategies to avoid over-resuscitation are discussed, including use of colloid, as well as nurse-driven and computer-guided resuscitation protocols. New data regarding common ICU issues such as insulin therapy, delirium, and preferred intravenous access are reviewed. The importance of nutrition in the burn patient is emphasized, particularly early initiation of enteral nutrition, continuation of nutrition during surgical procedures, and use of adjuncts such as immunonutrition and beta blockade. Finally, both short-term and long-term wound issues are addressed via sections on laser Doppler assessment of burns and pressure garment therapy to prevent long-term scarring.

  18. Prevention and Management of Infections Associated With Burns in the Combat Casualty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    all involved tissue; thus, excision to fascia is frequently required. When infection is suspected, samples of the de- brided tissue should be sent for...phaeohyphomycosis due to Curvularia lunata involving skin and subcutaneous tissue after an explosion at a chemical plant . Am J Med Sci. 1993;305:387–389

  19. Sterilization of silver acidium pipemedicum skin for the treatment of burns by radioactive cobalt-60-γray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Defeng; Cao Fengsheng; Chen Qinglong; Li Guohui; Su Ziyi; Cao Yong; Wu Wenqing; Qiu Zeyi; Chen Zhanxian

    1995-01-01

    The radiated silver acidum pipemedicum skin (RSAPS) was made of 0.4-0.8mm laminal skin from healthy white pig, which was infiltrated in norfloxacin and silver nitrate, packed with the filkm bag of alummium poil and radiated by cobalt-60γ-ray for sterilization at the dosage of 27.92-35.31Gy/min for a total dose of 25KGY, RSAPS was very effective in sterilization and had no bad effect on elasticity, adhesion, water permeability, and structure of pig skin. So it is highly appreciated by the patients and medical personnel for its convenience of usage and has gained good social and economic beneficial results. (Author)

  20. Medical diagnosis system and method with multispectral imaging. [depth of burns and optical density of the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Reilly, T. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A skin diagnosis system includes a scanning and optical arrangement whereby light reflected from each incremental area (pixel) of the skin is directed simultaneously to three separate light filters, e.g., IR, red, and green. As a result, the three devices simultaneously produce three signals which are directly related to the reflectance of light of different wavelengths from the corresponding pixel. These three signals for each pixel after processing are used as inputs to one or more output devices to produce a visual color display and/or a hard copy color print, for one usable as a diagnostic aid by a physician.

  1. Skin cancer in the military: a systematic review of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer incidence, prevention, and screening among active duty and veteran personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemenschneider, Kelsie; Liu, Jesse; Powers, Jennifer G

    2017-12-29

    Occupational sun exposure is a well-studied risk factor for skin cancer development, but more work is needed to assess melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer risk among U.S. military personnel to improve education and screening efforts in this population. To conduct an extensive review of skin cancer risks for U.S. military personnel to inform preventative education, diagnosis, and treatment efforts to better protect these individuals from future skin cancer development. A systematic review of published studies on the subject of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer in military personnel was conducted. Nine studies describing skin cancer incidence in the United States military were identified, with four studies specific to melanoma. The study findings reveal an increased risk of melanoma associated with service in the military or prisoner of war status. Service in tropical environments was associated with an increased incidence of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer among World War II soldiers. Two studies found that increased melanoma risk was also branch-dependent, with the highest rates among the United States Air Force (USAF) branch. Several of the reviewed studies implicated increased sun exposure during military service and lack of sufficient sun protection as the causes of higher rates of skin cancer among U.S. military and veteran populations as compared to the non-military population in the US. The reviewed articles have variable results; a prospective randomized controlled trial would be helpful to develop interventions that mitigate skin cancer risk in the U.S. military. This review identifies an abundance of evidence for an increased risk of skin cancer development among U.S. active duty and veteran populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Skin Preparation for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection After Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Ivan M; Van Arsdale, Anne; Govindappagari, Shravya; Judge, Nancy E; Neto, Nicole K; Bernstein, Jeffrey; Bernstein, Peter S; Garry, David J

    2015-12-01

    To compare chlorhexidine with alcohol, povidone-iodine with alcohol, and both applied sequentially to estimate their relative effectiveness in prevention of surgical site infections after cesarean delivery. Women undergoing nonemergent cesarean birth at greater than 37 0/7 weeks of gestation were randomly allocated to one of three antiseptic skin preparations: povidone-iodine with alcohol, chlorhexidine with alcohol, or the sequential combination of both solutions. The primary outcome was surgical site infection reported within the first 30 days postpartum. Based on a surgical site infection rate of 12%, an anticipated 50% reduction for the combination group relative to either single skin preparation group, with a power of 0.90 and an α of 0.05, 430 women per group were needed to detect a difference. From January 2013 to July 2014, 1,404 women were randomly assigned to one of three groups: povidone-iodine with alcohol (n=463), chlorhexidine with alcohol (n=474), or both (n=467). The groups were similar with respect to demographics, medical disorders, indication for cesarean delivery, operative time, and blood loss. The overall rate of surgical site infection-4.3%-was lower than anticipated. The skin preparation groups had similar surgical site infection rates: povidone-iodine 4.6%, chlorhexidine with alcohol 4.5%, and sequential 3.9% (P=.85). The skin preparation techniques resulted in similar rates of surgical site infections. Our study provides no support for any particular method of skin preparation before cesarean delivery. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01870583. I.

  3. Acceleration of skin regeneration in full-thickness burns by incorporation of bFGF-loaded alginate microspheres into a CMCS-PVA hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; Huang, Yuchen; Lan, Yong; Zuo, Qinhua; Li, Chenghua; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Rui; Xue, Wei

    2017-05-01

    Two important issues in skin tissue engineering are the vascularization and regeneration of the dermis. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is known to promote angiogenesis and accelerate wound healing. Direct delivery of bFGF to the wound area, however, would lead to a loss of bioactivity. To this end, bFGF-loaded alginate microspheres (Ms) were fabricated and incorporated into carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS)-poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) to form a composite hydrogel. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicated that the incorporation of Ms does not significantly affect the inner structure of CMCS-PVA. In an in vitro study, the release of bFGF from Ms-CMCS-PVA in a sustained manner retained higher bioactivity over a 2-week period. Full-thickness burn wounds were created in the dorsal area of rats for in vivo evaluation of skin regeneration treated with CMCS-PVA hydrogel, with and without bFGF. Compared with the control, CMCS-PVA and bFGF-CMCS-PVA groups, the bFGF/Ms-CMCS-PVA group revealed significantly faster wound recovery rates, with re-epithelialization and regeneration of the dermis. Moreover, the bFGF/Ms-CMCS-PVA group had the highest density of newly formed and mature blood vessels during the 2 mweek treatment period. The ability of the bFGF/Ms-CMCS-PVA hydrogel to accelerate wound healing in a full-thickness burn model suggests its potential for use in dermal tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Burns of the feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, L S; Heggers, J P; Robson, M C; Smith, D J; Maniker, A A; Sachs, R J

    1987-01-01

    Although they are formally categorized by the ABA as major burns, isolated burns of the feet are often managed on an outpatient basis. This retrospective review evaluates the success of such outpatient management, including the complications encountered. The outcome of the review emphasizes that although isolated burns encompass only a small body surface area, they require careful in-hospital treatment to avoid the complications of cellulitis, subsequent prolonged hospitalization, increased need for skin grafting, and increased incidence of hypertrophic scarring.

  5. In vivo time-lapse imaging of skin burn wound healing using second-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Wound healing is a process to repair the damaged tissue caused by thermal burn, incised wound, or stab wound. Although the wound healing has many aspects, it is common for dynamics of collagen fiber, such as decomposition, production, or growth, to be closely related with wound healing. If such the healing process can be visualized as a timelapse image of the collagen fiber in the same subject, one may obtain new findings regarding biological repairing mechanisms in the healing process. In this article, to investigate the temporal modoification of dermal collagen fiber in the burn wound healing, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, minimal invasiveness, deep penetration, the absence of interference from background light, and in vivo measurement without additional staining. Since SHG light arises from a non-centrosymmetric triple helix of three polypeptide chains in the collagen molecule, SHG intensity sensitively reflects the structure maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates. A series of time-lapse SHG images during the wound healing process of 2 weeks clearly indicated that condensation and melting of dermal collagen fibers by the deep dermal burn, decomposition of the damaged collagen fibers in the inflammation phase, production of new collagen fibers in the proliferation phase, and the growth of the new collagen fibers in the remodeling phase. These results show a high potential of SHG microscopy for optical assessment of the wound healing process in vivo.

  6. Preventive effects of tamarind seed coat extract on UVA-induced alterations in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phetdee, Khemjira; Rakchai, Racharat; Rattanamanee, Kwanchai; Teaktong, Thanasak; Viyoch, Jarupa

    2014-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions on skin is from solar radiation, particularly from its ultraviolet (UV) component, through the formation of oxidative species. Thus, an antioxidant strategy that prevents the formation of these oxidants could form the basis of an efficacious cutaneous protectant. Many herbal materials contain antioxidant polyphenols, and this study assessed the possibility that tamarind seed coat extract could fulfill this role. An alcoholic extract of the tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seed coat showed stronger antioxidant activity (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl inhibition, EC(50) = 12.9 μg/ml) than L-ascorbic acid (EC(50) = 22.9 μg/ml) and α-tocopherol (EC(50) = 29.3 μg/ml). In cultured fibroblasts taken from human skin, hydrogen peroxide (100-1000 μM) damaged 62-92% of the cells compared to only 35-47% when the cells were preincubated in extract (200 μg/ml) for 24 h. UVA (40 J/cm2) irradiation of human fibroblasts damaged 25% of the cells but the death rate was reduced to 10% with extract. UV irradiation increased the proportion of cells arrest in G(0)/G(1) phase (from 59% to 78%) but this was largely prevented by the extract (64%), according to flow cytometry. Intracellular total glutathione of UVA-irradiated cells pretreated with the extract increased to 10-25% compared to the non-pretreated group at 24-72 h after irradiation. Fibroblasts typically increased matrix metalloproteinase-1 secretion after photodamage, and this is prevented by the extract. This is the first report showing that tamarind seed coat extract is an antioxidant and can protect human skin fibroblasts from cellular damage produced by UVA and thus may form the foundation for an antiaging cosmetic.

  7. Assessing burn depth in tattooed burn lesions with LASCA Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezdorn, N.; Limbourg, A.; Paprottka, F.J.; Könneker; Ipaktchi, R.; Vogt, P.M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tattoos are on the rise, and so are patients with tattooed burn lesions. A proper assessment with regard to burn depth is often impeded by the tattoo dye. Laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) is a technique that evaluates burn lesions via relative perfusion analysis. We assessed the effect of tattoo skin pigmentation on LASCA perfusion imaging in a multicolour tattooed patient. Depth of burn lesions in multi-coloured tattooed and untattooed skin was assessed using LASCA. Relative perfusion was measured in perfusion units (PU) and compared to various pigment colours, then correlated with the clinical evaluation of the lesion. Superficial partial thickness burn (SPTB) lesions showed significantly elevated perfusion units (PU) compared to normal skin; deep partial thickness burns showed decreased PU levels. PU of various tattoo pigments to normal skin showed either significantly lower values (blue, red, pink) or significantly increased values (black) whereas orange and yellow pigment showed values comparable to normal skin. In SPTB, black and blue pigment showed reduced perfusion; yellow pigment was similar to normal SPTB burn. Deep partial thickness burn (DPTB) lesions in tattoos did not show significant differences to normal DPTB lesions for black, green and red. Tattoo pigments alter the results of perfusion patterns assessed with LASCA both in normal and burned skin. Yellow pigments do not seem to interfere with LASCA assessment. However proper determination of burn depth both in SPTB and DPTB by LASCA is limited by the heterogenic alterations of the various pigment colours. PMID:28149254

  8. The implementation of knowledge dissemination in the prevention of occupational skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, A; Bollmann, U; Cazzaniga, S; Hübner, A; John, S M; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, J; Mijakoski, D; Šimić, D; Simon, D; Sonsmann, F; Stoleski, S; Weinert, P; Wulfhorst, B

    2018-03-01

    Occupational skin diseases (OSD) have a high medical, social, economic and political impact. Knowledge dissemination from research activities to key stakeholders involved in health care is a prerequisite to make prevention effective. To study and prioritize different activity fields and stakeholders that are involved in the prevention of OSD, to reflect on their inter-relationships, to develop a strategic approach for knowledge dissemination and to develop a hands-on tool for OSD prevention projects METHODS: Seven different activity fields that are relevant in the prevention of OSD have been stepwise identified. This was followed by an impact analysis. Fifty-five international OSD experts rated the impact and the influence of the activity fields for the prevention of OSD with a standardized questionnaire. Activity fields identified to have a high impact in OSD prevention are the political system, mass media and industry. The political system has a strong but more indirect effect on the general population via the educational system, local public health services or the industry. The educational system, mass media, industry and local public health services have a strong direct impact on the OSD 'at risk' worker. Finally, a hands-on tool for future OSD prevention projects has been developed that addresses knowledge dissemination and different stakeholder needs. Systematic knowledge dissemination is important to make OSD prevention more effective and to close the gap between research and practice. This study provides guidance to identify stakeholders, strategies and dissemination channels for systematic knowledge dissemination which need to be adapted to country-specific structures, for example the social security system and healthcare systems. A key for successful knowledge dissemination is building linkages among different stakeholders, building strategic partnerships and gaining their support right from the inception phase of a project. © 2017 European Academy of

  9. Ultraviolet radiation, aging and the skin: prevention of damage by topical cAMP manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Ortiz, Alexandra; Yan, Betty; D'Orazio, John A

    2014-05-15

    Being the largest and most visible organ of the body and heavily influenced by environmental factors, skin is ideal to study the long-term effects of aging. Throughout our lifetime, we accumulate damage generated by UV radiation. UV causes inflammation, immune changes, physical changes, impaired wound healing and DNA damage that promotes cellular senescence and carcinogenesis. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and among the malignancies of highest increasing incidence over the last several decades. Melanoma incidence is directly related to age, with highest rates in individuals over the age of 55 years, making it a clear age-related disease. In this review, we will focus on UV-induced carcinogenesis and photo aging along with natural protective mechanisms that reduce amount of "realized" solar radiation dose and UV-induced injury. We will focus on the theoretical use of forskolin, a plant-derived pharmacologically active compound to protect the skin against UV injury and prevent aging symptoms by up-regulating melanin production. We will discuss its use as a topically-applied root-derived formulation of the Plectranthus barbatus (Coleus forskolii) plant that grows naturally in Asia and that has long been used in various Aryuvedic teas and therapeutic preparations.

  10. Ultraviolet Radiation, Aging and the Skin: Prevention of Damage by Topical cAMP Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Amaro-Ortiz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Being the largest and most visible organ of the body and heavily influenced by environmental factors, skin is ideal to study the long-term effects of aging. Throughout our lifetime, we accumulate damage generated by UV radiation. UV causes inflammation, immune changes, physical changes, impaired wound healing and DNA damage that promotes cellular senescence and carcinogenesis. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and among the malignancies of highest increasing incidence over the last several decades. Melanoma incidence is directly related to age, with highest rates in individuals over the age of 55 years, making it a clear age-related disease. In this review, we will focus on UV-induced carcinogenesis and photo aging along with natural protective mechanisms that reduce amount of “realized” solar radiation dose and UV-induced injury. We will focus on the theoretical use of forskolin, a plant-derived pharmacologically active compound to protect the skin against UV injury and prevent aging symptoms by up-regulating melanin production. We will discuss its use as a topically-applied root-derived formulation of the Plectranthus barbatus (Coleus forskolii plant that grows naturally in Asia and that has long been used in various Aryuvedic teas and therapeutic preparations.

  11. Prevention and treatment of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Raymond Javan; Webster, Joan; Chung, Bryan; Marquart, Louise; Ahmed, Muhtashimuddin; Garantziotis, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced skin reaction (RISR) is a common side effect that affects the majority of cancer patients receiving radiation treatment. RISR is often characterised by swelling, redness, pigmentation, fibrosis, and ulceration, pain, warmth, burning, and itching of the skin. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of interventions which aim to prevent or manage RISR in people with cancer. We searched the following databases up to November 2012: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2012, Issue 11), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), CINAHL (from 1981) and LILACS (from 1982). Randomized controlled trials evaluating interventions for preventing or managing RISR in cancer patients were included. The primary outcomes were development of RISR, and levels of RISR and symptom severity. Secondary outcomes were time taken to develop erythema or dry desquamation; quality of life; time taken to heal, a number of skin reaction and symptom severity measures; cost, participant satisfaction; ease of use and adverse effects. Where appropriate, we pooled results of randomized controlled trials using mean differences (MD) or odd ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Forty-seven studies were included in this review. These evaluated six types of interventions (oral systemic medications; skin care practices; steroidal topical therapies; non-steroidal topical therapies; dressings and other). Findings from two meta-analyses demonstrated significant benefits of oral Wobe-Mugos E for preventing RISR (OR 0.13 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.38)) and limiting the maximal level of RISR (MD -0.92 (95% CI -1.36 to -0.48)). Another meta-analysis reported that wearing deodorant does not influence the development of RISR (OR 0.80 (95% CI 0.47 to 1.37)). Despite the high number of trials in this area, there is limited good, comparative research that provides definitive results suggesting the effectiveness of any single intervention for

  12. Economics of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Michael J; Phillips, Linda G

    2008-07-01

    Sustaining a burn injury sets in motion a cycle of pain, disfigurement, and a search for survival. In pediatric burns, the injury extends to the parents where fear, ignorance, and helplessness forever change their lives. Pediatric burn injuries are caused by fire, hot liquids, clothing irons, hair curlers, caustic substances like drain cleaner, the grounding of an electrical source, and exposure to radiation. Efficiency in the delivery of pediatric burn care is critical. Maximizing resource utilization means continual self-evaluation and economic analysis of therapeutic modalities. Griffiths et al found that most childhood burns are due to scalds, which can be treated for $1061 per percent burn. Paddock et al reduced the cost of treating superficial pediatric burns and reduced the length of stay in hospital using silver-impregnated gauze over traditional methods. Barrett et al found improved cosmesis of skin grafts using cultured epithelial autografts but at a substantially increased cost. Corpron et al showed that pediatric burn units that treat burns >10% total body surface area and operative treatment of pediatric burns regardless of size generate positive revenue. There is a paucity of evidentiary pediatric burn economic data. More research is needed to address areas of pediatric burn care inefficiency. Improving knowledge of cost in all health care endeavors will create competition and drive down expenditures.

  13. Linalool prevents oxidative stress activated protein kinases in single UVB-exposed human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaseelan, Srithar; Balupillai, Agilan; Govindasamy, Kanimozhi; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Muthusamy, Ganesan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Thangaiyan, Radhiga; Robert, Beaulah Mary; Prasad Nagarajan, Rajendra; Ponniresan, Veeramani Kandan; Rathinaraj, Pierson

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (285-320 nm) elicits a number of cellular signaling elements. We investigated the preventive effect of linalool, a natural monoterpene, against UVB-induced oxidative imbalance, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling in HDFa cells. We observed that linalool treatment (30 μM) prevented acute UVB-irradiation (20 mJ/cm2) mediated loss of activities of antioxidant enzymes in HDFa cells. The comet assay results illustrate that linalool significantly prevents UVB-mediated 8-deoxy guanosine formation (oxidative DNA damage) rather than UVB-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine (CPD) formation. This might be due to its ability to prevent UVB-induced ROS formation and to restore the oxidative imbalance of cells. This has been reflected in UVB-induced overexpression of MAPK and NF-κB signaling. We observed that linalool inhibited UVB-induced phosphorylation of ERK1, JNK and p38 proteins of MAPK family. Linalool inhibited UVB-induced activation of NF-κB/p65 by activating IκBa. We further observed that UVB-induced expression of TNF-α, IL6, IL-10, MMP-2 and MMP-9 was modulated by linalool treatment in HDFa cells. Thus, linalool protects the human skin cells from the oxidative damages of UVB radiation and modulates MAPK and NF-κB signaling in HDFa cells. The present findings substantiate that linalool may act as a photoprotective agent against UVB-induced skin damages.

  14. 1,8-cineole prevents UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis by targeting the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Nam Hyouck; Kim, Young Eon; Kim, Yoonsook; Song, Kyung-Mo; Jung, Sung Keun

    2017-01-01

    1,8-cineole is a natural monoterpene cyclic ether present in Eucalyptus, and has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the preventive effect of 1,8-cineole on skin carcinogenesis and the molecular mechanism of action responsible remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of 1,8-cineole on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. 1,8-cineole inhibited UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein and mRNA expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation in HaCaT cells. 1,8-cineole also inhibited phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, and phosphorylation of its upstream kinases, c-Src and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS) assay results showed that 1,8-cineole suppressed UVB-induced expression of a target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), cyp1a1, and directly binds to AhR. Knockdown of AhR suppressed COX-2 expression as well as phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in HaCaT cells. Furthermore, topical treatment of 1,8-cineole on mouse skin delayed tumor incidence and reduced tumor numbers, while inhibiting COX-2 expression in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that 1,8-cineole is a potent chemopreventive agent that inhibits UVB-induced COX-2 expression by targeting AhR to suppress UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:29285309

  15. Skin Cancer Prevention Coverage in Popular US Women’s Health and Fitness Magazines: An Analysis of Advertisements and Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey Hannah; Ethan, Danna; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Berdnik, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    The desire to be tan is a phenomenon that public health researchers have investigated, as exposure to UV radiation increases the chances of developing skin cancer. Media messages in women’s magazines have been shown to contribute to this problem. Much less is known about the prevalence of skin cancer prevention messages in these magazines. This study’s aim was to identify the number and type of articles and advertised products devoted to skin health (sun protection and skin cancer prevention in particular) within five popular U.S. greater than women’s health and fitness magazines. We analyzed articles and advertisements over seven months of issues of the following popular women’s health and fitness magazines: Fitness, Health, Self, Shape, and Women’s Health, March 2013 through September 2013. Overall, 31 issues of the five magazines with a total of 780 articles and 1,986 advertisements were analyzed. Of the 780 articles, a mere 2.9% (n=23) were devoted to skin. Of the 258 skin product advertisements, less than 20% of the products contained sun protection factor (SPF). These findings suggest that women’s health and fitness magazines can improve their efforts in informing women of skin cancer risks and preventive measures to minimize these risks. The role of these magazines in building health literacy among their readers is also discussed. PMID:24999136

  16. Skin cancer prevention coverage in popular US women's health and fitness magazines: an analysis of advertisements and articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey Hannah; Ethan, Danna; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Berdnik, Alyssa

    2014-04-02

    The desire to be tan is a phenomenon that public health researchers have investigated, as exposure to UV radiation increases the chances of developing skin cancer.  Media messages in women's magazines have been shown to contribute to this problem. Much less is known about the prevalence of skin cancer prevention messages in these magazines. This study's aim was to identify the number and type of articles and advertised products devoted to skin health (sun protection and skin cancer prevention in particular) within five popular U.S. greater than women's health and fitness magazines. We analyzed articles and advertisements over seven months of issues of the following popular women's health and fitness magazines: Fitness, Health, Self, Shape, and Women's Health, March 2013 through September 2013. Overall, 31 issues of the five magazines with a total of 780 articles and 1,986 advertisements were analyzed. Of the 780 articles, a mere 2.9% (n=23) were devoted to skin. Of the 258 skin product advertisements, less than 20% of the products contained sun protection factor (SPF). These findings suggest that women's health and fitness magazines can improve their efforts in informing women of skin cancer risks and preventive measures to minimize these risks. The role of these magazines in building health literacy among their readers is also discussed.

  17. Application of Minicircle Technology of Self-Reproducing Synthetic Protein Drugs in Preventing Skin Allograft Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sun Woo; Kim, Young Kyun; Park, Narae; Jin, Long; Jin, Jian; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Yang, Chul Woo

    2015-07-30

    Recently, it has been reported that minicircle vectors could allow the expression of transgenes using the protein synthesis system of the host. Here, we tested a novel strategy to permit the production of synthetic biologics using minicircle technology and evaluated their feasibility as a therapeutic tool in a skin allograft model. We engineered vectors to carry cassette sequences for tocilizumab [anti-soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) antibody] and/or etanercept [tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2)-Fc fusion protein], and then isolated minicircle vectors from the parent vectors. We verified the production of proteins from minicircles and their duration in HEK293T cells and mice. We also evaluated whether these proteins were expressed at levels sufficient to ameliorate skin allograft rejection in mice. Each minicircle transfected into cells was detectable for at least 30 days. In mice, the drugs were mainly expressed in the liver and were detectable for at least 10 days after a single injection. These drugs were also detected in the blood. Treatment of mice with minicircles prolonged skin allograft survival, which was accompanied by a reduction of the number of interferon-γ+ or interleukin-17+ lymphocytes and an induction of forkhead box P3 expression. These findings suggest that blocking of sIL-6R and/or TNF-α using minicircles encoding tocilizumab and/or etanercept was functionally active and relevant for preventing acute allograft rejection. Self-reproducing synthetic protein drugs produced using minicircle technology are potentially powerful tools for preventing acute rejection in transplantation.

  18. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  19. A Review of the Use of Topical Calendula in the Prevention and Treatment of Radiotherapy-Induced Skin Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodiyan, Joyson; Amber, Kyle T.

    2015-01-01

    Calendula is a topical agent derived from a plant of the marigold family Calendula Officinalis. Containing numerous polyphenolic antioxidants, calendula has been studied in both the laboratory and clinical setting for the use in treating and preventing radiation induced skin toxicity. Despite strong evidence in the laboratory supporting calendula’s mechanism of action in preventing radiation induced skin toxicity, clinical studies have demonstrated mixed results. In light of the controversy surrounding the efficacy of calendula in treating and preventing radiodermatitis, the topic warrants further discussion. PMID:26783706

  20. A Review of the Use of Topical Calendula in the Prevention and Treatment of Radiotherapy-Induced Skin Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyson Kodiyan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Calendula is a topical agent derived from a plant of the marigold family Calendula Officinalis. Containing numerous polyphenolic antioxidants, calendula has been studied in both the laboratory and clinical setting for the use in treating and preventing radiation induced skin toxicity. Despite strong evidence in the laboratory supporting calendula’s mechanism of action in preventing radiation induced skin toxicity, clinical studies have demonstrated mixed results. In light of the controversy surrounding the efficacy of calendula in treating and preventing radiodermatitis, the topic warrants further discussion.

  1. CLINICAL STUDY OF ELECTRICAL BURNS AMONG ALL BURNS CASES- 3 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabathula Durga Prasad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND With the advances in technology, electrical injuries are becoming more common and are the leading cause of work-related traumatic death. One third of all electrical traumas and most high-voltage injuries are job related and more than 50% of these injuries result from power line contact. The management of the major burn injury represents a significant challenge to every member of the burns team. Most of electrical burns present with gangrene of toes and limbs with eschar over body parts. Their presentation is mostly due to contact with high-voltage electricity at their work places. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was made to study the clinico-social profile of patients suffering electric burns admitted into Department of General Surgery. RESULTS 92 cases were evaluated and studied. Majority of patients developed gangrene of limbs and toes. Amputations and skin grafting was done. Most patients who suffered electric burns were males of age group 21 to 40 years. All cases are accidental and mostly occurred at work places. Most electric burns are high-voltage based and caused deep burns. Major complications like acute renal failure and septicaemia were encountered. Most of them suffered 16 to 30% burns. Most commonly isolated organism from wounds is pseudomonas. Most of them suffered a hospital stay of 1 to 2 months. CONCLUSION Electric burns are a burden to the society. Prevention is the best way to deal with them. Electricity-based employees have to be trained properly regarding safety measures to be taken. General education of public regarding safety measures can prevent electrical burn injuries.

  2. Clothing Flammability and Burn Injuries: Public Opinion Concerning an Overlooked, Preventable Public Health Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Spivak, Steven M; Pollack, Keshia M; Gielen, Andrea C; Salomon, Michele; Damant, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe knowledge of clothing flammability risk, public support for clothing flammability warning labels, and stronger regulation to reduce the risk. As part of a national survey of homeowners about residential sprinkler systems, the authors included questions about clothing flammability. The authors used an online web panel to sample homeowners and descriptive methods to analyze the resulting data. The sample included 2333 homeowners. Knowledge of clothing flammability and government oversight of clothing flammability risk was low. Homeowners were evenly split about the effectiveness of current standards; however, when presented with clothing-related burn injury and death data, a majority (53%) supported stricter standards. Most homeowners (64%) supported warning labels and indicated that such labels would either have no effect on their purchasing decisions (64%) or be an incentive (24%) to purchase an item. Owners of sprinkler-equipped homes were more likely to support these interventions than owners of homes without sprinkler systems. Public knowledge about clothing flammability risks is low. Most homeowners supported clothing labels to inform consumers of this risk and increased government intervention to reduce the risk.

  3. A burn prevention program as a long-term investment: trends in burn injuries among Jews and Bedouin children in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, E; Bahar-Fuchs, S A; Abu-Hammad, I; Friger, M; Rosenberg, L

    2000-03-01

    In order to broaden our long-term intervention efforts in elementary schools in Israel (underway since 1988) and to set priorities for further population-specific actions, we compared the pattern of burn injuries among two age groups (0-4; 5-14) of two ethnic groups of Jews and Bedouins admitted to a regional hospital between 1986 and 1995 (n = 1050). The findings indicated a significant downward trend, though somewhat nonlinear, in burn admissions among the older age groups. A relatively less favorable trend was observed for the younger age groups. Consistently across years, burn rates in the younger group of Bedouin children were the highest. For the 10-year period, a significant season by ethnic group variation in burn admissions was observed, with a peak in the spring and in the wintertime for the Jews and Bedouins, respectively. A significant trend of decrease, mostly among older children, in average lengths of hospital stay, was also evident. Yet, regardless of age group and across years, Bedouin children stayed longer in the hospital than Jewish children. The overall leading causes of injury (for 1992-1995) were hot liquids (69%), fire (17%), chemicals (9.5%) and contact (2%). In our view, there is a need to address at-risk populations through environmental, community and family-oriented interventions and to venture beyond the pathogenic factors to the investigation of the salutary factors of health under diverse life conditions.

  4. Repair of deep tissue defects in the posterior talocrural region using a superficial temporal fascia free flap plus thin split-skin grafting in extensively burned patients: A retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuekang; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Mengdong; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Qiaohua; Li, Zhiqiang; Han, Juntao; Hu, Dahai

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the scheme, surgical procedures, and clinical outcomes for the early repair of deep wounds of the posterior talocrural region in extensively burned patients with a method combining a superficial temporal fascia free flap with thin split-skin grafting.From January 2013 to February 2016, 9 extensively burned patients with deep tissue defects of the posterior talocrural region were treated in our department (2 patients had bilateral deep tissue defects of the posterior talocrural region). All 11 wounds were repaired using a superficial temporal fascia free flap and thin split-skin grafting. After the operation, survival of the fascia flaps and grafted skin was observed, and the appearance and functional recovery of the grafts were evaluated. Follow-up information was reviewed, and complications were documented.All 11 fascia flaps survived completely. Two cases of partial skin necrosis healed after the second application of skin grafts. The appearance and function of recipient sites were well restored in all patients over a follow-up period of 5 to 14 months.Deep tissue defects of the posterior talocrural region can be effectively repaired with our method combining a superficial temporal fascia free flap with thin split-skin grafting. This method offers the advantages of a good appearance, strong resistance to infection, minimal damage at the donor site, short course of disease, and good prognosis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The relationship between occupational sun exposure and non-melanoma skin cancer: clinical basics, epidemiology, occupational disease evaluation, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartasch, Manigé; Diepgen, Thomas Ludwig; Schmitt, Jochen; Drexler, Hans

    2012-10-01

    The cumulative effect of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is responsible for the worldwide increase in non-melanoma skin cancer, a category that includes squamous cell carcinoma and its precursors (the actinic keratoses) as well as basal-cell carcinoma. Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in areas of the world with a light-skinned population. The occupational exposure to UV radiation is high in many outdoor occupations; recent studies suggest that persons working in such occupations are more likely to develop non-melanoma skin cancer. On the basis of a selective review of the literature, we present the current state of knowledge about occupational and non-occupational UV exposure and the findings of meta-analyses on the association of outdoor activity with non-melanoma skin cancer. We also give an overview of the current recommendations for prevention and for medicolegal assessment. Recent meta-analyses have consistently documented a significantly higher risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin among persons who work outdoors (odds ratio [OR] 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.40-2.22, pmelanoma skin cancer in persons with high occupational exposure to UV radiation should be reported as an occupational disease under § 9, paragraph 2 of the Seventh Book of the German Social Code (Sozialgesetzbuch, SGB VII). Preventive measures are urgently needed for persons with high occupational exposure to UV radiation.

