WorldWideScience

Sample records for prevent skin burns

  1. Hair bleaching and skin burning

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, K.; Lingitz, R.; Prattes, G.; Schneider, G.; Sutter, S.; Schintler, M.; Trop, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hairdressing-related burns are preventable and therefore each case is one too many. We report a unique case of a 16-yr-old girl who suffered full-thickness chemical and thermal burns to the nape of her neck and superficial burns to the occiput after her hair had been dyed blond and placed under a dryer to accelerate the highlighting procedure. The wound on the nape of the neck required surgical debridement and skin grafting. The grafted area resulted in subsequent scar formation.

  2. Using Pig skin to treat Burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katebe, R.

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses the use of irradiated Pig Skin for the treatment of Burns, traumatic dermal denudations and poorly healing Decubitus ulcers. It gives a brief history of Pig skin use its characteristics

  3. Preventing Burns in Your Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clothing when you handle chemicals. Store chemicals, including gasoline, out of the reach of children. To prevent ... mild burn? What is the treatment for smoke inhalation? Resources American Red Cross, Home Fire Safety Centers ...

  4. [Compression treatment for burned skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Fadhel; Lassoued, Mohamed A; Sahnoun, Mahdi; Sfar, Souad; Cheikhrouhou, Morched

    2012-02-01

    The regularity of a compressive knit is defined as its ability to perform its function in a burnt skin. This property is essential to avoid the phenomenon of rejection of the material or toxicity problems But: Make knits biocompatible with high burnet of human skin. We fabric knits of elastic material. To ensure good adhesion to the skin, we made elastic material, typically a tight loop knitted. The Length of yarn absorbed by stitch and the raw matter are changed with each sample. The physical properties of each sample are measured and compared. Surface modifications are made to these samples by impregnation of microcapsules based on jojoba oil. Knits are compressif, elastic in all directions, light, thin, comfortable, and washable for hygiene issues. In addition, the washing can find their compressive properties. The Jojoba Oil microcapsules hydrated the human burnet skin. This moisturizer is used to the firmness of the wound and it gives flexibility to the skin. Compressive Knits are biocompatible with burnet skin. The mixture of natural and synthetic fibers is irreplaceable in terms comfort and regularity.

  5. Preventing Skin Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-18

    A man and a woman talk about how they’ve learned to protect their skin from the sun over the years. .  Created: 5/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/18/2016.

  6. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn ... know about burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. Read our burn prevention tips | ...

  7. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Properties and Types of Significant Thermal Skin Burn Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The deep burn category includes deep second, deep third and deep fourth-degree burns. Table 2: Burn Classification and Injury Outcome ( Rice ...Subcutaneous tissue  Entire dermis destroyed  No to low pain due to nerve destruction  Waxy white to leathery gray to charred black skin  Dry...Richard R.L. (2009) Rehabilitation of the Burned Hand. Hand Clinics, 25, 529- 541 Rice P.L. & Orgill, D.P. (2015).Classification of burns. (Ed

  9. Improving burn care and preventing burns by establishing a burn database in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzaylov, Gennadiy; Murthy, Sushila; Dunaev, Alexander; Savchyn, Vasyl; Knittel, Justin; Zabolotina, Olga; Dylewski, Maggie L; Driscoll, Daniel N

    2014-08-01

    Burns are a challenge for trauma care and a contribution to the surgical burden. The former Soviet republic of Ukraine has a foundation for burn care; however data concerning burns in Ukraine has historically been scant. The objective of this paper was to compare a new burn database to identify problems and implement improvements in burn care and prevention in this country. Retrospective analyses of demographic and clinical data of burn patients including Tukey's post hoc test, analysis of variance, and chi square analyses, and Fisher's exact test were used. Data were compared to the American Burn Association (ABA) burn repository. This study included 1752 thermally injured patients treated in 20 hospitals including Specialized Burn Unit in Municipal Hospital #8 Lviv, Lviv province in Ukraine. Scald burns were the primary etiology of burns injuries (70%) and burns were more common among children less than five years of age (34%). Length of stay, mechanical ventilation use, infection rates, and morbidity increased with greater burn size. Mortality was significantly related to burn size, inhalation injury, age, and length of stay. Wound infections were associated with burn size and older age. Compared to ABA data, Ukrainian patients had double the length of stay and a higher rate of wound infections (16% vs. 2.4%). We created one of the first burn databases from a region of the former Soviet Union in an effort to bring attention to burn injury and improve burn care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Skin bioengineering and stem cells for severe burn treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lataillade, J.J.; Trouillas, M.; Alexaline, M.; Brachet, M.; Bey, E.; Duhamel, P.; Leclerc, T.; Bargues, L.

    2015-01-01

    Severely burned patients need definitive and efficient wound coverage. The outcome of massive burns has improved with cultured epithelial auto-grafts (CEA). In spite of its fragility, percentage of success, cost of treatment and long-term tendency to contracture, this surgical technique has been developed in some burn centres. The first improvements involved combining CEA and dermis-like substitutes. Cultured skin substitutes provide faster skin closure and satisfying functional results. These methods have been used successfully in massive burns. A second improvement was to enable skin regeneration by using epidermal stem cells. Stem cells can differentiate into keratinocytes, to promote wound repair and to regenerate skin appendages. Human mesenchymal stem cells foster wound healing and were used in cutaneous radiation syndrome. Skin regeneration and tissue engineering methods remain a complex challenge and offer the possibility of new treatment for injured and burned patients. (authors)

  11. Skin contamination - prevention and decontaminating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the structure of human skin. Measures were drawn up to prevent skin contamination in nuclear installations as well as contaminated skin was decontaminated from the personnel. By systematically applying these measures a significant level of success was achieved in preventing contamination in nuclear installations. Cases where more far-reaching chemical methods had to be used were kept to a minimum. (R.P.)

  12. Car radiator burns: a prevention issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitts, Angela; Alden, Nicole E; Conlin, Tara; Yurt, Roger W

    2004-01-01

    Scald burns continue to be the major cause of injury to patients admitted to the burn center. Scald burns occurring from car radiator fluid comprise a significant subgroup. Although manufacturer warning labels have been placed on car radiators, these burns continue to occur. This retrospective review looks at all patients admitted to our burn center who suffered scald burns from car radiator fluid to assess the extent of this problem. During the study period, 86 patients were identified as having suffered scald burns as a result of contact with car radiator fluid. Seventy-one percent of the burn injuries occurred in the summer months. The areas most commonly burned were the head and upper extremities. Burn prevention efforts have improved greatly over the years; however, this study demonstrates that scald burns from car radiator fluid continue to cause physical, emotional, and financial devastation. The current radiator warning labels alone are not effective. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has proposed a new federal motor vehicle safety standard to aid in decreasing the number of scald burns from car radiators. The results of this study were submitted to the United States Department of Transportation for inclusion in a docket for federal legislation supporting these safety measures.

  13. National programme for prevention of burn injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The estimated annual burn incidence in India is approximately 6-7 million per year. The high incidence is attributed to illiteracy, poverty and low level safety consciousness in the population. The situation becomes further grim due to the absence of organized burn care at primary and secondary health care level. But the silver lining is that 90% of burn injuries are preventable. An initiative at national level is need of the hour to reduce incidence so as to galvanize the available resources for more effective and standardized treatment delivery. The National Programme for Prevention of Burn Injuries is the endeavor in this line. The goal of National programme for prevention of burn injuries (NPPBI would be to ensure prevention and capacity building of infrastructure and manpower at all levels of health care delivery system in order to reduce incidence, provide timely and adequate treatment to burn patients to reduce mortality, complications and provide effective rehabilitation to the survivors. Another objective of the programme will be to establish a central burn registry. The programme will be launched in the current Five Year Plan in Medical colleges and their adjoining district hospitals in few states. Subsequently, in the next five year plan it will be rolled out in all the medical colleges and districts hospitals of the country so that burn care is provided as close to the site of accident as possible and patients need not to travel to big cities for burn care. The programme would essentially have three components i.e. Preventive programme, Burn injury management programme and Burn injury rehabilitation programme.

  14. Radiator scald burns: a preventable hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmeir, P; Rosenberg, L; Sagi, A; Ben-Yakar, Y

    1990-04-01

    During the last 13 years 80 patients have been admitted to our department suffering from burns caused by a vehicle's radiator. Ten of them were deeply burned and had to be treated surgically. The preventive aspect of this injury is emphasized.

  15. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch ... learn what you need to know about burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. ...

  16. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs ... to learn what you need to know about burn prevention if you have a child with special ...

  17. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs ... to learn what you need to know about burn prevention if you have a child with special ...

  18. Skin graft fixation in severe burns: use of topical negative pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamolz, L P; Lumenta, D B; Parvizi, D; Wiedner, M; Justich, I; Keck, M; Pfurtscheller, K; Schintler, M

    2014-09-30

    Over the last 50 years, the evolution of burn care has led to a significant decrease in mortality. The biggest impact on survival has been the change in the approach to burn surgery. Early excision and grafting has become a standard of care for the majority of patients with deep burns; the survival of a given patient suffering from major burns is invariably linked to the take rate and survival of skin grafts. The application of topical negative pressure (TNP) therapy devices has demonstrated improved graft take in comparison to conventional dressing methods alone. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of TNP therapy on skin graft fixation in large burns. In all patients, we applied TNP dressings covering a %TBSA of >25. The following parameters were recorded and documented using BurnCase 3D: age, gender, %TBSA, burn depth, hospital length-of-stay, Baux score, survival, as well as duration and incidence of TNP dressings. After a burn depth adapted wound debridement, coverage was simultaneously performed using split-thickness skin grafts, which were fixed with staples and covered with fatty gauzes and TNP foam. The TNP foam was again fixed with staples to prevent displacement and finally covered with the supplied transparent adhesive film. A continuous subatmospheric pressure between 75-120 mm Hg was applied (VAC®, KCI, Vienna, Austria). The first dressing change was performed on day 4. Thirty-six out of 37 patients, suffering from full thickness burns, were discharged with complete wound closure; only one patient succumbed to their injuries. The overall skin graft take rate was over 95%. In conclusion, we consider that split thickness skin graft fixation by TNP is an efficient method in major burns, notably in areas with irregular wound surfaces or subject to movement (e.g. joint proximity), and is worth considering for the treatment of aged patients.

  19. Live Skin Allograft in the Management of Severe Burns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    skin substitute should in some way be incorporated into the healing wound as ... liquid nitrogen or they may be lyophilized and freeze- dried (4, 5). ... more severe the burn the greater the degree of immunosuppresion. ... Humby knife under spinal anesthesia. .... Alloantibody Effect on Skin Graft Survival in Mice. Hiroshima J ...

  20. Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for some types of cancer, but only smoking can be avoided. Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors ... may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being ... enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking and ...

  1. A skin burn associated with Ranunculus arvensis (wedding bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orak Murat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ranunculus arvensis L-a member of Ranunculaceae family- is grown as a wild plant in productive agriculture lands of the altitude between 1 to 1850 m mainly in the Mediterranean Region and Iran-Turan vegetation in Turkey. Skin burn cases associated with Ranunculaceae family is very limited in literature and according to the authors′ knowledge this is the only report in literature from Turkey. In this report, we have presented a case of skin burn associated with Ranunculus arvensis represented to our emergency service.

  2. Integra artificial skin dermal regeneration templates in burn scar surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rexon Ngim

    1999-01-01

    Integra artificial skin is a porous matrix used as a permanent dermal replacement. Developed in the 1970's, it has been used successfully in the treatment of acute bums requiring full or deep partial thickness skin replacement. Three patients with burn scars received Integra Artificial Skin to resurface various areas of burn scars and also contractures. The first was a 24-year-old woman who had two pieces of Integra to resurface a forearm/elbow/wrist defect. The second was a 28-year-old woman who had two pieces of Integra to resurface a neck contracture. The third was a 44 year-old woman who had two pieces to correct severe burn contractures/ scars of her hands. The results of these three patients, probably the first time Integra was used for bum scar and contracture revision, indicate that there is a place for Integra in Burn Scar surgery. However, the basic principle of its application must be adhered to. These include excision to remove the complete scar, recreation of original size of skin defect and meticulous application of the Artificial Skin and its care post-operatively. Details of its application will be highlighted

  3. Introducing banked allograft skin to burn surgery in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burn injury remains a severely neglected epidemic in South Africa. (SA), despite the magnitude of the problem. This has been described by a number of authors, and there is a shift towards addressing the deficits.[1-6] The recent establishment of the first allograft skin bank in SA is potentially a tremendous stride towards ...

  4. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in previously burned or irradiated skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, M.J.; Hirsch, R.M.; Broadwater, J.R.; Netscher, D.T.; Ames, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising in previously burned or irradiated skin was reviewed in 66 patients treated between 1944 and 1986. Healing of the initial injury was complicated in 70% of patients. Mean interval from initial injury to diagnosis of SCC was 37 years. The overwhelming majority of patients presented with a chronic intractable ulcer in previously injured skin. The regional relapse rate after surgical excision was very high, 58% of all patients. Predominant patterns of recurrence were in local skin and regional lymph nodes (93% of recurrences). Survival rates at 5, 10, and 20 years were 52%, 34%, and 23%, respectively. Five-year survival rates in previously burned and irradiated patients were not significantly different (53% and 50%, respectively). This review, one of the largest reported series, better defines SCC arising in previously burned or irradiated skin as a locally aggressive disease that is distinct from SCC arising in sunlight-damaged skin. An increased awareness of the significance of chronic ulceration in scar tissue may allow earlier diagnosis. Regional disease control and survival depend on surgical resection of all known disease and may require radical lymph node dissection or amputation

  5. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn what you need ... burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. Read our burn prevention tips | Visit our YouTube ...

  6. Targeting burn prevention in Ukraine: evaluation of base knowledge in burn prevention and first aid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamelli, Liza; Mykychack, Iryna; Kushnir, Antin; Driscoll, Daniel N; Fuzaylov, Gennadiy

    2015-01-01

    Burn prevention has been identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a topic in need of further investigation and education throughout the world, with an increased need in low-income countries. It has been noted that implementing educational programs for prevention in high income countries has aided in lowering the rate of burn injuries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the current education level of knowledge of prevention and first aid treatment of scald burns. A prevention campaign will target these educational needs as a part of an outreach program to improve burn care in Ukraine. The research team evaluated the current health structure in Ukraine and how it could benefit from the increased knowledge of burn prevention and first aid. A test was designed to assess the baseline level of knowledge with regard to first aid and scald prevention in parents, pregnant woman, and healthcare and daycare providers. A total of 14,456 tests were sent to pediatric clinics, obstetrician clinics, and daycare facilities to test respondents. A total of 6,120 completed tests were returned. Doctors presented with the highest level of knowledge averaging 77.0% on prevention and 67.5% on first aid while daycare workers presented the largest gap in knowledge at 65.0% in prevention and 54.3% in first aid. Interest in further educational materials was reported by 92% of respondents. The results of this study clearly show a lack of knowledge in first aid and prevention of scald burn injury in all the populations tested.

  7. Best Practices for Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the Burn Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Julia; Ann Raible, Mary; Hajduk, Gina; Collavo, Jacqueline

    The State of Pennsylvania Hospital Engagement Network, in collaboration with a hospital system in Southwestern Pennsylvania, established a goal of reducing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers by 20%. A 6-month unfavorable trend of nurse-sensitive clinical indicators called for immediate process improvement. A retrospective chart review resulted in identification of predominant risk factors placing the burn patient at high risk for pressure ulcer formation. Implementations of pressure ulcer prevention measures were inconsistent. Nurses demonstrated varied levels of knowledge about products used for prevention. It became imperative to examine processes within the unit and provide nursing with education, access to skin care supplies, and advanced skin/wound care products for maintaining skin integrity. Creation of evidence-based guidelines was necessary to improve patient outcomes. A collaborative team approach influenced nursing and physician awareness of pressure ulcer risk. Evidence-based prevention guidelines were developed, and consistency in early intervention was achieved, supporting our culture of safety. A change in interprofessional collaborative practice and positive trend in pressure ulcer incidence data supports the success of our program.

  8. Burn prevention in Zambia: a targeted epidemiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Jason P; Latenser, Barbara A; Liao, Junlin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess primary burn prevention knowledge in a rural Zambian population that is disproportionately burdened by burn injuries. A 10-question survey was completed by youths, and a 15-question survey was completed by adults. The survey was available in both English and Nyanja. The surveys were designed to test their knowledge in common causes, first aid, and emergency measures regarding burn injuries. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore relationships between burn knowledge, age, school, and socioeconomic variables. A burn prevention coloring book, based on previous local epidemiological data, was also distributed to 800 school age youths. Five hundred fifty youths and 39 adults completed the survey. The most significant results show knowledge deficits in common causes of burns, first aid treatment of a burn injury, and what to do in the event of clothing catching fire. Younger children were more likely to do worse than older children. The adults performed better than the youths, but still lack fundamental burn prevention and treatment knowledge. Primary burn prevention data from the youths and adults surveyed demonstrate a clear need for burn prevention and treatment education in this population. In a country where effective and sustainable burn care is lacking, burn prevention may be a better investment to reduce burn injury than large investments in healthcare resources.

  9. Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asafe tan. Atan means you have damaged your skin. FACT: Tanning indoors is not safer than tanning in the ... both dangerous. You can get a burn from tanning indoors. Tanned skin is damaged skin. Although it is important to ...

  10. Cutaneous contamination after a uranyl nitrate skin burn: incident report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berard, P.; Chalabreysse, J.; Quesne, B.; Auriol, B.

    1994-01-01

    The authors review the circumstances of a handburn incident by a mixture of dilute nitric acid and uranyl nitrate. The burn was localised on the thumb and three fingers of the left hand. After abundant washing, external direct measurements revealed the presence of uranium on the fingers. The injured employee was maintained under observation for ten days, and therapy was performed until all the activity disappeared. External monitoring with various detectors, and measurements of the bandages and skin showed a rapid decrease of uranium fixation. All urine was collected throughout the duration of the treatment. The study shows that all the activity was retained on the burnt skin, with very little systemic uptake. Rapid peeling eliminated the cutaneous retention. Internal and external dose assessments were calculated and the committed effective dose equivalent and the committed dose equivalent for the skin and bone surfaces were low. (author)

  11. Skin Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  12. Folate in Skin Cancer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.D.; Jacobson, Elaine L.; Kim, H.; Kim, M.; Jacobson, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Skin, the largest, most exposed organ of the body, provides a protective interface between humans and the environment. One of its primary roles is protection against exposure to sunlight, a major source of skin damage where the UV radiation (UVR) component functions as a complete carcinogen. Melanin pigmentation and the evolution of dark skin is an adaptive protective mechanism against high levels of UVR exposure. Recently, the hypothesis that skin pigmentation balances folate preservation an...

  13. Personnel decontamination and preventive skin care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Skin contamination arises from contact with contaminated aqueous solutions and from transmission of radioactively contaminated dirt particles. As long as the surface of the skin is neither inflamed nor showing any lesions, normally only a limited part of the top layer (epidermis), i.e. the upper layers of the stratum corneum, is contaminated. The intact horny layer has a barrier function protecting against the penetration of chemicals and dirt particles. The horny layer can be damaged by water, solvents, alkaline substances, and acids. In general, it is safe to say that the horny layer acts as a natural barrier to the penetration of liquid and particulate impurities into lower layers of the skin. As long as the horny layer is intact and free from lesions, the risk of incorporation can be considered low. When decontaminating and cleansing the skin, also in daily skin cleansing, care must be taken to prevent the acid protective layer and the horny layer from being compromised. Daily cleansing and cleansing for decontamination must be carried out with a mild, weakly acidic detergent. In addition, prevention should be achieved daily by applying a non-greasy skin lotion to protect the skin. Following a systematic regular regimen in skin cleansing and preventive skin care as well as a specific approach in skin decontamination and cleansing will avoid damage to the skin and remove any contamination incurred. This approach comprises a three-pronged concept, namely skin protection, cleansing and care. (orig.)

  14. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Age Group Special Needs Space and Place Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type Video Audience Parents You are here Home Safety Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch ...

  15. Cultured skin substitutes reduce donor skin harvesting for closure of excised, full-thickness burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Steven T; Kagan, Richard J; Yakuboff, Kevin P; Meyer, Nicholas A; Rieman, Mary T; Greenhalgh, David G; Warden, Glenn D

    2002-02-01

    Comparison of cultured skin substitutes (CSS) and split-thickness skin autograft (AG) was performed to assess whether donor-site harvesting can be reduced quantitatively and whether functional and cosmetic outcome is similar qualitatively in the treatment of patients with massive cutaneous burns. Cultured skin substitutes consisting of collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates populated with autologous fibroblasts and keratinocytes have been shown to close full-thickness skin wounds in preclinical and clinical studies with acceptable functional and cosmetic results. Qualitative outcome was compared between CSS and AG in 45 patients on an ordinal scale (0, worst; 10, best) with primary analyses at postoperative day 28 and after about 1 year for erythema, pigmentation, pliability, raised scar, epithelial blistering, and surface texture. In the latest 12 of the 45 patients, tracings were performed of donor skin biopsies and wounds treated with CSS at postoperative days 14 and 28 to calculate percentage engraftment, the ratio of closed wound:donor skin areas, and the percentage of total body surface area closed with CSS. Measures of qualitative outcome of CSS or AG were not different statistically at 1 year after grafting. Engraftment at postoperative day 14 exceeded 75% in the 12 patients evaluated. The ratio of closed wound:donor skin areas for CSS at postoperative day 28 was significantly greater than for conventional 4:1 meshed autografts. The percentage of total body surface area closed with CSS at postoperative day 28 was significantly less than with AG. The requirement for harvesting of donor skin for CSS was less than for conventional skin autografts. These results suggest that acute-phase recovery of patients with extensive burns is facilitated and that complications are reduced by the use of CSS together with conventional skin grafting.

  16. Treatment of radioinduced skin burns by adult stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lataillade, J.J.; Prat, M.; Gourmelon, P.; Bey, E.

    2009-01-01

    In the area of skin injuries caused by ionizing radiations; the recent opportunity give us the the possibility to manage victims of radiation accidents with skin acute symptoms of irradiation. The approach of cell therapy developed for these patients could be in a second time, used for other types of injuries as thermal burns and the injuries linked to overexposure in radiotherapy. In spite of the diversity of approaches of allogeneic and autologous transplantation, the prognosis of deep and extended radioinduced burns is not completely satisfying because of inflammatory recurrences, origin of graft failures. The stem cells have been used in association. The stem cells were got from sampling of autologous bone marrow after an expansion in vitro from 15 to 17 days. The cultures were realised in medium with 8% of platelet lysate (clinical grade). The cells have been given by injection in complement of epidermis auto graft. A spectacular effect was noticed the day after the injection, but disappearing in some days encouraging to realize supplementary injections. An effect of the quickness and the quality of the graft success is appeared significant too. no necrosis recurrence for the patients after four years for the first one of them. We think that the stem cells participate to the local control of inflammation. (N.C.)

  17. Rationalization of thermal injury quantification methods: application to skin burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglianti, Benjamin L; Dewhirst, Mark W; Abraham, John P; Gorman, John M; Sparrow, Eph M

    2014-08-01

    Classification of thermal injury is typically accomplished either through the use of an equivalent dosimetry method (equivalent minutes at 43 °C, CEM43 °C) or through a thermal-injury-damage metric (the Arrhenius method). For lower-temperature levels, the equivalent dosimetry approach is typically employed while higher-temperature applications are most often categorized by injury-damage calculations. The two methods derive from common thermodynamic/physical chemistry origins. To facilitate the development of the interrelationships between the two metrics, application is made to the case of skin burns. This thermal insult has been quantified by numerical simulation, and the extracted time-temperature results served for the evaluation of the respective characterizations. The simulations were performed for skin-surface exposure temperatures ranging from 60 to 90 °C, where each surface temperature was held constant for durations extending from 10 to 110 s. It was demonstrated that values of CEM43 at the basal layer of the skin were highly correlated with the depth of injury calculated from a thermal injury integral. Local values of CEM43 were connected to the local cell survival rate, and a correlating equation was developed relating CEM43 with the decrease in cell survival from 90% to 10%. Finally, it was shown that the cell survival/CEM43 relationship for the cases investigated here most closely aligns with isothermal exposure of tissue to temperatures of ~50 °C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Venous malformations: MR imaging features that predict skin burns after percutaneous alcohol embolization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Hazirolan, Tuncay; Carrino, John A.; Bluemke, David A.; Mitchell, Sally

    2008-01-01

    To examine the value of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for predicting the occurrence of skin burns in patients with venous malformations who undergo percutaneous alcohol embolization was the objective of the study. Pre-procedural MR imaging at 1.5 T from 40 patients with venous malformations who had undergone percutaneous alcohol embolization was retrospectively reviewed by two observers for these features: anatomic location, definition (well-defined or ill-defined), and the presence of skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscle, tendon, bone, joint, and deep venous system involvement. One observer recorded the length of skin involvement and volume of the malformation. Univariate and multivariate analysis tests were used to determine whether an association between the occurrence of skin burns and MR imaging features existed. The anatomic locations of the venous malformations were the lower extremity (20 out of 40), upper extremity (11 out of 40), trunk (four out of 40), head/neck (three out of 40) and pelvis (two out of 40). Of the 40 subjects, 15% (six out of 40) experienced skin burns. There was a significant association between the absence of muscle involvement (p=0.0198) as well as the length of skin involvement (p=0.027), with the occurrence of skin burns. Malformation size and all other features were not significantly associated with skin burns. Skin burns in patients with venous malformations treated with alcohol embolization are associated with the length of skin involvement and with the absence of deeper tissue involvement, as depicted on MR imaging. (orig.)

  19. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog Videos Newsletter facebook twitter instagram pinterest gplus youtube Search Menu Why It Matters Who We Are ... needs. Read our burn prevention tips | Visit our YouTube channel To embed this Safety Tip in your ...

  20. Third Degree Skin Burns Caused by an MRI Compatible Electrocardiographic Monitoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau; Isaksen, Christin Rosendahl Graff; Kristensen, Birgitte Hornbæk

    of the assigned compatibility specifications of the leads due to the use of TFE sequences with high SAR values. MRI compatible monitoring systems are only safe when used with proper care. The presented burn cases may have been avoided if space had been provided between the ECG leads and the skin using a cloth....... This holds true even in cases in which the devices are MRI compatible and therefore safe in specified MRI environments. Of particular interest to this case report is skin burns caused by the ECG monitoring equipment. In this context, several cases of ECG electrode related burns have been reported, while...... burns caused by the ECG cables are less common [1]. This case report presents two unusual cases of skin burns which were caused by MRI safe ECG leads during scanning. Cases:Two patients suffered third degree burns using MRI approved ECG leads (Medrad® Veris MR Monitor system) in a Siemens Skyra 3...

  1. Effect of piracetam and nimodipine on full-thickness skin burns in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Elif; Dincel, Gungor C

    2016-08-01

    The potential of several drugs for full-thickness skin burns has been investigated, but the treatment of such burns remains a challenge in plastic surgery. The present study was designed to determine the effect of systemic and topical administration of piracetam and nimodipine on full-thickness skin burn wound healing. A total of 36 New Zealand male rabbits were divided into six groups. Full-thickness skin burns were produced in all the groups, except the control group. Piracetam was administered systemically (piracetam-IV) and topically (piracetam-C) for 14 days, and nimodipine was administered systemically (nimodipine-IV) and topically (nimodipine-C) over the burn wounds for 14 days. The sham group underwent burn injury but was not administered any drug. After 21 days, gross examination and histopathological analysis were performed and the results were compared statistically. Nimodipine-C and nimodipine-IV had no effect on burn wound healing. However, both piracetam-IV and piracetam-C significantly enhanced the healing of the full-thickness skin burn wounds, although the latter was more effective, useful and practical in burn wound healing. The histopathological features of the wounds in the piracetam-C group were closer to those of the control group than those of the other groups. Piracetam-C rather than piracetam-IV may promote full-thickness burn wound healing in rabbits. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Skin substitutes for management of thermal burns in the event of a nuclear detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Skin substitutes can play a potential role in the treatment of burn injuries in a nuclear scenario. Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur is involved in the development of various types of skin substitutes for use in burn injuries. Amniotic membranes collected from placentae are processed as biological dressings and sterilized by gamma radiation. Multi-centric clinical trials have demonstrated the functional and clinical efficacy of radiation sterilized biological dressings in burn wound care. Chitin-nanosilver membranes and hydrogels have also been developed and characterized for use as burn wound dressing

  3. Effect of auto-skin grafting on bacterial infection of wound in rats inflicted with combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Xinze; Yan Yongtang; Wei Shuqing

    1992-01-01

    Rats were exposed to 6 Gy whole body γ-ray irradiation from a 60 Co source followed by light radiation burn (15% TBSA, full thickness burn) from a 5 kw bromo-tungsten lamp. The effect of auto-skin grafting on invasive bacterial infection of wound in the rats with combined radiation-burn injury was studied, In the control group inflicted with combined radiation-burn injury but without skin grafting, bacteria were found on and in the eschars at 24th hour after injury, and in the subeschar tissue on 3rd day. Tremendous bacterial multiplication occurred from 7th to 15th day, and the amount of bacteria in the internal organs increased along with the increase of subeschar infection. At the same time, no bacterial infection was found in internal organs in auto-skin grafted group at 24th hour after injury. The results show that skin grafting can decrease or prevent bacterial infection in both subeschar tissue and internal organs

  4. The treatment of extensively burned patents and β irradiational injury skin burn patients with irradiated pigskin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhongyi; Lu Xingan; Jing Ling; Qi Qiang

    1994-01-01

    Obvious therapeutic effects achieved by the covering of irradiation sterilized pigskin on burn wounds, escarectomized 3rd degree burn wounds β injured burns are discussed. The article also describes the manufacture processes of irradiated pigskins and the selection of surgical treatments of various burns. 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  5. Skin resurfacing in a circumferential full thickness burn to the penis: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabir, Shehab; Frew, Quentin; Thompson, Richard; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-08-13

    A circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis is a rarely encountered injury. However, when it does occur, it proves a management challenge to the plastic and burns surgeon in terms of reconstruction. This is due to the need of not only regaining adequate function of the organ, but also because of the need for a pleasing aesthetic outcome. Split-skin grafts have been utilised successfully to resurface full thickness burns of the penis and have given good results. Yet the success of split-skin grafts, especially those applied to an anatomically challenging region of the body such as the penis, depends on a number of carefully thought-out steps. We discuss the case of a circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis which was treated with split-skin grafting and highlight important pitfalls that the plastic and burns surgeon need to be aware of to ensure a successful outcome.

  6. Cryopreserved cadaveric skin allograft for cover of excised burns wounds: early clinical experience in Singapore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See, P.; Chua, J.J.; Phua, T.T.; Song, C.; Tan, K.C.; Foo, C.L.; Lee, S.T.; Ngim, R.

    1999-01-01

    Human cadaveric skin allograft is widely and effectively used in the treatment of extensive burns. A Skin Bank was established in Singapore National Burns Centre in late 1992 to cater to this need. Due to the shortage of skin donors, it was not until early 1998 that the Skin Bank began to store cadaveric skin harvested from consent donors under the Medical Therapy, Education and Research Act. Cadaveric skin has significant clinical usefulness particularly in the treatment of severe burns. The National Burns Centre admits on the average 300 patients a year, and about 25% of which have sustained major burns (total bum area in excess of 30% BSA or full thickness in excess of 20% BSA). In many cases, the bums are too extensive for autologous skin grafts. The pivotal role of the Skin Bank allows temporary coverage of the entire open bum wound following desloughing or bum wound excision. To date six skin donations have been dealt with. The national tissue transplant team coordinated the selection and screening of these donors. The skin harvested is cryopreserved with 10% dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) or glycerol in DMEM. Supplementation with antibiotics is important. Storage temperature is set at -150 degree C. The procurement, processing, preservation and storage of skin allografts were according to guidelines issued by the American Association of Tissue Banks.Three patients with extensive bums (45% mean body surface area) have benefited from this stored cadaveric skin as temporary biological dressings. The technique is by no means novel but the usage of cadaveric skin represents a further treatment milestone for the severe bum injury patients at our centre

  7. Safety considerations to avoid current-induced skin burns in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knopp, M.V.; Metzner, R.; Kaick, G. van; Brix, G.; Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim

    1998-01-01

    The safety aspects of radiological methods continue to evolve. In this paper we report on two cases of skin burns in MRI caused by induced electrical current. A second- and a third-degree skin burn occurred during imaging in a 1.5 T system. The electromagnetic radiofrequency field inadvertently led to electrical currents caused by a conducting loop through the extremities and trunk. Skin burns induced by electrical current may occur in extremely rare cases even with standard MR imaging protocols operating within all current safety guidelines by inadvertently forming a closed conducting loop. By avoiding focal skin to skin contact of the extremities, this extremely rare adverse event can be avoided. (orig.) [de

  8. Photocarcinogenesis and Skin Cancer Prevention Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebode, Christina; Lehmann, Janin; Emmert, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    In this review the basic principles of UV-induced carcinogenesis are summarized and the state of the art diagnosis and therapeutic strategies are discussed. The prevalent keratinocyte-derived neoplasms of the skin are basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Cutaneous melanoma is less frequent but associated with high mortality. Common risk factors for all three tumor entities include sun exposure and DNA-repair deficiencies. Photocarcinogenesis follows a multistep model of cancer development in which ultraviolet-induced DNA damage leads to mutations resulting in activation of oncogenes or silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. This ends in a cellular mutator phenotype even more prone to mutation acquisition. DNA repair, especially the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, counteracts mutation formation and skin cancer development. This is vividly demonstrated by the NER-defective disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. Primary skin cancer preventative strategies, therefore, include reduction of DNA photodamage by protection from the sun. Secondary preventative strategies include skin cancer screening. This implies standard examination techniques with the naked eye, an epiluminescence microscope, or digital epiluminescence microscopy. More advanced techniques include confocal laser scan microscopy. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Treadmills: a preventable source of pediatric friction burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguiña, Pirko; Palmieri, Tina L; Greenhalgh, David G

    2004-01-01

    Treadmills are a burn risk for children. A child's hand can get trapped in the conveyor belt, causing friction burns to the underlying tissue. The purpose of this retrospective study was to review the characteristics and treatment of treadmill-related burns in children from 1998 to 2002. Ten patients, at a mean age of 3.4 years, sustained injuries associated with treadmill use. Trapping of the hand between the conveyor belt and the base was the most frequent injury mechanism. Burn location was predominantly on fingers and palms. Four patients required operative intervention. All patients required specialized wound care as well as scar management and occupational therapy. Treadmills pose a danger to children. Current safety devices are ineffective for preventing serious hand injuries in children. New design modifications and public awareness are needed to improve child safety.

  10. Risks for skin and other cancers up to 25 years after burn injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellemkjaer, Lene; Hölmich, Lisbet R; Gridley, Gloria

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malignant degeneration of chronic ulcers such as nonhealed burn wounds has been described in the literature, but this phenomenon has never been quantified in an epidemiologic study. We investigated the risks for skin and other cancers among patients with a prior burn. METHODS: We...... with that in the general population of Denmark. RESULTS: Patients with burn had 139 skin cancers, with 189 expected, yielding a standardized incidence ratio of 0.7 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-0.9). This reduced risk was due mainly to deficits of basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, whereas the number...... of squamous cell carcinomas observed was close to expected. We saw no consistent increases in risk for skin cancer in the subgroups of patients with the most severe injuries or with the longest periods of follow up. CONCLUSIONS: The tendency to malignant degeneration of burn scars, described in previous...

  11. Significant skin burns may occur with the use of a water balloon in HIFU treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Robert; Collin, Jamie; Wu, Feng; Coussios, Constantin; Leslie, Tom; Cranston, David

    2012-10-01

    HIFU is a minimally-invasive therapy suitable for treating selected intra-abdominal tumors. Treatment is safe although skin burns may occur due to pre-focal heating. HIFU treatment of a renal transplant tumor located in the left lower abdomen was undertaken in our centre. Treatment was performed prone, requiring displacement of the abdominal wall away from the treatment field using a water balloon, constructed of natural rubber latex and filled with degassed water. Intra-operatively, ultrasound imaging and physical examination of the skin directly over the focal region was normal. Immediately post-operative, a full-thickness skin burn was evident at the periphery of the balloon location, outside the expected HIFU path. Three possibilities may account for this complication. Firstly, the water balloon may have acted as a lens, focusing the HIFU to a neo-focus off axis. Secondly, air bubbles may have been entrapped between the balloon and the skin, causing heating at the interface. Finally, heating of the isolated water within the balloon may have been sufficient to cause burning. In this case, the placement of a water balloon caused a significant skin burn. Care should be taken in their use as burns, situated off axis, may occur even if the overlying skin appears normal.

  12. Effect of blood transfusion and skin grafting on rats with combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongtang; Ran Xinze; Wei Shuqing

    1990-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of escharectomy and skin grafting at different times on rats with combined radiation-burn injuries (5 Gy total body irradiation plus flash radiation from a 5 kW bromotungstenic lamp to induce a 15% TBSA full thickness burn on back) treated with blood transfusion (BT) were studied. The treatment with BT and escharectomy plus skin grafting at 24, 48, and 72 h after injury showed significant therapeutic effects. In these treated groups, early recovery of WBC counts, the granulocytes and total lymphocytes, T, B-cells, bone marrow cells or CFU-F counts were evident within 30 days after injury. The 30-day survival rates of the skin grafts in the group treated with BT and skin grafting at 24 h after injury was 80%, in the group with skin grafting alone was 50%, while all the skin grafts sloughted within 30 days when the grafting was performed 48 and 72 h after injury. The 30-day survival rate of the recipients treated with skin grafting plus BT was higher than that of the animals with skin grafting alone. The results showed that satisfactory results were achieved with BT plus escharectomy and skin grafting within 24 h after injury, while skin grafting performed at 48 or 72 h after injury was ineffective for the survival of skin grafts

  13. Use of preputial skin for coverage of post-burn contractures of fingers in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed I Zaroo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hand burns are common injuries. Children frequently sustain burn injuries, especially to their hands. Contractures are a common sequel of severe burns around joints. The prepuce, or foreskin, has been used as a skin graft for a number of indications. We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of utilising the preputial skin for the management of post-burn contractures of fingers in uncircumcised male children. Materials and Methods: Preputial skin was used for the coverage of released contractures of fingers in 12 patients aged 2-6 years. The aetiology of burns was "Kangri" burn in eight patients and scalding in four patients. Six patients had contracture in two fingers, four patients in one finger, and two patients had contractures in three fingers. Results: None of the patients had graft loss, and all the wounds healed within 2 weeks. All patients had complete release of contractures without any recurrence. Hyperpigmentation of the grafts was observed over a period of time, which was well accepted by the parents. Conclusions: Preputial skin can be used successfully for male children with mild-to-moderate contractures of 2-3 fingers for restoration of the hand function, minimal donor site morbidity.

  14. Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it might mean for you. What is skin cancer? Skin cancer is cancer that occurs in different kinds ... squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Facts About Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer ...

  15. Skin banking at a regional burns centre-The way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Sunil Manohar; Mishra, Mukesh Gopinath; Karnik, Shilpa; Dutta, Shruti; Mishra, Mamata; Panda, Sangita; Varghese, Reshmi; Virkar, Tanvi; Upendran, Vaishna

    2018-04-13

    In India approximately 1 million people get burnt every year and most of them are from the lower or middle income strata. Therefore it is obligatory to find out an economic way of treatment for the affected populace. Since use of human skin allograft is the gold standard for the treatment of burn wound, in-house skin banking for a burn unit hospital is prerequisite to make the treatment procedure affordable. Although, there was one skin bank at India till 2009, but it was difficult for a single bank to cover the entire country's need. Looking at the necessities, National Burns Centre (a tertiary burn care centre) along with Rotary International and Euro Skin Bank collaborated and developed an effective cadaveric skin banking model in Mumbai, Maharashtra in 2009. Initial two to three years were formation phase; by the year 2013 the entire system was organized and started running full fledged. The model has also been replicated in other states of India to accommodate the large burn population of the country. This paper therefore, gives a step by step account of how the bank evolved and its present status. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Pediatric soup scald burn injury: etiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Tina L; Alderson, Tyrone S; Ison, Dahlia; O'Mara, Michael S; Sharma, Raj; Bubba, Anthony; Coombs, Elena; Greenhalgh, David G

    2008-01-01

    One of the leading causes of scald burn injury in children is from hot soup, particularly prepackaged instant soups. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic, socioeconomic, and situational factors that contribute to the incidence of scald burns in children. A 20-item questionnaire was given to the caregiver of children who were treated for scald burn injury at a pediatric burn center from July 2006 to March 2007. Questions included demographics (child age, gender, siblings, ethnicity), socioeconomic status (income, education), factors contributing to the injury (type of soup, child supervision, type of container), and location of injury. The mean age of the 78 children sustaining burn injury and completing the survey was 4.8 +/- 0.6 years. The majority of patients were girls (51%), and the most frequently involved ethnic group was Hispanic (44%). Households had a mean of 3.0 +/- 0.3 children in residence, and an income of less than $29,000/year (59%). The highest educational level achieved was high school for 73% of the parents. Prepackaged soup (65%) with a narrow base heated directly in the original container (46%) using the microwave (51%) was implicated in the majority of burns. Soup scald burns, especially from prepackaged instant soups, appear to predominate in lower income families with multiple children. The majority of injuries occur when the caregiver heats the soup in the original container using the microwave. Prevention of these types of injuries will require a two-pronged approach: educating families with multiple children and changing the soup packaging.

  17. Development of a Skin Burn Predictive Model adapted to Laser Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneck-Museux, N.; Scheer, E.; Perez, L.; Agay, D.; Autrique, L.

    2016-12-01

    Laser technology is increasingly used, and it is crucial for both safety and medical reasons that the impact of laser irradiation on human skin can be accurately predicted. This study is mainly focused on laser-skin interactions and potential lesions (burns). A mathematical model dedicated to heat transfers in skin exposed to infrared laser radiations has been developed. The model is validated by studying heat transfers in human skin and simultaneously performing experimentations an animal model (pig). For all experimental tests, pig's skin surface temperature is recorded. Three laser wavelengths have been tested: 808 nm, 1940 nm and 10 600 nm. The first is a diode laser producing radiation absorbed deep within the skin. The second wavelength has a more superficial effect. For the third wavelength, skin is an opaque material. The validity of the developed models is verified by comparison with experimental results (in vivo tests) and the results of previous studies reported in the literature. The comparison shows that the models accurately predict the burn degree caused by laser radiation over a wide range of conditions. The results show that the important parameter for burn prediction is the extinction coefficient. For the 1940 nm wavelength especially, significant differences between modeling results and literature have been observed, mainly due to this coefficient's value. This new model can be used as a predictive tool in order to estimate the amount of injury induced by several types (couple power-time) of laser aggressions on the arm, the face and on the palm of the hand.

  18. Skin contamination resulting from an uranyl nitrate burn. An incident study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesne, B.; Auriol, B.; Berard, P.; Chalabreysse, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe the circumstances of a burn incident on hand by a mixture of diluted nitric acid and uranyl nitrate. The burn is located on the left hand fingers. After important washings uranium remains on the fingers. During about ten days, the worker is examined and the therapy is going on till the total radioactivity disappearance. Urine collection of twenty four hours is prescribed during the treatment. The whole activity is kept on the burnt skin. The quick desquamation is the elimination way of the skin retention. 6 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Spotlight on Psoriasis: Preventing Patches of Itchy, Sore Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe August 2016 Print this issue Spotlight on Psoriasis Preventing Patches of Itchy, Sore Skin En español ... Sun Damage Sun and Skin Wise Choices Avoid Psoriasis Triggers Factors that may trigger psoriasis or make ...

  20. Bilayered nanofibrous 3D hierarchy as skin rudiment by emulsion electrospinning for burn wound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Pallabi; Dadhich, Prabhash; Srivas, Pavan Kumar; Das, Bodhisatwa; Maulik, Dhrubajyoti; Dhara, Santanu

    2017-08-22

    Mimicking skin extracellular matrix hierarchy, the present work aims to develop a bilayer skin graft comprising a porous cotton-wool-like 3D layer with membranous structure of PCL-chitosan nanofibers. Emulsion electrospinning with differential stirring periods of PCL-chitosan emulsion results in development of a bilayer 3D structure with varied morphology. The electrospun membrane has fiber diameter ∼274 nm and pore size ∼1.16 μm while fluffy 3D layer has fiber diameter ∼1.62 μm and pore size ∼62 μm. The 3D layer was further coated with collagen I isolated from Cirrhinus cirrhosus fish scales to improve biofunctionality. Surface coating with collagen I resulted in bundling the fibers together, thereby increasing their average diameter to 2.80 μm and decreasing pore size to ∼45 μm. The architecture and composition of the scaffold promotes efficient cellular activity where interconnected porosity with ECM resembling collagen I coating assists cellular adhesion, infiltration, and proliferation from initial days of fibroblast seeding, while keratinocytes migrate on the surface only without infiltrating in the membranous nanofiber layer. Anatomy of the scaffold arising due to variation in pore size distribution at different layers thereby facilitates compartmentalization and prevents initial cellular transmigration. The scaffold also assists in extracellular matrix protein synthesis and keratinocyte stratification in vitro. Further, the scaffold effectively integrates and attaches with third-degree burn wound margins created in rat models and accelerates healing in comparison to standard Tegaderm dressing™. The bilayer scaffold is thus a promising, readily available, cost-effective, off-the-shelf matrix as a skin substitute.

  1. [Recognizing prevention and treatment of burn sepsis with the concept of holistic integrative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, J N

    2017-04-20

    Sepsis remains a major cause of death in severe burns. The effect of sepsis management is influenced by its complicated pathophysiologic changes. In order to improve the outcome of burn sepsis, the predisposing factor of sepsis after burn analyzed by advanced technology, the early prevention, antibiotics therapy, and combined treatment in severe burns with sepsis are discussed using the concept of holistic integrative medicine.

  2. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carriers serve as reservoirs for transmission; therefore, a household approach to decolonization is more effective than measures performed by individuals alone. Other factors, such as environmental surface contamination, may also be considered. Novel strategies for the prevention of recurrent SSTI are needed. PMID:26311356

  3. Tests of Flammability of Cotton Fabrics and Expected Skin Burns in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Jane M.; Torvi, David A.; Gabriel, Kamiel S.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    During a shuttle launch and other portions of space flight, astronauts wear specialized flame resistant clothing. However during most of their missions on board the Space Shuttle or International Space Station, astronauts wear ordinary clothing, such as cotton shirts and pants. As the behaviour of flames is considerably different in microgravity than under earth s gravity, fabrics are expected to burn in a different fashion in microgravity than when tested on earth. There is interest in determining how this change in burning behaviour may affect times to second and third degree burn of human skin, and how the results of standard fabric flammability tests conducted under earth s gravity correlate with the expected fire behaviour of textiles in microgravity. A new experimental apparatus was developed to fit into the Spacecraft Fire Safety Facility (SFSF), which is used on NASA s KC-135 low gravity aircraft. The new apparatus was designed to be similar to the apparatus used in standard vertical flammability tests of fabrics. However, rather than using a laboratory burner, the apparatus uses a hot wire system to ignite 200 mm high by 80 mm wide fabric specimens. Fabric temperatures are measured using thermocouples and/or an infrared imaging system, while flame spread rates are measured using real time observations or video. Heat flux gauges are placed between 7 and 13 mm away from the fabric specimen, so that heat fluxes from the burning fabric to the skin can be estimated, along with predicted times required to produce skin burns.

  4. Early burn wound excision and skin grafting postburn trauma restores in vivo neutrophil delivery to inflammatory lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchervenkov, J.I.; Epstein, M.D.; Silberstein, E.B.; Alexander, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of early vs delayed postburn wound excision and skin grafting on the in vivo neutrophil delivery to a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction and a bacterial skin lesion (BSL). Male Lewis rats were presensitized to keyhole-limpet hemocyanin. Group 1 comprised sham controls. Groups 2 through 4 were given a 30% 3 degrees scald burn, but the burn wounds were excised, and skin was grafted on days 1, 3, and 7, respectively, after the burn. Group 5 comprised burn controls. Twelve days after burn trauma, all rats were injected at different intervals (during a 24-hour period) with a trio of intradermal injections of keyhole-limpet hemocyanin, Staphylococcus aureus 502A, and saline at different sites. In vivo neutrophil delivery to these dermal lesions was determined by injecting indium in 111 oxyquinoline-labeled neutrophils isolated from similarly treated groups of rats. Neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL lesions was restored to normal by excision and skin grafting of the burn wound one day after burn trauma. Waiting three days after burn trauma to excise and skin graft the wound partially, but not completely, restored the in vivo neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL lesions. Waiting one week to excise and skin graft a burn wound resulted in no improvement in neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL dermal lesions. It was concluded that burn wound excision and skin grafting immediately after burn trauma restored in vivo neutrophil delivery to a BSL and DTH dermal lesion. This may, in part, explain the beneficial effect of early aggressive burn wound debridement in patients with burn injuries

  5. The evolution of acute burn care - retiring the split skin graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, J E

    2017-07-01

    The skin graft was born in 1869 and since then, surgeons have been using split skin grafts for wound repair. Nevertheless, this asset fails the big burn patient, who deserves an elastic, mobile and robust outcome but who receives the poorest possible outcome based on donor site paucity. Negating the need for the skin graft requires an autologous composite cultured skin and a material capable of temporising the burn wound for four weeks until the composite is produced. A novel, biodegradable polyurethane chemistry has been used to create two such products. This paper describes the design, production, optimisation and evaluation of several iterations of these products. The evaluation has occurred in a variety of models, both in vitro and in vivo, employing Hunterian scientific principles, and embracing Hunter's love and appreciation of comparative anatomy. The process has culminated in significant human experience in complex wounds and extensive burn injury. Used serially, the products offer robust and elastic healing in deep burns of any size within 6 weeks of injury.

  6. Ingestion of white spirit resulting in perineal skin burns: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoucke, Joke; Buylaert, Walter; Colpaert, Kirsten; De Paepe, Peter

    2017-10-01

    In the literature, possible systemic effects on health of inhalation or ingestion of white spirit are well described. Only a few case reports discuss the toxic skin effects that can occur following massive ingestion. Ingestion of large amounts of white spirit produces a watery diarrhoea with a high concentration of white spirit, resulting in perineal skin burns when there is prolonged contact. We describe a patient who developed partial thickness perineal skin burns after ingestion of white spirit and review the literature. The present data indicate that conservative therapy of the skin burns is recommended.

  7. An Exploration of Molecular Correlates Relevant to Radiation Combined Skin-Burn Trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminul Islam

    Full Text Available Exposure to high dose radiation in combination with physical injuries such as burn or wound trauma can produce a more harmful set of medical complications requiring specialist interventions. Currently these interventions are unavailable as are the precise biomarkers needed to help both accurately assess and treat such conditions. In the present study, we tried to identify and explore the possible role of serum exosome microRNA (miRNA signatures as potential biomarkers for radiation combined burn injury (RCBI.Female B6D2F1/J mice were assigned to four experimental groups (n = 6: sham control (SHAM, burn injury (BURN, radiation injury (RI and combined radiation skin burn injury (CI. We performed serum multiplex cytokine analysis and serum exosome miRNA expression profiling to determine novel miRNA signatures and important biological pathways associated with radiation combined skin-burn trauma.Serum cytokines, IL-5 and MCP-1, were significantly induced only in CI mice (p<0.05. From 890 differentially expressed miRNAs identified, microarray analysis showed 47 distinct miRNA seed sequences significantly associated with CI mice compared to SHAM control mice (fold change ≥ 1.2, p<0.05. Furthermore, only two major miRNA seed sequences (miR-690 and miR-223 were validated to be differentially expressed for CI mice specifically (fold change ≥ 1.5, p<0.05.Serum exosome miRNA signature data of adult mice, following RCBI, provides new insights into the molecular and biochemical pathways associated with radiation combined skin-burn trauma in vivo.

  8. A rare case of failed healing in previously burned skin after a secondary burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, Stephen J; Parsons, Shaun; Menezes, Hana; Ives, Andrew; Cleland, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Patients presenting with large surface area burns are common in our practice; however, patients with a secondary large burn on pre-existing burn scars and grafts are rare and not reported. We report on an unusual case of a patient sustaining a secondary large burn to areas previously injured by a burn from a different mechanism. We discuss the potential implications when managing a case like this and suggest potential biological reasons why the skin may behave differently. Our patient was a 33-year-old man who presented with a 5% TBSA burn on skin scarred by a previous 40% total body surface area (TBSA) burn and skin grafts. Initially assessed as superficial partial thickness in depth, the wounds were treated conservatively with dressings; however, they failed to heal and became infected requiring surgical management. Burns sustained in areas of previous burn scars and grafts may behave differently to normal patterns of healing, requiring more aggressive management and surgical intervention at an early stage.

  9. β-adrenergic blockade does not impair the skin blood flow sensitivity to local heating in burned and non-burned skin under neutral and hot environments in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Eric; McEntire, Serina J.; Herndon, David N.; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Suman, Oscar E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Tested the hypothesis that propranolol, a drug given to burn patients to reduce hypermetabolism/cardiac stress, may inhibit heat dissipation by changing the sensitivity of skin blood flow (SkBF) to local heating under neutral and hot conditions. Methods In a randomized double-blind study, a placebo was given to 8 burned children while propranolol was given to 13 burned children with similar characteristics (mean ± SD: 11.9±3y, 147±20cm, 45±23kg, 56±12% TBSA). Non-burned children (n=13, 11.4±3y, 152±15cm, 52±13kg) served as healthy controls. A progressive local heating protocol characterized SkBF responses in burned and unburned skin and non-burned control skin under the two environmental conditions (23°C and 34°C) via laser-Doppler flowmetry. Results Resting SkBF was greater in burned and unburned skin compared to the non-burned control (main effect: skin, Pburned; 38±36 unburned vs 9±8 control %SkBFmax). No difference was found for maximal SkBF capacity to local heating between groups. Additionally, dose response curves for the sensitivity of SkBF to local heating were not different among burned or unburned skin, and non-burned control skin (EC50, P>0.05) under either condition. Conclusion Therapeutic propranolol does not negatively affect SkBF under neutral or hot environmental conditions and further compromise temperature regulation in burned children. PMID:28071840

  10. Randomized, Paired-Site Comparison of Autologous Engineered Skin Substitutes and Split-Thickness Skin Graft for Closure of Extensive, Full-Thickness Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Steven T; Simpson, Peggy S; Rieman, Mary T; Warner, Petra M; Yakuboff, Kevin P; Bailey, J Kevin; Nelson, Judith K; Fowler, Laura A; Kagan, Richard J

    Stable closure of full-thickness burn wounds remains a limitation to recovery from burns of greater than 50% of the total body surface area (TBSA). Hypothetically, engineered skin substitutes (ESS) consisting of autologous keratinocytes and fibroblasts attached to collagen-based scaffolds may reduce requirements for donor skin, and decrease mortality. ESS were prepared from split-thickness skin biopsies collected after enrollment of 16 pediatric burn patients into an approved study protocol. ESS and split-thickness autograft (AG) were applied to 15 subjects with full-thickness burns involving a mean of 76.9% TBSA. Data consisted of photographs, tracings of donor skin and healed wounds, comparison of mortality with the National Burn Repository, correlation of TBSA closed wounds with TBSA full-thickness burn, frequencies of regrafting, and immunoreactivity to the biopolymer scaffold. One subject expired before ESS application, and 15 subjects received 2056 ESS grafts. The ratio of closed wound to donor areas was 108.7 ± 9.7 for ESS compared with a maximum of 4.0 ± 0.0 for AG. Mortality for enrolled subjects was 6.25%, and 30.3% for a comparable population from the National Burn Repository (P burn generated an R value of 0.65 (P burns of greater than 50% TBSA.