  6. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that ...

  7. Stages of Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that ...

  8. A modern method of treatment: The role of silver dressings in promoting healing and preventing pathological scarring in patients with burn wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, A; Florescu, IP; Nitescu, C

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds are a global public health problem, which affects all countries, no matter the development stage and occurs in all age groups, from toddlers to elderly. In spite of burns being the cause of numerous household and work accidents, there are still no clear stated unanimous rules for their treatment. Every day new products appear on the market, each of them trying to prove more effective. Since ancient times, silver has been known for its antimicrobial properties, so it has been used for a long time in the treatment of burns and other types of wounds. One of the relatively modern methods of treatment is applying silver sheets on the scald lesions. In this paper, which was part of a larger study (research for a PhD thesis), concerning prevention and treatment of the post-burn pathological scars, the cases of some patients with burns, who were treated by using the above mentioned method were presented and analyzed. The results obtained by applying silver sheets were then commented and interpreted, pointing out the advantages and disadvantages compared to silver sulfadiazine creams and ointments, which have already been used at a large scale. The prevention and treatment of post-burn pathological (hypertrophic and keloid) scars is a field in which still little is known and in which there are also no clearly set therapy plans. We hope that through this research and the following ones we will manage to establish some major guidelines concerning the prevention of pathological scars, which are not only disabling, but also a major aesthetic issue for any patient, in order to obtain better outcomes. PMID:27974941

  9. A modern method of treatment: The role of silver dressings in promoting healing and preventing pathological scarring in patients with burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, A; Florescu, I P; Nitescu, C

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds are a global public health problem, which affects all countries, no matter the development stage and occurs in all age groups, from toddlers to elderly. In spite of burns being the cause of numerous household and work accidents, there are still no clear stated unanimous rules for their treatment. Every day new products appear on the market, each of them trying to prove more effective. Since ancient times, silver has been known for its antimicrobial properties, so it has been used for a long time in the treatment of burns and other types of wounds. One of the relatively modern methods of treatment is applying silver sheets on the scald lesions. In this paper, which was part of a larger study (research for a PhD thesis), concerning prevention and treatment of the post-burn pathological scars, the cases of some patients with burns, who were treated by using the above mentioned method were presented and analyzed. The results obtained by applying silver sheets were then commented and interpreted, pointing out the advantages and disadvantages compared to silver sulfadiazine creams and ointments, which have already been used at a large scale. The prevention and treatment of post-burn pathological (hypertrophic and keloid) scars is a field in which still little is known and in which there are also no clearly set therapy plans. We hope that through this research and the following ones we will manage to establish some major guidelines concerning the prevention of pathological scars, which are not only disabling, but also a major aesthetic issue for any patient, in order to obtain better outcomes.

  10. The Healthy Skin Project: changing nursing practice to prevent and treat hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour-Burton, Teri; Fields, Willa; Outlaw, Lanie; Deleon, Elvira

    2013-06-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers are serious clinical complications that can lead to increased length of stay, pain, infection, and, potentially, death. The surgical progressive care unit at Sharp Grossmont Hospital, San Diego, California, developed the multidisciplinary Healthy Skin Project to decrease the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The previous treatment plan was reviewed and modified according to current evidence-based practice. The project consisted of 3 components: creation of a position for a unit-based wound liaison nurse, staff education, and involvement of the nursing assistants. The wound liaison nurse developed and conducted bimonthly skin audits, which revealed inconsistencies in clinical practice and documentation. Education for the staff was accomplished via a self-learning module, case presentations, and 1-on-1 training. In addition, a pressure ulcer algorithm tool was developed to demonstrate step-by-step wound management and documentation. From Spring 2003 through Summer 2006, the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers ranged from 0.0% to 18.92%, with a mean of 4.85%. After implementation of the project, the prevalence decreased to 0.0% for 17 of 20 quarters, through 2011. Prevention and a multidisciplinary approach are effective in reducing the occurrence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  11. Paediatric Burns: Mortality in a Burns Unit | Olatain | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burn injury, especially from flames, is associated with a high mortality rate in children. Safe practices with flammable liquids (petrol in particular) should be emphasized in paediatric burn prevention programmes. Keywords: Paediatric, burn,mortality, prevention. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery Vol. 4 (2) 2007: pp. 82-85 ...

  12. Grape seed and skin extract prevents high-fat diet-induced brain lipotoxicity in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charradi, Kamel; Elkahoui, Salem; Karkouch, Ines; Limam, Ferid; Hassine, Fethy Ben; Aouani, Ezzedine

    2012-09-01

    Obesity is related to an elevated risk of dementia and the physiologic mechanisms whereby fat adversely affects the brain are poorly understood. The present investigation analyzed the effect of a high fat diet (HFD) on brain steatosis and oxidative stress and the intracellular mediators involved in signal transduction, as well as the protection offered by grape seed and skin extract (GSSE). HFD induced ectopic deposition of cholesterol and phospholipid but not triglyceride. Moreover brain lipotoxicity is linked to an oxidative stress characterized by increased lipoperoxidation and carbonylation, inhibition of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities, depletion of manganese and a concomitant increase in ionizable calcium and acetylcholinesterase activity. Importantly GSSE alleviated all the deleterious effects of HFD treatment. Altogether our data indicated that HFD could find some potential application in the treatment of manganism and that GSSE should be used as a safe anti-lipotoxic agent in the prevention and treatment of fat-induced brain injury.

  13. Sun protection for preventing basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Guillermo; Nova, John; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Andrea Esperanza; Medina, Roger David; Solorzano-Restrepo, Carolina; Gonzalez, Jenny; Olmos, Miguel; Godfrey, Kathie; Arevalo-Rodriguez, Ingrid

    2016-07-25

    'Keratinocyte cancer' is now the preferred term for the most commonly identified skin cancers basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), which were previously commonly categorised as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Keratinocyte cancer (KC) represents about 95% of malignant skin tumours. Lifestyle changes have led to increased exposure to the sun, which has, in turn, led to a significant increase of new cases of KC, with a worldwide annual incidence of between 3% and 8%. The successful use of preventive measures could mean a significant reduction in the resources used by health systems, compared with the high cost of the treatment of these conditions. At present, there is no information about the quality of the evidence for the use of these sun protection strategies with an assessment of their benefits and risks. To assess the effects of sun protection strategies (i.e. sunscreen and barrier methods) for preventing keratinocyte cancer (that is, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) of the skin) in the general population. We searched the following databases up to May 2016: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS. We also searched five trial registries and the bibliographies of included studies for further references to relevant trials. We included randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of preventive strategies for keratinocyte cancer, such as physical barriers and sunscreens, in the general population (children and adults), which may provide information about benefits and adverse events related to the use of solar protection measures. We did not include trials focused on educational strategies to prevent KC or preventive strategies in high-risk groups. Our prespecified primary outcomes were BCC or cSCC confirmed clinically or by histopathology at any follow-up and adverse events. Two review authors independently selected studies for eligibility using

  14. The relevance of piroxicam for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer and its precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campione E

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Elena Campione,1 Evelin Jasmine Paternò,2 Eleonora Candi,3,4 Mattia Falconi,5 Gaetana Costanza,2 Laura Diluvio,1 Alessandro Terrinoni,4 Luca Bianchi,1 Augusto Orlandi2,6,7 1Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, 3Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 4Biochemistry Laboratory IDI-IRCCS, Faculty of Medicine, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 5Department of Biology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 6Institute of Anatomic Pathology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 7Tor Vergata University-Policlinic of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: Piroxicam (PXM, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is an enolic benzothiazine and a potent member of the oxicam series. The drug suppresses the synthesis of proinflammatory enzymes, such as cyclooxygenases-1 and -2 (COX-1 and 2, downregulates the production of prostaglandins (PGs and tromboxanes, and inhibits polyamines production by blocking ornithine decarboxylase induction involved in nonmelanoma skin carcinogenesis. In addition, PXM is able to induce tumor cell apoptosis and suppresses metalloproteinase 2 activities. Skin carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which the accumulation of genetic events leads to a gradually dysplastic cellular expression, deregulation of cell growth, and carcinomatous progression. COX-1 upregulation plays a significant role in PG and vascular epidermal growth factor production supporting tumor growth. Increased level of PGs in premalignant and/or malignant cutaneous tumors is also favored by upregulation of COX-2 and downregulation of the tumor suppressor gene 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase. Chemoprevention can be a hopeful approach to inhibit carcinoma occurrence before an invasive tumor develops. The chemopreventive effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on nonmelanoma skin cancers has been established. In this study, we highlighted the different modalities of action

  15. Regorafenib-associated hand-foot skin reaction: practical advice on diagnosis, prevention, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, B; Ciardiello, F; Lacouture, M E; Segaert, S; Van Cutsem, E

    2015-10-01

    Regorafenib is an orally available, small-molecule multikinase inhibitor with international marketing authorizations for use in colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In clinical trials, regorafenib showed a consistent and predictable adverse-event profile, with hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) among the most clinically significant toxicities. This review summarizes the clinical characteristics of regorafenib-related HFSR and provides practical advice on HFSR management to enable health care professionals to recognize, pre-empt, and effectively manage the symptoms, thereby allowing patients to remain on active therapy for as long as possible. This review is based on a systematic literature search of the PubMed database (using synonyms of HFSR, regorafenib, and skin toxicities associated with targeted therapies or cytotoxic chemotherapy). However, as this search identified very few articles, the authors also use their clinical experience as oncologists and dermatologists managing patients with treatment-related HFSR to provide recommendations on recognition and management of HFSR in regorafenib-treated patients. Regorafenib-related HFSR is similar to that seen with other multikinase inhibitors (e.g. sorafenib, sunitinib, cabozantinib, axitinib, and pazopanib) but differs from the hand-foot syndrome seen with cytotoxic chemotherapies (e.g. fluoropyrimidines, anthracyclines, and taxanes). There have been no controlled trials of symptomatic management of regorafenib-related HFSR, and limited good-quality evidence from randomized clinical trials of effective interventions for HFSR associated with other targeted therapies. Recommendations on prevention and management of regorafenib-related HFSR in this review are therefore based on the expert opinion of the authors (dermatologists and oncologists with expertise in the management of treatment-related skin toxicities and oncologists involved in clinical trials of regorafenib) and tried-and-tested empirical

  16. Regorafenib-associated hand–foot skin reaction: practical advice on diagnosis, prevention, and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, B.; Ciardiello, F.; Lacouture, M. E.; Segaert, S.; Van Cutsem, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Regorafenib is an orally available, small-molecule multikinase inhibitor with international marketing authorizations for use in colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In clinical trials, regorafenib showed a consistent and predictable adverse-event profile, with hand–foot skin reaction (HFSR) among the most clinically significant toxicities. This review summarizes the clinical characteristics of regorafenib-related HFSR and provides practical advice on HFSR management to enable health care professionals to recognize, pre-empt, and effectively manage the symptoms, thereby allowing patients to remain on active therapy for as long as possible. Design This review is based on a systematic literature search of the PubMed database (using synonyms of HFSR, regorafenib, and skin toxicities associated with targeted therapies or cytotoxic chemotherapy). However, as this search identified very few articles, the authors also use their clinical experience as oncologists and dermatologists managing patients with treatment-related HFSR to provide recommendations on recognition and management of HFSR in regorafenib-treated patients. Results Regorafenib-related HFSR is similar to that seen with other multikinase inhibitors (e.g. sorafenib, sunitinib, cabozantinib, axitinib, and pazopanib) but differs from the hand–foot syndrome seen with cytotoxic chemotherapies (e.g. fluoropyrimidines, anthracyclines, and taxanes). There have been no controlled trials of symptomatic management of regorafenib-related HFSR, and limited good-quality evidence from randomized clinical trials of effective interventions for HFSR associated with other targeted therapies. Recommendations on prevention and management of regorafenib-related HFSR in this review are therefore based on the expert opinion of the authors (dermatologists and oncologists with expertise in the management of treatment-related skin toxicities and oncologists involved in clinical trials of regorafenib) and

  17. [Enhancement of endogenous antioxidant defenses: a promising strategy for prevention of skin cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béani, J C

    2001-01-01

    induced to cellular membrane were appreciated by determination of thiobarbituric reactants (Tbars) by a fluorometric micromethod. Cellular DNA damage was examined by strand break determination carried out using the method described by Birnboim and Jevcak and by the Comet assay. Our results show that: UVA1 have a main part in cytotoxic effect of UVA and this effect is linked to ROS; thiols and selenium protect cells against UVA radiation with a synergic interaction and this protection acts though an increase in glutathion peroxidase activity; zinc protects against cytotoxicity of UVA and UVB and against UVB induced DNA damages; above all, DNA damages induced by UVA or UVB are significantly prevented by thiol molecules, selenium and zinc. As DNA damages have a main place in photocarcinogenesis, our results point out the potential interest of a photoprotection based on the support of endogenous antioxidant system. The research of new ways for photoprotection is indeed a necessity because sunscreens did not give convincing evidences of efficacy in preventing skin cancers.

  18. Protect the Ones You Love: Burns Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Search The CDC Protect the Ones You Love: Child Injuries are Preventable Note: Javascript is disabled ... ways you can help protect the children you love from burns. Key Prevention Tips To prevent burns ...

  19. Skin care as a tool in the prevention of health care-associated infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Linda

    2010-05-01

    Keeping skin healthy is particularly important for patients and all health-care personnel as any break in the skin can potentially harbour bacteria that may become a cross-infection risk to patients. When skin is damaged it is more difficult to remove microrganisms even when staff follow the recommended technique for hand washing (Royal College of Nursing, 2000). Broken skin on patients increases the risk of developing a healthcare-associated infection (HAI) as microorganisms can penetrate the surface of broken skin and cause anything from boils to bacteraemia. The aim of this article is to discuss skin as a barrier to infection, and examine ways to maintain the integrity of both staff and patients' skin. It will also look at the effect damaged skin can have on hand hygiene compliance and how it can increase the need for intervention in patients with broken areas of skin if these areas then become infected.

  20. Human skin equivalents to study the prevention and treatment of wound infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, I.

    2018-01-01

    Infection of burn wounds remains the leading cause of death in burn patients. Topical treatment of such infections with conventional antibiotics is often unsuccessful due to the presence of drug-resistant bacteria and/or to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Taken together there is a clear

  1. Managing Occupational Irritant Contact Dermatitis Using a Two-Step Skincare Regimen Designed to Prevent Skin Damage and Support Skin Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Grote, Erika C; Palaniswarmy, Kiruthi; Meckfessel, Matthew H

    2016-12-01

    Occupational irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) affecting the hands is a common and difficult-to-manage condition. Occupations that necessitate contact with harsh chemicals, use of alcohol-based disinfectants, and frequent hand washing elevate the risk of ICD. Management strategies that do not adequately prevent accumulated damage and repair skin, can develop into chronic dermatoses which negatively impact work productivity and quality of life. A 2-step skin-care regimen (Excipial Daily Protection Hand Cream (EP) and Excipial Rapid Repair Hand Cream (ER), Galderma Laboratories, L.P.) has been developed as a daily-use management strategy to protect and repair vulnerable hands. The protective barrier cream is formulated with aluminum chlorohydrate and designed for pre-exposure application to enhance the skin's natural protective barrier and minimize excessive moisture while wearing protective gloves. The repair cream, a lipid-rich formulation, is intended for post-exposure application to rehydrate and facilitate the skin's natural healing process. The results of 3 clinical studies highlighted in this review demonstrate how the use of a 2-step skin-care regimen offers a greater protective effect against ICD than the use of barrier cream alone, and also how the formulation of the barrier cream used in these studies helps minimize the occlusion effect caused by gloves and does not interfere with the antibacterial efficacy of an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. This 2-step skin-care regimen is effectively designed to manage and minimize the risk of ICD development in a variety of patients and provides clinicians an additional tool for helping patients manage ICD. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(12):1504-1510.

  2. Educational Activities for Rural and Urban Students to Prevent Skin Cancer in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasques, Kelle; Michels, Luana Roberta; Colome, Leticia Marques; Haas, Sandra Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Excessive exposure to the sun during childhood is strongly associated with the development of skin cancer in the future. The only way to prevent the development of skin cancer is to protect against ultraviolet radiation, which can be achieved through strategic awareness during childhood and adolescence. The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of educational activities for rural and urban students to promote the use of sunscreens and prevent skin cancer. This study was carried out with students (9-12 years) of rural (n=70) and urban (n=70) schools in Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. The educational interventions were lectures and games. The impact of this strategy was evaluated through the application of a questionnaire before and after the interventions. Before the intervention, it was found around 50% of rural and urban students were not aware of the damage caused by sun exposure, often exposing themselves to UV radiation without use sunscreen ( ~ 25 %) and at the most critical times of the day/year. After the lectures we observed an improvement in the behavior of the students with regard to sun exposure and knowledge about skin cancer. The results of this study emphasize the importance of prevention strategies for skin cancer and promoting the use of sunscreens based educational strategies. The interventions were of great value in relation to disseminating knowledge on the subject.

  3. Burns and military clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  4. Biomass burning in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, V.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the direct biomass burning practices in India. The review pertains to fire practices in forest, agricultural fields, grasslands, households, and industry. In forest land, extent of controlled burning for regeneration and fire prevention is estimated based on the forest statistics. The biomass burned annually due to accidental fires and for shifting cultivation is quantified based on a few earlier studies. In the case of household and small-scale industries, the biomass burned is quantified by extrapolating past data on energy consumption. In addition to wood and crop residues, the use of dungcakes and charcoal is also accounted for in calculating the total amount of biofuels burned annually. Wherever possible, regional and seasonal variations in the biomass burning practices are highlighted. This exercise has led to improve the current estimates of biomass burned annually in India. The factors influencing the impact of National Programme on Improved Cookstoves (NPIC) in reducing the greenhouse gas emissions are discussed

  5. The prevention of occupational hand dermatitis in bakers, confectioners and employees in the catering trades. Preliminary results of a skin prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A; Kelterer, D; Stadeler, M; Schneider, W; Kleesz, P; Wollina, U; Elsner, P

    2001-02-01

    Occupational skin diseases (OSD) are among the most frequent occupational diseases (OD). Compared to other occupations, bakers, confectioners and employees in the catering trades are at a high risk of developing OSD. In January 1999, the interdisciplinary Skin Disease Prevention Program in the Baking, Hotel and Catering Industries (SDPP) conducted by the Department of Dermatology and Allergology at the Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, in cooperation with the Research Center for Applied System Safety and Industrial Medicine, Erfurt, and the technical experts at the Social Insurance for the Food Industry and Related Professions (Berufsgenossenschaft für Nahrungsmittel und Gaststätten--(BGN)), Erfurt, was initiated. Following detailed analysis of the occupational exposure of the employees and their personal occupational disease history, the patients' diagnosis and therapy was re-evaluated and supplemented if necessary. Individual skin care and protection regimes were demonstrated and practically trained. Skin care and protection products were supplied. Skin-care and protection seminars were offered to volunteering participants. From January to December 1999, 29 affected employees were examined in the OSD clinic. 22 employees (76%) suffered from irritant contact dermatitis. The follow-up data of 11 employees are available. In 8 employees (73%), the skin disease improved or disappeared. Moreover, in 1 employee (9%), the skin condition was stabilized even though he continued working. In only 2 employees (18%) did the skin condition worsen. These preliminary results showed that most of the OSD were due to lack of or unsuitable skin care and protection. The program will be extended to cover a larger number of food industry employees with OSD.

  6. Descriptive analysis of articles and advertisements pertaining to skin cancer prevention in 2 popular US parenting magazines, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Basch, Charles E

    2013-04-04

    Magazines focused on parenting are popular in the United States, and parents may use them to guide decisions about the health of their children. We analyzed issues of 2 popular parenting magazines published in the past 11 years during the months of peak ultraviolet radiation exposure for content related to sun protection and for advertisements for skin products that did and did not contain sun protection factor. Only 24 of 2,594 articles addressed the topic of sun protection for skin cancer prevention. Although advertising is pervasive in these magazines, the extent to which such advertising focuses on products with sun protection factor was low. These findings suggest that parenting magazines can do more to assist parents in making informed decisions about preventing skin cancer risk among youth.

  7. Descriptive Analysis of Articles and Advertisements Pertaining to Skin Cancer Prevention in 2 Popular US Parenting Magazines, 2000–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Basch, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Magazines focused on parenting are popular in the United States, and parents may use them to guide decisions about the health of their children. We analyzed issues of 2 popular parenting magazines published in the past 11 years during the months of peak ultraviolet radiation exposure for content related to sun protection and for advertisements for skin products that did and did not contain sun protection factor. Only 24 of 2,594 articles addressed the topic of sun protection for skin cancer prevention. Although advertising is pervasive in these magazines, the extent to which such advertising focuses on products with sun protection factor was low. These findings suggest that parenting magazines can do more to assist parents in making informed decisions about preventing skin cancer risk among youth. PMID:23557639

  8. Obesity and skin and soft tissue infections: how to optimize antimicrobial usage for prevention and treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupper, Mordechai; Nicolau, David P

    2017-04-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are prevalent in the obese population, with rising trend expected. Although numerous antibiotics are available for the prevention and treatment of SSTIs, their characterization in obese patients is not a regulatory mandate. Consequently, information that carries importance for optimizing the dosing regimen in the obese population may not be readily available. This review focuses on the most recent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data on this topic with attention to cefazolin for surgical prophylaxis as well as antibiotics that are active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Moreover, the implications for optimizing SSTIs prevention and treatment in the obese population will also be discussed. On the basis of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic considerations, most studies found a perioperative prophylactic cefazolin regimen of 2 g to be reasonable in the case of obese patients undergoing cesarean delivery or bariatric surgery. There is general paucity of data regarding the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics of antimicrobials active against MRSA in obese patients, especially for the target tissue. Therapeutic drug monitoring has been correlated with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic optimization for vancomycin and teicoplanin, and should be used in these cases. There is more supportive evidence for the use of oxazolidinones (linezolid and tedizolid), daptomycin and lipoglycopeptides (telavancin, dalbavancin and oritavancin) in the management of SSTIs in this population. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic approach, which can be used as a basis or supplement to clinical trials, provides valuable data and decision-making tools for optimizing regimens used for both prevention and treatment of SSTIs in the obese population. Important pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics of antibiotics, such as the penetration into the subcutaneous tissue and the probability of reaching the

  9. Treatment of silymarin, a plant flavonoid, prevents ultraviolet light-induced immune suppression and oxidative stress in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2002-12-01

    It is well documented that ultraviolet (UV) light-induced immune suppression and oxidative stress play an important role in the induction of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of silymarin, a plant flavonoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn.), to mouse skin prevents photocarcinogenesis, but the preventive mechanism of photocarcinogenesis in vivo animal system by silymarin is not well defined and understood. To define the mechanism of prevention, we employed immunostaining, analytical assays and ELISA which revealed that topical treatment of silymarin (1 mg/cm2 skin area) to C3H/HeN mice inhibits UVB (90 mJ/cm2)-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response to contact sensitizer dinitrofluorobenzene. Prevention of UVB-induced suppression of CHS by silymarin was found to be associated with the inhibition of infiltrating leukocytes, particularly CD11b+ cell type, and myeloperoxidase activity (50-71%). Silymarin treatment also resulted in significant reduction of UVB-induced immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 producing cells and its production (58-72%, pskin cancer risk human population and ii) development of sunscreen containing silymarin as an antioxidant (chemopreventive agent) or silymarin can be supplemented in skin care products.

  10. Evaluation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infection prevention strategies at a military training center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Stephanie M; Blaesing, Carl R; Millar, Eugene V; Chukwuma, Uzo; Schlett, Carey D; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Tribble, David R; Ellis, Michael W

    2013-08-01

    Military trainees are at high risk for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A multicomponent hygiene-based SSTI prevention strategy was implemented at a military training center. After implementation, we observed 30% and 64% reductions in overall and MRSA-associated SSTI rates, respectively.

  11. Preoperative bathing or showering with skin antiseptics to prevent surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Osborne, Sonya

    2015-02-20

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after invasive (surgical) procedures. Preoperative bathing or showering with an antiseptic skin wash product is a well-accepted procedure for reducing skin bacteria (microflora). It is less clear whether reducing skin microflora leads to a lower incidence of surgical site infection. To review the evidence for preoperative bathing or showering with antiseptics for preventing hospital-acquired (nosocomial) surgical site infections. For this fifth update we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 18 December 2014); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2014 Issue 11); Ovid MEDLINE (2012 to December Week 4 2014), Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations December 18, 2014); Ovid EMBASE (2012 to 2014 Week 51), EBSCO CINAHL (2012 to December 18 2014) and reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials comparing any antiseptic preparation used for preoperative full-body bathing or showering with non-antiseptic preparations in people undergoing surgery. Two review authors independently assessed studies for selection, risk of bias and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. We did not identify any new trials for inclusion in this fifth update. Seven trials involving a total of 10,157 participants were included. Four of the included trials had three comparison groups. The antiseptic used in all trials was 4% chlorhexidine gluconate (Hibiscrub/Riohex). Three trials involving 7791 participants compared chlorhexidine with a placebo. Bathing with chlorhexidine compared with placebo did not result in a statistically significant reduction in SSIs; the relative risk of SSI (RR) was 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80 to 1.04). When only trials of high quality were included in this comparison, the RR of SSI was 0.95 (95%CI 0.82 to 1.10). Three trials of 1443 participants compared bar soap with

  12. Non-rinse skin cleansers: the way forward in preventing incontinence related moisture lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, F J; Begg, P A

    2016-05-01

    The use of non-rinse skin cleansers in the care of patients who are at risk of tissue breakdown is not new within the National Health Service (NHS). Back to the Floor Continence Care Rounds (introduced in 2012 to facilitate bedside continence care education) at University Hospitals Birmingham had identified that in the current climate of austerity and efficiency savings, the use of non-rinse cleanser was being randomly rationed. Our objective was to determine whether the introduction of a smaller tube of non-rinse cleanser with targeted education would improve usage and ultimately improve the skin of incontinent patients. There were five clinical areas randomised into two groups. In group 1 three clinical areas were provided with targeted education and new sizes of tubes of non-rinse skin cleanser. In group 2, the two remaining clinical areas acted as control groups, one receiving targeted education only and the remaining had no education or new sized tubes. The incidence of incontinence associated moisture lesions from each clinical area was monitored for 13 weeks pre and post study period. The in-depth study undertaken at University Hospitals Birmingham, over a 6-month period, confirmed a trend in staff committing to the ethos of prudency, and in turn compromising the use of the most effective treatment and prevention of incontinence associated moisture lesions. The ability of the Trust staff to recognise and respond to a change in practice and the responsiveness of a commercial provider to the proposed new methodology has resulted in a significant reduction in incontinence associated moisture lesions across the trust. The clinical areas included in the study demonstrated a 70-76.9% reduction in moisture lesion incidence compared to an 8.3-13.6% reduction in the control groups. The results strongly suggest that a reduction in incontinence associated moisture lesions can be achieved by a simple change in nursing regime. The combination of solid education provision

  13. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  14. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-01-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6 . The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2 . The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  15. [Currently available skin substitutes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravcová, Darina; Koller, Ján

    2014-01-01

    The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. Autologous split or full-thickness skin graft are the best definitive burn wound coverage, but it is constrained by the limited available sources, especially in major burns. Donor site morbidities in term of additional wounds and scarring are also of concern of the autograft application. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. This paper reviews currently available skin substitutes, produced in not for-profit skin banks as well as commercially available. They are divided according to type of material included, as biological, biosynthetic and synthetic and named respectively.

  16. Pediatric facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Theodore A; Gosain, Arun K

    2008-07-01

    Despite major advances in the area of burn management, burn injury continues to be a leading cause of pediatric mortality and morbidity. Facial burns in particular are devastating to the affected child and result in numerous physical and psychosocial sequelae. Although many of the principles of adult burn management can be applied to a pediatric patient with facial burns, the surgeon must be cognizant of several important differences. Facial burns and subsequent scar formation can drastically affect the growth potential of a child's face. Structures such as the nose and teeth may become deformed due to abnormal external forces caused by contractures. Serious complications such as occlusion amblyopia and microstomia must be anticipated and urgently addressed to avert permanent consequences, whereas other reconstructive procedures can be delayed until scar maturation occurs. Furthermore, because young children are actively developing the concept of self, severe facial burns can alter a child's sense of identity and place the child at high risk for future emotional and psychologic disturbances. Surgical reconstruction of burn wounds should proceed only after thorough planning and may involve a variety of skin graft, flap, and tissue expansion techniques. The most favorable outcome is achieved when facial resurfacing is performed with respect to the aesthetic units of the face. Children with facial burns remain a considerable challenge to their caregivers, and these patients require long-term care by a multidisciplinary team of physicians and therapists to optimize functional, cosmetic, and psychosocial outcomes.

  17. The maximal cumulative solar UVB dose allowed to maintain healthy and young skin and prevent premature photoaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Ando, Hideya

    2014-10-01

    The young facial skin of children with a smooth healthy appearance changes over time to photoaged skin having mottled pigmentation, solar lentigines, wrinkles, dry and rough skin, leathery texture, and benign and malignant tumors after exposure to chronic, repeated solar radiation. The first sign of photoaging in Japanese subjects is usually solar lentigines appearing around 20 years of age on the face. Fine wrinkles can then appear after 30 years of age, and benign skin tumors, seborrhoeic keratoses, can occur after 35 years of age in sun-exposed skin. We theoretically calculated the maximal daily exposure time to solar radiation, which could prevent the development of photoaged skin until 60 and 80 years of age, based on published data of personal solar UVB doses in sun-exposed skin. One MED (minimal erythema dose) was determined to be 20 mJ/cm(2) , and 200 MED was used as the average yearly dose of Japanese children. Further, we hypothesized that the annual dose of Japanese adults is the same as that of the children. The cumulative UVB dose at 20 years of age was thus calculated to be 4000 MED, and 22 MED was used as the maximal daily UVB dose based on data measured in Kobe, located in the central area of Japan. We used the solar UVB dose from 10:00 a.m. to 14:00 p.m. which occupies 60% of the total daily UV dose, to obtain the maximal UVB per hour in a day, and calculated the maximal daily UV exposure time that would delay the onset of solar lentigines until 60 or 80 years of age. The mean daily sun exposure time to maintain healthy skin until 80 years of age in the summer was calculated to be 2.54 min (0.14 MED) for unprotected skin and 127 min with the use of a sunscreen of SPF (sun protection factor) of 50. In this study, we did not evaluate the photoaging effect of UVA radiation, but findings of the adverse effects of UVA radiation on the skin have accumulated in the last decade. Therefore, it will be important to estimate the maximal dose of solar

  18. Lipopolysaccharide O-antigen prevents phagocytosis of Vibrio anguillarum by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss skin epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Lindell

    Full Text Available Colonization of host tissues is a first step taken by many pathogens during the initial stages of infection. Despite the impact of bacterial disease on wild and farmed fish, only a few direct studies have characterized bacterial factors required for colonization of fish tissues. In this study, using live-cell and confocal microscopy, rainbow trout skin epithelial cells, the main structural component of the skin epidermis, were demonstrated to phagocytize bacteria. Mutant analyses showed that the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum required the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to evade phagocytosis and that O-antigen transport required the putative wzm-wzt-wbhA operon, which encodes two ABC polysaccharide transporter proteins and a methyltransferase. Pretreatment of the epithelial cells with mannose prevented phagocytosis of V. anguillarum suggesting that a mannose receptor is involved in the uptake process. In addition, the O-antigen transport mutants could not colonize the skin but they did colonize the intestines of rainbow trout. The O-antigen polysaccharides were also shown to aid resistance to the antimicrobial factors, lysozyme and polymyxin B. In summary, rainbow trout skin epithelial cells play a role in the fish innate immunity by clearing bacteria from the skin epidermis. In defense, V. anguillarum utilizes O-antigen polysaccharides to evade phagocytosis by the epithelial cells allowing it to colonize rapidly fish skin tissues.

  19. [Advances in the research of application of urine output monitoring in prevention and treatment of burn shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Q L; Wang, Q M; Li, N; Luo, Q Z

    2018-01-20

    Fluid therapy is a crucial treatment for patients with extensive burn, which affects patients'prognosis directly. Accurate urine output measurement plays an irreplaceable role in guiding fluid resuscitation in clinic. As one of the best indexes in traditional burn resuscitation, urine output comprehensively reflects systemic circulation. However, it doesn't fully reflect all the specific chapters of microcirculation and systemic circulation and deficient cellular oxygen metabolism exactly. We need to use urine output combined with other shock parameters to ensure adequate fluid replacement. Currently, the most common way of urine output monitoring is manual measurement. The article reviews the application of urine output monitoring in guiding fluid resuscitation of burn shock.

  20. Tourniquet associated chemical burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyuk Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical burn under pneumatic tourniquet is an iatrogenic preventable injury and is rarely reported in the literature. The two important mechanisms are maceration (friction and wetness underneath the tourniquent. In this report, our experience with two illustrative patients who presented with iatrogenic tourniquet associated burn is described.

  1. Invariant NKT cells promote skin wound healing by preventing a prolonged neutrophilic inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Kanno, Emi; Suzuki, Aiko; Takagi, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Hideki; Ishii, Keiko; Imai, Yoshimichi; Maruyama, Ryoko; Tachi, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    The wound-healing process consists of the inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling phases. In chronic wounds, the inflammation phase is prolonged with persistent neutrophil infiltration. The inflammatory response is critically regulated by cytokines and chemokines that are secreted from various immune cells. Recently, we showed that skin wound healing was delayed and the healing process was impaired under conditions lacking invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, an innate immune lymphocyte with potent immuno-regulatory activity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of iNKT cell deficiency on the neutrophilic inflammatory response during the wound healing process. Neutrophil infiltration was prolonged in wound tissue in mice genetically lacking iNKT cells (Jα18KO mice) than in wild-type (WT) control mice on days 1 and 3 after wounding. MIP-2, KC, and IL-17A were produced at a significantly higher level in Jα18KO mice than in WT mice. In addition, neutrophil apoptosis was significantly reduced in the wound tissue in Jα18KO mice than in WT mice. Treatment with anti-IL-17A mAb, anti-Gr-1 mAb, or neutrophil elastase inhibitor reversed the impaired wound healing in Jα18KO mice. These results suggest that iNKT cells may promote the wound healing process through preventing the prolonged inflammatory response mediated by neutrophils. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  2. Multifactorial skin barrier deficiency and atopic dermatitis: Essential topics to prevent the atopic march.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Gyohei; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease in the industrialized world and has multiple causes. Over the past decade, data from both experimental models and patients have highlighted the primary pathogenic role of skin barrier deficiency in patients with AD. Increased access of environmental agents into the skin results in chronic inflammation and contributes to the systemic "atopic (allergic) march." In addition, persistent skin inflammation further attenuates skin barrier function, resulting in a positive feedback loop between the skin epithelium and the immune system that drives pathology. Understanding the mechanisms of skin barrier maintenance is essential for improving management of AD and limiting downstream atopic manifestations. In this article we review the latest developments in our understanding of the pathomechanisms of skin barrier deficiency, with a particular focus on the formation of the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, which contributes significantly to skin barrier function. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Covering techniques for severe burn treatment: lessons for radiological burn accidents; Moyens de recouvrement du brule grave: reflexions sur leur application aux lesions radiologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carsin, H.; Stephanazzi, J. [Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, Centre de Traitement de Brules, 92 - Clamart (France); Lambert, F. [Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, Service de Chirurgie Plastique, 92 - Clamart (France); Curet, P.M. [Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, Service de Protection Radiologique, 92 - Clamart (France); Gourmelon, P. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    2002-03-01

    Covering techniques for severe burn treatment: lessons for radiological burn accidents. After a severe burn, the injured person is weakened by a risk of infection and a general inflammation. The necrotic tissues have to be removed because they are toxic for the organism. The injured person also needs to be covered by a cutaneous envelope, which has to be done by a treatment centre for burned people. The different techniques are the following: - auto grafts on limited burned areas; - cutaneous substitutes to cover temporary extended burned areas. Among them: natural substitutes like xenografts (pork skin, sheep skin,..) or allografts (human skin), - treated natural substitutes which only maintain the extracellular matrix. Artificial skins belong to this category and allow the development of high quality scars, - cell cultures in the laboratory: multiplying the individual cells and grafting them onto the patient. This technique is not common but allows one to heal severely injured patients. X-ray burns are still a problem. Their characteristics are analysed: intensive, permanent, antalgic resistant pain. They are difficult to compare with heat burns. In spite of a small number of known cases, we can give some comments and guidance on radio necrosis cures: the importance of the patients comfort, of ending the pain, of preventing infection, and nutritional balance. At the level of epidermic inflammation and phlyctena (skin blisters), the treatment may be completed by the use of growth factors. At the level of necrosis, after a temporary cover, an auto graft can be considered only if a healthy basis is guaranteed. The use of cellular cultures in order to obtain harmonious growth factors can be argued. (author)

  4. American Burn Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... burn-related care, prevention, education, and research. Our multidisciplinary membership enhances our ability to work toward common goals with other organizations and educational programs. Membership Being a member of ...

  5. Preformulation study of epigallocatechin gallate, a promising antioxidant for topical skin cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proniuk, Stefan; Liederer, Bianca M; Blanchard, James

    2002-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a potent polyphenolic antioxidant extracted from green tea. Due to its antimutagenic and antitumor activities, it is a promising candidate for use in topical formulations for skin cancer prevention. The overall goal of this study was therefore to determine the influence of several factors on the stability of EGCG in solution to obtain information that would facilitate the subsequent development of topical formulations. Our first objective was to determine the influence of pH, temperature, and ionic strength on the aqueous stability of EGCG. A second objective was to determine the stability of EGCG in various solvents in the presence and absence of different antioxidants. A simple and rapid stability indicating high-performance liquid chromatography assay for EGCG was developed. Stability studies were performed in 0.05 M aqueous buffers at pH 3, 5, 7, and 9 at 4, 25, and 50 degrees C. The effect of ionic strength on EGCG stability was evaluated in 0.05 M acetate buffer, pH 5, adjusted to the desired ionic strength with sodium chloride. An accelerated stability study of EGCG was performed at 50 degrees C in the organic solvents glycerin and Transcutol P in the presence of antioxidants. The degradation of EGCG increased rapidly as temperature and solution pH were increased. Ionic strength increases also caused an accelerated degradation. The solution stability of EGCG was prolonged in glycerin and Transcutol P compared with an aqueous environment. The addition of 0.1% concentrations of several antioxidants in combination with 0.025% EDTA caused variable effects on EGCG stability. Butylated hydroxytoluene in glycerin produced the greatest stability improvement for EGCG. The t(90) (time for 10% degradation to occur) was 76.1 days at 50 degrees C. It can be concluded that glycerin-based vehicles are suitable for stabilizing EGCG. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Necrobiotic process causing burn wound conversion may be prevented by allogeneic kerationcytes delivered by the recombined human/pig skin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušková, Eva; Brož, L.; Pokorná, Eva; Konigová, R.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 4 (2001), s. 135-144 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd IZ4368 Keywords : cultured keratinocytes * delivery system * grafting upside-down Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  7. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third......-degree burn injury was induced with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear...... neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization of the skin showed an increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes dominated inflammation in the group of mice...

  8. Skin abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help identify the cause of the infection. Treatment You can apply moist heat (such as warm compresses) to help the abscess ... if you develop new symptoms during or after treatment of a skin abscess. Prevention ... the skin around minor wounds clean and dry to prevent infection. Call your provider if you ...

  9. Resveratrol Prevents High Fluence Red Light-Emitting Diode Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Photoinhibition of Human Skin Fibroblast Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mamalis

    Full Text Available Skin fibrosis is a significant medical problem that leads to a functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial impact on quality-of-life. Light-emitting diode-generated 633-nm red light (LED-RL is part of the visible light spectrum that is not known to cause DNA damage and is considered a safe, non-invasive, inexpensive, and portable potential alternative to ultraviolet phototherapy that may change the treatment paradigm of fibrotic skin disease.The goal of our study was to investigate the how reactive oxygen species (ROS free radicals generated by high fluence LED-RL inhibit the migration of skin fibroblasts, the main cell type involved in skin fibrosis. Fibroblast migration speed is increased in skin fibrosis, and we studied cellular migration speed of cultured human skin fibroblasts as a surrogate measure of high fluence LED-RL effect on fibroblast function. To ascertain the inhibitory role of LED-RL generated ROS on migration speed, we hypothesized that resveratrol, a potent antioxidant, could prevent the photoinhibitory effects of high fluence LED-RL on fibroblast migration speed.High fluence LED-RL generated ROS were measured by flow cytometry analysis using dihydrorhodamine (DHR. For purposes of comparison, we assessed the effects of ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on fibroblast migration speed and the ability of resveratrol, a well known antioxidant, to prevent LED-RL and H2O2 generated ROS-associated changes in fibroblast migration speed. To determine whether resveratrol could prevent the high fluence LED-RL ROS-mediated photoinhibition of human skin fibroblast migration, treated cells were incubated with resveratrol at concentrations of 0.0001% and 0.001% for 24 hours, irradiated with high fluences LED-RL of 480, 640, and 800 J/cm2.High fluence LED-RL increases intracellular fibroblast ROS and decreases fibroblast migration speed. LED-RL at 480, 640 and 800 J/cm2 increased ROS levels to 132.8%, 151.0%, and 158.4% relative to matched

  10. Severe burns due to biofuel heater injury: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, Alicia; Muller, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Biofuel heaters are a new form of flame heating for indoor and outdoor use. Fuelled by methylated spirits, they are simple structures with few safety features, and can be associated with severe burn. We report five cases of severe burns in adults that occurred when refilling these heaters. We undertook a retrospective audit of all adults presenting to the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) with a biofuel heater-related burn between 20 and 30th June 2014. Five patients required admission for management of their burns. Three were admitted to ICU for greater than 3 weeks, and remained inpatients for up to 78 days. Two did not require ICU and were managed in the burns unit. Average total body surface area (TBSA) burned was 24.7%, and patients went to theatre up to seven times for debridement and skin grafting. Average length of stay was 41.8 days. Biofuel heaters are easily accessible yet there is no Australian Standard to ensure they are safe or perform in the way they were intended. As such, people using them are at undue risk of severe burn, even when following the operating instructions. These products should be removed from the market to prevent further harm and potential mortality. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pediatric sink-bathing: a risk for scald burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggott, Kaitlin; Rabbitts, Angela; Leahy, Nicole E; Bourke, Patrick; Yurt, Roger W

    2013-01-01

    Our burn center previously reported a significant incidence of scald burns from tap water among patients treated at the center. However, mechanism of these scalds was not investigated in detail. A recent series of pediatric patients who sustained scalds while bathing in the sink was noted. To evaluate the extent of these injuries and create an effective prevention program for this population, a retrospective study of bathing-related sink burns among pediatric patients was performed. Patients between the ages of 0 and 5.0 years who sustained scald burns while being bathed in the sink were included in this study. Sex, race, age, burn size, length of stay, and surgical procedures were reviewed. During the study period of January 2003 through August 2008, 56 patients who were scalded in the sink were admitted, accounting for 54% of all bathing-related scalds. Among these, 56% were boys and 45% were Hispanic. Mean age was 0.8 ± 0.1 years. Burn size and hospital length of stay averaged 5 ± 0.7% and 11 ± 1 days, respectively. Of this group, 10.7% required skin grafting. The overwhelming majority (94% of patients) were discharged home. The remaining patients were discharged to inpatient rehabilitation, foster care, and others. Pediatric scald burns sustained while bathing in a sink continue to be prevalent at our burn center. Because of limited space and the child's proximity to faucet handles and water flow, sinks are an unsafe location to bathe a child. While such practice may be necessary for some families, comprehensive burn prevention education must address this hazard.

  12. Pediatric Thermal Burns and Treatment: A Review of Progress and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Mathias

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are a devastating critical care problem. In children, burns continue to be a major epidemiologic problem around the globe resulting in significant morbidity and death. Apparently, treating these burn injuries in children and adults remains similar, but there are significant physiological and psychological differences. The dermal layer of the skin is generally thinner in neonates, infants, and children than in adults. Enhanced evaporative loss and need for isotonic fluids increases the risk of hypothermia in the pediatric population. The pain management of the children with major burns challenges the skills of the personnel of every unit. Managing these wounds requires intensive therapeutic treatment for multi-organ dysfunction, and surgical treatment to prevent sepsis and other complications that further delay wound closure. Alternatives to the practice of donor site harvest and autografting for the treatment of severe burns and other complex skin defects are urgently needed for both adult and pediatric populations. This review article focuses on thermal burn pathophysiology and pain management and provides an overview of currently approved products used for the treatment of pediatric burn wounds. A new promising approach has been presented as a first-line therapy in the treatment of burns to reduce surgical autografting in pediatric patients.

  13. Pediatric Thermal Burns and Treatment: A Review of Progress and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Elton; Srinivas Murthy, Madhu

    2017-12-11

    Burn injuries are a devastating critical care problem. In children, burns continue to be a major epidemiologic problem around the globe resulting in significant morbidity and death. Apparently, treating these burn injuries in children and adults remains similar, but there are significant physiological and psychological differences. The dermal layer of the skin is generally thinner in neonates, infants, and children than in adults. Enhanced evaporative loss and need for isotonic fluids increases the risk of hypothermia in the pediatric population. The pain management of the children with major burns challenges the skills of the personnel of every unit. Managing these wounds requires intensive therapeutic treatment for multi-organ dysfunction, and surgical treatment to prevent sepsis and other complications that further delay wound closure. Alternatives to the practice of donor site harvest and autografting for the treatment of severe burns and other complex skin defects are urgently needed for both adult and pediatric populations. This review article focuses on thermal burn pathophysiology and pain management and provides an overview of currently approved products used for the treatment of pediatric burn wounds. A new promising approach has been presented as a first-line therapy in the treatment of burns to reduce surgical autografting in pediatric patients.

  14. Skin preparation with alcohol versus alcohol followed by any antiseptic for preventing bacteraemia or contamination of blood for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Bell-Syer, Sally E M; Foxlee, Ruth

    2015-02-12

    Blood for transfusion may become contaminated at any point between collection and transfusion and may result in bacteraemia (the presence of bacteria in the blood), severe illness or even death for the blood recipient. Donor arm skin is one potential source of blood contamination, so it is usual to cleanse the skin with an antiseptic before blood donation. One-step and two-step alcohol based antiseptic regimens are both commonly advocated but there is uncertainty as to which is most effective. To assess the effects of cleansing the skin of blood donors with alcohol in a one-step compared with alcohol in a two-step procedure to prevent contamination of collected blood or bacteraemia in the recipient. In December 2014, for this third update, we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library; Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. All randomised trials (RCTs) comparing alcohol based donor skin cleansing in a one-step versus a two-step process that includes alcohol and any other antiseptic for pre-venepuncture skin cleansing were considered. Quasi randomised trials were to have been considered in the absence of RCTs. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion. No studies (RCTs or quasi RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. We did not identify any eligible studies for inclusion in this review. It is therefore unclear whether a two-step, alcohol followed by antiseptic skin cleansing process prior to blood donation confers any reduction in the risk of blood contamination or bacteraemia in blood recipients, or conversely whether a one-step process increases risk above that associated with a two-step process.

  15. Burns: The epidemiological pattern, risk and safety awareness at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Many burns are preventable but there is no published local prospective data on the epidemiological pattern of burns that would form the basis of care and formulation of burn prevention strategies. Objectives: To determine the epidemiological pattern of burns and assess the awareness of burn risk and ...

  16. Self-management interventions to improve skin care for pressure ulcer prevention in people with spinal cord injuries: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Justine; Swaine, Jillian; Presseau, J.; Aspinall, Arlene; Jaglal, Susan; White, Barry; Wolfe, Dalton; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers are a serious, common, lifelong, and costly secondary complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Community-dwelling people with a SCI can prevent them with appropriate skin care (i.e. pressure relieving activities, skin checks). Adherence to skin care remains suboptimal however, and self-management interventions that focus on improving this have been designed. Little is known on their content, effectiveness, or theoretical basis. The aim of the proposed systematic re...

  17. Anhydrous ammonia burns case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amshel, C E; Fealk, M H; Phillips, B J; Caruso, D M

    2000-08-01

    Chemical burns are associated with significant morbidity, especially anhydrous ammonia burns. Anhydrous ammonia is a colorless, pungent gas that is stored and transported under pressure in liquid form. A 28 year-old patient suffered 45% total body surface area of second and third degree burns as well as inhalational injury from an anhydrous ammonia explosion. Along with fluid resuscitation, the patient's body was scrubbed every 6 h with sterile water for the first 48 h to decrease the skin pH from 10 to 6-8. He subsequently underwent a total of seven wound debridements; initially with allograft and then autograft. On post burn day 45, he was discharged. The injuries associated with anhydrous ammonia burns are specific to the effects of ammonium hydroxide. Severity of symptoms and tissue damage produced is directly related to the concentration of hydroxyl ions. Liquefactive necrosis results in superficial to full-thickness tissue loss. The affinity of anhydrous ammonia and its byproducts for mucous membranes can result in hemoptysis, pharyngitis, pulmonary edema, and bronchiectasis. Ocular sequelae include iritis, glaucoma, cataracts, and retinal atrophy. The desirability of treating anhydrous ammonia burns immediately cannot be overemphasized. Clothing must be removed quickly, and irrigation with water initiated at the scene and continued for the first 24 h. Resuscitative measures should be started as well as early debridement of nonviable skin. Patients with significant facial or pharyngeal burns should be intubated, and the eyes irrigated until a conjunctivae sac pH below 8.5 is achieved. Although health care professionals need to be prepared to treat chemical burns, educating the public, especially those workers in the agricultural and industrial setting, should be the first line of prevention.

  18. Sun’s effect on skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The skin uses sunlight to help manufacture vitamin D, which is important for normal bone formation. But sometimes its ultraviolet light can be ... the pigment melanin. Melanin protects skin from the sun's ultraviolet rays, which can burn the skin, and ...

  19. Pediatric Burns: A Single Institution Retrospective Review of Incidence, Etiology, and Outcomes in 2273 Burn Patients (1995-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christina J; Mahendraraj, Krishnaraj; Houng, Abraham; Marano, Michael; Petrone, Sylvia; Lee, Robin; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    Unintentional burn injury is the third most common cause of death in the U.S. for children age 5 to 9, and accounts for major morbidity in the pediatric population. Pediatric burn admission data from U.S. institutions has not been reported recently. This study assesses all pediatric burn admissions to a State wide Certified Burn Treatment Center to evaluate trends in demographics, burn incidence, and cause across different age groups. Demographic and clinical data were collected on 2273 pediatric burn patients during an 18-year period (1995-2013). Pediatric patients were stratified by age into "age 0 to 6," "age 7 to 12," and "age 13 to 18." Data were obtained from National Trauma Registry of the American College of Surgeons and analyzed using standard statistical methodology. A total of 2273 burn patients under age 18 were treated between 1995 and 2013. A total of 1663 (73.2%) patients were ages 0 to 6, 294 (12.9%) were 7 to 12, and 316 (13.9%) were age 13 to 18. A total of 1400 (61.6%) were male and 873 (38.4%) were female (male:female ratio of 1.6:1). Caucasians had the highest burn incidence across all age groups (40.9%), followed by African-Americans (33.6%), P burns occurred at home, P burned was 8.9%, with lower extremity being the most common site (38.5%). Scald burns constituted the majority of cases (71.1%, n = 1617), with 53% attributable to hot liquids related to cooking, including coffee or tea, P burns were the dominant cause (53.8%). Overall mean length of stay was 10.5 ± 10.8 days for all patients, and15.5 ± 12 for those admitted to the intensive care unit, P burn injuries are scald burns that occur at home and primarily affect the lower extremities in Caucasian and African-American males. Among Caucasian teenagers flame burns predominate. Mean length of stay was 10 days, 23% of patients required skin grafting surgery, and mortality was 0.9%. The results of this study highlight the need for primary prevention programs focusing on avoiding

  20. Candesartan restores pressure-induced vasodilation and prevents skin pressure ulcer formation in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danigo, Aurore; Nasser, Mohamad; Bessaguet, Flavien; Javellaud, James; Oudart, Nicole; Achard, Jean-Michel; Demiot, Claire

    2015-02-18

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blockers have beneficial effects on neurovascular complications in diabetes and in organ's protection against ischemic episodes. The present study examines whether the AT1R blocker candesartan (1) has a beneficial effect on diabetes-induced alteration of pressure-induced vasodilation (PIV, a cutaneous physiological neurovascular mechanism which could delay the occurrence of tissue ischemia), and (2) could be protective against skin pressure ulcer formation. Male Swiss mice aged 5-6 weeks were randomly assigned to four experimental groups. In two groups, diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg.kg(-1)). After 6 weeks, control and STZ mice received either no treatment or candesartan (1 mg/kg-daily in drinking water) during 2 weeks. At the end of treatment (8 weeks of diabetes duration), C-fiber mediated nociception threshold, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PIV were assessed. Pressure ulcers (PUs) were then induced by pinching the dorsal skin between two magnetic plates for three hours. Skin ulcer area development was assessed during three days, and histological examination of the depth of the skin lesion was performed at day three. After 8 weeks of diabetes, the skin neurovascular functions (C-fiber nociception, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PIV) were markedly altered in STZ-treated mice, but were fully restored by treatment with candesartan. Whereas in diabetes mice exposure of the skin to pressure induced wide and deep necrotic lesions, treatment with candersartan restored their ability to resist to pressure-induced ulceration as efficiently as the control mice. Candesartan decreases the vulnerability to pressure-induced ulceration and restores skin neurovascular functions in mice with STZ-induced established diabetes.

  1. Use of UV-protective windows and window films to aid in the prevention of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Cox, Mary Jude; Becker, Daniel G; Horowitz, Jed H; Nichter, Larry S; Britt, L D; Long, William B; Edlic, Elizabeth C

    2004-01-01

    People are exposed to ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation throughout their daily routine, intentionally and unintentionally. Cumulative and excessive exposure to UV radiation is the behavioral cause to skin cancers, skin damage, premature skin aging, and sun-related eye disorders. More than one million new cases of skin cancer were diagnosed in the United States this year. UV radiates directly and diffusely scattered by the various environmental and atmospheric conditions and has access to the skin from all directions. Because of this diffuse UV radiation, a person situated under a covering, such as the roof of a car or house, is not completely protected from the sun's rays. Because shade structures do not protect effectively against UV radiation, there have been major advances in photoprotection of glass by the development of specially designed photoprotective windows and films. It is the purpose of this collective review to highlight the photoprotective windows and films that should be incorporated into residential, commercial, and school glass windows to reduce sun exposure. Low-emittence (low-E) coatings are microscopically thin, virtually invisible, metal or metallic oxide layers deposited on a window or skylight glazing surface to reduce the U-factor by suppressing radiative heat flow as well as to limit UV radiation. The exclusive Thermaflect coating uses the most advanced, double-layer soft coat technology to continue to deliver top performance for UV protection as well as prevent heat loss in the home. This product blocks 87% of UV radiation and has an Energy Star certification in all climate zones. Tints and films have been another important advance in glass photoprotection, especially in automobiles. Quality widow film products are high-tech laminates of polyester and metallized coatings bonded by distortion-free adhesives. The International Window Film Association provides members with accreditation in solar control films, safety films, and

  2. Healing effect of Shaoshang Yuhe yihao on burns in rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    burns model in rats. Methods: Female Wistar rats, weighing 200 - 220 g, were subjected to deep second-degree skin burns ... tissue expressions of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) were determined along with skin histopathology. The burned tissues ... toxicity and are less costly than synthetic drugs. Many plants and ...

  3. Ablation of burned skin with ultra-short pulses laser to promote healing: evaluation by optical coherence tomography, histology, {mu}ATR-FTIR and Nonlinear Microscopy; Ablacao de pele queimada com laser de pulsos ultra-curtos para promocao da cicatrizacao: avaliacao por tomografia por coerencia optica, histologia, {mu}ATR-FTIR e microscopia nao-linear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Moises Oliveira dos

    2012-07-01

    Burns cause changes in the anatomical structure of the skin associated with trauma. The severity of the burn injury is divided into first, second and third-degree burns. The third-degree burns have been a major focus of research in search of more conservative treatments and faster results in repair for a functional and cosmetically acceptable. The conventional treatment is the use of topical natural or synthetic skin graft. An alternative therapy is the laser ablation process for burned tissue necrosis removal due to the no mechanical contact, fast application and access to difficult areas. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using high intensity femtosecond lasers as an adjunct treatment of burned patients. For this study, 65 Wistar rats were divided into groups of five animals: healthy skin, burned skin, two types of treatment (surgical debridement or femtosecond laser ablation) and four different times in the healing process monitoring. Three regions of the back of the animals were exposed to steam source causing third-degree burn. On the third day after the burn, one of the regions was ablated with high intensity ultrashort laser pulses ({lambda} = 785 nm, 90 fs, 2 kHz and 10 {mu}J/ pulse), the other received surgical debridement, and the last was considered the burn control. The regions were analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT), histology, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy using Fourier transform ({mu}-ATR-FTIR), two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) and second harmonic generation technique (SHG) on days 3, 5, 7 and 14 pos-treatments. The results showed that with the laser irradiation conditions used it was possible to remove debris from third degree burn. The techniques used to characterize the tissue allowed to verify that all treatments promoted wound healing. On the fourteenth day, the regeneration curve showed that the attenuation coefficient of laser ablated tissue converges to the values

  4. Burn Wise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn Wise is a partnership program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  5. Cellularized Bilayer Pullulan-Gelatin Hydrogel for Skin Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-05-01

    Skin substitutes significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of patients with burn injuries and chronic wounds. However, current skin substitutes have disadvantages related to high costs and inadequate skin regeneration due to highly inflammatory wounds. Thus, new skin substitutes are needed. By combining two polymers, pullulan, an inexpensive polysaccharide with antioxidant properties, and gelatin, a derivative of collagen with high water absorbency, we created a novel inexpensive hydrogel-named PG-1 for "pullulan-gelatin first generation hydrogel"-suitable for skin substitutes. After incorporating human fibroblasts and keratinocytes onto PG-1 using centrifugation over 5 days, we created a cellularized bilayer skin substitute. Cellularized PG-1 was compared to acellular PG-1 and no hydrogel (control) in vivo in a mouse excisional skin biopsy model using newly developed dome inserts to house the skin substitutes and prevent mouse skin contraction during wound healing. PG-1 had an average pore size of 61.69 μm with an ideal elastic modulus, swelling behavior, and biodegradability for use as a hydrogel for skin substitutes. Excellent skin cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology were visualized through live/dead assays, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation assays, and confocal microscopy. Trichrome and immunohistochemical staining of excisional wounds treated with the cellularized skin substitute revealed thicker newly formed skin with a higher proportion of actively proliferating cells and incorporation of human cells compared to acellular PG-1 or control. Excisional wounds treated with acellular or cellularized hydrogels showed significantly less macrophage infiltration and increased angiogenesis 14 days post skin biopsy compared to control. These results show that PG-1 has ideal mechanical characteristics and allows ideal cellular characteristics. In vivo evidence suggests that cellularized PG-1 promotes skin regeneration and may

  6. Prevention of neural hypersensitivity after acute upper limb burns: Development and pilot of a cortical training protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Dale; Zorzi, Lisa M; Wand, Ben M; Brockman, Nathalie; Griggs, Carolyn; Clifford, Matthew; Wood, Fiona

    2011-06-01

    Acute burn patients suffer pain and secondary hyperalgesia. This alters movement patterns and impairs function. Non-pharmacological methods of treatment are limited and lack rigorous testing and evidence for use. The treatment in this case series was designed to direct conscious attention to, and normalise sensation of, the injured limb in pain free way. The aim of the study was to describe a cortical training programme (CTP) in acute upper limb burn patients and to investigate the efficacy, safety and feasibility of the protocol. The study is a descriptive case series (n=6). Study tasks engaged sensory and motor nerves to influence the perception of the injured area. Visual and tactile inputs to maintain and, or normalise the homuncular map were central to the intervention. One patient, who commenced the study without resting pain, responded negatively. The remaining five patients had reduced pain and fear avoidance behaviours with associated improvement in arm function. The CTP approach is safe and feasible for use with acute burn patients where pain is reported at rest. Comparative studies are required to determine the relative efficacy of the program to usual interventions and the patients who may benefit from the technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of the collagen birefringence and the relative attenuation coefficient of health and burned skin irradiated with linearly polarized He-Ne laser; Analise da birrefringencia do colageno e do coeficiente de atenuacao de amostras de pele sadia e queimada irradiadas pelo laser de He-Ne linearmente polarizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Daniela de Fatima Teixeira da

    2002-07-01

    Low-intensity laser therapy is characterized by its ability to induce athermic effects and nondestructive photobiological processes. Although it has been in use for more than 40 years, this phototherapy is still not an established therapeutic modality. The objectives of this study were: to quantify the collagen fibers organization by polarized light microscopy in normal and burned skin samples at day 17 post-injury considering preferential axis as the animal's spinal column and aligning the linear laser polarization in two directions of polarization, parallel or perpendicular to this axis; to determine the relative attenuation coefficient for the intensity light by the technique of imaging the light distribution in normal and burned skin during wound healing process taking only parallel direction of polarization. To reach the objectives, burns about 6 mm in diameter were created with liquid N{sub 2} on the back of the rats and the lesions were irradiated on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-wounding, D= 1 J/cm{sup 2}, to investigate the effects of low-intensity linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam on skin wounds healing. Control lesions were not irradiated. The results have demonstrated that: the skin samples irradiated with linearly parallel polarized He-Ne laser beam showed collagen fibers more organized; burned skin samples presents a higher attenuation coefficient than normal skin samples. These results are important to optimize low intensity laser therapy dosimetry on acceleration wound healing. (author)

  8. Anti-oxidant defence mechanism in vitiliginous skin increases with skin type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briganti, S.; Caron-Schreinemachers, A.-L. D. B.; Picardo, M.; Westerhof, W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vitiligo skin shows different burning capacity in people with different phototype. In normal skin antioxidant status is correlated to skin phototype, but unexpectedly it appears that there is a gradual decrease in burning susceptibility of depigmented skin of individuals with increasing

  9. Cyanoacrylate Skin Microsealant for Preventing Surgical Site Infection after Vascular Surgery : A Discontinued Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, Bastiaan P.; Ott, Alewijn; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Oskam, Jacques; Ott, Alewijn; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) after vascular surgery are related to substantial morbidity. Restriction of bacterial access to the site of surgery with a cyanoacrylate sealant is a new concept. We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of the sealing of skin with a

  10. The relevance of piroxicam for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer and its precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione, Elena; Paternò, Evelin Jasmine; Candi, Eleonora; Falconi, Mattia; Costanza, Gaetana; Diluvio, Laura; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Bianchi, Luca; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Piroxicam (PXM), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is an enolic benzothiazine and a potent member of the oxicam series. The drug suppresses the synthesis of proinflammatory enzymes, such as cyclo-oxygenases-1 and -2 (COX-1 and 2), downregulates the production of prostaglandins (PGs) and tromboxanes, and inhibits polyamines production by blocking ornithine decarboxylase induction involved in nonmelanoma skin carcinogenesis. In addition, PXM is able to induce tumor cell apoptosis and suppresses metalloproteinase 2 activities. Skin carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which the accumulation of genetic events leads to a gradually dysplastic cellular expression, deregulation of cell growth, and carcinomatous progression. COX-1 upregulation plays a significant role in PG and vascular epidermal growth factor production supporting tumor growth. Increased level of PGs in premalignant and/or malignant cutaneous tumors is also favored by upregulation of COX-2 and downregulation of the tumor suppressor gene 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase. Chemoprevention can be a hopeful approach to inhibit carcinoma occurrence before an invasive tumor develops. The chemopreventive effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on nonmelanoma skin cancers has been established. In this study, we highlighted the different modalities of action of PXM on the pathogenesis of nonmelanoma skin cancer, analyzing and evaluating binding modes and energies between COX-1 or COX-2 and PXM by protein-ligand molecular docking. Our clinical experience about the local use of PXM on actinic keratoses and field cancerization is also reported, confirming its efficacy as target therapy.