  11. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaghiele, Marta; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair), which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  12. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Madaghiele

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair, which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  13. Effect of skin graft thickness on scar development in a porcine burn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruler, Danielle M; Blackstone, Britani N; McFarland, Kevin L; Baumann, Molly E; Supp, Dorothy M; Bailey, J Kevin; Powell, Heather M

    2018-06-01

    Animal models provide a way to investigate scar therapies in a controlled environment. It is necessary to produce uniform, reproducible scars with high anatomic and biologic similarity to human scars to better evaluate the efficacy of treatment strategies and to develop new treatments. In this study, scar development and maturation were assessed in a porcine full-thickness burn model with immediate excision and split-thickness autograft coverage. Red Duroc pigs were treated with split-thickness autografts of varying thickness: 0.026in. ("thin") or 0.058in. ("thick"). Additionally, the thin skin grafts were meshed and expanded at 1:1.5 or 1:4 to evaluate the role of skin expansion in scar formation. Overall, the burn-excise-autograft model resulted in thick, raised scars. Treatment with thick split-thickness skin grafts resulted in less contraction and reduced scarring as well as improved biomechanics. Thin skin autograft expansion at a 1:4 ratio tended to result in scars that contracted more with increased scar height compared to the 1:1.5 expansion ratio. All treatment groups showed Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression that increased over time and peaked 4 weeks after grafting. Burns treated with thick split-thickness grafts showed decreased expression of pro-inflammatory genes 1 week after grafting, including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and TGF-β1, compared to wounds treated with thin split-thickness grafts. Overall, the burn-excise-autograft model using split-thickness autograft meshed and expanded to 1:1.5 or 1:4, resulted in thick, raised scars similar in appearance and structure to human hypertrophic scars. This model can be used in future studies to study burn treatment outcomes and new therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimating the time and temperature relationship for causation of deep-partial thickness skin burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John P; Plourde, Brian; Vallez, Lauren; Stark, John; Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and present a simple procedure for evaluating the temperature and exposure-time conditions that lead to causation of a deep-partial thickness burn and the effect that the immediate post-burn thermal environment can have on the process. A computational model has been designed and applied to predict the time required for skin burns to reach a deep-partial thickness level of injury. The model includes multiple tissue layers including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue. Simulated exposure temperatures ranged from 62.8 to 87.8°C (145-190°F). Two scenarios were investigated. The first and worst case scenario was a direct exposure to water (characterized by a large convection coefficient) with the clothing left on the skin following the exposure. A second case consisted of a scald insult followed immediately by the skin being washed with cool water (20°C). For both cases, an Arrhenius injury model was applied whereby the extent and depth of injury were calculated and compared for the different post-burn treatments. In addition, injury values were compared with experiment data from the literature to assess verification of the numerical methodology. It was found that the clinical observations of injury extent agreed with the calculated values. Furthermore, inundation with cool water decreased skin temperatures more quickly than the clothing insulating case and led to a modest decrease in the burn extent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Burn Scar Reconstruction of the Neck with FTSG Obtained from Lower Abdominal Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadrollah Motamed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Burns account for a significant proportion of injuries, and of these the face, neck, and anterior torso are commonly affected. Burn scars remain a lasting reminder of the insult both for the patient and the outside world. There is little doubt that the change in appearance and the limitation imposed by a burn scar contribute to negative body image. Treatment of hypertrophic scars in the neck has been quite challenging if there is no intact tissue for local flaps. So application of full-thickness skin grafts could be of great value. We applied full-thickness grafts obtained from lower abdominal skin for treatment of severe neck contractures in four patients when other treatment modalities such as local flaps could not be used. Full-thickness skin graft of the neck is a safe and reliable treatment option with fairly good functional and aesthetic results. It has little donor site morbidity in spite of providing a large surface area of full-thickness skin.

  16. Third degree skin burns caused by a MRI conditional electrocardiographic monitoring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brix L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Two unusual cases of third degree skin burns are reported using MRI approved electrocardiographic leads. This is very uncommon as it is most often the electrodes which are the source of heat related issues. Both patients were sedated due to pain related issues of their lower spine. The burns were caused by a combination of using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner and the inability to cry out during scanning. We would like to bring forward a message that even when using MRI conditional equipment, clinical staff must be extremely careful in order to secure safe image acquisition using MRI.

  17. Spray-on-skin cells in burns: a common practice with no agreed protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allouni, Ammar; Papini, Remo; Lewis, Darren

    2013-11-01

    Cultured epithelial autograft (CEA) has been used for skin coverage after burn wound excision since 1981. It is used in burn units and centres throughout the U.K.; however, there appears to be no agreed standards of practice. We aimed to investigate the experience and current practice with its usage in the management of acute burn injury. An online survey was sent to twenty-five burns consultants in the U.K., who are members of the British Burn Association. We received 14 responses. Rarely have the responders agreed to the same practice in most of the questions. Different choices were given by responders with regards the indications for cell culture, techniques used, primary and secondary dressings used, first wound review timing, and measures used to evaluate outcomes. In the current economic environment, the NHS needs to rationalize services on the basis of cost effectiveness. CEA is an expensive procedure that requires an adequately sterile laboratory, special equipments and highly experienced dedicated staff. When dealing with expensive management options, it is important to have an agreed protocol that can form the standard that can be referred to when auditing practices and results to improve burn management and patients' care. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. LED phototherapy in full-thickness burns induced by CO2 laser in rats skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Melo, Milene; Alves, Leandro Procópio; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Carvalho, Henrique Cunha; de Lima, Carlos José; Munin, Egberto; Gomes, Mônica Fernandes; Salgado, Miguel Angel Castillo; Zângaro, Renato Amaro

    2018-04-27

    Many studies have been conducted on the treatment of burns because they are important in morbidity and mortality. These studies are mainly focused on improving care and quality of life of patients. The aim of this study was evaluate the LED phototherapy effects in rats skin full-thickness burns induced by CO 2 laser. The animals were divided in NT group that did not received any treatment and LED group that received LED irradiation at 685 nm, 220 mW, and 4.5 J/cm 2 during 40 s by burned area. Biopsies were obtained after 7, 14, and 21 days of treatment and submitted to histological and immunohistochemical analysis. The LED phototherapy shows anti-inflammatory effects, improves angiogenesis, and stimulates the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts. The T CD8+ lymphocytes were more common in burned areas compared to T CD4+ lymphocytes since statistically significant differences were observed in the LED group compared to the NT group after 7 days of treatment. These results showed that LED phototherapy performs positive influence in full-thickness burns repair from the healing process modulated by cellular immune response. The obtained results allowed inferring that burns exhibit a characteristic cell immune response and this cannot be extrapolated to other wounds such as incision and wounds induced by punch, among others.

  19. Management of facial burns with a collagen/glycosaminoglycan skin substitute-prospective experience with 12 consecutive patients with large, deep facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthew B; Engrav, Loren H; Holmes, James H; Friedrich, Jeffrey B; Costa, Beth A; Honari, Shari; Gibran, Nicole S

    2005-05-01

    Management of deep facial burns remains one of the greatest challenges in burn care. We have developed a protocol over the past 20 years for management of facial burns that includes excision and coverage with thick autograft. However, the results were not perfect. Deformities of the eyelids, nose and mouth as well as the prominence of skin graft junctures demonstrated the need to explore novel approaches. Integra has been used with success in the management of burns of the trunk and extremities. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the aesthetic outcome of the use of Integra for deep facial burns. Twelve consecutive patients underwent excision of large, deep facial burns and placement of Integra. Integra provides excellent color and minimally visible skin graft junctures. The texture is good but not as supple as thick autograft. Integra is not well suited for use in the coverage of eyelid burns due to the need to wait 2 weeks for adequate vascularization. In summary, thick autograft remains the gold standard for deep facial burns. However, for patients with extensive burns and limited donor sites, Integra provides an acceptable alternative.

  20. Vacuum-assisted closure device as a split-thickness skin graft bolster in the burn population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltzman, Joshua T; Bell, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    The vacuum-assisted closure device (VAC) is associated with improved wound healing outcomes. Its use as a bolster device to secure a split-thickness skin graft has been previously demonstrated; however, there is little published evidence demonstrating its benefits specifically in the burn population. With use of the VAC becoming more commonplace, its effect on skin graft take and overall time to healing in burn patients deserves further investigation. Retrospective review of burn registry database at a high-volume level I trauma center and regional burn center during a 16-month period was performed. Patients who had a third-degree burn injury requiring a split-thickness skin graft and who received a VAC bolster were included. Data points included age, sex, burn mechanism, burn location, grafted area in square centimeters, need for repeat grafting, percent graft take, and time to complete reepithelialization. Sixty-seven patients were included in the study with a total of 88 skin graft sites secured with a VAC. Age ranged from skin graft in the burn population. The observed rate of zero returns to the operating room for repeat grafting was especially encouraging. Its ability to conform to contours of the body and cover large surface areas makes it especially useful in securing a graft. This method of bolstering results in decreased repeat grafting and minimal graft loss, thus decreasing morbidity compared with conventional bolster dressings.

  1. Evaluation of Amniotic Membrane Effectiveness in Skin Graft Donor Site Dressing in Burn Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Seyed Hamid; As'adi, Kamran; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Shoar, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    Although the recipient site in burn wounds is dressed with universally accepted materials, the ideal management of split-thickness skin donor sites remains controversial. The aim of our study is to compare two methods of wound dressing in donor sites of split-thickness skin graft in patients undergoing burn wound reconstructive surgery. Forty-two consecutive patients with second- and third-degree burns with a total body surface area between 20 and 40 % were enrolled in this randomized clinical trial conducted in Motahari Burn Hospital in Tehran, Iran. In each patient, two anatomic areas with similar features were randomly selected as intervention and control donor sites. The intervention site was dressed with amniotic membrane, whereas the control site was treated with Vaseline-impregnated gauze. Wounds were examined daily by expert surgeons to measure the clinical outcomes including duration of healing, severity of pain, and infection rate. The mean ± SD age of patients was 31.17 ± 13.72 years; furthermore, burn percentage had a mean ± SD of 31.19 ± 10.56. The mean ± SD of patients' cooperation score was 1.6 ± 0.79 in the intervention group compared with 2.93 ± 0.71 in the control group, revealing a statistically significant difference (P  0.05). Amniotic membrane as an alternative for dressing of skin graft donor sites provides significant benefits by increasing patients' comfort via diminishing the number of dressing changes and facilitating the process of wound healing.

  2. Algorithm for Primary Full-thickness Skin Grafting in Pediatric Hand Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Seo Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPediatric hand burns are a difficult problem because they lead to serious hand deformities with functional impairment due to rapid growth during childhood. Therefore, adequate management is required beginning in the acute stage. Our study aims to establish surgical guidelines for a primary full-thickness skin graft (FTSG in pediatric hand burns, based on long-term observation periods and existing studies.MethodsFrom January 2000 to May 2011, 210 patients underwent primary FTSG. We retrospectively studied the clinical course and treatment outcomes based on the patients' medical records. The patients' demographics, age, sex, injury site of the fingers, presence of web space involvement, the incidence of postoperative late deformities, and the duration of revision were critically analyzed.ResultsThe mean age of the patients was 24.4 months (range, 8 to 94 months, consisting of 141 males and 69 females. The overall observation period was 6.9 years (range, 1 to 11 years on average. At the time of the burn, 56 cases were to a single finger, 73 to two fingers, 45 to three fingers, and 22 to more than three. Among these cases, 70 were burns that included a web space (33.3%. During the observation, 25 cases underwent corrective operations with an average period of 40.6 months.ConclusionsIn the volar area, primary full-thickness skin grafting can be a good indication for an isolated injured finger, excluding the web spaces, and injuries of less than three fingers including the web spaces. Also, in the dorsal area, full-thickness skin grafting can be a good indication. However, if the donor site is insufficient and the wound is large, split-thickness skin grafting can be considered.

  3. Expression of DNA repair genes in burned skin exposed to low-level red laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Pôrto, Luís Cristóvão; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-11-01

    Although red laser lights lie in the region of non-ionizing radiations in the electromagnetic spectrum, there are doubts whether absorption of these radiations causes lesions in the DNA molecule. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the genes involved with base excision and nucleotide excision repair pathways in skin tissue submitted to burn injury and exposed to low-level red laser. Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group-rats burned and not irradiated, laser group-rats burned and irradiated 1 day after injury for five consecutive days, and later laser group-rats injured and treated 4 days after injury for five consecutive days. Irradiation was performed according to a clinical protocol (20 J/cm(2), 100 mW, continuous wave emission mode). The animals were sacrificed on day 10, and scarred tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, and evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Low-level red laser exposure (1) reduces the expression of APE1 messenger (mRNA), (2) increases the expression of OGG1 mRNA, (3) reduces the expression of XPC mRNA, and (4) increases the expression of XPA mRNA both in laser and later laser groups. Red laser exposure at therapeutic fluences alters the expression of genes related to base excision and nucleotide excision pathways of DNA repair during wound healing of burned skin.

  4. Free water content and monitoring of healing processes of skin burns studied by microwave dielectric spectroscopy in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Miura, Nobuhiro; Shinyashiki, Naoki; Yagihara, Shin

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the dielectric properties of human skin in vivo at frequencies up to 10 GHz using a time-domain reflectometry method with open-ended coaxial probes. Since γ-dispersion results from the reorientation of free water molecules, the free water content of skin is quantitatively determined by dielectric measurements. The free water content of finger skin increased by about 10% after soaking in 37 0 C water for 30 min, and it systematically decreased again through the drying process, as expected. Thus this analytical method has been applied to the study of skin burns. The free water content of burned human cheek skin due to hydrofluoric acid was significantly lower than that of normal skin, and the burned skin recovered through the healing process. In the case of a human hand skin burn due to heat, although the free water content was almost the same as that of normal skin at the beginning, it decreased during the healing process for the first 10 days, then began to increase. Although the number of test subjects was one for each experiment, it was shown that free water content is a good indicator for evaluating skin health and can be well monitored by dielectric spectroscopy

  5. Development of a Vascularized Skin Construct Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cells from Debrided Burned Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    2010. [4] D. Mellus and R. K. Chan, “Reconstructive surgery in the thermally injured patient,” Perioperative Nursing Clinics, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 107–113...survival probability in paediatric patients in modern burn care: a prospective observational cohort study,” The Lancet, vol. 379, no. 9820, pp. 1013–1021

  6. An External Wire Frame Fixation Method of Skin Grafting for Burn Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yukiko; Ueda, Hyakuzoh; Ono, Simpei; Ogawa, Rei

    2017-06-28

    The skin graft is a prevalent reconstructive method for burn injuries. We have been applying external wire frame fixation methods in combination with skin grafts since 1986 and have experienced better outcomes in percentage of successful graft take. The overall purpose of this method was to further secure skin graft adherence to wound beds in hard to stabilize areas. There are also location-specific benefits to this technique such as eliminating the need of tarsorrhaphy in periorbital area, allowing immediate food intake after surgery in perioral area, and performing less invasive fixing methods in digits, and so on. The purpose of this study was to clarify its benefits and applicable locations. We reviewed 22 postburn patients with skin graft reconstructions using the external wire frame method at our institution from December 2012 through September 2016. Details of the surgical technique and individual reports are also discussed. Of the 22 cases, 15 (68%) were split-thickness skin grafts and 7 (32%) were full-thickness skin grafts. Five cases (23%) involved periorbital reconstruction, 5 (23%) involved perioral reconstruction, 2 (9%) involved lower limb reconstruction, and 10 (45%) involved digital reconstruction. Complete (100%) survival of the skin graft was attained in all cases. No signs of complication were observed. With 30 years of experiences all combined, we have summarized fail-proof recommendations to a successful graft survival with an emphasis on the locations of its application.

  7. β-Adrenergic blockade does not impair the skin blood flow sensitivity to local heating in burned and nonburned skin under neutral and hot environments in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Eric; McEntire, Serina J; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Suman, Oscar E

    2017-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that propranolol, a drug given to burn patients to reduce hypermetabolism/cardiac stress, may inhibit heat dissipation by changing the sensitivity of skin blood flow (SkBF) to local heating under neutral and hot conditions. In a randomized double-blind study, a placebo was given to eight burned children, while propranolol was given to 13 burned children with similar characteristics (mean±SD: 11.9±3 years, 147±20 cm, 45±23 kg, 56±12% Total body surface area burned). Nonburned children (n=13, 11.4±3 years, 152±15 cm, 52±13 kg) served as healthy controls. A progressive local heating protocol characterized SkBF responses in burned and unburned skin and nonburned control skin under the two environmental conditions (23 and 34°C) via laser Doppler flowmetry. Resting SkBF was greater in burned and unburned skin compared to the nonburned control (main effect: skin, Pburned; 38±36 unburned vs 9±8 control %SkBF max ). No difference was found for maximal SkBF capacity to local heating between groups. Additionally, dose-response curves for the sensitivity of SkBF to local heating were not different among burned or unburned skin, and nonburned control skin (EC 50 , P>.05) under either condition. Therapeutic propranolol does not negatively affect SkBF under neutral or hot environmental conditions and further compromise temperature regulation in burned children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Occupational skin diseases and prevention among sanitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in body defense, and is predisposed to disease when subjected to ... sanitation workers in Wuhan (China) for better manage- ment and ... Symptoms of facial skin photo .... ronment, diet nutrition and working environment were also poor.

  9. How to Prevent Skin Conditions in Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  10. Effects of combined radiation-burn injury on survival rate of allogeneic skin grafts and immune reaction in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Xinze; Yan Yongtang; Cheng Tianmin; Li Yuan; Wei Shuqing

    1996-01-01

    The effects of combined radiation-burn injury on survival rate of allogeneic skin grafts and immune reaction were studied in rats with combined injury of 3-8 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiation plus 15% total body surface area full thickness burn induced by exposure to a 5 kw bromotungsten lamp. The allogeneic skin was transplanted 24 hours after injury. It was found that all the skin grafts failed to survive in 10 days and the immune reaction significantly increased in the early stage of burn injury. But the immune reaction was obviously suppressed by the combined radiation-burn injury. The survival rates of skin grafts were 20% and 30% in the combined injury of burn plus 3 and 4 Gy irradiation respectively. When the radiation doses increased to 5,6 and 8 Gy, the survival rates elevated to 69%, 88% and 100% respectively (in the group of 8 Gy, bone marrow transplantation was conducted before receiving skin graft). At day 30 post-transplantation the survival rates were still 36%, 42% and 100% respectively. Compared with burn group, there was a significant difference in survival rate when the radiation doses were higher than 5 Gy. These results indicate that the survival rate of the allogeneic skin graft increases concurrently with the increase in radiation dose and decreases with the elapse of the post-transplantation time

  11. The Potential of Plant Phenolics in Prevention and Therapy of Skin Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Działo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds constitute a group of secondary metabolites which have important functions in plants. Besides the beneficial effects on the plant host, phenolic metabolites (polyphenols exhibit a series of biological properties that influence the human in a health-promoting manner. Evidence suggests that people can benefit from plant phenolics obtained either by the diet or through skin application, because they can alleviate symptoms and inhibit the development of various skin disorders. Due to their natural origin and low toxicity, phenolic compounds are a promising tool in eliminating the causes and effects of skin aging, skin diseases, and skin damage, including wounds and burns. Polyphenols also act protectively and help prevent or attenuate the progression of certain skin disorders, both embarrassing minor problems (e.g., wrinkles, acne or serious, potentially life-threatening diseases such as cancer. This paper reviews the latest reports on the potential therapy of skin disorders through treatment with phenolic compounds, considering mostly a single specific compound or a combination of compounds in a plant extract.

  12. Algorithm for Primary Full-thickness Skin Grafting in Pediatric Hand Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Seo Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Pediatric hand burns are a difficult problem because they lead to serious handdeformities with functional impairment due to rapid growth during childhood. Therefore,adequate management is required beginning in the acute stage. Our study aims to establishsurgical guidelines for a primary full-thickness skin graft (FTSG in pediatric hand burns, basedon long-term observation periods and existing studies.Methods From January 2000 to May 2011, 210 patients underwent primary FTSG. Weretrospectively studied the clinical course and treatment outcomes based on the patients’medical records. The patients’ demographics, age, sex, injury site of the fingers, presence ofweb space involvement, the incidence of postoperative late deformities, and the duration ofrevision were critically analyzed.Results The mean age of the patients was 24.4 months (range, 8 to 94 months, consisting of141 males and 69 females. The overall observation period was 6.9 years (range, 1 to 11 yearson average. At the time of the burn, 56 cases were to a single finger, 73 to two fingers, 45 tothree fingers, and 22 to more than three. Among these cases, 70 were burns that included aweb space (33.3%. During the observation, 25 cases underwent corrective operations withan average period of 40.6 months.Conclusions In the volar area, primary full-thickness skin grafting can be a good indicationfor an isolated injured finger, excluding the web spaces, and injuries of less than three fingersincluding the web spaces. Also, in the dorsal area, full-thickness skin grafting can be a goodindication. However, if the donor site is insufficient and the wound is large, split-thicknessskin grafting can be considered.

  13. β-lapachone accelerates the recovery of burn-wound skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shih-Chen; Chau, Yat-Pang; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Kung, Hsiu-Ni

    2011-07-01

    β-lapachone is a quinone of lapachol extracted from the bark of lapacho tree. Recent findings demonstrated that punched skin wounds of mice healed faster with β-lapachone treatment. The present study investigates the effects of β-lapachone on burn-wound skin of C57BL/6 mice injured by a 100 °C iron stick. Our results indicated that wounds treated with β-lapachone recovered faster than those treated with control ointment containing no β-lapachone. On the third day after burning, the area of β-lapachone treated-wound was 30% smaller than wound treated with control ointment. H&E and immunohistochemistry staining showed that burn-wound skin treated with ointment containing β-lapachone healed faster in its epidermis, dermis, and underlying connective tissues with more macrophages appeared than those treated with control ointment alone. RAW264.7 cell, a macrophage-like cell line derived from BALB/C mice, was used as a model for scrutinizing the effect of β-lapachone on macrophages. We found that the proliferation and the secretion of EGF and VEGF by macrophages were higher in cultures treated with β-lapachone and that ß-lapachone can also increase the release of EGF with TNF-α pretreatment. We conclude that β-lapachone plays an important role in accelerating burn wound healing, and that β-lapachone not only can raise the proliferation of macrophages but also increase the release of VEGF from macrophages.

  14. Prevention of Infections Associated with Combat-Related Burn Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    microbial flora and wound colonization in burned patients. Burns. 2004;30:357–361. 20. Barret JP, Herndron DN. Effects of burn wound excision on bacterial...Biobrane versus 1% silver sulfadiazine. Ann Emerg Med. 1990;19:121–124. 57. Barret JP, Dziewulski P, Ramzy PI, Wolf SE, Desai MH, Herndon DN

  15. Health initiatives for the prevention of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, Rüdiger; Breitbart, Eckhard W; Mohr, Peter; Volkmer, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in white population worldwide. However, because the most prominent risk factor-solar UV-radiation and/or artificial UV from sunbeds-is known, skin cancer is highly preventable be primary prevention. This prevention needs, that the public is informed by simple and balanced messages about the possible harms and benefits of UV-exposure and how a person should behave under certain conditions of UV-exposure. For this purpose information and recommendations for the public must be age- and target-group specific to cover all periods of life and to reach all sub-groups of a population, continuously. There is a need that political institutions together with Health Institutions and Societies (e.g., European Commission, WHO, EUROSKIN, ICNIRP, etc.), which are responsible for primary prevention of skin cancer, find a common language to inform the public, in order not to confuse it. This is especially important in connection with the ongoing Vitamin D debate, where possible positive effects of UV have to be balanced with the well known skin cancer risk of UV. A continuously ongoing evaluation of interventions and programs in primary prevention is a pre-requisite to assess the effectiveness of strategies. There is surely no "no message fits all" approach, but balanced information in health initiatives for prevention of skin cancer, which use evidence-base strategies, will further be needed in the future to reduce the incidence, morbidity and mortality skin cancer.

  16. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    A burn is damage to your body's tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or radiation. Scalds from hot ... and gases are the most common causes of burns. Another kind is an inhalation injury, caused by ...

  17. Temporal expression of wound healing-related genes in skin burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hidemichi; Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Kanekura, Takuro; Ogata, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the age of burns, as well as of wounds induced mechanically, is essential in forensic practice, particularly in cases of suspected child abuse. Here, we investigated temporal changes in the expression of 13 genes during wound healing after a burn. The expression of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ), chemokines (KC, MCP-1), proliferative factors (TGF-β, VEGF), proteases (MMP-2, 9, 13) and type I collagen in murine skin was examined by real-time PCR at 3, 6, 9, and 12 h and 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after a burn. Based on macroscopic and histological appearance, the healing process of a burn consists of 3 phases: inflammatory (from 3 h to 1 day after the burn), proliferative (from 1 to 7 days), and maturation (from 7 to 14 days). Expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and KC increased significantly in a biphasic pattern from 3 or 6 h to 12 h or 1 day and from 3 or 5 days to 7 days. Expression of MCP-1 increased significantly from 6 h to 5 days. Expression of both IL-10 and TGF-β increased significantly from 12 h to 7 days. Expression of VEGF, MMP-2, MMP-13 and type I collagen increased significantly from 3 days to 7 or 14 days. Expression of MMP-9 increased significantly from 6 h to 14 days. Our results suggest that evaluating the expression of a combination of these genes would enable the exact estimation of the age of a burn. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Collagen-chitosan scaffold - Lauric acid plasticizer for skin tissue engineering on burn cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiyanti, Prihartini; Setyadi, Ewing Dian; Rudyardjo, Djony Izak

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of burns in the world is more than 800 cases per one million people each year and this is the second highest cause of death due to trauma after traffic accident. Many studies are turning to skin substitute methods of tissue engineering. The purpose of this study is to determine the composition of the collagen, chitosan, and lauric acid scaffold, as well as knowing the results of the characterization of the scaffold. The synthesis of chitosan collagen lauric acid scaffold as a skin tissue was engineered using freeze dried method. Results from making of collagen chitosan lauric acid scaffold was characterized physically, biologically and mechanically by SEM, cytotoxicity, biodegradation, and tensile strength. From the morphology test, the result obtained is that pore diameter size ranges from 94.11 to 140.1 µm for samples A,B,C,D, which are in the range of normal pore size 63-150 µm, while sample E has value below the standard which is about 37.87 to 47.36 µm. From cytotoxicity assay, the result obtained is the percentage value of living cells between 20.11 to 21.51%. This value is below 50% the standard value of living cells. Incompatibility is made possible because of human error mainly the replication of washing process over the standard. Degradation testing obtained values of 19.44% - 40% by weight which are degraded during the 7 days of observation. Tensile test results obtained a range of values of 0.192 - 3.53 MPa. Only sample A (3.53 MPa) and B (1.935 MPa) meet the standard values of skin tissue scaffold that is 1-24 MPa. Based on the results of the characteristics of this study, composite chitosan collagen scaffold with lauric acid plasticizer has a potential candidate for skin tissue engineering for skin burns cases.

  19. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carr...

  20. A system for 3D representation of burns and calculation of burnt skin area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, María Felicidad; Acha, Begoña; Gómez-Cía, Tomás; Fondón, Irene; Serrano, Carmen

    2011-11-01

    In this paper a computer-based system for burnt surface area estimation (BAI), is presented. First, a 3D model of a patient, adapted to age, weight, gender and constitution is created. On this 3D model, physicians represent both burns as well as burn depth allowing the burnt surface area to be automatically calculated by the system. Each patient models as well as photographs and burn area estimation can be stored. Therefore, these data can be included in the patient's clinical records for further review. Validation of this system was performed. In a first experiment, artificial known sized paper patches were attached to different parts of the body in 37 volunteers. A panel of 5 experts diagnosed the extent of the patches using the Rule of Nines. Besides, our system estimated the area of the "artificial burn". In order to validate the null hypothesis, Student's t-test was applied to collected data. In addition, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated and a value of 0.9918 was obtained, demonstrating that the reliability of the program in calculating the area is of 99%. In a second experiment, the burnt skin areas of 80 patients were calculated using BAI system and the Rule of Nines. A comparison between these two measuring methods was performed via t-Student test and ICC. The hypothesis of null difference between both measures is only true for deep dermal burns and the ICC is significantly different, indicating that the area estimation calculated by applying classical techniques can result in a wrong diagnose of the burnt surface. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanomedicine and advanced technologies for burns: Preventing infection and facilitating wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofazzal Jahromi, Mirza Ali; Sahandi Zangabad, Parham; Moosavi Basri, Seyed Masoud; Sahandi Zangabad, Keyvan; Ghamarypour, Ameneh; Aref, Amir R; Karimi, Mahdi; Hamblin, Michael R

    2018-01-01

    According to the latest report from the World Health Organization, an estimated 265,000 deaths still occur every year as a direct result of burn injuries. A widespread range of these deaths induced by burn wound happens in low- and middle-income countries, where survivors face a lifetime of morbidity. Most of the deaths occur due to infections when a high percentage of the external regions of the body area is affected. Microbial nutrient availability, skin barrier disruption, and vascular supply destruction in burn injuries as well as systemic immunosuppression are important parameters that cause burns to be susceptible to infections. Topical antimicrobials and dressings are generally employed to inhibit burn infections followed by a burn wound therapy, because systemic antibiotics have problems in reaching the infected site, coupled with increasing microbial drug resistance. Nanotechnology has provided a range of molecular designed nanostructures (NS) that can be used in both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in burns. These NSs can be divided into organic and non-organic (such as polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) and silver NPs, respectively), and many have been designed to display multifunctional activity. The present review covers the physiology of skin, burn classification, burn wound pathogenesis, animal models of burn wound infection, and various topical therapeutic approaches designed to combat infection and stimulate healing. These include biological based approaches (e.g. immune-based antimicrobial molecules, therapeutic microorganisms, antimicrobial agents, etc.), antimicrobial photo- and ultrasound-therapy, as well as nanotechnology-based wound healing approaches as a revolutionizing area. Thus, we focus on organic and non-organic NSs designed to deliver growth factors to burned skin, and scaffolds, dressings, etc. for exogenous stem cells to aid skin regeneration. Eventually, recent breakthroughs and technologies with substantial potentials in tissue

  2. University Student Awareness of Skin Cancer: Behaviors, Recognition, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, Megan; Estaville, Lawrence

    2017-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer, and it often is preventable. The authors sought to evaluate behavior and knowledge regarding skin cancer among students at a Texas university. The authors recruited a diverse group of students in terms of sex, age, and ethnicity to participate in a survey regarding knowledge of skin cancer signs, use of tanning beds, and performance of self-assessment for skin cancer. Participating students could complete surveys in classrooms, at health fairs, or online via Survey Monkey. The authors examined data for the 3 variables in relation to sex, ethnicity, and age. A total of 512 responses were completed. Female students completed 371 (72.46%) surveys, and male students completed 141 (27.54%). The ethnicity of student participants was nearly evenly split among whites, African Americans, and Hispanics. Ethnicity was the most significant factor influencing the knowledge of skin cancer and behaviors to prevent it. Specifically, Hispanic and African American students possessed a lower level of skin cancer awareness. More female students than male students used tanning beds, and although use was self-reported as infrequent, the results imply that 4500 of the university's students might use tanning beds, which is concerning if extrapolated to other university student populations in Texas. Behavioral intervention is critical in reducing students' risk of skin cancer in later years, and university students must acquire knowledge to increase their awareness of skin health and to minimize their risk of developing skin cancer. Radiation therapists are uniquely positioned to share knowledge of skin cancer. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  3. Forty-Year Follow-up of Full-Thickness Skin Graft After Thermal Burn Injury to the Volar Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Dexter; Kasdan, Morton L; Wilhelmi, Bradon J

    2016-01-01

    The hands are commonly affected in severe thermal burn injuries. Resulting contractures lead to significant loss of function. Burn contracture release and skin grafting are necessary to restore hand function. We report a case in which surgical reconstruction of a volar hand burn was performed with full-thickness skin grafting. The patient had a 40-year follow-up to assess the function and cosmesis of the repaired hand. We report a case in which a 15-month-old boy presented after receiving third-degree burns to the left volar hand, including the flexural aspects of the index, long, and ring fingers by placing it on a hot kitchen stove burner. The patient subsequently underwent scar contracture release and full-thickness skin grafting. Eleven years after reconstruction, further contractures developed associated with the patient's growth, which were reconstructed with repeat full-thickness skin graft from the inguinal region. No recurrence was witnessed afterward and 40 years after initial injury, the patient maintains full activities of daily living and use of his hand in his occupation. There is debate regarding the superiority of split-thickness versus full-thickness grafts during reconstruction. Our case strengthens the argument for durability of a full-thickness skin graft following thermal burn injury.

  4. [The advantages in using cyanoacrylate glue over skin staples as a method of skin graft fixation in the pediatric burns population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curings, P; Vincent, P-L; Viard, R; Gir, P; Comparin, J-P; Voulliaume, D

    2017-11-23

    Local postoperative care and burn wound management can present with a certain degree of difficulty in the pediatric population. While the use of skin staples as a method of skin graft fixation is a well-known, rapid and simple method, their removal can be painful and may necessitate some sedation or even general anesthesia. We studied in this article the advantages and economic value of using the cyanoacrylate glue as a fixation method for skin grafts. A comparative study was carried out from 2012 to 2016. Hundred and eighteen infants with burns up to 5% of total body surface area were included in the study. Seventy-two infants had split thickness skin grafts fixed with skin staples. Forty-six infants had split thickness skin grafts fixed with cyanoacrylate glue. We compared the quality of graft, the sedation used during the first postoperative dressing, the length of hospital stay, the amount of glue used and the presence of complications. There is a difference between the two groups studied in terms of age and total burn surface area. The rate of graft take was 100% in both groups. The first postoperative dressing was carried out without the use of powerful analgesia in the cyanoacrylate group, while it was necessary to use general anesthesia in 64% of the skin staples group. The average length of stay in hospital after skin grafting was 4.9 days for the cyanoacrylate glue versus 6.5 days in the skin staples group. No complications were noted in the 2 groups. The use of cyanoacrylate glue allows rapid fixation of skin grafts and avoid general anesthesia for postoperative cares. Subsequently the length of hospital stay is reduced within 25%. The medico-economic value of glue protocol is highly significant compared to skin staples, while having similar good results and without significant problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Unique Presentation of Orf Virus Infection in a Thermal-Burn Patient After Receiving an Autologous Skin Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Christopher H; Rokni, Ghasem Rahmatpour; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Brinster, Nooshin; Li, Yu; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Zhao, Hui; Petersen, Brett; McCollum, Andrea M; Reynolds, Mary G

    2016-10-15

    We describe a burn patient who developed skin lesions on her skin-graft harvest and skin-graft recipient (burn) sites. Orf virus infection was confirmed by a combination of diagnostic assays, including molecular tests, immunohistochemical analysis, pathologic analysis, and electron microscopy. DNA sequence analysis grouped this orf virus isolate among isolates from India. Although no definitive source of infection was determined from this case, this is the first reported case of orf virus infection in a skin graft harvest. Skin graft recipients with exposures to animals may be at risk for this viral infection. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. Interventions for preventing and managing of skin lesions after radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Bafe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiotherapy has a pivotal role in the fight against cancer. However 85% of patients, who undergo radiotherapy, will face moderate to severe skin reactions, for the treatment of which various local products, available in the market, are used. Aim: The aim of this systematic literature review was to investigate the prevention and treatment of these skin lesions induced by radiation. Methods: For this purpose 34 articles were collected concerning materials, approved by the FDA, for the prevention and treatment of skin damage due to radiation, preclinical factors tested in animal models, factors involved in the prevention and treatment of moist desquamation and unauthorized agents or with little information about them. Results: According to the study results, the moisturizing and hydrophilic creams, herbal preparations, gels based on hyaluronic acid, and Vitamin E, heparinoid creams and formulations based on oils appear to have a positive effect in preventing dermatitis as well as in providing symptom relief. Patches are suitable for the case of moist desquamation. Vasculotide, agent EUK-207, agent RTA 408, agent ALDH2 and the agent Celecoxib are still in the preclinical stage but may become future therapeutic targets. Conclusion: Skin reactions due to radiation remain a significant problem for patients undergoing radical treatment. However, thanks to the multitude of formulations available in the market and several clinical trials it is possible that early prevention and treatment for actinic dermatitis could be achieved. In conclusion, it is crucial that health professionals are aware of the formulations indicated and contraindicated in case of skin reactions induced by radiation and adjust the treatment for the prevention and management of skin reactions in patients receiving radiation therapy.

  7. The role of topically applied L-ascorbic acid in ex-vivo examination of burn-injured human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna; Biniaś, Dorota; Bobiński, Rafał; Sarna, Ewa; Paluch, Jadwiga; Waksmańska, Wioletta

    2017-10-01

    Wound treatment and healing is complex and is comprised of an elaborate set of processes including cellular, spectroscopic and biochemical ones as well as the ;reaction; of local tissue to thermal injury. Vitamin C as L-ascorbic acid (LA) prevents injurious effects of oxidants because it reduces reactive oxygen species to stable molecules, it becomes oxidized to the short-lived ascorbyl radical. As a result, antioxidant treatment may contribute to minimizing injury in burn patients. The aim of this study is to assess changes in molecular structure of collagen extracted from human epidermis burn wound scab during incubation of the epidermis in L-ascorbic acid solution. The study will be performed using FTIR and FT Raman spectroscopies. During this research it was observed that the intensity of Raman peaks increased where healing was being modified by LA. The intensity of the amide III band at 1247 cm- 1 relative to the intensity at 1326 cm- 1 was used to test tissue repair degree at the incision site. FTIR spectra were recorded from frozen specimens of serum modified by LA; an analysis of shifts in the amide I band position was conducted. The appearance of a new band for frozen samples modified by LA was observed around 1149-1220 cm- 1. The above conclusions confirmed the creation of hydrogen bonds between Nsbnd H stretch and Cdbnd O. Samples being incubated in solutions of L-ascorbic acid demonstrated the absence of electrophoretic bands of albumin. Alterations in the surface of the skin incubated in L-ascorbic acid were investigated with the use of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). A decrease in external symptoms of burn injury was noted in the damaged epidermis incubated in L-ascorbic acid.

  8. Preventing skin cancer through behavior change. Implications for interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, J S; Blais, L M; Redding, C A; Weinstock, M A

    1995-07-01

    Sun exposure is the only major causative factor for skin cancer for which prevention is feasible. Both individual and community-based interventions have been effective in changing sun exposure knowledge and attitudes but generally have not been effective in changing behaviors. An integrative model of behavior change is described that has been successful in changing behavior across a wide range of health conditions. This model holds promise for developing a rational public health approach to skin cancer prevention based on sound behavioral science.

  9. Efficacy of Laser Debridement With Autologous Split-Thickness Skin Grafting in Promoting Improved Wound Healing of Deep Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Burns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graham, John

    2002-01-01

    ...) full thickness CO2 laser debridement followed by skin grafting, (2) full thickness sharp surgical tangential excision followed by skin grafting, the 'Gold Standard' used in deep thermal burns management, (3...

  10. [Prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with advanced burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagner, D O; Krylov, K M; Verbitsky, V G; Shlyk, I V

    2018-01-01

    To reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with advanced burns by developing a prophylactic algorithm. The study consisted of retrospective group of 488 patients with thermal burns grade II-III over 20% of body surface area and prospective group of 135 patients with a similar thermal trauma. Standard clinical and laboratory examination was applied. Instrumental survey included fibrogastroduodenoscopy, endoscopic pH-metry and invasive volumetric monitoring (PICCO plus). Statistical processing was carried out with Microsoft Office Excel 2007 and IBM SPSS 20.0. New algorithm significantly decreased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding (p<0.001) and mortality rate (p=0.006) in patients with advanced burns.

  11. Prevention of burn injuries to children involving nightwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, R M; Bryant, V

    1991-08-28

    The effectiveness of legislative intervention in the New Zealand market for children's nightclothes as an injury prevention strategy has been reassessed by examining those hospital admissions for the period 1980-8 (with emphasis on the 1985-8 period) in which clothing and/or nightclothes were involved. The profiles of the production of children's nightclothes (1977-86) and domestic heating (1984-8) were also examined. Ninety-five cases of burn injury discharges were identified (1985-8), and of those cases involving clothing 42% involved nightwear (49% 1981-4). Some of the 27% unspecified cases may have also involved nightwear (23%, 1981-4). A very strong linear downward trend for nightwear incidents was noted (chi 2 slope = 31.06, p less than 0.001). Forty-eight percent of cases involved children aged 1-6 years, and 68% involved pajamas. Stoves were the main specified ignition agent for nightclothes (36%). Open fires as a form of household heating decreased from 49% to 34% of households (1984-8). Estimated production of nightdresses in New Zealand also decreased (460,000 to 80,000 units, 1973-86). The pronounced decrease in injuries attributable to ignition of children's nightclothes is likely to be the result of mandatory controls on children's nightclothes, increased use of pyjamas, and a steady decrease in use of open fires and portable electric heaters. The typical injury event portrayed to the public of a girl in front of a heater or open fire needs to be corrected.

  12. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Age Group Special Needs Space and Place Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type Video Audience Parents You ... Team Staying Safe Safety by Age Safety by Risk Safety Issues Get Your Car Seat Checked Safety ...

  13. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type Video Audience Parents You are here Home Safety Tips Video Special ... Seat Checked Safety Tips Safety Laws Tools For Parents For Safety Professionals For Educators For Press Latest ...

  14. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laws Donate Safety Tips Age Group Special Needs Space and Place Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type ... emergency room. Learn More » About Us Mission Programs Public Policy Research Safe Kids Near You Join Our ...

  15. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laws Donate Safety Tips Age Group Special Needs Space and Place Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type ... related injuries. Learn More » About Us Mission Programs Public Policy Research Safe Kids Near You Join Our ...

  16. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Involved Safety Laws Donate Safety Tips Age Group Special Needs Space and Place Home Risks Burns ... Policy Research Safe Kids Near You Join Our Team Staying Safe Safety by Age Safety by Risk ...

  17. [Current situation and reflection on the prevention and treatment of burns in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J P; Huang, Y S

    2017-09-20

    With ageing of the population, it is estimated that the percentage of old people aged above 65 years old will be approached to 30% in China by 2035. This presents a considerable challenge to geriatric burn treatment, as elderly burn patients have more serious injuries, longer hospital lengths of stay, and higher rates of complications and mortality. In this article, we analyze the current status of burns in the elderly in China and the factors contributing to the outcome of the elderly, and put forward therapeutic strategies so as to improve the level of prevention and treatment of burns in the elderly.

  18. [Effects of Meek skin grafting on patients with extensive deep burn at different age groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, H P; Niu, X H; Li, Q; Li, X L; Xue, J D; Cao, D Y; Han, D W; Xia, C D

    2017-03-20

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Meek skin grafting on patients with extensive deep burn at different age groups. Methods: Eighty-four patients with extensive deep burns conforming to the study criteria were hospitalized in our unit from April 2011 to April 2015. Patients were divided into children group (C, with age less than 12 years old), young and middle-aged group (YM, with age more than 18 years and less than 50 years old), and old age group (O, with age more than 55 years old) according to age, with 28 patients in each group. All patients received Meek skin grafting treatment. The use of autologous skin area, operation time, wound healing time, and hospitalization time were recorded. The survival rate of skin graft on post operation day 7, complete wound healing rate in post treatment week 2, and the mortality were calculated. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, t test, and χ (2) test. Results: The use of autologous skin area of patients in group C was (5.1±1.0)% total body surface area (TBSA), significantly less than (8.3±1.0)%TBSA and (8.3±1.4)%TBSA in groups YM and O, respectively (with t values 32.900 and 52.624, respectively, P values below 0.05). The operation time, wound healing time, and hospitalization time of patients in group C were (1.368±0.562) h, (9.6±0.6) and (32±11) d, significantly shorter than those in group YM [(3.235±0.011) h, (16.9±2.6) and (48±12) d, respectively] and group O [(3.692±0.481) h, (17.3±2.6) and (46±13) d, respectively, with t values from 4.350 to 21.160, P values below 0.05]. The survival rate of skin graft of patients on post operation day 7 in group C was (92±15)%, significantly higher than (81±10)% and (72±12)% in groups YM and O, respectively (with t values 5.509 and 3.229, respectively, P values below 0.05). The above indexes in groups YM and O were similar (with t values from 0.576 to 22.958, P values above 0.05). Complete wound healing rate in post treatment week 2 and the

  19. Gaps in Workplace Education For Prevention of Occupational Skin Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tanya; Arrandale, Victoria H; Kudla, Irena; Holness, D Linn

    2018-02-13

    Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is a common occupational disease. Evidence suggests that education and training are effective prevention strategies. In spite of these known prevention strategies, workers continue to develop OCD. Little is reported regarding the actual training experience of workers. To examine the training experience of workers with contact dermatitis to identify areas for improvement. Participants were workers being assessed for contact dermatitis in an occupational health clinic. The anonymous survey collected demographics, workplace characteristics, and education and prevention practices. Approximately 80% reported general occupational health and safety training; however, only 49% reported skin-specific training (SST). For workers reporting SST, most received information regarding exposure avoidance, hand washing, and glove use. This content was reported as helpful by at least 50%. Workers who did not receive SST indicated the most important content would be warning signs of skin problems, how to avoid exposure and skin care while using gloves. While the study was anonymous and used self-reported of training experience, the study suggests there are gaps in skin protection training. Addressing these gaps may lead to improved prevention and reduction in OCD. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  20. View and practices of dermatologists regarding preventable skin diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, N.; Seir, F.; Qadir, S.N.R.

    2014-01-01

    To find out views and practice of dermatologists regarding prevention of preventable skin diseases. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was set up in Apr-May 2010 at PAF Hospital Faisal, Karachi, Pakistan. Material and Methods: A close-ended questionnaire was sent to 100 dermatologists through resource persons at different places throughout the country. It included basic information about them, their views and practice regarding prevention of these diseases. Data was managed and analyzed using SPSS-17. Results: Fifty dermatologists thought that frequency of preventable skin diseases in their clinical practice is 26-50%. Fifty-six observed educated community as the most important link for prevention, 46 held governments responsible and 42 consider busy schedule as barrier to educate community. Thirty dermatologists delivered talk to general public, 11 at schools, colleges and factories, 07 appeared on mass media and 08 prepared leaflets, pamphlets and brochures regarding preventive aspects of skin diseases at least once during last one year. Conclusion: Dermatologists in Pakistan are aware of magnitude of the problem and understand importance of public education; however only a few dermatologists have endeavored to take up this task. (author)

  1. Local cooling does not prevent hyperalgesia following burn injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Lassen, Birgit Vibeke; Pedersen, Juri L

    2002-01-01

    One of the oldest methods of pain relief following a burn injury is local application of ice or cold water. Experimental data indicate that cooling may also reduce the severity of tissue injury and promote wound healing, but there are no controlled studies in humans evaluating the anti-inflammato......One of the oldest methods of pain relief following a burn injury is local application of ice or cold water. Experimental data indicate that cooling may also reduce the severity of tissue injury and promote wound healing, but there are no controlled studies in humans evaluating the anti...... and mechanical detection thresholds, thermal and mechanical pain responses, area of secondary hyperalgesia), first degree burn injuries were induced on both calves by contact thermodes (12.5 cm(2), 47 degrees C for 7 min). Eight minutes after the burn injury, contact thermodes (12.5 cm(2)) were again applied...... on the burns. One of the thermodes cooled the burn (8 degrees C for 30 min) whereas the other thermode was a non-active dummy on the control burn. Inflammatory and sensory variables were followed for 160 min after end of the cooling procedure. The burn injury induced significant increases in skin temperature...

  2. Severe childhood burns in the Czech Republic: risk factors and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čelko, Alexander Martin; Dáňová, Jana; Barss, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess risk factors for paediatric burn injuries in the Czech Republic and to suggest preventive measures. Methods This study included all children aged 0–16 years hospitalized during 1993–2000 at the Prague Burn Centre and data from the Czech Ministry of Health on national paediatric burn hospitalizations during 1996–2006. Personal, equipment and environmental risk factors were identified from hospital records. Findings The incidence of burn admissions among 0–14 year-olds increased from 85 to 96 per 100 000 between 1996 and 2006, mainly due to a 13% increase among 1–4 year-olds. Between 1993–2000 and 2006, the proportion of burn victims in the country hospitalized at the Prague Burn Centre increased from 9% to 21%. Detailed data were available on 1064 children (64% boys). Around 31% of all burn hospitalizations were in 1 year-olds. Some 79% of burns occurred at home: 70% in the kitchen, 14% in the living room or bedroom and 11% in the bathroom. Of the 18% occurring outdoors, 80% involved boys. Scalds from hot liquids accounted for 70% of all burns. The mean hospital stay was 22 days for boys and 18 days for girls. Conclusion Most burns involved scalds from hot liquids at home: beverages in kitchens and water in bathrooms. There is a need for passive preventive measures, such as redesigned domestic cooking and eating areas, safer electrical kettles and temperature control devices for bathrooms. Educational programmes should be developed for parents and caregivers. A national plan for child burn prevention with specific targets would be helpful. PMID:19551256

  3. An analysis of surgical and anaesthetic factors affecting skin graft viability in patients admitted to a Burns Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isitt, Catherine E; McCloskey, Kayleigh A; Caballo, Alvaro; Sharma, Pranev; Williams, Andrew; Leon-Villapalos, Jorge; Vizcaychipi, Marcela P

    2016-01-01

    Skin graft failure is a recognised complication in the treatment of major burns. Little research to date has analysed the impact of the complex physiological management of burns patients on the success of skin grafting. We analysed surgical and anaesthetic variables to identify factors contributing to graft failure. Inclusion criteria were admission to our Burns Intensive Care Unit (BICU) between January 2009 and October 2013 with a major burn. After exclusion for death before hospital discharge or prior skin graft at a different hospital, 35 patients remained and were divided into those with successful autografts (n=16) and those with a failed autograft (n=19). For the purposes of this study, we defined poor autograft viability as requiring at least one additional skin graft to the same site. Logistic regression of variables was performed using SPSS (Version 22.0 IBMTM). Age, Sex, %Total Burn Surface Area or Belgian Outcome Burns Injury score did not significantly differ between groups. No differences were found in any surgical factor at logistic regression (graft site, harvest site, infection etc.). When all operations were analysed, the use of colloids was found to be significantly associated with graft failure (p=0.035, CI 95%) and this remained significant when only split thickness skin grafts (STSGs) and debridement operations were included (p=0.034, CI 95%). No differences were found in crystalloid use, intraoperative temperature, pre-operative haemoglobin and blood products or vasopressor use. This analysis highlights an independent association between colloids and graft failure which has not been previously documented.

  4. Pathological changes after bone marrow and skin allograft transplantation in rats inflicted with severe combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Huaien; Cheng Tianmin; Yan Yongtang

    1994-01-01

    Bone marrow and skin allografts from the same donor were transplanted to rats inflicted with 8 Gy γ-radiation combined with third degree burns of 15% body surface area within 6 hr post injury. Pathological changes of hematopoietic tissues and skin allografts were studied. All injured controls died within 7 days post injury without bone marrow regeneration; 50% of treated rats survived with living skin allografts on 50th day post injury. On days 100 and 480 post operation, grafted skin still survived well on recipients with normal ultrastructure. Epidermic cells of skin allografts proliferated on day 5, developed and repaired on day 10. Histological structure of the skin returned to normal on day 30 post operation. The regeneration of bone marrow appeared on 5th day, increased markedly on day 10, and almost completed on day 15 after bone marrow transplantation. However, the regeneration of lymphocytes in cortex of spleen and lymph nodes did not appear until day 15 of BMT. The results show that bone marrow and skin allograft transplantation at early time post injury in most severe combined radiation-burn injury have tremendous beneficial effects, and the skin allograft can survive for a long time

  5. Phytochemicals in Skin Cancer Prevention and Treatment: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau Yee Ng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin is the largest human organ, our protection against various environmental assaults and noxious agents. Accumulation of these stress events may lead to the formation of skin cancers, including both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Although modern targeted therapies have ameliorated the management of cutaneous malignancies, a safer, more affordable, and more effective strategy for chemoprevention and treatment is clearly needed for the improvement of skin cancer care. Phytochemicals are biologically active compounds derived from plants and herbal products. These agents appear to be beneficial in the battle against cancer as they exert anti-carcinogenic effects and are widely available, highly tolerated, and cost-effective. Evidence has indicated that the anti-carcinogenic properties of phytochemicals are due to their anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and anti-angiogenic effects. In this review, we discuss the preventive potential, therapeutic effects, bioavailability, and structure–activity relationship of these selected phytochemicals for the management of skin cancers. The knowledge compiled here will provide clues for future investigations on novel oncostatic phytochemicals and additional anti-skin cancer mechanisms.

  6. Preventing Occupational Skin Disease: A Review of Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zack, Bethany; Arrandale, Victoria H; Holness, D Linn

    Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is a common occupational disease that impacts a variety of worker groups. Skin protection and disease prevention training programs have shown promise for improving prevention practices and reducing the incidence of OCD. This review details the features of training programs for primary prevention of OCD and identifies gaps in the literature. Twelve studies were identified for in-depth review: many studies included wet workers employed in health care, hairdressing, cleaning, and food preparation; 1 program featured manufacturing workers. Few programs provided content on allergic contact dermatitis, and only 1 was evaluated for long-term effectiveness. Effective programs were similar in content, delivery method, and timing and were characterized by industry specificity, multimodal learning, participatory elements, skin care resource provision, repeated sessions, and management engagement. Long-term effectiveness, generalizability beyond OCD, workplace health and safety culture impact, and translation of programs in the North American context represent areas for future research.

  7. PRIMARY PREVENTION OF MALIGNANT SKIN TUMORS – PHOTOPROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Benedičič - Pilih

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of skin cancer is increasing in the world as well as in our country. Decades of research have increased the understanding of the ethiopathogenetic influences and risk factors for development of malignant skin tumors and stimulated efforts to promote their prevention. There are successes of prevention programs in some places in the world expressing with the reduction of mortality because of the cutaneous malignant melanoma. A primary prevention of a skin cancer attempts to change population knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about sunlight, leading to reduce of sunlight exposure.Conclusions. In this article we are discussing guidelines for photoprevention. The best approach to it is a reduction in the overall exposure to sunlight. The natural protection with the use of shade, clothing and hats is promoted as the best protection. Sunscreens are assumed as an important component of adjuvant photoprotection based on their convenience of use and also on their widespread promotion. While it has been argued that all tanning is a manifestation of skin injury, avoiding of artificial tanning devices is proposed also.

  8. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Space and Place Home Risks Burns and Scalds Type Video Audience Parents You are here Home Safety ... Videos Resource Center Resources Library FAQs CPS Certification Sports Safety 101 Countdown2Drive Español Get Involved Shout Out ...

  9. Biomedical implications from a morphoelastic continuum model for the simulation of contracture formation in skin grafts that cover excised burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppenol, D.C.; Vermolen, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    A continuum hypothesis-based model is developed for the simulation of the (long term) contraction of skin grafts that cover excised burns in order to obtain suggestions regarding the ideal length of splinting therapy and when to start with this therapy such that the therapy is effective

  10. An in vivo comparison of commonly used topical antimicrobials on skin graft healing after full-thickness burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ozan L; Borman, Huseyin; Bahar, Taner; Ertaş, Nilgün M; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Topical antimicrobials are frequently used for local control of infections in burn patients. It has been postulated that these agents retard wound healing. There are limited data about the effects of topical antimicrobial agents on skin graft healing. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of nitrofurazone, 1% silver sulfadiazine, and povidone-iodine on skin graft healing. Forty male rats were used in this study. A meshed skin graft, placed on an excised burn wound, was used as a model to compare topical agents with a control group. Skin graft survival rates, closure of meshed graft interstices (based on physical parameters, namely epithelialization and wound contraction), and histological changes were analyzed. Graft take was more than 85% in all groups. There was no difference between the mean values of the percent graft survival for each group (P > .05). Epithelialization occurred significantly earlier in animals in the nitrofurazone group (P .05). There was no histological difference between the biopsy specimens of skin grafts. In specimens obtained from the interstices of the meshed graft, no significant differences were found among the groups regarding the wound healing parameters (P > .05). We found that nitrofurazone, silver sulfadiazine, and povidone-iodine had no negative effect on graft healing and take in noncontaminated burn wounds.

  11. In vivo classification of human skin burns using machine learning and quantitative features captured by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Neeru; Srivastava, Vishal; Singh Mehta, Dalip

    2018-02-01

    We report the first fully automated detection of human skin burn injuries in vivo, with the goal of automatic surgical margin assessment based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Our proposed automated procedure entails building a machine-learning-based classifier by extracting quantitative features from normal and burn tissue images recorded by OCT. In this study, 56 samples (28 normal, 28 burned) were imaged by OCT and eight features were extracted. A linear model classifier was trained using 34 samples and 22 samples were used to test the model. Sensitivity of 91.6% and specificity of 90% were obtained. Our results demonstrate the capability of a computer-aided technique for accurately and automatically identifying burn tissue resection margins during surgical treatment.

  12. Preventing skin cancer through reduction of indoor tanning: current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Meg; Holman, Dawn M; Fox, Kathleen A; Guy, Gery P; Seidenberg, Andrew B; Sampson, Blake P; Sinclair, Craig; Lazovich, DeAnn

    2013-06-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation from indoor tanning devices (tanning beds, booths, and sun lamps) or from the sun contributes to the risk of skin cancer, including melanoma, which is the type of skin cancer responsible for most deaths. Indoor tanning is common among certain groups, especially among older adolescents and young adults, adolescent girls and young women, and non-Hispanic whites. Increased understanding of the health risks associated with indoor tanning has led to many efforts to reduce use. Most environmental and systems efforts in the U.S. (e.g., age limits or requiring parental consent/accompaniment) have occurred at the state level. At the national level, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission regulate indoor tanning devices and advertising, respectively. The current paper provides a brief review of (1) the evidence on indoor tanning as a risk factor for skin cancer; (2) factors that may influence use of indoor tanning devices at the population level; and (3) various environmental and systems options available for consideration when developing strategies to reduce indoor tanning. This information provides the context and background for the companion paper in this issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, which summarizes highlights from an informal expert meeting convened by the CDC in August 2012 to identify opportunities to prevent skin cancer by reducing use of indoor tanning devices. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Preventing Skin Cancer Through Reduction of Indoor Tanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Meg; Holman, Dawn M.; Fox, Kathleen A.; Guy, Gery P.; Seidenberg, Andrew B.; Sampson, Blake P.; Sinclair, Craig; Lazovich, DeAnn

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation from indoor tanning devices (tanning beds, booths, and sun lamps) or from the sun contributes to the risk of skin cancer, including melanoma, which is the type of skin cancer responsible for most deaths. Indoor tanning is common among certain groups, especially among older adolescents and young adults, adolescent girls and young women, and non-Hispanic whites. Increased understanding of the health risks associated with indoor tanning has led to many efforts to reduce use. Most environmental and systems efforts in the U.S. (e.g., age limits or requiring parental consent/accompaniment) have occurred at the state level. At the national level, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission regulate indoor tanning devices and advertising, respectively. The current paper provides a brief review of (1) the evidence on indoor tanning as a risk factor for skin cancer; (2) factors that may influence use of indoor tanning devices at the population level; and (3) various environmental and systems options available for consideration when developing strategies to reduce indoor tanning. This information provides the context and background for the companion paper in this issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, which summarizes highlights from an informal expert meeting convened by the CDC in August 2012 to identify opportunities to prevent skin cancer by reducing use of indoor tanning devices. PMID:23683987

  14. [Skin care and prevention of bed sores in bedridden patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Cuervo, Fernando; Soldevilla Agreda, J Javier; Verdú Soriano, José; Segovia Gómez, Teresa; García Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo Hidalgo, Pedro Luís

    2007-12-01

    The aging process and environmental aggressions will leave their imprints on the state of a person's skin, possibly compromising some of its functions. Age is a risk factor for the development of bed sores, but not the only factor nor the most important one; therefore, we need to develop prevention programs directed to all patients who spend long periods of time sedentary or bedridden. Prevention programs for bed sores must be based on the best evidence available and include a risk evaluation on these factors: suffering a lesion due to pressure, specific skin treatment, incontinence control, excessive humidity posture changes and the use of special surfaces to manage pressure during an increase in mobility or activity by the patient, local pressure reducing devices as well as paying attention to special situations. All of these care measures have to be developed based on a continuity of treatment among the institutions and caretakers involved with treating each patient.

  15. Novel vitamin D compounds and skin cancer prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Tongkao-on, Wannit; Gordon-Thomson, Clare; Dixon, Katie M.; Song, Eric J.; Luu, Tan; Carter, Sally E.; Sequeira, Vanessa B.; Reeve, Vivienne E.; Mason, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    As skin cancer is one of the most costly health issues in many countries, particularly in Australia, the possibility that vitamin D compounds might contribute to prevention of this disease is becoming increasingly more attractive to researchers and health communities. In this article, important epidemiologic, mechanistic and experimental data supporting the chemopreventive potential of several vitamin D-related compounds are explored. Evidence of photoprotection by the active hormone, 1α,25di...

  16. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Bhatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5–treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  17. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  18. Diet and Skin Cancer: The Potential Role of Dietary Antioxidants in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Katta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most common cancer among Americans. Ultraviolet (UV radiation exposure is the major risk factor for the development of NMSC. Dietary AOs may prevent free radical-mediated DNA damage and tumorigenesis secondary to UV radiation. Numerous laboratory studies have found that certain dietary AOs show significant promise in skin cancer prevention. These results have been substantiated by animal studies. In human studies, researchers have evaluated both oral AO supplements and dietary intake of AOs via whole foods. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of AOs in preventing tumorigenesis and outline four targeted dietary AOs. We review the results of research evaluating oral AOs supplements as compared to dietary AOs intake via whole foods. While these specific supplements have not shown efficacy, intake of AOs via consumption of whole foods has shown some promise. Lessons learned from the field of hypertension research may provide important guidance in future study design. Further research on the role of dietary AOs in the prevention of NMSC is warranted and should focus on intake via whole food consumption.

  19. Pilot testing of a burn prevention teaching tool for Amish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieman, Mary T; Kagan, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Burn prevention education for Amish children is warranted as there are unique risks associated with the Amish lifestyle. Specific educational opportunities are related to scalds, ignition of clothing, and ignition of highly flammable materials. A culturally sensitive burn prevention teaching tool, consisting of a magnetic storyboard, burn safety curriculum, and tests, was developed with the cooperation of one Old Order Amish community. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of the tool in an Amish school. The teacher obtained parental permission and informed assent for the participation of the children. Pretesting was completed before the lessons began. The teacher told stories and arranged the magnets on the storyboard to show burn hazards involving lighters, stoves, kerosene heaters, gasoline-powered engines, and hot liquids used for canning, butchering, mopping, washing clothes, and making lye soap. The children were challenged to rearrange the pieces for a safer situation. Posttesting was performed 2 months after the pretest. Twenty-seven students (grades 1-8) participated. Tests were scored as a percentage of the 33 items answered correctly. The mean pretest score was 62 and the mean posttest score was 83. Statistical analysis using paired t-test demonstrated a highly significant improvement in test scores (P < .0001), with a power of more than 99%. This pilot study demonstrated that the burn prevention teaching tool was effective for improving knowledge in one classroom of Amish children. These results support expanded use and testing of this tool in other Amish schools.

  20. The role of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in ex-vivo examination of human skin burn injury treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna; Gawłowski, Andrzej; Biniaś, Dorota; Bobiński, Rafał; Kawecki, Marek; Klama-Baryła, Agnieszka; Kitala, Diana; Łabuś, Wojciech; Glik, Justyna; Paluch, Jadwiga

    2018-05-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is one of the most versatile solvents in biological science, therefore it is frequently used as a solvent in biological studies and as a vehicle for drug therapy. DMSO readily penetrates, diffuses through biological membranes and ipso facto increases fluidity of liposomal membranes modelling stratum corneum. Thermal injury is associated with the appearance of lipid peroxidation products in the burned skin. The influence of DMSO on protein structure and stability is concentration and temperature dependant. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of DMSO on human burn wounds and examine the interactions between DMSO and skin surface. The real problem in burn treatment is hypoalbuminemia. At the level of the laboratory studies there was an attempt at answering the question of whether the DMSO will modify the standard serum solution. In the case of the incubation of skin fragments in 1%-100% DMSO, the following findings were reported: modification of the serum, appearance of low molecular weight oligomer bands, disappearance of albumin bands or reconstruction of native serum bands during incubation in antioxidant solutions. The result of the modification is also the exposure of FTIR 1603 and 1046 cm-1 bands observed in frozen serum solutions. In the case of modification of the burned skin by DMSO solutions or antioxidants - frequency shifts, an increase in the intensity of amide I band as well as the appearance of the 1601 cm-1 band can be specific biomarkers of the tissue regeneration process. In this study the areas 1780-1580 cm-1 and 1418-1250 cm-1 on the Raman spectra are particularly rich in spectral information.

  1. Evolution of skin grafting for treatment of burns: Reverdin pinch grafting to Tanner mesh grafting and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mansher; Nuutila, Kristo; Collins, K C; Huang, Anne

    2017-09-01

    Skin grafting is the current standard care in the treatment of full thickness burns. It was first described around 1500 BC but the vast majority of advancements have been achieved over the past 200 years. An extensive literature review was conducted on Pubmed, Medline and Google Scholar researching the evolution of skin grafting techniques. The authors concentrated on the major landmarks of skin grafting and also provide an overview of ongoing research efforts in this field. The major innovations of skin grafting include Reverdin pinch grafting, Ollier grafting, Thiersch grafting, Wolfe grafting, Padgett dermatome and modifications, Meek-wall microdermatome and Tanner mesh grafting. A brief description of the usage, advantages and limitations of each technique is included in the manuscript. Skin grafting technique have evolved significantly over past 200 years from Reverdin pinch grafting to modern day meshed skin grafts using powered dermatome. Increasing the expansion ratio and improving the cosmetic and functional outcome are the main focus of ongoing skin grafting research and emerging techniques (such as Integra ® , Recell ® , Xpansion ® ) are showing promise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. An Integrative Suicide Prevention Program for Visitor Charcoal Burning Suicide and Suicide Pact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Paul W. C.; Liu, Patricia M. Y.; Chan, Wincy S. C.; Law, Y. W.; Law, Steven C. K.; Fu, King-Wa; Li, Hana S. H.; Tso, M. K.; Beautrais, Annette L.; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2009-01-01

    An integrative suicide prevention program was implemented to tackle an outbreak of visitor charcoal burning suicides in Cheung Chau, an island in Hong Kong, in 2002. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the program. The numbers of visitor suicides reduced from 37 deaths in the 51 months prior to program implementation to 6 deaths in the 42…

  3. Burn injury in kitchen workers: a cause for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riina, L H; Simpson, R L; Gudjonsson, O; Glickman, L T; Harris, S U; Johnson, D; Ginocchio, M

    2000-01-01

    Preventable thermal injuries in professional kitchen workers have been identified, and we have introduced a protective garment. Because of the nature of their occupation, kitchen workers are prone to thermal injuries. It has been our experience that the majority of these injuries are scald injuries on the ankles and dorsum of the feet. We propose that a protective garment, such as a waterproof shoe and garter, could reduce the incidence of these injuries.

  4. Educational materials used for education in forest fires and preventive burning in Baccalaureate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Montoya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This work includes various aspects of teaching in Secondary Education and Baccalaureate rarely on the agenda: forest fires and prescribed burns. It includes a proposal of training materials for the study and awareness of students about the serious problem posed by wildfires and how we can avoid them. Within the latter, the importance of controlled burning for preventing these fires is highlighted, which, as it has been shown when trying, is an unknown aspect for them. This test was to see if after the educational intervention previous ideas were modified.

  5. Development of an effective communication strategy for the prevention of burns in children: the PRIUS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedri, S; Briguglio, E; Cedri, C; Masellis, A; Crenca, A; Pitidis, A

    2015-06-30

    This study has developed a learning kit for the prevention of domestic burns in childhood. The main objective was to trial an educational package for children (nursery and primary classes), for the prevention of burns, to be implemented through education in schools. The educational kit comprises posters, information leaflets, comic books, and pre and post education evaluation materials for school children, parents and teachers. Recipients of the preliminary study were the students of nine schools in the eight Italian cities where Burn Centers are located. In order to reach the target groups of children, it was necessary to identify the most effective communication strategy to convey the burn prevention message. For nursery school children, it was not possible to use tools with written texts alone, as they were not yet literate. Moreover, even for older children, it was necessary to find an attractive tool to catch their attention and interest, promoting the understanding and memorization of lessons learned. The most suitable means was found to be comic strips, allowing the messages to be conveyed through images as well as words. A total of 370 children (195 from nurseries and 175 from primary schools) participated in the trial of the educational kit. Overall, for every environment represented in the evaluation table, the ability to recognize the dangers among both the pre-school and primary school children increased significantly after the training activity. In conclusion, the educational kit has been positively assessed.

  6. Domestic burns prevention and first aid awareness in and around Jamshedpur, India: strategies and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A; Bharat, R

    2000-11-01

    This article highlights the strategy for awareness creation regarding burns prevention and first aid and its impact in and around the steel-producing city of Jamshedpur, India. This is a joint venture of the Burns Centre and the Medico Social Welfare Unit of the Tata Main Hospital, Jamshedpur in collaboration with the Social Service Division of Tata Steel and city schools. The first phase of 5 years has been devoted to general awareness building in the population through two main programmes, namely "Community Awareness Programmes" for the target group of ladies and teenage girls and "School Education Programmes" for the target group of school children of Standard 8 in the steel-producing city. These programmes include audio-visual presentations as well as face to face interactions regarding structure and arrangements in the kitchen, floor level cooking, clothing while cooking, careful use of electrical appliances, pressure stoves, etc. The discussions also include suicidal and homicidal burns prevention strategies. Various competitions for the target group provide feedback on programmes. The growing awareness about burns prevention among school children and community members, and steady increase in the number of patients who use water as first aid, speak about the success of the strategies.

  7. Development of an effective communication strategy for the prevention of burns in children: the PRIUS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedri, S.; Briguglio, E.; Cedri, C.; Masellis, A.; Crenca, A.; Pitidis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study has developed a learning kit for the prevention of domestic burns in childhood. The main objective was to trial an educational package for children (nursery and primary classes), for the prevention of burns, to be implemented through education in schools. The educational kit comprises posters, information leaflets, comic books, and pre and post education evaluation materials for school children, parents and teachers. Recipients of the preliminary study were the students of nine schools in the eight Italian cities where Burn Centers are located. In order to reach the target groups of children, it was necessary to identify the most effective communication strategy to convey the burn prevention message. For nursery school children, it was not possible to use tools with written texts alone, as they were not yet literate. Moreover, even for older children, it was necessary to find an attractive tool to catch their attention and interest, promoting the understanding and memorization of lessons learned. The most suitable means was found to be comic strips, allowing the messages to be conveyed through images as well as words. A total of 370 children (195 from nurseries and 175 from primary schools) participated in the trial of the educational kit. Overall, for every environment represented in the evaluation table, the ability to recognize the dangers among both the pre-school and primary school children increased significantly after the training activity. In conclusion, the educational kit has been positively assessed. PMID:27252606

  8. Can Skin Exposure to Sunlight Prevent Liver Inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Gorman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Liver inflammation contributes towards the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Here we discuss how skin exposure to sunlight may suppress liver inflammation and the severity of NAFLD. Following exposure to sunlight-derived ultraviolet radiation (UVR, the skin releases anti-inflammatory mediators such as vitamin D and nitric oxide. Animal modeling studies suggest that exposure to UVR can prevent the development of NAFLD. Association studies also support a negative link between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and NAFLD incidence or severity. Clinical trials are in their infancy and are yet to demonstrate a clear beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation. There are a number of potentially interdependent mechanisms whereby vitamin D could dampen liver inflammation, by inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis and liver fibrosis, modulating the gut microbiome and through altered production and transport of bile acids. While there has been a focus on vitamin D, other mediators induced by sun exposure, such as nitric oxide may also play important roles in curtailing liver inflammation.

  9. Release of hand burn contracture: comparing the ALT perforator flap with the gracilis free flap with split skin graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misani, M; Zirak, C; Hau, Lê Thua Trung; De Mey, A; Boeckx, W

    2013-08-01

    The use of microsurgery in the management of burn sequelae is not a new idea. According to the properties of various types of free flaps different goals can be achieved or various additional procedures have to be combined. We report the comparison of two different free flaps on a single patient for reconstruction of both upper extremities for burn sequelae. A 1-year-old child sustained severe burns on both hands, arms and thorax and was initially only treated conservatively. This resulted in severe contractures. At the age of 4-years a free gracilis flap was selected for reconstruction of his left hand and a free anterolateral thigh flap for the right hand. We noticed a better functional and esthetic result for the gracilis flap associated with a shorter operative time and a minor donor site morbidity. The intraoperative technique and time, postoperative complications, functional and esthetic results and donor site morbidities were studied in the two types of flaps chosen. A review of literature was also performed. Our experience reported a better success of the gracilis muscle flap covered with a split skin graft compared to the anterolateral thigh flap in the reconstruction of hand function after severe burn sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. An objective long-term evaluation of Integra (a dermal skin substitute) and split thickness skin grafts, in acute burns and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dai Q A; Potokar, Tom S; Price, Patricia

    2010-02-01

    The field of wound healing and tissue repair has advanced rapidly in the last decade, with this there is an increasing emphasis on the importance of the functional and cosmetic outcomes following injury. Integra artificial skin is the most widely used synthetic skin substitute and is reported to have better outcomes in relation to the appearance and elasticity when compared to split thickness skin grafting (SSG). A review of the literature reveals very few trials that are based on an objective evaluation of Integra treated scars as compared to SSGs. This research aimed to provide objective data on the long-term outcome of Integra. All adult patients from the Welsh Burns Centre who had been successfully treated with Integra+/-SSG were invited to attend a clinic for a follow up provided they had been healed for greater than one year. The hypothesis that Integra scars are more pliable than skin grafts was tested objectively using the Cutometer, a suction device which measures skin elasticity. Of the 13 patients eligible, six were available for assessment. The results of this study suggest that Integra treated sites correlate well with normal skin as measured by the Cutometer. This was statistically significant for the parameters Ur/Ue (elastic function) and Ur/Uf (gross elasticity). On the other hand there was no correlation seen between the patients SSG sites and the patient's normal skin. With advances in medicine we are increasingly able to modulate wound healing and the resultant scars. In order to assess new and often costly treatments the need for objective scar measurement tools have become apparent. Integra has been advocated to improve scarring from injury. However, there have been few studies to evaluate the long-term outcome of Integra as compared to traditional methods such as SSG. In the past scar evaluation has been based on subjective scores by patients and clinicians. Now the mechanical properties of the skin can be evaluated using simple

  11. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10μM HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at λ=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  12. Skin Photoaging and the Role of Antioxidants in Its Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Pandel, Ruža; Poljšak, Borut; Godic, Aleksandar; Dahmane, Raja

    2013-01-01

    Photoaging of the skin depends primarily on the degree of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and on an amount of melanin in the skin (skin phototype). In addition to direct or indirect DNA damage, UVR activates cell surface receptors of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the skin, which leads to a breakdown of collagen in the extracellular matrix and a shutdown of new collagen synthesis. It is hypothesized that dermal collagen breakdown is followed by imperfect repair that yields a deficit in the stru...

  13. Chemoprevention of Skin Cancer Program Project | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in the world. One out of three new cancers is a skin cancer. More than 1 million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) (basal cell carcinoma [BCC] and squamous cell cancers [SCC]) occur annually. While the incidence rates for non-melanoma skin cancers continue to rise, there continues to be a

  14. Factors that Affected Functional Outcome After a Delayed Excision and Split-Thickness Skin Graft on the Dorsal Side of Burned Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichinohe, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Kawashima, Kunihiro; Kimura, Chu; Ono, Kentaro; Horiuchi, Katsumi; Yoshida, Tetsunori; Murao, Naoki; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Funayama, Emi; Oyama, Akihiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi

    Early excision and skin grafting is the principle treatment for a burned hand although there are occasions when it cannot be done such as severe general condition, delayed consultation, and the lack of a definitive assessment of burn depth. This study analyzes the factors that affected function after a delayed excision and skin graft for hands with a deep dermal burn. This study retrospectively evaluated 43 burned hands that required a delayed excision and split-thickness skin graft on the dorsal side. Cases were required to only have split-thickness skin grafting from the dorsum of the hand and fingers distally to at least the proximal interphalangeal joint at least 8 days after the injury. The hands were divided into two functional categories: Functional category A, normal or nearly normal joint movements, and functional category B, abnormal joint movements. Demographic data were assessed statistically by a univariate analysis following a multiple regression analysis by a stepwise selection. A significant difference was observed between the groups in the number of days from grafting to complete wound healing of the graft site and with or without an escharotomy in the analysis. These parameters were statistically significant predictors of functional category B. The functional outcome of a burned hand after a delayed excision and split-thickness skin graft on the dorsal side became degraded depending on the number of days from grafting to complete wound healing. Cases that underwent an escharotomy also showed deterioration in function.

  15. NCI Statement on the U.S. Surgeon General's "Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer"

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the Federal Government's principal agency for cancer research and training, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) endorses the U.S. Surgeon General’s “Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer,” which provides a comprehensive evaluation of the current state of skin cancer prevention efforts in the United States and recommends actions for improvement in the future.

  16. Antecedent thermal injury worsens split-thickness skin graft quality: A clinically relevant porcine model of full-thickness burn, excision and grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Anders H; Rose, Lloyd F; Fletcher, John L; Wu, Jesse C; Leung, Kai P; Chan, Rodney K

    2017-02-01

    Current standard of care for full-thickness burn is excision followed by autologous split-thickness skin graft placement. Skin grafts are also frequently used to cover surgical wounds not amenable to linear closure. While all grafts have potential to contract, clinical observation suggests that antecedent thermal injury worsens contraction and impairs functional and aesthetic outcomes. This study evaluates the impact of antecedent full-thickness burn on split-thickness skin graft scar outcomes and the potential mediating factors. Full-thickness contact burns (100°C, 30s) were created on the backs of anesthetized female Yorkshire Pigs. After seven days, burn eschar was tangentially excised and covered with 12/1000th inch (300μm) split-thickness skin graft. For comparison, unburned wounds were created by sharp excision to fat before graft application. From 7 to 120days post-grafting, planimetric measurements, digital imaging and biopsies for histology, immunohistochemistry and gene expression were obtained. At 120days post-grafting, the Observer Scar Assessment Scale, colorimetry, contour analysis and optical graft height assessments were performed. Twenty-nine porcine wounds were analyzed. All measured metrics of clinical skin quality were significantly worse (pskin graft quality, likely by multiple mechanisms including burn-related inflammation, microscopically inadequate excision, and dysregulation of tissue remodeling. A valid, reliable, clinically relevant model of full-thickness burn, excision and skin replacement therapy has been demonstrated. Future research to enhance quality of skin replacement therapies should be directed toward modulation of inflammation and assessments for complete excision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Incidence and characteristics of chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Lee, Sang-Gil; Kim, Hwan-Cheol

    2017-05-01

    Chemical burns can lead to serious health outcomes. Previous studies about chemical burns have been performed based on burn center data so these studies have provided limited information about the incidence of chemical burns at the national level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns using nationwide databases. A cohort representing the Korean population, which was established using a national health insurance database, and a nationwide workers' compensation database were used to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns. Characteristics of the affected body region, depth of burns, industry, task, and causative agents were analyzed from two databases. The incidence of chemical burns was calculated according to employment status. The most common regions involving chemical burns with hospital visits were the skin followed by the eyes. For skin lesions, the hands and wrists were the most commonly affected regions. Second degree burns were the most common in terms of depth of skin lesions. The hospital visit incidence was 1.96 per 10,000 person-year in the general population. The compensated chemical burns incidence was 0.17 per 10,000 person-year. Employees and the self-employed showed a significantly increased risk of chemical burns undergoing hospital visits compared to their dependents. Chemical burns on the skin and eyes are almost equally prevalent. The working environment was associated with increased risk of chemical burns. Our results may aid in estimating the size of the problem and prioritizing prevention of chemical burns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiology of pediatric burns and future prevention strategies-a study of 475 patients from a high-volume burn center in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhopte, Amol; Tiwari, V K; Patel, Pankaj; Bamal, Rahul

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric burns have a long-term social impact. This is more apparent in a developing country such as India, where their incidence and morbidity are high. The aim of this study was to provide recent prospective epidemiological data on pediatric burns in India and to suggest future preventive strategies. Children up to 18 years old admitted to the Department of Burns, Plastic & Maxillofacial Surgery, VMMC & Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, between January and December 2014 were included in the study. Data regarding age, sex, etiology, total body surface area (TBSA), circumstances of injury, and clinical assessment were collected. The Mann-Whitney test or Kruskal-Wallis test or ANOVA was used to compare involved TBSA among various cohort groups accordingly. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to determine the predictors of TBSA. There were a total of 475 patients involved in the study, including seven suicidal burns, all of whom were females with a mean age greater than the cohort average. Age, type of burns, mode of injury, presence or absence of inhalation injury, gender, and time of year (quarter) for admission were found to independently affect the TBSA involved. Electrical burns also formed an important number of presenting burn patients, mainly involving teenagers. Several societal issues have come forth, e.g., child marriage, child labor, and likely psychological problems among female children as suggested by a high incidence of suicidal burns. This study also highlights several issues such as overcrowding, lack of awareness, dangerous cooking practices, and improper use of kerosene oil. There is an emergent need to recognize the problems, formulate strategies, spread awareness, and ban or replace hazardous substances responsible for most burn accidents.

  19. Pirfenidone nanoparticles improve corneal wound healing and prevent scarring following alkali burn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushovan Chowdhury

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of pirfenidone nanoparticles on corneal re-epithelialization and scarring, major clinical challenges after alkali burn.Effect of pirfenidone on collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA synthesis by TGFβ induced primary corneal fibroblast cells was evaluated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Pirfenidone loaded poly (lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA nanoparticles were prepared, characterized and their cellular entry was examined in primary corneal fibroblast cells by fluorescence microscopy. Alkali burn was induced in one eye of Sprague Dawley rats followed by daily topical treatment with free pirfenidone, pirfenidone nanoparticles or vehicle. Corneal re-epithelialization was assessed daily by flourescein dye test; absence of stained area indicated complete re-epithelialization and the time for complete re-epithelialization was determined. Corneal haze was assessed daily for 7 days under slit lamp microscope and graded using a standard method. After 7 days, collagen I deposition in the superficial layer of cornea was examined by immunohistochemistry.Pirfenidone prevented (P<0.05 increase in TGF β induced collagen I and α-SMA synthesis by corneal fibroblasts in a dose dependent manner. Pirfenidone could be loaded successfully within PLGA nanoparticles, which entered the corneal fibroblasts within 5 minutes. Pirfenidone nanoparticles but not free pirfenidone significantly (P<0.05 reduced collagen I level, corneal haze and the time for corneal re-epithelialization following alkali burn.Pirfenidone decreases collagen synthesis and prevents myofibroblast formation. Pirfenidone nanoparticles improve corneal wound healing and prevent fibrosis. Pirfenidone nanoparticles are of potential value in treating corneal chemical burns and other corneal fibrotic diseases.

  20. Ablation of burned skin with ultra-short pulses laser to promote healing: evaluation by optical coherence tomography, histology, μATR-FTIR and Nonlinear Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Moises Oliveira dos

    2012-01-01

    Burns cause changes in the anatomical structure of the skin associated with trauma. The severity of the burn injury is divided into first, second and third-degree burns. The third-degree burns have been a major focus of research in search of more conservative treatments and faster results in repair for a functional and cosmetically acceptable. The conventional treatment is the use of topical natural or synthetic skin graft. An alternative therapy is the laser ablation process for burned tissue necrosis removal due to the no mechanical contact, fast application and access to difficult areas. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using high intensity femtosecond lasers as an adjunct treatment of burned patients. For this study, 65 Wistar rats were divided into groups of five animals: healthy skin, burned skin, two types of treatment (surgical debridement or femtosecond laser ablation) and four different times in the healing process monitoring. Three regions of the back of the animals were exposed to steam source causing third-degree burn. On the third day after the burn, one of the regions was ablated with high intensity ultrashort laser pulses (λ = 785 nm, 90 fs, 2 kHz and 10 μJ/ pulse), the other received surgical debridement, and the last was considered the burn control. The regions were analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT), histology, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy using Fourier transform (μ-ATR-FTIR), two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) and second harmonic generation technique (SHG) on days 3, 5, 7 and 14 pos-treatments. The results showed that with the laser irradiation conditions used it was possible to remove debris from third degree burn. The techniques used to characterize the tissue allowed to verify that all treatments promoted wound healing. On the fourteenth day, the regeneration curve showed that the attenuation coefficient of laser ablated tissue converges to the values of

  1. Analysis of the collagen birefringence and the relative attenuation coefficient of health and burned skin irradiated with linearly polarized He-Ne laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Daniela de Fatima Teixeira da

    2002-01-01

    Low-intensity laser therapy is characterized by its ability to induce athermic effects and nondestructive photobiological processes. Although it has been in use for more than 40 years, this phototherapy is still not an established therapeutic modality. The objectives of this study were: to quantify the collagen fibers organization by polarized light microscopy in normal and burned skin samples at day 17 post-injury considering preferential axis as the animal's spinal column and aligning the linear laser polarization in two directions of polarization, parallel or perpendicular to this axis; to determine the relative attenuation coefficient for the intensity light by the technique of imaging the light distribution in normal and burned skin during wound healing process taking only parallel direction of polarization. To reach the objectives, burns about 6 mm in diameter were created with liquid N 2 on the back of the rats and the lesions were irradiated on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-wounding, D= 1 J/cm 2 , to investigate the effects of low-intensity linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam on skin wounds healing. Control lesions were not irradiated. The results have demonstrated that: the skin samples irradiated with linearly parallel polarized He-Ne laser beam showed collagen fibers more organized; burned skin samples presents a higher attenuation coefficient than normal skin samples. These results are important to optimize low intensity laser therapy dosimetry on acceleration wound healing. (author)

  2. Major Full Skin Thickness Burn Injuries in an Infant due to an Incubator: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhan Ciftci

    2011-06-01

    We conclude that in neonates and infants, relatively low temperatures may cause deep burn injuries. We therefore recommend the delivery of preterm childbirths at well equipped facilities with staff who are qualified to nurse premature neonates. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 85-88

  3. Assessment of the relation between prealbumin serum level and healing of skin-grafted burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghazy, A M; Adly, O A; Abbas, A H; Moati, T A; Ali, O S; Mohamed, B A

    2010-06-01

    Nutritional status is an important factor in graft healing. Prealbumin (transthyretin) is a better nutritional marker than the widely used albumin serum level. Prealbumin serum levels were estimated in an endeavour to correlate them to graft healing and to serve as a predictor of graft healing in burn wounds. Fifty burned patients undergoing graft in the Suez Canal University Hospital Burn Unit were subjected to this cross-sectional study. Prealbumin levels were assessed on preoperative day and on the fourth postoperative day. Graft healing was considered complete when the take was 90% or more of the grafted area. The most significantly correlated factor to graft healing was serum prealbumin. Serum albumin levels were not in significant correlation with graft healing or prealbumin levels. In addition, serum prealbumin levels were significantly higher in the younger age group and significantly lower in patients with chronic diseases. Serum prealbumin level is a sensitive tool in predicting graft take in burned patients when all local conditions are favourable and optimised. Nevertheless, it seems less sensitive in the prediction of graft healing in small raw areas less than 5% of total body surface area (TBSA). (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetically Modified Porcine Skin Grafts for Treatment of Severe Burn Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    skin treatment and storage Clinical and Histopathologic Data Confirmation of Preliminary Data and Reproducibility of Xenotransplantation Model...the counts per minute ( cpm ) for the responses at each of the time points, which have lower cpms (see red circles around cpm values on pgs. 49-50...although the blade was fresh for each animal. The skin grafts were kept moist and cold in a saline-filled Petri dish on ice while being trimmed to the

  5. Burning Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be accompanied by a pins and needles sensation (paresthesia) or numbness, or both. Burning feet may also be referred to as tingling feet or paresthesia. While fatigue or a skin infection can cause ...

  6. Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Canada Chapter 2: Primary Prevention of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Kirk; Searles, Gordon E; Vender, Ronald; Teoh, Hwee; Ashkenas, John

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal and squamous cell carcinoma (BCC and SCC), represents the most common malignancy. To provide guidance to Canadian health care practitioners regarding primary prevention of NMSC. Structured literature searches were conducted, using search terms including prevention, sunscreen, and sun prevention factor. All recommendations concern guidance that physicians should regularly discuss with their patients to help establish photoprotection habits. The GRADE system was used to assign strength to each recommendation. Ultraviolet exposure is the major modifiable risk factor for NMSC. Aspects of photoprotection, including effective sunscreen use and avoidance of both the midday sun and artificial tanning, are discussed. Several widespread misunderstandings that undermine responsible public health measures related to sun safety are addressed. Photoprotection represents both an individual priority and a public health imperative. By providing accurate information during routine patient visits, physicians reinforce the need for ongoing skin cancer prevention. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Main approaches for delivering antioxidant vitamins through the skin to prevent skin ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gašperlin, Mirjana; Gosenca, Mirjam

    2011-07-01

    One of the major contributions to skin photoageing and diseases is oxidative stress, caused by UV radiation inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Successful prophylaxis and therapy would necessitate control of the oxidant/antioxidant balance at the affected site, which can be achieved through the external supply of endogenous antioxidants. This review discusses possible strategies for dermal delivery of the antioxidant vitamins E and C, as oral supplementation has proved insufficient. These antioxidants have low skin bioavailability, owing to their poor solubility, inefficient skin permeability, or instability during storage. These drawbacks can be overcome by various approaches, such as chemical modification of the vitamins and the use of new colloidal drug delivery systems. New knowledge is included about the importance of: enhancing the endogenous skin antioxidant defense through external supply; the balance between various skin antioxidants; factors that can improve the skin bioavailability of antioxidants; and new delivery systems, such as microemulsions, used to deliver vitamins C and E into the skin simultaneously. A promising strategy for enhancing skin protection from oxidative stress is to support the endogenous antioxidant system, with antioxidants containing products that are normally present in the skin.

  8. Comparative study of Low-level laser therapy and microcurrent on the healing of skin burns in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pegado de Abreu Freitas

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated and compared the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT and microcurrent in the burn healing process in Wistar rats. We conducted a randomized controlled study with 30 rats divided into 3 groups (n = 10; control group (CG, laser group (LG and microcurrent group (MG. After thermal damage, 10 applications of 660 nm diode laser were performed in GL and 10 applications of 60 Hz microcurrent (160 μA in MG. The semi-quantitative histological analysis was done using scores (0–3, in sections stained by hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome. The results indicated a significant improvement in the fibroblasts proliferation, collagen fibers deposition, neoangiogenesis, and cutaneous appendages regeneration in MG and LG. When microcurrent and LLLT were compared, no difference was detected, except the regeneration and formation of new cutaneous appendages, observed in MG. Despite the similar effects, GM showed faster tissue repair with the formation of skin appendages.

  9. Should dermal scald burns in children be covered with autologous skin grafts or with allogeneic cultivated keratinocytes?--"The Viennese concept".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rab, Matthias; Koller, Rupert; Ruzicka, Margot; Burda, Gudrun; Kamolz, Lars Peter; Bierochs, Bettina; Meissl, Guenther; Frey, Manfred

    2005-08-01

    The treatment of scald burns in children is still under discussion. The aim of the present study was to evaluate an optimised treatment regime for scald burns in children. Between 1997 and 2002, 124 children underwent surgical intervention due to burn injuries. Thirty-six out of these 124 children were enrolled into the evaluation of our recent treatment protocol. Twenty-two children with scald burns covering an average body surface area (TBSA) of 18.5% were treated by early excision and coverage with allogeneic keratinocytes in case of partial thickness lesions (keratinocyte group). Fourteen children with a TBSA of 17.2% were treated with autologous skin grafts alone (skin graft group). Both groups were comparable according to age, burn depth and affected TBSA. The complete clinical follow-up examination of at least 17 months was performed in 12 out of 22 children of the keratinocyte group and in 9 out of 14 patients of the comparative group. Visible scar formations were classified according to the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) in each patient. The use of allogeneic keratinocytes led to complete epithelialisation within 12 days in 20 of the 22 cases. No secondary skin grafting procedures had to be done. Skin take rate at the sixth postoperative day was 100% in the skin graft group. Blood transfusions were administered intraoperatively according to the clinical need of the patients by the responsible anaesthesiologist. The mean volume of blood, which had to be transfused was 63.9 ml in the keratinocyte group and significantly lower than the volume of 151.4 ml, which was administered in the skin graft group (p=0.04). At follow up the VSS observed in areas covered by keratinocytes was 2.33 on the average and therefore, significantly lower than the VSS of 5.22 in skin grafted areas of the comparative group (p=0.04). In children the use of cultivated keratinocytes in partial thickness scald burns is a procedure, which renders constantly reliable results. It minimizes the

  10. Lucky number seven: RNase 7 can prevent Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, John S; Xuan, Caiyun; Miller, Lloyd S

    2010-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus colonization is a major risk factor for infection. In this issue, Simanski et al. demonstrate that the antimicrobial peptide RNase 7 is essential for preventing S. aureus colonization in human skin. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions aimed at targeting RNase 7 production in the skin may be a novel strategy to protect against S. aureus infections.

  11. The Paediatric skin at risk: Challenges in burns, surgery and specific infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.A. Baartmans (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe skin, the largest human organ, provides the body shape and is the main organ that protects our body against intruders such as heat, cold, trauma, or infections. A number of important functions are listed here: - Regulation of body temperature - Sensory function: touch, feel and pain

  12. Prevention of burn-on defect on surface of hydroturbine blade casting of ultra-low-carbon refining stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The burn-on sand is common surface defect encountered in CO2-cured silicate-bonded sand casting of hydroturbine blade of ultra-low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, its feature, causes and prevention measures are presented in this paper. Experiments showed that the burn-on defect is caused by oxidization of chromium in the molten steel at high temperature and can be effectively eliminated by using chromium-corundum coating.

  13. The establishment of animal model of radiation-skin-burn and its changes of tissue metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xingan; Wu Shiliang; Wang Xiuzhen; Zhou Yinghui; Feng Yizhong; Tian Ye; Peng Miao

    2001-01-01

    The biochemistry metabolic changes of the tissues induced by 60 Co γ radiation or by accelerator β radiation on the animal local tissues were observed. The experiment results were shown as follows: (1) 60 Co γ radiation can induce the metabolic changes of the local tissue and led to ulcer or death. (2) Accelerator β radiation at the same dose of γ radiation can only produce ulcer but no death. (3) The biochemistry metabolic changes of the tissues induced by 60 Co γ radiation are similar to that by β radiation, but as a radiation-burn animal model, the latter is better

  14. The Effects of Punica granatum Flower Extract on Skin Injuries Induced by Burn in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Nasiri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We compared the efficacy of P. granatum (P flower extract with that of silver sulfadiazine (SSD for treating thermal burn injuries in rats. Methods. Ten Wistar rats in each group were topically given base cream, normal saline, cream containing 1% SSD, or creams containing 5% or 10% Punica granatum flower extract. The treatments were administered once daily until complete wound healing was observed. The wound area and healing time were assessed. In addition, percentage wound contraction and histopathological characteristics such as neovascularization and collagen formation were determined. The tannin content in P. granatum extract was determined. Results. The decrease in the average size of wounds on day 15 of the treatment was higher in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum extract than in rats treated with cream containing SSD (2.8±0.9 cm2 versus 8.4±3.2 cm2. The wounds completely healed on day 25 of the treatment in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum flower extract compared with those in rats treated with the other agents. Conclusion. These results indicated that P. granatum flower extract promoted wound healing in rats and could be used for managing burn injuries.

  15. The Effects of Punica granatum Flower Extract on Skin Injuries Induced by Burn in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Ebrahim; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Akbari, Jafar; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Azizi, Soheil

    2017-01-01

    Background . We compared the efficacy of P. granatum (P) flower extract with that of silver sulfadiazine (SSD) for treating thermal burn injuries in rats. Methods . Ten Wistar rats in each group were topically given base cream, normal saline, cream containing 1% SSD, or creams containing 5% or 10% Punica granatum flower extract. The treatments were administered once daily until complete wound healing was observed. The wound area and healing time were assessed. In addition, percentage wound contraction and histopathological characteristics such as neovascularization and collagen formation were determined. The tannin content in P. granatum extract was determined. Results . The decrease in the average size of wounds on day 15 of the treatment was higher in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum extract than in rats treated with cream containing SSD (2.8 ± 0.9 cm 2 versus 8.4 ± 3.2 cm 2 ). The wounds completely healed on day 25 of the treatment in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum flower extract compared with those in rats treated with the other agents. Conclusion . These results indicated that P. granatum flower extract promoted wound healing in rats and could be used for managing burn injuries.

  16. Generation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells from burn patient-derived skin fibroblasts using a non-integrative method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shangfeng; Ding, Jianwu; Liu, Dewu; Huang, Heping; Li, Min; Liu, Yang; Tu, Longxiang; Liu, Deming

    2018-01-01

    Patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been recognized as a possible source of cells for skin tissue engineering. They have the potential to greatly benefit patients with large areas of burned skin or skin defects. However, the integration virus-based reprogramming method is associated with a high risk of genetic mutation and mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder-cells may be a pollutant. In the present study, human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) were successfully harvested from patients with burns and patient-specific iPSCs were generated using a non-integration method with a feeder-free approach. The octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), sex-determining region Y box 2 (SOX2) and NANOG transcription factors were delivered using Sendai virus vectors. iPSCs exhibited representative human embryonic stem cell-like morphology and proliferation characteristics. They also expressed pluripotent markers, including OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, TRA181, stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 and TRA-160, and exhibited a normal karyotype. Teratoma and embryoid body formation revealed that iPSCs were able to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. The results of the present study demonstrate that HSFs derived from patients with burns, may be reprogrammed into stem cells with pluripotency, which provides a basis for cell‑based skin tissue engineering in the future.

  17. Skin Cancer Concerns in People of Color: Risk Factors and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Alpana K; Bharadwaj, Mausumi; Mehrotra, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Though people of color (POC) are less likely to become afflicted with skin cancer, they are much more likely to die from it due to delay in detection or presentation. Very often, skin cancer is diagnosed at a more advanced stage in POC, making treatment difficult. The purpose of this research was to improve awareness regarding skin cancers in people of color by providing recommendations to clinicians and the general public for early detection and photo protection preventive measures. Methods: Data on different types of skin cancers were presented to POC. Due to limited research, there are few resources providing insights for evaluating darkly pigmented lesions in POC. Diagnostic features for different types of skin cancers were recorded and various possible risk factors were considered. Results: This study provided directions for the prevention and early detection of skin cancer in POC based on a comprehensive review of available data. Conclusions: The increased morbidity and mortality rate associated with skin cancer in POC is due to lack of awareness, diagnosis at a more advanced stage and socioeconomic barriers hindering access to care. Raising public health concerns for skin cancer prevention strategies for all people, regardless of ethnic background and socioeconomic status, is the key to timely diagnosis and treatment. PMID:28125871

  18. Wound management and outcome of 595 electrical burns in a major burn center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haisheng; Tan, Jianglin; Zhou, Junyi; Yuan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jiaping; Peng, Yizhi; Wu, Jun; Luo, Gaoxing

    2017-06-15

    Electrical burns are important causes of trauma worldwide. This study aims to analyze the clinical characteristics, wound management, and outcome of electric burns. This retrospective study was performed at the Institute of Burn Research of the Third Military Medical University during 2013-2015. Data including the demographics, injury patterns, wound treatment, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. A total of 595 electrical burn patients (93.8% males) were included. The average age was 37.3 ± 14.6 y, and most patients (73.5%) were aged 19∼50 years. Most patients (67.2%) were injured in work-related circumstances. The mean total body surface area was 8.8 ± 11.8% and most wounds (63.5%) were full-thickness burns. Operation times of high-voltage burns and current burns were higher than those of low-voltage burns and arc burns, respectively. Of the 375 operated patients, 83.2% (n = 312) underwent skin autografting and 49.3% (n = 185) required skin flap coverage. Common types of skin flaps were adjacent (50.3%), random (42.2%), and pedicle (35.7%). Amputation was performed in 107 cases (18.0%) and concentrated on the hands (43.9%) and upper limbs (39.3%). The mean length of stay was 42.9 ± 46.3 d and only one death occurred (0.2%). Current burns and higher numbers of operations were major risk factors for amputation and length of stay, respectively. Electrical burns mainly affected adult males with occupational exposures in China. Skin autografts and various skin flaps were commonly used for electric burn wound management. More standardized and effective strategies of treatment and prevention are still needed to decrease amputation rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Skin cancer and sun radiation: peruvian experience in the prevention and early detection of skin cancer and melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo, Carlos; Gutiérrez, César

    2013-03-01

    The excessive exposure to sun radiation, especially to ultraviolet radiation (UV), has led to various diseases, in particular to skin cancer. In 1995, the Peruvian Dermatological Association conducted the first "Campaign for Education, Prevention and Early Detection of Skin Cancer and Melanoma" called "Mole's Day". The Ministry of Health has turned it into an official event, and the Health Social Security (EsSalud) also participates. This is a free campaign that takes place every year nationwide. 118,092 people attended from 1995 to 2011 in 76 sites distributed in 18 cities throughout the country. A cutaneous lesion were malignancy was suspected was identified in 2.8% of people attending, out of which 64.9% corresponded to basal cell carcinoma, 26.7% to cutaneous melanoma, and 8.4% to squamous cell carcinoma. These campaigns are highly important not only because of the assistance given, but also because of the educational activities aimed at promoting a prevention culture in favor of the most vulnerable populations. Finally, we believe it is important to continue educating the population on skin cancer prevention, to build awareness among the authorities so that they actively participate in the performance of these activities, and to ask all physicians to coordinately join this initiative, in order to continue growing, and to improve all that has been attained for the benefit of our country.

  20. Prescribed burning experiences in Italy: an integrated approach to prevent forest fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascoli D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Prescribed burning is used in many geographical areas for multiple and integrated objectives (wildfire prevention, habitat conservation, grazing management. In Europe the collaboration between researchers and fire professionals has brought to implement this technique over increasing areas (~104 ha year-1, effectively and efficiently. In Italy prescribed burning has not been much studied and it is rarely applied. A new interest is recently rising. Some Regions particularly threatened by wildfires have updated their legislation and set up procedures to authorize prescribed fire experiments and interventions. From 2004 to 2011 several scientific, operative and training experiences have been carried out at a regional level (Basilicata, Campania, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Piemonte, Sardegna, Toscana. The present paper aims to: (i document and compare these regional programs; (ii discuss their frameworks and limitations; (iii provide information about objectives, prescriptions, methods and results. The study has involved Universities, Forest Corps, Civil Protection, Municipalities, Parks and professionals from Italy and other Countries. Interventions have regarded integrated objectives (fire hazard reduction; habitat conservation; forest and grazing management, and involved several vegetation types (broadleaved and conifer forests; Mediterranean and Continental shrublands; grasslands. Studies on fire behaviour and ecology have helped to set prescriptions for specific objectives and environments. Results have been transferred to professionals through training sessions. Several common elements are outlined: integrated objectives, multidisciplinary character, training and research products. Ecological questions, certification to the use of fire, communication to local communities and the proposal of new studies, are some of the issues outlined in the discussion. The present study is the first review at national level and we hope it will help to deepen the

  1. Burns (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... small, and have sensitive skin that needs extra protection. Although some minor burns aren't cause for concern and can ... burns, the mildest of the three, are limited to the top layer of skin: Signs ... pain, and minor swelling. The skin is dry without blisters. Healing ...

  2. Opportunities for Skin Cancer Prevention Education among Individuals Attending a Community Skin Cancer Screening in a High-Risk Catchment Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Bridget Grahmann; Gren, Lisa H; Simonsen, Sara E; Harding, Garrett; Grossman, Douglas; Wu, Yelena P

    2018-04-01

    Despite the highly preventable nature of skin cancer, it remains the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in the United States. Recommendations for a complete skin cancer prevention regimen include engaging in photoprotection (e.g., sunscreen use), avoiding skin cancer risk behaviors (e.g., tanning), and receiving total body skin exams from a health care provider. The current study examined reported engagement in these behaviors among participants attending a community skin cancer screening (N = 319) in a high-risk catchment area to assess the need for increased health education on skin cancer prevention. Participants' responses indicate a history of suboptimal avoidance of skin cancer risk behaviors. Over half of participants (52%) reported four or more blistering sunburns before age 20, and 46% reported indoor tanning at least one during their lifetime. There is a need among this population for education regarding a complete skin cancer prevention regimen, which could improve adherence to photoprotection and avoidance of skin cancer risk behaviors, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality due to skin cancer.

  3. Occupational skin diseases and prevention among sanitation workers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuehua; Wang, Xinggang; Wu, Jianbo; Xu, Li

    2015-09-01

    Little research has been focused on the health status or the occupational protection awareness of sanitation workers. The policy recommendations on the occupational safety and health of sanitation workers based on the scientific research are also insufficient in developing countries like China. To study the incidence of dermatoses and the relevance with occupational exposure, protection awareness and protective measures among sanitation workers for better management and protection of the sanitation workers. 273 sanitation workers and 113 administrative staff from 11 streets of Wuhan were recruited. Dermatological problems were evaluated and recorded by physical examination. Occupational exposure, protection awareness, the use of protective equipments and personal history of skin disease were assessed by questionnaires. Compared with administrative staff, sanitation workers had much more occupational dermatological problems and had a much higher rate of harmful ultraviolet ray exposure. Young sanitation workers were more aware of occupational self-protection and a relatively higher rate of them using protective equipments compared with old ones. Exposure to multiple health hazards and the poor use of protective equipments are related to skin diseases in sanitation workers. Prejob training of self-protection and the use of protective equipments are recommended.

  4. A randomized controlled trial of sertraline to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder in burned children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Frederick J; Luthra, Rohini; Sorrentino, Erica A; Saxe, Glenn N; Drake, Jennifer; Chang, Yuchiao; Levine, John B; Chedekel, David S; Sheridan, Robert L

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefits of a centrally acting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, sertraline, versus placebo for prevention of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression in burned children. This is the first controlled investigation based on our review of the early use of a medication to prevent PTSD in children. Twenty-six children aged 6-20 were assessed in a 24-week double-blind placebo-controlled design. Each child received either flexibly dosed sertraline between 25-150 mg/day or placebo. At each reassessment, information was collected in compliance with the study medication, parental assessment of the child's symptomatology and functioning, and the child's self-report of symptomatology. The protocol was approved by the Human Studies Committees of Massachusetts General Hospital and Shriners Hospitals for Children. The final sample was 17 subjects who received sertraline versus 9 placebo control subjects matched for age, severity of injury, and type of hospitalization. There was no significant difference in change from baseline with child-reported symptoms; however, the sertraline group demonstrated a greater decrease in parent-reported symptoms over 8 weeks (-4.1 vs. -0.5, p=0.005), over 12 weeks (-4.4 vs. -1.2, p=.008), and over 24 weeks (-4.0 vs. -0.2, p=0.017). Sertraline was a safe drug, and it was somewhat more effective in preventing PTSD symptoms than placebo according to parent report but not child report. Based on this study, sertraline may prevent the emergence of PTSD symptoms in children.

  5. Fernblock, a Nutriceutical with Photoprotective Properties and Potential Preventive Agent for Skin Photoaging and Photoinduced Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeles Juarranz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many phytochemicals are endowed with photoprotective properties, i.e., the capability to prevent the harmful effects of excessive exposure to ultraviolet (UV light. These effects include photoaging and skin cancer, and immunosuppression. Photoprotection is endowed through two major modes of action: UV absorption or reflection/scattering; and tissue repair post-exposure. We and others have uncovered the photoprotective properties of an extract of the fern Polypodium leucotomos (commercial name Fernblock. Fernblock is an all-natural antioxidant extract, administered both topically (on the skin or orally. It inhibits generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS production induced by UV including superoxide anion. It also prevents damage to the DNA, inhibits UV-induced AP1 and NF-κB, and protects endogenous skin natural antioxidant systems, i.e., CAT, GSH, and GSSR. Its photoprotective effects at a cellular level include a marked decrease of UV-mediated cellular apoptosis and necrosis and a profound inhibition of extracellular matrix remodeling. These molecular and cellular effects translate into long-term inhibition of photoaging and carcinogenesis that, together with its lack of toxicity, postulate its use as a novel-generation photoprotective nutriceutical of phytochemical origin.

  6. Awareness of Skin Cancer, Prevention, and Early Detection among Turkish University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyafet Ugurlu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the awareness about skin cancer, prevention, and early detection among university students. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 404 students in a university located in Ankara, the capital city of Turkey. A 35-item questionnaire was used for data collection. Results: Less than half of the students (37.9% had knowledge about skin cancer mostly through the internet (24.5% and media (24.1%. Half of them aware of the risk factors; mostly as avoiding direct exposure to the Sun between 10 am and 4 pm (45.3%; smoking and alcohol (38.4%; having fair skin color (34.9%; and ultraviolet light exposure (25.7%. Only one-third of them (32.9% are knowledgeable about skin cancer signs and symptoms, such as a change in color and appearance of the nevus/moles (24%. The majority of the responders (77.3% did not know about screening tests for skin cancer and only 18 (4.5% students were practicing skin self-examination. Conclusions: This study showed a lack of knowledge about skin cancer, prevention, and early detection among university students and reported the need for educational interventions to raise awareness in this target group.

  7. Clinical use of radiation sterile porcine skin and Ag-skin of porcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiaobo

    1995-01-01

    Clinical examination revealed that either radiation sterilized skin or Ag-skin of pig are effective biologic dressing. When used as temporary skin coverage for fresh burn wound, for wound after escharectomy, and for wounds among skin grafts, they are effective in preventing infection and loss of body fluid. They can also be used for covering the infected granulation wound to control bacterial growth and further contamination

  8. The burning issues of motor vehicle radiator scald injuries revisited - a fresh review and changing prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J N; Tan, A; Frew, Q; Dziewulski, P

    2016-12-31

    A preventable subgroup of burn injuries is scalds sustained from motor vehicle radiators. This study was to determine changes in trends in epidemiology of such injuries and to discuss whether current and other prevention efforts proposed previously require reinforcement. We conducted a retrospective study (February 2007-August 2015) of all motor vehicle-related burn referrals to our regional burns service. 68 cases of motor vehicle radiator burns were identified. Male to female ratio was 65:3. Mean age was 35.1 (range = 9-71). Most cases occurred in the summer months (22/68 = 32.4%). 65 cases (95.6%) involved car radiators. 66% of injuries resulted from actively removing the pressure cap of an overheated radiator in the motor vehicle. Mean total burn surface area (%TBSA) was 2.1% (range = 0.5- 11%). The depths of burn injuries were mostly superficial partial thickness. Face, chest and upper limbs were the most common sites of injury. Mean healing time was 14.2 days (range = 4-60). Following the introduction of safety measures by vehicle manufacturers, motor vehicle radiator burns in this era are mostly minor injuries and can be potentially managed conservatively as an outpatient. This contrasts with findings from previous studies over a decade ago of larger, more significant injuries requiring admission and surgery. Whilst manufacturers have installed safety measures into the design of radiator caps, our findings suggest that re-educating the public to allow a period of cooling prior to opening caps should be reinforced.

  9. The burning issues of motor vehicle radiator scald injuries revisited – a fresh review and changing prevention strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J.N.; Tan, A.; Frew, Q.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A preventable subgroup of burn injuries is scalds sustained from motor vehicle radiators. This study was to determine changes in trends in epidemiology of such injuries and to discuss whether current and other prevention efforts proposed previously require reinforcement. We conducted a retrospective study (February 2007-August 2015) of all motor vehicle-related burn referrals to our regional burns service. 68 cases of motor vehicle radiator burns were identified. Male to female ratio was 65:3. Mean age was 35.1 (range = 9-71). Most cases occurred in the summer months (22/68 = 32.4%). 65 cases (95.6%) involved car radiators. 66% of injuries resulted from actively removing the pressure cap of an overheated radiator in the motor vehicle. Mean total burn surface area (%TBSA) was 2.1% (range = 0.5- 11%). The depths of burn injuries were mostly superficial partial thickness. Face, chest and upper limbs were the most common sites of injury. Mean healing time was 14.2 days (range = 4-60). Following the introduction of safety measures by vehicle manufacturers, motor vehicle radiator burns in this era are mostly minor injuries and can be potentially managed conservatively as an outpatient. This contrasts with findings from previous studies over a decade ago of larger, more significant injuries requiring admission and surgery. Whilst manufacturers have installed safety measures into the design of radiator caps, our findings suggest that re-educating the public to allow a period of cooling prior to opening caps should be reinforced. PMID:28289357

  10. PMN Leukocytes and Fibroblasts Numbers on Wound Burn Healing on the Skin of White Rat after Administration of Ambonese Plantain Banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juniarti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A study of ambonese plantain banana (Musa paradisiaca var sapientum Lamb treatment in burn wound healing on the skin of white rats (Rattus novergicus has been conducted. The wound healing of burn injuries was evaluated by counting the number of PMN leukocytes and fibroblasts at the 7th, 14th, and 21st days following the treatment. The study showed that the decrease in number of PMN leukocytes of subjects treated with ambonese plantain banana was relatively more significant compared to both negative and positive control (Bioplacenton ®. In contrast, an increasing number of fibroblasts was significantly demonstrated at the 14th and 21st days after treatment. In conclusion, ambonese plantain banana treatment in burn injuries will provide better results compared to both positive and negative controls.

  11. Evaluation of Primary Prevention of Skin Cancer: A UK Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melia, J.; Pendry, L.; Eiser, J.R.; Harland, C.; Moss, S.