  11. An Evaluation of UV-Monitoring Enhanced Skin Cancer Prevention among Farm Youth in Rural Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Ohanehi, Donatus C.; Redican, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health districts in southwest Virginia have one of the highest ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure and sunburn rate. Due to higher levels of UV exposure, rural farm youth are at higher risk for skin cancer than non-farm youth. Few studies have been published that explore best practices for decreasing UV exposure among this population.…

  12. Individual and setting level predictors of the implementation of a skin cancer prevention program: a multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brownson Ross C

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To achieve widespread cancer control, a better understanding is needed of the factors that contribute to successful implementation of effective skin cancer prevention interventions. This study assessed the relative contributions of individual- and setting-level characteristics to implementation of a widely disseminated skin cancer prevention program. Methods A multilevel analysis was conducted using data from the Pool Cool Diffusion Trial from 2004 and replicated with data from 2005. Implementation of Pool Cool by lifeguards was measured using a composite score (implementation variable, range 0 to 10 that assessed whether the lifeguard performed different components of the intervention. Predictors included lifeguard background characteristics, lifeguard sun protection-related attitudes and behaviors, pool characteristics, and enhanced (i.e., more technical assistance, tailored materials, and incentives are provided versus basic treatment group. Results The mean value of the implementation variable was 4 in both years (2004 and 2005; SD = 2 in 2004 and SD = 3 in 2005 indicating a moderate implementation for most lifeguards. Several individual-level (lifeguard characteristics and setting-level (pool characteristics and treatment group factors were found to be significantly associated with implementation of Pool Cool by lifeguards. All three lifeguard-level domains (lifeguard background characteristics, lifeguard sun protection-related attitudes and behaviors and six pool-level predictors (number of weekly pool visitors, intervention intensity, geographic latitude, pool location, sun safety and/or skin cancer prevention programs, and sun safety programs and policies were included in the final model. The most important predictors of implementation were the number of weekly pool visitors (inverse association and enhanced treatment group (positive association. That is, pools with fewer weekly visitors and pools in the enhanced

  13. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Research Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Genetics ...

  14. Protection during production: Problems due to prevention? Nail and skin condition after prolonged wearing of occlusive gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weistenhöfer, Wobbeke; Uter, Wolfgang; Drexler, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Wearing of occlusive gloves during the whole working shift is considered a risk factor for developing hand eczema, similar to wet work. Moreover, the increased hydration due to glove occlusion may lead to brittle nails. Two hundred and seventy clean room workers, wearing occlusive gloves for prolonged periods, and 135 administrative employees not using gloves were investigated. This included a dermatological examination of the nails and the hands, using the Hand Eczema ScoRe for Occupational Screening (HEROS), measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and a standardized interview. Of the clean room workers, 39%, mainly women, reported nail problems, mostly brittle nails with onychoschisis. Skin score values showed no significant differences between HEROS values of both groups. TEWL values of exposed subjects were similar to TEWL values of controls 40 min after taking off the occlusive gloves. In a multiple linear regression analysis, male gender and duration of employment in the clean room were associated with a significant increase in TEWL values. The effect of occlusion on TEWL seems to be predominantly transient and not be indicative of a damaged skin barrier. This study confirmed the results of a previous investigation showing no serious adverse effect of wearing of occlusive gloves on skin condition without exposure to additional hazardous substances. However, occlusion leads to softened nails prone to mechanical injury. Therefore, specific prevention instructions are required to pay attention to this side effect of occlusion.

  15. Evaluation of efficacy of skin cleansing with chlorhexidine in prevention of neonatal nosocomial sepsis - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Basudev; Vaswani, Narain Das; Sharma, Deepak; Chaudhary, Uma; Lekhwani, Seema

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of skin cleansing with chlorhexidine (CHD) in the prevention of neonatal nosocomial sepsis - a randomized controlled trial. This study design was a randomized controlled trial carried out in a tertiary care center of north India. About 140 eligible neonates were randomly allocated to either the subject area group (wiped with CHD solution till day seven of life) or the control group (wiped with lukewarm water). The primary outcome studied was to determine the decrease in the incidence of neonatal nosocomial sepsis (blood culture proven) in the intervention group. Out of 140 enrolled neonates, 70 were allocated to each group. The ratio of positive blood culture among the CHD group was 3.57%, while the ratio of positive blood culture among the control group was 6.85%. There was trending towards a reduction in blood culture proven sepsis in the intervention group, although the remainder was not statistically significant. A similar decreasing trend was observed in rates of skin colonization, duration of hospital stay, and duration of antibiotic treatment. CHD skin cleansing decreases the incidence of blood culture sepsis and could be an easy and cheap intervention for reducing the neonatal sepsis in countries where the neonatal mortality rate is high because of sepsis.

  16. Moisturisers in scar management following burn: A survey report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Tanja; Kurmis, Rochelle; Munn, Zachary; Heath, Kathryn; Greenwood, John

    2017-08-01

    Scar management is a recognised key component of rehabilitation following burn. Moisturising often combined with massage is commenced once healing tissue has gained sufficient strength to tolerate surface friction, with the aim being to hydrate the dry scar. The studies on various moisturisers and creams provide some guidance on moisturiser selection, but many are inconclusive. This survey aimed to determine the current expert opinion regarding moisturiser recommendations, including the basis for these recommendations, across the burns community. A brief web-based survey was distributed to burn therapists via mailing lists of the Australian and New Zealand Burn Association (ANZBA), and American Burn Association (ABA) 'Occupational and Physical Therapist Burn Special Interest Group'. The fifty three respondents indicated that there were 29 different moisturisers commonly recommended in practice. Three main themes were indicated as influencing recommendations for moisturiser: the perceived effects on the scar/skin (48%); the general properties of the moisturiser (38%); the ingredients (14%). Therapists reported that the principle stimuli determining their recommendations were patient feedback and the choice of the previous burn therapist in their service. Many were also guided by medical staff, pharmacists and sales representatives. Only three respondents were able to provide citations for published evidence supporting their recommendations. There is a paucity of evidence currently to support optimal moisturiser choice. This survey demonstrates that conflicting opinions are held on the ideal moisturiser brand, properties and ingredients. The recommendations made are based on low level evidence. Further research is required to inform clinicians which moisturiser to recommend to their clients. An ideal moisturiser should be one that is conducive to scar maturation, non- or minimally irritant, prevent skin drying, minimise transepidermal water loss and have no negative

  17. Preoperative skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyn Solano Castro

    2014-01-01

    The results of secondary research that refers to preoperative skin preparation with antiseptic chlorhexidine 2% are presented. Surgical Site Infections are one of the most common complications in surgical procedures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the user and are the third -associated infection more frequent in the health care . Steps of clinical practice based on evidence were applied, considering in the first instance a question in PICO format, then a search for ...

  18. Peptide-mediated desmoglein 3 crosslinking prevents pemphigus vulgaris autoantibody-induced skin blistering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Volker; Rötzer, Vera; Dehner, Carina; Kempf, Bettina; Gliem, Martin; Radeva, Mariya; Hartlieb, Eva; Harms, Gregory S.; Schmidt, Enno; Waschke, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In pemphigus vulgaris, a life-threatening autoimmune skin disease, epidermal blisters are caused by autoantibodies primarily targeting desmosomal cadherins desmoglein 3 (DSG3) and DSG1, leading to loss of keratinocyte cohesion. Due to limited insights into disease pathogenesis, current therapy relies primarily on nonspecific long-term immunosuppression. Both direct inhibition of DSG transinteraction and altered intracellular signaling by p38 MAPK likely contribute to the loss of cell adhesion. Here, we applied a tandem peptide (TP) consisting of 2 connected peptide sequences targeting the DSG adhesive interface that was capable of blocking autoantibody-mediated direct interference of DSG3 transinteraction, as revealed by atomic force microscopy and optical trapping. Importantly, TP abrogated autoantibody-mediated skin blistering in mice and was effective when applied topically. Mechanistically, TP inhibited both autoantibody-induced p38 MAPK activation and its association with DSG3, abrogated p38 MAPK-induced keratin filament retraction, and promoted desmosomal DSG3 oligomerization. These data indicate that p38 MAPK links autoantibody-mediated inhibition of DSG3 binding to skin blistering. By limiting loss of DSG3 transinteraction, p38 MAPK activation, and keratin filament retraction, which are hallmarks of pemphigus pathogenesis, TP may serve as a promising treatment option. PMID:23298835

  19. Comparison of Four Antiseptic Preparations for Skin in the Prevention of Contamination of Percutaneously Drawn Blood Cultures: a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfee, David P.; Farr, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    A number of skin antiseptics have been used to prevent the contamination of blood cultures, but the comparative efficacies of these agents have not been extensively evaluated. We therefore sought to compare the efficacy of four skin antiseptics in preventing blood culture contamination in a randomized, crossover, investigator-blinded study conducted in an emergency department and the inpatient wards of a university hospital. The patient group included all patients from whom blood samples were obtained percutaneously for culture. Skin antisepsis was performed with 10% povidone-iodine, 70% isopropyl alcohol, tincture of iodine, or povidone-iodine with 70% ethyl alcohol (i.e., Persist). The blood culture contamination rate associated with each antiseptic was then determined. A total of 333 (2.62%) of 12,692 blood cultures were contaminated during the study period compared to 413 (3.21%) of 12,859 blood cultures obtained during the previous 12-month period (relative risk = 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 0.94; P = 0.006). During the study, the contamination rates were determined to be 2.93% with povidone-iodine, 2.58% with tincture of iodine, 2.50% with isopropyl alcohol, and 2.46% with Persist (P = 0.62). We detected no significant differences in the blood culture contamination rates among these four antiseptics, although there was some evidence suggesting greater efficacy among the alcohol-containing antiseptics. Among the evaluated antiseptics, isopropyl alcohol may be the optimal antiseptic for use prior to obtaining blood for culture, given its convenience, low cost, and tolerability. PMID:11980938

  20. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... video. UPDATED: February 7, 2018 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ...

  1. [Burns care following a nuclear incident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargues, L; Donat, N; Jault, P; Leclerc, T

    2010-09-30

    Radiation injuries are usually caused by radioactive isotopes in industry. Detonations of nuclear reactors, the use of military nuclear weapons, and terrorist attacks represent a risk of mass burn casualties. Ionizing radiation creates thermal burns, acute radiation syndrome with pancytopenia, and a delayed cutaneous syndrome. After a latency period, skin symptoms appear and the depth of tissue damages increase with dose exposure. The usual burn resuscitation protocols have to be applied. Care of these victims also requires assessment of the level of radiation, plus decontamination by an experienced team. In nuclear disasters, the priority is to optimize the available resources and reserve treatment to patients with the highest probability of survival. After localized nuclear injury, assessment of burn depth and surgical techniques of skin coverage are the main difficulties in a burn centre. Training in medical facilities and burn centres is necessary in the preparation for management of the different types of burn injuries.

  2. Rural and Metropolitan Pediatric Burns in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory: Does Distance Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Ela J; Zeni, Geoffrey; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    To determine if differences exist between children who sustain burns in rural areas and in metropolitan areas, an analysis of children presenting to the Burns Unit at The Children's Hospital at Westmead, from the January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012 was performed. In all, 4326 children met the inclusion criteria, of which 21.2% came from rural regions. Just more than a quarter (26.0%) of rural children and 11.6% from metropolitan areas were Indigenous Australian (P burns in both populations. Of the rural children, 40.8% sustained contact burns, 37.7% scald, and 12.5% flame. In contrast, 58.8% metropolitan children sustained scalds, 27.4% contact, and 4.5% flame. The home was the most common place for all burns to occur, but rural injuries commonly occurred outdoors. Burns were associated with risk-taking behavior in 15.3% rural and 8.7% metropolitan children (P burn injuries (≥10% Total BSA) occurred in 3.4% of rural and 2.1% metropolitan children (P = 0.02). Skin grafting was required in 28.3% rural and 16.3% metropolitan children (P = 0.0001). Nearly 32% of rural children required admission to the Burns Unit for >24 hours (15.9% metropolitan; P = 0.0001). Significant differences exist between burns sustained by rural and metropolitan children. This should be accounted for in burns prevention campaigns and the education of local health practitioners.

  3. Oral administration of Aloe vera gel powder prevents UVB-induced decrease in skin elasticity via suppression of overexpression of MMPs in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Marie; Tanaka, Miyuki; Misawa, Eriko; Yao, Ruiquing; Nabeshima, Kazumi; Yamauchi, Kouji; Abe, Fumiaki; Yamamoto, Yuki; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the effects of oral Aloe vera gel powder (AVGP) containing Aloe sterols on skin elasticity and the extracellular matrix in ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated hairless mice. Ten-week-old hairless mice were fed diets containing 0.3% AVGP for 8 weeks and irradiated UVB for 6 weeks. Mice treated with AVGP showed significant prevention of the UVB-induced decrease in skin elasticity. To investigate the mechanism underlying this suppression of skin elasticity loss, we measured the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -9, and -13. AVGP prevented both the UVB-induced increases in MMPs expressions. Moreover, we investigated hyaluronic acid (HA) content of mice dorsal skin and gene expression of HA synthase-2 (Has2). In the results, AVGP oral administration prevented UVB-induced decreasing in skin HA content and Has2 expression and attenuates the UVB-induced decrease in serum adiponectin, which promotes Has2 expression. These results suggested that AVGP has the ability to prevent the skin photoaging.

  4. Fructose diet-induced skin collagen abnormalities are prevented by lipoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukkarasu, V; Nandhini, A T Anitha; Anuradha, C V

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of proteins, leading to chemical modification and cross-linking are of importance in the pathology of diabetic complications. We studied the effect alpha-lipoic acid (LA) on the content and characteristics of the protein collagen from skin of high-fructose fed rats. The rats were divided into 4 groups of 6 each. Two groups of rats were fed with a high fructose diet (60 g/100 g diet) and administered either LA (35 mg/kg b.w., i.p) (FRU+LA) or 0.2 ml vehicle (saline) (FRU) for 45 days. The other 2 groups were fed with control diet containing starch (60 g/100 g diet) and administered either saline (CON) or lipoic acid (CON+LA). The rats were maintained for 45 days and then sacrificed. Plasma glucose, insulin, fructosamine, protein glycation, and blood glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) were measured. Collagen was isolated from skin and the physicochemical properties of collagen were studied. Fructose administration caused accumulation of collagen in skin. Extensive cross-linking was evidenced by enhanced glycation and AGE-linked fluorescence. Increased peroxidation and changes in physicochemical properties such as shrinkage temperature, aldehyde content, solubililty pattern, susceptibility to denaturing agents were observed in fructose-fed rats. SDS gel pattern of collagen from these rats showed elevated beta component of type I collagen. These changes were alleviated by the simultaneous administration of LA. Administration of LA to fructose-fed rats had a positive influence on both quantitative and qualitative properties of collagen. The results suggest a mechanism for the ability of LA to delay diabetic complications.

  5. Comparing the effects of 3 different pressure ulcer prevention support surfaces on the structure and function of heel and sacral skin: An exploratory cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomova-Simitchieva, Tsenka; Lichterfeld-Kottner, Andrea; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2017-12-26

    Special support surfaces are key in pressure ulcer prevention. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of 3 different types of mattresses (reactive gel, active alternating air, basic foam) on skin properties of the sacral and heel skin after 2 hours loading. Fifteen healthy females (median age 66 years) were included. Transepidermal water loss, skin surface temperature, erythema, stratum corneum hydration, epidermal hydration, skin extensibility, elastic function, and recovery as well as skin roughness parameters were measured under controlled room conditions before loading, immediately after loading, and 20 minutes post-loading in the supine position on the different mattresses. The highest increases in transepidermal water loss, skin temperature, and erythema were observed for the foam mattress after loading, indicating higher deformation and occlusion. Cutaneous stiffness decreased in all 3 groups, indicating structural changes during loading. There was a substantial decrease of mean roughness at the heel skin in the foam group, leading to a flattening of the skin surface. Study results indicate that the type of support surface influences skin structure and function during loading. The gel and air mattress appeared to be more protective compared with the foam mattress, but the differences between the gel and air were minor. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. An evidence-based approach to the prevention and initial management of skin tears within the aged community setting: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beechey, Rebekah; Priest, Laura; Peters, Micah; Moloney, Clint

    2015-06-12

    Maintaining skin integrity in a community setting is an ongoing issue, as research suggests that the prevalence of skin tears within the community is greater than that in an institutional setting. While skin tear prevention and management principles in these settings are similar to those in an acute care setting, consideration of the environmental and psychological factors of the client is pivotal to prevention in a community setting. Evidence suggests that home environment assessment, education for clients and care givers, and being proactive in improving activities of daily living in a community setting can significantly reduce the risk of sustaining skin tears. The aim of this implementation project was to assess and review current skin tear prevention and management practices within the community setting, and from this, to implement an evidence-based approach in the education of clients and staff on the prevention of skin tears. As well. the project aims to implement evidence-based principles to guide clinical practice in relation to the initial management of skin tears, and to determine strategies to overcome barriers and non-compliance. The project utilized the Joanna Brigg's Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System audit tool for promoting changes in the community health setting. The implementation of this particular project is based in a region within Anglicare Southern Queensland. A small team was established and a baseline audit carried out. From this, multiple strategies were implemented to address non-compliance which included education resources for clients and caregivers, staff education sessions, and creating skin integrity kits to enable staff members to tend to skin tears, and from this a follow-up audit undertaken. Baseline audit results were slightly varied, from good to low compliance. From this, the need for staff and client education was highlighted. There were many improvements in the audit criteria following client and

  7. Preoperative skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Solano Castro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of secondary research that refers to preoperative skin preparation with antiseptic chlorhexidine 2% are presented. Surgical Site Infections are one of the most common complications in surgical procedures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the user and are the third -associated infection more frequent in the health care . Steps of clinical practice based on evidence were applied, considering in the first instance a question in PICO format, then a search for information in databases recommended in the Course of Clinical Nursing Practice Evidence-Based, taught by the program for Collaborative Research in Evidence-Based Nursing of Costa Rica ( CIEBE -CR . The PubMed database and Cochrane LIBRARY was consulted, National Center for Biotechnology Information ( NCBI, Google Scholar, CINAHL (cummulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature. SCIELO (Scientific Electronic Library on line www.Scielo.org . 22 documents were recovered, but only three were selected because had methodological rigor. For the critical analysis Critical Reading Sheets 2.0 ( FLC software was used. Was concluded that 2% chlorhexidine, is the best choice for preoperative skin preparation antiseptic, however, it is necessary to conduct further studies in order to determine which is the correct way in strength, frequency, technical and adverse effects in the pediatric population.

  8. Self-recognition mechanism between skin and suckers prevents octopus arms from interfering with each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesher, Nir; Levy, Guy; Grasso, Frank W; Hochner, Binyamin

    2014-06-02

    Controlling movements of flexible arms is a challenging task for the octopus because of the virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) [1, 2]. Octopuses simplify this control by using stereotypical motion patterns that reduce the DOFs, in the control space, to a workable few [2]. These movements are triggered by the brain and are generated by motor programs embedded in the peripheral neuromuscular system of the arm [3-5]. The hundreds of suckers along each arm have a tendency to stick to almost any object they contact [6-9]. The existence of this reflex could pose significant problems with unplanned interactions between the arms if not appropriately managed. This problem is likely to be accentuated because it is accepted that octopuses are "not aware of their arms" [10-14]. Here we report of a self-recognition mechanism that has a novel role in motor control, restraining the arms from interfering with each other. We show that the suckers of amputated arms never attach to octopus skin because a chemical in the skin inhibits the attachment reflex of the suckers. The peripheral mechanism appears to be overridden by central control because, in contrast to amputated arms, behaving octopuses sometime grab amputated arms. Surprisingly, octopuses seem to identify their own amputated arms, as they treat arms of other octopuses like food more often than their own. This self-recognition mechanism is a novel peripheral component in the embodied organization of the adaptive interactions between the octopus's brain, body, and environment [15, 16]. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Designing Skin Cancer Prevention Messages: Should We Emphasize Gains or Losses? Message Framing, Risk Type, and Prior Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon J; Kang, Hannah

    2018-05-01

    To test whether message framing (ie, gain vs. loss) and risk type (ie, health vs appearance risk) in skin cancer prevention messages interact with one's prior experience. Two experiments with a 2 (message framing: gain vs loss) × 2 (risk type: health vs appearance risk) factorial design were conducted. The participants were given a URL to the experiment website via e-mail. On the first page of the website, the participants were told that they would be asked to evaluate a skin cancer print public service announcement (PSA): Online experiments. A total of 397 individuals participated (236 for experiment 1 and 161 for experiment 2). Apparatus: Four versions of the skin cancer print PSAs were developed. Four PSAs were identical except for the 2 manipulated components: message framing and risk type. Measures were adopted from Cho and Boster (message framing), Jones and Leary and Kiene et al. (risk type), De Vries, Mesters, van't Riet, Willems, and Reubsaet and Knight, Kirincich, Farmer, and Hood (prior experience), and Hammond, Fong, Zanna, Thrasher, and Borland and Hoffner and Ye (behavioral intent). General linear models were used to test hypotheses. Three-way interactions among message framing, risk type, and prior experience were found: When the intent of the message was to encourage sunscreen use, the effects of message framing and risk type were shown to be the exact opposite directions from when the intent was to discourage indoor/outdoor tanning. To discourage tanning among those with prior experience, messages emphasizing losses in terms of one's health will work better. For those with no prior experience, messages emphasizing potential appearance losses will work better for discouraging tanning while messages emphasizing gains like improving appearance will do a better job in encouraging sunscreen use.

  10. Satisfaction of mountain guides with high sun protection as a tool to prevent non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizek, L; Krause, J; Biedermann, T; Zink, A

    2017-11-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an occupational disease for outdoor workers in Germany since 2015. Sustainable prevention is demanded and sunscreen promoted as an effective tool. However, studies on the satisfaction of sunscreen users are rare. To evaluate the satisfaction of mountain guides using a high SPF sunscreen product as an appropriate prevention tool for mountain guides. Motivating mountain and ski guides in Germany to use very high protection sunscreen (SPF50+, Actinica Lotion) during a 4- to 8-h workday followed by the completion of a self-filled paper-based questionnaire about their experience and satisfaction with the product. Of 88 mountain and ski guides (61 men, 27 women) included in the study, 61.4% reported regular sunscreen use with the application of very high protection (SPF50+) in 18.6% of all cases. At the end of the workday, 78.6% found the product convenient and easy to include into their daily work and 79.3% felt sufficiently protected against the sun. Overall satisfaction with the use of high SPF products during work is high in mountain and ski guides and could be an effective tool in prevention campaigns. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  11. Natural Substances for Prevention of Skin Photoaging: Screening Systems in the Development of Sunscreen and Rejuvenation Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, Vladimir; Potapovich, Alla; Albuhaydar, Ahmed R; Mayer, Wolfgang; De Luca, Chiara; Korkina, Liudmila

    2018-04-01

    Solar broadband UV irradiation is commonly regarded as a major causative reason for cutaneous photoaging. The pro-aging molecular pathways and cellular targets affected by UVA+UVB light in human skin have been extensively investigated. Notwithstanding growing knowledge in mechanisms of photoaging, research and development of clinically efficient, nontoxic, and sustainable topical preparations providing full physical, chemical, and biological photoprotection still remain a great challenge for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In this study, we are proposing a panel of the in vitro methods for preselection of natural photoprotective substances with high photostability and low phototoxicity able of absorbing a broadband UVA+UVB irradiation (physical sunscreen), reducing UV-related overproduction of free radicals and loss of endogenous antioxidants (chemical protection), and attenuating UV-induced cytotoxicity and immune and metabolic responses (biological protection) in primary human epidermal keratinocytes and immortalized human keratinocyte cultures. Our data showed that secondary metabolites biosynthesized in plant cells in response to UV irradiation, such as phenylpropanoids and their glycosylated metabolites, aglycons and glycosylated flavonoids, and leontopodic acids, hold the best promise for complete natural topical prevention of photoaging and rejuvenation of photoaged skin. Meristem plant cell cultures elicited by solar simulating UV could be the most environmentally sustainable biotechnological source of polyphenols with combined photoprotective and antiaging properties.

  12. Natural Substances for Prevention of Skin Photoaging: Screening Systems in the Development of Sunscreen and Rejuvenation Cosmetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, Vladimir; Potapovich, Alla; Albuhaydar, Ahmed R.; Mayer, Wolfgang; De Luca, Chiara

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Solar broadband UV irradiation is commonly regarded as a major causative reason for cutaneous photoaging. The pro-aging molecular pathways and cellular targets affected by UVA+UVB light in human skin have been extensively investigated. Notwithstanding growing knowledge in mechanisms of photoaging, research and development of clinically efficient, nontoxic, and sustainable topical preparations providing full physical, chemical, and biological photoprotection still remain a great challenge for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In this study, we are proposing a panel of the in vitro methods for preselection of natural photoprotective substances with high photostability and low phototoxicity able of absorbing a broadband UVA+UVB irradiation (physical sunscreen), reducing UV-related overproduction of free radicals and loss of endogenous antioxidants (chemical protection), and attenuating UV-induced cytotoxicity and immune and metabolic responses (biological protection) in primary human epidermal keratinocytes and immortalized human keratinocyte cultures. Our data showed that secondary metabolites biosynthesized in plant cells in response to UV irradiation, such as phenylpropanoids and their glycosylated metabolites, aglycons and glycosylated flavonoids, and leontopodic acids, hold the best promise for complete natural topical prevention of photoaging and rejuvenation of photoaged skin. Meristem plant cell cultures elicited by solar simulating UV could be the most environmentally sustainable biotechnological source of polyphenols with combined photoprotective and antiaging properties. PMID:28661208

  13. Staphylococcal septicaemia in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, R K; Sanyal, S C; Bang, R L; Mokaddas, E; Lari, A R

    2000-06-01

    This study analyses staphylococcal septicaemia in a series of 1516 burn patients who were admitted to the burn unit of the Al-Babtain Centre for Burns and Plastic Surgery, Ibn Sina Hospital, Kuwait over a period of 6.5 years (1 June 1992-31 December 1998). One hundred and nine patients (7.2%) developed clinically and microbiologically proven septicaemia, of which 80 (73.4%) showed one or the other type of Staphylococcus in their blood. Fifty (62.5%) of them were males and 30 (37.5%) females, with a mean age of 26 years and the mean total body surface area of burns (TBSA) of 45% (range 1-93%). Preschool age children comprised 27.5% of the patients. Flame was the dominant (80%) cause of burn. Of the 80 patients who had 91 episodes of septicaemia, 52 (65%) had MRSA, 8 (10%) MSSA, 11 (13.8%) MRSE and 5 (6.2%) MSSE and 4 (5%) others had mixed organisms. Only the patients with MRSA had multiple episodes. Eight patients (10%) showed septicaemic episodes within only 48 h of admission; however, the majority of the patients (77.5%) had a septicaemic attack within 2 weeks postburn. Of the 52 MRSA septicaemic cases, 39 (75%) survived and 13 (25%) died. Four patients with septicaemia due to mixed infections died. A total of 19 patients were intubated, 14 due to inhalation injury and 5 because of septicaemia; all in the former group died. Glycopeptide therapy (vancomycin/teicoplanin) was instituted immediately following the detection of staphylococci in the blood. No significant difference was noted in relation to mortality amongst the septicaemic patients, whether or not on prophylactic antibiotic. Fifty-six (70%) of the 80 patients had 139 sessions of skin grafting and survived. Of the 52 MRSA patients, 40 had 101 sessions of skin grafting and 33 of them survived. The apparent low mortality was probably due to early detection of the organism, appropriate antibiotic therapy, care for nutrition and early wound cover. This study indicates a high incidence of staphylococcal

  14. A prospective, randomised study of a novel transforming methacrylate dressing compared with a silver-containing sodium carboxymethylcellulose dressing on partial-thickness skin graft donor sites in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadian, Ojan; Arnoldo, Brett; Purdue, Gary; Burris, Agnes; Skrinjar, Edda; Duschek, Nikolaus; Leaper, David J

    2015-06-01

    This prospective, randomised study compares a new transforming methacrylate dressing (TMD) with a silver-containing carboxymethylcellulose dressing (CMC-Ag) after application to split-thickness skin graft (STSG) donor sites. This was an unblinded, non-inferiority, between-patient, comparison study that involved patients admitted to a single-centre burn unit who required two skin graft donor sites. Each patient's donor sites were covered immediately after surgery: one donor site with TMD and the other with CMC-Ag. The donor sites were evaluated until healing or until 24 days post-application, whichever came first. Study endpoints were time to healing, daily pain scores, number of dressing changes, patient comfort and physicians' and patients' willingness to use the dressings in the future. Nineteen patients had both the dressings applied. No statistically significant difference was noted in time to healing between the two dressings (14·2 days using TMD compared with 13·2 days using CMC-Ag). When pain scores were compared, TMD resulted in statistically significantly less pain at three different time periods (2-5 days, 6-10 days and 11-15 days; P dressing, compared with CMC-Ag, were seen as clinical benefits as these are the major issues in donor site management. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Characterization of burn injuries using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, M. Hassan; Dickey, Trevor C.; Winebrenner, Dale P.; Chen, Antao; Mourad, Pierre D.

    2011-03-01

    The accuracy rates of the clinical assessment techniques used in grading burn injuries remain significantly low for partial thickness burns. In this paper, we present experimental results from terahertz characterization of 2nd and 3rd degree burn wounds induced on a rat model. Reflection measurements were obtained from the surface of both burned and normal skin using pulsed terahertz spectroscopy. Signal processing techniques are described for interpretation of the acquired terahertz waveform and differentiation of burn wounds. Furthermore, the progression of burn injuries is shown by comparison between acute characterization and 72-hours survival studies. While the water content of healthy and desiccated skin has been considered as a source of terahertz signal contrast, it is demonstrated that other biological effects such as formation of post-burn interstitial edema as well as the density of the discrete scattering structures in the skin (such as hair follicles, sweat glands, etc.) play a significant role in the terahertz response of the burn wounds.

  16. [Prevention of hand dermatoses in small catering enterprises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpiewska, Joanna; Liwkowicz, Jolanta; Padlewska, Kamila

    2013-01-01

    Work in catering and food processing is mostly performed by hands. Mechanical, thermal and chemical agents, as well as damp working conditions and frequent hand washing aggravate skin irritation. The aim of the study was to test the efficacy of hydrophobic skin protection measure at these workplaces. We recommended the prevention of contact skin disorders by using hydrophobic skin protection measure. The study was conducted in a group of 20 food service sector workers, They were interviewed about skin problems and skin protection measures. Tolb assess the effect of the protective preparation on the skin dermatological test procedures, corneometry and sebumetry, were applied, as well as the level of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured. The same survey was performed in the control group composed of 10 workers who used and 10 who did not use barrier preparation. The respondents declared dryness, roughness, peeling, burning, redness, erythema of the skin. All who had applied barrier cream observed a significant improvement of the skin hydration increased by about 30%, and lubrication of the skin - by 11 times on average. Also the level of TEWL decreased by about 25%. The improvement of skin conditions and reduction of skin disorders were observed confirming the effectiveness of the protection of the skin from exposure to harmful factors. Knowledge about prevention of skin diseases should be promoted among employees of catering enterprises.