    2000-01-01

    Good quality research to study behaviour in the sun is needed in the UK to ensure that we can develop the most effective methods for ultimately reducing the incidence of skin cancer. Many initiatives have taken place during the past two decades to reduce the level of sun exposure. However, there have been relatively few studies to evaluate the impact of these initiatives on behaviour and health. This review summarises outcome measures of knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour and of clinical signs of sun damage. The results of evaluation studies show that adolescents are a group resistant to change. Initiatives should focus on families with young children. Targeting holiday makers at the time of departure also proved to be ineffective. Future research should aim to monitor changes in behaviour in the general population, and to study changes among target groups using standardised methods. The costs of different interventions should be compared. (author)

  12. Primary prevention: exposure reduction, skin exposure and respiratory protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heederik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Henneberger, P.K.; Redlich, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Interventions for the primary prevention of occupational asthma have been reported in the medical literature, understanding the effectiveness of these efforts could help future interventions. The aim of our study was to evaluate the existing knowledge regarding the impact of controlling work

  13. An optimized animal model for partial and total skin thickness burns studies Um modelo animal aperfeiçoado para estudo de queimaduras superficiais e profundas da pele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Bomfim Soares Campelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Development of an improved animal model for studying skin burns in rats. METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n=6: G1-Control, G2- T100°C, G3-T150°C and G4-T200°C. Two 10 x 10 mm squares were outlined with a sterile surgical marker on each side and along the vertebral column using a prepared template positioned between the anterior and posterior limbs. G2-G4 rats were subjected to 100°C, 150°C and 200ºC thermal burns, respectively. G1 rats served as controls. Burns were inflicted by applying a copper plate connected to an electronic temperature controlling device to the dorsal skin of anesthetized rats. Four burns were produced on each animal (total area: 4 cm²/animal leaving about 1 cm of undamaged skin between burn areas. Analgesia was administered during 24 h after burn injury by adding 30 mg codeine phosphate hemihydrate to 500 ml tap water. RESULTS: The application of 100°C and 150ºC resulted in partial thickness skin burns with central reepithelialization of the burned area only at 100°C. In G4 group the whole thickness of the skin was injured without central reepithelialization. However, there was marginal reepithelialization in all groups. CONCLUSION: The model studied is inexpensive and easily reproducible, enabling the achievement of controlled burns with partial or total impairment of the skin in experimental animals.OBJETIVO: Desenvolvimento de um modelo animal aperfeiçoado para estudo de queimaduras cutâneas em ratos. MÉTODOS: Vinte e quatro ratos Wistar, machos, foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos (n=6: G1-Controle, G2-T100°C, G3-T150°C e G4-T200°C. Dois quadrados medindo 10x10 mm foram delineados com um marcador cirúrgico estéril em cada lado e ao longo da coluna vertebral e posicionados entre os membros anteriores e posteriores, utilizando um molde previamente preparado. Os ratos dos grupos G2-G4 foram submetidos a queimaduras térmicas de 100

  14. Radiation-induced skin toxicity: prevention and treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorette, G.; Machet, L.

    2001-01-01

    Acute and long term effects are frequent after radiotherapy. They may alter the general status and quality of life of the patients. Chronic radiodermatitis may result in ulceration and in transformation into a squamous cell carcinoma. There is a correlation of the frequency of acute dermatitis with the total dose. Chronic radiodermatitis may develop after repeated small doses of ionizing radiation for cardiac catheterization and coronary angio-plasties. The other prognostic factors for the level of acute and late skin reactions are volume of tissue treated, total daily dose, fractionations schemes... but there are some variation in the degree of reaction in patients treated with identical radiotherapy schedules. There is a patient - to- patient variability. Several diseases as systemic sclerosis, some genetic diseases, perhaps some drugs may increase the cutaneous reactions. So both acute and chronic irradiation injury is a complex process with many regulations. Chronic fibrosis may be caused by mechanism of cell activation (and particularly fibroblasts). Cytokines e.g transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) might be involved in the induction of fibrosis. Treatment use emollients. Superoxide dismutase was used as an ointment for radio-fibrosis therapy and obtains a reduction of the fibrosis. In late phases plastic surgery or sometimes cryo-surgery can be used. (authors)

  15. Comprehensive outreach, prevention education, and skin cancer screening for Utah ski resorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varedi, Amir; Secrest, Aaron M; Harding, Garrett; Maness, Lori; Branson, Donna; Smith, Kristi; Hull, Christopher M

    2018-02-15

    Outdoor recreation can lead to substantial sun exposure. Employees of outdoor recreation establishments with extended time outdoors have amplified cumulative exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and an increased risk of skin cancer. The "Sun Safe on the Slopes" program was created by Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah and the Utah Cancer Action Network to address increased UV exposure and skin cancer risk with free skin cancer screenings, outreach, and prevention education to local ski resorts. Herein, we describe the processes and barriers to implementation of a ski resort skin screening and education program and our 5-year report of the experience and screening data. Nine free skin cancer screenings were held at Utah ski resorts between 2011 and 2016, resulting in the presumptive diagnosis of 38 skin cancers (9.6%) in 394 participants. Behavioral data collected from participants indicates suboptimal sun safety practices, including underuse of sunscreen and protective clothing. Ski resort employees who experience sun exposure during peak hours at high altitudes and UV reflection from the snow are at an increased risk of skin cancer. These data indicate a need for emphasis on sun safety education and screening and can serve as a model for future endeavors.

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Appearance-focused Intervention to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, Joel; Turrisi, Rob; Stapleton, Jerod; Robinson, June

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Skin cancer represents a significant health threat with over 1.3 million diagnoses, 8000 melanoma deaths, and more than $1 billion spent annually for skin cancer healthcare in the US. Despite findings from laboratory, case-control, and prospective studies that indicate a link between youthful indoor tanning (IT) and skin cancer, IT is increasing among US youth. Appearance-focused interventions represent a promising method to counteract these trends. METHODS A total of 430 female indoor tanners were randomized into intervention or no intervention control conditions. Intervention participants received an appearance-focused booklet based on decision-theoretical models of health behavior. Outcome variables included self-reports of IT behavior and intentions, as well as measures of cognitive mediating variables. RESULTS Normative increases in springtime IT rates were significantly lower (ie, over 35%) at 6-month follow-up in intervention versus control participants with similar reductions in future intentions. Mediation analyses revealed 6 cognitive variables (IT attitudes, fashion attitudes, perceived susceptibility to skin cancer and skin damage, subjective norms, and image norms) that significantly mediated change in IT behavior. CONCLUSIONS The appearance-focused intervention demonstrated strong effects on IT behavior and intentions in young indoor tanners. Appearance-focused approaches to skin cancer prevention need to present alternative behaviors as well as alter IT attitudes. Mediational results provide guides for strengthening future appearance-focused interventions directed at behaviors that increase risk of skin cancer. PMID:18937268

  17. Solar radiation induced skin damage: review of protective and preventive options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svobodová, Alena; Vostálová, Jitka

    2010-12-01

    Solar energy has a number of short- and long-term detrimental effects on skin that can result in several skin disorders. The aim of this review is to summarise current knowledge on endogenous systems within the skin for protection from solar radiation and present research findings to date, on the exogenous options for such skin photoprotection. Endogenous systems for protection from solar radiation include melanin synthesis, epidermal thickening and an antioxidant network. Existing lesions are eliminated via repair mechanisms. Cells with irreparable damage undergo apoptosis. Excessive and chronic sun exposure however can overwhelm these mechanisms leading to photoaging and the development of cutaneous malignancies. Therefore exogenous means are a necessity. Exogenous protection includes sun avoidance, use of photoprotective clothing and sufficient application of broad-spectrum sunscreens as presently the best way to protect the skin. However other strategies that may enhance currently used means of protection are being investigated. These are often based on the endogenous protective response to solar light such as compounds that stimulate pigmentation, antioxidant enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, non-enzymatic antioxidants. More research is needed to confirm the effectiveness of new alternatives to photoprotection such as use of DNA repair and antioxidant enzymes and plant polyphenols and to find an efficient way for their delivery to the skin. New approaches to the prevention of skin damage are important especially for specific groups of people such as (young) children, photosensitive people and patients on immunosuppressive therapy. Changes in public awareness on the subject too must be made.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of an appearance-focused intervention to prevent skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, Joel; Turrisi, Rob; Stapleton, Jerod; Robinson, June

    2008-12-01

    Skin cancer represents a significant health threat with over 1.3 million diagnoses, 8000 melanoma deaths, and more than $1 billion spent annually for skin cancer healthcare in the US. Despite findings from laboratory, case-control, and prospective studies that indicate a link between youthful indoor tanning (IT) and skin cancer, IT is increasing among US youth. Appearance-focused interventions represent a promising method to counteract these trends. A total of 430 female indoor tanners were randomized into intervention or no intervention control conditions. Intervention participants received an appearance-focused booklet based on decision-theoretical models of health behavior. Outcome variables included self-reports of IT behavior and intentions, as well as measures of cognitive mediating variables. Normative increases in springtime IT rates were significantly lower (ie, over 35%) at 6-month follow-up in intervention versus control participants with similar reductions in future intentions. Mediation analyses revealed 6 cognitive variables (IT attitudes, fashion attitudes, perceived susceptibility to skin cancer and skin damage, subjective norms, and image norms) that significantly mediated change in IT behavior. The appearance-focused intervention demonstrated strong effects on IT behavior and intentions in young indoor tanners. Appearance-focused approaches to skin cancer prevention need to present alternative behaviors as well as alter IT attitudes. Mediational results provide guides for strengthening future appearance-focused interventions directed at behaviors that increase risk of skin cancer. (c) 2008 American Cancer Society

  19. Occupational Skin Disease Prevention: An Educational Intervention for Hairdresser Cosmetology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughtigan, Kara; Main, Eve; Bragg-Underwood, Tonya; Watkins, Cecilia

    2017-11-01

    Cosmetologists frequently develop occupational skin disease related to workplace exposures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an educational intervention to increase cosmetology students' occupational skin disease knowledge and use of preventive practices. A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate students' knowledge, behaviors, intentions, expectancies, and expectations. A 20-minute verbal presentation and printed two-page educational handout were provided for participants. Statistically significant increases in knowledge, frequency of glove use, and frequency of moisturizer use were found, but the frequency of handwashing did not increase. In addition, the Behavioral Strategies subscale, the Intention subscale, and the Expectancies subscale showed statistically significant improvements. The results of this study suggest an educational intervention can increase cosmetology students' knowledge of occupational skin diseases and their use of preventive strategies.

  20. An evaluation of costs and effects of a nutrient-based skin care program as a component of prevention of skin tears in an extended convalescent center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Marjorie; Shannon, Ronald J; Chakravarthy, Debashish; Fleck, Cynthia A

    2010-01-01

    A decision model was developed in a pilot study comparing a regimen using a skin care product line containing active ingredients and nutrients with a commercially available alternative skin care regimen in an elderly convalescent care hospital-based center. Using a decision-tree model, skin treatment with a nutrient-based skin care (NBSC) formulation was compared with products without nutrients. The number of skin-tear-free days was the primary outcome measure. A cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated for each skin treatment as the average cost for reaching a particular outcome. Incidence of skin tear data was collected from residents in a convalescent center from 2004 to 2005. An independent t test was used to compare differences in the number of skin tears between periods when NBSC and other formulations were used. All costs in the decision model were adjusted to 2007 dollars. Sensitivity analysis was used to test uncertain data. The NBSC provided more skin-tear-free days and was less costly than the use of non-NBSC products. The expected skin-tear-free days for a patient in the model treated with NBSC were 179.7 days compared with 154.6 days for non-NBSC products, yielding an incremental effect of 25.1 days. The expected cost of preventing skin tears and treatment via skin treatment per patient in the NBSC group was $281.00 versus $324.10 for periods when other products were used. The NBSC had a lower projected cost for prevention of skin tears and more skin-tear-free days when compared with non-NBSC products.

  1. Preventing and treating intertrigo in the large skin folds of adults: a literature overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mistiaen, P.; Poot, E.; Hickox, S.; Jochems, C.; Wagner, C.

    2004-01-01

    Intertrigo is an inflammatory dermatosis of the skin folds of the body, for which a large variety of topical medications may be recommended. A systematic literature review was performed to find scientific evidence for preventing and treating intertrigo within the nursing domain. Seven electronic

  2. Sun Protection is Fun! A Skin Cancer Prevention Program for Preschools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Mary K.; Herrmann, Nancy B.; Parcel, Guy S.; Chamberlin, Robert M.; Gritz, Ellen R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Sun Protection is Fun! skin cancer prevention program for preschool children that features intervention methods grounded in social cognitive theory and emphasizes symbolic modeling, vicarious learning, enactive mastery experiences, and persuasion. Program components include a curriculum and teacher's guide, videos, newsletters,…

  3. Prescribed burning in ponderosa pine: fuel reductions and redistributing fuels near boles to prevent injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescribed burning can be an effective tool for thinning forests and reducing fuels to lessen wildfire risks. However, prescribed burning sometimes fails to substantially reduce fuels and sometimes damages/kills valuable, large trees. This study compared fuel reductions between fall and spring pre...

  4. Diagnostic multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections and detection of antibiotic susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashouf, Rasoul Y.; Farahani, Hadi S.; Zamani, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) and detection of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates from culture. We conducted the cross-sectional study in 140 patients with wound infections who admitted to referral burn center of Motahari, Tehran, Iran, during a 12-month period from 2005-2006. Skin biopsy specimens were aseptically taken from each patient, one for PCR and one for bacterial culture. A M-PCR test based on simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL, was used to directly detect fluorescent pseudomonades and P. aeruginosa in skin biopsy specimens. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa isolates to 16 antibiotics was determined using the disc diffusion method. Out of 140 biopsy specimens, M-PCR detected 66 (47.2%) isolates, while culture detected 57 (40.7%) isolates as P. aeruginosa. Positive results for both genes which observed only for P. aeruginosa, while only one gene, oprI, was amplified from other fluorescent pseudomonades (n=12) and all other bacterial tested (n=62) were negative by the amplification test. The most effective antibiotics against isolate of P. aeruginosa were cefepime (79%), azetreonam (76%), ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (68%), tobramycin (62%) and amikacin (61%). Multiplex PCR assay appears promising for the rapid and sensitive detection of P. aeruginosa from the burned skin biopsy specimens. Simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL could detect P. aeruginosa and oprI gene only for other fluorescent pseudomonades. (author)

  5. Counseling About Skin Cancer Prevention Among Adolescents: What Do Parents Receive From Health Care Providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Mays, Darren; Kornides, Melanie L; Gilkey, Melissa B

    2017-10-01

    Adolescence is a high-risk period for ultraviolet radiation exposure, a primary cause of skin cancer later in life. We sought to characterize receipt of health care provider-delivered counseling about skin cancer prevention (SCP) among parents of adolescents. In 2016, we conducted an online survey with a national sample of parents of adolescents aged 11-17 years (n = 1,253). Multivariable logistic regression assessed correlates of receiving counseling from a health care provider about any of the six skin cancer prevention (SCP) topics. Only half (49%) of parents recalled discussing any SCP topic with their child's provider; the prevalence was highest for sunscreen (39%) and lowest for indoor tanning (3%). Parents had greater odds of receiving counseling if they had a child with more sun-reactive skin (odds ratio [OR] = 1.53); a family history of skin cancer (OR = 1.38); or a higher quality relationship with the provider (OR = 1.47; all p attention to SCP counseling is needed, especially for exposures such as indoor tanning that remain prevalent among adolescents but are rarely addressed in clinical encounters. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychological maintenance as an integrated approach to prevention and correction of professional burning out of the medical staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Kucher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of professional burning out is a complex of symptoms and signs evidenced in various negative psychic conditions at individual, interpersonal and organizational levels. It is formed owing to a long mismatch between the requirements of the professional environment and the resources of the expert. Analysis of the preventive and correctional programs as a psychological assistance showed insufficiency of such approach. Creation of preventive and correctional programs within psychological maintenance from the position of involution of professional resources, taking into account the theoretical - methodological basis (the concept, the purposes, tasks, system approach, criteria of efficiency and the subjective-personal resources of counteraction directed at activization to burning out at all stages of professional development is progressive.

  7. Andrographolide Sodium Bisulfate Prevents UV-Induced Skin Photoaging through Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis Ya-Xian Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide sodium bisulfate (ASB, a water-soluble form made from andrographolide through sulfonating reaction, is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drug; however, the antiphotoaging effect of ASB has still not been revealed. Oxidative stress and inflammation are known to be responsible for ultraviolet (UV irradiation induced skin damage and consequently premature aging. In this study, we aimed at examining the effect of ASB on UV-induced skin photoaging of mice by physiological and histological analysis of skin and examination of skin antioxidant enzymes and immunity analyses. Results showed that topical administration of ASB suppressed the UV-induced skin thickness, elasticity, wrinkles, and water content, while ASB, especially at dose of 3.6 mg/mouse, increased the skin collagen content by about 53.17%, decreased the epidermal thickness by about 41.38%, and prevented the UV-induced disruption of collagen fibers and elastic fibers. Furthermore, ASB decreased MDA level by about 40.21% and upregulated the activities of SOD and CAT and downregulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α in UV-irradiated mice. Our study confirmed the protective effect of ASB against UV-induced photoaging and initially indicated that this effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo, suggesting that ASB may be a potential antiphotoaging agent.

  8. Andrographolide Sodium Bisulfate Prevents UV-Induced Skin Photoaging through Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Janis Ya-Xian; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Liu, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Zhen-Biao; Wang, Lan; Chen, Jian-Nan; Huang, Song; Zeng, Hui-Fang; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Andrographolide sodium bisulfate (ASB), a water-soluble form made from andrographolide through sulfonating reaction, is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drug; however, the antiphotoaging effect of ASB has still not been revealed. Oxidative stress and inflammation are known to be responsible for ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced skin damage and consequently premature aging. In this study, we aimed at examining the effect of ASB on UV-induced skin photoaging of mice by physiological and histological analysis of skin and examination of skin antioxidant enzymes and immunity analyses. Results showed that topical administration of ASB suppressed the UV-induced skin thickness, elasticity, wrinkles, and water content, while ASB, especially at dose of 3.6 mg/mouse, increased the skin collagen content by about 53.17%, decreased the epidermal thickness by about 41.38%, and prevented the UV-induced disruption of collagen fibers and elastic fibers. Furthermore, ASB decreased MDA level by about 40.21% and upregulated the activities of SOD and CAT and downregulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α in UV-irradiated mice. Our study confirmed the protective effect of ASB against UV-induced photoaging and initially indicated that this effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo, suggesting that ASB may be a potential antiphotoaging agent. PMID:26903706

  9. Deep sole burns in several participants in a traditional festival of the firewalking ceremony in Kee-lung, Taiwan--clinical experiences and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shun-Cheng; Hsu, Chih-Kang; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Teng, Shou-Cheng; Fu, Ju-Peng; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo; Feng, Chun-Che

    2012-11-01

    Firewalking is a common Taoist cleansing ceremony in Taiwan, but burns associated with the practice have rarely been reported. We analyzed the patients with plantar burns from one firewalking ceremony. In one firewalking ceremony, 12 Taoist disciples suffered from contact burns to the soles of their feet while walking over burning coals. Eight of them had at least second-degree burns over areas larger than 1% of their total body surface areas (TBSAs). The age, sex, medical history, date of injury, time taken to traverse the fire pit, depth and TBSA of the burns, treatment, length of stay, and outcome were recorded and analyzed. Deep, disseminated second- to third-degree burns were noted and healing took as long as three weeks in some patients. Because disseminated hypertrophic scars form after burns, the soles involved regain much of their tensile strength while walking. The patients experienced only a few difficulties in their daily lives three months after injury. From our experience treating patients with deep disseminated second- to third-degree plantar burns caused by firewalking, we conclude that they should be treated conservatively, with secondary healing rather than a skin graft. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Skin cancer prevention and detection campaign at golf courses on Spain's Costa del Sol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Boz, J; Fernández-Morano, T; Padilla-España, L; Aguilar-Bernier, M; Rivas-Ruiz, F; de Troya-Martín, M

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer prevention and detection campaigns targeting specific groups are necessary and have proven to be more effective than those aimed at the general population. Interventions in outdoor tourist spots have proven successful, although none have specifically targeted golf courses. The aims of this study were to describe the risk profile of golfers and golf course workers and evaluate the impact of a skin cancer prevention and early detection intervention. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted at 6 golf courses. The intervention included a skin examination and completion of a questionnaire about demographic details, risk factors, and sun exposure and sun protection habits. Participants were also given advice on sun protection measures, self-examination, and use of sunscreens, and were asked about their satisfaction with the intervention and their intention to change their current behaviors. The effect was measured in terms of the diagnoses made, satisfaction with the intervention, reported intention to change, and potential effect in terms of existing risk factors. Of the 351 participants (57% golfers and 43% golf course workers), 70.4% had fair skin, 11.7% had a family history of skin cancer, and 8.5% had a personal history of skin cancer. Skin cancer and actinic keratoses were diagnosed in 10.7% and 40% of the golfers, respectively. The session was rated positively by 99.4% of the participants; 93.9% stated that they intended to improve their sun exposure habits and 93.4% said that they planned to examine their skin more frequently. Our findings confirm that golf course workers and, in particular, golfers are an important target for skin cancer prevention campaigns. This is the first intervention to specifically target golf courses, and it proved to be both feasible and useful. Its success appears to be attributable to numerous factors: it was conducted at golf courses, had multiple components, and was preceded by a motivational campaign

  11. A review of campfire burns in children: The QLD experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon, O; Zhu, L; Kimble, R M; Stockton, K A

    2018-03-27

    Campfire burns in children are a significant health issue. It is imperative that the extent of the problem is examined and strategies discussed to inform future prevention campaigns. A retrospective review of data from the Queensland Paediatric Burns Registry for all children presenting with campfire burns between January 2013 and December 2014 (inclusive). Information collected included patient demographics, detail regarding mechanism of injury, first aid, Total Body Surface Area (TBSA), burn depth, and treatment. Seventy-five children with campfire burns were seen in our paediatric burns centre during this 2-year period. The median age of patients was 3 years (range 10 days-14 years). The hands and feet were the areas most commonly affected. Eleven percent of patients suffered flame burns, whilst 89% suffered contact burns from the hot coals or ashes. Of the latter group, approximately half experienced burns from campfires that had been extinguished for at least one night. Thirteen percent of patients underwent split thickness skin grafting. The incidence of burns was increased during school holiday months. We have previously demonstrated the effectiveness of targeted campaigns in reducing the incidence of campfire burns. A significant portion of patients sustained burns from incorrectly extinguished campfires. These injuries are likely to be preventable with ongoing public awareness campaigns. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Changing patterns in electrical burn injuries in a developing country: should prevention programs focus on the rural population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Surendra B; Khare, Nishant Anil; Jaiswal, Sumeet; Jain, Arvind; Chitranshi, Anurag; Math, Mahantesh

    2010-01-01

    In the developing world, the incidence of electrical injuries has increased in the past few years. This study attempts to identify the causative and demographic risk factors that can help in formulating a targeted prevention program. The study was conducted prospectively and retrospectively from 2004 to 2009. Eighty-four consecutive patients with electrical burn injuries were analyzed for their demographic profile, age, sex, occupation, rural-urban distribution, mode of injury, and place of injury. The patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their awareness about electrical burn injuries, and the results were tabulated. The age of presentation ranged from 3 to 61 years. The most frequently affected age group was the second decade of life (33.3%). Of 84 patients studied, 71 were male and 13 female. Fifty-nine patients were from the urban area, while 25 were from the surrounding rural area. Students including children and adolescents were the most common affected single group (22.5%). Contact with live wire or contact with an object that was in contact with a live wire (secondary contact) accounted for 43 of 84 cases (51%). Home was the most common location where injury occurred (51.2%). Twenty-one of 59 cases (35.6%) reported from the urban area and 3 of 25 cases (12%) from the rural area had specific knowledge about prevention of electrical burn injury. Forty-one patients (69.4%) from the urban area and 22 (88%) from the rural area believed that adequate information regarding electrical burn injury was not available. Thirty-six patients (61%) from the urban area and 24 (96%) from the rural area believed that they would have behaved differently if the information had been available. The authors recommend that prevention programs should be modified to cater to the specific needs of the younger age groups and the rural population.

  13. "What do kids know": a survey of 420 Grade 5 students in Cambodia on their knowledge of burn prevention and first-aid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Marvin; Tsai, Brian; Uk, Pisey; Jo, Harrison; Gomez, Manuel; Gollogly, James G; Beveridge, Massey

    2007-05-01

    Cambodia is a developing country of 13 million people where there are an estimated 20,000 burns and 2000 burn deaths annually. Two thirds of the burns occur to children under the age of 10 years. The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge of burn prevention and first aid for burns in Grade 5 Cambodian school children, as baseline information to design a burn prevention campaign. A 34-question survey regarding burn prevention and first-aid treatment for burn injuries was developed. Additional questions on TV watching habits were included to determine the feasibility of a targeted TV burn educational campaign. The survey was translated into Khmer language and tested on a trial class for accuracy and ease of administration. After obtaining the school director's permission and children's consent the survey was administered by Canadian medical students helped by trained translators and teachers to Grade 5 students from eight different elementary schools in the Kampot province. A total of 420 students were surveyed. Average age was 12.5 years (range 9-17 years) and 55% were females. Seventy-four percent routinely cared for other children. Only 52% had TV at home but still 78% managed to watch TV for an average 2h per day. Even though 36% of students indicated they had received information about burn prevention and first aid, only 13% mentioned application of cool water as initial treatment, only 7% knew to roll on the ground if their clothes caught fire, and nearly 50% would pour water on a burning pot of oil. Half of students indicated that they would not believe a TV message promoting application of cold water on acute burns. Top reasons given were parental influence, belief in other treatments, and not trusting TV messages. Interestingly, 62% of these skeptics would change their mind if the TV message was endorsed by an authority figure such as a physician, teacher, parent, or the Ministry of Health. A set of five Public Service Announcements for

  14. Prevention of incontinence-related skin breakdown for acute and critical care patients: comparison of two products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Mary; Droegemueller, Carol; Rivers, Sonja; Deuser, William E

    2012-01-01

    Perineal protection products were compared for their efficacy in preventing skin breakdown in the hospitalized patient with urinary and/or fecal incontinence. Each product was used for the duration of the hospital stay with daily observations for perineal skin condition. Results indicated the spray product and wipe product were comparable in rate of skin breakdown prevention. Findings suggest the wipe product is more cost-effective for use during hospitalization, and the spray product preserves skin integrity over a longer period of time, beyond average hospitalization duration.

  15. Does cryotherapy improve skin circulation compared with compression and elevation in preventing venous leg ulcers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Mueller, Martina; Madisetti, Mohan; Prentice, Margie A; Dooley, Mary J

    2017-08-01

    This trial compared skin blood flow, temperature and incidence of venous leg ulcers in patients with chronic venous disease using compression wraps and elevation pillows. Patients with CEAP C4 skin damage and C5 history of ulcers were randomly assigned to a cryotherapy intervention (n = 138) or placebo cuff control (n = 138) applied to the lower legs over 9 months. The time the ulcers healed prior to enrollment in the study for the cryotherapy group ranged from 1 to 2218 days (n = 8, median = 32 days); for the control group, the range was 24 to 489 days (n = 6, median = 390 days). There were no statistically significant blood flow changes measured in perfusion units with a laser Doppler flowmetre within or between the groups; mean difference between the groups was 0·62, P = 0·619. No differences were noted in skin temperature measured with an infrared thermometer within and between the groups; mean difference between the groups was -0·17°C, P = 0·540. Cryotherapy did not improve skin blood flow or temperature and did not show efficacy in preventing ulcers. However, at least 30% of intervention and 50% of control participants were anticipated to develop an ulcer during the study; only ∼7% occurred. These findings suggest that strict adherence to standard of care decreases the incidence of leg ulcers and remains a best practice for leg ulcer prevention. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A multicenter study of preventable contact burns from glass fronted gas fireplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibbenmeyer, Lucy; Gittelman, Michael A; Kluesner, Karen; Liao, Junlin; Xing, Yunfan; Faraklas, Iris; Anyan, Walter; Gamero, Chelsea; Moulton, Steven; Nederveld, Cindy; Banks, Ashley; Ryan, Colleen M; Conway, Jennifer A; Reilly, Debra A; Fish, Joel; Kelly, Charis; Peltier, George; Schwantke, Emily; Conrad, Peggie F; Caruso, Daniel M; Richey, Karen J; McCrory, Kristine; Elfar, Mohamed S A; Pittinger, Timothy; Sadie, Christine; Greenhalgh, David; Palmieri, Tina; Grossman, Peter H; Richards, Kurt M; Joyce, Teresa; Pozez, Andrea L; Savetamal, Alisa; Harrington, David T; Duncan, Kimberley; Pomerantz, Wendy J; Dillard, B Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Glass fronted gas fireplaces (GFGFs) have exterior surfaces that can reach extremely high temperatures. Burn injuries from contact with the glass front can be severe with long-term sequelae. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reported that these injuries are uncommon, whereas single-center studies indicate a much higher frequency. The purpose of this multi-institutional study was to determine the magnitude and severity of GFGF injuries in North America. Seventeen burn centers elected to participate in this retrospective chart review. Chart review identified 402 children ≤10 years of age who sustained contact burns from contact with GFGF, who were seen or admitted to the study hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Demographic, burn, treatment, and financial data were collected. The mean age of the study group was 16.8 ± 13.3 months. The majority suffered burns to their hands (396, 98.5%), with burns to the face being the second, much less common site (14, 3.5%). Two hundred and sixty-nine required rehabilitation therapy (66.9%). The number of GFGF injuries reported was 20 times greater than the approximately 30 injuries estimated by the Consumer Product Safety Commission's 10-year review. For the affected children, these injuries are painful, often costly and occasionally can lead to long-term sequelae. Given that less than a quarter of burn centers contributed data, the injury numbers reported herein support a need for broader safety guidelines for gas fireplaces in order to have a significant impact on future injuries.

  17. Development of effective skin cancer treatment and prevention in xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, W Clark; Lambert, Muriel W

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, recessively transmitted genetic disease characterized by increasingly marked dyspigmentation and xerosis (dryness) of sun-exposed tissues, especially skin. Skin cancers characteristically develop in sun-exposed sites at very much earlier ages than in the general population; these are often multiple and hundreds or even thousands may develop. Eight complementation groups have been identified. Seven groups, XP-A…G, are associated with defective genes encoding proteins involved in the nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) pathway that recognizes and excises mutagenic changes induced in DNA by sunlight; the eighth group, XP-V, is associated with defective translesion synthesis (TLS) bypassing such alterations. The dyspigmentation, xerosis and eventually carcinogenesis in XP patients appear to be due to their cells' failure to respond properly to these mutagenic DNA alterations, leading to mutations in skin cells. A subset of cases, especially those in some complementation groups, may develop neurological degeneration, which may be severe. However, in most XP patients, in the past the multiple skin cancers have led to death at an early age due to either metastases or sepsis. Using either topical 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod, we have developed a protocol that effectively prevents most skin cancer development in XP patients. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  18. Preoperative skin antiseptic preparations for preventing surgical site infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Chris; McGahan, Lynda; Polisena, Julie; Mierzwinski-Urban, Monika; Embil, John M

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of preoperative skin antiseptic preparations and application techniques for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). Systematic review of the literature using Medline, EMBASE, and other databases, for the period January 2001 to June 2011. Comparative studies (including randomized and nonrandomized trials) of preoperative skin antisepsis preparations and application techniques were included. Two researchers reviewed each study and extracted data using standardized tables developed before the study. Studies were reviewed for their methodological quality and clinical findings. Twenty studies (n = 9,520 patients) were included in the review. The results indicated that presurgical antiseptic showering is effective for reducing skin flora and may reduce SSI rates. Given the heterogeneity of the studies and the results, conclusions about which antiseptic is more effective at reducing SSIs cannot be drawn. The evidence suggests that preoperative antiseptic showers reduce bacterial colonization and may be effective at preventing SSIs. The antiseptic application method is inconsequential, and data are lacking to suggest which antiseptic solution is the most effective. Disinfectant products are often mixed with alcohol or water, which makes it difficult to form overall conclusions regarding an active ingredient. Large, well-conducted randomized controlled trials with consistent protocols comparing agents in the same bases are needed to provide unequivocal evidence on the effectiveness of one antiseptic preparation over another for the prevention of SSIs.

  19. Preventative and Therapeutic Probiotic Use in Allergic Skin Conditions: Experimental and Clinical Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Öner; Göksu Erol, Azize Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are ingested live microbes that can modify intestinal microbial populations in a way that benefits the host. The interest in probiotic preventative/therapeutic potential in allergic diseases stemmed from the fact that probiotics have been shown to improve intestinal dysbiosis and permeability and to reduce inflammatory cytokines in human and murine experimental models. Enhanced presence of probiotic bacteria in the intestinal microbiota is found to correlate with protection against allergy. Therefore, many studies have been recently designed to examine the efficacy of probiotics, but the literature on the allergic skin disorders is still very scarce. Here, our objective is to summarize and evaluate the available knowledge from randomized or nonrandomized controlled trials of probiotic use in allergic skin conditions. Clinical improvement especially in IgE-sensitized eczema and experimental models such as atopic dermatitis-like lesions (trinitrochlorobenzene and picryl chloride sensitizations) and allergic contact dermatitis (dinitrofluorobenzene sensitization) has been reported. Although there is a very promising evidence to recommend the addition of probiotics into foods, probiotics do not have a proven role in the prevention or the therapy of allergic skin disorders. Thus, being aware of possible measures, such as probiotics use, to prevent/heal atopic diseases is essential for the practicing allergy specialist. PMID:24078929

  20. Gold standards for primary care of burn management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Zor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, about 2.5 million people are affected from burns in the world. In our country there is no reliable database related to this subject. There are ongoing studies about the epidemiology of burns in Turkey. After burn injury had represent many various complications, such as myocardial infarction, cardiac deficiency, acute hypertension, endocarditis, thromboembolism, pulmonary edema, pneumonia, respiratuar failure, renal failure, gastric ulcus, ileus, sepsis, coagulopathy and anemia. Such complications can preventable or treatable. In this respect, preventive management in the first step burn treatment had very importantly in burn cases. Skin is a barrier which protects evaporative heat loss. In cases of acute burn, hypothermia occurs related to skin loss. For these cases, care must be taken to keep the patient warm. In addition fluid resuscitation is very important in these cases. Furthermore, the damaged tissues are highly susceptible to infection in burned patients. Burn care and rehabilitation includes challenging and complex procedures. Briefly, treatments of burn cases require a multidisciplinary and meticulous approach.

  1. Teens, Tweets, and Tanning Beds: Rethinking the Use of Social Media for Skin Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Ashley E; Brindis, Claire D; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Junn, Alexandra; Pagoto, Sherry; Wehner, Mackenzie; Linos, Eleni

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of skin cancer is rising in the U.S., and melanoma, the deadliest form, is increasing disproportionately among young white women. Indoor tanning is a modifiable risk factor for all skin cancers and continues to be used at the highest rates in young white women. Adolescents and young adults report personal appearance-based reasons for using indoor tanning. Previous research has explored the influences on tanning bed use, including individual factors as well as relationships with peers, family, schools, media influences, legislation, and societal beauty norms. Adolescents and young adults also have high rates of social media usage, and research is emerging on how best to utilize these platforms for prevention. Social media has the potential to be a cost-effective way to reach large numbers of young people and target messages at characteristics of specific audiences. Recent prevention efforts have shown that comprehensive prevention campaigns that include technology and social media are promising in reducing rates of indoor tanning among young adults. This review examines the literature on psychosocial influences on indoor tanning among adolescents and young adults, and highlights ways in which technology and social media can be used for prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Covering techniques for severe burn treatment: lessons for radiological burn accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsin, H.; Stephanazzi, J.; Lambert, F.; Curet, P.M.; Gourmelon, P.

    2002-01-01

    Covering techniques for severe burn treatment: lessons for radiological burn accidents. After a severe burn, the injured person is weakened by a risk of infection and a general inflammation. The necrotic tissues have to be removed because they are toxic for the organism. The injured person also needs to be covered by a cutaneous envelope, which has to be done by a treatment centre for burned people. The different techniques are the following: - auto grafts on limited burned areas; - cutaneous substitutes to cover temporary extended burned areas. Among them: natural substitutes like xenografts (pork skin, sheep skin,..) or allografts (human skin), - treated natural substitutes which only maintain the extracellular matrix. Artificial skins belong to this category and allow the development of high quality scars, - cell cultures in the laboratory: multiplying the individual cells and grafting them onto the patient. This technique is not common but allows one to heal severely injured patients. X-ray burns are still a problem. Their characteristics are analysed: intensive, permanent, antalgic resistant pain. They are difficult to compare with heat burns. In spite of a small number of known cases, we can give some comments and guidance on radio necrosis cures: the importance of the patients comfort, of ending the pain, of preventing infection, and nutritional balance. At the level of epidermic inflammation and phlyctena (skin blisters), the treatment may be completed by the use of growth factors. At the level of necrosis, after a temporary cover, an auto graft can be considered only if a healthy basis is guaranteed. The use of cellular cultures in order to obtain harmonious growth factors can be argued. (author)

  3. Skin cancer has a large impact on our public hospitals but prevention programs continue to demonstrate strong economic credentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Sophy T F; Carter, Rob; Heward, Sue; Sinclair, Craig

    2017-08-01

    While skin cancer is still the most common cancer in Australia, important information gaps remain. This paper addresses two gaps: i) the cost impact on public hospitals; and ii) an up-to-date assessment of economic credentials for prevention. A prevalence-based cost approach was undertaken in public hospitals in Victoria. Costs were estimated for inpatient admissions, using State service statistics, and outpatient services based on attendance at three hospitals in 2012-13. Cost-effectiveness for prevention was estimated from 'observed vs expected' analysis, together with program expenditure data. Combining inpatient and outpatient costs, total annual costs for Victoria were $48 million to $56 million. The SunSmart program is estimated to have prevented more than 43,000 skin cancers between 1988 and 2010, a net cost saving of $92 million. Skin cancer treatment in public hospitals ($9.20∼$10.39 per head/year) was 30-times current public funding in skin cancer prevention ($0.37 per head/year). At about $50 million per year for hospitals in Victoria alone, the cost burden of a largely preventable disease is substantial. Skin cancer prevention remains highly cost-effective, yet underfunded. Implications for public health: Increased funding for skin cancer prevention must be kept high on the public health agenda. Hospitals would also benefit from being able to redirect resources to non-preventable conditions. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Local cooling does not prevent hyperalgesia following burn injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Lassen, Birgit Vibeke; Pedersen, Juri L

    2002-01-01

    One of the oldest methods of pain relief following a burn injury is local application of ice or cold water. Experimental data indicate that cooling may also reduce the severity of tissue injury and promote wound healing, but there are no controlled studies in humans evaluating the anti-inflammato......One of the oldest methods of pain relief following a burn injury is local application of ice or cold water. Experimental data indicate that cooling may also reduce the severity of tissue injury and promote wound healing, but there are no controlled studies in humans evaluating the anti...

  5. Burn wound: Pathophysiology and its management by herbal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhirender Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In human body, wound healing is a normal biological phenomenon. Burns may be acute or chronic depending upon the source and its time of exposure. Burn wounds may be superficial, partial or full thickness wounds. When skin comes in contact with higher temperature, protein denaturation takes place due to which the plasma membrane integrity is lost. When skin is burned, a number of inflammatory mediators and releasing agents such as histamine, nitric oxide, oxygen free radicals, eicosanoid products, tumor necrosis factors, and interleukins etc., are released at the site. For wound healing mechanism, the keratinocytes has to move from uninjured site to the burned area. For deeper burns this process takes a long time. By some unknown mechanisms, burn wounds may convert from one form to another form. So burn wound depth must be accurately measured before starting the treatment to prevent the complications. Burns can be induced in experimental animals by using different models. Many treatments such as herbal drugs, topical agents, gene therapy, volume therapy, and rehabilitation can be employed. This review article mainly deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of burn wound healing. Some burn wound healing plants with their chemical constituents, plant part used, uses and animal models are described here.

  6. A programme of research to set priorities and reduce uncertainties for the prevention and treatment of skin disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, K. S.; Batchelor, J. M.; Bath-Hextall, F.; Chalmers, J. R.; Clarke, T.; Crowe, S.; Delamere, F. M.; Eleftheriadou, V.; Evans, N.; Firkins, L.; Greenlaw, N.; Lansbury, L.; Lawton, S.; Layfield, C.; Leonardi-Bee, J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skin diseases are very common and can have a large impact on the quality of life of patients and caregivers. This programme addressed four diseases: (1) eczema, (2) vitiligo, (3) squamous cell skin cancer (SCC) and (4) pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). OBJECTIVE: To set priorities and reduce uncertainties for the treatment and prevention of skin disease in our four chosen diseases. DESIGN: Mixed methods including eight systematic reviews, three prioritisation exercises, tw...

  7. Prevention and treatment of skin lesions associated with non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Recommendations of experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raurell-Torredà, M; Romero-Collado, A; Rodríguez-Palma, M; Farrés-Tarafa, M; Martí, J D; Hurtado-Pardos, B; Peñarrubia-San Florencio, L; Saez-Paredes, P; Esquinas, A M

    In the last two decades, non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) has been consolidated as an initial strategy for the management of respiratory failure in critical adult and paediatric patients. To identify risk factors and preventive strategies to reduce the incidence of skin lesions associated with clinical devices (LESADIC) related to NIV, as well as the most effective treatment for injuries that cannot be avoided. Review in the MEDLINE, CINAHL and Cochrane databases of studies published in the last 10years to reach consensus through an expert panel. Knowledge about how to measure correct mask size and protection of the skin with foam or hydrocolloids dressings are factors related to the incidence of LESADIC, as it conditions the degree of pressure-friction and shear that the interface exerts on the skin. The interface that causes fewer LESADIC and is better tolerated is the face mask. When there are injuries, the first thing is to remove the interface that causes pressure on damaged skin, recommending a Helmet ® hood as an alternative, treating the infection, managing the exudate and stimulating perilesional skin. The mask of choice is the facial, always using foam or hydrocolloid dressings on the nasal bridge. Evaluate the condition of the skin under the interface and harness every 4hours (recommended) and 11hours (maximum). Evaluate the rotation strategy of the interface at 24hours if the NIV is still needed on an ongoing basis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment of radioinduced skin burns by adult stem cells;Traitement des brulures cutanees radio-induites par cellules souches adultes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lataillade, J.J.; Prat, M. [Hopital Militaire Percy, Centre de Transfusion Sanguine des Armees, Dept. Recherches et Therapies Cellulaires, 92 - Clamart (France); Gourmelon, P. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Bey, E. [Hopital Militaire Percy, Service de Chirurgie Plastique, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2009-12-15

    In the area of skin injuries caused by ionizing radiations; the recent opportunity give us the the possibility to manage victims of radiation accidents with skin acute symptoms of irradiation. The approach of cell therapy developed for these patients could be in a second time, used for other types of injuries as thermal burns and the injuries linked to overexposure in radiotherapy. In spite of the diversity of approaches of allogeneic and autologous transplantation, the prognosis of deep and extended radioinduced burns is not completely satisfying because of inflammatory recurrences, origin of graft failures. The stem cells have been used in association. The stem cells were got from sampling of autologous bone marrow after an expansion in vitro from 15 to 17 days. The cultures were realised in medium with 8% of platelet lysate (clinical grade). The cells have been given by injection in complement of epidermis auto graft. A spectacular effect was noticed the day after the injection, but disappearing in some days encouraging to realize supplementary injections. An effect of the quickness and the quality of the graft success is appeared significant too. no necrosis recurrence for the patients after four years for the first one of them. We think that the stem cells participate to the local control of inflammation. (N.C.)

  9. A comparative study of histopathological effects of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with sulfadiazine on skin burn wound healing in rats infected with Pseudomonas aeuroginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Valilou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen, is the most common infective agent of burn wounds. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological effect of a mixture of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with silver sulfadiazine on the healing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected second grade skin burn wounds in rats. To this end, 60 male rats were randomly assigned to four experimental groups (15 rats in each group. After inducing anesthesia, second grade burn wound with the diameter of 12 mm was created in the dorsal region of rats. Then, 1.5×108 cfu/ml P. aeruginosa PA01was equally bestrewed on the wound of all rats. Every 12 hours, silver sulfadiazine (group 1, honey (group 2 and aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey (group 3 were applied to the wounds and group 4 was kept as control. On days 7, 14, and 21, five rats were selected from each group at each time point and after inducing anesthesia and measuring the diameter of the wound by coliseum, microbial and histopathological samples were taken from the wounds. Microbial studies showed that in all groups except the control group, the growth of the microbe was stopped. Histopathological observations regarding wound healing and diameter showed that there was a significant difference between treatment groups and the control group on days 7, 14 and 21 (p

  10. SELECTIVE INTESTINAL DECONTAMINATION FOR PREVENTION OF WOUND COLONIZATION IN SEVERELY BURNED PATIENTS - A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANSON, WL; KLASEN, HJ; SAUER, EW; OLIEMAN, A

    In this study the effect of selective intestinal decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) on wound colonization was investigated. Ninety-one patients with at least 25 per cent total burned surface area (TBSA) were included in this study. All patients received oral polymyxin. In 63 patients oral

  11. Prevention of burn wound conversion by allogeneic keratinocytes cultured on acellular xenodermis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušková, Eva; Brož, L.; Pokorná, Eva; Königová, R.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2002), s. 29-35 ISSN 1389-9333 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : human keratinocytes * tissue engineered skin * dried porcine dermis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  12. Teens, Tweets, and Tanning Beds: Rethinking the Use of Social Media for Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Ashley E.; Brindis, Claire D.; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Junn, Alexandra; Pagoto, Sherry; Wehner, Mackenzie; Linos, Eleni

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of skin cancer is rising in the U.S., and melanoma, the deadliest form, is increasing disproportionately among young white women. Indoor tanning is a modifiable risk factor for all skin cancers and continues to be used at the highest rates in young white women. Adolescents and young adults report personal appearance–based reasons for using indoor tanning. Previous research has explored the influences on tanning bed use, including individual factors as well as relationships with peers, family, schools, media influences, legislation, and societal beauty norms. Adolescents and young adults also have high rates of social media usage, and research is emerging on how best to utilize these platforms for prevention. Social media has the potential to be a cost-effective way to reach large numbers of young people and target messages at characteristics of specific audiences. Recent prevention efforts have shown that comprehensive prevention campaigns that include technology and social media are promising in reducing rates of indoor tanning among young adults. This review examines the literature on psychosocial influences on indoor tanning among adolescents and young adults, and highlights ways in which technology and social media can be used for prevention efforts. PMID:28818251

  13. EFFECTIVENESS OF A COGNITIVE SOCIAL PROGRAM TO PREVENT SKIN CANCER IN ADOLESCENT WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PABLO ALFONSO SANABRIA FERRAND

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Differential effect of three components of a social cognitive program, e.g., information, self-evaluation of risk andsubjective norms, influencing sun protective practices was established in a group of 57 female teenagers. The componentswere defined as three independent variables consisting of (i Oral information about skin cancer, (ii Self-evaluation ofthe risk of acquiring skin cancer and identification and modification of the barriers, and finally (iii Identification andrestructure of subjective norms that favor exposure and sun tanning behavior. The study design was intrasubject withmeasurements pre- and pos-test and twelve weeks of following-up after finalizing the preventive program. It wasfound that the given information about skin cancer favours negative attitudes towards sun tanning behavior, althoughcontrary to was expected, there was an increase of sunbathing and sun tanning, which just diminished after theimplementation of the preventive program’s second component. The third component was related with the decreasedof the perceived benefits of protection and the increased of severity perception towards foto-ageing. The followed-upand correlations among the psycho-social model ´s variables with protection habits reckon the effectiveness of themodel to increment the sun protection practices

  14. Prevention of Skin Tears in the Dependent Older Person: Contribution of the Humanitude Care Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Cândida Melo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aging is characterized by a decline in physical and cognitive functioning, increasing the older person’s vulnerability to dependence. The age factor and the associated physiological skin changes contribute to the occurrence of skin tears. This type of wounds is common in older people and often results from care delivery, hence the importance of caring with Humanitude and avoiding the use of force during interventions. Objectives: This study aims to identify and analyze the current scientific evidence on the contribution of the Humanitude care methodology toward reducing the agitation and preventing skin tears in dependent older people. Methods: Integrative literature review of articles published between 2011 and 2016, available in full text and written in Portuguese and English, in the EBSCOhost and Google Scholar databases. Results: Of a total of 75 articles, five articles were obtained after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conclusions: The studies showed that the application of the Humanitude care methodology, by using gentle caring techniques, is particularly effective in dependent older people by reducing their pathological agitation behaviors and opposition to treatment/refusal of care and preventing shearing, friction, and bruising.

  15. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in 2018! Learn More For Loved Ones A burn injury doesn't just impact the survivor. Families ... to support longterm recovery, improve the quality of burn care, and prevent burn injury. Explore articles on ...

  16. Gas fireplace contact burns in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettel, Julie C; Khambalia, Amina; Barden, Wendy; Murthy, Trisha; Macarthur, Colin

    2004-01-01

    Contact burns from domestic appliances are common in young children. Recently, gas fireplaces have been recognized as a potential cause of contact burns in young children. We sought to quantify the frequency of gas fireplace contact burns in young children, to identify the etiology of contact, to describe the clinical presentation, and to describe clinical outcomes. Children with gas fireplace contact burn injuries presenting to The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto (1999-2002) were identified using three data sources: the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program Database, the Burn Unit Registry, and the Rehabilitation Services Database. Demographic, clinical, and outcomes data were collected on all children. During the 4-year study period, 27 children presented to the hospital because of a gas fireplace contact burn (approximately 9% of all contact burns). The median age of the children was 14 months (range, 8-36 months), with 16 boys (59%). Most children were burned in their own home. With regard to etiology, 10 children (37%) lost their balance near the fireplace, 2 (7%) walked too close to the glass front, and 8 (30%) touched the glass front out of curiosity. Almost half (44%) of the children burned the palms and digits of both hands. The median total burn surface area was 1% (range, 0.2-2.5%). In total, 30% of children were admitted to hospital, and 11% required skin grafts. All children had full wound closure after 4 to 43 days. Given the etiology of these burns (loss of balance or curiosity), passive prevention, such as barriers or changes in the composition of glass panels, may be the most effective approach to combat them.

  17. Skin Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Ruka; Kishi, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Skin graft is one of the most indispensable techniques in plastic surgery and dermatology. Skin grafts are used in a variety of clinical situations, such as traumatic wounds, defects after oncologic resection, burn reconstruction, scar contracture release, congenital skin deficiencies, hair restoration, vitiligo, and nipple-areola reconstruction. Skin grafts are generally avoided in the management of more complex wounds. Conditions with deep spaces and exposed bones normally require the use o...

  18. Ultraviolet light protection by a sunscreen prevents interferon-driven skin inflammation in cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Sabine; Graef, Medina; Patsinakidis, Nikolaos; Landmann, Aysche; Surber, Christian; Wenzel, Joerg; Kuhn, Annegret

    2014-07-01

    Irradiation with ultraviolet (UV) light is an important exacerbating factor in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and induces various effects in the skin of patients with the disease, such as cell death and inflammation. Recently, we demonstrated the ability of a broad-spectrum sunscreen to prevent UV-induced damage both in patients with CLE and healthy controls (HCs). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the UV-dependent activation of interferon (IFN)-driven inflammation in CLE can also be prevented by application of the sunscreen. In 20 patients with different subtypes of CLE and 10 HCs, defined areas on the upper back were treated with a broad-spectrum liposomal sunscreen 20 min prior to a combined standardized UVA/UVB irradiation. Immunohistological analyses using antibodies directed against MxA, CD11c, CD123 and CD68 were performed from skin biopsies taken from areas before UV irradiation as well as from sunscreen-treated and sunscreen-untreated areas 24 and 72 h after UV irradiation. The expression of MxA was completely prevented by the sunscreen applied prior to UV irradiation in CLE patients and HCs. Additionally, sunscreen protection significantly diminished the number of the CD11c- and CD123-positive dendritic cells, which are suggested to be a major source of type I/III IFNs, in UV-irradiated skin of patients with CLE. Moreover, the application of the sunscreen prevented the increase in CD68-positive macrophages in both groups 72 h after UV irradiation. The data of this study demonstrate that UV protection reduces lesional tissue damage and inhibits the typical IFN-driven inflammatory response in CLE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A comparative study of spray keratinocytes and autologous meshed split-thickness skin graft in the treatment of acute burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Rajiv; Roggy, David Edward; Zieger, Madeline Jane; Nazim, Muhammad; Hartman, Brett Colby; Gibbs, Jeff Thomas

    2015-02-01

    ReCell (Avita Medical, Northridge, CA) is an autologous cell harvesting (ACH) device that enables a thin split-thickness skin biopsy to be processed to produce a cell population that includes a mixed population of keratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells, and papillary dermal fibroblasts for immediate delivery via a spray applicator onto a prepared skin surface. In this Institutional Review Board-approved US Food and Drug Administration phase 2 study, the authors prospectively evaluated the treatment of partial-thickness burns in patients with two 320 cm2 areas, 1 area treated with the ACH device and the other with a meshed split-thickness skin graft (MSTSG) as a control. The authors compared the treatment areas for graft take, pigmentation, and color match to surrounding healthy tissue, scarring, and pain. In this preliminary study, 10 patients were treated with this protocol. Eight patients had 100% take to both treatment areas and 2 patients had significant non-take and graft loss attributable to underexcised wound beds and difficulty with the spray applicator. Pigmentation and color match ratings were identical at week 52 and the Modified Vancouver Scar Scale scores were comparable. One subject rated the autologous cell harvesting site as having a better appearance, while the remaining subjects rated their ACH and MSTSG sites' appearances as being comparable. In early follow-up visits, pain ratings were slightly elevated in the ACH group due to graft healing; however, in visits following week 2, pain ratings at the ACH and MSTSG sites were rated similarly by all patients. This preliminary report describes an early experience with the ACH device and the treatment of partial-thickness burn injuries. In this 10-patient series, patients benefitted from having a decreased donor site size and comparable outcomes with MSTSG treatment. While this preliminary underpowered study has provided positive results, there is a learning curve with choosing the proper wound

  20. Biochemical mechanisms of skin radiation burns inhibition and healing by the volumetric autotransplantation of fibroblasts and of keratinocytes with fibroblasts composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Altukhova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of influence of volumetric autotransplantation of fibroblasts and of the mixture of fibroblasts and keratinocytes on the development of the local 3rd degree X-ray burn and the radiation skin ulcer in guinea pigs were investigated. We used deepadministration into the irradiation zone on its perimeter of 6 doses, which contained (150–160×103 fibroblasts and (130–140×103 keratinocytes in 100 µl. It is shown that this autotransplantation carried out 1 hour after the irradiation, and then every 24 hours, reduces the area of burn on the 35th day, compared to the control by 63%. Radiation ulcer appears on the 10th day after irradiation and is completely healed on the 25th day. With the same regimen of administration of only fibroblasts containing (200–210×103 cells in 100 µl, these parameters of treatment were equal to 31% on 4th and 35th day, respectively. It is shown that as a result of radiation in the area of burn the level of gene expression of collagen types I and III, elastin, fibronectin, vinculin, decorin, hyaluronansynthases 1, 2, 3, matrix metalloproteinases 1, 2, 3, 7, 9 and hyaluronidase is reduced. Besides, in the burn area the level of gene expression of transforming growth factor α, fibroblast growth factors 1, 2, 8 and anti-inflammatory cytokines – interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor-β1 – is reduced, while the level of gene expression of proinflammatory cytokine (interleykin1β increases. Both types of autotransplantation cause the growth of the expression level of all the structural genes and regulatory proteins of biopolymers and decrease in the expression level of interleukin 1β, which leads to activation of tissue regeneration and healing of the burn wound. Reasonsfor the higher efficiency of autotransplantation using the mixture of fibroblasts and keratinocytes compared to autotransplantation by fibroblasts only are both the larger total number of live cells regularly replacing dead cells in

  1. Language of Uncertainty: the Expression of Decisional Conflict Related to Skin Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalova, Yulia A; James, Vaughan S

    2017-09-01

    User-generated information on the Internet provides opportunities for the monitoring of health information consumer attitudes. For example, information about cancer prevention may cause decisional conflict. Yet posts and conversations shared by health information consumers online are often not readily actionable for interpretation and decision-making due to their unstandardized format. This study extends prior research on the use of natural language as a predictor of consumer attitudes and provides a link to decision-making by evaluating the predictive role of uncertainty indicators expressed in natural language. Analyzed data included free-text comments and structured scale responses related to information about skin cancer prevention options. The study identified natural language indicators of uncertainty and showed that it can serve as a predictor of decisional conflict. The natural indicators of uncertainty reported here can facilitate the monitoring of health consumer perceptions about cancer prevention recommendations and inform education and communication campaign planning and evaluation.

  2. Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Malignant disease involving the skin represents a significant work load to the general radiotherapist and can involve interesting diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Primary skin cancer is also relatively common and there is a need to provide an efficient service in which the first treatment is successful in the majority of patients. The reward for careful attention to technique is very considerable both in terms of clinical cancer control and functional results. Squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and intra-epidermal carcinoma constitute the majority of the lesions dealt with clinically, but metastatic disease, lymphomas, and malignant melanomas are also referred regularly for opinions and may require radiotherapy. The general principle of the techniques of assessment and radiotherapeutic management to be described are equally applicable to any malignant skin tumour once the decision has been made to accept it for radiotherapy. Dosage and fractionation may have to be adjusted to allow for the nature of the disease process and the intent of the treatment

  3. [Burns, new challenges to take on].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galí-Llàcer, Rosa; Sena-Fernández, Beatriz; Leyva-Moral, Juan Manuel

    2009-04-01

    This article concerns a transversal descriptive study which shows the characteristics of burns treated in a Primary Health Care Center in an urban environment in Barcelona from 19 July 2005 unti 11 August 2007 (N=93). Patients younger than 15 were excluded from this study. 88% (82; CI of 95% 81,47-94,59) of the burns treated were caused by a thermal agent. Kitchen cooking oil ranks first as the cause of burns (24; 27%, CI of 95% 17,99-36,01). 70% of the burns studied had signs of superficial skin damage (65, CI of 95% 60,70-79,30). 61% (57; CI of 95% 51,70-70,30) of these burns were located on upper extremities The average recorded body surface burned was 0.0076% (median = 0,005%, range = 0,0001-0,5000%). The greatest number of wounds were observed among men aged 31 to 45 (17%; 16; CI of 95% 9,38-24,62). Educational health programs which focus on prevention of, and first aid care for, burns are needed. Studies like this one may prove useful when starting preventive or educational strategies.

  4. The implementation of knowledge dissemination in the prevention of occupational skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, A; Bollmann, U; Cazzaniga, S; Hübner, A; John, S M; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, J; Mijakoski, D; Šimić, D; Simon, D; Sonsmann, F; Stoleski, S; Weinert, P; Wulfhorst, B

    2018-03-01

    Occupational skin diseases (OSD) have a high medical, social, economic and political impact. Knowledge dissemination from research activities to key stakeholders involved in health care is a prerequisite to make prevention effective. To study and prioritize different activity fields and stakeholders that are involved in the prevention of OSD, to reflect on their inter-relationships, to develop a strategic approach for knowledge dissemination and to develop a hands-on tool for OSD prevention projects METHODS: Seven different activity fields that are relevant in the prevention of OSD have been stepwise identified. This was followed by an impact analysis. Fifty-five international OSD experts rated the impact and the influence of the activity fields for the prevention of OSD with a standardized questionnaire. Activity fields identified to have a high impact in OSD prevention are the political system, mass media and industry. The political system has a strong but more indirect effect on the general population via the educational system, local public health services or the industry. The educational system, mass media, industry and local public health services have a strong direct impact on the OSD 'at risk' worker. Finally, a hands-on tool for future OSD prevention projects has been developed that addresses knowledge dissemination and different stakeholder needs. Systematic knowledge dissemination is important to make OSD prevention more effective and to close the gap between research and practice. This study provides guidance to identify stakeholders, strategies and dissemination channels for systematic knowledge dissemination which need to be adapted to country-specific structures, for example the social security system and healthcare systems. A key for successful knowledge dissemination is building linkages among different stakeholders, building strategic partnerships and gaining their support right from the inception phase of a project. © 2017 European Academy of

  5. Ultraviolet Radiation, Aging and the Skin: Prevention of Damage by Topical cAMP Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Amaro-Ortiz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Being the largest and most visible organ of the body and heavily influenced by environmental factors, skin is ideal to study the long-term effects of aging. Throughout our lifetime, we accumulate damage generated by UV radiation. UV causes inflammation, immune changes, physical changes, impaired wound healing and DNA damage that promotes cellular senescence and carcinogenesis. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and among the malignancies of highest increasing incidence over the last several decades. Melanoma incidence is directly related to age, with highest rates in individuals over the age of 55 years, making it a clear age-related disease. In this review, we will focus on UV-induced carcinogenesis and photo aging along with natural protective mechanisms that reduce amount of “realized” solar radiation dose and UV-induced injury. We will focus on the theoretical use of forskolin, a plant-derived pharmacologically active compound to protect the skin against UV injury and prevent aging symptoms by up-regulating melanin production. We will discuss its use as a topically-applied root-derived formulation of the Plectranthus barbatus (Coleus forskolii plant that grows naturally in Asia and that has long been used in various Aryuvedic teas and therapeutic preparations.

  6. Sterilization of silver acidium pipemedicum skin for the treatment of burns by radioactive cobalt-60-γray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Defeng; Cao Fengsheng; Chen Qinglong; Li Guohui; Su Ziyi; Cao Yong; Wu Wenqing; Qiu Zeyi; Chen Zhanxian

    1995-01-01

    The radiated silver acidum pipemedicum skin (RSAPS) was made of 0.4-0.8mm laminal skin from healthy white pig, which was infiltrated in norfloxacin and silver nitrate, packed with the filkm bag of alummium poil and radiated by cobalt-60γ-ray for sterilization at the dosage of 27.92-35.31Gy/min for a total dose of 25KGY, RSAPS was very effective in sterilization and had no bad effect on elasticity, adhesion, water permeability, and structure of pig skin. So it is highly appreciated by the patients and medical personnel for its convenience of usage and has gained good social and economic beneficial results. (Author)

  7. Prevention and treatment of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Raymond Javan; Webster, Joan; Chung, Bryan; Marquart, Louise; Ahmed, Muhtashimuddin; Garantziotis, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced skin reaction (RISR) is a common side effect that affects the majority of cancer patients receiving radiation treatment. RISR is often characterised by swelling, redness, pigmentation, fibrosis, and ulceration, pain, warmth, burning, and itching of the skin. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of interventions which aim to prevent or manage RISR in people with cancer. We searched the following databases up to November 2012: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2012, Issue 11), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), CINAHL (from 1981) and LILACS (from 1982). Randomized controlled trials evaluating interventions for preventing or managing RISR in cancer patients were included. The primary outcomes were development of RISR, and levels of RISR and symptom severity. Secondary outcomes were time taken to develop erythema or dry desquamation; quality of life; time taken to heal, a number of skin reaction and symptom severity measures; cost, participant satisfaction; ease of use and adverse effects. Where appropriate, we pooled results of randomized controlled trials using mean differences (MD) or odd ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Forty-seven studies were included in this review. These evaluated six types of interventions (oral systemic medications; skin care practices; steroidal topical therapies; non-steroidal topical therapies; dressings and other). Findings from two meta-analyses demonstrated significant benefits of oral Wobe-Mugos E for preventing RISR (OR 0.13 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.38)) and limiting the maximal level of RISR (MD -0.92 (95% CI -1.36 to -0.48)). Another meta-analysis reported that wearing deodorant does not influence the development of RISR (OR 0.80 (95% CI 0.47 to 1.37)). Despite the high number of trials in this area, there is limited good, comparative research that provides definitive results suggesting the effectiveness of any single intervention for

  8. Medical diagnosis system and method with multispectral imaging. [depth of burns and optical density of the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Reilly, T. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A skin diagnosis system includes a scanning and optical arrangement whereby light reflected from each incremental area (pixel) of the skin is directed simultaneously to three separate light filters, e.g., IR, red, and green. As a result, the three devices simultaneously produce three signals which are directly related to the reflectance of light of different wavelengths from the corresponding pixel. These three signals for each pixel after processing are used as inputs to one or more output devices to produce a visual color display and/or a hard copy color print, for one usable as a diagnostic aid by a physician.

  9. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for bu...

  10. Skin cancer prevention coverage in popular US women's health and fitness magazines: an analysis of advertisements and articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey Hannah; Ethan, Danna; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Berdnik, Alyssa

    2014-04-02

    The desire to be tan is a phenomenon that public health researchers have investigated, as exposure to UV radiation increases the chances of developing skin cancer.  Media messages in women's magazines have been shown to contribute to this problem. Much less is known about the prevalence of skin cancer prevention messages in these magazines. This study's aim was to identify the number and type of articles and advertised products devoted to skin health (sun protection and skin cancer prevention in particular) within five popular U.S. greater than women's health and fitness magazines. We analyzed articles and advertisements over seven months of issues of the following popular women's health and fitness magazines: Fitness, Health, Self, Shape, and Women's Health, March 2013 through September 2013. Overall, 31 issues of the five magazines with a total of 780 articles and 1,986 advertisements were analyzed. Of the 780 articles, a mere 2.9% (n=23) were devoted to skin. Of the 258 skin product advertisements, less than 20% of the products contained sun protection factor (SPF). These findings suggest that women's health and fitness magazines can improve their efforts in informing women of skin cancer risks and preventive measures to minimize these risks. The role of these magazines in building health literacy among their readers is also discussed.

  11. Skin Cancer Prevention Coverage in Popular US Women’s Health and Fitness Magazines: An Analysis of Advertisements and Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey Hannah; Ethan, Danna; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Berdnik, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    The desire to be tan is a phenomenon that public health researchers have investigated, as exposure to UV radiation increases the chances of developing skin cancer. Media messages in women’s magazines have been shown to contribute to this problem. Much less is known about the prevalence of skin cancer prevention messages in these magazines. This study’s aim was to identify the number and type of articles and advertised products devoted to skin health (sun protection and skin cancer prevention in particular) within five popular U.S. greater than women’s health and fitness magazines. We analyzed articles and advertisements over seven months of issues of the following popular women’s health and fitness magazines: Fitness, Health, Self, Shape, and Women’s Health, March 2013 through September 2013. Overall, 31 issues of the five magazines with a total of 780 articles and 1,986 advertisements were analyzed. Of the 780 articles, a mere 2.9% (n=23) were devoted to skin. Of the 258 skin product advertisements, less than 20% of the products contained sun protection factor (SPF). These findings suggest that women’s health and fitness magazines can improve their efforts in informing women of skin cancer risks and preventive measures to minimize these risks. The role of these magazines in building health literacy among their readers is also discussed. PMID:24999136

  12. Preventive effect of chemical peeling on ultraviolet induced skin tumor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed; Funasaka, Yoko; Kamo, Tsuneyoshi; Ooe, Masahiko; Matsunaka, Hiroshi; Yanagita, Emmy; Itoh, Tomoo; Nishigori, Chikako

    2010-10-01

    Chemical peeling is one of the dermatological treatments available for certain cutaneous diseases and conditions or improvement of cosmetic appearance of photoaged skin. We assessed the photochemopreventive effect of several clinically used chemical peeling agents on the ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated skin of hairless mice. Chemical peeling was done using 35% glycolic acid dissolved in distilled water, 30% salicylic acid in ethanol, 10% or 35% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in distilled water at the right back of UV-irradiated hairless mice every 2 weeks in case of glycolic acid, salicylic acid, and 10% TCA and every 4 weeks in case of 35% TCA for totally 18 weeks after the establishment of photoaged mice by irradiation with UVA+B range light three times a week for 10 weeks at a total dose of 420 J/cm(2) at UVA and 9.6 J/cm(2) at UVB. Tumor formation was assessed every week. Skin specimens were taken from treated and non-treated area for evaluation under microscopy, evaluation of P53 expression, and mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. Serum level of prostaglandin E(2) was also evaluated. All types of chemical peeling reduced tumor formation in treated mice, mostly in the treated area but also non-treated area. Peeling suppressed clonal retention of p53 positive abnormal cells and reduced mRNA expression of COX-2 in treated skin. Further, serum prostaglandin E(2) level was decreased in chemical peeling treated mice. These results indicate that chemical peeling with glycolic acid, salicylic acid, and TCA could serve tumor prevention by removing photodamaged cells. Copyright © 2010 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interventions to prevent skin cancer by reducing exposure to ultraviolet radiation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiya, Mona; Glanz, Karen; Briss, Peter A; Nichols, Phyllis; White, Cornelia; Das, Debjani; Smith, S Jay; Tannor, Bernice; Hutchinson, Angela B; Wilson, Katherine M; Gandhi, Nisha; Lee, Nancy C; Rimer, Barbara; Coates, Ralph C; Kerner, Jon F; Hiatt, Robert A; Buffler, Patricia; Rochester, Phyllis

    2004-12-01

    The relationship between skin cancer and ultraviolet radiation is well established. Behaviors such as seeking shade, avoiding sun exposure during peak hours of radiation, wearing protective clothing, or some combination of these behaviors can provide protection. Sunscreen use alone is not considered an adequate protection against ultraviolet radiation. This report presents the results of systematic reviews of effectiveness, applicability, other harms or benefits, economic evaluations, and barriers to use of selected interventions to prevent skin cancer by reducing exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services found that education and policy approaches to increasing sun-protective behaviors were effective when implemented in primary schools and in recreational or tourism settings, but found insufficient evidence to determine effectiveness when implemented in other settings, such as child care centers, secondary schools and colleges, and occupational settings. They also found insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of interventions oriented to healthcare settings and providers, media campaigns alone, interventions oriented to parents or caregivers of children, and community-wide multicomponent interventions. The report also provides suggestions for areas for future research.

  14. Application of Minicircle Technology of Self-Reproducing Synthetic Protein Drugs in Preventing Skin Allograft Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sun Woo; Kim, Young Kyun; Park, Narae; Jin, Long; Jin, Jian; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Yang, Chul Woo

    2015-07-30

    Recently, it has been reported that minicircle vectors could allow the expression of transgenes using the protein synthesis system of the host. Here, we tested a novel strategy to permit the production of synthetic biologics using minicircle technology and evaluated their feasibility as a therapeutic tool in a skin allograft model. We engineered vectors to carry cassette sequences for tocilizumab [anti-soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) antibody] and/or etanercept [tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2)-Fc fusion protein], and then isolated minicircle vectors from the parent vectors. We verified the production of proteins from minicircles and their duration in HEK293T cells and mice. We also evaluated whether these proteins were expressed at levels sufficient to ameliorate skin allograft rejection in mice. Each minicircle transfected into cells was detectable for at least 30 days. In mice, the drugs were mainly expressed in the liver and were detectable for at least 10 days after a single injection. These drugs were also detected in the blood. Treatment of mice with minicircles prolonged skin allograft survival, which was accompanied by a reduction of the number of interferon-γ+ or interleukin-17+ lymphocytes and an induction of forkhead box P3 expression. These findings suggest that blocking of sIL-6R and/or TNF-α using minicircles encoding tocilizumab and/or etanercept was functionally active and relevant for preventing acute allograft rejection. Self-reproducing synthetic protein drugs produced using minicircle technology are potentially powerful tools for preventing acute rejection in transplantation.

  15. An Advertisement and Article Analysis of Skin Products and Topics in Popular Women's Magazines: Implications for Skin Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Mongiovi, Jennifer; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Fullwood, M D; Ethan, Danna; Hammond, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer, with an estimated 5 million people treated per year and annual medical treatment expenditures that exceed 8 billion dollars. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to enumerate the number of advertisements for skin products with and without Sun Protection Factor (SPF) and to further analyze the specific advertisements for sunblock to determine if models, when present, depict sun safe behaviors and 2) to enumerate the number of articles related to the skin for content. Both aims include an assessment for differences in age and in magazines targeting a Black or Latina population. The sample for this cross sectional study was comprised of 99 issues of 14 popular United States magazines marketed to women, four of which market to a Black or Latina audience. There were 6,142 advertisements, of which 1,215 (19.8%, 95% CI: 18.8-20.8%) were related to skin products. Among the skin product advertisements, 1,145 (93.8%, 95% CI: 93.9-96.3%) depicted skin products without SPF. The majority of skin articles (91.2%, 95% CI: 91.7-100.0%), skin product advertisements (89.9%, 95% CI: 88.2-91.6%), and sunblock advertisements featuring models (were found in magazines aimed at the older (>24 yr) audience. Future research on this topic could focus on the extent to which images in these magazines translate into risky health behaviors, such as sun seeking, or excessive other harmful effects of UV radiation.

  16. Assessing burn depth in tattooed burn lesions with LASCA Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezdorn, N.; Limbourg, A.; Paprottka, F.J.; Könneker; Ipaktchi, R.; Vogt, P.M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tattoos are on the rise, and so are patients with tattooed burn lesions. A proper assessment with regard to burn depth is often impeded by the tattoo dye. Laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) is a technique that evaluates burn lesions via relative perfusion analysis. We assessed the effect of tattoo skin pigmentation on LASCA perfusion imaging in a multicolour tattooed patient. Depth of burn lesions in multi-coloured tattooed and untattooed skin was assessed using LASCA. Relative perfusion was measured in perfusion units (PU) and compared to various pigment colours, then correlated with the clinical evaluation of the lesion. Superficial partial thickness burn (SPTB) lesions showed significantly elevated perfusion units (PU) compared to normal skin; deep partial thickness burns showed decreased PU levels. PU of various tattoo pigments to normal skin showed either significantly lower values (blue, red, pink) or significantly increased values (black) whereas orange and yellow pigment showed values comparable to normal skin. In SPTB, black and blue pigment showed reduced perfusion; yellow pigment was similar to normal SPTB burn. Deep partial thickness burn (DPTB) lesions in tattoos did not show significant differences to normal DPTB lesions for black, green and red. Tattoo pigments alter the results of perfusion patterns assessed with LASCA both in normal and burned skin. Yellow pigments do not seem to interfere with LASCA assessment. However proper determination of burn depth both in SPTB and DPTB by LASCA is limited by the heterogenic alterations of the various pigment colours. PMID:28149254

  17. Evaluation of the low-level laser therapy application parameters for skin burn treatment in experimental model: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassolatti, Patricia; de Andrade, Ana Laura Martins; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; Otterço, Albaiza Nicoletti; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antônio

    2018-05-05

    Burn is defined as a traumatic injury of thermal origin, which affects the organic tissue. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has gained great prominence as a treatment in this type of injury; however, the application parameters are still controversial in the literature. The aims of this study were to review the literature studies that use LLLT as a treatment in burns conducted in an experimental model, discuss the main parameters used, and highlight the benefits found in order to choose an appropriate therapeutic window to be applied in this type of injury. The selection of the studies related to the theme was carried out in the main databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, LILACS, Web of Science, and Scopus in the period from 2001 to 2017). Subsequently, the articles were then chosen that fell within the inclusion criteria previously established. In the end, 22 were evaluated, and the main parameters were presented. The analyzed studies presented both LLLT use in continuous and pulsed mode. Differences between the parameters used (power, fluence, and total energy) were observed. In addition, the protocols are distinct as to the type of injury and the number of treatment sessions. Among the results obtained by the authors are the improvements in the local microcirculation and cellular proliferation; however, a study reported no effects with LLLT as a treatment. LLLT is effective in accelerating the healing process. However, there is immense difficulty in establishing the most adequate protocol, due to the great discrepancy found in the applied dosimetry values.

  18. Sun protection for preventing basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Guillermo; Nova, John; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Andrea Esperanza; Medina, Roger David; Solorzano-Restrepo, Carolina; Gonzalez, Jenny; Olmos, Miguel; Godfrey, Kathie; Arevalo-Rodriguez, Ingrid

    2016-07-25

    'Keratinocyte cancer' is now the preferred term for the most commonly identified skin cancers basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), which were previously commonly categorised as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Keratinocyte cancer (KC) represents about 95% of malignant skin tumours. Lifestyle changes have led to increased exposure to the sun, which has, in turn, led to a significant increase of new cases of KC, with a worldwide annual incidence of between 3% and 8%. The successful use of preventive measures could mean a significant reduction in the resources used by health systems, compared with the high cost of the treatment of these conditions. At present, there is no information about the quality of the evidence for the use of these sun protection strategies with an assessment of their benefits and risks. To assess the effects of sun protection strategies (i.e. sunscreen and barrier methods) for preventing keratinocyte cancer (that is, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) of the skin) in the general population. We searched the following databases up to May 2016: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS. We also searched five trial registries and the bibliographies of included studies for further references to relevant trials. We included randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of preventive strategies for keratinocyte cancer, such as physical barriers and sunscreens, in the general population (children and adults), which may provide information about benefits and adverse events related to the use of solar protection measures. We did not include trials focused on educational strategies to prevent KC or preventive strategies in high-risk groups. Our prespecified primary outcomes were BCC or cSCC confirmed clinically or by histopathology at any follow-up and adverse events. Two review authors independently selected studies for eligibility using

  19. Impaired skin integrity related to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratliff, C.

    1990-01-01

    Skin reactions associated with radiation therapy require frequent nursing assessment and intervention. Preventive interventions and early management can minimize the severity of the skin reaction. With the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation skin reactions, the ET nurse can determine who is at risk and then implement preventive measures. Because radiation treatment is fractionated, skin reactions do not usually occur until midway through the course of therapy and will subside within a few weeks after completion of radiation. Many patients and their families still fear that radiation causes severe burns. Teaching and anticipatory guidance by the ET nurse is needed to assist patients and their families to overcome this fear, and to educate them on preventive skin care regimens

  20. A novel technique for preventing skin pressure sores using a rubber tube during surgical treatment of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase-Koga, Yoko; Mori, Yoshiyuki; Hoshi, Kazuhito; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Craniofacial surgery occasionally results in sores and necrosis of the facial skin because of pressure from surgical instruments. During surgical treatment of mandibular condylar process fractures, the main mandibular fragment is routinely retracted downward using a wire to achieve a satisfactory anatomic reduction. This procedure may injure the facial skin. This potential complication is easily overlooked by medical staff, but it is easily preventable. We herein describe a method of using a rubber tube to avoid causing pressure sores of the facial skin during surgical treatment of mandibular condylar process fractures.

  1. Evaluation of a new topical skin protectant (RD1433) for the prevention and treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Hazem; Larner, Joanne; Viegas, Vanessa; Kansagra, Sneha; Atkinson, Karen L; Shetage, Satyajit; Skamarauskas, John T; Theivendran, Baveetharan; Goldman, Virginia S; Chilcott, Robert P

    2017-09-01

    Context Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a type of moisture-associated dermatitis caused by repeated skin exposure to urine or stool. A product that could mitigate such symptoms would have a significant impact on cost of care and patients' quality of life. Objective This study compared the clinical efficacy of RD1433 and a comparator product (Vaseline®) in preventing and treating experimental IAD skin lesions. Materials and methods For the "prevention" part of the study, skin sites in eight human volunteers were treated daily for 5 d with either RD1433 or Vaseline® immediately prior to synthetic urine exposure. In the "treatment" part, exposure to synthetic urine was substituted for Vaseline® or RD1433 application on the first 2 d to promote the development of skin lesions prior to the application of the products from day three. Product efficacy was quantified by visual scoring and an array of biophysical instruments. Results Both RD1433 and Vaseline® significantly reduced lesion progression when applied as a prophylactic. When applied as a treatment (following establishment of skin lesions), RD1433 demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in several measures of skin function whereas there was no statistically significant improvement following treatment with Vaseline®. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that RD1433 may be superior to Vaseline® in the prevention and treatment of experimental IAD lesions. Clearly, further work is required to establish the efficacy of RD1433 with patients in a clinical environment.

  2. Primary and secondary prevention of skin cancer in mountain guides: attitude and motivation for or against participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Alexander; Thome, Frank; Schielein, Maximilian; Spinner, Christoph D; Biedermann, Tilo; Tizek, Linda

    2018-05-30

    Outdoor professionals such as mountain guides are at a substantial risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Despite major recent primary prevention efforts, studies on secondary skin cancer prevention efforts are limited and corresponding data on outdoor workers scarce. To assess the sun-protective behavior and individual motivations for or against skin cancer screening examinations in the German mountain guide population to aid in the development of effective awareness and prevention strategies. A cross-sectional study among all registered mountain guides in Germany was conducted using a 35-item online questionnaire on primary and secondary prevention of NMSC as well as perceived barriers for prevention. A total of 145 mountain guides participated in the study in January 2017. Of these, 86.2% reported using sunscreen often or always, 62.1% with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30-50; and 60.7% had undergone dermatological examination by a medical professional. The most common reasons for using secondary prevention efforts were hope of an early diagnosis (77.3%), fear of skin cancer (73.9%), and the intention to be aware of one's own health (70.5%). The main reasons for not doing so were absence of conspicuous skin conditions (63.2%), and feeling healthy (59.6%). Awareness of prevention strategies recommended by the scientific community is low among affected occupationally high-risk mountain guide populations. Understanding the specific needs of this high-risk group is essential for the development of sustainable awareness and prevention strategies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Miguel A; Zakaria, Alan; Nizran, Parminder

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer accounts for most malignancies across the globe. They are primarily divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin malignancies. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Fair skin and chronic ultraviolet B exposure are the most important risk factors. Primary prevention is achieved by avoiding sun exposure and tanning beds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The sunless study: a beach randomized trial of a skin cancer prevention intervention promoting sunless tanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry L; Schneider, Kristin L; Oleski, Jessica; Bodenlos, Jamie S; Ma, Yunsheng

    2010-09-01

    To examine the impact of a skin cancer prevention intervention that promoted sunless tanning as a substitute for sunbathing. Randomized controlled trial. Public beaches in Massachusetts. Women (N = 250) were recruited to participate in the study during their visit to a public beach. Intervention The intervention included motivational messages to use sunless tanning as an alternative to UV tanning, instructions for proper use of sunless tanning products, attractive images of women with sunless tans, a free trial of a sunless tanning product, skin cancer education, and UV imaging. The control participants completed surveys. The primary outcome was sunbathing 2 months and 1 year after the intervention. Secondary outcomes included sunburns, sun protection use, and sunless tanning. At 2 months, intervention participants reduced their sunbathing significantly more than did controls and reported significantly fewer sunburns and greater use of protective clothing. At 1 year, intervention participants reported significant decreases in sunbathing and increases in sunless tanning relative to control participants but no differences in the other outcomes. This intervention, which promoted sunless tanning as an alternative to UV tanning, had a short-term effect on sunbathing, sunburns, and use of protective clothing and a longer-term effect on sunbathing and sunless tanning. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00403377.

  5. Skin cancer preventive behaviors among rural farmers: An intervention based on protection motivation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babazadeh, Towhid; Kamran, Aziz; Dargahi, Abdollah; Moradi, Fatemeh; Shariat, Fariba; Rezakhani Moghaddam, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Skin cancer is a serious public health problem in the world. Its prevalence in many countries has been increased in recent years. This study aimed to assess the effects of a theory-based educational intervention to promote skin cancer preventive behaviors (SCPBs) among rural farmers in Chalderan County, Iran. Methods: This was a quasi-randomized controlled field trial study conducted on 238 rural farmers. The data were collected by a questionnaire containing the constructs of the Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) as well as the items of SCPBs. The differences between the groups before and 3 months after the intervention were determined by independent t-test, paired t-test, and chi-square applying SPSS software. Results: Before the intervention, no significant difference was found in the scores of the PMT constructs between the two groups (p>0.05). However, significant differences were found between the scores of all the variables, as well as SCPBs, in the two groups after the intervention (p<0.05). Conclusion: The PMT was found to be an appropriate framework for designing educational interventions aiming at promoting SCPBs among rural farmers. It was concluded that designing an educational program with a focus on promoting perceived susceptibility increased the level of performing SCPBs among the rural farmers.

  6. The Healthy Skin Project: changing nursing practice to prevent and treat hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour-Burton, Teri; Fields, Willa; Outlaw, Lanie; Deleon, Elvira

    2013-06-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers are serious clinical complications that can lead to increased length of stay, pain, infection, and, potentially, death. The surgical progressive care unit at Sharp Grossmont Hospital, San Diego, California, developed the multidisciplinary Healthy Skin Project to decrease the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The previous treatment plan was reviewed and modified according to current evidence-based practice. The project consisted of 3 components: creation of a position for a unit-based wound liaison nurse, staff education, and involvement of the nursing assistants. The wound liaison nurse developed and conducted bimonthly skin audits, which revealed inconsistencies in clinical practice and documentation. Education for the staff was accomplished via a self-learning module, case presentations, and 1-on-1 training. In addition, a pressure ulcer algorithm tool was developed to demonstrate step-by-step wound management and documentation. From Spring 2003 through Summer 2006, the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers ranged from 0.0% to 18.92%, with a mean of 4.85%. After implementation of the project, the prevalence decreased to 0.0% for 17 of 20 quarters, through 2011. Prevention and a multidisciplinary approach are effective in reducing the occurrence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  7. Clothing Flammability and Burn Injuries: Public Opinion Concerning an Overlooked, Preventable Public Health Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Spivak, Steven M; Pollack, Keshia M; Gielen, Andrea C; Salomon, Michele; Damant, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe knowledge of clothing flammability risk, public support for clothing flammability warning labels, and stronger regulation to reduce the risk. As part of a national survey of homeowners about residential sprinkler systems, the authors included questions about clothing flammability. The authors used an online web panel to sample homeowners and descriptive methods to analyze the resulting data. The sample included 2333 homeowners. Knowledge of clothing flammability and government oversight of clothing flammability risk was low. Homeowners were evenly split about the effectiveness of current standards; however, when presented with clothing-related burn injury and death data, a majority (53%) supported stricter standards. Most homeowners (64%) supported warning labels and indicated that such labels would either have no effect on their purchasing decisions (64%) or be an incentive (24%) to purchase an item. Owners of sprinkler-equipped homes were more likely to support these interventions than owners of homes without sprinkler systems. Public knowledge about clothing flammability risks is low. Most homeowners supported clothing labels to inform consumers of this risk and increased government intervention to reduce the risk.

  8. Approach/avoidance motivation, message framing and skin cancer prevention: a test of the congruency hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevey, David; Dolan, Michelle

    2014-08-01

    The congruency hypothesis posits that approach-orientated individuals are persuaded to engage in prevention behaviours by positively framed messages; conversely, negatively framed messages are more persuasive in encouraging those who are avoidance-orientated. A 2 (frame: loss vs gain) × 2 (motivation: avoidance vs approach) design examined the effects of skin cancer information on sun-protective intentions and free sunscreen sample requests among 533 young adults. Gain-framed messages had the strongest effect on sun-protective intentions for approach-oriented individuals, whereas loss-framed messages had the strongest effect on avoidance-oriented individuals. Message framing effects on precautionary sun behaviour intentions were moderated by motivational differences. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Occupational skin cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawkrodger, D.J. [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Dermatology

    2004-10-01

    Skin cancer due to occupation is more common than is generally recognized, although it is difficult to obtain an accurate estimate of its prevalence. Over the past two centuries, occupational skin cancers have particularly been due to industrial exposure of men (it seems more so than women) to chemical carcinogens such as polycyclic hydrocarbons (e.g. from coal tar products) or to arsenic. Industrial processes have improved in most Western countries to limit this type of exposure, but those with outdoor occupations are still exposed to solar ultraviolet irradiation without this being widely recognized as an industrial hazard. Ionizing radiation such as X-rays can also cause skin cancer. Occupational skin cancers often resemble skin tumours found in non-occupational subjects, e.g. basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, but some pre-malignant lesions can be more specific and point to an occupational origin, e.g. tar keratoses or arsenical keratoses. An uncommon but well-recognized cause of occupational skin cancer is that which results from scar formation following an industrial burn. In the future it will be necessary to focus on preventative measures, e.g. for outdoor workers, the need to cover up in the sun and use sun protective creams and a campaign for earlier recognition of skin cancers, which are usually curable if treated in their early stages.

  10. CLINICAL STUDY OF ELECTRICAL BURNS AMONG ALL BURNS CASES- 3 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabathula Durga Prasad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND With the advances in technology, electrical injuries are becoming more common and are the leading cause of work-related traumatic death. One third of all electrical traumas and most high-voltage injuries are job related and more than 50% of these injuries result from power line contact. The management of the major burn injury represents a significant challenge to every member of the burns team. Most of electrical burns present with gangrene of toes and limbs with eschar over body parts. Their presentation is mostly due to contact with high-voltage electricity at their work places. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was made to study the clinico-social profile of patients suffering electric burns admitted into Department of General Surgery. RESULTS 92 cases were evaluated and studied. Majority of patients developed gangrene of limbs and toes. Amputations and skin grafting was done. Most patients who suffered electric burns were males of age group 21 to 40 years. All cases are accidental and mostly occurred at work places. Most electric burns are high-voltage based and caused deep burns. Major complications like acute renal failure and septicaemia were encountered. Most of them suffered 16 to 30% burns. Most commonly isolated organism from wounds is pseudomonas. Most of them suffered a hospital stay of 1 to 2 months. CONCLUSION Electric burns are a burden to the society. Prevention is the best way to deal with them. Electricity-based employees have to be trained properly regarding safety measures to be taken. General education of public regarding safety measures can prevent electrical burn injuries.

  11. The relevance of piroxicam for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer and its precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campione E

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Elena Campione,1 Evelin Jasmine Paternò,2 Eleonora Candi,3,4 Mattia Falconi,5 Gaetana Costanza,2 Laura Diluvio,1 Alessandro Terrinoni,4 Luca Bianchi,1 Augusto Orlandi2,6,7 1Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, 3Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 4Biochemistry Laboratory IDI-IRCCS, Faculty of Medicine, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 5Department of Biology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 6Institute of Anatomic Pathology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 7Tor Vergata University-Policlinic of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: Piroxicam (PXM, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is an enolic benzothiazine and a potent member of the oxicam series. The drug suppresses the synthesis of proinflammatory enzymes, such as cyclooxygenases-1 and -2 (COX-1 and 2, downregulates the production of prostaglandins (PGs and tromboxanes, and inhibits polyamines production by blocking ornithine decarboxylase induction involved in nonmelanoma skin carcinogenesis. In addition, PXM is able to induce tumor cell apoptosis and suppresses metalloproteinase 2 activities. Skin carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which the accumulation of genetic events leads to a gradually dysplastic cellular expression, deregulation of cell growth, and carcinomatous progression. COX-1 upregulation plays a significant role in PG and vascular epidermal growth factor production supporting tumor growth. Increased level of PGs in premalignant and/or malignant cutaneous tumors is also favored by upregulation of COX-2 and downregulation of the tumor suppressor gene 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase. Chemoprevention can be a hopeful approach to inhibit carcinoma occurrence before an invasive tumor develops. The chemopreventive effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on nonmelanoma skin cancers has been established. In this study, we highlighted the different modalities of action

  12. Skin graft - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100100.htm Skin graft - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... entire body, and acts as a protective barrier. Skin grafts may be recommended for: Extensive wounds Burns Specific ...

  13. Regorafenib-associated hand-foot skin reaction: practical advice on diagnosis, prevention, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, B; Ciardiello, F; Lacouture, M E; Segaert, S; Van Cutsem, E

    2015-10-01

    Regorafenib is an orally available, small-molecule multikinase inhibitor with international marketing authorizations for use in colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In clinical trials, regorafenib showed a consistent and predictable adverse-event profile, with hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) among the most clinically significant toxicities. This review summarizes the clinical characteristics of regorafenib-related HFSR and provides practical advice on HFSR management to enable health care professionals to recognize, pre-empt, and effectively manage the symptoms, thereby allowing patients to remain on active therapy for as long as possible. This review is based on a systematic literature search of the PubMed database (using synonyms of HFSR, regorafenib, and skin toxicities associated with targeted therapies or cytotoxic chemotherapy). However, as this search identified very few articles, the authors also use their clinical experience as oncologists and dermatologists managing patients with treatment-related HFSR to provide recommendations on recognition and management of HFSR in regorafenib-treated patients. Regorafenib-related HFSR is similar to that seen with other multikinase inhibitors (e.g. sorafenib, sunitinib, cabozantinib, axitinib, and pazopanib) but differs from the hand-foot syndrome seen with cytotoxic chemotherapies (e.g. fluoropyrimidines, anthracyclines, and taxanes). There have been no controlled trials of symptomatic management of regorafenib-related HFSR, and limited good-quality evidence from randomized clinical trials of effective interventions for HFSR associated with other targeted therapies. Recommendations on prevention and management of regorafenib-related HFSR in this review are therefore based on the expert opinion of the authors (dermatologists and oncologists with expertise in the management of treatment-related skin toxicities and oncologists involved in clinical trials of regorafenib) and tried-and-tested empirical

  14. Regorafenib-associated hand–foot skin reaction: practical advice on diagnosis, prevention, and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, B.; Ciardiello, F.; Lacouture, M. E.; Segaert, S.; Van Cutsem, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Regorafenib is an orally available, small-molecule multikinase inhibitor with international marketing authorizations for use in colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In clinical trials, regorafenib showed a consistent and predictable adverse-event profile, with hand–foot skin reaction (HFSR) among the most clinically significant toxicities. This review summarizes the clinical characteristics of regorafenib-related HFSR and provides practical advice on HFSR management to enable health care professionals to recognize, pre-empt, and effectively manage the symptoms, thereby allowing patients to remain on active therapy for as long as possible. Design This review is based on a systematic literature search of the PubMed database (using synonyms of HFSR, regorafenib, and skin toxicities associated with targeted therapies or cytotoxic chemotherapy). However, as this search identified very few articles, the authors also use their clinical experience as oncologists and dermatologists managing patients with treatment-related HFSR to provide recommendations on recognition and management of HFSR in regorafenib-treated patients. Results Regorafenib-related HFSR is similar to that seen with other multikinase inhibitors (e.g. sorafenib, sunitinib, cabozantinib, axitinib, and pazopanib) but differs from the hand–foot syndrome seen with cytotoxic chemotherapies (e.g. fluoropyrimidines, anthracyclines, and taxanes). There have been no controlled trials of symptomatic management of regorafenib-related HFSR, and limited good-quality evidence from randomized clinical trials of effective interventions for HFSR associated with other targeted therapies. Recommendations on prevention and management of regorafenib-related HFSR in this review are therefore based on the expert opinion of the authors (dermatologists and oncologists with expertise in the management of treatment-related skin toxicities and oncologists involved in clinical trials of regorafenib) and

  15. A burn prevention program as a long-term investment: trends in burn injuries among Jews and Bedouin children in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, E; Bahar-Fuchs, S A; Abu-Hammad, I; Friger, M; Rosenberg, L

    2000-03-01

    In order to broaden our long-term intervention efforts in elementary schools in Israel (underway since 1988) and to set priorities for further population-specific actions, we compared the pattern of burn injuries among two age groups (0-4; 5-14) of two ethnic groups of Jews and Bedouins admitted to a regional hospital between 1986 and 1995 (n = 1050). The findings indicated a significant downward trend, though somewhat nonlinear, in burn admissions among the older age groups. A relatively less favorable trend was observed for the younger age groups. Consistently across years, burn rates in the younger group of Bedouin children were the highest. For the 10-year period, a significant season by ethnic group variation in burn admissions was observed, with a peak in the spring and in the wintertime for the Jews and Bedouins, respectively. A significant trend of decrease, mostly among older children, in average lengths of hospital stay, was also evident. Yet, regardless of age group and across years, Bedouin children stayed longer in the hospital than Jewish children. The overall leading causes of injury (for 1992-1995) were hot liquids (69%), fire (17%), chemicals (9.5%) and contact (2%). In our view, there is a need to address at-risk populations through environmental, community and family-oriented interventions and to venture beyond the pathogenic factors to the investigation of the salutary factors of health under diverse life conditions.

  16. Comparative study of Silver Sulfadiazine with other materials for healing and infection prevention in burns: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nímia, Heloisa Helena; Carvalho, Viviane Fernandes; Isaac, Cesar; Souza, Francisley Ávila; Gemperli, Rolf; Paggiaro, André Oliveira

    2018-06-11

    The aim of this systematic review with meta-analysis was to compare the effect of Silver Sulfadiazine (SSD) with other new dressings, with or without silver, on healing and infection prevention in burns. The electronic search was carried out in the electronic databases of Pubmed, ScienceDirect, Lilacs and BVS. The articles included were randomized clinical trials about burn treatment with SSD, which evaluated the healing and infection of burn wounds in humans. The exclusion criteria included articles, editorials and letters published in the form of abstracts, unpublished reports and case series, cross-sectional, observational experimental studies, and the use of sulfadiazine for other types of wounds. The search identified 873 references, and 24 studies were included in accordance with the eligibility criteria. The results showed a statistically favorable difference related to the time of healing for silver dressings (p0.05). The rate of infection was significantly higher in the SSD group compared with the group treated with dressings without silver (p<0.005; MD 25.29% and MD 12.97%). Considering the clinical trials conducted up to the present time, the authors concluded that new dressings with and without silver show better results than SSD for wound healing, and burns treated with dressings without silver are less likely to become infected than burns with SSD. No differences between SSD and new silver materials were observed in relation to infection prevention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Educational Activities for Rural and Urban Students to Prevent Skin Cancer in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasques, Kelle; Michels, Luana Roberta; Colome, Leticia Marques; Haas, Sandra Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Excessive exposure to the sun during childhood is strongly associated with the development of skin cancer in the future. The only way to prevent the development of skin cancer is to protect against ultraviolet radiation, which can be achieved through strategic awareness during childhood and adolescence. The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of educational activities for rural and urban students to promote the use of sunscreens and prevent skin cancer. This study was carried out with students (9-12 years) of rural (n=70) and urban (n=70) schools in Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. The educational interventions were lectures and games. The impact of this strategy was evaluated through the application of a questionnaire before and after the interventions. Before the intervention, it was found around 50% of rural and urban students were not aware of the damage caused by sun exposure, often exposing themselves to UV radiation without use sunscreen ( ~ 25 %) and at the most critical times of the day/year. After the lectures we observed an improvement in the behavior of the students with regard to sun exposure and knowledge about skin cancer. The results of this study emphasize the importance of prevention strategies for skin cancer and promoting the use of sunscreens based educational strategies. The interventions were of great value in relation to disseminating knowledge on the subject.

  18. Skin cancer beliefs, knowledge, and prevention practices: a comparison of farmers and nonfarmers in a midwestern population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Alexandra; Stratman, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Farmers have substantial sun exposure and increased skin cancer risk but poor sun protection practices. There are few studies regarding the underlying factors that contribute to inadequate skin cancer prevention practices in the farming population, and minimal data to guide skin cancer awareness and educational interventions for this population. The purpose of this study was to assess skin cancer knowledge, sun protection behaviors and barriers, health care information sources, and the impact of skin cancer screening among midwestern farmers and nonfarmers. Individuals attending a free skin cancer screening during 2011 Wisconsin Farm Technology Days were surveyed for self-reported sun protection use, extent of sun exposure, and skin cancer and sun protection beliefs and knowledge. A total of 476 individuals participated in the study, including 194 farmers. Although farmers identified sun protection benefits, few reported optimal practices, with only 23% of farmers reporting sunscreen use always or frequently when out in the sun for 15 minutes or more. Common barriers to sun protection included discomfort with wearing long pants and long shirts, forgetfulness with sunscreen use, and inconvenience with wearing wide-brimmed hats. Higher knowledge scores in farmers were associated with better sun protection. Farmers utilized different sources of health care information compared with nonfarmers, including farm magazines and newspapers, radio, and farm organizations. Providers should consider the unique characteristics of the farming population to provide skin cancer prevention education that is tailored to the needs of this population, such as reminders for sunscreen use and resources for sun-protective hats that do not interfere with work. Among individuals without prior history of skin cancer, 34% of farmers and 22% of nonfarmers (P = .0127) were referred for additional evaluation due to identification of a concerning lesion at the screening event. Thus, farmers may

  19. Managing Occupational Irritant Contact Dermatitis Using a Two-Step Skincare Regimen Designed to Prevent Skin Damage and Support Skin Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Grote, Erika C; Palaniswarmy, Kiruthi; Meckfessel, Matthew H

    2016-12-01

    Occupational irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) affecting the hands is a common and difficult-to-manage condition. Occupations that necessitate contact with harsh chemicals, use of alcohol-based disinfectants, and frequent hand washing elevate the risk of ICD. Management strategies that do not adequately prevent accumulated damage and repair skin, can develop into chronic dermatoses which negatively impact work productivity and quality of life. A 2-step skin-care regimen (Excipial Daily Protection Hand Cream (EP) and Excipial Rapid Repair Hand Cream (ER), Galderma Laboratories, L.P.) has been developed as a daily-use management strategy to protect and repair vulnerable hands. The protective barrier cream is formulated with aluminum chlorohydrate and designed for pre-exposure application to enhance the skin's natural protective barrier and minimize excessive moisture while wearing protective gloves. The repair cream, a lipid-rich formulation, is intended for post-exposure application to rehydrate and facilitate the skin's natural healing process. The results of 3 clinical studies highlighted in this review demonstrate how the use of a 2-step skin-care regimen offers a greater protective effect against ICD than the use of barrier cream alone, and also how the formulation of the barrier cream used in these studies helps minimize the occlusion effect caused by gloves and does not interfere with the antibacterial efficacy of an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. This 2-step skin-care regimen is effectively designed to manage and minimize the risk of ICD development in a variety of patients and provides clinicians an additional tool for helping patients manage ICD. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(12):1504-1510.

  20. A modern method of treatment: The role of silver dressings in promoting healing and preventing pathological scarring in patients with burn wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, A; Florescu, IP; Nitescu, C

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds are a global public health problem, which affects all countries, no matter the development stage and occurs in all age groups, from toddlers to elderly. In spite of burns being the cause of numerous household and work accidents, there are still no clear stated unanimous rules for their treatment. Every day new products appear on the market, each of them trying to prove more effective. Since ancient times, silver has been known for its antimicrobial properties, so it has been used for a long time in the treatment of burns and other types of wounds. One of the relatively modern methods of treatment is applying silver sheets on the scald lesions. In this paper, which was part of a larger study (research for a PhD thesis), concerning prevention and treatment of the post-burn pathological scars, the cases of some patients with burns, who were treated by using the above mentioned method were presented and analyzed. The results obtained by applying silver sheets were then commented and interpreted, pointing out the advantages and disadvantages compared to silver sulfadiazine creams and ointments, which have already been used at a large scale. The prevention and treatment of post-burn pathological (hypertrophic and keloid) scars is a field in which still little is known and in which there are also no clearly set therapy plans. We hope that through this research and the following ones we will manage to establish some major guidelines concerning the prevention of pathological scars, which are not only disabling, but also a major aesthetic issue for any patient, in order to obtain better outcomes. PMID:27974941

  1. Detection of lumpy skin disease virus in skin lesions, blood, nasal swabs and milk following preventive vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedeković, T; Šimić, I; Krešić, N; Lojkić, I

    2018-04-01

    Lumpy skin disease caused by Capripoxvirus is at the moment the most important threat to European cattle industry. The only way for successful control of disease is fast and efficient diagnosis and vaccination. According to EU legislation, vaccination against LDS can be conducted only after confirmation of the disease. Croatia has a special position regarding LSD-in 2016, for the first-time vaccination of the entire cattle population was conducted without an index case. The presence of vaccine viral particles was detected in milk, skin nodules, blood and nasal swabs in seven from total of eight herds. The presence of virus genome was detected in five cows from 10 up to 21-day post-vaccination. The virus was successfully isolated on cell culture from 10 up to 21-day post-vaccination from three animals. The obtained results support the need for further efforts to develop safer vaccines against LSDV. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Descriptive analysis of articles and advertisements pertaining to skin cancer prevention in 2 popular US parenting magazines, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Basch, Charles E

    2013-04-04

    Magazines focused on parenting are popular in the United States, and parents may use them to guide decisions about the health of their children. We analyzed issues of 2 popular parenting magazines published in the past 11 years during the months of peak ultraviolet radiation exposure for content related to sun protection and for advertisements for skin products that did and did not contain sun protection factor. Only 24 of 2,594 articles addressed the topic of sun protection for skin cancer prevention. Although advertising is pervasive in these magazines, the extent to which such advertising focuses on products with sun protection factor was low. These findings suggest that parenting magazines can do more to assist parents in making informed decisions about preventing skin cancer risk among youth.

  3. Descriptive Analysis of Articles and Advertisements Pertaining to Skin Cancer Prevention in 2 Popular US Parenting Magazines, 2000–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Basch, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Magazines focused on parenting are popular in the United States, and parents may use them to guide decisions about the health of their children. We analyzed issues of 2 popular parenting magazines published in the past 11 years during the months of peak ultraviolet radiation exposure for content related to sun protection and for advertisements for skin products that did and did not contain sun protection factor. Only 24 of 2,594 articles addressed the topic of sun protection for skin cancer prevention. Although advertising is pervasive in these magazines, the extent to which such advertising focuses on products with sun protection factor was low. These findings suggest that parenting magazines can do more to assist parents in making informed decisions about preventing skin cancer risk among youth. PMID:23557639

  4. Human skin equivalents to study the prevention and treatment of wound infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, I.

    2018-01-01

    Infection of burn wounds remains the leading cause of death in burn patients. Topical treatment of such infections with conventional antibiotics is often unsuccessful due to the presence of drug-resistant bacteria and/or to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Taken together there is a clear

  5. Treatment of silymarin, a plant flavonoid, prevents ultraviolet light-induced immune suppression and oxidative stress in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2002-12-01

    It is well documented that ultraviolet (UV) light-induced immune suppression and oxidative stress play an important role in the induction of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of silymarin, a plant flavonoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn.), to mouse skin prevents photocarcinogenesis, but the preventive mechanism of photocarcinogenesis in vivo animal system by silymarin is not well defined and understood. To define the mechanism of prevention, we employed immunostaining, analytical assays and ELISA which revealed that topical treatment of silymarin (1 mg/cm2 skin area) to C3H/HeN mice inhibits UVB (90 mJ/cm2)-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response to contact sensitizer dinitrofluorobenzene. Prevention of UVB-induced suppression of CHS by silymarin was found to be associated with the inhibition of infiltrating leukocytes, particularly CD11b+ cell type, and myeloperoxidase activity (50-71%). Silymarin treatment also resulted in significant reduction of UVB-induced immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 producing cells and its production (58-72%, pskin cancer risk human population and ii) development of sunscreen containing silymarin as an antioxidant (chemopreventive agent) or silymarin can be supplemented in skin care products.

  6. Evaluation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infection prevention strategies at a military training center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Stephanie M; Blaesing, Carl R; Millar, Eugene V; Chukwuma, Uzo; Schlett, Carey D; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Tribble, David R; Ellis, Michael W

    2013-08-01

    Military trainees are at high risk for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A multicomponent hygiene-based SSTI prevention strategy was implemented at a military training center. After implementation, we observed 30% and 64% reductions in overall and MRSA-associated SSTI rates, respectively.

  7. Non-rinse skin cleansers: the way forward in preventing incontinence related moisture lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, F J; Begg, P A

    2016-05-01

    The use of non-rinse skin cleansers in the care of patients who are at risk of tissue breakdown is not new within the National Health Service (NHS). Back to the Floor Continence Care Rounds (introduced in 2012 to facilitate bedside continence care education) at University Hospitals Birmingham had identified that in the current climate of austerity and efficiency savings, the use of non-rinse cleanser was being randomly rationed. Our objective was to determine whether the introduction of a smaller tube of non-rinse cleanser with targeted education would improve usage and ultimately improve the skin of incontinent patients. There were five clinical areas randomised into two groups. In group 1 three clinical areas were provided with targeted education and new sizes of tubes of non-rinse skin cleanser. In group 2, the two remaining clinical areas acted as control groups, one receiving targeted education only and the remaining had no education or new sized tubes. The incidence of incontinence associated moisture lesions from each clinical area was monitored for 13 weeks pre and post study period. The in-depth study undertaken at University Hospitals Birmingham, over a 6-month period, confirmed a trend in staff committing to the ethos of prudency, and in turn compromising the use of the most effective treatment and prevention of incontinence associated moisture lesions. The ability of the Trust staff to recognise and respond to a change in practice and the responsiveness of a commercial provider to the proposed new methodology has resulted in a significant reduction in incontinence associated moisture lesions across the trust. The clinical areas included in the study demonstrated a 70-76.9% reduction in moisture lesion incidence compared to an 8.3-13.6% reduction in the control groups. The results strongly suggest that a reduction in incontinence associated moisture lesions can be achieved by a simple change in nursing regime. The combination of solid education provision

  8. The Study of Factors Relevant to Skin Cancer Preventive Behavior in Female High School Students in Yazd Based on Protection Motivation Theory

    OpenAIRE

    mohammad hosein baghiyanimoghadam; soheila mohammadi; mohammad taghi norbala; seed saeed mazlomi

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Skin cancer is the most prevalent type of cancer in Yazd, and childhood and adolescence are particularly important time for preventing later skin cancer risk. The goal of this study is to assess the factors relevant to skin cancer preventive behavior in female high school students in Yazd based on protection motivation theory. Methods: Participants in this cross- sectional study were 360 female students from 4 high schools in Yazd. Data were gathered through a self- report quest...

  9. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  10. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-01-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6 . The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2 . The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  11. Protect the Ones You Love: Burns Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Search The CDC Protect the Ones You Love: Child Injuries are Preventable Note: Javascript is disabled ... ways you can help protect the children you love from burns. Key Prevention Tips To prevent burns ...

  12. Lipopolysaccharide O-antigen prevents phagocytosis of Vibrio anguillarum by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss skin epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Lindell

    Full Text Available Colonization of host tissues is a first step taken by many pathogens during the initial stages of infection. Despite the impact of bacterial disease on wild and farmed fish, only a few direct studies have characterized bacterial factors required for colonization of fish tissues. In this study, using live-cell and confocal microscopy, rainbow trout skin epithelial cells, the main structural component of the skin epidermis, were demonstrated to phagocytize bacteria. Mutant analyses showed that the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum required the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to evade phagocytosis and that O-antigen transport required the putative wzm-wzt-wbhA operon, which encodes two ABC polysaccharide transporter proteins and a methyltransferase. Pretreatment of the epithelial cells with mannose prevented phagocytosis of V. anguillarum suggesting that a mannose receptor is involved in the uptake process. In addition, the O-antigen transport mutants could not colonize the skin but they did colonize the intestines of rainbow trout. The O-antigen polysaccharides were also shown to aid resistance to the antimicrobial factors, lysozyme and polymyxin B. In summary, rainbow trout skin epithelial cells play a role in the fish innate immunity by clearing bacteria from the skin epidermis. In defense, V. anguillarum utilizes O-antigen polysaccharides to evade phagocytosis by the epithelial cells allowing it to colonize rapidly fish skin tissues.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Prevents Phagocytosis of Vibrio anguillarum by Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindell, Kristoffer; Fahlgren, Anna; Hjerde, Erik; Willassen, Nils-Peder; Fällman, Maria; Milton, Debra L.

    2012-01-01

    Colonization of host tissues is a first step taken by many pathogens during the initial stages of infection. Despite the impact of bacterial disease on wild and farmed fish, only a few direct studies have characterized bacterial factors required for colonization of fish tissues. In this study, using live-cell and confocal microscopy, rainbow trout skin epithelial cells, the main structural component of the skin epidermis, were demonstrated to phagocytize bacteria. Mutant analyses showed that the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum required the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to evade phagocytosis and that O-antigen transport required the putative wzm-wzt-wbhA operon, which encodes two ABC polysaccharide transporter proteins and a methyltransferase. Pretreatment of the epithelial cells with mannose prevented phagocytosis of V. anguillarum suggesting that a mannose receptor is involved in the uptake process. In addition, the O-antigen transport mutants could not colonize the skin but they did colonize the intestines of rainbow trout. The O-antigen polysaccharides were also shown to aid resistance to the antimicrobial factors, lysozyme and polymyxin B. In summary, rainbow trout skin epithelial cells play a role in the fish innate immunity by clearing bacteria from the skin epidermis. In defense, V. anguillarum utilizes O-antigen polysaccharides to evade phagocytosis by the epithelial cells allowing it to colonize rapidly fish skin tissues. PMID:22662189

  14. [Currently available skin substitutes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravcová, Darina; Koller, Ján

    2014-01-01

    The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. Autologous split or full-thickness skin graft are the best definitive burn wound coverage, but it is constrained by the limited available sources, especially in major burns. Donor site morbidities in term of additional wounds and scarring are also of concern of the autograft application. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. This paper reviews currently available skin substitutes, produced in not for-profit skin banks as well as commercially available. They are divided according to type of material included, as biological, biosynthetic and synthetic and named respectively.

  15. Multifactorial skin barrier deficiency and atopic dermatitis: Essential topics to prevent the atopic march.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Gyohei; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease in the industrialized world and has multiple causes. Over the past decade, data from both experimental models and patients have highlighted the primary pathogenic role of skin barrier deficiency in patients with AD. Increased access of environmental agents into the skin results in chronic inflammation and contributes to the systemic "atopic (allergic) march." In addition, persistent skin inflammation further attenuates skin barrier function, resulting in a positive feedback loop between the skin epithelium and the immune system that drives pathology. Understanding the mechanisms of skin barrier maintenance is essential for improving management of AD and limiting downstream atopic manifestations. In this article we review the latest developments in our understanding of the pathomechanisms of skin barrier deficiency, with a particular focus on the formation of the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, which contributes significantly to skin barrier function. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Burns and military clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  17. Initial evaluation and management of the critical burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivó, C; Galeiras, R; del Caz, Ma D P

    2016-01-01

    The major improvement in burn therapy is likely to focus on the early management of hemodynamic and respiratory failures in combination with an aggressive and early surgical excision and skin grafting for full-thickness burns. Immediate burn care by first care providers is important and can vastly alter outcomes, and it can significantly limit burn progression and depth. The goal of prehospital care should be to cease the burning process as well as prevent future complications and secondary injuries for burn shock. Identifying burn patients appropriate for immediate or subacute transfer is an important step in reducing morbidity and mortality. Delays in transport to Burn Unit should be minimized. The emergency management follows the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support Guidelines for assessment and stabilization of airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure and environment control. All patients with suspected inhalation injury must be removed from the enclosure as soon as possible, and immediately administer high-flow oxygen. Any patient with stridor, shortness of breath, facial burns, singed nasal hairs, cough, soot in the oral cavity, and history of being in a fire in an enclosed space should be strongly considered for early intubation. Fibroscopy may also be useful if airway damage is suspected and to assess known lung damage. Secondary evaluation following admission to the Burn Unit of a burned patient suffering a severe thermal injury includes continuation of respiratory support and management and treatment of inhalation injury, fluid resuscitation and cardiovascular stabilization, pain control and management of burn wound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  18. Effectiveness of an employee skin cancer screening program for secondary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Ugur; Hees, Felix; Winnik, Eva; Uter, Wolfgang; Sticherling, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Incidences of UV-induced skin cancer are continuously increasing. For this reason, early diagnosis is becoming more important. In this study, 783 employees of a technical company participated in an employee skin cancer screening program, which consisted of a physical examination for benign and malignant skin lesions and premalignant conditions. To ensure the quality of the examinations, screening was only performed by 5 trained dermatologists. Participants also were asked to complete a standardized questionnaire prior to examination. A total of 661 skin lesions were diagnosed among 48% of participants; 12.8% of participants exhibited 50 or more melanocytic nevi and the risk for developing skin cancer was categorized as at least moderate for 64.9%. Additionally, 84.4% of participants with at least 1 skin lesion were advised to have a checkup within 1 year. The high rate of suspicious nevi detected in this study suggested that employee skin cancer screening programs are effective and also should be recommended at companies where employees are not at increased risk for developing skin cancer due to the nature of their work (eg, those who work outdoors). Despite the comparatively selective and young study population, these examinations provide evidence of the importance of skin cancer screening for the wider population.