  17. Prevention of hand dermatoses in small catering enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kurpiewska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work in catering and food processing is mostly performed by hands. Mechanical, thermal and chemical agents, as well as damp working conditions and frequent hand washing aggravate skin irritation. The aim of the study was to test the efficacy of hydrophobic skin protection measure at these workplaces. Materials and Methods: We recommended the prevention of contact skin disorders by using hydrophobic skin protection measure. The study was conducted in a group of 20 food service sector workers. They were interviewed about skin problems and skin protection measures. To assess the effect of the protective preparation on the skin dermatological test procedures, corneometry and sebumetry, were applied, as well as the level of transepidermal water loss (TEWL was measured. The same survey was performed in the control group composed of 10 workers who used and 10 who did not use barrier preparation. Results: The respondents declared dryness, roughness, peeling, burning, redness, erythema of the skin. All who had applied barrier cream observed a significant improvement of the skin - hydration increased by about 30%, and lubrication of the skin - by 11 times on average. Also the level of TEWL decreased by about 25%. Conclusions: The improvement of skin conditions and reduction of skin disorders were observed confirming the effectiveness of the protection of the skin from exposure to harmful factors. Knowledge about prevention of skin diseases should be promoted among employees of catering enterprises. Med Pr 2013;64(4:521–525

  18. Pediatric deep burns caused by hot incense ashes during 2014 Spring Festival in Fuyang city, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhou, Bo; Tao, Ren Qin; Chen, Xu Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese people in Fuyang city, a northwest city of Anhui Province, are accustomed to burning incense at home for blessing during the Spring Festival. Their children, especially toddlers, like playing around the burning incense and are at risk of burning by hot incense ashes. The purpose of this study was to describe the unique cause and clinical characteristics of pediatric deep burns caused by hot incense ashes during 2014 Spring Festival. Twelve consecutive children admitted to our Burn Center and Fuyang People's Hospital during 2014 Spring Festival, with burn injuries caused by hot incense ashes which were epidemiologically studied retrospectively. Data on age, gender, size, depth and site of burn, incidence by day, number of operation, hospital stay, and causes of burns were collected. All patients came from Fuyang city. Of the 12 patients, the average age was 2.17 years, with a range of 1-6. The boy-to-girl ratio was 2: 1. The mean total burn surface area (TBSA) was 5.83%, and 91.67% of the children sustained full-thickness burn. Hands were the most common parts of the body to be injured. Dry necrosis developed in 14 fingers of 3 patients. January 31, 2014, the first day of the Chinese New Year, was the time of highest incidence. Six patients (50%) required surgical intervention while the number of operations including escharectomy, excision, skin grafting, or amputation of necrotic fingers, per patient was 2. A total of 14 fingers were amputated of the necrotic parts. All children survived and mean length of hospital stay of the patients was 20 days. Hot incense ashes cause serious injuries to children in Fuyang city during the Spring Festival. Preventive programs should be directed towards high risk groups to reduce the incidence of this burn.

  19. Decontamination of burns contaminated with radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vykouril, L.

    1986-01-01

    The suitability of various solutions for the decontamination of burnt skin and their efficiency were tested by experiments on rats. Tested was the decontamination of undisturbed skin, second degree skin burns and third degree skin burns. Decontamination solutions used included: distilled water, jodonal (an aqueous solution of iodine, ethoxylated nonylphenols, the copolymer of ethylene oxide with propylene oxide, and phosphoric acid) and a decontamination mixture of Sapon, Komplexon (trade names of detergents) and sodium hexametaphosphate. Decontamination efficiency was 68.4% for second degree burns and 47.1% for third degree burns. Most effective was the decontamination solution with an efficiency of 72%; the efficiency of jodonal was 67% and of water - 54%. Jodonal is the most suitable: in addition, it acts as a disinfectant and antiseptic. (M.D.)

  20. Interest of Supportive and Barrier Protective Skin Care Products in the Daily Prevention and Treatment of Cutaneous Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Berger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As many as 50% of patients with cancer develop acute skin reactions to some degree with radiotherapy. Proactive skin care is often recommended to minimise these skin reactions and maintain the integrity of the epidermal barrier; nevertheless, no consensual guidelines are systematically used. This multicentre, observational, prospective study evaluated the tolerability and benefit of supportive and barrier protective skin care products in preventing radiotherapy-induced skin reactions in 253 women initiating radiotherapy (exclusive or adjuvant for breast cancer. Methods: Patients received a kit of 5 commercially available skin care products before the first radiotherapy treatment. The following variables were assessed: cutaneous adverse events, investigator-assessed skin reactions (oedema, erythema, dryness, desquamation before and after radiotherapy course, investigator, and patient opinion on products benefit. Results were analysed by frequency of product use (heavy versus low. Results: Average age was 60 years (range: 34-85. Over 92% of patients reported good to excellent tolerance on irradiated skin for each product. During the 6-week radiotherapy period, we observed that heavy product users had less skin reactions than the low users, particularly within 10 days of radiotherapy initiation (8% versus 18%; p  = .031. Positive physician’s opinion on product use was more frequent for high (66.6% versus low (32% users. Patient-assessed patient benefit index was generally >1, indicating relevant treatment benefit, with a tendency for better benefit in high versus low users. Conclusions: These results support recommendations to use skin care products to minimise the impact of secondary cutaneous reactions with radiotherapy cancer treatment.

  1. Interest of Supportive and Barrier Protective Skin Care Products in the Daily Prevention and Treatment of Cutaneous Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Antoine; Regueiro, Carlos; Hijal, Tarek; Pasquier, David; De La Fuente, Cristina; Le Tinier, Florence; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Lartigau, Eric; Moyal, Dominique; Seité, Sophie; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2018-01-01

    As many as 50% of patients with cancer develop acute skin reactions to some degree with radiotherapy. Proactive skin care is often recommended to minimise these skin reactions and maintain the integrity of the epidermal barrier; nevertheless, no consensual guidelines are systematically used. This multicentre, observational, prospective study evaluated the tolerability and benefit of supportive and barrier protective skin care products in preventing radiotherapy-induced skin reactions in 253 women initiating radiotherapy (exclusive or adjuvant) for breast cancer. Patients received a kit of 5 commercially available skin care products before the first radiotherapy treatment. The following variables were assessed: cutaneous adverse events, investigator-assessed skin reactions (oedema, erythema, dryness, desquamation) before and after radiotherapy course, investigator, and patient opinion on products benefit. Results were analysed by frequency of product use (heavy versus low). Average age was 60 years (range: 34-85). Over 92% of patients reported good to excellent tolerance on irradiated skin for each product. During the 6-week radiotherapy period, we observed that heavy product users had less skin reactions than the low users, particularly within 10 days of radiotherapy initiation (8% versus 18%; p  = .031). Positive physician's opinion on product use was more frequent for high (66.6%) versus low (32%) users. Patient-assessed patient benefit index was generally >1, indicating relevant treatment benefit, with a tendency for better benefit in high versus low users. These results support recommendations to use skin care products to minimise the impact of secondary cutaneous reactions with radiotherapy cancer treatment.

  2. An ophthalmic solution of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist prevents corneal inflammation in a rat alkali burn model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Masaaki; Masuda, Yukinari; Nagasaka, Shinya; Fukuda, Yuh; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We clarified the effects of an ophthalmic solution of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist on corneal inflammation and wound healing after alkali burn injury in rats. Methods After alkali exposure, either an ophthalmic solution with 0.1% pioglitazone hydrochloride (the PPARγ group) or vehicle (the vehicle group) was topically applied to the cornea until day 14. Histological, immunohistochemical, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis were performed. Results After alkali injury, PPARγ expression increased, with the infiltration of many inflammatory cells. The infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages started from the corneal limbus within 6 h, and developed in the corneal center by day 7, with associated neovascularization. The accumulation of α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts and the deposition of type III collagen were noted on day 14. The histological changes were suppressed significantly by treatment with the ophthalmic solution of the PPARγ agonist. In addition, the number of infiltrating M2 macrophages in the cornea was increased by PPARγ agonist treatment. In real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, the messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor beta 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A were decreased in the PPARγ group compared to the vehicle group in the early periods of corneal inflammation. Conclusions The ophthalmic solution of the PPARγ agonist inhibited inflammation, decreased the fibrotic reaction, and prevented neovascularization in the cornea from the early phase after alkali burn injury. The ophthalmic solution of the PPARγ agonist may provide a new treatment strategy with useful clinical applications for corneal inflammation and wound healing. PMID:24194635

  3. Knowledge of undergraduate nursing course teachers on the prevention and care of peristomal skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Magela Salomé

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the knowledge of undergraduate nursing course teachers on peristomal skin care in individuals with intestinal stoma. Methods: This is an exploratory, analytical and cross-sectional study, conducted with undergraduate nursing course teachers from two private universities in the city of São Paulo, named A and B. The sample consisted of 42 teachers/nurses, being 22 from University A and 20 from University B, who supervised the internship at Hospital Vila Nova Cachoeirinha. With the aim to collect data, a structured questionnaire consisting of 10 questions (checklist was used; each question in the checklist had correct and wrong answers. The teachers had to indicate with “x” the correct answer. The questionnaire was delivered to teachers/nurses on a predetermined day. Data collection was carried out on August 2006. Results: The majority of study participants know that stoma demarcation must be performed preoperatively, and that it is important to educate the patient about surgery, care for the stoma and on the collecting device, as well as to perform a sensitivity test for the equipment. The hygiene should be performed with mild soap and water and with a piece of clean, soft, damp cotton cloth without rubbing, and the skin must be kept dry. The hair removal should be done with curved tip scissors, cutting close to the abdominal wall. Conclusion: The results showed that, although most of the participants have a basic knowledge about stomized patients care, updating and improvement are needed. Resumo: Objetivo: Avaliar o conhecimento de docentes do curso de graduação em enfermagem sobre os cuidados com da pele periestomal nos indivíduos com estomas intestinais. Métodos: Trata-se de um estudo exploratório, analítico e transversal realizado com os docentes dos Cursos de Graduação em Enfermagem de duas Universidades privadas da cidade de São Paulo, denominadas A e B. A amostra foi constituída de 42 docentes

  4. Endogenous angiotensins and catecholamines do not reduce skin blood flow or prevent hypotension in preterm piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiby, Yvonne A; Lumbers, Eugenie R; Staunton, Michael P; Wright, Layne L; Colditz, Paul B; Wright, Ian M R; Lingwood, Barbara E

    2014-12-01

    Endocrine control of cardiovascular function is probably immature in the preterm infant; thus, it may contribute to the relative ineffectiveness of current adrenergic treatments for preterm cardiovascular compromise. This study aimed to determine the cardiovascular and hormonal responses to stress in the preterm piglet. Piglets were delivered by cesarean section either preterm (97 of 115 days) or at term (113 days). An additional group of preterm piglets received maternal glucocorticoids as used clinically. Piglets were sedated and underwent hypoxia (4% FiO2 for 20 min) to stimulate a cardiovascular response. Arterial blood pressure, skin blood flow, heart rate and plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, angiotensin II (Ang II), angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)), and cortisol were measured. Term piglets responded to hypoxia with vasoconstriction; preterm piglets had a lesser response. Preterm piglets had lower blood pressures throughout, with a delayed blood pressure response to the hypoxic stress compared with term piglets. This immature response occurred despite similar high levels of circulating catecholamines, and higher levels of Ang II compared with term animals. Prenatal exposure to glucocorticoids increased the ratio of Ang-(1-7):Ang II. Preterm piglets, in contrast to term piglets, had no increase in cortisol levels in response to hypoxia. Preterm piglets have immature physiological responses to a hypoxic stress but no deficit of circulating catecholamines. Reduced vasoconstriction in preterm piglets could result from vasodilator actions of Ang II. In glucocorticoid exposed preterm piglets, further inhibition of vasoconstriction may occur because of an increased conversion of Ang II to Ang-(1-7). © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  5. An Advertisement and Article Analysis of Skin Products and Topics in Popular Women’s Magazines: Implications for Skin Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Basch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the United States, skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer, with an esti­mated 5 million people treated per year and annual medical treatment expenditures that exceed 8 billion dollars. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1 to enumerate the number of advertisements for skin products with and without Sun Protection Factor (SPF and to further analyze the specific advertise­ments for sunblock to determine if models, when present, depict sun safe behaviors and 2 to enumer­ate the number of articles related to the skin for content. Both aims include an assessment for differ­ences in age and in magazines targeting a Black or Latina population. Methods: The sample for this cross sectional study was comprised of 99 issues of 14 popular United States magazines marketed to women, four of which market to a Black or Latina audience. Results: There were 6,142 advertisements, of which 1,215 (19.8%, 95% CI: 18.8-20.8% were related to skin products. Among the skin product advertisements, 1,145 (93.8%, 95% CI: 93.9-96.3% depicted skin products without SPF. The majority of skin articles (91.2%, 95% CI: 91.7-100.0%, skin product advertisements (89.9%, 95% CI: 88.2-91.6%, and sunblock advertisements featuring models (were found in magazines aimed at the older (>24 yr audience. Conclusion: Future research on this topic could focus on the extent to which images in these maga­zines translate into risky health behaviors, such as sun seeking, or excessive other harmful effects of UV radiation.

  6. Medical adhesives and patient safety: state of the science: consensus statements for the assessment, prevention, and treatment of adhesive-related skin injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichol, Laurie; Lund, Carolyn; Rosen, Ted; Gray, Mikel

    2013-01-01

    Skin injury related to medical adhesive usage is a prevalent but underrecognized complication that occurs across all care settings and among all age groups. If proper technique for application and/or removal of adhesive products is not used, tissue trauma can occur, impacting patient safety and quality of life and increasing healthcare costs. Little guidance exists in the literature regarding appropriate selection and proper use of adhesive products to minimize medical adhesive-related skin injury, as well as best practices for skin care preventive strategies, application and removal techniques, and assessment and treatment of such injuries. In an effort to define best practices for prevention of such injury, a consensus panel of 23 recognized key opinion leaders convened to establish consensus statements on the assessment, prevention, and treatment of medical adhesive-related skin injury. The consensus summit was held in December 2012 and was made possible by an unrestricted educational grant from 3M. This document details the consensus definitions and statements and identifies research priorities for development of new adhesive technologies and protocols for skin protection.

  7. Trends in news coverage about skin cancer prevention, 1993-2006: increasingly mixed messages for the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Maree; Wakefield, Melanie; Dixon, Helen

    2008-10-01

    To provide a comprehensive overview of trends in news coverage about sun protection issues in an Australian setting over a 14-year period. A content analysis was performed on all relevant articles (N=547) published in two major daily newspapers, The Age and the Herald Sun, from 1993 to 2006. Articles were coded for article type, prominence, theme, spokesperson, topic slant and opinion slant. The most frequent themes were the health effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure (24% of articles), education/prevention (14%) and product issues (12%). Themes that became more dominant over time were vitamin D issues, solaria issues and fake tans. Sixty per cent of articles included a pro-sun protection spokesperson and 12% an anti-sun protection spokesperson, with the profile of anti-sun protection spokespeople increasing over time. Half the articles reported on topics positive for sun protection, whereas 18% reported on negative topics; however, this difference narrowed considerably from 2001 onwards. In opinionated articles, the opinions expressed by authors were mainly positive (57%) rather than negative (7%) for sun protection. The findings suggest that the mix of sun protection issues covered and views of sun protection have changed over time, resulting in greater coverage of controversies and issues not necessarily positive for sun protection objectives. These findings imply that evaluation of paid skin cancer prevention public education campaigns may need to take account of the changing news media environment in which they take place.

  8. YouTube as a source of health information: Analysis of sun protection and skin cancer prevention related issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Linda; Køster, Brian; Siegert, Anna Maria; Cop, Christian; Boyers, Lindsay; Karimkhani, Chante; Winston, Helena; Mounessa, Jessica; Dellavalle, Robert P; Reinau, Daphne; Diepgen, Thomas; Surber, Christian

    2017-01-15

    Although social media ubiquitously supplementstraditional information sources such as newspapers,magazines, radio, and television, investigation of onlinehealth information related to sun protection and skincancer prevention has been scarce and largely limitedto English language sources. Using the search terms"sun protection," "sunscreen," "skin cancer prevention,"tanning bed" and "vitamin D," we investigated 281YouTube videos presented in 6 languages: English,German, French, Spanish, Swedish, and Danish. Foreach video, we used a four-sectioned checklist toassess general information, popularity, expert drivenmeasures, and heuristic driven measures. Differencesbetween languages were detected: English languagevideos were most frequently viewed (median numberof views: 5488 compared to 248 -1591 in otherlanguages). Approximately 60% of videos revealednegative effects of solar ultraviolet (UV)-exposure.The majority of videos (75%) targeted adults. Videoson tanning beds and sunscreen contained false ormisleading information 40% and 20% of the time,respectively. We confirm observations made withrespect to other medical disciplines that the generalquality of YouTube contributions is often inferiorand does not deliver sustainable information. Othersources of information should be included whensearching for health information online.

  9. Testing a social cognitive theory-based model of indoor tanning: implications for skin cancer prevention messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Seth M; Myrick, Jessica Gall; Zeitany, Alexandra; Kelley, Dannielle; Morales-Pico, Brenda; Thomas, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a theory-based understanding of indoor tanning is a major impediment to the development of effective messages to prevent or reduce this behavior. This study applied the Comprehensive Indoor Tanning Expectations (CITE) scale in an analysis of indoor tanning behavior among sorority women (total N = 775). Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that CITE positive and negative expectations were robust, multidimensional factors and that a hierarchical structure fit the data well. Social cognitive theory-based structural equation models demonstrated that appearance-oriented variables were significantly associated with outcome expectations. Outcome expectations were, in turn, significantly associated with temptations to tan, intention to tan indoors, and indoor tanning behavior. The implications of these findings for the development of messages to prevent and reduce indoor tanning behavior are discussed in two domains: (a) messages that attempt to change broader societal perceptions about tan skin, and (b) messages that focus more narrowly on indoor tanning-challenging positive expectations, enhancing negative expectations, and encouraging substitution of sunless tanning products.

  10. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that ...

  11. Effectiveness of skin protection creams in the prevention of occupational dermatitis: results of a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winker, Robert; Salameh, Bayda; Stolkovich, Sabine; Nikl, Michael; Barth, Alfred; Ponocny, Elisabeth; Drexler, Hans; Tappeiner, Gerhard

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the trial was to investigate whether the publicized effects of skin protection creams can be replicated in a real occupational setting during activities that expose the skin. A prospective, randomized, four-tailed controlled pilot trial was performed to compare the effect of skin protection and skin care alone or in combination with cleansing against a control group (only cleansing). Two branches were selected for the investigation: the building industry and the timber industry. A total of 1,006 workers from these two branches were recruited, and out of these 485 workers were examined longitudinally for at least three time points over 1 year (lost for follow-up: 430 workers, exclusion: 91 workers). At each time point, as a primary outcome measure, we assessed the condition of the skin at both hands in a blinded manner and the individual was assigned to one of the following categories: no eczema, mild, moderate and severe eczema. As a secondary outcome measure, the worker's transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured under standardized conditions at the back of both hands. In addition, the workers were asked to evaluate their skin condition during the study. With regard to differences in the occurrence of eczemas, we found only in workers in building industry without application of skin protection or skin care creams a statistical significant increase in the incidence between the first and the second visit and a statistical significant decrease in the incidence between the second and third visit. When evaluating the secondary outcome-measurement changes in the TEWL values, an improvement was found for the group skin protection and skin care in combination and by skin care alone. Females in the timber industry started with better TEWL values than males, which may be due to better overall skin care. In this group we found an improvement for the group skin protection and skin care in combination and by skin protection alone. For skin protection alone, we

  12. CopA3 Peptide Prevents Ultraviolet-Induced Inhibition of Type-I Procollagen and Induction of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in Human Skin Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hee Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV exposure is well-known to induce premature aging, which is mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 activity. A 9-mer peptide, CopA3 (CopA3 was synthesized from a natural peptide, coprisin, which is isolated from the dung beetle Copris tripartitus. As part of our continuing search for novel bioactive natural products, CopA3 was investigated for its in vitro anti-skin photoaging activity. UV-induced inhibition of type-I procollagen and induction of MMP-1 were partially prevented in human skin fibroblasts by CopA3 peptide in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 25 μM, CopA3 nearly completely inhibited MMP-1 expression. These results suggest that CopA3, an insect peptide, is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of skin aging.

  13. Burning Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2014. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Sept. 20, ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/burning-feet/basics/definition/SYM-20050809 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  14. The Effect of Educational Intervention Based on Health Belief Model and Social Support on Promoting Skin Cancer Preventive Behaviors in a Sample of Iranian Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeihooni, Ali Khani; Rakhshani, Tayebeh

    2018-01-08

    Skin cancer is one of the most common cancers in Iran. Farmers are exposed to the sun's ultraviolet radiation due to their job and are susceptible to skin cancer. The aim of this study is to survey the effect of educational intervention based on health belief model and social support on promoting skin cancer preventive behaviors in farmers of Fasa City, Fars province, Iran. In this quasi-experimental study, 200 farmers (100 in experimental group and 100 in control group) in Fasa City, Fars, Iran, were selected in 2017. The educational intervention for the experimental group consisted of eight training sessions (introduction to skin cancer, risk factors, complications, benefits and barriers to proper use of sunscreen, UV sunglasses and physical protection, self-efficacy in applying preventive behaviors, role of social support). A questionnaire consisting of demographic information, knowledge, HBM constructs (perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, barriers, self-efficacy and cues to action), and social support was used to measure skin cancer preventive behaviors before, 3 months after the intervention, and 6 months later. Data were analyzed using SPSS-22 via chi-squared, independent samples t test, Mann-Whitney, and repeated measures ANOVA at a significance level of 0.5. The mean age of the farmers was 42.21 ± 10.52 years in the experimental group and 44.28 ± 10.16 years in the control group. Three months after the intervention and 6 months after the intervention, the experimental group showed a significant increase in the knowledge, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, self-efficacy, cues to action, social support, and skin cancer preventive behaviors compared to the control group. This study showed the effectiveness of the intervention based on the HBM constructs and social support in adoption of skin cancer preventive behaviors in 3 and 6 months post intervention in farmers. Hence, these models can act as a

  15. Protective effect of sanguinarine on ultraviolet B-mediated damages in SKH-1 hairless mouse skin: implications for prevention of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Haseeb; Reagan-Shaw, Shannon; Eggert, David M; Tan, Thomas C; Afaq, Farrukh; Mukhtar, Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2007-01-01

    Excessive exposure of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly its UVB component (280-320 nm), to human skin is the major cause of skin cancers. UV exposure also leads to the development of precancerous conditions such as actinic keratosis and elicits a variety of other adverse effects such as sunburn, inflammation, hyperplasia, immunosuppression and skin aging. Therefore, there is a need to intensify our efforts towards the development of novel mechanism-based approaches/agents for the protection of UVB-mediated damages. Chemoprevention is being investigated as a potential approach for the management of UV damages including skin cancer. We have earlier shown that sanguinarine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid, inhibits UVB exposure-mediated damages in HaCaT keratinocytes. In this study, to determine the relevance of our in vitro findings to in vivo situations, we assessed the effects of sanguinarine on UVB-mediated damages in SKH-1 hairless mice. Our data demonstrated that a topical application of sanguinarine (5 micromol 0.3 mL(-1) ethanol per mouse), either as a pretreatment (30 min prior to UVB) or posttreatment (5 min after UVB), resulted in a significant decrease in UVB-mediated increases in skin edema, skin hyperplasia and infiltration of leukocytes. Further, sanguinarine treatments (pre and post) also resulted in a significant decrease in UVB mediated (1) generation of H2O2 and (2) increases in the protein levels of markers of tumor promotion/proliferation viz. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Kiel antigen-67. Based on this data, we suggest that sanguinarine could be developed as an agent for the management of conditions elicited by UV exposure including skin cancer. However, further detailed studies are needed to support this suggestion.

  16. Prevention of sudden cardiac death beyond the ICD: Have we reached the boundary or are we just burning the surface?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyada Naksuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preventing sudden cardiac death (SCD remains a major unsolved problem in contemporary medical practice. As the most common cause of SCD, treatment for ventricular arrhythmias is the target area of interest in research field. While implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD effectively decreases death from ventricular arrhythmias in highly selected patients, risk of inappropriate shocks, mortality from frequent therapy, chance of failing in abortion of arrhythmias despite having a defibrillator, and our inability to recognize which of several hundreds of thousands of patients at risk for sudden death but do not meet current criteria for defibrillator, limit ICD effectiveness. In this article, a brief review of mechanism leading to SCD, the existing evidence for a defibrillator and the lacunae in present guidelines for patients clearly at risk for sudden death but without proven benefit from a defibrillator are presented in Section I. Following this, interventional approaches, both catheter-based and general measures that may serve as adjuncts to a defibrillator in preventing this all too common catastrophic end event, are summarized in Section II.

  17. Aplicaciones de la dermis artificial para la prevención y tratamiento de cicatrices hipertróficas y contracturas Artificial dermis aplications to prevent and treat hypertrofyc scars and skin retractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ferreiro González

    2012-03-01

    hypertrophic scars and contractures. The following variables were evaluated: haematoma, infection and total or partial loss of artificial dermis. The scar quality was reviewed during the postoperative period, using the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS. Patients´ satisfaction was measured using a 0-10 score survey. None of the areas treated with artificial dermis showed adverse scarring and in patients with prior hypertrophic scars no recurrence was found. We also observed that in acute burns, the areas treated with artificial dermis developed much better scar quality compared with those areas treated with split skin grafts. We achieved satisfactory coverage in areas with tendon exposure. Artificial dermis can be selectively applied to special areas during acute burn injury to prevent scar hypertrophy and contracture. It can also be used as coverage for normally non-graftable structures less than 3 cm where skin flaps are usually required. During the chronic stage, artificial dermis can be useful to treat contractures, as well as hypertrophic scars.

  18. Importance of local skin treatments during radiotherapy for prevention and treatment of radio-induced epithelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chargari, C.; Fromantin, I.; Kirova, Y.M.; Chargari, C.

    2009-01-01

    Radio-epithelitis represents a common problem, for which treatments are characterized by a great heterogeneity. The present review of literature focuses on data referenced in Pub med/Medline and published in French/English. Despite a real preclinical rationale, aloe vera and trolamine failed to demonstrate any benefit in the prophylactic settings. In a prospective assessment phase III assessment, Calendula officinalis was shown to be superior to trolamine for the prevention of radio-epithelitis. In the curative settings, sucrafalte failed to demonstrate any benefit. The benefit of dermo-corticoids was suggested in terms of erythema and itching. Promising clinical results are available with hyaluronic acid (M.A. S065D and Ialugen) and silver leaf may reduce the intensity of cutaneous radio-induced side effects. Data from the literature are conflicting, making real the difficulty to adopt from clinical trials any proof-of-principle strategy. Considering these uncertainties, several strategies are allowed. New topics are under investigation. Present data from the literature highlight the need for further trials, in order to propose evidence-based treatments and to harmonize clinical practice. (authors)

  19. Preliminary results in single-step wound closure procedure of full-thickness facial burns in children by using the collagen-elastin matrix and review of pediatric facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircan, Mehmet; Cicek, Tugrul; Yetis, Muhammed Ikbal

    2015-09-01

    Management of full-thickness facial burns remains one of the greatest challenges. Controversy exists among surgeons regarding the use of early excision for facial burns. Unfortunately, delayed excision of deeper burns often results in more scarring and subsequent reconstruction becomes more difficult. A collagen-elastin matrix is used to improve the quality of the reconstructed skin, to reduce scarring and to prevent wound contraction. It serves as a foundation for split thickness skin graft and enhances short and long-term results. We report the usage of a collagen-elastin matrix during single-step wound closure technique of severe full-thickness facial burns in 15 children with large burned body surface area, and also we review the literature about pediatric facial burns. There were 15 pediatric patients with severe facial burns, 8 girls and 7 boys ranging in age from 10 months to 12 years, mean age 7 years and 6 months old. The facial burn surface area (FBSA) among the patients includes seven patients with 100%, five with 75%, and three with 50%. The average total body surface area (TBSA) for the patients was 72%, ranging between 50 and 90%. 5 of the patients' admissions were late, more than four days after burns while the rest of the patients were admitted within the first four days (acute admission time). The burns were caused by flame in eight of the patients, bomb blast in four, and scalding in three. All patients were treated by the simultaneous application of the collagen-elastin matrix and an unmeshed split thickness skin graft at Turgut Özal Medical Center, Pediatric Burn Center, Malatya, Turkey. After the treatment only two patients needed a second operation for revision of the grafts. All grafts transplanted to the face survived. The average Vancouver scar scales (VSS) were 2.55±1.42, ranging between one and six, in the first 10 of 15 patients at the end of 6 months postoperatively. VSS measurements of the last 5 patients were not taken since the 6

  20. The changing pattern of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyasundara, Sandun L; Rajan, Vasant; Lam, Lawrence; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2011-01-01

    After scalds, flame burns have been considered the next most common mode of burn injury in childhood. Recent experience in the authors' unit suggested that contact burns were becoming more frequent. The authors sought to determine the contemporary frequency of different burn modalities in children presenting to a burns unit. A retrospective review of 3621 children treated in the burns unit, both ambulatory and inpatient, at the authors' institution between January 2003 and December 2007 was performed. Patients were identified using the Burns Unit database. Data collected included age, gender, burn etiology and site, TBSA, and whether operative surgery was required. Of the 3515 patients eligible for inclusion, scalds accounted for 55.9%, contact 30.5%, and flame 7.9% of all burns. Contact burns were shown to be consistently more frequent than flame burns for every year of the study (z = 17.30, P burns, reflecting the variety of mechanisms involved. The data suggest a change in the historical pattern of pediatric burns previously reported in the literature. These findings have implications for public health awareness and burns prevention campaigns.

  1. Optimal skin antiseptic agents for prevention of surgical site infection in cesarean section: a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huaping; Li, Guirong; Wang, Haiyan; He, Mei

    2017-08-30

    The best choice of antiseptic agent for skin preparation at cesarean section remains controversial. We performed this meta-analysis to assess whether chlorhexidine (CH)-based skin antisepsis was more effective than povidone iodine (PI)-based antisepsis for the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI) after cesarean section. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched to identify English publications that compared chlorhexidine gluconate (CH) as a skin preparation agent with PI in cesarean section. The primary outcome was SSI rate. Review Manager 5.3 was used to analyze the collected data and trial sequential analysis (TSA) Software 0.9 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK) beta was applied to estimate whether the overall pooled outcome was conclusive. Six articles involving 4385 participants were included in this study. The outcomes showed that CH-based skin antisepsis, compared with PI-based antisepsis, was not associated with a decreased overall rate of SSI (risk ratio [RR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-1.02; p = .07). TSA indicated that the current available evidence was inconclusive. There were no differences in adverse skin reactions in the two groups. This study provides evidence that CH-based antisepsis for skin preparation does not show an additional advantage in reducing risk of SSI after cesarean section. However, additional high-quality, randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  2. Management of patients in a dedicated burns intensive care unit (BICU) in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Madiha; Kamal, Rehana

    2013-05-01

    In Pakistan the practice of managing extensive burns in dedicated intensive care units is not well established. This audit aims to define the characteristics of the victims of major burns and factors that increase mortality and outcome of the protocol-based management in a dedicated burns intensive care unit (BICU). This prospective audit included all patients admitted to the BICU of Suleiman Dawood Burns Unit in Karachi from 1st September 2002 to 31st August 2011. Demographic information, type and place of burn, total body surface area burn (TBSA), type of organ support provided, length of ICU stay, any associated medical diseases, and out outcome were documented. A total of 1597 patients were admitted to the BICU in 9 years. Median age of the patients was 22 (IQR =32-7). 32% victims were children 50 years old. Male to female ratio was 1.4:1. Fire was the leading cause of burns in adults (64%) and scald burns were most common in (64%) in children. 72.4% of the accidents happened at home, where kitchen was the commonest location (597 cases). Mean TBSA burnt was 32.5% (SD ± 22.95%, 95%CI: 31.36-33.61). 27% patients needed ventilatory support, 4% were dialyzed and split skin graftings were performed in 20% patients. Average length of ICU stay was 10.42 days. Epilepsy, psychiatric illness and drug addiction were not common associations with burns. Overall mortality was 41.30% but it decreased over the years from 75% to 27%. Groups of people most vulnerable to sustain burn are young females getting burnt in the kitchen, young males getting burnt at work, and small children falling in pots of hot water stored for drinking or bathing. TBSA >40%, age >50 years, fire burn and female gender were associated with a higher risk of death. Carefully planned, protocol based management of burn patients by burn teams of dedicated healthcare professionals, even with limited resources reduced mortality. Burn hazard awareness, prevention and educational programmes targeted at the

  3. Rehabilitation of the burn patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Procter Fiona

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation is an essential and integral part of burn treatment. It is not something which takes place following healing of skin grafts or discharge from hospital; instead it is a process that starts from day one of admission and continues for months and sometimes years after the initial event. Burns rehabilitation is not something which is completed by one or two individuals but should be a team approach, incorporating the patient and when appropriate, their family. The term ′Burns Rehabilitation′ incorporates the physical, psychological and social aspects of care and it is common for burn patients to experience difficulties in one or all of these areas following a burn injury. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. The aims of burn rehabilitation are to minimise the adverse effects caused by the injury in terms of maintaining range of movement, minimising contracture development and impact of scarring, maximising functional ability, maximising psychological wellbeing, maximising social integration

  4. Burn wound: Pathophysiology and its management by herbal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Dhirender Kaushik; Shiwani Kamboj; Pawan Kaushik; Shivkant Sharma; A C Rana

    2013-01-01

    In human body, wound healing is a normal biological phenomenon. Burns may be acute or chronic depending upon the source and its time of exposure. Burn wounds may be superficial, partial or full thickness wounds. When skin comes in contact with higher temperature, protein denaturation takes place due to which the plasma membrane integrity is lost. When skin is burned, a number of inflammatory mediators and releasing agents such as histamine, nitric oxide, oxygen free radicals, eicosanoid produ...

  5. Cutaneous osteosarcoma arising from a burn scar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min A.; Yi, Jaehyuck [Kyungpook National University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Jong Min [Kyungpook National University, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Tumors that develop in old burn scars are usually squamous cell carcinomas. Sarcomas have also been reported, albeit rarely. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of an extraskeletal osteosarcoma arising in a prior burn scar reported in the English-language literature, mainly discussing the clinicopathological features. Herein, we present a case of cutaneous osteosarcoma visualized as a mineralized soft-tissue mass arising from the scar associated with a previous skin burn over the back. This seems to be the first report describing the imaging features of a cutaneous osteosarcoma from an old burn scar. (orig.)

  6. Biologic and synthetic skin substitutes: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Khoo, Teng Lye; Mohd. Yussof, Shah Jumaat

    2010-01-01

    The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. Skin substitutes have important roles in the treatment of deep dermal and full thickness wounds of various aetiologies. At present, there is no ideal substitute in the market. Skin substit...

  7. The antiviral drug tenofovir, an inhibitor of Pannexin-1-mediated ATP release, prevents liver and skin fibrosis by downregulating adenosine levels in the liver and skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Feig

    Full Text Available Fibrosing diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and, therefore, there is a need for safe and effective antifibrotic therapies. Adenosine, generated extracellularly by the dephosphorylation of adenine nucleotides, ligates specific receptors which play a critical role in development of hepatic and dermal fibrosis. Results of recent clinical trials indicate that tenofovir, a widely used antiviral agent, reverses hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection. Belonging to the class of acyclic nucleoside phosphonates, tenofovir is an analogue of AMP. We tested the hypothesis that tenofovir has direct antifibrotic effects in vivo by interfering with adenosine pathways of fibrosis using two distinct models of adenosine and A2AR-mediated fibrosis.Thioacetamide (100mg/kg IP-treated mice were treated with vehicle, or tenofovir (75mg/kg, SubQ (n = 5-10. Bleomycin (0.25U, SubQ-treated mice were treated with vehicle or tenofovir (75mg/kg, IP (n = 5-10. Adenosine levels were determined by HPLC, and ATP release was quantitated as luciferase-dependent bioluminescence. Skin breaking strength was analysed and H&E and picrosirus red-stained slides were imaged. Pannexin-1expression was knocked down following retroviral-mediated expression of of Pannexin-1-specific or scrambled siRNA.Treatment of mice with tenofovir diminished adenosine release from the skin of bleomycin-treated mice and the liver of thioacetamide-treated mice, models of diffuse skin fibrosis and hepatic cirrhosis, respectively. More importantly, tenofovir treatment diminished skin and liver fibrosis in these models. Tenofovir diminished extracellular adenosine concentrations by inhibiting, in a dose-dependent fashion, cellular ATP release but not in cells lacking Pannexin-1.These studies suggest that tenofovir, a widely used antiviral agent, could be useful in the treatment of fibrosing diseases.

  8. Acute surgical management of hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Winston T; Vergara, Edward; Dalaly, Dawood G; Coady-Fariborzian, Loretta; Mozingo, David W

    2014-10-01

    A hand represents 3% of the total body surface area. The hands are involved in close to 80% of all burns. The potential morbidity associated with hand burns can be substantial. Imagine a patient carrying a pan of flaming cooking oil to the doorway or someone lighting a room-sized pile of leaves and branches doused with gasoline. It is clear how the hands are at risk in these common scenarios. Not all burn injuries will require surgical intervention. Recognizing the need for surgery is paramount to achieving good functional outcomes for the burned hand. The gray area between second- and third-degree burns tests the skill and experience of every burn/hand surgeon. Skin anatomy and the size of injury dictate the surgical technique used to close the burn wound. In addition to meticulous surgical technique, preoperative and postoperative hand therapy for the burned hand is essential for a good functional outcome. Recognizing the burn depth is paramount to developing the appropriate treatment plan for any burn injury. This skill requires experience and practice. In this article, we present an approach to second- and third-degree hand burns. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An ex vivo porcine skin model to evaluate pressure-reducing devices of different mechanical properties used for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ching-Yan C; Holmes, David F; Thomason, Helen A; Stephenson, Christian; Derby, Brian; Hardman, Matthew J

    2016-11-01

    Pressure ulcers are complex wounds caused by pressure- and shear-induced trauma to skin and underlying tissues. Pressure-reducing devices, such as dressings, have been shown to successfully reduce pressure ulcer incidence, when used in adjunct to pressure ulcer preventative care. While pressure-reducing devices are available in a range of materials, with differing mechanical properties, understanding of how a material's mechanical properties will influence clinical efficacy remains limited. The aim of this study was to establish a standardized ex vivo model to allow comparison of the cell protection potential of two gel-like pressure-reducing devices with differing mechanical properties (elastic moduli of 77 vs. 35 kPa). The devices also displayed differing energy dissipation under compressive loading, and resisted strain differently under constant load in compressive creep tests. To evaluate biological efficacy we employed a new ex vivo porcine skin model, with a confirmed elastic moduli closely matching that of human skin (113 vs. 119 kPa, respectively). Static loads up to 20 kPa were applied to porcine skin ex vivo with subsequent evaluation of pressure-induced cell death and cytokine release. Pressure application alone increased the percentage of epidermal apoptotic cells from less than 2% to over 40%, and increased cellular secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. Co-application of a pressure-reducing device significantly reduced both cellular apoptosis and cytokine production, protecting against cellular damage. These data reveal new insight into the relationship between mechanical properties of pressure-reducing devices and their biological effects. After appropriate validation of these results in clinical pressure ulcer prevention with all tissue layers present between the bony prominence and external surface, this ex vivo porcine skin model could be widely employed to optimize design and evaluation of devices aimed at reducing pressure

  10. Preventing the acute skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer: the use of corneometry in order to evaluate the protective effect of moisturizing creams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Franco, Rossella; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Muto, Paolo; Ravo, Vincenzo; Sammarco, Elena; Calvanese, Maria Grazia; De Natale, Flora; Falivene, Sara; Di Lecce, Ada; Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Murino, Paola; Manzo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to add, to the objective evaluation, an instrumental assessment of the skin damage induced by radiation therapy. A group of 100 patients affected by breast cancer was recruited in the study over one year. Patients were divided into five groups of 20 patients. For each group it was prescribed a different topical treatment. The following products were used: Betaglucan, sodium hyaluronate (Neoviderm®), Vitis vinifera A. s-I-M.t-O.dij (Ixoderm®), Alga Atlantica plus Ethylbisiminomethylguaicolo and Manganese Cloruro (Radioskin1®) and Metal Esculetina plus Ginko Biloba and Aloe vera (Radioskin 2®); Natural triglycerides-fitosterols (Xderit®); Selectiose plus thermal water of Avene (Trixera+®). All hydrating creams were applied twice a day starting 15 days before and one month after treatment with radiations. Before and during treatment patients underwent weekly skin assessments and corneometry to evaluate the symptoms related to skin toxicity and state of hydration. Evaluation of acute cutaneous toxicity was defined according to the RTOG scale. All patients completed radiotherapy; 72% of patients presented a G1 cutaneous toxicity, 18% developed a G2 cutaneous toxicity, 10% developed a G3 toxicity, no one presented G4 toxicity. The corneometry study confirmed the protective role of effective creams used in radiation therapy of breast cancer and showed its usefulness to identify radiation-induced dermatitis in a very early stage. The preventive use of topic products reduces the incidence of skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. An instrumental evaluation of skin hydration can help the radiation oncologist to use strategies that prevent the onset of toxicity of high degree. All moisturizing creams used in this study were equally valid in the treatment of skin damage induced by radiotherapy

  11. Electrical burns of the abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male farmer came in contact with 11,000 volts high tension electric wire and sustained full thickness burn wounds over scapula, upper limb and anterior abdominal wall along with perforation of the intestine. Patient was initially managed conservatively in general surgery ward and was referred to us after 3 days with necrosis of the burned skin and muscles over the shoulder and abdomen. Patient was initially managed conservatively and then thorough debridement of the necrotic skin over the left shoulder and upper arm was done and the area was split skin grafted. Patient developed enterocutaneous fistula, which healed over a period of 8 weeks. The granulating wound over the abdomen was also skin grafted and patient was discharged after 18 days. About 4 months, after the discharge patient presented with ventral hernia. Repair of ventral hernia by synthetic mesh application and reconstruction of the abdominal wall with a free tensor fascia lata flap was done over the mesh, but the flap failed. Then after debridement two random pattern transposition skin flaps, one from the right upper and another from the left lower abdomen were transposed over the abdominal wound and donor area was skin grafted. Patient was discharged after 17 days.

  12. Educational Materials - Burn Wise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn Wise outreach material. Burn Wise is a partnership program of that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right wood-burning appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  13. The safety and efficacy of EGF-based cream for the prevention of radiotherapy-induced skin injury: results from a multicenter observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Cheol [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seung Do [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Ho [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min Kyu [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, eungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Huasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topically applied recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) for the prevention of radiation-induced dermatitis in cancer patients. From December 2010 to April 2012, a total of 1,172 cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) of more than 50 Gy were prospectively enrolled and treated with EGF-based cream. An acute skin reaction classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 6-point rating scale was the primary end point and we also assessed the occurrence of edema, dry skin, or pruritus. The percentage of radiation dermatitis with maximum grade 0 and grade 1 was 19% and 58% at the time of 50 Gy, and it became 29% and 47% after completion of planned RT. This increment was observed only in breast cancer patients (from 18%/62% to 32%/49%). Adverse events related to the EGF-based cream developed in 49 patients (4%) with mild erythema the most common. Skin toxicity grade >2 was observed in 5% of the patients. Edema, dry skin, and pruritus grade > or =3 developed in 9%, 9%, and 1% of the patients, respectively. Prophylactic use of an EGF-based cream is effective in preventing radiation dermatitis with tolerable toxicity. Further studies comparing EGF cream with other topical agents may be necessary.

  14. Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blue or green or other light-colored eyes. Red or blond hair. Having actinic keratosis . Past treatment with radiation . Having ... Blue or green or other light-colored eyes. Red or blond hair. Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight ( ...

  15. Co-Activation of Glucocorticoid Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ in Murine Skin Prevents Worsening of Atopic March.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Julie; Bougarne, Nadia; Mylka, Viacheslav; Desmet, Sofie; Luypaert, Astrid; Devos, Michael; Tanghe, Giel; Van Moorleghem, Justine; Vanheerswynghels, Manon; De Cauwer, Lode; Thommis, Jonathan; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Tavernier, Jan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2017-12-27

    Children with atopic dermatitis show an increased risk to develop asthma later in life, a phenomenon referred to as "atopic march," which emphasizes the need for secondary prevention therapies. This study aimed to investigate whether relief of skin inflammation by glucocorticoids and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists might influence the subsequent development of asthma in a murine model for the atopic march in which mice were repeatedly exposed to house dust mite via the skin, followed by exposure to house dust mite in lungs. To abrogate atopic dermatitis, mice received topical treatment with glucocorticoid receptor/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists. Nuclear receptor ligand effects were assessed on primary keratinocytes and dendritic cells, as central players in skin inflammation. Prior house dust mite-induced skin inflammation aggravates allergic airway inflammation and induces a mixed T helper type 2/T helper type 17 response in the lungs. Cutaneous combined activation of glucocorticoid receptor/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ reduced skin inflammation to a higher extent compared to single activation. Additive anti-inflammatory effects were more prominent in dendritic cells, as compared to keratinocytes. Alleviation of allergic skin inflammation by activation of glucocorticoid receptor/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ appeared insufficient to avoid the allergic immune response in the lungs, but efficiently reduced asthma severity by counteracting the Th17 response. Glucocorticoid receptor/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activation represents a potent remedy against allergic skin inflammation and worsening of atopic march. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of post burn hand deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabapathy S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The hand is ranked among the three most frequent sites of burns scar contracture deformity. One of the major determinants of the quality of life in burns survivors is the functionality of the hands. Burns deformities, although largely preventable, nevertheless do occur when appropriate treatment is not provided in the acute situation or when they are part of a major burns. Reconstructive procedures can greatly improve the function of the hands. Appropriate choice of procedures and timing of surgery followed by supervised physiotherapy can be a boon for a burns survivor.

  17. Cost-efficacy of cultured epidermal autografts in massive pediatric burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Wolf, SE; Desai, MH; Herndon, DN

    Objective To assess the efficacy of cultured epidermal autografts (CEA) for closure of burn wounds in pediatric burn patients with full-thickness burns of more than 90% total body surface area. Summary Background Data Paucity of donor sites in massive burns makes the use of expanded skin of

  18. Preventing Burns in Your Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health ...

  19. UV-generated free radicals (FR) in skin: Their prevention by sunscreens and their induction by self-tanning agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, K.; Seifert, M.; Herrling, Th.; Fuchs, J.

    2008-05-01

    In the past few years, the cellular effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced in skin have become increasingly recognized. Indeed, it is now well known that UV irradiation induces structural and cellular changes in all the compartments of skin tissue. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the first and immediate consequence of UV exposure and therefore the quantitative determination of free radical reactions in the skin during UV radiation is of primary importance for the understanding of dermatological photodamage. The RSF method (radical sun protection factor) herein presented, based on electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR), enables the measurement of free radical reactions in skin biopsies directly during UV radiation. The amount of free radicals varies with UV doses and can be standardized by varying UV irradiance or exposure time. The RSF method allows the determination of the protective effect of UV filters and sunscreens as well as the radical induction capacity of self-tanning agents as dihydroxyacetone (DHA). The reaction of the reducing sugars used in self-tanning products and amino acids in the skin layer (Maillard reaction) leads to the formation of Amadori products that generate free radicals during UV irradiation. Using the RSF method three different self-tanning agents were analyzed and it was found, that in DHA-treated skin more than 180% additional radicals were generated during sun exposure with respect to untreated skin. For this reason the exposure duration in the sun must be shortened when self-tanners are used and photoaging processes are accelerated.

  20. The true cost of burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chris S; Maitz, Peter K M

    2012-11-01

    It is difficult to define the true cost of a burns injury, however there has always been a consensus that the costs associated with burns care are high. This study aims to achieve an accurate calculation of the cost of acute burns care in an Australian context. A retrospective review of 20 adult burn patients treated at our Centre was performed. An itemized price list was prepared based on items, services and equipment actually utilized in the care of burns patients. Case records were reviewed for a count of quantities to calculate costs for each item. Regression analysis was performed to produce a cost vs %TBSA curve for cost prediction. A cost breakdown was also performed for analysis of the most significant areas of expenditure and their trends with %TBSA. The cost calculated for an average adult burns patient was AU$71,056 (US$73,532). The total cost of all 20 patients was AU$2,449,112 (US$2,534,464). %TBSA injured was confirmed as the primary determinant of cost. Hospital length of stay, operative costs, dressings and staffing were found to be the most significant components of cost and increased most prominently with %TBSA. Compared to our findings, expenditure for prevention and education programs is minimal. There is limited conclusive evidence that changes in management protocols have had successful impact on the cost of burns treatment. Future progress in burns management may effect factors such as hospital length of stay, however until such changes, resource allocation should recognize the importance of prevention and its success at reduction of injury severity for real reductions in cost of burns care. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An animal study of a newly developed skin-penetrating pad and covering material for catheters to prevent exit-site infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Masato; Mizuno, Toshihide; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Nemoto, Yasushi; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Takemoto, Yoshiaki; Naganuma, Toshihide; Nakatani, Tatsuya

    2009-12-01

    goat skin throughout the 2-year experimental period without any special wound care such as cleansing or disinfection. The performance of the skin-penetrating pad was similarly favorable when attached to a commercial continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis catheter. The newly developed segmented polyurethane porous material had excellent tissue biocompatibility and tissue ingrowth. The skin-penetrating pad devised by using this porous material did not cause epidermal downgrowth, suggesting that it may be effective for the prevention of exit-site infection.

  2. A Skin Cancer Prevention Facial-Aging Mobile App for Secondary Schools in Brazil: Appearance-Focused Interventional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckl, Marlene; Gatzka, Martina; Heppt, Markus V; Resende Rodrigues, Henrique; Schneider, Sven; Sondermann, Wiebke; de Almeida e Silva, Carolina; Kirchberger, Michael C; Klode, Joachim; Enk, Alexander H; Knispel, Sarah; von Kalle, Christof; Stoffels, Ingo; Schadendorf, Dirk; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Esser, Stefan; Assis, Aisllan; Bernardes-Souza, Breno

    2018-01-01

    Background The incidence of melanoma is increasing faster than any other major cancer both in Brazil and worldwide. Southeast Brazil has especially high incidences of melanoma, and early detection is low. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a primary risk factor for developing melanoma. Increasing attractiveness is a major motivation among adolescents for tanning. A medical student-delivered intervention that takes advantage of the broad availability of mobile phones and adolescents’ interest in their appearance indicated effectiveness in a recent study from Germany. However, the effect in a high-UV index country with a high melanoma prevalence and the capability of medical students to implement such an intervention remain unknown. Objective In this pilot study, our objective was to investigate the preliminary success and implementability of a photoaging intervention to prevent skin cancer in Brazilian adolescents. Methods We implemented a free photoaging mobile phone app (Sunface) in 15 secondary school classes in southeast Brazil. Medical students “mirrored” the pupils’ altered 3-dimensional (3D) selfies reacting to touch on tablets via a projector in front of their whole grade accompanied by a brief discussion of means of UV protection. An anonymous questionnaire capturing sociodemographic data and risk factors for melanoma measured the perceptions of the intervention on 5-point Likert scales among 356 pupils of both sexes (13-19 years old; median age 16 years) in grades 8 to 12 of 2 secondary schools in Brazil. Results We measured more than 90% agreement in both items that measured motivation to reduce UV exposure and only 5.6% disagreement: 322 (90.5%) agreed or strongly agreed that their 3D selfie motivated them to avoid using a tanning bed, and 321 (90.2%) that it motivated them to improve their sun protection; 20 pupils (5.6%) disagreed with both items. The perceived effect on motivation was higher in female pupils in both tanning bed

  3. Grape seed and skin extract alleviates high-fat diet-induced renal lipotoxicity and prevents copper depletion in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charradi, Kamel; Elkahoui, Salem; Karkouch, Ines; Limam, Ferid; Hamdaoui, Ghaith; Ben Hassine, Fethy; El May, Michèle Veronique; El May, Ahmed; Aouani, Ezzedine

    2013-03-01

    Obesity is a public health problem that contributes to morbidity and mortality from diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and cancers. The purpose of this investigation was to analyse the link between obesity-induced oxidative stress, renal steatosis, and kidney dysfunction, as well as the protective effect of grape seed and skin extract. Rats were fed a standard diet or a high-fat diet for 6 weeks and were either treated or not treated with grape seed and skin extract. Fat-induced oxidative stress was evaluated in the kidney with a special emphasis on transition metals. High-fat diet induced triglyceride deposition and disturbances in kidney function parameters, which are linked to an oxidative stress status and depletion of copper from the kidney. Grape seed and skin extract abrogated almost all fat-induced kidney disturbances. Grape seed and skin extract exerted potential protection against fat-induced kidney lipotoxicity and should find potential application in other kidney-related diseases.

  4. Cost of providing inpatient burn care in a tertiary, teaching, hospital of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Rajeev B; Goswami, Prasenjit

    2013-06-01

    There is an extreme paucity of studies examining cost of burn care in the developing world when over 85% of burns take place in low and middle income countries. Modern burn care is perceived as an expensive, resource intensive endeavour, requiring specialized equipment, personnel and facilities to provide optimum care. If 'burn burden' of low and middle income countries (LMICs) is to be tackled deftly then besides prevention and education we need to have burn centres where 'reasonable' burn care can be delivered in face of resource constraints. This manuscript calculates the cost of providing inpatient burn management at a large, high volume, tertiary burn care facility of North India by estimating all cost drivers. In this one year study (1st February to 31st January 2012), in a 50 bedded burn unit, demographic parameters like age, gender, burn aetiology, % TBSA burns, duration of hospital stay and mortality were recorded for all patients. Cost drivers included in estimation were all medications and consumables, dressing material, investigations, blood products, dietary costs, and salaries of all personnel. Capital costs, utility costs and maintenance expenditure were excluded. The burn unit is constrained to provide conservative management, by and large, and is serviced by a large team of doctors and nurses. Entire treatment cost is borne by the hospital for all patients. 797 patients (208 burn were admitted with a mean age of 23.04 years (range 18 days to 83 years). The mean BSA burn was 42.26% (ranging from 2% to 100%). 378/797 patients (47.43%) sustained up to 30% BSA burns, 216 patients (27.1%) had between 31 and 60% BSA and 203 patients (25.47%) had >60% BSA burns. 258/797 patients died (32.37%). Of these deaths 16, 68 and 174 patients were from 0 to 30%, 31 to 60% and >60% BSA groups, respectively. The mean length of hospitalization for all admissions was 7.86 days (ranging from 1 to 62 days) and for survivors it was 8.9 days. There were 299 operations

  5. [Diagnosis and treatment of Kawasaki disease in burn children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Li, Wei-ren; Wang, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We try to discuss the relationship between burn and Kawasaki disease (KD), and to study the diagnosis and treatment of KD in burn children. The medical records of one burn child with KD from our pediatric ward together with those of 5 burn children with KD retrieved from foreign literature were analyzed. The clinical features of KD, including bilateral nonexudative conjunctivitis, erythema of the lips and oral mucosa, skin rash, cervical lymphadenopathy, changes in the distal part of extremities, were enrolled in the study. Six patients were male and younger than 5 years old, with 2 suffering from mild burn, 2 with moderate burn, and 2 with severe burn. Two days after second degree burn, all burn children had fever and skin rash with 4 or 5 clinical symptoms and signs of KD. Among them, coronary artery dilatation was found in 1 case as detected by echocardiography, positive wound culture was found in 2 cases, negative blood culture was found in 6 cases. All patients were given high-dose gamma globulin or (and) aspirin within 10 days after the first fever, followed by control and amelioration of the disease. We conclude that the pathogenesis of KD may be related with burn wound and reabsorption of edema. KD may be suspected in burn children younger than 5 years when they had fever and skin rash at the same time.

  6. Myths on Chemical Burns in the Diaper Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kara

    2017-05-01

    Over the past several years, a number of articles and online posts have circulated on the Internet associating use of disposable and cloth diapers with chemical burns on babies' skin. Because both mild chemical burns and diaper dermatitis (diaper rash) can cause skin redness and peeling, it is not surprising that some confusion has arisen regarding the association between these two conditions. However, diapers cannot cause chemical burns because they are made of inert materials. Diaper rash and chemical burns are distinct conditions that require different evaluation and treatment, which is why it is important for pediatricians to help parents understand the difference.

  7. Honey dressing in pediatric burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangroo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal properties of honey have been recognized since antiquity. Although used as an adjuvant method of accelerating wound healing from ancient times, honey has been sporadically used in the treatment of burns. Honey acts mainly as a hyperosmolar medium and prevents bacterial growth. Because of its high viscosity, it forms a physical barrier, and the presence of enzyme catalase gives honey an antioxidant property. Its high-nutrient content improves substrate supply in local environment promoting epithelialization and angiogenesis. In pediatric burn patients no exclusive study has been conducted using honey as a burn dressing. An attempt is being made to evaluate the effect of honey in the management of burns in pediatric patients.

  8. Comparison of the efficacy of chlorhexidine gluconate versus povidone iodine as preoperative skin preparation for the prevention of surgical site infections in clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Anirudh; Kaman, Lileswar; Raj, Prithivi; Gautam, Vikas; Dahiya, Divya; Singh, Gurpreet; Singh, Rajinder; Medhi, Bikash

    2015-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of chlorhexidine-gluconate versus povidone iodine in preoperative skin preparation in the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs) in clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries. This was a prospective randomized controlled trial conducted on patients undergoing clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries. A total of 351 patients 18-70 years old were randomized into two groups; chlorhexidine and povidone iodine skin preparation before surgery. The incidence of SSIs in the chlorhexidine group was 10.8 %, in comparison to 17.9 % in the povidone iodine group. The odds ratio was 0.6 in favor of chlorhexidine use, but the results were not statistically significant (P = 0.06). In the first postoperative week, SSIs developed in 7 % of patients in the chlorhexidine group and 14.1 % in the povidone iodine group (P = 0.03), and in the second postoperative week, SSIs were present in 4.1 % of the patients in the chlorhexidine group and 4.4 % in the povidone iodine group, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.88). The incidence of SSIs after clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries was lower with the use of chlorhexidine skin preparation than with povidone iodine preparation, although the results were not statistically significant. However, the odds ratio between the two groups favored the use of chlorhexidine over povidone iodine for preventing SSIs.

  9. Exopolysaccharides Isolated from Milk Fermented with Lactic Acid Bacteria Prevent Ultraviolet-Induced Skin Damage in Hairless Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morifuji, Masashi; Kitade, Masami; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Yamaji, Taketo; Ichihashi, Masamitsu

    2017-01-13

    We studied the mechanism by which fermented milk ameliorates UV-B-induced skin damage and determined the active components in milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria by evaluating erythema formation, dryness, epidermal proliferation, DNA damage and cytokine mRNA levels in hairless mice exposed to acute UV-B irradiation. Nine week-old hairless mice were given fermented milk (1.3 g/kg BW/day) or exopolysaccharide (EPS) concentrate (70 mg/kg BW/day) orally for ten days. Seven days after fermented milk or EPS administration began, the dorsal skin of the mice was exposed to a single dose of UV-B (20 mJ/cm²). Ingestion of either fermented milk or EPS significantly attenuated UV-B-induced erythema formation, dryness and epidermal proliferation in mouse skin. Both fermented milk and EPS were associated with a significant decrease in cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and upregulated mRNA levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA), which is involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, administration of either fermented milk or EPS significantly suppressed increases in the ratio of interleukin (IL)-10/IL-12a and IL-10/interferon-gamma mRNA levels. Together, these results indicate that EPS isolated from milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria enhanced DNA repair mechanisms and modulated skin immunity to protect skin against UV damage.

  10. Exopolysaccharides Isolated from Milk Fermented with Lactic Acid Bacteria Prevent Ultraviolet-Induced Skin Damage in Hairless Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Morifuji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We studied the mechanism by which fermented milk ameliorates UV-B-induced skin damage and determined the active components in milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria by evaluating erythema formation, dryness, epidermal proliferation, DNA damage and cytokine mRNA levels in hairless mice exposed to acute UV-B irradiation. Methods: Nine week-old hairless mice were given fermented milk (1.3 g/kg BW/day or exopolysaccharide (EPS concentrate (70 mg/kg BW/day orally for ten days. Seven days after fermented milk or EPS administration began, the dorsal skin of the mice was exposed to a single dose of UV-B (20 mJ/cm2. Results: Ingestion of either fermented milk or EPS significantly attenuated UV-B-induced erythema formation, dryness and epidermal proliferation in mouse skin. Both fermented milk and EPS were associated with a significant decrease in cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and upregulated mRNA levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA, which is involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, administration of either fermented milk or EPS significantly suppressed increases in the ratio of interleukin (IL-10/IL-12a and IL-10/interferon-gamma mRNA levels. Conclusion: Together, these results indicate that EPS isolated from milk fermented with lactic acid bacteria enhanced DNA repair mechanisms and modulated skin immunity to protect skin against UV damage.

  11. Evaporative Water Loss in Superficial to Full Thickness Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busche, Marc Nicolai; Roettger, Anne; Herold, Christian; Vogt, Peter Maria; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Increased evaporative water loss (EWL) in burn patients leads to dehydration and hypothermia. Early clinical studies performed with outdated hygrometers suggested a 17 to 75 times increased EWL in burns with contradicting results for the different burn depths.Our study proposals were: (1) obtain reliable data of the EWL of all burn depths, (2) compare these results with findings from earlier studies, (3) evaluate the usefulness of the EWL in differentiating between superficial and deep partial thickness burns, (4) determine the effect of Biobrane on the EWL of superficial partial thickness burns in vivo, and (5) evaluate the effect of the sterile incision foil Opraflex on the EWL in split skin graft donor sites. We measured the EWL of all burn depths in 28 patients under stable and recorded conditions regarding room temperature and humidity with a modern digital evaporimeter (Tewameter TM 300). For the first time in vivo, we also determined the effect of Biobrane on the EWL of burns and evaluated the EWL in split skin graft donor sites covered with Opraflex. The EWL in all burn depths was significantly increased (P 0.05) in the EWL of superficial compared with deep partial thickness burns, whereas full thickness burns had a significantly lower EWL (P < 0.05) compared with superficial and deep partial thickness burns. Biobrane significantly reduced the EWL (P < 0.05) of superficial partial thickness burns. The EWL of Opraflex covered skin graft donor sites was significantly reduced compared with uncovered donor sites (P < 0.05). Our data suggest that the actual EWL in burns is approximately 3 times higher in full thickness burns and approximately 4 times higher in superficial and deep partial thickness burns compared with normal skin and therefore much lower than suggested previously.Because there was no significant difference in the EWL of superficial compared with deep partial thickness burns, the EWL cannot be used to differentiate between these burn depths

  12. Burning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J.

    1990-10-01

    The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R ampersand D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration

  13. Burning plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

  14. Malignant melanoma and other cancers of the skin in Czech Republic (epidemiology, risk factors and prevention possibilities).

    OpenAIRE

    Pojezná, Eliška

    2009-01-01

    two basic types: non-melanoma skin cancer and melanoma. Skin tumors mean up to 5%. The increase in incidence is due to both a strong knowledge ofdevelopment issues and melanoma tumor detection and efforts to reduce its incidence. Also in the diagnosis of melanoma was diagnosis. Although in recent years to s tumor. I see a reduction in its incidence. Also in the diagnostic result in death, but are far from melanoma malignancy. This does not mean that they should vykousanou crayfish or crab. "i...

  15. Auricular burns associated with operating microscope use during otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latuska, Richard F; Carlson, Matthew L; Neff, Brian A; Driscoll, Colin L; Wanna, George B; Haynes, David S

    2014-02-01

    To raise awareness of the potential hazard of auricular burns associated with operating microscope use during otologic surgery. Retrospective case series and summary of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database of voluntary adverse event reports pertaining to microscope related auricular thermal injuries. All patients who sustained auricular burns while using the operating microscope during otologic surgery at 2 tertiary academic referral centers. Surgical procedure, microscope model, intensity of illumination, length of procedure, focal length, location and severity of burn, and patient outcome. A total of 4 microscope-related auricular thermal injuries were identified from the authors' institutions. Additionally, 82 unique cases of soft tissue burns associated with the use of an operative microscope have been voluntarily reported to the FDA since 2004. A disproportionately large percent (∼ 30%) of these occurred within the field of otology, the majority of which were during tympanoplasty or tympanomastoidectomy procedures at focal length distances of 300 mm or less with xenon light source microscopes. Simultaneous advancements in light delivery technologies and lens optics have continued to improve the efficiency of the operating microscope; however, these improvements also increase the potential for thermal injuries. Although rare, a review of the FDA MAUDE database suggests that microscope-related soft tissue burns occur more frequently in otology than any other surgical specialty. A variety of factors may help explain this finding, including the unique anatomy of the external ear with thin skin and limited underlying adipose tissue. Preventative measures should be taken to decrease the risk of thermal injuries including use of the lowest comfortable light intensity, adjusting the aperture width to match the operative field, frequent wound irrigation, and covering exposed portions of the pinna

  16. Bionanomaterials for skin regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Leonida, Mihaela D

    2016-01-01

    This book gives a concise overview of bionanomaterials with applications for skin regeneration. The advantages and challenges of nanoscale materials are covered in detail, giving a basic view of the skin structure and conditions that require transdermal or topical applications. Medical applications, such as wound healing, care for burns, skin disease, and cosmetic care, such as aging of the skin and photodamage, and how they benefit from bionanomaterials, are described in detail. A final chapter is devoted to the ethical and social issues related to the use of bionanomaterials for skin regeneration. This is an ideal book for researchers in materials science, medical scientists specialized in dermatology, and cosmetic chemists working in formulations. It can also serve as a reference for nanotechnologists, dermatologists, microbiologists, engineers, and polymer chemists, as well as students studying in these fields.