  19. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of skin cancer. Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about skin cancer: Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Genetics ...

  20. Resveratrol Prevents High Fluence Red Light-Emitting Diode Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Photoinhibition of Human Skin Fibroblast Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mamalis

    Full Text Available Skin fibrosis is a significant medical problem that leads to a functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial impact on quality-of-life. Light-emitting diode-generated 633-nm red light (LED-RL is part of the visible light spectrum that is not known to cause DNA damage and is considered a safe, non-invasive, inexpensive, and portable potential alternative to ultraviolet phototherapy that may change the treatment paradigm of fibrotic skin disease.The goal of our study was to investigate the how reactive oxygen species (ROS free radicals generated by high fluence LED-RL inhibit the migration of skin fibroblasts, the main cell type involved in skin fibrosis. Fibroblast migration speed is increased in skin fibrosis, and we studied cellular migration speed of cultured human skin fibroblasts as a surrogate measure of high fluence LED-RL effect on fibroblast function. To ascertain the inhibitory role of LED-RL generated ROS on migration speed, we hypothesized that resveratrol, a potent antioxidant, could prevent the photoinhibitory effects of high fluence LED-RL on fibroblast migration speed.High fluence LED-RL generated ROS were measured by flow cytometry analysis using dihydrorhodamine (DHR. For purposes of comparison, we assessed the effects of ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on fibroblast migration speed and the ability of resveratrol, a well known antioxidant, to prevent LED-RL and H2O2 generated ROS-associated changes in fibroblast migration speed. To determine whether resveratrol could prevent the high fluence LED-RL ROS-mediated photoinhibition of human skin fibroblast migration, treated cells were incubated with resveratrol at concentrations of 0.0001% and 0.001% for 24 hours, irradiated with high fluences LED-RL of 480, 640, and 800 J/cm2.High fluence LED-RL increases intracellular fibroblast ROS and decreases fibroblast migration speed. LED-RL at 480, 640 and 800 J/cm2 increased ROS levels to 132.8%, 151.0%, and 158.4% relative to matched

  1. Tourniquet associated chemical burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyuk Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical burn under pneumatic tourniquet is an iatrogenic preventable injury and is rarely reported in the literature. The two important mechanisms are maceration (friction and wetness underneath the tourniquent. In this report, our experience with two illustrative patients who presented with iatrogenic tourniquet associated burn is described.

  2. Skin preparation with alcohol versus alcohol followed by any antiseptic for preventing bacteraemia or contamination of blood for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Bell-Syer, Sally E M; Foxlee, Ruth

    2015-02-12

    Blood for transfusion may become contaminated at any point between collection and transfusion and may result in bacteraemia (the presence of bacteria in the blood), severe illness or even death for the blood recipient. Donor arm skin is one potential source of blood contamination, so it is usual to cleanse the skin with an antiseptic before blood donation. One-step and two-step alcohol based antiseptic regimens are both commonly advocated but there is uncertainty as to which is most effective. To assess the effects of cleansing the skin of blood donors with alcohol in a one-step compared with alcohol in a two-step procedure to prevent contamination of collected blood or bacteraemia in the recipient. In December 2014, for this third update, we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library; Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. All randomised trials (RCTs) comparing alcohol based donor skin cleansing in a one-step versus a two-step process that includes alcohol and any other antiseptic for pre-venepuncture skin cleansing were considered. Quasi randomised trials were to have been considered in the absence of RCTs. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion. No studies (RCTs or quasi RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. We did not identify any eligible studies for inclusion in this review. It is therefore unclear whether a two-step, alcohol followed by antiseptic skin cleansing process prior to blood donation confers any reduction in the risk of blood contamination or bacteraemia in blood recipients, or conversely whether a one-step process increases risk above that associated with a two-step process.

  3. Skin Cancer Knowledge, Beliefs, Self-Efficacy, and Preventative Behaviors among North Mississippi Landscapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak K. Nahar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are slightly over one million workers in the landscape service industry in the US. These workers have potential for high levels of solar ultraviolet radiation exposure, increasing their risk of skin cancer. A cross-sectional sample of 109 landscapers completed a self-administered questionnaire based on Health Belief Model (HBM. The participants correctly answered 67.1% of the knowledge questions, 69.7% believed they were more likely than the average person to get skin cancer, and 87.2% perceived skin cancer as a severe disease. Participants believed that the use of wide-brimmed hats, long sleeved shirts/long pants, and sunscreen was beneficial but reported low usage of these and other sun protective strategies. The primary barriers to using sun protection were “I forget to wear it” and “it is too hot to wear.” Of the HBM variables, perceived benefits outweighing perceived barrier (, and self-efficacy (, were correlated with sun protection behaviors. The reasons for absence of the relationship between perceived skin cancer threat and sun protection behaviors could be lack of skin cancer knowledge and low rate of personal skin cancer history.

  4. American Burn Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... burn-related care, prevention, education, and research. Our multidisciplinary membership enhances our ability to work toward common goals with other organizations and educational programs. Membership Being a member of ...

  5. Prevention of skin cancer in primary healthcare: an evaluation of three different prevention effort levels and the applicability of a phototest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Magnus; Anderson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The high skin cancer incidence in western society, and its known association with sun exposure habits, makes the area an important target for prevention. We investigated, in a primary healthcare setting, differentiated levels of prevention efforts directed at the propensity of the patient to change his/her sun habits, sun protection behaviour, and attitudes, after information intervention. Additionally, the impact of the performance of a phototest to determine individual sun sensitivity was evaluated. 308 patients visiting a primary healthcare centre in southern Sweden completed a questionnaire concerning sun habits, sun protection behaviour, and attitudes, and were randomized into one of three groups, representing increasing levels of prevention effort in terms of resources. Feedback on their questionnaire and general preventive sun protection advice was given, in the first group by means of a letter, and in the second and third groups by a doctor's consultation. Group 3 also underwent a phototest, with a self-reading assessment and a written follow-up of the phototest result. Change of sun habits, behaviour, and attitudes, based on the Transtheoretical Model of Behaviour Change and on Likert scale scorings, was evaluated after 6 months, by a repeated questionnaire. Prevention mediated by a doctor's consultation had a clearly better impact on the subjects. The addition of a phototest did not further reinforce this effect in the group as a whole, but it did for a subgroup of individuals with high ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity, as determined by the phototest itself, suggesting that this might actually be a tool to improve outcome in this high-risk group. A personal doctor's consultation is a valuable tool in the effective delivery of preventive information in the general practice setting. In individuals with high UV-sensitivity and thus high risk for skin cancer the performance of a photo-test reinforces a positive outcome in habits, behaviour and attitudes.

  6. Use of UV-protective windows and window films to aid in the prevention of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Cox, Mary Jude; Becker, Daniel G; Horowitz, Jed H; Nichter, Larry S; Britt, L D; Long, William B; Edlic, Elizabeth C

    2004-01-01

    People are exposed to ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation throughout their daily routine, intentionally and unintentionally. Cumulative and excessive exposure to UV radiation is the behavioral cause to skin cancers, skin damage, premature skin aging, and sun-related eye disorders. More than one million new cases of skin cancer were diagnosed in the United States this year. UV radiates directly and diffusely scattered by the various environmental and atmospheric conditions and has access to the skin from all directions. Because of this diffuse UV radiation, a person situated under a covering, such as the roof of a car or house, is not completely protected from the sun's rays. Because shade structures do not protect effectively against UV radiation, there have been major advances in photoprotection of glass by the development of specially designed photoprotective windows and films. It is the purpose of this collective review to highlight the photoprotective windows and films that should be incorporated into residential, commercial, and school glass windows to reduce sun exposure. Low-emittence (low-E) coatings are microscopically thin, virtually invisible, metal or metallic oxide layers deposited on a window or skylight glazing surface to reduce the U-factor by suppressing radiative heat flow as well as to limit UV radiation. The exclusive Thermaflect coating uses the most advanced, double-layer soft coat technology to continue to deliver top performance for UV protection as well as prevent heat loss in the home. This product blocks 87% of UV radiation and has an Energy Star certification in all climate zones. Tints and films have been another important advance in glass photoprotection, especially in automobiles. Quality widow film products are high-tech laminates of polyester and metallized coatings bonded by distortion-free adhesives. The International Window Film Association provides members with accreditation in solar control films, safety films, and

  7. Candesartan restores pressure-induced vasodilation and prevents skin pressure ulcer formation in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danigo, Aurore; Nasser, Mohamad; Bessaguet, Flavien; Javellaud, James; Oudart, Nicole; Achard, Jean-Michel; Demiot, Claire

    2015-02-18

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blockers have beneficial effects on neurovascular complications in diabetes and in organ's protection against ischemic episodes. The present study examines whether the AT1R blocker candesartan (1) has a beneficial effect on diabetes-induced alteration of pressure-induced vasodilation (PIV, a cutaneous physiological neurovascular mechanism which could delay the occurrence of tissue ischemia), and (2) could be protective against skin pressure ulcer formation. Male Swiss mice aged 5-6 weeks were randomly assigned to four experimental groups. In two groups, diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg.kg(-1)). After 6 weeks, control and STZ mice received either no treatment or candesartan (1 mg/kg-daily in drinking water) during 2 weeks. At the end of treatment (8 weeks of diabetes duration), C-fiber mediated nociception threshold, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PIV were assessed. Pressure ulcers (PUs) were then induced by pinching the dorsal skin between two magnetic plates for three hours. Skin ulcer area development was assessed during three days, and histological examination of the depth of the skin lesion was performed at day three. After 8 weeks of diabetes, the skin neurovascular functions (C-fiber nociception, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PIV) were markedly altered in STZ-treated mice, but were fully restored by treatment with candesartan. Whereas in diabetes mice exposure of the skin to pressure induced wide and deep necrotic lesions, treatment with candersartan restored their ability to resist to pressure-induced ulceration as efficiently as the control mice. Candesartan decreases the vulnerability to pressure-induced ulceration and restores skin neurovascular functions in mice with STZ-induced established diabetes.

  8. Sun’s effect on skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The skin uses sunlight to help manufacture vitamin D, which is important for normal bone formation. But sometimes its ultraviolet light can be ... the pigment melanin. Melanin protects skin from the sun's ultraviolet rays, which can burn the skin, and ...

  9. Light - Instead of UV Protection: New Requirements for Skin Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrow, Leonhard; Lademann, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The requirements on sunscreens have essentially changed, since some years ago it was demonstrated that approximately 50% of free radicals, that are formed in the skin by solar radiation, originate from the visible and infrared regions of the solar spectrum. In addition, a critical radical concentration threshold could be found. If this concentration, the free radical threshold value (FRTV), is exceeded, sunburn, immunosuppression and skin cancer may develop. Application of sunscreens and lotions protects against sunburn in the UV region of the solar spectrum and therefore is frequently used to extend people's stay in the sun. However, this behaviour can enhance the concentration of free radicals formed in the visible and infrared regions of the solar spectrum, so that the critical radical threshold is exceeded and the skin may be damaged. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric Thermal Burns and Treatment: A Review of Progress and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Mathias

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are a devastating critical care problem. In children, burns continue to be a major epidemiologic problem around the globe resulting in significant morbidity and death. Apparently, treating these burn injuries in children and adults remains similar, but there are significant physiological and psychological differences. The dermal layer of the skin is generally thinner in neonates, infants, and children than in adults. Enhanced evaporative loss and need for isotonic fluids increases the risk of hypothermia in the pediatric population. The pain management of the children with major burns challenges the skills of the personnel of every unit. Managing these wounds requires intensive therapeutic treatment for multi-organ dysfunction, and surgical treatment to prevent sepsis and other complications that further delay wound closure. Alternatives to the practice of donor site harvest and autografting for the treatment of severe burns and other complex skin defects are urgently needed for both adult and pediatric populations. This review article focuses on thermal burn pathophysiology and pain management and provides an overview of currently approved products used for the treatment of pediatric burn wounds. A new promising approach has been presented as a first-line therapy in the treatment of burns to reduce surgical autografting in pediatric patients.

  11. Assessment of knowledge of skin cancer prevention and its relation with sun exposure and photo protection amongst gym academy members on the south of Santa Catarina, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabris, Mariana Rocha; Durães, Edson Souza Machado; Martignago, Beatriz Castellar de Faria; Blanco, Luiz Felipe de Oliveira; Fabris, Thiago Rocha

    2012-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most frequent neoplasia in several parts of the world and also in Brazil. There is evidence of an increase in morbidity and mortality from skin cancer. Although the incidence of skin cancer is increasing, it is estimated that 45% of all preventable cancers worldwide are skin neoplasias. Several studies have emphasized the need for campaigns to encourage sun protection. To assess the knowledge about skin cancer prevention and its association with sun exposure and photo protection in gym members. We conducted a cross-sectional, descriptive and quantitative study during January to July 2009, including gym members of both sexes in the city of Criciuma. A self-administered questionnaire was used. The statistical analysis was conducted in a descriptive way in regards to the absolute and relative frequencies of the variables under study. Of the 317 questionnaires studied, 62% were from women and 38% from men. Skin types II and III predominated, and the average age was 27.6 years. 94.3% of the participants reported that they had heard about the risks of sun exposure, mostly in terms of skin cancer risk (80.8%). Most participants, especially women, reported some form of sun protective measure. The population studied, similar to that in other regions of Brazil and the world, is aware of the risks of excessive sun exposure and skin cancer prevention, but has not yet incorporated appropriate sun protection measures into their daily habits.

  12. [Individual prevention of occupational contact dermatitis: protective gloves and skin protection recommendations as part of the patient management scheme by the public statutory employers' liability insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, A; Skudlik, C; Sonsmann, F K

    2018-05-02

    The dermatologist's procedure is a pivotal tool for early recognition of occupational contact dermatitis (OCD), for reporting OCD cases to the statutory accident insurance and for treating the diseases. The employer is in charge of implementing skin protection measures at the workplace. However, in terms of an individual prevention approach it may be necessary to propose targeted skin protection recommendations in specific patient cases. The patient's own skin protection behavior significantly contributes to regenerating and maintaining healthy skin. This behavior includes the use of occupational skin products, and in particular the correct use of appropriately selected protective gloves. Protective gloves are the most important personal protective measure in the prevention of OCD. Prevention services, occupational health and safety specialists, occupational physicians and centers specialized in occupational dermatology can support the identification of suitable protective measures. Nowadays, suitable protective gloves exist for (almost) every occupational activity and exposure. However, improper use in practice can become a risk factor by itself for the skin (e. g., incorrectly used gloves). Therefore, it is of utmost importance to identify application errors, to educate patients in terms of skin protection and to motivate them to perform an appropriate skin protection behavior. With particular focus on protective gloves, this article gives an overview of various types, materials and potentially glove-related allergens, presents strategies for reducing occlusion effects and discusses some typical application errors and solutions.

  13. Cellularized Bilayer Pullulan-Gelatin Hydrogel for Skin Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-05-01

    Skin substitutes significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of patients with burn injuries and chronic wounds. However, current skin substitutes have disadvantages related to high costs and inadequate skin regeneration due to highly inflammatory wounds. Thus, new skin substitutes are needed. By combining two polymers, pullulan, an inexpensive polysaccharide with antioxidant properties, and gelatin, a derivative of collagen with high water absorbency, we created a novel inexpensive hydrogel-named PG-1 for "pullulan-gelatin first generation hydrogel"-suitable for skin substitutes. After incorporating human fibroblasts and keratinocytes onto PG-1 using centrifugation over 5 days, we created a cellularized bilayer skin substitute. Cellularized PG-1 was compared to acellular PG-1 and no hydrogel (control) in vivo in a mouse excisional skin biopsy model using newly developed dome inserts to house the skin substitutes and prevent mouse skin contraction during wound healing. PG-1 had an average pore size of 61.69 μm with an ideal elastic modulus, swelling behavior, and biodegradability for use as a hydrogel for skin substitutes. Excellent skin cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology were visualized through live/dead assays, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation assays, and confocal microscopy. Trichrome and immunohistochemical staining of excisional wounds treated with the cellularized skin substitute revealed thicker newly formed skin with a higher proportion of actively proliferating cells and incorporation of human cells compared to acellular PG-1 or control. Excisional wounds treated with acellular or cellularized hydrogels showed significantly less macrophage infiltration and increased angiogenesis 14 days post skin biopsy compared to control. These results show that PG-1 has ideal mechanical characteristics and allows ideal cellular characteristics. In vivo evidence suggests that cellularized PG-1 promotes skin regeneration and may

  14. 78 FR 47320 - Preventing Skin Cancer Through Reduction of UV Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... radiation and a history of sunburn (indicating both intensity of UV exposure and skin sensitivity to... experiencing one or more sunburns in the past 12 months, and sunburn is even more common among younger adults... sun protection is low, while excessive sun exposure, indoor tanning, and sunburn are common. HHS/CDC...

  15. The relevance of piroxicam for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer and its precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione, Elena; Paternò, Evelin Jasmine; Candi, Eleonora; Falconi, Mattia; Costanza, Gaetana; Diluvio, Laura; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Bianchi, Luca; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Piroxicam (PXM), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is an enolic benzothiazine and a potent member of the oxicam series. The drug suppresses the synthesis of proinflammatory enzymes, such as cyclo-oxygenases-1 and -2 (COX-1 and 2), downregulates the production of prostaglandins (PGs) and tromboxanes, and inhibits polyamines production by blocking ornithine decarboxylase induction involved in nonmelanoma skin carcinogenesis. In addition, PXM is able to induce tumor cell apoptosis and suppresses metalloproteinase 2 activities. Skin carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which the accumulation of genetic events leads to a gradually dysplastic cellular expression, deregulation of cell growth, and carcinomatous progression. COX-1 upregulation plays a significant role in PG and vascular epidermal growth factor production supporting tumor growth. Increased level of PGs in premalignant and/or malignant cutaneous tumors is also favored by upregulation of COX-2 and downregulation of the tumor suppressor gene 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase. Chemoprevention can be a hopeful approach to inhibit carcinoma occurrence before an invasive tumor develops. The chemopreventive effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on nonmelanoma skin cancers has been established. In this study, we highlighted the different modalities of action of PXM on the pathogenesis of nonmelanoma skin cancer, analyzing and evaluating binding modes and energies between COX-1 or COX-2 and PXM by protein-ligand molecular docking. Our clinical experience about the local use of PXM on actinic keratoses and field cancerization is also reported, confirming its efficacy as target therapy.

  16. Cyanoacrylate Skin Microsealant for Preventing Surgical Site Infection after Vascular Surgery : A Discontinued Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, Bastiaan P.; Ott, Alewijn; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Oskam, Jacques; Ott, Alewijn; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) after vascular surgery are related to substantial morbidity. Restriction of bacterial access to the site of surgery with a cyanoacrylate sealant is a new concept. We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of the sealing of skin with a

  17. An Evaluation of UV-Monitoring Enhanced Skin Cancer Prevention among Farm Youth in Rural Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Ohanehi, Donatus C.; Redican, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health districts in southwest Virginia have one of the highest ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure and sunburn rate. Due to higher levels of UV exposure, rural farm youth are at higher risk for skin cancer than non-farm youth. Few studies have been published that explore best practices for decreasing UV exposure among this population.…

  18. Individual and setting level predictors of the implementation of a skin cancer prevention program: a multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brownson Ross C

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To achieve widespread cancer control, a better understanding is needed of the factors that contribute to successful implementation of effective skin cancer prevention interventions. This study assessed the relative contributions of individual- and setting-level characteristics to implementation of a widely disseminated skin cancer prevention program. Methods A multilevel analysis was conducted using data from the Pool Cool Diffusion Trial from 2004 and replicated with data from 2005. Implementation of Pool Cool by lifeguards was measured using a composite score (implementation variable, range 0 to 10 that assessed whether the lifeguard performed different components of the intervention. Predictors included lifeguard background characteristics, lifeguard sun protection-related attitudes and behaviors, pool characteristics, and enhanced (i.e., more technical assistance, tailored materials, and incentives are provided versus basic treatment group. Results The mean value of the implementation variable was 4 in both years (2004 and 2005; SD = 2 in 2004 and SD = 3 in 2005 indicating a moderate implementation for most lifeguards. Several individual-level (lifeguard characteristics and setting-level (pool characteristics and treatment group factors were found to be significantly associated with implementation of Pool Cool by lifeguards. All three lifeguard-level domains (lifeguard background characteristics, lifeguard sun protection-related attitudes and behaviors and six pool-level predictors (number of weekly pool visitors, intervention intensity, geographic latitude, pool location, sun safety and/or skin cancer prevention programs, and sun safety programs and policies were included in the final model. The most important predictors of implementation were the number of weekly pool visitors (inverse association and enhanced treatment group (positive association. That is, pools with fewer weekly visitors and pools in the enhanced

  19. Composition of minerals and trace elements at Mamasani thermal source: A possible preventive treatment for some skin diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidizadeh, Nasrin; Simaeetabar, Shima; Handjani, Farhad; Ranjbar, Sara; Moghadam, Mohammad Gohari; Parvizi, Mohammad Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Some skin diseases are incurable and modern medicine can only control them. In addition, alternative treatment remedies including balneotherapy can be effective in improving skin conditions. However, there are only a limited number of studies on particular mineral or trace elements of mineral sources that have been identified in Iran. In this respect, the amount of minerals and trace elements in Mamasani thermal source, Fars Province, Iran, was measured using electrochemical, titration, and spectrophotometric methods and evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The amount of minerals and trace elements in Mamasani thermal source, Fars Province, Iran, was measured using electrochemical, titration, and spectrophotometric methods. RESULTS: The concentrations of natural gases such as H2S and NO3 in Mamasani thermal source were measured to be 22.10 mg/L and 42.79 mg/L, respectively. The source also contained major ions such as chloride, sulfate, sodium, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and carbonate. Due to the high concentration of chloride, sulfate, and sodium ions in comparison with other major ions, the water source is also classified as sulfide water. The existing trace elements in this thermal water source are iron, zinc, copper, selenium, cobalt, chromium, boron, silisium, aluminum, magnesium, and molybdenum. CONCLUSION: We concluded that bathing in this source could be beneficial. As nitrate concentration is close to the highest standard concentration for drinking water, it can be used in chronic dermatitis, psoriasis, burns, and allergy. Furthermore, the antibacterial and antifungal effects of sulfur-containing water in this source can be helpful in the treatment of leg ulcers, tinea versicolor, tinea corporis, and tinea capitis. PMID:29296611

  20. Anti-oxidant defence mechanism in vitiliginous skin increases with skin type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briganti, S.; Caron-Schreinemachers, A.-L. D. B.; Picardo, M.; Westerhof, W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vitiligo skin shows different burning capacity in people with different phototype. In normal skin antioxidant status is correlated to skin phototype, but unexpectedly it appears that there is a gradual decrease in burning susceptibility of depigmented skin of individuals with increasing

  1. Pediatric Burns: A Single Institution Retrospective Review of Incidence, Etiology, and Outcomes in 2273 Burn Patients (1995-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christina J; Mahendraraj, Krishnaraj; Houng, Abraham; Marano, Michael; Petrone, Sylvia; Lee, Robin; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    Unintentional burn injury is the third most common cause of death in the U.S. for children age 5 to 9, and accounts for major morbidity in the pediatric population. Pediatric burn admission data from U.S. institutions has not been reported recently. This study assesses all pediatric burn admissions to a State wide Certified Burn Treatment Center to evaluate trends in demographics, burn incidence, and cause across different age groups. Demographic and clinical data were collected on 2273 pediatric burn patients during an 18-year period (1995-2013). Pediatric patients were stratified by age into "age 0 to 6," "age 7 to 12," and "age 13 to 18." Data were obtained from National Trauma Registry of the American College of Surgeons and analyzed using standard statistical methodology. A total of 2273 burn patients under age 18 were treated between 1995 and 2013. A total of 1663 (73.2%) patients were ages 0 to 6, 294 (12.9%) were 7 to 12, and 316 (13.9%) were age 13 to 18. A total of 1400 (61.6%) were male and 873 (38.4%) were female (male:female ratio of 1.6:1). Caucasians had the highest burn incidence across all age groups (40.9%), followed by African-Americans (33.6%), P burns occurred at home, P burned was 8.9%, with lower extremity being the most common site (38.5%). Scald burns constituted the majority of cases (71.1%, n = 1617), with 53% attributable to hot liquids related to cooking, including coffee or tea, P burns were the dominant cause (53.8%). Overall mean length of stay was 10.5 ± 10.8 days for all patients, and15.5 ± 12 for those admitted to the intensive care unit, P burn injuries are scald burns that occur at home and primarily affect the lower extremities in Caucasian and African-American males. Among Caucasian teenagers flame burns predominate. Mean length of stay was 10 days, 23% of patients required skin grafting surgery, and mortality was 0.9%. The results of this study highlight the need for primary prevention programs focusing on avoiding

  2. Evaluation of efficacy of skin cleansing with chlorhexidine in prevention of neonatal nosocomial sepsis - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Basudev; Vaswani, Narain Das; Sharma, Deepak; Chaudhary, Uma; Lekhwani, Seema

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of skin cleansing with chlorhexidine (CHD) in the prevention of neonatal nosocomial sepsis - a randomized controlled trial. This study design was a randomized controlled trial carried out in a tertiary care center of north India. About 140 eligible neonates were randomly allocated to either the subject area group (wiped with CHD solution till day seven of life) or the control group (wiped with lukewarm water). The primary outcome studied was to determine the decrease in the incidence of neonatal nosocomial sepsis (blood culture proven) in the intervention group. Out of 140 enrolled neonates, 70 were allocated to each group. The ratio of positive blood culture among the CHD group was 3.57%, while the ratio of positive blood culture among the control group was 6.85%. There was trending towards a reduction in blood culture proven sepsis in the intervention group, although the remainder was not statistically significant. A similar decreasing trend was observed in rates of skin colonization, duration of hospital stay, and duration of antibiotic treatment. CHD skin cleansing decreases the incidence of blood culture sepsis and could be an easy and cheap intervention for reducing the neonatal sepsis in countries where the neonatal mortality rate is high because of sepsis.

  3. Protection during production: Problems due to prevention? Nail and skin condition after prolonged wearing of occlusive gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weistenhöfer, Wobbeke; Uter, Wolfgang; Drexler, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Wearing of occlusive gloves during the whole working shift is considered a risk factor for developing hand eczema, similar to wet work. Moreover, the increased hydration due to glove occlusion may lead to brittle nails. Two hundred and seventy clean room workers, wearing occlusive gloves for prolonged periods, and 135 administrative employees not using gloves were investigated. This included a dermatological examination of the nails and the hands, using the Hand Eczema ScoRe for Occupational Screening (HEROS), measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and a standardized interview. Of the clean room workers, 39%, mainly women, reported nail problems, mostly brittle nails with onychoschisis. Skin score values showed no significant differences between HEROS values of both groups. TEWL values of exposed subjects were similar to TEWL values of controls 40 min after taking off the occlusive gloves. In a multiple linear regression analysis, male gender and duration of employment in the clean room were associated with a significant increase in TEWL values. The effect of occlusion on TEWL seems to be predominantly transient and not be indicative of a damaged skin barrier. This study confirmed the results of a previous investigation showing no serious adverse effect of wearing of occlusive gloves on skin condition without exposure to additional hazardous substances. However, occlusion leads to softened nails prone to mechanical injury. Therefore, specific prevention instructions are required to pay attention to this side effect of occlusion.

  4. Ablation of burned skin with ultra-short pulses laser to promote healing: evaluation by optical coherence tomography, histology, {mu}ATR-FTIR and Nonlinear Microscopy; Ablacao de pele queimada com laser de pulsos ultra-curtos para promocao da cicatrizacao: avaliacao por tomografia por coerencia optica, histologia, {mu}ATR-FTIR e microscopia nao-linear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Moises Oliveira dos

    2012-07-01

    Burns cause changes in the anatomical structure of the skin associated with trauma. The severity of the burn injury is divided into first, second and third-degree burns. The third-degree burns have been a major focus of research in search of more conservative treatments and faster results in repair for a functional and cosmetically acceptable. The conventional treatment is the use of topical natural or synthetic skin graft. An alternative therapy is the laser ablation process for burned tissue necrosis removal due to the no mechanical contact, fast application and access to difficult areas. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using high intensity femtosecond lasers as an adjunct treatment of burned patients. For this study, 65 Wistar rats were divided into groups of five animals: healthy skin, burned skin, two types of treatment (surgical debridement or femtosecond laser ablation) and four different times in the healing process monitoring. Three regions of the back of the animals were exposed to steam source causing third-degree burn. On the third day after the burn, one of the regions was ablated with high intensity ultrashort laser pulses ({lambda} = 785 nm, 90 fs, 2 kHz and 10 {mu}J/ pulse), the other received surgical debridement, and the last was considered the burn control. The regions were analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT), histology, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy using Fourier transform ({mu}-ATR-FTIR), two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) and second harmonic generation technique (SHG) on days 3, 5, 7 and 14 pos-treatments. The results showed that with the laser irradiation conditions used it was possible to remove debris from third degree burn. The techniques used to characterize the tissue allowed to verify that all treatments promoted wound healing. On the fourteenth day, the regeneration curve showed that the attenuation coefficient of laser ablated tissue converges to the values

  5. Prevention of neural hypersensitivity after acute upper limb burns: Development and pilot of a cortical training protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Dale; Zorzi, Lisa M; Wand, Ben M; Brockman, Nathalie; Griggs, Carolyn; Clifford, Matthew; Wood, Fiona

    2011-06-01

    Acute burn patients suffer pain and secondary hyperalgesia. This alters movement patterns and impairs function. Non-pharmacological methods of treatment are limited and lack rigorous testing and evidence for use. The treatment in this case series was designed to direct conscious attention to, and normalise sensation of, the injured limb in pain free way. The aim of the study was to describe a cortical training programme (CTP) in acute upper limb burn patients and to investigate the efficacy, safety and feasibility of the protocol. The study is a descriptive case series (n=6). Study tasks engaged sensory and motor nerves to influence the perception of the injured area. Visual and tactile inputs to maintain and, or normalise the homuncular map were central to the intervention. One patient, who commenced the study without resting pain, responded negatively. The remaining five patients had reduced pain and fear avoidance behaviours with associated improvement in arm function. The CTP approach is safe and feasible for use with acute burn patients where pain is reported at rest. Comparative studies are required to determine the relative efficacy of the program to usual interventions and the patients who may benefit from the technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of the collagen birefringence and the relative attenuation coefficient of health and burned skin irradiated with linearly polarized He-Ne laser; Analise da birrefringencia do colageno e do coeficiente de atenuacao de amostras de pele sadia e queimada irradiadas pelo laser de He-Ne linearmente polarizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Daniela de Fatima Teixeira da

    2002-07-01

    Low-intensity laser therapy is characterized by its ability to induce athermic effects and nondestructive photobiological processes. Although it has been in use for more than 40 years, this phototherapy is still not an established therapeutic modality. The objectives of this study were: to quantify the collagen fibers organization by polarized light microscopy in normal and burned skin samples at day 17 post-injury considering preferential axis as the animal's spinal column and aligning the linear laser polarization in two directions of polarization, parallel or perpendicular to this axis; to determine the relative attenuation coefficient for the intensity light by the technique of imaging the light distribution in normal and burned skin during wound healing process taking only parallel direction of polarization. To reach the objectives, burns about 6 mm in diameter were created with liquid N{sub 2} on the back of the rats and the lesions were irradiated on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-wounding, D= 1 J/cm{sup 2}, to investigate the effects of low-intensity linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam on skin wounds healing. Control lesions were not irradiated. The results have demonstrated that: the skin samples irradiated with linearly parallel polarized He-Ne laser beam showed collagen fibers more organized; burned skin samples presents a higher attenuation coefficient than normal skin samples. These results are important to optimize low intensity laser therapy dosimetry on acceleration wound healing. (author)

  7. Skin Cancer Chemoprevention by Silibinin: Mechanisms and Efficacy | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) type, is a major health problem in the United States (US); annual BCC incidences alone are higher than all other cancer incidences combined (1.67 million/year). Most BCC cases are curable by surgery/radiation, but these can be painful and highly disfiguring and are not viable treatment options for BCC patients with

  8. Comparison of Four Antiseptic Preparations for Skin in the Prevention of Contamination of Percutaneously Drawn Blood Cultures: a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfee, David P.; Farr, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    A number of skin antiseptics have been used to prevent the contamination of blood cultures, but the comparative efficacies of these agents have not been extensively evaluated. We therefore sought to compare the efficacy of four skin antiseptics in preventing blood culture contamination in a randomized, crossover, investigator-blinded study conducted in an emergency department and the inpatient wards of a university hospital. The patient group included all patients from whom blood samples were obtained percutaneously for culture. Skin antisepsis was performed with 10% povidone-iodine, 70% isopropyl alcohol, tincture of iodine, or povidone-iodine with 70% ethyl alcohol (i.e., Persist). The blood culture contamination rate associated with each antiseptic was then determined. A total of 333 (2.62%) of 12,692 blood cultures were contaminated during the study period compared to 413 (3.21%) of 12,859 blood cultures obtained during the previous 12-month period (relative risk = 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 0.94; P = 0.006). During the study, the contamination rates were determined to be 2.93% with povidone-iodine, 2.58% with tincture of iodine, 2.50% with isopropyl alcohol, and 2.46% with Persist (P = 0.62). We detected no significant differences in the blood culture contamination rates among these four antiseptics, although there was some evidence suggesting greater efficacy among the alcohol-containing antiseptics. Among the evaluated antiseptics, isopropyl alcohol may be the optimal antiseptic for use prior to obtaining blood for culture, given its convenience, low cost, and tolerability. PMID:11980938

  9. Novel burn device for rapid, reproducible burn wound generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J Y; Dunham, D M; Supp, D M; Sen, C K; Powell, H M

    2016-03-01

    Scarring following full thickness burns leads to significant reductions in range of motion and quality of life for burn patients. To effectively study scar development and the efficacy of anti-scarring treatments in a large animal model (female red Duroc pigs), reproducible, uniform, full-thickness, burn wounds are needed to reduce variability in observed results that occur with burn depth. Prior studies have proposed that initial temperature of the burner, contact time with skin, thermal capacity of burner material, and the amount of pressure applied to the skin need to be strictly controlled to ensure reproducibility. The purpose of this study was to develop a new burner that enables temperature and pressure to be digitally controlled and monitored in real-time throughout burn wound creation and compare it to a standard burn device. A custom burn device was manufactured with an electrically heated burn stylus and a temperature control feedback loop via an electronic microstat. Pressure monitoring was controlled by incorporation of a digital scale into the device, which measured downward force. The standard device was comprised of a heat resistant handle with a long rod connected to the burn stylus, which was heated using a hot plate. To quantify skin surface temperature and internal stylus temperature as a function of contact time, the burners were heated to the target temperature (200±5°C) and pressed into the skin for 40s to create the thermal injuries. Time to reach target temperature and elapsed time between burns were recorded. In addition, each unit was evaluated for reproducibility within and across three independent users by generating burn wounds at contact times spanning from 5 to 40s at a constant pressure and at pressures of 1 or 3lbs with a constant contact time of 40s. Biopsies were collected for histological analysis and burn depth quantification using digital image analysis (ImageJ). The custom burn device maintained both its internal

  10. Oral administration of Aloe vera gel powder prevents UVB-induced decrease in skin elasticity via suppression of overexpression of MMPs in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Marie; Tanaka, Miyuki; Misawa, Eriko; Yao, Ruiquing; Nabeshima, Kazumi; Yamauchi, Kouji; Abe, Fumiaki; Yamamoto, Yuki; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the effects of oral Aloe vera gel powder (AVGP) containing Aloe sterols on skin elasticity and the extracellular matrix in ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated hairless mice. Ten-week-old hairless mice were fed diets containing 0.3% AVGP for 8 weeks and irradiated UVB for 6 weeks. Mice treated with AVGP showed significant prevention of the UVB-induced decrease in skin elasticity. To investigate the mechanism underlying this suppression of skin elasticity loss, we measured the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -9, and -13. AVGP prevented both the UVB-induced increases in MMPs expressions. Moreover, we investigated hyaluronic acid (HA) content of mice dorsal skin and gene expression of HA synthase-2 (Has2). In the results, AVGP oral administration prevented UVB-induced decreasing in skin HA content and Has2 expression and attenuates the UVB-induced decrease in serum adiponectin, which promotes Has2 expression. These results suggested that AVGP has the ability to prevent the skin photoaging.

  11. Burn Wise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn Wise is a partnership program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  12. Ultra-pure soft water ameliorates atopic skin disease by preventing metallic soap deposition in NC/Tnd mice and reduces skin dryness in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Jung, Kyungsook; Jang, Hyosun; Ahn, Ginnae; Ishizaka, Saori; Amagai, Yosuke; Oida, Kumiko; Arkwright, Peter D; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    Mineral ions in tap water react with fatty acids in soap, leading to the formation of insoluble precipitate (metallic soap) on skin during washing. We hypothesised that metallic soap might negatively alter skin conditions. Application of metallic soap onto the skin of NC/Tnd mice with allergic dermatitis further induced inflammation with elevation of plasma immunoglobulin E and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Pruritus and dryness were ameliorated when the back of mice was washed with soap in Ca2+- and Mg2+-free ultra-pure soft water (UPSW). Washing in UPSW, but not tap water, also protected the skin of healthy volunteers from the soap deposition. Furthermore, 4 weeks of showering with UPSW reduced dryness and pruritus of human subjects with dry skin. Washing with UPSW may be therapeutically beneficial in patients with skin troubles.

  13. Moisturisers in scar management following burn: A survey report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Tanja; Kurmis, Rochelle; Munn, Zachary; Heath, Kathryn; Greenwood, John

    2017-08-01

    Scar management is a recognised key component of rehabilitation following burn. Moisturising often combined with massage is commenced once healing tissue has gained sufficient strength to tolerate surface friction, with the aim being to hydrate the dry scar. The studies on various moisturisers and creams provide some guidance on moisturiser selection, but many are inconclusive. This survey aimed to determine the current expert opinion regarding moisturiser recommendations, including the basis for these recommendations, across the burns community. A brief web-based survey was distributed to burn therapists via mailing lists of the Australian and New Zealand Burn Association (ANZBA), and American Burn Association (ABA) 'Occupational and Physical Therapist Burn Special Interest Group'. The fifty three respondents indicated that there were 29 different moisturisers commonly recommended in practice. Three main themes were indicated as influencing recommendations for moisturiser: the perceived effects on the scar/skin (48%); the general properties of the moisturiser (38%); the ingredients (14%). Therapists reported that the principle stimuli determining their recommendations were patient feedback and the choice of the previous burn therapist in their service. Many were also guided by medical staff, pharmacists and sales representatives. Only three respondents were able to provide citations for published evidence supporting their recommendations. There is a paucity of evidence currently to support optimal moisturiser choice. This survey demonstrates that conflicting opinions are held on the ideal moisturiser brand, properties and ingredients. The recommendations made are based on low level evidence. Further research is required to inform clinicians which moisturiser to recommend to their clients. An ideal moisturiser should be one that is conducive to scar maturation, non- or minimally irritant, prevent skin drying, minimise transepidermal water loss and have no negative

  14. Prospective, double-blinded, randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of an Octenidine-based hydrogel on bacterial colonisation and epithelialization of skin graft wounds in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W, Eisenbeiß; F, Siemers; G, Amtsberg; P, Hinz; B, Hartmann; T, Kohlmann; A, Ekkernkamp; U, Albrecht; O, Assadian; A, Kramer

    2012-01-01

    Moist wound treatment improves healing of skin graft donor site wounds. Microbial colonised wounds represent an increased risk of wound infection; while antimicrobially active, topical antiseptics may impair epithelialization. The aim of this prospective randomised controlled clinical trial was to examine the influence of an Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) hydrogel on bacterial colonisation and epithelialization of skin graft donor sites. The study was designed as a randomised, double-blinded, controlled clinical trial. Skin graft donor sites from a total of 61 patients were covered either with 0.05% OCT (n=31) or an OCT-free placebo wound hydrogel (n=30). Potential interaction with wound healing was assessed by measuring the time until 100% re-epithelialization. In addition, microbial wound colonisation was quantitatively determined in all skin graft donor sites. There was no statistically significant difference in the time for complete epithelialization of skin graft donor sites in the OCT and the placebo group (7.3±0.2 vs. 6.9±0.2 days; p=0.236). Microbial wound colonisation was significantly lower in the OCT group than in the placebo group (p=0.014). The OCT-based hydrogel showed no delay in wound epithelialization and demonstrated a significantly lower bacterial colonisation of skin graft donor site wounds.

  15. Hataedock treatment has preventive therapeutic effects for atopic dermatitis through skin barrier protection in Dermatophagoides farinae-induced NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ho-Yeol; Ahn, Sang-Hyun; Cheon, Jin-Hong; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Kibong

    2017-07-12

    Hataedock treatment is traditionally used for the purpose of preventing the future skin disease by feeding herbal extracts to the newborn in traditional Chinese and Korean medicine. This study investigated the preventive therapeutic effects of Hataedock (HTD) treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD) through skin barrier protection in Dermatophagoides farinae-induced NC/Nga mice. To the HTD treatment group, the extract of Coptis japonica Makino and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fischer, which analyzed with High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)-fingerprint for quality consistency, was administered orally to the 3-week-old mice before inducing AD. After that, Dermatophagoides farinae was applied except the control group to induce AD-like skin lesions. We confirmed the effects of HTD on morphological changes, protection of skin barrier, regulation of Th2 differentiation, inflammation regulation and induction of apoptosis through histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. HTD effectively reduced edema, angiogenesis and skin lesion. HTD also increased the levels of liver X receptor (LXR) and filaggrin but decreased the level of protein kinase C (PKC) (pprotection of skin barrier. Therefore, HTD may have potential applications for alternative and preventive treatment in the management of AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Morphogenesis and Biomechanics of Engineered Skin Cultured Under Uniaxial Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Britani N; Powell, Heather M

    2012-04-01

    Split-thickness autograft is the standard wound treatment for full-thickness burns. In large burns, sparse availability of uninjured skin prevents rapid closure of the wound, resulting in increased scar tissue formation or mortality. Tissue-engineered skin (ES) offers promise when autografts are not available. ES, constructed from a polymeric scaffold and skin cells, has been shown to reduce donor site area required to permanently close wounds, mortality, and morbidity from scarring but cannot restore all skin functions. Current generations of ES are orders of magnitude weaker than normal human skin, leading to difficulty in surgical application, greater susceptibility to mechanical damage during fabrication and application, and less elasticity and strength once engrafted. Previous studies to improve ES biomechanics focus on altering the scaffolding material, which resulted in modest improvements but often inhibited proper skin development. As the skin is naturally under static strain, adding these mechanical cues to the culture environment is hypothesized to improve ES biomechanics. ES was cultured under applied static strains ranging from 0% to 40% strain for a total of 10 days. Strain magnitudes of 10% and 20% strain resulted in significantly stronger ES than unstrained controls, showed upregulation of many genes encoding structural extracellular matrix proteins, and exhibited increased epidermal cell proliferation and differentiation. Enhanced biomechanical properties of ES can allow for facile surgical application and less damage during dressing changes. These findings suggest that mechanical cues play a significant role in skin development and should be further explored.

  17. Designing Skin Cancer Prevention Messages: Should We Emphasize Gains or Losses? Message Framing, Risk Type, and Prior Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon J; Kang, Hannah

    2018-05-01

    To test whether message framing (ie, gain vs. loss) and risk type (ie, health vs appearance risk) in skin cancer prevention messages interact with one's prior experience. Two experiments with a 2 (message framing: gain vs loss) × 2 (risk type: health vs appearance risk) factorial design were conducted. The participants were given a URL to the experiment website via e-mail. On the first page of the website, the participants were told that they would be asked to evaluate a skin cancer print public service announcement (PSA): Online experiments. A total of 397 individuals participated (236 for experiment 1 and 161 for experiment 2). Apparatus: Four versions of the skin cancer print PSAs were developed. Four PSAs were identical except for the 2 manipulated components: message framing and risk type. Measures were adopted from Cho and Boster (message framing), Jones and Leary and Kiene et al. (risk type), De Vries, Mesters, van't Riet, Willems, and Reubsaet and Knight, Kirincich, Farmer, and Hood (prior experience), and Hammond, Fong, Zanna, Thrasher, and Borland and Hoffner and Ye (behavioral intent). General linear models were used to test hypotheses. Three-way interactions among message framing, risk type, and prior experience were found: When the intent of the message was to encourage sunscreen use, the effects of message framing and risk type were shown to be the exact opposite directions from when the intent was to discourage indoor/outdoor tanning. To discourage tanning among those with prior experience, messages emphasizing losses in terms of one's health will work better. For those with no prior experience, messages emphasizing potential appearance losses will work better for discouraging tanning while messages emphasizing gains like improving appearance will do a better job in encouraging sunscreen use.

  18. Self-recognition mechanism between skin and suckers prevents octopus arms from interfering with each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesher, Nir; Levy, Guy; Grasso, Frank W; Hochner, Binyamin

    2014-06-02

    Controlling movements of flexible arms is a challenging task for the octopus because of the virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) [1, 2]. Octopuses simplify this control by using stereotypical motion patterns that reduce the DOFs, in the control space, to a workable few [2]. These movements are triggered by the brain and are generated by motor programs embedded in the peripheral neuromuscular system of the arm [3-5]. The hundreds of suckers along each arm have a tendency to stick to almost any object they contact [6-9]. The existence of this reflex could pose significant problems with unplanned interactions between the arms if not appropriately managed. This problem is likely to be accentuated because it is accepted that octopuses are "not aware of their arms" [10-14]. Here we report of a self-recognition mechanism that has a novel role in motor control, restraining the arms from interfering with each other. We show that the suckers of amputated arms never attach to octopus skin because a chemical in the skin inhibits the attachment reflex of the suckers. The peripheral mechanism appears to be overridden by central control because, in contrast to amputated arms, behaving octopuses sometime grab amputated arms. Surprisingly, octopuses seem to identify their own amputated arms, as they treat arms of other octopuses like food more often than their own. This self-recognition mechanism is a novel peripheral component in the embodied organization of the adaptive interactions between the octopus's brain, body, and environment [15, 16]. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Natural Substances for Prevention of Skin Photoaging: Screening Systems in the Development of Sunscreen and Rejuvenation Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, Vladimir; Potapovich, Alla; Albuhaydar, Ahmed R; Mayer, Wolfgang; De Luca, Chiara; Korkina, Liudmila

    2018-04-01

    Solar broadband UV irradiation is commonly regarded as a major causative reason for cutaneous photoaging. The pro-aging molecular pathways and cellular targets affected by UVA+UVB light in human skin have been extensively investigated. Notwithstanding growing knowledge in mechanisms of photoaging, research and development of clinically efficient, nontoxic, and sustainable topical preparations providing full physical, chemical, and biological photoprotection still remain a great challenge for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In this study, we are proposing a panel of the in vitro methods for preselection of natural photoprotective substances with high photostability and low phototoxicity able of absorbing a broadband UVA+UVB irradiation (physical sunscreen), reducing UV-related overproduction of free radicals and loss of endogenous antioxidants (chemical protection), and attenuating UV-induced cytotoxicity and immune and metabolic responses (biological protection) in primary human epidermal keratinocytes and immortalized human keratinocyte cultures. Our data showed that secondary metabolites biosynthesized in plant cells in response to UV irradiation, such as phenylpropanoids and their glycosylated metabolites, aglycons and glycosylated flavonoids, and leontopodic acids, hold the best promise for complete natural topical prevention of photoaging and rejuvenation of photoaged skin. Meristem plant cell cultures elicited by solar simulating UV could be the most environmentally sustainable biotechnological source of polyphenols with combined photoprotective and antiaging properties.

  20. Natural Substances for Prevention of Skin Photoaging: Screening Systems in the Development of Sunscreen and Rejuvenation Cosmetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, Vladimir; Potapovich, Alla; Albuhaydar, Ahmed R.; Mayer, Wolfgang; De Luca, Chiara

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Solar broadband UV irradiation is commonly regarded as a major causative reason for cutaneous photoaging. The pro-aging molecular pathways and cellular targets affected by UVA+UVB light in human skin have been extensively investigated. Notwithstanding growing knowledge in mechanisms of photoaging, research and development of clinically efficient, nontoxic, and sustainable topical preparations providing full physical, chemical, and biological photoprotection still remain a great challenge for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In this study, we are proposing a panel of the in vitro methods for preselection of natural photoprotective substances with high photostability and low phototoxicity able of absorbing a broadband UVA+UVB irradiation (physical sunscreen), reducing UV-related overproduction of free radicals and loss of endogenous antioxidants (chemical protection), and attenuating UV-induced cytotoxicity and immune and metabolic responses (biological protection) in primary human epidermal keratinocytes and immortalized human keratinocyte cultures. Our data showed that secondary metabolites biosynthesized in plant cells in response to UV irradiation, such as phenylpropanoids and their glycosylated metabolites, aglycons and glycosylated flavonoids, and leontopodic acids, hold the best promise for complete natural topical prevention of photoaging and rejuvenation of photoaged skin. Meristem plant cell cultures elicited by solar simulating UV could be the most environmentally sustainable biotechnological source of polyphenols with combined photoprotective and antiaging properties. PMID:28661208

  1. Determinants of Skin Cancer Preventive Behaviors Among Rural Farmers in Iran: an Application of Protection Motivation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babazadeh, Towhid; Nadrian, Haidar; Banayejeddi, Morteza; Rezapour, Baratali

    2017-09-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers, worldwide, which happens more among those with more sunlight exposure like farmers. The aim of this study was to explore the determinants of skin cancer preventive behaviors (SCPBs) among rural farmers using Protection Motivation Theory (PMT). In this cross-sectional study, multistage random sampling was employed to enroll 238 farmers referring to rural health houses (HH) in Chaldoran County, Iran. A valid and reliable instrument based on PMT variables was used. Significant correlations were found between all PMT variables with SCPBs (p Protection Motivation and SCPBs as outcome variables. Predictors for these two outcome variables were classified in two different blocks according to their natures. Demographic characteristics (p > 0.05) and PMT constructs (p Protection Motivation, respectively. Also, no significant effect was found on SCPBs by demographic variables, in the first block (∆R 2  = 0.025); however, in the second block, Perceived Susceptibility (p = 0.000), Rewards (p = 0.022), Self-efficacy (p = 0.000), and Response Cost (p = 0.001) were significant predictors of SCPBs (∆R 2  = 0.432). Health care providers may consider PMT as a framework for developing educational interventions aiming at improving SCPBs among rural farmers.

  2. [Burns care following a nuclear incident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargues, L; Donat, N; Jault, P; Leclerc, T

    2010-09-30

    Radiation injuries are usually caused by radioactive isotopes in industry. Detonations of nuclear reactors, the use of military nuclear weapons, and terrorist attacks represent a risk of mass burn casualties. Ionizing radiation creates thermal burns, acute radiation syndrome with pancytopenia, and a delayed cutaneous syndrome. After a latency period, skin symptoms appear and the depth of tissue damages increase with dose exposure. The usual burn resuscitation protocols have to be applied. Care of these victims also requires assessment of the level of radiation, plus decontamination by an experienced team. In nuclear disasters, the priority is to optimize the available resources and reserve treatment to patients with the highest probability of survival. After localized nuclear injury, assessment of burn depth and surgical techniques of skin coverage are the main difficulties in a burn centre. Training in medical facilities and burn centres is necessary in the preparation for management of the different types of burn injuries.

  3. Primary prevention of skin dysplasia in renal transplant recipients with photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Omland, S H; Wulf, H C

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at high risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); prevention includes early treatment of premalignant actinic keratosis (AK). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive field therapy that reduces new AKs in patients with existing AK...

  4. [Prevention of hand dermatoses in small catering enterprises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpiewska, Joanna; Liwkowicz, Jolanta; Padlewska, Kamila

    2013-01-01

    Work in catering and food processing is mostly performed by hands. Mechanical, thermal and chemical agents, as well as damp working conditions and frequent hand washing aggravate skin irritation. The aim of the study was to test the efficacy of hydrophobic skin protection measure at these workplaces. We recommended the prevention of contact skin disorders by using hydrophobic skin protection measure. The study was conducted in a group of 20 food service sector workers, They were interviewed about skin problems and skin protection measures. Tolb assess the effect of the protective preparation on the skin dermatological test procedures, corneometry and sebumetry, were applied, as well as the level of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured. The same survey was performed in the control group composed of 10 workers who used and 10 who did not use barrier preparation. The respondents declared dryness, roughness, peeling, burning, redness, erythema of the skin. All who had applied barrier cream observed a significant improvement of the skin hydration increased by about 30%, and lubrication of the skin - by 11 times on average. Also the level of TEWL decreased by about 25%. The improvement of skin conditions and reduction of skin disorders were observed confirming the effectiveness of the protection of the skin from exposure to harmful factors. Knowledge about prevention of skin diseases should be promoted among employees of catering enterprises.

  5. Prevention of hand dermatoses in small catering enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kurpiewska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work in catering and food processing is mostly performed by hands. Mechanical, thermal and chemical agents, as well as damp working conditions and frequent hand washing aggravate skin irritation. The aim of the study was to test the efficacy of hydrophobic skin protection measure at these workplaces. Materials and Methods: We recommended the prevention of contact skin disorders by using hydrophobic skin protection measure. The study was conducted in a group of 20 food service sector workers. They were interviewed about skin problems and skin protection measures. To assess the effect of the protective preparation on the skin dermatological test procedures, corneometry and sebumetry, were applied, as well as the level of transepidermal water loss (TEWL was measured. The same survey was performed in the control group composed of 10 workers who used and 10 who did not use barrier preparation. Results: The respondents declared dryness, roughness, peeling, burning, redness, erythema of the skin. All who had applied barrier cream observed a significant improvement of the skin - hydration increased by about 30%, and lubrication of the skin - by 11 times on average. Also the level of TEWL decreased by about 25%. Conclusions: The improvement of skin conditions and reduction of skin disorders were observed confirming the effectiveness of the protection of the skin from exposure to harmful factors. Knowledge about prevention of skin diseases should be promoted among employees of catering enterprises. Med Pr 2013;64(4:521–525

  6. Interest of Supportive and Barrier Protective Skin Care Products in the Daily Prevention and Treatment of Cutaneous Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Antoine; Regueiro, Carlos; Hijal, Tarek; Pasquier, David; De La Fuente, Cristina; Le Tinier, Florence; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Lartigau, Eric; Moyal, Dominique; Seité, Sophie; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2018-01-01

    As many as 50% of patients with cancer develop acute skin reactions to some degree with radiotherapy. Proactive skin care is often recommended to minimise these skin reactions and maintain the integrity of the epidermal barrier; nevertheless, no consensual guidelines are systematically used. This multicentre, observational, prospective study evaluated the tolerability and benefit of supportive and barrier protective skin care products in preventing radiotherapy-induced skin reactions in 253 women initiating radiotherapy (exclusive or adjuvant) for breast cancer. Patients received a kit of 5 commercially available skin care products before the first radiotherapy treatment. The following variables were assessed: cutaneous adverse events, investigator-assessed skin reactions (oedema, erythema, dryness, desquamation) before and after radiotherapy course, investigator, and patient opinion on products benefit. Results were analysed by frequency of product use (heavy versus low). Average age was 60 years (range: 34-85). Over 92% of patients reported good to excellent tolerance on irradiated skin for each product. During the 6-week radiotherapy period, we observed that heavy product users had less skin reactions than the low users, particularly within 10 days of radiotherapy initiation (8% versus 18%; p  = .031). Positive physician's opinion on product use was more frequent for high (66.6%) versus low (32%) users. Patient-assessed patient benefit index was generally >1, indicating relevant treatment benefit, with a tendency for better benefit in high versus low users. These results support recommendations to use skin care products to minimise the impact of secondary cutaneous reactions with radiotherapy cancer treatment.