  17. The relevance of the vitamin D endocrine system (VDES) for tumorigenesis, prevention, and treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichrath, Jörg; Reichrath, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Solar UV (UV)-B-radiation exerts both beneficial and adverse effects on human health. On the one hand, it is the most important environmental risk factor for the development of non-melanoma skin cancer [NMSC; most importantly basal (BCC) and squamous (SCC) cell carcinomas], that represent the most common malignancies in Caucasian populations. On the other hand, the human body’s requirements of vitamin D are mainly achieved by UV-B-induced cutaneous photosynthesis. This dilemma represents a serious problem in many populations, for an association of vitamin D-deficiency and multiple independent diseases including various types of cancer has been convincingly demonstrated. In line with these findings, epidemiologic and laboratory investigations now indicate that vitamin D and its metabolites have a risk reducing effect for NMSC. Potential mechanisms of action include inhibition of the hedgehog signaling pathway (BCC) and modulation of p53-mediated DNA damage response (SCC). As a consequence of these new findings it can be concluded that UV-B-radiation exerts both beneficial and adverse effects on risk and prognosis of NMSC. It can be assumed that many independent factors, including frequency and dose of UV-B exposure, skin area exposed, and individual factors (such as skin type and genetic determinants of the skin`s vitamin D status and of signaling pathways that are involved in the tumorigenesis of NMSC) determine whether UV-B exposure promotes or inhibits tumorigenesis of NMSC. Moreover, these findings may help to explain many of the differential effects of UV-B radiation on risk of NMSC, including variation in the dose-dependent risk for development of SCC in situ (actinic keratosis, AK), invasive SCC, and BCC. In this review, we analyze the relevance of the vitamin D endocrine system (VDES) for tumorigenesis, prevention, and treatment of NMSC and give an overview of present concepts and future perspectives. PMID:24494041

  18. Systematic Review and Cost Analysis Comparing Use of Chlorhexidine with Use of Iodine for Preoperative Skin Antisepsis to Prevent Surgical Site Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ingi; Agarwal, Rajender K.; Lee, Bruce Y.; Fishman, Neil O.; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare use of chlorhexidine with use of iodine for preoperative skin antisepsis with respect to effectiveness in preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) and cost. Methods We searched the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website, the Cochrane Library, Medline, and EMBASE up to January 2010 for eligible studies. Included studies were systematic reviews, meta-analyses, or randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing preoperative skin antisepsis with chlorhexidine and with iodine and assessing for the outcomes of SSI or positive skin culture result after application. One reviewer extracted data and assessed individual study quality, quality of evidence for each outcome, and publication bias. Meta-analyses were performed using a fixed-effects model. Using results from the meta-analysis and cost data from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, we developed a decision analytic cost-benefit model to compare the economic value, from the hospital perspective, of antisepsis with iodine versus antisepsis with 2 preparations of chlorhexidine (ie, 4% chlorhexidine bottle and single-use applicators of a 2% chlorhexidine gluconate [CHG] and 70% isopropyl alcohol [IPA] solution), and also performed sensitivity analyses. Results Nine RCTs with a total of 3,614 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis revealed that chlorhexidine antisepsis was associated with significantly fewer SSIs (adjusted risk ratio, 0.64 [95% confidence interval, [0.51–0.80]) and positive skin culture results (adjusted risk ratio, 0.44 [95% confidence interval, 0.35–0.56]) than was iodine antisepsis. In the cost-benefit model baseline scenario, switching from iodine to chlorhexidine resulted in a net cost savings of $16–$26 per surgical case and $349,904–$568,594 per year for the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Sensitivity analyses showed that net cost savings persisted under most circumstances. Conclusions Preoperative skin antisepsis

  19. In vitro human skin permeation of endoxifen: potential for local transdermal therapy for primary prevention and carcinoma in situ of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee O

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oukseub Lee1, David Ivancic1, Robert T Chatterton Jr2, Alfred W Rademaker3, Seema A Khan11Department of Surgery, 2Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAPurpose: Oral tamoxifen, a triphenylethylene (TPE, is useful for breast cancer prevention, but its adverse effects limit acceptance by women. Tamoxifen efficacy is related to its major metabolites 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT and N-desmethyl-4-hydroxytamoxifen (endoxifen [ENX]. Transdermal delivery of these to the breast may avert the toxicity of oral tamoxifen while maintaining efficacy. We evaluated the relative efficiency of skin permeation of 4-OHT and ENX in vitro, and tested oleic acid (OA as a permeation-enhancer.Methods: 4-OHT, ENX, and estradiol (E2 (0.2 mg/mL of 0.5 µCi 3H/mg were dissolved in 60% ethanol-phosphate buffer, ±OA (0.1%–5%. Permeation through EpiDermTM (Matek Corp, Ashland, MA and split-thickness human skin was calculated based on the amount of the agents recovered from the receiver fluid and skin using liquid scintillation counting over 24 hours.Results: In the EpiDerm model, the absorption of 4-OHT and ENX was 10%–11%; total penetration (TP was 26%–29% at 24 hours and was decreased by OA. In normal human skin, the absorption of 4-OHT and ENX was 0.3%; TP was 2%–4% at 24 hours. The addition of 1% OA improved the permeation of ENX significantly more than that of 4-OHT (P < 0.004; further titration of OA at 0.25%–0.5% further improved the permeation of ENX to a level similar to that of estradiol.Conclusion: The addition of OA to ENX results in a favorable rapid delivery equivalent to that of estradiol, a widely used transdermal hormone. The transdermal delivery of ENX to the breast should be further developed in preclinical and clinical studies.Keywords: endoxifen, breast cancer prevention, human skin, transdermal, oleic acid

  20. EPIDEMOLOGY OF BURNS IN ENUGU, NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JIBURUM

    BACKGROUND Burn injury has been observed as a world wide problem.. The knowledge of the epidemiology is important for planning of management and preventive programmes and every community is encouraged to study the epidemiology of burns since this important problem varies from community to community.

  1. [Analysis of the application and funding projects of National Natural Science Foundation of China in the field of burns and plastic surgery from 2010 to 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z C; Dou, D; Wang, X Y; Xie, D H; Yan, Z C

    2017-02-20

    We analyzed the data of application and funding projects of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) during 2010-2016 in the field of burns and plastic surgery and summarized the NSFC funding pattern, the research hotspots, and weaknesses in this field. The NSFC has funded 460 projects in the field of burns and plastic surgery, with total funding of RMB 227.96 million. The scientific issues involved in the funding projects include orthotherapy against malformations, wound repair, basic research of burns, skin grafting, scars prevention, and regeneration of hair follicle and sweat glands. The research techniques involved in the funding projects are diversified. NSFC plays an important role in the scientific research and talents training in the field of burns and plastic surgery.

  2. Protocol for the systematic review of the prevention, treatment and public health management of impetigo, scabies and fungal skin infections in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Philippa; Bowen, Asha; Tong, Steven; Steer, Andrew; Prince, Sam; Andrews, Ross; Currie, Bart; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-09-23

    Impetigo, scabies, and fungal skin infections disproportionately affect populations in resource-limited settings. Evidence for standard treatment of skin infections predominantly stem from hospital-based studies in high-income countries. The evidence for treatment in resource-limited settings is less clear, as studies in these populations may lack randomisation and control groups for cultural, ethical or economic reasons. Likewise, a synthesis of the evidence for public health control within endemic populations is also lacking. We propose a systematic review of the evidence for the prevention, treatment and public health management of skin infections in resource-limited settings, to inform the development of guidelines for the standardised and streamlined clinical and public health management of skin infections in endemic populations. The protocol has been designed in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols statement. All trial designs and analytical observational study designs will be eligible for inclusion. A systematic search of the peer-reviewed literature will include PubMed, Excertpa Medica and Global Health. Grey literature databases will also be systematically searched, and clinical trials registries scanned for future relevant studies. The primary outcome of interest will be the clinical cure or decrease in prevalence of impetigo, scabies, crusted scabies, tinea capitis, tinea corporis or tinea unguium. Two independent reviewers will perform eligibility assessment and data extraction using standardised electronic forms. Risk of bias assessment will be undertaken by two independent reviewers according to the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Data will be tabulated and narratively synthesised. We expect there will be insufficient data to conduct meta-analysis. The final body of evidence will be reported against the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation grading system. The evidence

  3. A state of the science on influential factors related to sun protective behaviors to prevent skin cancer in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy F. Bruce, MSN, RN, NE-BC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer rates have risen over the past decades, making it imperative that adults understand the need for protection from sun exposure. Though some risk factors have been identified as predictive for skin cancers, there is a lack of synthesized information about factors that influence adults in their decisions to engage in sun protective behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to present the current state of the science on influential factors for sun protective behaviors in the general adult population. A rigorous literature search inclusive of a generally White, Caucasian, and non-Hispanic adult population was performed, and screening yielded 18 quantitative studies for inclusion in this review. Findings indicate that modifiable and non-modifiable factors are interdependent and play a role in sun protective behaviors. This study resulted in a proposed conceptual model for affecting behavioral change in sun protection including the following factors: personal characteristics, cognitive factors, family dynamics, and social/peer group influences. These factors are introduced to propose tailored nursing interventions that would change current sun protective behavior practice. Key implications for nursing research and practice focus on feasibility of annual skin cancer screening facilitated by advanced practice nurses, incorporating the identified influential factors to reduce skin cancer risk and unnecessary sun exposure.

  4. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, E.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Boulware, S. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, M.C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  5. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, E.L.; Boulware, S.; Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L.; DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M.; MacLeod, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  6. Synthetic inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases prevent sulfur mustard-induced epidermal-dermal separation in human skin pieces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, M.A.E.; Alblas, S.W.; Hammer, A.; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    Degradation of proteins of the basement membrane zone (BMZ) in the skin depends on the activity of proteolytic enzymes, particularly those belonging to the group of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In the present study we have investigated the contribution of these enzymes to the epidermal-dermal

  7. Practices and Procedures to Prevent the Transmission of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in High School Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Stephanie A.; Long, Marcus; Gaebelein, Claude J.; Martin, Madeline S.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Yetter, John

    2012-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are frequent in student athletes and are often caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA). We evaluated the awareness of CA-MRSA among high school coaches and athletic directors in Missouri (n = 4,408) and evaluated hygiene practices affecting SSTI…

  8. Fibrin glue instillation under skin flaps to prevent seroma-related morbidity following breast and axillary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad S; Hutson, Kristian H; Rapisarda, Ignazio F; Bonomi, Riccardo

    2013-05-31

    Fibrin glue (FG) combines fibrinogen and thrombin, under the presence of factor XIII and calcium chloride, and produces a 'fibrin clot' as would occur through the natural clotting cascade. FG is thought to close over any small vessels including lymphatics that are too small for conventional surgical closure, thereby reducing seroma formation, seroma incidence and related comorbidities. To assess the evidence on the effectiveness of FG in people undergoing breast and axillary surgery and to establish whether FG is an efficient modality to prevent postoperative seroma and seroma-related outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group's (CBCG) Specialised Register (9 December 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 1 2012), MEDLINE (9 December 2011), EMBASE (9 December 2011), LILACS (22 October 2012), SCI-E (22 October 2012), the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trial Registry (9 December 2011) and ClinicalTrials.gov (22 October 2012). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effectiveness of FG in terms of reducing the postoperative seroma incidence and related comorbidities in people undergoing breast and axillary surgery. At least two review authors independently scrutinised search results, selected eligible studies and extracted the data. The pooled analysis of the extracted data was achieved by the statistical analysis on Review Manager software. The quality of studies was assessed using The Cochrane Collaboration's 'Risk of bias' tool. The search of four standard electronic databases yielded 119 potentially relevant studies but only 18 RCTs involving 1252 people were found suitable for statistical analysis. There was significant heterogeneity among trials and the majority of trials were of poor quality. The use of FG under skin flaps following breast and axillary surgery failed to reduce the incidence of postoperative seroma (risk ratio (RR) 1.02; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.90 to 1.16, P

  9. [Antiseptic effect of compound lysostaphin disinfectant and its preventive effect on infection of artificial dermis after graft on full-thickness skin defect wound in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J; Zhou, H; Cui, Z C; Wang, L; Luo, P F; Ji, S Z; Hu, X Y; Ma, B; Wang, G Y; Zhu, S H; Xia, Z F

    2018-04-20

    Objective: To study the antiseptic effect of compound lysostaphin disinfectant and its preventive effect on infection of artificial dermis after graft on full-thickness skin defect wound in rats. Methods: (1) Each one standard strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus were selected. Each 20 clinical strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus were collected from those isolated from wound exudates of burn patients hospitalized in our wards from January 2014 to December 2016 according to the random number table. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of compound lysostaphin disinfectant to above-mentioned strains were detected. The experiment was repeated 3 times. Compared with the corresponding standard strain, the clinical strain with higher MIC and/or MBC was considered as having decreased sensitivity to the disinfectant. The percentage of strains of each of the three kinds of bacteria with decreased sensitivity was calculated. (2) Artificial dermis pieces were soaked in compound lysostaphin disinfectant for 5 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 4 h, respectively, with 21 pieces at each time point. After standing for 0 (immediately), 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 h (with 3 pieces at each time point), respectively, the diameters of their inhibition zones to standard strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus were measured. The experiment was repeated 3 times. The shortest soaking time corresponding to the longest standing time, after which the disinfectant-soaked artificial dermis could form an effective inhibition zone (with diameter more than 7 mm), was the sufficient soaking time of the disinfectant to the artificial dermis. (3) Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into post injury day (PID) 3, 7, 14, and 21 sampling groups according to the random number table, with 10 rats in each group. A full-thickness skin

  10. Does vitamin D deficiency contribute to post-burn bone loss? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/QLDkCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon L Klein

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury results in the acute loss of bone as well as the development of progressive vitamin D deficiency. Bone loss occurs acutely due to resorption, which is then followed by apoptosis of osteoblasts preventing repair of the bone loss. The acute resorption is due to a combination of the inflammatory response and the stress response to the burn injury. The resultant production of inflammatory cytokines and endogenous glucocorticoids initially stimulate the osteoblasts to produce RANK ligand, which stimulates marrow stem cell differentiation into osteoclasts. As the stress response persists for approximately one year post-burn the glucocorticoids produced by the body will cause osteoblast apoptosis and adynamic bone, impairing the ability of bone to recover its resorptive losses. The vitamin D deficiency is due to the failure to supplement the diet of burn patients with vitamin D on discharge from hospital and to failure of the skin to make normal quantities of vitamin D on sunlight exposure. Because the bone resorption can be prevented by the acute administration of bisphosphonates it is unlikely that vitamin D deficiency is responsible for the early-onset bone loss following burns. However, because a deficit in trabecular bone remains for at least two years post-burn, it is possible that vitamin D deficiency prevents the recovery of trabecular bone density over the long term.

  11. Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-05-01

    This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

  12. Increase of the Cure Rate of Burn Patients by Improving Burn Wound Management Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Luo, Q.; Peng, Y.; Wang, J.; Huang, Y.; Yang, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Summary In order to summarize the progress of burn wound management of the patients in our burn ward and its correlation with the improvement of treatment results in the past 44 years, the general data (hospitalization time, cure rate, operation times) of 12,568 cases were analysed in terms of three periods, namely 1958 to 1980, 1981 to 1990, and 1991 to 2002. The bene?cial effects of the systemic application of recombinant human growth hormone, post-burn immediate escharectomy en masse, the external application of epithelial growth factor, and the coverage of split-thickness skin donor sites with razor-thick skin on wound healing and overall therapeutic results were also analysed. It was found that there was an increase in the number of burn patients admitted to our burn ward in recent decades. The overall cure rate, especially that of major burn patients, increased signi?cantly with the improvement of burn wound management. Hospitalization time was shortened and wound-healing time reduced. The analysis suggested that escharectomy en masse as early as possible, systemic application of growth hormone, and external application of epithelial growth factor are bene?cial to early burn wound healing. PMID:21990972

  13. Rheology as a Tool to Predict the Release of Alpha-Lipoic Acid from Emulsions Used for the Prevention of Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Vera Lucia Borges; Chiari-Andréo, Bruna Galdorfini; Marto, Joana Marques; Moraes, Jemima Daniela Dias; Leone, Beatriz Alves; Corrêa, Marcos Antonio; Ribeiro, Helena Margarida

    2015-01-01

    The availability of an active substance through the skin depends basically on two consecutive steps: the release of this substance from the vehicle and its subsequent permeation through the skin. Hence, studies on the specific properties of vehicles, such as their rheological behavior, are of great interest in the field of dermatological products. Recent studies have shown the influence of the rheological features of a vehicle on the release of drugs and active compounds from the formulation. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the rheological features of two different emulsion formulations on the release of alpha-lipoic acid. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) was chosen for this study because of its antioxidant characteristics, which could be useful for the prevention of skin diseases and aging. The rheological and mechanical behavior and the in vitro release profile were assayed. The results showed that rheological features, such as viscosity, thixotropy, and compliance, strongly influenced the release of ALA from the emulsion and that the presence of a hydrophilic polymer in one of the emulsions was an important factor affecting the rheology and, therefore, the release of ALA. PMID:26788510

  14. The Betadine trial - antiseptic wound irrigation prior to skin closure at caesarean section to prevent surgical site infection: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Kassam; Ibiebele, Ibinabo; Buchanan, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) occur in around 10% of women following a caesarean section. Efforts to reduce SSI include wound irrigation with povidone-iodine (PVI), but studies are nonconclusive, mostly old and few on women having caesarean section (CS). To assess povidone-iodine (PVI) (Betadine) irrigation of wound prior to skin closure in reducing incidence of SSI after CS. Our hypothesis was that there would be no benefit with its use in reducing SSIs. A randomised controlled trial with 3027 women. Women having CS were allocated to receive PVI irrigation or no irrigation after closure of fascia and before skin closure. Women were followed up to four weeks to assess for SSI. Main outcome measure was surgical site infection. The two groups (1520 in Betadine and 1507 on no Betadine group) were well balanced. The incidence of SSI was similar in the two groups (9.5% vs 9.8%, RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.78-1.21). There was no difference between groups (2.6% vs 2.0%, RR 1.29, 95% CI 0.81-2.06 Betadine vs no Betadine, respectively) in readmission for wound infection requiring intravenous antibiotics; this was so in both the elective CS group as well as CS in labour group. PVI irrigation after the closure of fascia and before closure of skin is of no benefit in the prevention of SSI in women undergoing CS. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. Topical ozonated oil versus hyaluronic gel for the treatment of partial- to full-thickness second-degree burns: A prospective, comparative, single-blind, non-randomised, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanati, A; De Blasio, S; Giuliano, A; Ganzetti, G; Giuliodori, K; Pecora, T; Consales, V; Minnetti, I; Offidani, A

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that ozonated oil is effective on cutaneous wound healing. This in vivo study has been conducted to evaluate the clinical effect of the topical application of ozonated oil for 12 weeks on second-degree skin burns. A total of 30 patients suffering from second-degree skin burns in the phase of re-epithelisation were included in this study. Every skin burn was subdivided in two symmetrical parts. One part was treated with occlusive application of ozonated oil; the contralateral part of the lesion was treated with topical application of hyaluronic acid gel, once a day for 12 weeks. A clinical evaluation and an intra-vital video-capillaroscopy were performed on every patient at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks after. All treated lesions improved regardless of the treatment used. Ozonated oil was as effective as hyaluronic acid in improving erythema, tension, itching and burning sensation reported by patients, and it does not exert a specific anti-angiogenic effect compared to hyaluronic acid. However it seems more effective than hyaluronic acid in reducing post-lesional hyperpigmentation. Ozonated oil, topically applied for 12 weeks, seems to be as effective as hyaluronic acid in reducing symptoms related to skin burns, but it could be more effective in preventing the post-lesional hyperpigmentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Burn injuries and adolescents in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morad, Mohammed; Hemmo-Lotem, Michal; Kandel, Isack; Hyam, Eytan; Merrick, Joav

    2004-01-01

    Burn injury is a public health concern often associated with individual pain, emotional stress, prolonged hospitalizations, permanent disfigurement and family stress. In this paper we studied the avaliable data on burn injury among adolescents in Israel through a Medline search and found three relevant studies with data on this population. The incidence rate of burn injury was 0.46 per 1,000 children aged 5-14 years for Jews and 0.91 for Bedouin. Most of the burn injury in this age group was caused by hot liquids, followed by fire and chemical burns for both Jews and Bedouin, but electical burns occurred more often in Bedouins. Mortality was very low for the adolescent group. Prevention programs in schools since the 1980s have been found effective, but the public health focus should now be geared towards groups at risk.

  17. Training and burn care in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamania Shobha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn care is a huge challenge in India, having the highest female mortality globally due to flame burns. Burns can happen anywhere, but are more common in the rural region, affecting the poor. Most common cause is flame burns, the culprit being kerosene and flammable flowing garments worn by the women. The infrastructure of healthcare network is good but there is a severe resource crunch. In order to bring a positive change, there will have to be more trained personnel willing to work in the rural areas. Strategies for prevention and training of burn team are discussed along with suggestions on making the career package attractive and satisfying. This will positively translate into improved outcomes in the burns managed in the rural region and quick transfer to appropriate facility for those requiring specialised attention.

  18. Putative skin-protective formulations in preventing and/or inhibiting experimentally-produced irritant and allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, H; Willard, P; Maibach, H I

    1999-10-01

    The effectiveness of skin protective formulations was evaluated in a previously-described in vivo human model. All formulations failed to inhibit ammonium hydroxide and urea irritation. Only paraffin wax in cetyl alcohol statistically (plauryl sulfate irritation. Paraffin wax in cetyl alcohol was quantitatively the most effective formulation. These results suggest that some formulations may provide protective effects against certain, but not all, irritants or allergens.

  19. Tanning Shade Gradations of Models in Mainstream Fitness and Muscle Enthusiast Magazines: Implications for Skin Cancer Prevention in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Ethan, Danna; Berdnik, Alyssa; Basch, Charles E

    2015-07-01

    Tanned skin has been associated with perceptions of fitness and social desirability. Portrayal of models in magazines may reflect and perpetuate these perceptions. Limited research has investigated tanning shade gradations of models in men's versus women's fitness and muscle enthusiast magazines. Such findings are relevant in light of increased incidence and prevalence of melanoma in the United States. This study evaluated and compared tanning shade gradations of adult Caucasian male and female model images in mainstream fitness and muscle enthusiast magazines. Sixty-nine U.S. magazine issues (spring and summer, 2013) were utilized. Two independent reviewers rated tanning shade gradations of adult Caucasian male and female model images on magazines' covers, advertisements, and feature articles. Shade gradations were assessed using stock photographs of Caucasian models with varying levels of tanned skin on an 8-shade scale. A total of 4,683 images were evaluated. Darkest tanning shades were found among males in muscle enthusiast magazines and lightest among females in women's mainstream fitness magazines. By gender, male model images were 54% more likely to portray a darker tanning shade. In this study, images in men's (vs. women's) fitness and muscle enthusiast magazines portrayed Caucasian models with darker skin shades. Despite these magazines' fitness-related messages, pro-tanning images may promote attitudes and behaviors associated with higher skin cancer risk. To date, this is the first study to explore tanning shades in men's magazines of these genres. Further research is necessary to identify effects of exposure to these images among male readers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. "Suture fixation of the fingers": an effective method for positioning burned and contracted fingers using a pulley system as a guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Bakhshaeekia, Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Preserving function of the hand is the aim of treatment in burned hands; appropriate splinting is one of the important measures during acute and chronic treatment. We introduce an effective safe method for positioning of fingers without violating the joints; In this method before performing skin graft for palmar finger burn or contracture release we suture tip of finger with silk 2-0 and fix it to dorsum of hand while extending the finger and for preventing slipping we insert some pulley like circles tied with silk 2-0 fixing over dorsum of mid phalanx. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    barrier integrity, factors influencing the penetration of the skin, influence of wet work, and guidance for prevention and saving the barrier. Distinguished researchers have contributed to this book, providing a comprehensive and thorough overview of the skin barrier function. Researchers in the field...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  2. Self-management interventions to improve skin care for pressure ulcer prevention in people with spinal cord injuries: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Justine; Swaine, Jillian; Presseau, J; Aspinall, Arlene; Jaglal, Susan; White, Barry; Wolfe, Dalton; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2016-09-06

    Pressure ulcers are a serious, common, lifelong, and costly secondary complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Community-dwelling people with a SCI can prevent them with appropriate skin care (i.e. pressure relieving activities, skin checks). Adherence to skin care remains suboptimal however, and self-management interventions that focus on improving this have been designed. Little is known on their content, effectiveness, or theoretical basis. The aim of the proposed systematic review is to synthesize the literature on self-management interventions to improve skin care in people with a SCI. Specific objectives are to describe these interventions in relation to their content, effectiveness, theory base, and adherence to reporting guidelines for intervention description. The search strategy will combine an electronic search of nine bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, PsycInfo, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Rehabdata, CIRRIE, PEDro, ERIC) and two trial registers with a manual search of relevant reference lists. Predefined eligibility criteria will be applied in a two-phase selection process involving title and abstract screening, followed by full-text screening. A data extraction spreadsheet will be applied to included papers. Intervention content will be coded using two taxonomies (behaviour change taxonomy; PRISMS self-management support taxonomy). A validated tool (Theory Coding Scheme) and the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) will be used to examine theoretical basis and assess adherence to reporting guidelines for intervention description. A small number of heterogeneous studies are likely to be included in this review therefore a narrative synthesis is planned. This systematic review will help identify the gaps and priorities to guide future research activities in this area. PROSPERO CRD42016033191.

  3. Modern management of paediatric burns | Cox | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burns in children differ in multiple aspects from those in adults; the extent and depth of the burn injury are often more severe, the child's body proportions differ, resulting in greater evaporative water and heat loss, and fluid requirements are therefore generally greater. Importantly, many childhood burns are preventable.

  4. Pathophysiologic Response to Burns in the Elderly☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Patsouris, David; Stanojcic, Mile; Abdullahi, Abdikarim; Rehou, Sarah; Pinto, Ruxandra; Chen, Peter; Burnett, Marjorie; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades advancements have improved survival and outcomes of severely burned patients except one population, elderly. The Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) burn size in elderly has remained the same over the past three decades, and so has morbidity and mortality, despite the increased demand for elderly burn care. The objective of this study is to gain insights on why elderly burn patients have had such a poor outcome when compared to adult burn patients. The significance of this project is that to this date, burn care providers recognize the extreme poor outcome of elderly, but the reason remains unclear. In this prospective translational trial, we have determined clinical, metabolic, inflammatory, immune, and skin healing aspects. We found that elderly have a profound increased mortality, more premorbid conditions, and stay at the hospital for longer, p elderly, p > 0.05, but a significant increased incidence of multi organ failure, p elderly have substantially different responses to burns when compared to adults associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that these responses are complex and not linear, requiring a multi-modal approach to improve the outcome of severely burned elderly. PMID:26629550

  5. Pathophysiologic Response to Burns in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc G. Jeschke

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades advancements have improved survival and outcomes of severely burned patients except one population, elderly. The Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 burn size in elderly has remained the same over the past three decades, and so has morbidity and mortality, despite the increased demand for elderly burn care. The objective of this study is to gain insights on why elderly burn patients have had such a poor outcome when compared to adult burn patients. The significance of this project is that to this date, burn care providers recognize the extreme poor outcome of elderly, but the reason remains unclear. In this prospective translational trial, we have determined clinical, metabolic, inflammatory, immune, and skin healing aspects. We found that elderly have a profound increased mortality, more premorbid conditions, and stay at the hospital for longer, p  0.05, but a significant increased incidence of multi organ failure, p < 0.05. These clinical outcomes were associated with a delayed hypermetabolic response, increased hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic responses, inversed inflammatory response, immune-compromisation and substantial delay in wound healing predominantly due to alteration in characteristics of progenitor cells, p < 0.05. In summary, elderly have substantially different responses to burns when compared to adults associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that these responses are complex and not linear, requiring a multi-modal approach to improve the outcome of severely burned elderly.

  6. Autopsy audit of burn patients; the Lagos State University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background There are many studies detailing the improvement in the care and survival of burns patients. Very little have however been documented about the postmortem findings in patients that died after sustaining burns. This study was carried out to assess the severity of injury to skin and internal organs as revealed by ...

  7. Deep gluteal grounding pad burn after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Paolo; Venturini, Luigi; Cigna, Emanuele; Sterpetti, Antonio V; Biacchi, Daniele; di Marzo, Luca

    2015-06-24

    Although skin burns at the site of grounding pad are a known risk of surgery, their exact incidence is unknown. We first report the case of a patient who presented a deep gluteal burn at the site of the grounding pad after an abdominal aortic aneurism repair, the etiology and the challenging treatment required to overcome this complication.