  7. Interest of Supportive and Barrier Protective Skin Care Products in the Daily Prevention and Treatment of Cutaneous Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Berger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As many as 50% of patients with cancer develop acute skin reactions to some degree with radiotherapy. Proactive skin care is often recommended to minimise these skin reactions and maintain the integrity of the epidermal barrier; nevertheless, no consensual guidelines are systematically used. This multicentre, observational, prospective study evaluated the tolerability and benefit of supportive and barrier protective skin care products in preventing radiotherapy-induced skin reactions in 253 women initiating radiotherapy (exclusive or adjuvant for breast cancer. Methods: Patients received a kit of 5 commercially available skin care products before the first radiotherapy treatment. The following variables were assessed: cutaneous adverse events, investigator-assessed skin reactions (oedema, erythema, dryness, desquamation before and after radiotherapy course, investigator, and patient opinion on products benefit. Results were analysed by frequency of product use (heavy versus low. Results: Average age was 60 years (range: 34-85. Over 92% of patients reported good to excellent tolerance on irradiated skin for each product. During the 6-week radiotherapy period, we observed that heavy product users had less skin reactions than the low users, particularly within 10 days of radiotherapy initiation (8% versus 18%; p  = .031. Positive physician’s opinion on product use was more frequent for high (66.6% versus low (32% users. Patient-assessed patient benefit index was generally >1, indicating relevant treatment benefit, with a tendency for better benefit in high versus low users. Conclusions: These results support recommendations to use skin care products to minimise the impact of secondary cutaneous reactions with radiotherapy cancer treatment.

  8. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the healing process of donor site in patients with grade 3 burn ulcer after skin graft surgery (a randomized clinical trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghardoost, Reza; Momeni, Mahnoush; Kazemikhoo, Nooshafarin; Mokmeli, Soheila; Dahmardehei, Mostafa; Ansari, Fereshteh; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Sabr Joo, Parisa; Mey Abadi, Sara; Naderi Gharagheshlagh, Soheila; Sassani, Saeed

    2018-04-01

    Skin graft is a standard therapeutic technique in patients with deep ulcers, but managing donor site after grafting is very important. Although several modern dressings are available to enhance the comfort of donor site, using techniques that accelerate wound healing may enhance patient satisfaction. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used in several medical fields, including healing of diabetic, surgical, and pressure ulcers, but there is not any report of using this method for healing of donor site in burn patients. The protocols and informed consent were reviewed according to Medical Ethics Board of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (IR.SBMU.REC.1394.363) and Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT2016020226069N2). Eighteen donor sites in 11 patients with grade 3 burn ulcer were selected. Donor areas were divided into 2 parts, for laser irradiation and control randomly. Laser area was irradiated by a red, 655-nm laser light, 150 mW, 2 J/cm 2 , on days 0 (immediately after surgery), 3, 5, and 7. Dressing and other therapeutic care for both sites were the same. The patients and the person who analyzed the results were blinded. The size of donor site reduced in both groups during the 7-day study period (P < 0.01) and this reduction was significantly greater in the laser group (P = 0.01). In the present study, for the first time, we evaluate the effects of LLLT on the healing process of donor site in burn patients. The results showed that local irradiation of red laser accelerates wound healing process significantly.

  9. A review of treatment strategies for hydrofluoric acid burns: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yuanhai; Ni, Liangfang; You, Chuangang; Ye, Chunjiang; Jiang, Ruiming; Liu, Liping; Liu, Jia; Han, Chunmao

    2014-12-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF), a dangerous inorganic acid, can cause severe corrosive effects and systemic toxicity. HF enters the human body via where it contacts, such as skin and mucosa, alimentary and respiratory tracts, and ocular surfaces. In the recent years, the incidence of HF burn has tended to increase over time. The injury mechanism of HF is associated primarily with the massive absorption of HF and the release of hydrogen ions. Correct diagnosis and timely treatment are especially important for HF burns. The critical procedure to treat HF burn is to prevent on-going HF absorption, and block the progressive destruction caused by fluoride ions. Due to the distinct characteristics of HF burns, the topical treatment, as well as systemic support, has been emphasised. Whereas, management of patients with HF burns remains a great challenge in some situations. To date, there has been no widely accepted protocol for the rescue of HF burns, partly due to the diversity of HF burns. This paper overviews the current status and problems of treatment strategies for HF burns, for the purpose of promoting the future researches and improvement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of a Newly Implemented Burn Protocol on Surgically Managed Partial Thickness Burns at a Specialized Burns Center in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Khwee-Soon Vincent; Chong, Si-Jack; Tan, Bien-Keem

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a newly implemented protocol for superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns which involves early surgery and rapid coverage with biosynthetic dressing in a specialized national burns center in Singapore. Consecutive patients with 5% or greater total body surface area (TBSA) superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns injury admitted to the Burns Centre at the Singapore General Hospital between August and December 2014 for surgery within 48 hours of injury were prospectively recruited into the study to form the protocol group. Comparable historical cases from the year 2013 retrieved from the burns center audit database were used to form the historical control group. Demographics (age, sex), type and depth of burns, %TBSA burnt, number of operative sessions, and length of stay were recorded for each patient of both cohorts. Thirty-nine burns patients managed under the new protocol were compared with historical control (n = 39) comparable in age and extensiveness of burns. A significantly shorter length of stay (P burns was observed in the new protocol group (0.74 day/%TBSA) versus historical control (1.55 day/%TBSA). Fewer operative sessions were needed under the new protocol for burns 10% or greater TBSA burns (P protocol for surgically managed burns patients which involves early surgery and appropriate use of biosynthetic dressing on superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns. Clinically, shorter lengths of stay, fewer operative sessions, and decreased need for skin grafting of burns patient were observed.

  11. Knowledge of undergraduate nursing course teachers on the prevention and care of peristomal skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Magela Salomé

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the knowledge of undergraduate nursing course teachers on peristomal skin care in individuals with intestinal stoma. Methods: This is an exploratory, analytical and cross-sectional study, conducted with undergraduate nursing course teachers from two private universities in the city of São Paulo, named A and B. The sample consisted of 42 teachers/nurses, being 22 from University A and 20 from University B, who supervised the internship at Hospital Vila Nova Cachoeirinha. With the aim to collect data, a structured questionnaire consisting of 10 questions (checklist was used; each question in the checklist had correct and wrong answers. The teachers had to indicate with “x” the correct answer. The questionnaire was delivered to teachers/nurses on a predetermined day. Data collection was carried out on August 2006. Results: The majority of study participants know that stoma demarcation must be performed preoperatively, and that it is important to educate the patient about surgery, care for the stoma and on the collecting device, as well as to perform a sensitivity test for the equipment. The hygiene should be performed with mild soap and water and with a piece of clean, soft, damp cotton cloth without rubbing, and the skin must be kept dry. The hair removal should be done with curved tip scissors, cutting close to the abdominal wall. Conclusion: The results showed that, although most of the participants have a basic knowledge about stomized patients care, updating and improvement are needed. Resumo: Objetivo: Avaliar o conhecimento de docentes do curso de graduação em enfermagem sobre os cuidados com da pele periestomal nos indivíduos com estomas intestinais. Métodos: Trata-se de um estudo exploratório, analítico e transversal realizado com os docentes dos Cursos de Graduação em Enfermagem de duas Universidades privadas da cidade de São Paulo, denominadas A e B. A amostra foi constituída de 42 docentes

  12. An Advertisement and Article Analysis of Skin Products and Topics in Popular Women’s Magazines: Implications for Skin Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Basch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the United States, skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer, with an esti­mated 5 million people treated per year and annual medical treatment expenditures that exceed 8 billion dollars. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1 to enumerate the number of advertisements for skin products with and without Sun Protection Factor (SPF and to further analyze the specific advertise­ments for sunblock to determine if models, when present, depict sun safe behaviors and 2 to enumer­ate the number of articles related to the skin for content. Both aims include an assessment for differ­ences in age and in magazines targeting a Black or Latina population. Methods: The sample for this cross sectional study was comprised of 99 issues of 14 popular United States magazines marketed to women, four of which market to a Black or Latina audience. Results: There were 6,142 advertisements, of which 1,215 (19.8%, 95% CI: 18.8-20.8% were related to skin products. Among the skin product advertisements, 1,145 (93.8%, 95% CI: 93.9-96.3% depicted skin products without SPF. The majority of skin articles (91.2%, 95% CI: 91.7-100.0%, skin product advertisements (89.9%, 95% CI: 88.2-91.6%, and sunblock advertisements featuring models (were found in magazines aimed at the older (>24 yr audience. Conclusion: Future research on this topic could focus on the extent to which images in these maga­zines translate into risky health behaviors, such as sun seeking, or excessive other harmful effects of UV radiation.

  13. Testing a social cognitive theory-based model of indoor tanning: implications for skin cancer prevention messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Seth M; Myrick, Jessica Gall; Zeitany, Alexandra; Kelley, Dannielle; Morales-Pico, Brenda; Thomas, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a theory-based understanding of indoor tanning is a major impediment to the development of effective messages to prevent or reduce this behavior. This study applied the Comprehensive Indoor Tanning Expectations (CITE) scale in an analysis of indoor tanning behavior among sorority women (total N = 775). Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that CITE positive and negative expectations were robust, multidimensional factors and that a hierarchical structure fit the data well. Social cognitive theory-based structural equation models demonstrated that appearance-oriented variables were significantly associated with outcome expectations. Outcome expectations were, in turn, significantly associated with temptations to tan, intention to tan indoors, and indoor tanning behavior. The implications of these findings for the development of messages to prevent and reduce indoor tanning behavior are discussed in two domains: (a) messages that attempt to change broader societal perceptions about tan skin, and (b) messages that focus more narrowly on indoor tanning-challenging positive expectations, enhancing negative expectations, and encouraging substitution of sunless tanning products.

  14. Trends in news coverage about skin cancer prevention, 1993-2006: increasingly mixed messages for the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Maree; Wakefield, Melanie; Dixon, Helen

    2008-10-01

    To provide a comprehensive overview of trends in news coverage about sun protection issues in an Australian setting over a 14-year period. A content analysis was performed on all relevant articles (N=547) published in two major daily newspapers, The Age and the Herald Sun, from 1993 to 2006. Articles were coded for article type, prominence, theme, spokesperson, topic slant and opinion slant. The most frequent themes were the health effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure (24% of articles), education/prevention (14%) and product issues (12%). Themes that became more dominant over time were vitamin D issues, solaria issues and fake tans. Sixty per cent of articles included a pro-sun protection spokesperson and 12% an anti-sun protection spokesperson, with the profile of anti-sun protection spokespeople increasing over time. Half the articles reported on topics positive for sun protection, whereas 18% reported on negative topics; however, this difference narrowed considerably from 2001 onwards. In opinionated articles, the opinions expressed by authors were mainly positive (57%) rather than negative (7%) for sun protection. The findings suggest that the mix of sun protection issues covered and views of sun protection have changed over time, resulting in greater coverage of controversies and issues not necessarily positive for sun protection objectives. These findings imply that evaluation of paid skin cancer prevention public education campaigns may need to take account of the changing news media environment in which they take place.

  15. Skin Protective Nutraceuticals: The Current Evidence in Brief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oroma Nwanodi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutraceuticals are important for healthy skin maintenance. Probiotics, phenolics, and vitamins are just a few of the nutraceuticals meant to potentially prevent and assist medical management of dermatologic conditions. Among these, probiotics, vitamin E, and green tea catechins may offer the broadest array of skin protective mechanisms with probiotics having the greatest clinical range. Probiotics’ amelioration of atopic dermatitis and opportunistic infections of skin burns has been targeted in recent research efforts. This includes the improvement of Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index scores, p = 0.02, with intact Lactobacillus rhamnosus Goldin and Gorbach (LGG in comparison to heat inactivated LGG or placebo. Lactobacillus reuteri used prior to or concurrently with Staphylococcus aureus infection can increase epidermal keratinocyte survival, p < 0.01. Phenolics may not have been extensively studied for atopic dermatitis or skin burns. However, phenolics do have a role in photoprotection. The phenolic rutin increases ultraviolet B radiation filter reactive oxygen species scavenging at 75%, p < 0.002, and peak wavelength absorption, p < 0.001. While oral and topical probiotics have untapped potential for atopic dermatitis amelioration and skin infection prevention, phenolics will be increasingly used for photoprotection. With optimized bioavailability, dosage, and formulation, nutraceuticals will become crucial for healthy skin maintenance.

  16. Comparing the reported burn conditions for different severity burns in porcine models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Christine J; Cuttle, Leila

    2017-12-01

    There are many porcine burn models that create burns using different materials (e.g. metal, water) and different burn conditions (e.g. temperature and duration of exposure). This review aims to determine whether a pooled analysis of these studies can provide insight into the burn materials and conditions required to create burns of a specific severity. A systematic review of 42 porcine burn studies describing the depth of burn injury with histological evaluation is presented. Inclusion criteria included thermal burns, burns created with a novel method or material, histological evaluation within 7 days post-burn and method for depth of injury assessment specified. Conditions causing deep dermal scald burns compared to contact burns of equivalent severity were disparate, with lower temperatures and shorter durations reported for scald burns (83°C for 14 seconds) compared to contact burns (111°C for 23 seconds). A valuable archive of the different mechanisms and materials used for porcine burn models is presented to aid design and optimisation of future models. Significantly, this review demonstrates the effect of the mechanism of injury on burn severity and that caution is recommended when burn conditions established by porcine contact burn models are used by regulators to guide scald burn prevention strategies. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. CopA3 Peptide Prevents Ultraviolet-Induced Inhibition of Type-I Procollagen and Induction of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in Human Skin Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hee Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV exposure is well-known to induce premature aging, which is mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 activity. A 9-mer peptide, CopA3 (CopA3 was synthesized from a natural peptide, coprisin, which is isolated from the dung beetle Copris tripartitus. As part of our continuing search for novel bioactive natural products, CopA3 was investigated for its in vitro anti-skin photoaging activity. UV-induced inhibition of type-I procollagen and induction of MMP-1 were partially prevented in human skin fibroblasts by CopA3 peptide in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 25 μM, CopA3 nearly completely inhibited MMP-1 expression. These results suggest that CopA3, an insect peptide, is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of skin aging.

  18. The Effect of Educational Intervention Based on Health Belief Model and Social Support on Promoting Skin Cancer Preventive Behaviors in a Sample of Iranian Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeihooni, Ali Khani; Rakhshani, Tayebeh

    2018-01-08

    Skin cancer is one of the most common cancers in Iran. Farmers are exposed to the sun's ultraviolet radiation due to their job and are susceptible to skin cancer. The aim of this study is to survey the effect of educational intervention based on health belief model and social support on promoting skin cancer preventive behaviors in farmers of Fasa City, Fars province, Iran. In this quasi-experimental study, 200 farmers (100 in experimental group and 100 in control group) in Fasa City, Fars, Iran, were selected in 2017. The educational intervention for the experimental group consisted of eight training sessions (introduction to skin cancer, risk factors, complications, benefits and barriers to proper use of sunscreen, UV sunglasses and physical protection, self-efficacy in applying preventive behaviors, role of social support). A questionnaire consisting of demographic information, knowledge, HBM constructs (perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, barriers, self-efficacy and cues to action), and social support was used to measure skin cancer preventive behaviors before, 3 months after the intervention, and 6 months later. Data were analyzed using SPSS-22 via chi-squared, independent samples t test, Mann-Whitney, and repeated measures ANOVA at a significance level of 0.5. The mean age of the farmers was 42.21 ± 10.52 years in the experimental group and 44.28 ± 10.16 years in the control group. Three months after the intervention and 6 months after the intervention, the experimental group showed a significant increase in the knowledge, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, self-efficacy, cues to action, social support, and skin cancer preventive behaviors compared to the control group. This study showed the effectiveness of the intervention based on the HBM constructs and social support in adoption of skin cancer preventive behaviors in 3 and 6 months post intervention in farmers. Hence, these models can act as a

  19. Effectiveness of skin protection creams in the prevention of occupational dermatitis: results of a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winker, Robert; Salameh, Bayda; Stolkovich, Sabine; Nikl, Michael; Barth, Alfred; Ponocny, Elisabeth; Drexler, Hans; Tappeiner, Gerhard

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the trial was to investigate whether the publicized effects of skin protection creams can be replicated in a real occupational setting during activities that expose the skin. A prospective, randomized, four-tailed controlled pilot trial was performed to compare the effect of skin protection and skin care alone or in combination with cleansing against a control group (only cleansing). Two branches were selected for the investigation: the building industry and the timber industry. A total of 1,006 workers from these two branches were recruited, and out of these 485 workers were examined longitudinally for at least three time points over 1 year (lost for follow-up: 430 workers, exclusion: 91 workers). At each time point, as a primary outcome measure, we assessed the condition of the skin at both hands in a blinded manner and the individual was assigned to one of the following categories: no eczema, mild, moderate and severe eczema. As a secondary outcome measure, the worker's transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured under standardized conditions at the back of both hands. In addition, the workers were asked to evaluate their skin condition during the study. With regard to differences in the occurrence of eczemas, we found only in workers in building industry without application of skin protection or skin care creams a statistical significant increase in the incidence between the first and the second visit and a statistical significant decrease in the incidence between the second and third visit. When evaluating the secondary outcome-measurement changes in the TEWL values, an improvement was found for the group skin protection and skin care in combination and by skin care alone. Females in the timber industry started with better TEWL values than males, which may be due to better overall skin care. In this group we found an improvement for the group skin protection and skin care in combination and by skin protection alone. For skin protection alone, we

  20. Decontamination of burns contaminated with radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vykouril, L.

    1986-01-01

    The suitability of various solutions for the decontamination of burnt skin and their efficiency were tested by experiments on rats. Tested was the decontamination of undisturbed skin, second degree skin burns and third degree skin burns. Decontamination solutions used included: distilled water, jodonal (an aqueous solution of iodine, ethoxylated nonylphenols, the copolymer of ethylene oxide with propylene oxide, and phosphoric acid) and a decontamination mixture of Sapon, Komplexon (trade names of detergents) and sodium hexametaphosphate. Decontamination efficiency was 68.4% for second degree burns and 47.1% for third degree burns. Most effective was the decontamination solution with an efficiency of 72%; the efficiency of jodonal was 67% and of water - 54%. Jodonal is the most suitable: in addition, it acts as a disinfectant and antiseptic. (M.D.)

  1. The advantages of the application of amnion membrane in the treatment of burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonovska, D; Dzokic, Gj; Spasevska, L; Trajkovska, T; Popovska, K; Todorov, I; Petrovski, P; Kondov, G; Sapova, B; Marcikic, G; Atanasova, E; Obocki, E; Ugrinovska, J; Andonovski, D; Andonovski, D; Vasilevska, V; Mircevska-Zogovska, E

    2008-07-01

    A crucial and important factor for successful treatment of burns is the early covering of the burned area with skin substitutes. The covering of the burn requires material that restores the epidermal function and integrates itself into the process of healing. Biological dressings are the golden standard for the temporary covering of burns. All biological skin substitutes are susceptible to early graft reaction and the only exception is the amnion membrane. The importance of the amnion membrane as a biological dressing for burns amounts to: a barrier to bacterial colonization, hastens the epithelisation, and control of water loss. Amnioplasty is a method of application of amnion membrane on the recipient site. In this comparative study, 60 patients with dermal and sub-dermal burns were included. Research was made on an examination group of 30 patients with burns where the method of amnioplasty was applied, and for this amnion membrane conserved in 76% alcohol was used. The control group was made up of 30 patients with burns treated conventionally, and standard methods for the local treatment of burns were applied: exposition, occlusive dressing and initial excision with skin grafting. Pathohistological and microbiological analyses of the bioptical material were made. The degree of the burns was determined through a pathohistological analysis of the bioptical material taken the third day, and in some of the subjects where re-epithelialization was determined on the seventh day, the further re-epithelialization was observed clinically. Pathohistological examination enabled discrimination between bacterial colonization and the invasive bacterial infection. Furthermore, the type of bacterial colonization and infection was determined, which was confirmed with microbiological analysis. The analysis of the results from the microbiological and pathohistological researches of the bioptical material according to the bacterial colonization and infection showed that, although

  2. An ophthalmic solution of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist prevents corneal inflammation in a rat alkali burn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Masaaki; Shimizu, Akira; Masuda, Yukinari; Nagasaka, Shinya; Fukuda, Yuh; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We clarified the effects of an ophthalmic solution of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist on corneal inflammation and wound healing after alkali burn injury in rats. After alkali exposure, either an ophthalmic solution with 0.1% pioglitazone hydrochloride (the PPARγ group) or vehicle (the vehicle group) was topically applied to the cornea until day 14. Histological, immunohistochemical, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis were performed. After alkali injury, PPARγ expression increased, with the infiltration of many inflammatory cells. The infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages started from the corneal limbus within 6 h, and developed in the corneal center by day 7, with associated neovascularization. The accumulation of α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts and the deposition of type III collagen were noted on day 14. The histological changes were suppressed significantly by treatment with the ophthalmic solution of the PPARγ agonist. In addition, the number of infiltrating M2 macrophages in the cornea was increased by PPARγ agonist treatment. In real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, the messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor beta 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A were decreased in the PPARγ group compared to the vehicle group in the early periods of corneal inflammation. The ophthalmic solution of the PPARγ agonist inhibited inflammation, decreased the fibrotic reaction, and prevented neovascularization in the cornea from the early phase after alkali burn injury. The ophthalmic solution of the PPARγ agonist may provide a new treatment strategy with useful clinical applications for corneal inflammation and wound healing.

  3. An ophthalmic solution of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist prevents corneal inflammation in a rat alkali burn model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Masaaki; Masuda, Yukinari; Nagasaka, Shinya; Fukuda, Yuh; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We clarified the effects of an ophthalmic solution of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist on corneal inflammation and wound healing after alkali burn injury in rats. Methods After alkali exposure, either an ophthalmic solution with 0.1% pioglitazone hydrochloride (the PPARγ group) or vehicle (the vehicle group) was topically applied to the cornea until day 14. Histological, immunohistochemical, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis were performed. Results After alkali injury, PPARγ expression increased, with the infiltration of many inflammatory cells. The infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages started from the corneal limbus within 6 h, and developed in the corneal center by day 7, with associated neovascularization. The accumulation of α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts and the deposition of type III collagen were noted on day 14. The histological changes were suppressed significantly by treatment with the ophthalmic solution of the PPARγ agonist. In addition, the number of infiltrating M2 macrophages in the cornea was increased by PPARγ agonist treatment. In real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, the messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor beta 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A were decreased in the PPARγ group compared to the vehicle group in the early periods of corneal inflammation. Conclusions The ophthalmic solution of the PPARγ agonist inhibited inflammation, decreased the fibrotic reaction, and prevented neovascularization in the cornea from the early phase after alkali burn injury. The ophthalmic solution of the PPARγ agonist may provide a new treatment strategy with useful clinical applications for corneal inflammation and wound healing. PMID:24194635

  4. Pediatric deep burns caused by hot incense ashes during 2014 Spring Festival in Fuyang city, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhou, Bo; Tao, Ren Qin; Chen, Xu Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese people in Fuyang city, a northwest city of Anhui Province, are accustomed to burning incense at home for blessing during the Spring Festival. Their children, especially toddlers, like playing around the burning incense and are at risk of burning by hot incense ashes. The purpose of this study was to describe the unique cause and clinical characteristics of pediatric deep burns caused by hot incense ashes during 2014 Spring Festival. Twelve consecutive children admitted to our Burn Center and Fuyang People's Hospital during 2014 Spring Festival, with burn injuries caused by hot incense ashes which were epidemiologically studied retrospectively. Data on age, gender, size, depth and site of burn, incidence by day, number of operation, hospital stay, and causes of burns were collected. All patients came from Fuyang city. Of the 12 patients, the average age was 2.17 years, with a range of 1-6. The boy-to-girl ratio was 2: 1. The mean total burn surface area (TBSA) was 5.83%, and 91.67% of the children sustained full-thickness burn. Hands were the most common parts of the body to be injured. Dry necrosis developed in 14 fingers of 3 patients. January 31, 2014, the first day of the Chinese New Year, was the time of highest incidence. Six patients (50%) required surgical intervention while the number of operations including escharectomy, excision, skin grafting, or amputation of necrotic fingers, per patient was 2. A total of 14 fingers were amputated of the necrotic parts. All children survived and mean length of hospital stay of the patients was 20 days. Hot incense ashes cause serious injuries to children in Fuyang city during the Spring Festival. Preventive programs should be directed towards high risk groups to reduce the incidence of this burn.

  5. Youth indoor tanning and skin cancer prevention: lessons from tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenberg, Andrew B; Mahalingam-Dhingra, Aditya; Weinstock, Martin A; Sinclair, Craig; Geller, Alan C

    2015-02-01

    Youth use of ultraviolet-emitting indoor tanning beds represents a present and emerging public health crisis. Nearly 30% of white female high school students report tanning indoors, and a quarter of high school tanners have used a tanning bed more than 20 times in the past year. Despite the significant health risks of tanning beds, including potentially deadly melanoma and eye problems, limited actions have been taken in the U.S. to protect youth. Tobacco control policies and campaigns, which have sharply reduced youth smoking, may provide a useful framework to control indoor tanning among young people. This article describes several evidence-based tobacco control strategies with potential applicability to indoor tanning within the context of the U.S. Further, current tobacco control policies and current indoor tanning policies in the U.S. are compared, and recommendations on how to curtail youth indoor tanning are discussed. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Importance of local skin treatments during radiotherapy for prevention and treatment of radio-induced epithelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chargari, C.; Fromantin, I.; Kirova, Y.M.; Chargari, C.

    2009-01-01

    Radio-epithelitis represents a common problem, for which treatments are characterized by a great heterogeneity. The present review of literature focuses on data referenced in Pub med/Medline and published in French/English. Despite a real preclinical rationale, aloe vera and trolamine failed to demonstrate any benefit in the prophylactic settings. In a prospective assessment phase III assessment, Calendula officinalis was shown to be superior to trolamine for the prevention of radio-epithelitis. In the curative settings, sucrafalte failed to demonstrate any benefit. The benefit of dermo-corticoids was suggested in terms of erythema and itching. Promising clinical results are available with hyaluronic acid (M.A. S065D and Ialugen) and silver leaf may reduce the intensity of cutaneous radio-induced side effects. Data from the literature are conflicting, making real the difficulty to adopt from clinical trials any proof-of-principle strategy. Considering these uncertainties, several strategies are allowed. New topics are under investigation. Present data from the literature highlight the need for further trials, in order to propose evidence-based treatments and to harmonize clinical practice. (authors)

  7. Aplicaciones de la dermis artificial para la prevención y tratamiento de cicatrices hipertróficas y contracturas Artificial dermis aplications to prevent and treat hypertrofyc scars and skin retractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ferreiro González

    2012-03-01

    hypertrophic scars and contractures. The following variables were evaluated: haematoma, infection and total or partial loss of artificial dermis. The scar quality was reviewed during the postoperative period, using the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS. Patients´ satisfaction was measured using a 0-10 score survey. None of the areas treated with artificial dermis showed adverse scarring and in patients with prior hypertrophic scars no recurrence was found. We also observed that in acute burns, the areas treated with artificial dermis developed much better scar quality compared with those areas treated with split skin grafts. We achieved satisfactory coverage in areas with tendon exposure. Artificial dermis can be selectively applied to special areas during acute burn injury to prevent scar hypertrophy and contracture. It can also be used as coverage for normally non-graftable structures less than 3 cm where skin flaps are usually required. During the chronic stage, artificial dermis can be useful to treat contractures, as well as hypertrophic scars.

  8. Preventing skin injury during MR imaging for gamma knife surgery. Necessity and verification of insulated posts for fixation of leksell G-frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenai, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Masanori; Yamada, Akira; Asano, Tomoshige; Wakabayashi, Yukihiro; Nagatomi, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    At our institution, several patients developed swelling or, in some cases, severe skin injury (exempli gratia (e.g.) ulcer) at the sites of contact with frame fixation pins, during an early period after introduction of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). We confirmed that the skin injury was caused by heating of the skin tissue around a quick fixation screw (QFS) during MR imaging sequences with high specific absorption ratios (SARs), and noted for the first time that insulation of QFSs from the posts could prevent heat generation and skin injury. Therefore, we developed a novel insulated fixation post (IFP). The use of the IFP is the only practical means for ensuring safety. Here, we review our cases of skin injury, along with experimental results. We also describe the results of our verification study regarding the reliability of the IFP. To determine the degree of heating of the skin tissue around QFSs, which were suspected to be the causes of skin injury, MR imaging sequences used for patients who developed skin injury were reviewed and reproduced using a pumpkin and a melon as dummies with the 1.5-tesla apparatus. The strength of the IFP was also evaluated by fixing an aluminum pipe with IFPs and QFSs and applying impact. In addition, with patients, we compared the degree of displacement of coordinates using IFP versus conventional post made of aluminum alloy for frame fixation. In almost all cases of skin injury, 3D-time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiograpy with magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) pulse had been performed. In our experiments using the same MR imaging sequence, SARs were always high, with a whole body SAR (one-eighth of head SAR) exceeding 0.3 W/kg, and the temperature of the skin tissue around QFSs increased to about 55 deg C on average. Frame fixation with the IFPs did not induce heat generation during MR imaging for GKS in any sequences and did not cause skin injury. The strength and fixation accuracy of the IFP was comparable to those of the

  9. Prescribed burning: a topical issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovio G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Prescribed burning is a promising technique for the prevention of forest fires in Italy. The research deepened several ecological and operative aspects. However, legal issues need to be thoroughly investigated.

  10. Animal Models in Burn Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, A.; Amini-Nik, S.; Jeschke, M.G

    2014-01-01

    Burn injury is a severe form of trauma affecting more than two million people in North America each year. Burn trauma is not a single pathophysiological event but a devastating injury that causes structural and functional deficits in numerous organ systems. Due to its complexity and the involvement of multiple organs, in vitro experiments cannot capture this complexity nor address the pathophysiology. In the past two decades, a number of burn animal models have been developed to replicate the various aspects of burn injury; to elucidate the pathophysiology and explore potential treatment interventions. Understanding the advantages and limitations of these animal models is essential for the design and development of treatments that are clinically relevant to humans. This review paper aims to highlight the common animal models of burn injury in order to provide investigators with a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of these models for translational applications. While many animal models of burn exist, we limit our discussion to the skin healing of mouse, rat, and pig. Additionally, we briefly explain hypermetabolic characteristics of burn injury and the animal model utilized to study this phenomena. Finally, we discuss the economic costs associated with each of these models in order to guide decisions of choosing the appropriate animal model for burn research. PMID:24714880

  11. Private sector tuberculosis prevention in the US: Characteristics associated with interferon-gamma release assay or tuberculin skin testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbridge, Erica L; Miller, Thaddeus L; Carlson, Erin K; Ho, Christine

    2018-01-01

    To determine whether latent tuberculosis infection risk factors are associated with an increased likelihood of latent tuberculosis infection testing in the US private healthcare sector. A national sample of medical and pharmacy claims representing services rendered January 2011 through December 2013 for 3,997,986 commercially insured individuals in the US who were 0 to 64 years of age. We used multivariable logistic regression models to determine whether TB/LTBI risk factors were associated with an increased likelihood of Interferon-Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) or Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) testing in the private sector. 4.31% (4.27-4.34%) received at least one TST/IGRA test between 2011 and 2013 while 1.69% (1.67-1.72%) received a TST/IGRA test in 2013. Clinical risk factors associated with a significantly increased likelihood of testing included HIV, immunosuppressive therapy, exposure to tuberculosis, a history of tuberculosis, diabetes, tobacco use, end stage renal disease, and alcohol use disorder. Other significant variables included gender, age, asthma, the state tuberculosis rate, population density, and percent of foreign-born persons in a county. Private sector TST/IGRA testing is not uncommon and testing varies with clinical risk indicators. Thus, the private sector can be a powerful resource in the fight against tuberculosis. Analyses of administrative data can inform how best to leverage private sector healthcare toward tuberculosis prevention activities.

  12. Bioprinting of skin constructs for wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    He, Peng; Zhao, Junning; Zhang, Jiumeng; Li, Bo; Gou, Zhiyuan; Gou, Maling; Li, Xiaolu

    2018-01-01

    Extensive burns and full-thickness skin wounds are difficult to repair. Autologous split-thickness skin graft (ASSG) is still used as the gold standard in the clinic. However, the shortage of donor skin tissues is a serious problem. A potential solution to this problem is to fabricate skin constructs using biomaterial scaffolds with or without cells. Bioprinting is being applied to address the need for skin tissues suitable for transplantation, and can lead to the development of skin equivale...

  13. Preliminary results in single-step wound closure procedure of full-thickness facial burns in children by using the collagen-elastin matrix and review of pediatric facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircan, Mehmet; Cicek, Tugrul; Yetis, Muhammed Ikbal

    2015-09-01

    Management of full-thickness facial burns remains one of the greatest challenges. Controversy exists among surgeons regarding the use of early excision for facial burns. Unfortunately, delayed excision of deeper burns often results in more scarring and subsequent reconstruction becomes more difficult. A collagen-elastin matrix is used to improve the quality of the reconstructed skin, to reduce scarring and to prevent wound contraction. It serves as a foundation for split thickness skin graft and enhances short and long-term results. We report the usage of a collagen-elastin matrix during single-step wound closure technique of severe full-thickness facial burns in 15 children with large burned body surface area, and also we review the literature about pediatric facial burns. There were 15 pediatric patients with severe facial burns, 8 girls and 7 boys ranging in age from 10 months to 12 years, mean age 7 years and 6 months old. The facial burn surface area (FBSA) among the patients includes seven patients with 100%, five with 75%, and three with 50%. The average total body surface area (TBSA) for the patients was 72%, ranging between 50 and 90%. 5 of the patients' admissions were late, more than four days after burns while the rest of the patients were admitted within the first four days (acute admission time). The burns were caused by flame in eight of the patients, bomb blast in four, and scalding in three. All patients were treated by the simultaneous application of the collagen-elastin matrix and an unmeshed split thickness skin graft at Turgut Özal Medical Center, Pediatric Burn Center, Malatya, Turkey. After the treatment only two patients needed a second operation for revision of the grafts. All grafts transplanted to the face survived. The average Vancouver scar scales (VSS) were 2.55±1.42, ranging between one and six, in the first 10 of 15 patients at the end of 6 months postoperatively. VSS measurements of the last 5 patients were not taken since the 6

  14. Burning issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raloff, J.

    1993-01-01

    The idea of burning oil slicks at sea has intrigued oil-cleanup managers for more than a decade, but it wasn't until the advent of fireproof booms in the mid-1980's and a major spill opportunity (the March 1989 Exxon Valdez) that in-situ burning got a real sea trial. The results of this and other burning experiments indicate that, when conditions allow it, nothing can compete with fire's ability to remove oil from water. Burns have the potential to remove as much oil in one day as mechanical devices can in one month, along with minimal equipment, labor and cost. Reluctance to burn in appropriate situations comes primarily from the formation of oily, black smoke. Analysis of the potentially toxic gases have been done, indicating that burning will not increase the levels of polluting aldehydes, ketones, dioxins, furans, and PAHs above those that normally evaporate from spilled oil. This article contains descriptions of planned oil fires and the discussion on the advantages and concerns of such a policy

  15. Preventing the acute skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer: the use of corneometry in order to evaluate the protective effect of moisturizing creams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Franco, Rossella; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Muto, Paolo; Ravo, Vincenzo; Sammarco, Elena; Calvanese, Maria Grazia; De Natale, Flora; Falivene, Sara; Di Lecce, Ada; Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Murino, Paola; Manzo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to add, to the objective evaluation, an instrumental assessment of the skin damage induced by radiation therapy. A group of 100 patients affected by breast cancer was recruited in the study over one year. Patients were divided into five groups of 20 patients. For each group it was prescribed a different topical treatment. The following products were used: Betaglucan, sodium hyaluronate (Neoviderm®), Vitis vinifera A. s-I-M.t-O.dij (Ixoderm®), Alga Atlantica plus Ethylbisiminomethylguaicolo and Manganese Cloruro (Radioskin1®) and Metal Esculetina plus Ginko Biloba and Aloe vera (Radioskin 2®); Natural triglycerides-fitosterols (Xderit®); Selectiose plus thermal water of Avene (Trixera+®). All hydrating creams were applied twice a day starting 15 days before and one month after treatment with radiations. Before and during treatment patients underwent weekly skin assessments and corneometry to evaluate the symptoms related to skin toxicity and state of hydration. Evaluation of acute cutaneous toxicity was defined according to the RTOG scale. All patients completed radiotherapy; 72% of patients presented a G1 cutaneous toxicity, 18% developed a G2 cutaneous toxicity, 10% developed a G3 toxicity, no one presented G4 toxicity. The corneometry study confirmed the protective role of effective creams used in radiation therapy of breast cancer and showed its usefulness to identify radiation-induced dermatitis in a very early stage. The preventive use of topic products reduces the incidence of skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. An instrumental evaluation of skin hydration can help the radiation oncologist to use strategies that prevent the onset of toxicity of high degree. All moisturizing creams used in this study were equally valid in the treatment of skin damage induced by radiotherapy

  16. An ex vivo porcine skin model to evaluate pressure-reducing devices of different mechanical properties used for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ching-Yan C; Holmes, David F; Thomason, Helen A; Stephenson, Christian; Derby, Brian; Hardman, Matthew J

    2016-11-01

    Pressure ulcers are complex wounds caused by pressure- and shear-induced trauma to skin and underlying tissues. Pressure-reducing devices, such as dressings, have been shown to successfully reduce pressure ulcer incidence, when used in adjunct to pressure ulcer preventative care. While pressure-reducing devices are available in a range of materials, with differing mechanical properties, understanding of how a material's mechanical properties will influence clinical efficacy remains limited. The aim of this study was to establish a standardized ex vivo model to allow comparison of the cell protection potential of two gel-like pressure-reducing devices with differing mechanical properties (elastic moduli of 77 vs. 35 kPa). The devices also displayed differing energy dissipation under compressive loading, and resisted strain differently under constant load in compressive creep tests. To evaluate biological efficacy we employed a new ex vivo porcine skin model, with a confirmed elastic moduli closely matching that of human skin (113 vs. 119 kPa, respectively). Static loads up to 20 kPa were applied to porcine skin ex vivo with subsequent evaluation of pressure-induced cell death and cytokine release. Pressure application alone increased the percentage of epidermal apoptotic cells from less than 2% to over 40%, and increased cellular secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. Co-application of a pressure-reducing device significantly reduced both cellular apoptosis and cytokine production, protecting against cellular damage. These data reveal new insight into the relationship between mechanical properties of pressure-reducing devices and their biological effects. After appropriate validation of these results in clinical pressure ulcer prevention with all tissue layers present between the bony prominence and external surface, this ex vivo porcine skin model could be widely employed to optimize design and evaluation of devices aimed at reducing pressure

  17. The antiviral drug tenofovir, an inhibitor of Pannexin-1-mediated ATP release, prevents liver and skin fibrosis by downregulating adenosine levels in the liver and skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Feig

    Full Text Available Fibrosing diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and, therefore, there is a need for safe and effective antifibrotic therapies. Adenosine, generated extracellularly by the dephosphorylation of adenine nucleotides, ligates specific receptors which play a critical role in development of hepatic and dermal fibrosis. Results of recent clinical trials indicate that tenofovir, a widely used antiviral agent, reverses hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection. Belonging to the class of acyclic nucleoside phosphonates, tenofovir is an analogue of AMP. We tested the hypothesis that tenofovir has direct antifibrotic effects in vivo by interfering with adenosine pathways of fibrosis using two distinct models of adenosine and A2AR-mediated fibrosis.Thioacetamide (100mg/kg IP-treated mice were treated with vehicle, or tenofovir (75mg/kg, SubQ (n = 5-10. Bleomycin (0.25U, SubQ-treated mice were treated with vehicle or tenofovir (75mg/kg, IP (n = 5-10. Adenosine levels were determined by HPLC, and ATP release was quantitated as luciferase-dependent bioluminescence. Skin breaking strength was analysed and H&E and picrosirus red-stained slides were imaged. Pannexin-1expression was knocked down following retroviral-mediated expression of of Pannexin-1-specific or scrambled siRNA.Treatment of mice with tenofovir diminished adenosine release from the skin of bleomycin-treated mice and the liver of thioacetamide-treated mice, models of diffuse skin fibrosis and hepatic cirrhosis, respectively. More importantly, tenofovir treatment diminished skin and liver fibrosis in these models. Tenofovir diminished extracellular adenosine concentrations by inhibiting, in a dose-dependent fashion, cellular ATP release but not in cells lacking Pannexin-1.These studies suggest that tenofovir, a widely used antiviral agent, could be useful in the treatment of fibrosing diseases.

  18. Effect of seasonal affective disorder and pathological tanning motives on efficacy of an appearance-focused intervention to prevent skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, Joel; Turrisi, Rob; Stapleton, Jerod; Robinson, June

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the robustness of an appearance-focused intervention to prevent skin cancer in individuals reporting seasonal affective disorder (SAD) symptoms and pathological tanning motives. Randomized, controlled clinical trial. College campus. Four hundred thirty adult female indoor tanners (200 in the intervention group and 230 control participants). A booklet discussing the history of tanning, current tanning norms, UV radiation's effects on skin, recommendations for indoor tanning use focusing on abstinence and harm reduction recommendations, and information on healthier, appearance-enhancing alternatives to tanning. Self-reported attitudes, intentions, and tanning behaviors; pathological tanning motives assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study; and SAD symptoms assessed by the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire. Two of the 4 pathological tanning scales, opiatelike reactions to tanning and dissatisfaction with natural skin tone, were significant moderators demonstrating stronger treatment effects for individuals scoring higher on these scales. Treatment effects were equivalently positive (ie, no significant moderator effects) for all levels of SAD symptoms and all levels of the other 2 pathological tanning motive scales (ie, perceiving tanning as a problem and tolerance to the effects of tanning). The appearance-focused skin cancer prevention intervention is robust enough to reduce indoor tanning among tanners who exhibit SAD symptoms or pathological tanning motives. Tailored interventions may address individuals' motivations for tanning and their relation to maladaptive behavior, such as dissatisfaction with appearance or the need for relaxation because of anxiety.

  19. The safety and efficacy of EGF-based cream for the prevention of radiotherapy-induced skin injury: results from a multicenter observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Cheol [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seung Do [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Ho [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min Kyu [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, eungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Huasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topically applied recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) for the prevention of radiation-induced dermatitis in cancer patients. From December 2010 to April 2012, a total of 1,172 cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) of more than 50 Gy were prospectively enrolled and treated with EGF-based cream. An acute skin reaction classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 6-point rating scale was the primary end point and we also assessed the occurrence of edema, dry skin, or pruritus. The percentage of radiation dermatitis with maximum grade 0 and grade 1 was 19% and 58% at the time of 50 Gy, and it became 29% and 47% after completion of planned RT. This increment was observed only in breast cancer patients (from 18%/62% to 32%/49%). Adverse events related to the EGF-based cream developed in 49 patients (4%) with mild erythema the most common. Skin toxicity grade >2 was observed in 5% of the patients. Edema, dry skin, and pruritus grade > or =3 developed in 9%, 9%, and 1% of the patients, respectively. Prophylactic use of an EGF-based cream is effective in preventing radiation dermatitis with tolerable toxicity. Further studies comparing EGF cream with other topical agents may be necessary.

  20. The safety and efficacy of EGF-based cream for the prevention of radiotherapy-induced skin injury: results from a multicenter observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun Cheol; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Doo Ho; Kang, Min Kyu; Wu, Hong Gyun

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topically applied recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) for the prevention of radiation-induced dermatitis in cancer patients. From December 2010 to April 2012, a total of 1,172 cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) of more than 50 Gy were prospectively enrolled and treated with EGF-based cream. An acute skin reaction classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 6-point rating scale was the primary end point and we also assessed the occurrence of edema, dry skin, or pruritus. The percentage of radiation dermatitis with maximum grade 0 and grade 1 was 19% and 58% at the time of 50 Gy, and it became 29% and 47% after completion of planned RT. This increment was observed only in breast cancer patients (from 18%/62% to 32%/49%). Adverse events related to the EGF-based cream developed in 49 patients (4%) with mild erythema the most common. Skin toxicity grade >2 was observed in 5% of the patients. Edema, dry skin, and pruritus grade > or =3 developed in 9%, 9%, and 1% of the patients, respectively. Prophylactic use of an EGF-based cream is effective in preventing radiation dermatitis with tolerable toxicity. Further studies comparing EGF cream with other topical agents may be necessary.

  1. A prospective, randomised study of a novel transforming methacrylate dressing compared with a silver-containing sodium carboxymethylcellulose dressing on partial-thickness skin graft donor sites in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadian, Ojan; Arnoldo, Brett; Purdue, Gary; Burris, Agnes; Skrinjar, Edda; Duschek, Nikolaus; Leaper, David J

    2015-06-01

    This prospective, randomised study compares a new transforming methacrylate dressing (TMD) with a silver-containing carboxymethylcellulose dressing (CMC-Ag) after application to split-thickness skin graft (STSG) donor sites. This was an unblinded, non-inferiority, between-patient, comparison study that involved patients admitted to a single-centre burn unit who required two skin graft donor sites. Each patient's donor sites were covered immediately after surgery: one donor site with TMD and the other with CMC-Ag. The donor sites were evaluated until healing or until 24 days post-application, whichever came first. Study endpoints were time to healing, daily pain scores, number of dressing changes, patient comfort and physicians' and patients' willingness to use the dressings in the future. Nineteen patients had both the dressings applied. No statistically significant difference was noted in time to healing between the two dressings (14·2 days using TMD compared with 13·2 days using CMC-Ag). When pain scores were compared, TMD resulted in statistically significantly less pain at three different time periods (2-5 days, 6-10 days and 11-15 days; P < 0·001 at all time periods). Patients also reported greater comfort with TMD (P < 0·001). Users rated TMD as being less easy to use because of the time and technique required for application. Reductions in pain and increased patient comfort with the use of the TMD dressing, compared with CMC-Ag, were seen as clinical benefits as these are the major issues in donor site management. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Biologic and synthetic skin substitutes: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Khoo, Teng Lye; Mohd. Yussof, Shah Jumaat

    2010-01-01

    The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. Skin substitutes have important roles in the treatment of deep dermal and full thickness wounds of various aetiologies. At present, there is no ideal substitute in the market. Skin substit...

  3. Video education to improve recognition of common benign and malignant cutaneous lesions and skin cancer prevention in the public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lenczowski, BS

    2018-06-01

    Conclusion: In this study, we found that a brief, plain-language video was effective at conveying understandable content to help subjects learn to identify common cancerous and benign skin growths while also teaching them strategies to protect against skin cancer.

  4. Management of periocular post burn scarring in the epileptics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheema, A.M.; Saeed, M.; Ghani, A.; Akhter, S.W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical presentation and management of patients with epilepsy presenting with periocular post burn scarring. Results: There were 18 (78.26%) female and 5(21.73%) male patients. The age range was from 18 to 45 years with a mean of 28 years. In 17 (73.91%) patients, lid contracture was released to cover their eyeballs. In 6 (26.08%) patients the eyeball was lost due to late presentation. Conclusion: There should be a high index of suspicion in facial burns for ophthalmic damage and early referral to an ophthalmologist should be made to prevent complications. Early release of contracture with application of full or partial thickness skin grafts is advisable. (author)

  5. Management of patients in a dedicated burns intensive care unit (BICU) in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Madiha; Kamal, Rehana

    2013-05-01

    In Pakistan the practice of managing extensive burns in dedicated intensive care units is not well established. This audit aims to define the characteristics of the victims of major burns and factors that increase mortality and outcome of the protocol-based management in a dedicated burns intensive care unit (BICU). This prospective audit included all patients admitted to the BICU of Suleiman Dawood Burns Unit in Karachi from 1st September 2002 to 31st August 2011. Demographic information, type and place of burn, total body surface area burn (TBSA), type of organ support provided, length of ICU stay, any associated medical diseases, and out outcome were documented. A total of 1597 patients were admitted to the BICU in 9 years. Median age of the patients was 22 (IQR =32-7). 32% victims were children 50 years old. Male to female ratio was 1.4:1. Fire was the leading cause of burns in adults (64%) and scald burns were most common in (64%) in children. 72.4% of the accidents happened at home, where kitchen was the commonest location (597 cases). Mean TBSA burnt was 32.5% (SD ± 22.95%, 95%CI: 31.36-33.61). 27% patients needed ventilatory support, 4% were dialyzed and split skin graftings were performed in 20% patients. Average length of ICU stay was 10.42 days. Epilepsy, psychiatric illness and drug addiction were not common associations with burns. Overall mortality was 41.30% but it decreased over the years from 75% to 27%. Groups of people most vulnerable to sustain burn are young females getting burnt in the kitchen, young males getting burnt at work, and small children falling in pots of hot water stored for drinking or bathing. TBSA >40%, age >50 years, fire burn and female gender were associated with a higher risk of death. Carefully planned, protocol based management of burn patients by burn teams of dedicated healthcare professionals, even with limited resources reduced mortality. Burn hazard awareness, prevention and educational programmes targeted at the

  6. Spontaneous diffusion of an effective skin cancer prevention program through Web-based access to program materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dawn M; Escoffery, Cam; Nehl, Eric; Glanz, Karen

    2010-11-01

    Little information exists about the diffusion of evidence-based interventions, a process that can occur naturally in organized networks with established communication channels. This article describes the diffusion of an effective skin cancer prevention program called Pool Cool through available Web-based program materials. We used self-administered surveys to collect information from program users about access to and use of Web-based program materials. We analyzed the content of e-mails sent to the official Pool Cool Web site to obtain qualitative information about spontaneous diffusion. Program users were dispersed throughout the United States, most often learning about the program through a Web site (32%), publication (26%), or colleague (19%). Most respondents (86%) reported that their pool provided educational activities at swimming lessons. The Leader's Guide (59%) and lesson cards (50%) were the most commonly downloaded materials, and most respondents reported using these core items sometimes, often, or always. Aluminum sun-safety signs were the least frequently used materials. A limited budget was the most commonly noted obstacle to sun-safety efforts at the pool (85%). Factors supporting sun safety at the pool centered around risk management (85%) and health of the pool staff (78%). Diffusion promotes the use of evidence-based health programs and can occur with and without systematic efforts. Strategies such as providing well-packaged, user-friendly program materials at low or no cost and strategic advertisement of the availability of program materials may increase program use and exposure. Furthermore, highlighting the benefits of the program can motivate potential program users.

  7. [Skin Care to Prevent Development of Pressure Ulcers in Bedridden Nursing Home Residents from Developing Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Chie

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether skincare products are effective in preventing development of pressure ulcers in bedridden nursing home residents. The study sample consisted of 21 nursing home residents at a nursing home in Osaka, Japan who use diapers. Participants were assigned to 3 groups and compared to a control group. None of the subjects developed a pressure ulcer and had improved skin condition around the anus.

  8. Cutaneous osteosarcoma arising from a burn scar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min A.; Yi, Jaehyuck [Kyungpook National University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Jong Min [Kyungpook National University, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Tumors that develop in old burn scars are usually squamous cell carcinomas. Sarcomas have also been reported, albeit rarely. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of an extraskeletal osteosarcoma arising in a prior burn scar reported in the English-language literature, mainly discussing the clinicopathological features. Herein, we present a case of cutaneous osteosarcoma visualized as a mineralized soft-tissue mass arising from the scar associated with a previous skin burn over the back. This seems to be the first report describing the imaging features of a cutaneous osteosarcoma from an old burn scar. (orig.)

  9. Environmental arsenic exposure from a coal-burning power plant as a potential risk factor for nonmelanoma skin carcinoma: Results from a case-control study in the district of Prievidza, Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesch, B.; Ranft, U.; Jakubis, P.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M.J.; Hergemoller, A.; Unfried, K.; Jakubis, M.; Miskovic, P.; Keegan, T. [University of Dusseldorf, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2002-05-01

    To investigate the risk of arsenic exposure from a coal-burning power plant in Slovakia on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) development, a 1996-1999 population-based case-control study was conducted with 264 cases and 286 controls. Exposure assessment was based on residential history and annual emissions (Asres1, Asres2) and on nutritional habits and arsenic content in food (Asnut1, Asnut2). Asres1 was assessed as a function of the distance of places of residence to the plant. Asres2 additionally considered workplace locations. Asnut1 was used to calculate arsenic uptake by weighting food frequencies with arsenic concentrations and annual consumption of food items. Asnut2 additionally considered consumption of local products. Age- and gender-adjusted risk estimates for NMSC in the highest exposure category (90th vs. 30th percentile) were 1.90 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.39, 2.60) for Asres1, 1.90 (95% CI: 1.38, 2.62) for Asres2, 1.19 (95% CI: 0.64, 2.12) for Asnut1, and 1.83 (95% CI: 0.98, 3.43) for Asnut2. No interaction was found between arsenic exposure and dietary and residential data. Other plant emissions could have confounded the distance-based exposure variables. Consumption of contaminated vegetables and fruits could be confounded by the protective effects of such a diet. Nevertheless, the authors found an excess NMSC risk for environmental arsenic exposure.

  10. UV-generated free radicals (FR) in skin: Their prevention by sunscreens and their induction by self-tanning agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, K.; Seifert, M.; Herrling, Th.; Fuchs, J.

    2008-05-01

    In the past few years, the cellular effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced in skin have become increasingly recognized. Indeed, it is now well known that UV irradiation induces structural and cellular changes in all the compartments of skin tissue. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the first and immediate consequence of UV exposure and therefore the quantitative determination of free radical reactions in the skin during UV radiation is of primary importance for the understanding of dermatological photodamage. The RSF method (radical sun protection factor) herein presented, based on electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR), enables the measurement of free radical reactions in skin biopsies directly during UV radiation. The amount of free radicals varies with UV doses and can be standardized by varying UV irradiance or exposure time. The RSF method allows the determination of the protective effect of UV filters and sunscreens as well as the radical induction capacity of self-tanning agents as dihydroxyacetone (DHA). The reaction of the reducing sugars used in self-tanning products and amino acids in the skin layer (Maillard reaction) leads to the formation of Amadori products that generate free radicals during UV irradiation. Using the RSF method three different self-tanning agents were analyzed and it was found, that in DHA-treated skin more than 180% additional radicals were generated during sun exposure with respect to untreated skin. For this reason the exposure duration in the sun must be shortened when self-tanners are used and photoaging processes are accelerated.

  11. An animal study of a newly developed skin-penetrating pad and covering material for catheters to prevent exit-site infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Masato; Mizuno, Toshihide; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Nemoto, Yasushi; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Takemoto, Yoshiaki; Naganuma, Toshihide; Nakatani, Tatsuya

    2009-12-01

    goat skin throughout the 2-year experimental period without any special wound care such as cleansing or disinfection. The performance of the skin-penetrating pad was similarly favorable when attached to a commercial continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis catheter. The newly developed segmented polyurethane porous material had excellent tissue biocompatibility and tissue ingrowth. The skin-penetrating pad devised by using this porous material did not cause epidermal downgrowth, suggesting that it may be effective for the prevention of exit-site infection.

  12. Skin graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin transplant; Skin autografting; FTSG; STSG; Split thickness skin graft; Full thickness skin graft ... donor site. Most people who are having a skin graft have a split-thickness skin graft. This takes ...

  13. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer Types ... Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted ...

  14. In-vitro- and in-vivo-studies on the application of an innovative wound healing system for burn patients on the basis of a spray-transplantation of primary isolated skin cells and an active wound dressing made of hollow fiber capillaries

    OpenAIRE

    Plettig, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of acute burns, especially for patients with 2b degree wounds, is not resolved satisfactorily. The thesis evaluates an innovative therapeutic concept based on a primary skin cell isolation from fetal or adult tissue, an autologous spray-transplantation and a temporary wound supply via an active wound dressing based on hollow fiber capillaries. The aim is to increase the yield of regenerative basal keratinocyte precursor cells through a gentle isolation technique and to distribut...

  15. Electrical burns of the abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, Ritesh

    2013-09-01

    A 35-year-old male farmer came in contact with 11,000 volts high tension electric wire and sustained full thickness burn wounds over scapula, upper limb and anterior abdominal wall along with perforation of the intestine. Patient was initially managed conservatively in general surgery ward and was referred to us after 3 days with necrosis of the burned skin and muscles over the shoulder and abdomen. Patient was initially managed conservatively and then thorough debridement of the necrotic skin over the left shoulder and upper arm was done and the area was split skin grafted. Patient developed enterocutaneous fistula, which healed over a period of 8 weeks. The granulating wound over the abdomen was also skin grafted and patient was discharged after 18 days. About 4 months, after the discharge patient presented with ventral hernia. Repair of ventral hernia by synthetic mesh application and reconstruction of the abdominal wall with a free tensor fascia lata flap was done over the mesh, but the flap failed. Then after debridement two random pattern transposition skin flaps, one from the right upper and another from the left lower abdomen were transposed over the abdominal wound and donor area was skin grafted. Patient was discharged after 17 days.