  8. UVB 311 nm tolerance of vitiligo skin increases with skin photo type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caron-Schreinemachers, Anne-Lou D. B.; Kingswijk, Melanie M.; Bos, Jan D.; Westerhof, Wiete

    2005-01-01

    It is assumed that skin is protected against sunburn by melanin. In patients with vitiligo, there are white patches in the normal pigmented skin. We noticed that there is a difference in burning capacity of these white patches between people with different skin types. With UVB 311 nm lamps, we

  9. Rationale, Design, Samples, and Baseline Sun Protection in a Randomized Trial on a Skin Cancer Prevention Intervention in Resort Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B.; Andersen, Peter A.; Walkosz, Barbara J.; Scott, Michael D.; Beck, Larry; Cutter, Gary R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation during recreation is a risk factor for skin cancer. A trial evaluating an intervention to promote advanced sun protection (sunscreen pre-application/reapplication; protective hats and clothing; use of shade) during vacations. Materials and Methods Adult visitors to hotels/resorts with outdoor recreation (i.e., vacationers) participated in a group-randomized pretest-posttest controlled quasi-experimental design in 2012–14. Hotels/resorts were pair-matched and randomly assigned to the intervention or untreated control group. Sun protection (e.g., clothing, hats, shade and sunscreen) was measured in cross-sectional samples by observation and a face-to-face intercept survey during two-day visits. Results Initially, 41 hotel/resorts (11%) participated but 4 dropped out before posttest. Hotel/resorts were diverse (employees=30 to 900; latitude=24o 78′ N to 50o 52′ N; elevation=2 ft. to 9,726 ft. above sea level), and had a variety of outdoor venues (beaches/pools, court/lawn games, golf courses, common areas, and chairlifts). At pretest, 4,347 vacationers were observed and 3,531 surveyed. More females were surveyed (61%) than observed (50%). Vacationers were mostly 35–60 years old, highly educated (college education = 68%) and non-Hispanic white (93%), with high-risk skin types (22%). Vacationers reported covering 60% of their skin with clothing. Also, 40% of vacationers used shade; 60% applied sunscreen; and 42% had been sunburned. Conclusions The trial faced challenges recruiting resorts but result show that the large, multi-state sample of vacationers were at high risk for solar UV exposure. PMID:26593781

  10. Rationale, design, samples, and baseline sun protection in a randomized trial on a skin cancer prevention intervention in resort environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Andersen, Peter A; Walkosz, Barbara J; Scott, Michael D; Beck, Larry; Cutter, Gary R

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation during recreation is a risk factor for skin cancer. A trial evaluated an intervention to promote advanced sun protection (sunscreen pre-application/reapplication; protective hats and clothing; use of shade) during vacations. Adult visitors to hotels/resorts with outdoor recreation (i.e., vacationers) participated in a group-randomized pretest-posttest controlled quasi-experimental design in 2012-14. Hotels/resorts were pair-matched and randomly assigned to the intervention or untreated control group. Sun. protection (e.g., clothing, hats, shade and sunscreen) was measured in cross-sectional samples by observation and a face-to-face intercept survey during two-day visits. Initially, 41 hotel/resorts (11%) participated but 4 dropped out before posttest. Hotel/resorts were diverse (employees=30 to 900; latitude=24° 78' N to 50° 52' N; elevation=2ft. to 9726ft. above sea level), and had a variety of outdoor venues (beaches/pools, court/lawn games, golf courses, common areas, and chairlifts). At pretest, 4347 vacationers were observed and 3531 surveyed. More females were surveyed (61%) than observed (50%). Vacationers were mostly 35-60years old, highly educated (college education=68%) and non-Hispanic white (93%), with high-risk skin types (22%). Vacationers reported covering 60% of their skin with clothing. Also, 40% of vacationers used shade; 60% applied sunscreen; and 42% had been sunburned. The trial faced challenges recruiting resorts but result showed that the large, multi-state sample of vacationers were at high risk for solar UV exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Flt3 Ligand Treatment Attenuates T Cell Dysfunction and Improves Survival in a Murine Model of Burn Wound Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Naeem K; Bohannon, Julia K; Luan, Liming; Guo, Yin; Fensterheim, Benjamin; Hernandez, Antonio; Wang, Jingbin; Sherwood, Edward R

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death among severely burned patients. Burn injury disrupts the protective skin barrier and causes immunological dysfunction. In our previous studies, we found that burn injury and wound infection causes a significant decline in lymphocyte populations, implying adaptive immune system dysfunction. In the present study, we examined the effect of treatment with Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 Ligand (Flt3L) on T cell phenotype and function in a model of burn wound sepsis. FLt3L is an essential cytokine required for hematopoietic progenitor cell development and expansion of both myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Flt3L has been shown to potentiate innate immune functions of dendritic cells and neutrophils during burn wound sepsis. However, the ability of Flt3L to improve T cell function during burn wound sepsis has not been previously evaluated. Mice underwent 35% total body surface area scald burn and were treated with Flt3L (10 μg) or vehicle daily via the intraperitoneal route starting 1 day after burn injury. On day 4 after burn injury, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used to induce wound infection. Leukocytes in spleen and wound draining lymph nodes were characterized using flow cytometry. Bacterial clearance, organ injury, and survival were also assessed. Flt3L treatment prevented the decline in splenic CD4 and CD8 T cells caused by burn injury and infection. Flt3L treatment also attenuated the decline in CD28 expression on CD4 and CD8 T cells and IFNγ production by CD8 T cells in the spleen and wound draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, Flt3L decreased the levels of programmed death ligand 1 expression on splenic dendritic cells and macrophages. Flt3 treatment improved systemic bacterial clearance, decreased liver and kidney injury, and significantly improved survival in mice with burn wound sepsis. Burn injury and associated sepsis causes significant loss of T cells and evidence of T cell dysfunction. Flt3L attenuates T cell dysfunction and

  12. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  13. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, E L; Boulware, S; Fields, T; McIvor, E; Powell, K L; DiGiovanni, J; Vasquez, K M; MacLeod, M C

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Silver nanoparticles protect human keratinocytes against UVB radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis: potential for prevention of skin carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sumit; Tyagi, Nikhil; Bhardwaj, Arun; Rusu, Lilia; Palanki, Rohan; Vig, Komal; Singh, Shree R.; Singh, Ajay P.; Palanki, Srinivas; Miller, Michael E.; Carter, James E.; Singh, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation from the sun is an established etiological cause of skin cancer, which afflicts more than a million lives each year in the United States alone. Here, we tested the chemopreventive efficacy of silver-nanoparticles (AgNPs) against UVB-irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT). AgNPs were synthesized by reduction-chemistry and characterized for their physicochemical properties. AgNPs were well tolerated by HaCaT cells and their pretreatment protected them from UVB-irradiation-induced apoptosis along with significant reduction in cyclobutane-pyrimidine-dimer formation. Moreover, AgNPs pre-treatment led to G1-phase cell-cycle arrest in UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells. AgNPs were efficiently internalized in UVB-irradiated cells and localized into cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. Furthermore, we observed an altered expression of various genes involved in cell-cycle, apoptosis and nucleotide-excision repair in HaCaT cells treated with AgNPs prior to UVB-irradiation. Together, these findings provide support for potential utility of AgNPs as novel chemopreventive agents against UVB-irradiation-induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:25804413

  15. Annona muricata leaves extracts prevent DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumorigenesis via modulating antioxidants enzymes system in ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Roduan, Mohd Rohaizad; Hamid, Roslida Abd; Sulaiman, Hamizah; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah

    2017-10-01

    Annona muricata, locally known as soursop has been reported to exhibit antiproliferative activities against various cancer cell lines. In this current study, we have investigated the antitumor promotion of various fractions of Annona muricata leaves (AML); hexane (AMLH), dichloromethane (AMLD) and methanol (AMLM) fraction respectively on 7, 12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA) induced and 12-0-tetradecaboylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) promoted skin tumorigenesis in mice via morphological assessment, biochemical analysis and histopathological evaluation. The results of the study revealed significant inhibition in tumor incidence, tumor burden and tumor volume in the groups received AMLH and AMLD, respectively, and suppressive effects in group received AMLM compared with carcinogen control group at week 21. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and lipid peroxidation levels were returned to near normal by administration of AML to DMBA/TPA-induced mice. The above findings were supported by histopathological studies, in which the extensive epidermal hyperplasia in carcinogen control group was restored to normal in AML treated groups. Whilst, annonacin, a major annaonaceous acetogenin was found to be the highest in AMLH and AMLD. From the present study, it can be inferred that AML supressed DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumor and this antitumor-promoting activity may be linked to the antioxidant/free radical-scavenging constituents of the extract and annonacin contained in the extracts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. GHK-Cu may Prevent Oxidative Stress in Skin by Regulating Copper and Modifying Expression of Numerous Antioxidant Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Pickart

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The copper binding tripeptide GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine is a naturally occurring plasma peptide that significantly declines during human aging. It has been established that GHK:Copper(2+ improves wound healing and tissue regeneration and stimulates collagen and decorin production. GHK-Cu also supports angiogenesis and nerve outgrowth, improves the condition of aging skin and hair, and possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In addition, it increases cellular stemness and secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. GHK’s antioxidant actions have been demonstrated in vitro and in animal studies. They include blocking the formation of reactive oxygen and carbonyl species, detoxifying toxic products of lipid peroxidation such as acrolein, protecting keratinocytes from lethal Ultraviolet B (UVB radiation, and blocking hepatic damage by dichloromethane radicals. In recent studies, GHK has been found to switch gene expression from a diseased state to a healthier state for certain cancers and for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The Broad Institute’s Connectivity Map indicated that GHK induces a 50% or greater change of expression in 31.2% of human genes. This paper reviews biological data demonstrating positive effects of GHK in skin and proposes interaction with antioxidant-related genes as a possible explanation of its antioxidant activity.

  17. Jaggery: an avoidable cause of severe, deadly pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, T D; Latenser, B A; Heinle, J A; Stolpen, M S; Quinn, K A; Ravindran, V; Chacko, J

    2009-05-01

    Jaggery is the non-industrial refinement of sugar cane into a sugar product. Sugar cane cultivation, harvest and refinement are central aspects of rural Indian life. We present a retrospective review of pediatric burns at a single institution in Southern India, drawing special attention to scald burns incurred when young children fall into the cauldron of boiling jaggery. Descriptive statistics comparing children burned by jaggery and children burned by other mechanisms were performed. Multivariable logistic regression including burn size and mechanism of burn (jaggery and non-jaggery) was performed to determine the increased risk of death when burned by jaggery. Children burned by jaggery immersions are older, more likely male, and have larger burns. They have longer hospital stays, more operations, and are more likely to die. When controlling for age, gender, size of burn, and mechanism, jaggery exposure was associated with a higher mortality. Jaggery burns are deadly, devastating burns which could be prevented. While jaggery and sugar cane production can lead to economic independence for rural Indian villages, the cost it exacts from burns and death to the youngest and most vulnerable children must be addressed and prevented.

  18. Harborview burns--1974 to 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren H Engrav

    Full Text Available Burn demographics, prevention and care have changed considerably since the 1970s. The objectives were to 1 identify new and confirm previously described changes, 2 make comparisons to the American Burn Association National Burn Repository, 3 determine when the administration of fluids in excess of the Baxter formula began and to identify potential causes, and 4 model mortality over time, during a 36-year period (1974-2009 at the Harborview Burn Center in Seattle, WA, USA.14,266 consecutive admissions were analyzed in five-year periods and many parameters compared to the National Burn Repository. Fluid resuscitation was compared in five-year periods from 1974 to 2009. Mortality was modeled with the rBaux model. Many changes are highlighted at the end of the manuscript including 1 the large increase in numbers of total and short-stay admissions, 2 the decline in numbers of large burn injuries, 3 that unadjusted case fatality declined to the mid-1980s but has changed little during the past two decades, 4 that race/ethnicity and payer status disparity exists, and 5 that the trajectory to death changed with fewer deaths occurring after seven days post-injury. Administration of fluids in excess of the Baxter formula during resuscitation of uncomplicated injuries was evident at least by the early 1990s and has continued to the present; the cause is likely multifactorial but pre-hospital fluids, prophylactic tracheal intubation and opioids may be involved.1 The dramatic changes include the rise in short-stay admissions; as a result, the model of burn care practiced since the 1970s is still required but is no longer sufficient. 2 Fluid administration in excess of the Baxter formula with uncomplicated injuries began at least two decades ago. 3 Unadjusted case fatality declined to ∼6% in the mid-1980s and changed little since then. The rBaux mortality model is quite accurate.

  19. Camphor Burns on the Palm: An Unusual New Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B A Ramesh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Camphor burns on the palm are uncommon and rarely encountered by a plastic surgeon. Aim: This study aims to analyze different patterns of camphor burns on the palm. Methods: Five women and one man presented with camphor burns on their palm. All patients had burns on their right palm. The shape of camphor, the duration of contact with the ignited camphor on the palm, and post-burn treatments were evaluated. Results: Three types of camphor burns were noted: Type 1 (a ring-shaped or a dome-shaped blister with unburned skin in the center, Type 2 (an oval-shaped partially thick burn with unburned skin in the center, and Type 3 (a full-thickness burn exposing the palmar fascia. Conclusion: Different types of camphor burns on the palm are described in this study. This is the first study to report ring-shaped blisters and ring-shaped partially thick camphor burns caused on the palm.

  20. Factors affecting the depth of burns occurring in medical institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Soon; Choi, Young Hwan; Yoon, Cheonjae; You, Je Sung

    2015-05-01

    Most cases of burns occurring in medical institutions are associated with activities involving heat. It is very difficult to detect these burns. To date, there are few reports on burns occurring in medical institutions. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the etiology of burns occurring in medical institutions and to elucidate the factors affecting burn depth. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients who visited our center from April 2008 to February 2013. This study enrolled all patients with burns occurring in the medical institution during or related to treatment. We excluded burn patients whose burns were not related to treatment (for example, we excluded patients with scalding burns that occurred in the hospital cafeteria and pediatric patients with hot water burns from the water purifier). However, patients with burns that occurred in the recovery room after general anesthesia were included. A total of 115 patients were enrolled in this study. The average patient age was 41.5 years, with more women than men (M:F=31:84). There were 29 cases (25.3%) of superficial burns (first-degree and superficial second-degree) and 86 cases (74.7%) of deep burns (deep second-degree and third-degree). Hot packs were the most common cause of burns (27 cases, 23.5%), followed by laser therapy, heating pads, and grounding pads, accounting for 15 cases each. There were 89 cases (77.4%) of contact burns and 26 cases (22.6%) of non-contact burns. The most common site of burns was the lower extremities (41 cases, 35.7%). The burn site and contact burns were both factors affecting burn depth. The rate of deep burns was higher in patients with contact burns than in those with non-contact burns (odds ratio 4.26) and was associated with lower body burns (odds ratio 2.85). In burns occurring in medical institutions, there is a high probability of a deep burn if it is a contact burn or occurs in the lower body. Therefore, safety guidelines are needed

  1. [Disinfectants for the skin of premature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucurachi, G; Tuoto, M G

    2010-06-01

    Nosocomial infections are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections is based on strategies that aim to limit susceptibility to infections by enhancing host defences, interrupting trasmission of organisms by healthcare workers and by promoting the judicious use of antimicrobials. Strategies for the prevention of nosocomial infections include hand hygiene practices, prevention of central venous (cvc)-related bloodstream infections, judicious use of antimicrobials for therapy, enhancement of host defences, skin care and early enteral feeding with human milk. Major concerns about the use of alcoholic chlorhexidine are for the high risk of skin burns in extremely premature infants during the first days of life, when the skin is thin and not fully keratinesed. Aqueous chlorhexidine could be less irritant when used in very low birthweigth infants and thus could represent a good option. A recent prospective trial of adult patients showed similar effectiveness of alcoholic and aqueos solutions of chlorexidine. However, to date no study evaluated whether the aqueos formulation is less harmful and as effective as the alcoholic formulation in neonatal infants. The lack of evidence for neonatal patients prompts urgent need for large randomised controlled trials comparing effectiveness and safety of different skin disinfectants before CVC placement in neonates and particulary in very low birth-weight infants. Nosocomial infections are still of the most serious problems for the neonatal intensive care unit. Therefore every effort must be implemented to reduce the incidence of these infections, can not be considered a toll required hospitalization, as it may not be acceptable for a place of shelter and care as the hospital may itself be a source of disease.

  2. Inflammatory pain in experimental burns in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L

    2000-01-01

    demonstrated in animal models. Most often clinical pain is due to tissue damage leading to acute inflammation and hyperalgesia, but only few human pain models have examined pain responses in injured tissues. Therefore, models with controlled and reversible tissue trauma are needed. The human burn model...... is an example of such a model, and several groups have performed studies of analgesics and pain mechanisms based on the model. The thesis aims to provide a critical review of the human burn model as a tool in pain research, and to give suggestions for development of the model and future research. The pain...... and inflammatory responses to superficial thermal burns in skin have been studied in healthy volunteers. Burns have the potential for releasing most of the inflammatory and chemical mediators that produce sensitisation and excitation of nociceptors, and the intense nociceptive input during injury produces...

  3. Treatment of burn injuries with keratinocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syring, C.; Maenig, H.J.; Von Versen, R.; Bruck, J.

    1999-01-01

    The German Institute for Cell and Tissue Replacement (DIZG) provides burned patients with skin and amnion for a temporary wound closure. Severely burned patients (>60% BSA for adults, >40% BSA for children) were supplied with autologous and allogenic grafts from cultured keratinocytes. The keratinocyte culture is done under GMP-conditions using the method of Rheinwald and Green. The 3T3 fibroblasts were irradiated with 60 Gy and used as feeder cells to produce keratinocyte sheets within 3 weeks. In this time up to 6.000 cm are available. The sheets were harvested by detachment with dispase (1,2 U/ml), fixed to gauze and transported to the hospital. The DIZG has a 3 years experience in the treatment of burns with keratinocyte sheets. The sheets were transplanted to patients in different hospitals, the total transplanted area is about 30.000 cm. This paper describes the experiences with ten severely burned patients treated with keratinocyte sheet

  4. [Environmental pollution and skin aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierkötter, A

    2011-08-01

    Extrinsic skin aging is the skin aging process induced by environmental factors. The most prominent environmental factor leading to extrinsic skin aging is the sun; therefore extrinsic skin aging is also known as photoaging. However, numerous studies in recent years have shown that smoking leads to extrinsic skin aging. Further, very recently it has been shown, that environmental pollution by traffic is also associated with the occurrence of signs of extrinsic skin aging. Thus, in preventive skin aging strategies the long-term exposure towards air pollution by traffic must also be considered.

  5. LA50 in burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed-Forootan, K; Karimi, H; Motevalian, S A; Momeni, M; Safari, R; Ghadarjani, M

    2016-03-31

    Burn injuries put a huge financial burden on patients and healthcare systems. They are the 8th leading cause of mortality and the 13th most common cause of morbidity in our country. We used data from our Burn Registry Program to evaluate risk factors for mortality and lethal area fifty percent (LA50) in all burn patients admitted over two years. We used multiple logistic regressions to identify risk factors for mortality. LA50 is a reliable aggregate index for hospital care quality and a good measure for comparing results, also with those of other countries. 28,690 burn patients sought medical attention in the Emergency Department, and 1721 of them were admitted. Male to female ratio was 1,75:1. 514 patients were under 15 years old. Median age was 25 (range: 3 months - 93 years). Overall, probability of death was 8.4%. LA50 was 62.31% (CI 95%: 56.57-70.02) for patients aged 15 and over and 72.52% (CI 95%: 61.01-100) for those under 15. In the final model, we found that Adjusted OR was significant for age, female sex, TBSA and inhalation injury (P pay special attention to these variables, especially in prevention programs, to reduce mortality and improve patient outcome. Children have better outcome than adults given equal burn size. Suicide rates are higher for women than men in our country.

  6. Assessment of the effectiveness of silver-coated dressing, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%), citric acid (3%), and silver sulfadiazine (1%) for topical antibacterial effects against the multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting full-skin thickness burn wounds on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 10(8) CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp.

  7. Full thickness burn caused by exposure to giant hogweed: delayed presentation, histological features and surgical management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2012-02-01

    We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with a full thickness chemical burn on his right pretibial area due to phytophotodermatitis (PPD) following contact with giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). Although cutaneous burns due to plants are a well-established cause of chemical burn, previous reports described partial thickness burns that healed with conservative measures. This patient presented to our unit two weeks after the initial injury with an established full thickness burn. Debridement and split thickness skin grafting was required. We presented the histological features of the debrided skin specimen and discussed potential factors leading to this unexpected full thickness injury.

  8. Thermal injury induces impaired function in polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes and reduced control of burn wound infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, H.; Moser, C.; Jensen, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    of the skin showed a more polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs)-dominated inflammation in the group of mice with infected burn wound compared with the with burn wound group. In contrast, a higher degree of inflammation was observed in the burn wound group compared with the group of mice...... of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization...

  9. Beta-haemolytic Streptococcus infection in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, R L; Gang, R K; Sanyal, S C; Mokaddas, E M; Lari, A R

    1999-05-01

    Group A beta haemolytic Streptococcus has been one of the most serious infections in the burn patients resulting in severe cellulitis and sepsis. Penicillin has been used ever since its introduction as prophylaxis against these conditions. Penicillin prophylaxis was used in our burn unit as well without any serious evaluation until December 1992. This prospective study was therefore, undertaken to evaluate the incidence of beta haemolytic Streptococcus infection in burn patients, and its clinical outcome over a period of 5 years in the absence of prophylaxis with penicillin. 14 of the 1213 burn patients admitted to the Al-Babtain Centre for Plastic Surgery and Burns from January 1993 to December 1997 had either colonization or infection with Streptococcus spp. Their mean age was 15 years (range 1 month to 52 years) and the mean burn surface area was 20% (range 5 to 90%). Streptococci were isolated from burn wounds in 10 patients, throat in 3 and blood culture in 1. Group A Streptococcus was found in 5, group C in 3 and group D in 6 patients. In all patients except one the organisms were isolated > or =72 h post burn. The infections were successfully controlled by antibiotic and no detrimental effect was observed either on wound healing or skin graft take. There was no mortality amongst these 14 patients. The study showed that only 1.1% of the burn patients in our unit acquired Streptococcus of which only one third comprised of group A. This study thus demonstrates that the practice of penicillin prophylaxis during the first five post burn days may not be of any value and therefore, deserves discontinuation in units where the incidence of this organism is minuscule.

  10. Burn wound: How it differs from other wounds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of burn injury has always been the domain of burn specialists. Since ancient time, local and systemic remedies have been advised for burn wound dressing and burn scar prevention. Management of burn wound inflicted by the different physical and chemical agents require different regimes which are poles apart from the regimes used for any of the other traumatic wounds. In extensive burn, because of increased capillary permeability, there is extensive loss of plasma leading to shock while whole blood loss is the cause of shock in other acute wounds. Even though the burn wounds are sterile in the beginning in comparison to most of other wounds, yet, the death in extensive burns is mainly because of wound infection and septicemia, because of the immunocompromised status of the burn patients. Eschar and blister are specific for burn wounds requiring a specific treatment protocol. Antimicrobial creams and other dressing agents used for traumatic wounds are ineffective in deep burns with eschar. The subeschar plane harbours the micro-organisms and many of these agents are not able to penetrate the eschar. Even after complete epithelisation of burn wound, remodelling phase is prolonged. It may take years for scar maturation in burns. This article emphasizes on how the pathophysiology, healing and management of a burn wound is different from that of other wounds.

  11. A STUDY OF COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF PREOPERATIVE SKIN PREPARATION WITH CHLORHEXIDINE-ALCOHOL VERSUS POVIDONE-IODINE IN PREVENTION OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Danasekaran

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical site infections is a dangerous condition posing a heavy burden on the patient and social health system. The use of preoperative skin preparation by effective antiseptic plays an important role in reducing postoperative wound infections. Hence, the present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate the efficacy of 2% chlorhexidine-alcohol versus 5% povidone-iodine in abdominal surgeries for prevention of SSI. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present one year randomised controlled trial was conducted in the Department of General Surgery, Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, over a period from 2014 to 2015 on 120 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgeries. The patients were divided into two groups by computer randomisation that is Group A (chlorhexidine-alcohol group and Group B (povidone-iodine group. The surgical wounds were examined for any infections present. RESULTS Most of the patients were males in both the groups (73.33% and 61.67% in group A and B, respectively. Half of the patients (50% in both the groups had chronic appendicitis. The mean duration of surgery in group A was 44.66 ± 5.86 minutes, and in group B, it was 45.00 ± 6.24 minutes. Staphylococcus aureus (1.67% in group A and 10% in group B was the most common organism isolated after skin preparation. After the application of antiseptic agents, there was reduction of bacterial colonisation in both the groups, but significant reduction was seen in chlorhexidine group. In group A, two patients had superficial SSIs compared to 14 patients in group B (p=0.001. The mean length of hospital stay in group A was significantly less (7.20 ± 1.10 vs. 8.67 ± 3.17. CONCLUSION Preoperative skin cleansing with chlorhexidine significantly reduces risk of postoperative SSIs and colonisation of bacteria in clean abdominal surgeries.

  12. OWN EXPERIENCE OF LASER THERAPY FOR THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF EARLY AND LATE RADIATION-INDUCED SKIN INJURIES IN PATIENTS WITH BREAST CANCER AFTER SIMULTANEOUS RECONSTRUCTIVE PLASTIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Tkachev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-energy laser radiation has a good anti-inflammatory and stimulating effect on the damaged tissues; therefore, it can be used for the prevention and treatment of both early and late radiation-induced skin injuries in patients receiving radiotherapy. So far, the effect of low-energy laser radiation in the prevention of radiation-induced skin damage remains poorly understood. This article presents a brief overview of the results obtained in the latest foreign studies as well as own experience of laser therapy for the prevention and treatment of both early and late radiation-induced skin injuries in patients with breast cancer after simultaneous reconstructive plastic surgery.

  13. Pediatric burn wound impetigo after grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikins, Kimberly; Prasad, Narayan; Menon, Seema; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    Modern burn care techniques have reduced the risk of infection of the acute burn wound, resulting in more rapid healing and a lower incidence of graft loss. Secondary breakdown may still occur. The loss of epithelium in association with multifocal superficial abscesses and ulceration has been termed burns impetigo. This may result in considerable morbidity and require prolonged treatment. The events preceding development, the impact on the patient, and the ideal treatment appear unclear and poorly reported. In 5 years, between 2006 and 2011, 406 pediatric burns were treated with skin grafts, with 7% developing burns impetigo. Time to resolution ranged from 5 to 241 days: the mean time to complete healing was greatest with conservative management (96 days), followed by antibacterial dressings (37 days), oral antibiotics (36 days), topical steroids (16 days), and oral antibiotics in combination with topical steroids (13.5 days). Burns impetigo resulted in significant morbidity, requiring multiple visits to the treatment center and prolonged symptoms. Delay in diagnosis and treatment resulted in worse outcomes. Prompt consideration of burns impetigo should occur when postgraft patients present with suggestive clinical signs and treatment with oral antibiotics plus topical steroids should be considered.

  14. La prevención del cáncer de piel (Preventing Skin Cancer)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-31

    Un hombre y una mujer hablan sobre cómo aprendieron a protegerse la piel del sol con los años.  Created: 5/31/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/31/2016.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicaemia in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, R K; Bang, R L; Sanyal, S C; Mokaddas, E; Lari, A R

    1999-11-01

    Out of 1415 patients treated as inpatients at Al-Babtain Center for Burns and Plastic Surgery, Ibn Sina Hospital, Kuwait spanning over a period of 6 years from June 1992 to June 1998, 102 developed clinically and microbiologically proven septicaemia. Only 15 out of them had either single or multiple episodes of septicaemia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and were studied during their stay in the hospital. Five of them were males and 10 females, with a mean age of 26 years (range 3-51 years) and mean total body surface area of burns (TBSA) of 66% (range 25-90%). All of them had flame burns and resuscitation was found to be difficult in eight patients either due to delayed hospitalization or accompanied inhalation injury. Seven patients were intubated, four due to inhalation injury and three for septicaemic complications. Among the 15 patients under study, a total of 36 septicaemic episodes were detected of which 21 were due to P. aeruginosa. This organism was found in the first episodes in nine patients, in second episodes in six, in third episodes in three and fourth, fifth and sixth episodes in one patient, each at a variable postburn day. Ten patients had 38 sessions of excision and skin grafting, six of them survived. Nine of the 15 patients under study died due to septicaemia, but only six of them had P. aeruginosa as the last isolate. Except for one, all patients had > 40% TBSA burn, two had difficult resuscitation and four were intubated. The day of death varied between 3 to 52 days postburn (mean 19 days). This study showed that females with flame burns are susceptible to P. aeruginosa septicaemia. Difficult resuscitation and intubation also proved to be important risk factors. Septicaemia could occur quite early in the postburn days and the mortality due to this organism was quite high. Early excision and grafting with other effective management may result in a better outcome.

  16. Burn Depth Estimation Using Thermal Excitation and Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Yee, M.L.

    1998-12-17

    Accurate estimation of the depth of partial-thickness burns and the early prediction of a need for surgical intervention are difficult. A non-invasive technique utilizing the difference in thermal relaxation time between burned and normal skin may be useful in this regard. In practice, a thermal camera would record the skin's response to heating or cooling by a small amount-roughly 5{degrees} Celsius for a short duration. The thermal stimulus would be provided by a heat lamp, hot or cold air, or other means. Processing of the thermal transients would reveal areas that returned to equilibrium at different rates, which should correspond to different burn depths. In deeper thickness burns, the outside layer of skin is further removed from the constant-temperature region maintained through blood flow. Deeper thickness areas should thus return to equilibrium more slowly than other areas. Since the technique only records changes in the skin's temperature, it is not sensitive to room temperature, the burn's location, or the state of the patient. Preliminary results are presented for analysis of a simulated burn, formed by applying a patch of biosynthetic wound dressing on top of normal skin tissue.

  17. Antiseptics for burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gill; Christie, Janice; Liu, Zhenmi; Westby, Maggie J; Jefferies, Jayne M; Hudson, Thomas; Edwards, Jacky; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad; Hassan, Ibrahim A; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-07-12

    Burn wounds cause high levels of morbidity and mortality worldwide. People with burns are particularly vulnerable to infections; over 75% of all burn deaths (after initial resuscitation) result from infection. Antiseptics are topical agents that act to prevent growth of micro-organisms. A wide range are used with the intention of preventing infection and promoting healing of burn wounds. To assess the effects and safety of antiseptics for the treatment of burns in any care setting. In September 2016 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations), Ovid Embase, and EBSCO CINAHL. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions based on language, date of publication or study setting. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that enrolled people with any burn wound and assessed the use of a topical treatment with antiseptic properties. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We included 56 RCTs with 5807 randomised participants. Almost all trials had poorly reported methodology, meaning that it is unclear whether they were at high risk of bias. In many cases the primary review outcomes, wound healing and infection, were not reported, or were reported incompletely.Most trials enrolled people with recent burns, described as second-degree and less than 40% of total body surface area; most participants were adults. Antiseptic agents assessed were: silver-based, honey, Aloe Vera, iodine-based, chlorhexidine or polyhexanide (biguanides), sodium hypochlorite, merbromin, ethacridine lactate, cerium nitrate and Arnebia euchroma. Most studies compared antiseptic with a topical antibiotic, primarily silver sulfadiazine (SSD); others compared antiseptic with a non

  18. In vivo imaging of human burn injuries with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hean; Pierce, Mark C.; Maguluri, Gopi; Park, B. Hyle; Yoon, Sang June; Lydon, Martha; Sheridan, Robert; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2012-06-01

    The accurate determination of burn depth is critical in the clinical management of burn wounds. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been proposed as a potentially non-invasive method for determining burn depth by measuring thermally induced changes in the structure and birefringence of skin, and has been investigated in pre-clinical burn studies with animal models and ex vivo human skin. In this study, we applied PS-OCT to the in-vivo imaging of two pediatric burn patients. Deep and superficial burned skins along with contralateral controls were imaged in 3D. The imaging size was 8 mm×6 mm×2 mm in width, length, and depth in the air respectively, and the imaging time was approximately 6 s per volume. Superficially burned skins exhibited the same layered structure as the contralateral controls, but more visible vasculature and reduced birefringence compared to the contralateral controls. In contrast, a deeply burned skin showed loss of the layered structure, almost absent vasculature, and smaller birefringence compared to superficial burns. This study suggested the vasculature and birefringence as parameters for characterizing burn wounds.

  19. Pediatric burns in Khuzestan Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyarikhah, Hojjat; Shayestehfard, Marzieh; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Cheraghian, Bahman; Latifzadeh, Shila; Madari, Zahra

    2012-04-01

    Burn injuries are the most frequently occurring injuries among pediatric populations worldwide, and they are significant pediatric injuries in Iran. This study was conducted to analyze the pattern of pediatric burns in Khuzestan province in the south-west of Iran from April 2006 to March 2007. The location of the study was Taleghani Hospital, a sole center for burn patients in Khuzestan province. The number of patients with burns admitted to the center in 1 year (from April 2006 to March 2007) was 211. Data were obtained by reviewing the medical records of patients hospitalized at the center. Of the patients, 85 (40.3%) were female and 126 (59.7%) were male. Of the 85 female patients, 50 were from urban areas and 35 were from rural areas. Of the 126 male patients, 68 (54%) were from urban areas and 58 (46%) were from rural areas. The mean ± SE age of the children ranging between 0 and 11 years was 3.20 ± 0.188. Scalding was the predominant cause of burns and caused 86.7% of the burns. The age of the patients with scald injuries (2.95 ± 2.56 years) was significantly lower than that of patients with flame injuries (4.28 ± 3.3 years) (P=0.007). Correlation analysis showed that younger children and urban residents are more vulnerable to scald injuries. The mean body surface area of burns was 20.5 ± 10.26 cm in all patients. Scalding was the most common cause of burns. Age burn accidents in children in Khuzestan. An appropriate burn prevention program, with focus on education, is needed to prevent this injury.

  20. Tissue expansion in burn sequelae repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares Filho, João Medeiros; Belerique, Manoel; Franco, Diogo; Porchat, Carlos Alberto; Franco, Talita

    2007-03-01

    Burns may cause emotional, aesthetic and functional sequelae. Extended or hypertrophic scars are usually difficult to repair using local tissues, and the use of skin grafts may cause further injuries to the donor sites. The use of tissue expanders may offer a better option in the treatment of burn sequelae. This is a report on our experience using tissue expanders in 54 cases (23 patients) of burn sequelae located in different anatomical areas. Fourteen of the patients were female and nine male ranging in age between 5 and 48. The expanders were placed in the subgaleal, submuscular, subfascial or subcutaneous planes. Skin expansion was completed in 50 cases (92.5%). The injured area was removed by advancement flaps in 44 cases and by transposition flaps in 6 of them. Primary expansion was performed in 42 cases and reexpansion in 12. The rate of complications was 24.07%, of which 30.8% were considered to be absolute and 69.2% relative. Tissue expansion is an excellent option for burn sequelae treatment because it provides skin of similar local characteristics and does not damage the donor site. The procedure can be repeated in the event of major sequelae (reexpansion).

  1. Paraquat poisoning in a burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gear, A J; Ahrenholz, D H; Solem, L D

    2001-01-01

    Paraquat is a bipyridyl compound widely used as a contact herbicide. Since its introduction in 1962, hundreds of deaths have occurred, usually after suicidal or accidental ingestion. Death after dermal absorption of paraquat is uncommon, but has occurred after either contact with undi