  16. Electrical burns of the abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male farmer came in contact with 11,000 volts high tension electric wire and sustained full thickness burn wounds over scapula, upper limb and anterior abdominal wall along with perforation of the intestine. Patient was initially managed conservatively in general surgery ward and was referred to us after 3 days with necrosis of the burned skin and muscles over the shoulder and abdomen. Patient was initially managed conservatively and then thorough debridement of the necrotic skin over the left shoulder and upper arm was done and the area was split skin grafted. Patient developed enterocutaneous fistula, which healed over a period of 8 weeks. The granulating wound over the abdomen was also skin grafted and patient was discharged after 18 days. About 4 months, after the discharge patient presented with ventral hernia. Repair of ventral hernia by synthetic mesh application and reconstruction of the abdominal wall with a free tensor fascia lata flap was done over the mesh, but the flap failed. Then after debridement two random pattern transposition skin flaps, one from the right upper and another from the left lower abdomen were transposed over the abdominal wound and donor area was skin grafted. Patient was discharged after 17 days.

  17. A Skin Cancer Prevention Facial-Aging Mobile App for Secondary Schools in Brazil: Appearance-Focused Interventional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckl, Marlene; Gatzka, Martina; Heppt, Markus V; Resende Rodrigues, Henrique; Schneider, Sven; Sondermann, Wiebke; de Almeida e Silva, Carolina; Kirchberger, Michael C; Klode, Joachim; Enk, Alexander H; Knispel, Sarah; von Kalle, Christof; Stoffels, Ingo; Schadendorf, Dirk; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Esser, Stefan; Assis, Aisllan; Bernardes-Souza, Breno

    2018-01-01

    Background The incidence of melanoma is increasing faster than any other major cancer both in Brazil and worldwide. Southeast Brazil has especially high incidences of melanoma, and early detection is low. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a primary risk factor for developing melanoma. Increasing attractiveness is a major motivation among adolescents for tanning. A medical student-delivered intervention that takes advantage of the broad availability of mobile phones and adolescents’ interest in their appearance indicated effectiveness in a recent study from Germany. However, the effect in a high-UV index country with a high melanoma prevalence and the capability of medical students to implement such an intervention remain unknown. Objective In this pilot study, our objective was to investigate the preliminary success and implementability of a photoaging intervention to prevent skin cancer in Brazilian adolescents. Methods We implemented a free photoaging mobile phone app (Sunface) in 15 secondary school classes in southeast Brazil. Medical students “mirrored” the pupils’ altered 3-dimensional (3D) selfies reacting to touch on tablets via a projector in front of their whole grade accompanied by a brief discussion of means of UV protection. An anonymous questionnaire capturing sociodemographic data and risk factors for melanoma measured the perceptions of the intervention on 5-point Likert scales among 356 pupils of both sexes (13-19 years old; median age 16 years) in grades 8 to 12 of 2 secondary schools in Brazil. Results We measured more than 90% agreement in both items that measured motivation to reduce UV exposure and only 5.6% disagreement: 322 (90.5%) agreed or strongly agreed that their 3D selfie motivated them to avoid using a tanning bed, and 321 (90.2%) that it motivated them to improve their sun protection; 20 pupils (5.6%) disagreed with both items. The perceived effect on motivation was higher in female pupils in both tanning bed

  18. Effects of complex interventions in 'skin cancer prevention and treatment': protocol for a mixed-method systematic review with qualitative comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beifus, Karolina; Breitbart, Eckhard; Köberlein-Neu, Juliane

    2017-09-05

    Occurring from ultraviolet radiation combined with impairing ozone levels, uncritical sun exposure and use of tanning beds an increasing number of people are affected by different types of skin cancer. But preventive interventions like skin cancer screening are still missing the evidence for effectiveness and therefore are criticised. Fundamental for an appropriate course of action is to approach the defined parameters as measures for effectiveness critically. A prerequisite should be the critical application of used parameter that are defined as measures for effectiveness. This research seeks to establish, through the available literature, the effects and conditions that prove the effectiveness of prevention strategies in skin cancer. A mixed-method approach is employed to combine quantitative to qualitative methods and answer what effects can display effectiveness considering time horizon, perspective and organisational level and what are essential and sufficient conditions to prove effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in skin cancer prevention strategies. A systematic review will be performed to spot studies from any design and assess the data quantitatively and qualitatively. Included studies from each key question will be summarised by characteristics like population, intervention, comparison, outcomes, study design, endpoints, effect estimator and so on. Beside statistical relevancies for a systematic review the qualitative method of qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) will be performed. The estimated outcomes from this review and QCA are the accomplishment and absence of effects that are appropriate for application in effectiveness assessments and further cost-effectiveness assessment. Formal ethical approval is not required as primary data will not be collected. International Prospective Register for Systematic Reviews number CRD42017053859. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  19. Skin care and incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin care; Incontinence - pressure sore; Incontinence - pressure ulcer Patient Instructions Preventing pressure ulcers Images Male urinary system References Holroyd S. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: identification, prevention and care. Br J Nurs . 2015;24( ...

  20. Wood burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, H

    1955-01-01

    Discussed are the use of wood as a fuel, the technique of wood combustion and the operation of wood-burning stoves for cooking and heating. In addition, there is a section which reviews the use of wood stoves in various countries and lists manufacturers of stoves, central heating furnaces and in some cases sawdust burners.

  1. Surgical treatment and management of the severely burn patient: Review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacto-Sanchez, P

    Since one of the main challenges in treating acute burn injuries is preventing infection, early excising of the eschar and covering of the wound becomes critical. Non-viable tissue is removed by initial aggressive surgical debridement. Many surgical options for covering the wound bed have been described, although split-thickness skin grafts remain the standard for the rapid and permanent closure of full-thickness burns. Significant advances made in the past decades have greatly improved burns patient care, as such that major future improvements in survival rates seem to be more difficult. Research into stem cells, grafting, biomarkers, inflammation control, and rehabilitation will continue to improve individualized care and create new treatment options for these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the antioxidant capacity and preventive effects of a topical emulsion and its vehicle control on the skin response to UV exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, H; Behnam, S; Villarama, C D; Arens-Corell, M; Choi, M J; Maibach, H I

    2005-01-01

    Supplying topical exogenous antioxidants to the skin may prevent or minimize free radical-induced damaging. This study determines antioxidative capacity of a topical skin care emulsion (an oil-in-water vitamin E-containing formulation) versus its vehicle on human skin that was exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) by utilizing a photochemiluminescence device and biophysical methods. Ten healthy Caucasians (3 male and 7 female; mean age 47 +/- 10 years) were enrolled. In a randomized and double-blind manner, a pH-balanced vitamin E emulsion or its vehicle control was applied onto predesignated forearm prior to UVR exposure. Thirty minutes after application, these test sites were exposed to a UV light to induce the minimal erythema dose. One untreated site served as a blank control. Visual scoring and instrumental measurements were recorded at baseline and at 24 h and 48 h thereafter. At day 3, after completing instrumental measurements, each test site was stripped three times in a consecutive manner with a proprietary adhesive tape disc. These tapes were quantified for antioxidant capacity using a photochemiluminescence device. Vitamin E emulsion and vehicle control significantly (p emulsion showed significantly (p emulsion and its vehicle control significantly (p emulsion significantly (p emulsion and its vehicle control showed significant (p emulsion and its vehicle control proved effective in preventing induction of erythema and reducing inflammatory damage caused by UV exposure. The effect of vitamin E emulsion exceeded that of an 'active control'. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Management of post burn hand deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabapathy S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The hand is ranked among the three most frequent sites of burns scar contracture deformity. One of the major determinants of the quality of life in burns survivors is the functionality of the hands. Burns deformities, although largely preventable, nevertheless do occur when appropriate treatment is not provided in the acute situation or when they are part of a major burns. Reconstructive procedures can greatly improve the function of the hands. Appropriate choice of procedures and timing of surgery followed by supervised physiotherapy can be a boon for a burns survivor.

  4. Educational Materials - Burn Wise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn Wise outreach material. Burn Wise is a partnership program of that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right wood-burning appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  5. Use of helium-neon laser for the prevention of acute radiation reaction of the skin in neutron-beam therapy of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovich, V.I.; Musabaeva, L.I.; Kitsmanyuk, Z.D.; Lavrenkov, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary data on helium-neon laser usage to prevent acute radiation skinresponse in patients with head and neck neoplasm were presented in case of fast neutrons therapy with average energy of ≅ 6.3 MeV. Irradiation was performed by 2 fractions a week with single absorbed focal dose of 1.2-1.4 Gy and the dose for the skin was 2-2.2 Gy. RBE of the fast neutrons comprised ∼ 3. Some patients were subjected to neutron therapy in combination with helium-neon laser treatment, the others underwent only neutron therapy. Combination of neutron and helium-neon laser therapy increased skin resistance to neutron irradiation. Combined treatment with neutrons and helium-neon laser decreased development of humid epidermitis by half than in case of neutron treatment alone

  6. [Burns in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Rodríguez, R; Domínguez Amillo, E; Soto Beauregard, C; Díaz González, M; López Gutiérrez, J C; Ros Mar, Z; Tovar Larrucea, J A

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to know the epidemiology of burns in teenagers. Burn patients over 11 years old admitted in our Institution in the last 10 years were included. Etiology, burn size, hospital stay, quirurgical interventions and long term sequelae were registered. One thousand and eight patients were admitted, 89 were over 11 years (8.8%), 70.7% were boys and 29.3% girls. Fire was the principal agent in 58 cases (65.1%), due to fireworks in 13 (22.4%), alcohol in 7 (12%), explosion of flammable containers (spray) in 4 (6.8%) and gasoline in 3 (5.2%). Fireworks injuries and spray explosions affected face and hand in 88% cases. The median hospital stay was 8 days after admission (1 to 90). 83.1% required surgical treatment with mean of 1.8 +/- 1.4 interventions and 21.3% had long-term sequelaes that required at least one surgical intervention. Fire is the main cause of burns in adolescents. Fireworks injuries represented a quarter of that lesions, and highlights paint spray explosions as new causative agents. Considering the high morbidity in this age group, with permanent functional and aesthetic sequelae, prevention campaigns are needed to reduce such accidents.

  7. Quantification of thermal damage in skin tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Feng; Wen Ting; Lu Tianjian; Seffen Keith

    2008-01-01

    Skin thermal damage or skin burns are the most commonly encountered type of trauma in civilian and military communities. Besides, advances in laser, microwave and similar technologies have led to recent developments of thermal treatments for disease and damage involving skin tissue, where the objective is to induce thermal damage precisely within targeted tissue structures but without affecting the surrounding, healthy tissue. Further, extended pain sensation induced by thermal damage has also brought great problem for burn patients. Thus, it is of great importance to quantify the thermal damage in skin tissue. In this paper, the available models and experimental methods for quantification of thermal damage in skin tissue are discussed.

  8. Systematic Review and Cost Analysis Comparing Use of Chlorhexidine with Use of Iodine for Preoperative Skin Antisepsis to Prevent Surgical Site Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ingi; Agarwal, Rajender K.; Lee, Bruce Y.; Fishman, Neil O.; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare use of chlorhexidine with use of iodine for preoperative skin antisepsis with respect to effectiveness in preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) and cost. Methods We searched the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website, the Cochrane Library, Medline, and EMBASE up to January 2010 for eligible studies. Included studies were systematic reviews, meta-analyses, or randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing preoperative skin antisepsis with chlorhexidine and with iodine and assessing for the outcomes of SSI or positive skin culture result after application. One reviewer extracted data and assessed individual study quality, quality of evidence for each outcome, and publication bias. Meta-analyses were performed using a fixed-effects model. Using results from the meta-analysis and cost data from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, we developed a decision analytic cost-benefit model to compare the economic value, from the hospital perspective, of antisepsis with iodine versus antisepsis with 2 preparations of chlorhexidine (ie, 4% chlorhexidine bottle and single-use applicators of a 2% chlorhexidine gluconate [CHG] and 70% isopropyl alcohol [IPA] solution), and also performed sensitivity analyses. Results Nine RCTs with a total of 3,614 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis revealed that chlorhexidine antisepsis was associated with significantly fewer SSIs (adjusted risk ratio, 0.64 [95% confidence interval, [0.51–0.80]) and positive skin culture results (adjusted risk ratio, 0.44 [95% confidence interval, 0.35–0.56]) than was iodine antisepsis. In the cost-benefit model baseline scenario, switching from iodine to chlorhexidine resulted in a net cost savings of $16–$26 per surgical case and $349,904–$568,594 per year for the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Sensitivity analyses showed that net cost savings persisted under most circumstances. Conclusions Preoperative skin antisepsis

  9. In vitro human skin permeation of endoxifen: potential for local transdermal therapy for primary prevention and carcinoma in situ of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee O

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oukseub Lee1, David Ivancic1, Robert T Chatterton Jr2, Alfred W Rademaker3, Seema A Khan11Department of Surgery, 2Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAPurpose: Oral tamoxifen, a triphenylethylene (TPE, is useful for breast cancer prevention, but its adverse effects limit acceptance by women. Tamoxifen efficacy is related to its major metabolites 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT and N-desmethyl-4-hydroxytamoxifen (endoxifen [ENX]. Transdermal delivery of these to the breast may avert the toxicity of oral tamoxifen while maintaining efficacy. We evaluated the relative efficiency of skin permeation of 4-OHT and ENX in vitro, and tested oleic acid (OA as a permeation-enhancer.Methods: 4-OHT, ENX, and estradiol (E2 (0.2 mg/mL of 0.5 µCi 3H/mg were dissolved in 60% ethanol-phosphate buffer, ±OA (0.1%–5%. Permeation through EpiDermTM (Matek Corp, Ashland, MA and split-thickness human skin was calculated based on the amount of the agents recovered from the receiver fluid and skin using liquid scintillation counting over 24 hours.Results: In the EpiDerm model, the absorption of 4-OHT and ENX was 10%–11%; total penetration (TP was 26%–29% at 24 hours and was decreased by OA. In normal human skin, the absorption of 4-OHT and ENX was 0.3%; TP was 2%–4% at 24 hours. The addition of 1% OA improved the permeation of ENX significantly more than that of 4-OHT (P < 0.004; further titration of OA at 0.25%–0.5% further improved the permeation of ENX to a level similar to that of estradiol.Conclusion: The addition of OA to ENX results in a favorable rapid delivery equivalent to that of estradiol, a widely used transdermal hormone. The transdermal delivery of ENX to the breast should be further developed in preclinical and clinical studies.Keywords: endoxifen, breast cancer prevention, human skin, transdermal, oleic acid

  10. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  11. Protocol for the systematic review of the prevention, treatment and public health management of impetigo, scabies and fungal skin infections in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Philippa; Bowen, Asha; Tong, Steven; Steer, Andrew; Prince, Sam; Andrews, Ross; Currie, Bart; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-09-23

    Impetigo, scabies, and fungal skin infections disproportionately affect populations in resource-limited settings. Evidence for standard treatment of skin infections predominantly stem from hospital-based studies in high-income countries. The evidence for treatment in resource-limited settings is less clear, as studies in these populations may lack randomisation and control groups for cultural, ethical or economic reasons. Likewise, a synthesis of the evidence for public health control within endemic populations is also lacking. We propose a systematic review of the evidence for the prevention, treatment and public health management of skin infections in resource-limited settings, to inform the development of guidelines for the standardised and streamlined clinical and public health management of skin infections in endemic populations. The protocol has been designed in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols statement. All trial designs and analytical observational study designs will be eligible for inclusion. A systematic search of the peer-reviewed literature will include PubMed, Excertpa Medica and Global Health. Grey literature databases will also be systematically searched, and clinical trials registries scanned for future relevant studies. The primary outcome of interest will be the clinical cure or decrease in prevalence of impetigo, scabies, crusted scabies, tinea capitis, tinea corporis or tinea unguium. Two independent reviewers will perform eligibility assessment and data extraction using standardised electronic forms. Risk of bias assessment will be undertaken by two independent reviewers according to the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Data will be tabulated and narratively synthesised. We expect there will be insufficient data to conduct meta-analysis. The final body of evidence will be reported against the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation grading system. The evidence

  12. Pediatric burns: Kids' Inpatient Database vs the National Burn Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Tahereh; Evans, Tyler A; Sood, Rajiv; Hartman, Brett C; Hadad, Ivan; Tholpady, Sunil S

    2016-04-01

    Burn injuries are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in young children. The Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) and National Burn Repository (NBR) are two large national databases that can be used to evaluate outcomes and help quality improvement in burn care. Differences in the design of the KID and NBR could lead to differing results affecting resultant conclusions and quality improvement programs. This study was designed to validate the use of KID for burn epidemiologic studies, as an adjunct to the NBR. Using the KID (2003, 2006, and 2009), a total of 17,300 nonelective burn patients younger than 20 y old were identified. Data from 13,828 similar patients were collected from the NBR. Outcome variables were compared between the two databases. Comparisons revealed similar patient distribution by gender, race, and burn size. Inhalation injury was more common among the NBR patients and was associated with increased mortality. The rates of respiratory failure, wound infection, cellulitis, sepsis, and urinary tract infection were higher in the KID. Multiple regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders demonstrated similar mortality rate but significantly longer length of stay for patients in the NBR. Despite differences in the design and sampling of the KID and NBR, the overall demographic and mortality results are similar. The differences in complication rate and length of stay should be explored by further studies to clarify underlying causes. Investigations into these differences should also better inform strategies to improve burn prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bionanomaterials for skin regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Leonida, Mihaela D

    2016-01-01

    This book gives a concise overview of bionanomaterials with applications for skin regeneration. The advantages and challenges of nanoscale materials are covered in detail, giving a basic view of the skin structure and conditions that require transdermal or topical applications. Medical applications, such as wound healing, care for burns, skin disease, and cosmetic care, such as aging of the skin and photodamage, and how they benefit from bionanomaterials, are described in detail. A final chapter is devoted to the ethical and social issues related to the use of bionanomaterials for skin regeneration. This is an ideal book for researchers in materials science, medical scientists specialized in dermatology, and cosmetic chemists working in formulations. It can also serve as a reference for nanotechnologists, dermatologists, microbiologists, engineers, and polymer chemists, as well as students studying in these fields.

  14. A state of the science on influential factors related to sun protective behaviors to prevent skin cancer in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy F. Bruce, MSN, RN, NE-BC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer rates have risen over the past decades, making it imperative that adults understand the need for protection from sun exposure. Though some risk factors have been identified as predictive for skin cancers, there is a lack of synthesized information about factors that influence adults in their decisions to engage in sun protective behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to present the current state of the science on influential factors for sun protective behaviors in the general adult population. A rigorous literature search inclusive of a generally White, Caucasian, and non-Hispanic adult population was performed, and screening yielded 18 quantitative studies for inclusion in this review. Findings indicate that modifiable and non-modifiable factors are interdependent and play a role in sun protective behaviors. This study resulted in a proposed conceptual model for affecting behavioral change in sun protection including the following factors: personal characteristics, cognitive factors, family dynamics, and social/peer group influences. These factors are introduced to propose tailored nursing interventions that would change current sun protective behavior practice. Key implications for nursing research and practice focus on feasibility of annual skin cancer screening facilitated by advanced practice nurses, incorporating the identified influential factors to reduce skin cancer risk and unnecessary sun exposure.

  15. Synthetic inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases prevent sulfur mustard-induced epidermal-dermal separation in human skin pieces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, M.A.E.; Alblas, S.W.; Hammer, A.; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    Degradation of proteins of the basement membrane zone (BMZ) in the skin depends on the activity of proteolytic enzymes, particularly those belonging to the group of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In the present study we have investigated the contribution of these enzymes to the epidermal-dermal

  16. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, E.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Boulware, S. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, M.C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  17. Practices and Procedures to Prevent the Transmission of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in High School Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Stephanie A.; Long, Marcus; Gaebelein, Claude J.; Martin, Madeline S.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Yetter, John

    2012-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are frequent in student athletes and are often caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA). We evaluated the awareness of CA-MRSA among high school coaches and athletic directors in Missouri (n = 4,408) and evaluated hygiene practices affecting SSTI…

  18. Fibrin glue instillation under skin flaps to prevent seroma-related morbidity following breast and axillary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad S; Hutson, Kristian H; Rapisarda, Ignazio F; Bonomi, Riccardo

    2013-05-31

    Fibrin glue (FG) combines fibrinogen and thrombin, under the presence of factor XIII and calcium chloride, and produces a 'fibrin clot' as would occur through the natural clotting cascade. FG is thought to close over any small vessels including lymphatics that are too small for conventional surgical closure, thereby reducing seroma formation, seroma incidence and related comorbidities. To assess the evidence on the effectiveness of FG in people undergoing breast and axillary surgery and to establish whether FG is an efficient modality to prevent postoperative seroma and seroma-related outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group's (CBCG) Specialised Register (9 December 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 1 2012), MEDLINE (9 December 2011), EMBASE (9 December 2011), LILACS (22 October 2012), SCI-E (22 October 2012), the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trial Registry (9 December 2011) and ClinicalTrials.gov (22 October 2012). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effectiveness of FG in terms of reducing the postoperative seroma incidence and related comorbidities in people undergoing breast and axillary surgery. At least two review authors independently scrutinised search results, selected eligible studies and extracted the data. The pooled analysis of the extracted data was achieved by the statistical analysis on Review Manager software. The quality of studies was assessed using The Cochrane Collaboration's 'Risk of bias' tool. The search of four standard electronic databases yielded 119 potentially relevant studies but only 18 RCTs involving 1252 people were found suitable for statistical analysis. There was significant heterogeneity among trials and the majority of trials were of poor quality. The use of FG under skin flaps following breast and axillary surgery failed to reduce the incidence of postoperative seroma (risk ratio (RR) 1.02; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.90 to 1.16, P

  19. The abrupt temperature changes in the plantar skin thermogram of the diabetic patient: looking in to prevent the insidious ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renero-C, Francisco-J

    2018-01-01

    Background: One of the complications of the diabetes mellitus is the amputation of the lower limbs. This complication may be developed after an insidious ulcer, that may be raised by the peripheral neuropathy or the ischaemic limb, and that the ulcer get infected. That is, to develop an ulcer, in the diabetic patient, three factors should be taken into the account, the autonomic nervous system, the blood supply and the inmune system. Methods: In this work, the thermogram is used to identify regions on the plantar skin with blood supply deficiencies and the behaviour of the thermoregulation process. Within the thermogram of the plantar skin, it can be identify local regions with low and high temperatures that corresponds to ischemic or inflammatory process on that part of the skin. Results: The findings within the 186 thermograms of diabetic patients, obtained from three hospitals and from INAOE facilities, showed, first, the thermograms of the plantar skin of two diabetic patients, acquired in two different times show that the temperature distribution and the average temperatures, vary slightly for a period of weeks. Second, the thermograms of two patients, who both developed insidious ulcers which evolved favourable, demonstrated the importance of the immune system and the drug therapy. These patients are, one who has a Charcot foot, and in the second one, the patient had loss the sensibility of the feet. Finally, the thermograms of two patients, showing abrupt temperature change within small regions in the plantar skin, are discussed. Conclusion: A diabetic patient, with an asymmetric thermogram, as physiological interpretation of the thermoregulation, may indicate a decrease of the blood supply, which may be corroborated by vascular ultrasound. The regions of abrupt temperature change, cold or hot spots, may correspond to ischaemic or inflammatory processes.

  20. [Etiological analysis of subambient temperature burn in 351 cases of Hefei area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie; Qi, Weiwei; Xu, Qinglian; Zhou, Shunying; Wang, Guobao

    2010-06-01

    To study the preventive measure of the subambient temperature burn by analysing the pathogenesis feature. The clinical data were analysed from 351 cases of subambient temperature burn between February 2004 and February 2009, including age, sex, burn season, burn factors, burn position, burn area, burn degree, treatment way, and wound healing. Subambient temperature burn occurred in every age stage. The susceptible age stages included infant, children, and the elderly. Female patients were more than male patients. The common burn reasons were hot-water bottle burn, honey warm keeper burn, and heating device burn. The peak season was winter. Lower limb was the most common site of the subambient temperature burn. The deep II degree to III degree were the most common level, and the burn area was always small, often time safety awareness should be strengthened so as to decrease the incidence rate of subambient temperature burn and the injury degree.

  1. [Antiseptic effect of compound lysostaphin disinfectant and its preventive effect on infection of artificial dermis after graft on full-thickness skin defect wound in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J; Zhou, H; Cui, Z C; Wang, L; Luo, P F; Ji, S Z; Hu, X Y; Ma, B; Wang, G Y; Zhu, S H; Xia, Z F

    2018-04-20

    Objective: To study the antiseptic effect of compound lysostaphin disinfectant and its preventive effect on infection of artificial dermis after graft on full-thickness skin defect wound in rats. Methods: (1) Each one standard strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus were selected. Each 20 clinical strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus were collected from those isolated from wound exudates of burn patients hospitalized in our wards from January 2014 to December 2016 according to the random number table. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of compound lysostaphin disinfectant to above-mentioned strains were detected. The experiment was repeated 3 times. Compared with the corresponding standard strain, the clinical strain with higher MIC and/or MBC was considered as having decreased sensitivity to the disinfectant. The percentage of strains of each of the three kinds of bacteria with decreased sensitivity was calculated. (2) Artificial dermis pieces were soaked in compound lysostaphin disinfectant for 5 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 4 h, respectively, with 21 pieces at each time point. After standing for 0 (immediately), 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 h (with 3 pieces at each time point), respectively, the diameters of their inhibition zones to standard strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus were measured. The experiment was repeated 3 times. The shortest soaking time corresponding to the longest standing time, after which the disinfectant-soaked artificial dermis could form an effective inhibition zone (with diameter more than 7 mm), was the sufficient soaking time of the disinfectant to the artificial dermis. (3) Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into post injury day (PID) 3, 7, 14, and 21 sampling groups according to the random number table, with 10 rats in each group. A full-thickness skin

  2. Childhood burns in south eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibong, A E; Antia, U E; Udosen, J

    1997-06-01

    In a ten year retrospective study of burns in children in University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH), Calabar, the main causes were hot water, hot soup or oil (56.6%) involving children mostly in the one to three year age group. The relative safety of the home environment seen in other forms of paediatric trauma is not observed in burns in children. A changing pattern of burns in children has emerged within the region with naked flames/bush fire coming second and affecting 22.7% of the children. Chemical burns hitherto a rare occurrence is now frequent because of the storage of caustic soda and acids in living rooms by soap making parents. Burns affecting the perineum, axilla and buttocks are difficult to keep clean and frequently lead to infections, with associated increased morbidity. Causes of childhood burns are largely preventable requiring active social/medical education and public enlightenment campaigns on the various methods of prevention.

  3. Sedation and Analgesia in Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Akıncı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is one of the most serious injuries that mankind may face. In addition to serious inflammation, excessive fluid loss, presence of hemodynamic instability due to intercurrent factors such as debridements, infections and organ failure, very different levels and intensities of pain, psychological problems such as traumatic stress disorder, depression, delirium at different levels that occur in patient with severe burn are the factors which make it difficult to provide the patient comfort. In addition to a mild to moderate level of baseline permanent pain in burn patients, which is due to tissue damage, there is procedural pain as well, which occurs by treatments such as grafting and dressings, that are severe, short-term burst style 'breakthrough' pain. Movement and tactile stimuli are also seen in burn injury as an effect to sensitize the peripheral and central nervous system. Even though many burn centers have established protocols to struggle with the pain, studies show that pain relief still inadequate in burn patients. Therefore, the treatment of burn pain and the prevention of possible emergence of future psychiatric problems suc as post-traumatic stress disorder, the sedative and anxiolytic agents should be used as a recommendation according to the needs and hemodynamic status of individual patient. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 26-30

  4. Fisetin Regulates Nrf2 Expression and the Inflammation-Related Signaling Pathway to Prevent UVB-Induced Skin Damage in Hairless Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yuan Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic ultraviolet (UV exposure may cause skin damage, disrupt skin barrier function, and promote wrinkle formation. UV induces oxidative stress and inflammation, which results in extracellular matrix degradation in the dermis and epidermal hyperplasia. Our previous study demonstrated that fisetin exerts photoprotective activity by inhibiting mitogen-activated protein kinase/activator protein-1/matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs activation. In this study, fisetin was applied topically to investigate its antiphotodamage effects in hairless mice. The erythema index (a* values and transepidermal water loss were evaluated to assess skin damage, and immunohistochemical staining was conducted to elucidate the photoprotective mechanism of fisetin. The results revealed that the topical application of fisetin reduced UVB-induced increase in the a* value and wrinkle formation. In addition, fisetin inhibited epidermal hyperplasia and increased the collagen content in the dermis. Fisetin exerted photoprotective activity by inhibiting the expression of MMP-1, MMP-2, and cyclooxygenase-2 and increasing the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor. Furthermore, fisetin increased the expression of filaggrin to prevent UVB-induced barrier function disruption. Altogether, the present results provide evidence of the effects and mechanisms of fisetin’s antiphotodamage and antiphotoinflammation activities.

  5. Fisetin Regulates Nrf2 Expression and the Inflammation-Related Signaling Pathway to Prevent UVB-Induced Skin Damage in Hairless Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Yuan; Lyu, Jia-Ling; Liu, Yi-Jung; Chien, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Hao-Cheng; Wen, Kuo-Ching; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei

    2017-10-10

    Chronic ultraviolet (UV) exposure may cause skin damage, disrupt skin barrier function, and promote wrinkle formation. UV induces oxidative stress and inflammation, which results in extracellular matrix degradation in the dermis and epidermal hyperplasia. Our previous study demonstrated that fisetin exerts photoprotective activity by inhibiting mitogen-activated protein kinase/activator protein-1/matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activation. In this study, fisetin was applied topically to investigate its antiphotodamage effects in hairless mice. The erythema index (a* values) and transepidermal water loss were evaluated to assess skin damage, and immunohistochemical staining was conducted to elucidate the photoprotective mechanism of fisetin. The results revealed that the topical application of fisetin reduced UVB-induced increase in the a* value and wrinkle formation. In addition, fisetin inhibited epidermal hyperplasia and increased the collagen content in the dermis. Fisetin exerted photoprotective activity by inhibiting the expression of MMP-1, MMP-2, and cyclooxygenase-2 and increasing the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor. Furthermore, fisetin increased the expression of filaggrin to prevent UVB-induced barrier function disruption. Altogether, the present results provide evidence of the effects and mechanisms of fisetin's antiphotodamage and antiphotoinflammation activities.

  6. [Occupational skin cancer : Prevention and recommendations for UV protection as part of the treatment approved by the public statutory employers' liability insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocholl, M; Ludewig, M; Skudlik, C; Wilke, A

    2018-04-27

    In Germany, approximately 2 to 3 million employees work in outdoor professions. They are exceptionally exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation for a large part of their daily working time. Cumulative UV exposure is associated with a significantly increased risk of skin cancer for outdoor workers from various occupational groups (e. g. landscape and horticulture, agriculture and forestry, fisheries and seafaring, construction and trade, as well as sports teachers, lifeguards and mountain guides). Since 1 January 2015, squamous cell carcinoma and multiple actinic keratosis due to natural UV radiation can be recognised as occupational disease No. 5103 by the German statutory social accident insurance. Reducing cumulative UV exposure is the main prevention aspect of this type of skin damage. Therefore, technical, organisational and personal UV protection measures should be implemented in the professional and private environment. Moreover, they have to be regularly used in an appropriate way. In addition to guideline-oriented therapy, training and counselling of patients with already existing actinic skin damage or a recognised occupational disease No. 5103 is therefore of particular importance. The focus should be on improving the individual UV protection behaviour. This article gives an overview of current recommendations for UV protection in the professional environment. It outlines possible solutions for patient counselling in terms of UV protection in everyday practice.

  7. Fire-fighting burning oil wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newbury, Herbert; Risk, Stewart.

    1993-01-01

    A method of extinguishing burning oil wells is presented which involves dispensing liquid nitrogen to the burning site to prevent or inhibit oxygen from fuelling the flames. To carry out the method a remotely operated vehicle is described which is provided with a source of liquid nitrogen and an articulated deployment boom capable of supplying the liquid nitrogen to the site of a burning oil well. (Author)

  8. The enhanced total body wrap--the new frontier in dressing care for burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, O-Wern; Chong, Si Jack; Tan, Bien-Keem

    2013-11-01

    The management of extensive burns with their associated high fluid exudate following burn excision and skin grafting has always posed a challenge in burn wound care. The ideal dressing should protect the wound from physical damage and micro-organisms; be comfortable and durable; allow high humidity at the wound; and be able to allow maximal activity for wound healing without retarding or inhibiting any stage of the process. The dressing technique described in this paper fulfils all the criteria above and at the same time provides an efficient channel to effectively clear the excessive exudate produced while keeping the wounds moist. Advantages conferred include accurate charting of wound exudate; reduced frequency of dressing changes; lower infection rates through prevention of strike-through; and securing and improving the viability of skin grafts. An enhancement to a technique previously described by us through the use of long thin strips of VAC sponges to transmit negative pressure, the enhanced Total Body Wrap aims to provide ideal conditions to promote healing in burns. Using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), this technique is simple and straightforward enough to be applied in majority of tertiary centres around the world. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Skin bank development and critical incident response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kellie T; Herson, Marisa R

    2011-05-01

    The Donor Tissue Bank of Victoria (DTBV), situated in Melbourne, Australia developed a skin banking program in 1994. It remains Australia's only operational skin bank, processing cryopreserved human cadaveric skin for the treatment of burns. The demand for allograft skin in Australia has steadily increased since the development of the program. The bank has been involved in the provision of skin for a number of critical incidences or disasters both in Australia and overseas. Demand always exceeds supply, and in the absence of other local skin banks, the DTBV has needed to develop strategies to enable increased provision of allograft skin nationally.

  10. Tanning Shade Gradations of Models in Mainstream Fitness and Muscle Enthusiast Magazines: Implications for Skin Cancer Prevention in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Ethan, Danna; Berdnik, Alyssa; Basch, Charles E

    2015-07-01

    Tanned skin has been associated with perceptions of fitness and social desirability. Portrayal of models in magazines may reflect and perpetuate these perceptions. Limited research has investigated tanning shade gradations of models in men's versus women's fitness and muscle enthusiast magazines. Such findings are relevant in light of increased incidence and prevalence of melanoma in the United States. This study evaluated and compared tanning shade gradations of adult Caucasian male and female model images in mainstream fitness and muscle enthusiast magazines. Sixty-nine U.S. magazine issues (spring and summer, 2013) were utilized. Two independent reviewers rated tanning shade gradations of adult Caucasian male and female model images on magazines' covers, advertisements, and feature articles. Shade gradations were assessed using stock photographs of Caucasian models with varying levels of tanned skin on an 8-shade scale. A total of 4,683 images were evaluated. Darkest tanning shades were found among males in muscle enthusiast magazines and lightest among females in women's mainstream fitness magazines. By gender, male model images were 54% more likely to portray a darker tanning shade. In this study, images in men's (vs. women's) fitness and muscle enthusiast magazines portrayed Caucasian models with darker skin shades. Despite these magazines' fitness-related messages, pro-tanning images may promote attitudes and behaviors associated with higher skin cancer risk. To date, this is the first study to explore tanning shades in men's magazines of these genres. Further research is necessary to identify effects of exposure to these images among male readers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Putative skin-protective formulations in preventing and/or inhibiting experimentally-produced irritant and allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, H; Willard, P; Maibach, H I

    1999-10-01

    The effectiveness of skin protective formulations was evaluated in a previously-described in vivo human model. All formulations failed to inhibit ammonium hydroxide and urea irritation. Only paraffin wax in cetyl alcohol statistically (plauryl sulfate irritation. Paraffin wax in cetyl alcohol was quantitatively the most effective formulation. These results suggest that some formulations may provide protective effects against certain, but not all, irritants or allergens.

  12. Auricular burns associated with operating microscope use during otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latuska, Richard F; Carlson, Matthew L; Neff, Brian A; Driscoll, Colin L; Wanna, George B; Haynes, David S

    2014-02-01

    To raise awareness of the potential hazard of auricular burns associated with operating microscope use during otologic surgery. Retrospective case series and summary of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database of voluntary adverse event reports pertaining to microscope related auricular thermal injuries. All patients who sustained auricular burns while using the operating microscope during otologic surgery at 2 tertiary academic referral centers. Surgical procedure, microscope model, intensity of illumination, length of procedure, focal length, location and severity of burn, and patient outcome. A total of 4 microscope-related auricular thermal injuries were identified from the authors' institutions. Additionally, 82 unique cases of soft tissue burns associated with the use of an operative microscope have been voluntarily reported to the FDA since 2004. A disproportionately large percent (∼ 30%) of these occurred within the field of otology, the majority of which were during tympanoplasty or tympanomastoidectomy procedures at focal length distances of 300 mm or less with xenon light source microscopes. Simultaneous advancements in light delivery technologies and lens optics have continued to improve the efficiency of the operating microscope; however, these improvements also increase the potential for thermal injuries. Although rare, a review of the FDA MAUDE database suggests that microscope-related soft tissue burns occur more frequently in otology than any other surgical specialty. A variety of factors may help explain this finding, including the unique anatomy of the external ear with thin skin and limited underlying adipose tissue. Preventative measures should be taken to decrease the risk of thermal injuries including use of the lowest comfortable light intensity, adjusting the aperture width to match the operative field, frequent wound irrigation, and covering exposed portions of the pinna

  13. Development and characterization of novel 1-(1-Naphthyl)piperazine-loaded lipid vesicles for prevention of UV-induced skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Ana Catarina; Campos, Patrícia Mazureki; Euletério, Carla; Simões, Sandra; Praça, Fabíola Silva Garcia; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra; Ascenso, Andreia

    2016-07-01

    1-(1-Naphthyl)piperazine (1-NPZ) has shown promising effects by inhibiting UV radiation-induced immunosuppression. Ultradeformable vesicles are recent advantageous systems capable of improving the (trans)dermal drug delivery. The aim of this study was to investigate 1-NPZ-loaded transethosomes (NPZ-TE) and 1-NPZ-loaded vesicles containing dimethyl sulfoxide (NPZ-DM) as novel delivery nanosystems, and to uncover their chemopreventive effect against UV-induced acute inflammation. Their physicochemical properties were evaluated as follows: vesicles size and zeta potential by dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, respectively; vesicle deformability by pressure driven transport; rheological behavior by measuring viscosity and I-NPZ entrapment yield by HPLC. In vitro topical delivery studies were performed in order to evaluate the permeation profile of both formulations, whereas in vivo studies sought to assess the photoprotective effect of the selected formulation on irradiated hairless mice by measuring myeloperoxidase activity and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Either NPZ-TE or NPZ-DM exhibited positive results in terms of physicochemical properties. In vitro data revealed an improved permeation of 1-NPZ across pig ear skin, especially by NPZ-DM. In vivo studies demonstrated that NPZ-DM exposure was capable of preventing UVB-induced inflammation and blocking mediators of inflammation in mouse skin. The successful results here obtained encourage us to continue these studies for the management of inflammatory skin conditions that may lead to the development of skin cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Analysis of the application and funding projects of National Natural Science Foundation of China in the field of burns and plastic surgery from 2010 to 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z C; Dou, D; Wang, X Y; Xie, D H; Yan, Z C

    2017-02-20

    We analyzed the data of application and funding projects of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) during 2010-2016 in the field of burns and plastic surgery and summarized the NSFC funding pattern, the research hotspots, and weaknesses in this field. The NSFC has funded 460 projects in the field of burns and plastic surgery, with total funding of RMB 227.96 million. The scientific issues involved in the funding projects include orthotherapy against malformations, wound repair, basic research of burns, skin grafting, scars prevention, and regeneration of hair follicle and sweat glands. The research techniques involved in the funding projects are diversified. NSFC plays an important role in the scientific research and talents training in the field of burns and plastic surgery.

  15. Education and empowerment of the nursing assistant: validating their important role in skin care and pressure ulcer prevention, and demonstrating productivity enhancement and cost savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Lynn

    2008-06-01

    This article details an educational program designed to utilize nonlicensed personnel (certified nursing assistants [CNAs] and nursing assistants [NAs]) in the prevention of pressure ulcers and improved skin care in a 250-bed acute care facility in a suburban setting. The article is divided into 2 parts: A and B. Part A addresses the educational program, which was part of a major initiative for improving patient outcomes that included a review and standardization of skin care products and protocols. Part B addresses productivity enhancement and cost savings experienced because of changing bathing and incontinence care products and procedures. The educational program included instruction on time-saving methods for increasing productivity in bathing and incontinence care, and effectively promoted the importance of proper skin care and pressure ulcer prevention techniques. Methods incorporated into the educational training targeted different reading and comprehension levels, ranging from the use of PowerPoint slides, hands-on return demonstration, and group discussion related to pressure ulcer staging and wound treatment. These educational methods provided the participants with significant reinforcement of each day's learning objectives. Productivity enhancement and cost savings are addressed in part B, as well as the results of a time-motion study. Because of the program, CNAs/NAs were empowered in their integral caregiver roles. This program was part of a larger, major process improvement initiative, but the rate of acquired pressure ulcers declined from 2.17% in 2002 to 1.71% in 2003. This educational program was considered a contributor to the improved patient outcomes.

  16. Management of acid burns: experience from Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kishore Kumar; Olga, Loren; Peck, Michael; Morselli, Paolo G; Salek, A J M

    2015-05-01

    Acid burn injuries in Bangladesh primarily occur as a result of intentional attacks although there are incidences of accidental acid burns in industry, on the street, and at home. A total of 126 patients with acid burns, 95 from attacks and 31 from accidents, were studied from July 2004 to December 2012. A diagnosis of acid burn was made from history, physical examination and in some cases from chemical analysis of the patients' clothing. Alkali burns were excluded from the study. In the burn unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital, we applied a slightly different protocol for management of acid burns, beginning with plain water irrigation of the wound, which effectively reduced burn depth and the requirement of surgical treatment. Application of hydrocolloid dressing for 48-72 h helped with the assessment of depth and the course of treatment. Early excision and grafting gives good results but resultant acid trickling creates a marble cake-like appearance of the wound separated by the vital skin. Excision with a scalpel and direct stitching of the wounds are often a good option. Observation of patients on follow-up revealed that wounds showed a tendency for hypertrophy. Application of pressure garments and other scar treatments were given in all cases unless the burn was highly superficial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Burning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J.

    1990-10-01

    The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R ampersand D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration

  18. SKIN CARE IN INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is a complex organ in its structure. Numerous functions of the skin may be impaired in its pathology. Anatomical and physiological characteristics of the skin in children predispose to common diseases of the skin. Diaper dermatitis is one of the most common skin diseases during infancy and childhood. Diapered skin is exposed to friction and excessive hydration, has a higher pH than nondiapered skin, and is repeatedly soiled with feces that contains enzymes with high irritation potential for the skin. Diaper dermatitis may vary in clinical severity and course. Therapeutically, frequent diaper changes and adequate skin care are most important. Appropriate skin care can help to prevent the occurrence of diaper dermatitis and to speed up the healing of affected skin. This includes frequent diaper changes and aeration, gentle cleansing, and the use of a barrier cream. For the treatment of diaper dermatitis agents selected depending on the presence and severity of complications. For prevention and treatment of uncomplicated diaper dermatitis effective means of containing dexpantenol.

  19. Intake of Po-210 into the body through the damaged skin and efficiency of some methods in preventing its absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyin, L.A.; Ivannikov, A.T.; Bazhin, A.G.; Konstantinova, T.P.; Altukhova, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    The metabolic behaviour of 210 Po nitrate arising from contamination of damaged skin (stabbed, cutaneous and muscular wounds and abrasions) of rats and the efficiency of some methods of decontaminating the wounds and stimulating 210 Po removal from the body, have been studied. The decontamination efficiency obtained, by wiping and washing the wound surface with oxatiol, by surgical incision of the wounds, and by parenteral oxatiol injections, are compared. The accumulation of 210 Po in various organs and tissues of rats after the different decontamination routines had been carried out are shown tabulated. (U.K.)

  20. UVB 311 nm tolerance of vitiligo skin increases with skin photo type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caron-Schreinemachers, Anne-Lou D. B.; Kingswijk, Melanie M.; Bos, Jan D.; Westerhof, Wiete

    2005-01-01

    It is assumed that skin is protected against sunburn by melanin. In patients with vitiligo, there are white patches in the normal pigmented skin. We noticed that there is a difference in burning capacity of these white patches between people with different skin types. With UVB 311 nm lamps, we

  1. Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Your Skin KidsHealth / For Kids / Your Skin What's in this ... body) are really dead skin cells. Bye-Bye Skin Cells These old cells are tough and strong, ...

  2. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Home Health Info Health Topics Burning Mouth Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a painful, complex condition often described ... or other symptoms. Read More Publications Cover image Burning Mouth Syndrome Publication files Download Language English PDF — Number of ...

  3. Burning issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashmore, C.

    1998-10-01

    Coal is world`s most abundant source of energy. Turning this potential pollutant into a clean, cost-effective fuel for power production has become a matter for global concern. Some problems and their solutions are highlighted in this article. Environmental problems caused by the giant Mae Moh plant in Thailand were overcome with an extensive retrofit programme that included flue gas desulfurisation systems. For new and smaller coal-fuelled plant, boilers using circulating fluidised bed (CFB) technology provide a cost effective and efficient system which meets environmental standards. A large independent power plant at Colver, Pennsylvania, USA uses CFB technology to burn bituminous gob. AMM and Alstom can provide turnkey packages for coal-fired power plant using a modular concept based on CFB technology. 2 photos.

  4. Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-05-01

    This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

  5. GHK-Cu may Prevent Oxidative Stress in Skin by Regulating Copper and Modifying Expression of Numerous Antioxidant Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Pickart

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The copper binding tripeptide GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine is a naturally occurring plasma peptide that significantly declines during human aging. It has been established that GHK:Copper(2+ improves wound healing and tissue regeneration and stimulates collagen and decorin production. GHK-Cu also supports angiogenesis and nerve outgrowth, improves the condition of aging skin and hair, and possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In addition, it increases cellular stemness and secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. GHK’s antioxidant actions have been demonstrated in vitro and in animal studies. They include blocking the formation of reactive oxygen and carbonyl species, detoxifying toxic products of lipid peroxidation such as acrolein, protecting keratinocytes from lethal Ultraviolet B (UVB radiation, and blocking hepatic damage by dichloromethane radicals. In recent studies, GHK has been found to switch gene expression from a diseased state to a healthier state for certain cancers and for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The Broad Institute’s Connectivity Map indicated that GHK induces a 50% or greater change of expression in 31.2% of human genes. This paper reviews biological data demonstrating positive effects of GHK in skin and proposes interaction with antioxidant-related genes as a possible explanation of its antioxidant activity.

  6. Self-Burns in Fars Province, Southern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Tohidinik, Hamid Reza; Zardosht, Mitra; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The alarming incidence of self- burning provoked to set up a multidisciplinary preventive program to decrease the incidence and complications of this harmful issue. This study investigated the incidence and the preventive measures in self-burn in Fars Province, southern Iran. METHODS This study was a longitudinal prospective design on trend of self-inflicted burn injuries in Fars province after setting up a regional multidisciplinary preventive plan (2009-2012). RESULTS From 18862 ...

  7. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  8. Training and burn care in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamania Shobha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn care is a huge challenge in India, having the highest female mortality globally due to flame burns. Burns can happen anywhere, but are more common in the rural region, affecting the poor. Most common cause is flame burns, the culprit being kerosene and flammable flowing garments worn by the women. The infrastructure of healthcare network is good but there is a severe resource crunch. In order to bring a positive change, there will have to be more trained personnel willing to work in the rural areas. Strategies for prevention and training of burn team are discussed along with suggestions on making the career package attractive and satisfying. This will positively translate into improved outcomes in the burns managed in the rural region and quick transfer to appropriate facility for those requiring specialised attention.

  9. Maternal burn-out: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séjourné, N; Sanchez-Rodriguez, R; Leboullenger, A; Callahan, S

    2018-02-21

    Maternal burn-out is a psychological, emotional and physiological condition resulting from the accumulation of various stressors characterised by a moderate but also a chronic and repetitive dimension. Little research has focused on this syndrome. The current study aims to assess maternal burn-out rate and to identify factors associated with this state of exhaustion. 263 French mothers aged between 20 and 49 years answered five scales quantifying maternal burn-out, perceived social support, parental stress, depression and anxiety symptoms and history of postnatal depression. About 20% of mothers were affected by maternal burn-out. The main factors related to maternal burn-out were having a child perceived as difficult, history of postnatal depression, anxiety, satisfaction of a balance between professional and personal life and parental stress. This research shows the need for further work on maternal burn-out to better understand and prevent this syndrome.

  10. OWN EXPERIENCE OF LASER THERAPY FOR THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF EARLY AND LATE RADIATION-INDUCED SKIN INJURIES IN PATIENTS WITH BREAST CANCER AFTER SIMULTANEOUS RECONSTRUCTIVE PLASTIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Tkachev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-energy laser radiation has a good anti-inflammatory and stimulating effect on the damaged tissues; therefore, it can be used for the prevention and treatment of both early and late radiation-induced skin injuries in patients receiving radiotherapy. So far, the effect of low-energy laser radiation in the prevention of radiation-induced skin damage remains poorly understood. This article presents a brief overview of the results obtained in the latest foreign studies as well as own experience of laser therapy for the prevention and treatment of both early and late radiation-induced skin injuries in patients with breast cancer after simultaneous reconstructive plastic surgery.

  11. [Disinfectants for the skin of premature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucurachi, G; Tuoto, M G

    2010-06-01

    Nosocomial infections are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections is based on strategies that aim to limit susceptibility to infections by enhancing host defences, interrupting trasmission of organisms by healthcare workers and by promoting the judicious use of antimicrobials. Strategies for the prevention of nosocomial infections include hand hygiene practices, prevention of central venous (cvc)-related bloodstream infections, judicious use of antimicrobials for therapy, enhancement of host defences, skin care and early enteral feeding with human milk. Major concerns about the use of alcoholic chlorhexidine are for the high risk of skin burns in extremely premature infants during the first days of life, when the skin is thin and not fully keratinesed. Aqueous chlorhexidine could be less irritant when used in very low birthweigth infants and thus could represent a good option. A recent prospective trial of adult patients showed similar effectiveness of alcoholic and aqueos solutions of chlorexidine. However, to date no study evaluated whether the aqueos formulation is less harmful and as effective as the alcoholic formulation in neonatal infants. The lack of evidence for neonatal patients prompts urgent need for large randomised controlled trials comparing effectiveness and safety of different skin disinfectants before CVC placement in neonates and particulary in very low birth-weight infants. Nosocomial infections are still of the most serious problems for the neonatal intensive care unit. Therefore every effort must be implemented to reduce the incidence of these infections, can not be considered a toll required hospitalization, as it may not be acceptable for a place of shelter and care as the hospital may itself be a source of disease.

  12. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, PhD, Professor of Dermatology, Brown University, for permission to use this video. UPDATED: ... Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention ...

  13. Pathophysiologic Response to Burns in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc G. Jeschke

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades advancements have improved survival and outcomes of severely burned patients except one population, elderly. The Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 burn size in elderly has remained the same over the past three decades, and so has morbidity and mortality, despite the increased demand for elderly burn care. The objective of this study is to gain insights on why elderly burn patients have had such a poor outcome when compared to adult burn patients. The significance of this project is that to this date, burn care providers recognize the extreme poor outcome of elderly, but the reason remains unclear. In this prospective translational trial, we have determined clinical, metabolic, inflammatory, immune, and skin healing aspects. We found that elderly have a profound increased mortality, more premorbid conditions, and stay at the hospital for longer, p  0.05, but a significant increased incidence of multi organ failure, p < 0.05. These clinical outcomes were associated with a delayed hypermetabolic response, increased hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic responses, inversed inflammatory response, immune-compromisation and substantial delay in wound healing predominantly due to alteration in characteristics of progenitor cells, p < 0.05. In summary, elderly have substantially different responses to burns when compared to adults associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that these responses are complex and not linear, requiring a multi-modal approach to improve the outcome of severely burned elderly.

  14. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma Treatment: Stages I & II Melanoma Treatment: Stage III Melanoma ...

  15. La prevención del cáncer de piel (Preventing Skin Cancer)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-31

    Un hombre y una mujer hablan sobre cómo aprendieron a protegerse la piel del sol con los años.  Created: 5/31/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/31/2016.

  16. Modeling Skin Injury from Hot Spills on Clothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgrim Log

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work analyzes scald burns from hot beverages, such as coffee and tea, spilled on the lap, i.e., an incident that may occur in daily life. The Pennes bioheat equation is solved numerically for small spills wetting the clothing, i.e., the fabric prevents the spilled liquid from draining away. Temperatures are analyzed in the wetted fabric and the skin layers and the resulting skin injury is calculated based on the basal layer temperature. Parameters influencing burn severity, such as clothing thickness, liquid temperature, removal of fabric and thermal effects of post scald water cooling are analyzed. The fabric cools the water some but represents a threat since the entrapped water results in a prolonged heat supply. The liquid temperature turned out to be the most important injury parameter, where liquid temperature of about 80–85 °C seems to be a limit for developing superficial partial-thickness burns in the present minimum case, i.e., where the liquid just wets the fabric. Spilling water in excess of just wetting the fabric, more severe burns will develop at lower liquid temperatures due to the prolonged heat supply. Higher liquid temperatures will nearly instantly develop more severe burns. It is demonstrated that removal of the clothing within the first seconds after the spill may significantly reduce the scalding severity. The general advice is therefore to avoid excessive heating of beverages and, if the beverage is spilled, to quickly remove the wetted clothing. Prolonged tempered water cooling is advised to improve the healing processes.

  17. Burn-related peripheral neuropathy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yiji; Lineaweaver, William C; Zheng, Xianyou; Chen, Zenggan; Mullins, Fred; Zhang, Feng

    2017-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most frequent disabling neuromuscular complication of burns. However, the insidious and progressive onset of burn neuropathy makes it often undiagnosed or overlooked. In our study, we reviewed the current studies on the burn-related peripheral neuropathy to summarize the morbidity, mechanism, detecting method and management of peripheral neuropathy in burn patients. Of the 1533 burn patients included in our study, 98 cases (6.39%) were presented with peripheral neuropathy. Thermal and electrical burns were the most common etiologies. Surgical procedures, especially nerve decompression, showed good effect on functional recovery of both acute and delayed peripheral neuropathy in burn patients. It is noteworthy that, for early detection and prevention of peripheral neuropathy, electrodiagnostic examinations should be performed on burn patients independent of symptoms. Still, the underlying mechanisms of burn-related peripheral neuropathy remain to be clarified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Camphor Burns on the Palm: An Unusual New Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B A Ramesh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Camphor burns on the palm are uncommon and rarely encountered by a plastic surgeon. Aim: This study aims to analyze different patterns of camphor burns on the palm. Methods: Five women and one man presented with camphor burns on their palm. All patients had burns on their right palm. The shape of camphor, the duration of contact with the ignited camphor on the palm, and post-burn treatments were evaluated. Results: Three types of camphor burns were noted: Type 1 (a ring-shaped or a dome-shaped blister with unburned skin in the center, Type 2 (an oval-shaped partially thick burn with unburned skin in the center, and Type 3 (a full-thickness burn exposing the palmar fascia. Conclusion: Different types of camphor burns on the palm are described in this study. This is the first study to report ring-shaped blisters and ring-shaped partially thick camphor burns caused on the palm.

  19. Investigating the depth of thermal burns in elephants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shakespeare

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Histological examination of burn injuries in elephants revealed that the depth was not as severe as expected from clinical observation. Although the actual burn depth was deep, the thickness of elephant skin, especially the dermis, resulted in the lesions being classified as less severe than expected. Examination of skin samples from selected areas showed that most lesions were either superficial (1st degree or superficial partial-thickness (superficial 2nd degree burns with the occasional deep partial thickness (deep 2nd degree wound. These lesions however, resulted in severe complications that eventually led to the death of a number of the elephants.

  20. Burn Control Mechanisms in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. A.; Stacey, W. M.

    2015-11-01

    Burn control and passive safety in accident scenarios will be an important design consideration in future tokamak reactors, in particular fusion-fission hybrid reactors, e.g. the Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor. We are developing a burning plasma dynamics code to explore various aspects of burn control, with the intent to identify feedback mechanisms that would prevent power excursions. This code solves the coupled set of global density and temperature equations, using scaling relations from experimental fits. Predictions of densities and temperatures have been benchmarked against DIII-D data. We are examining several potential feedback mechanisms to limit power excursions: i) ion-orbit loss, ii) thermal instability density limits, iii) MHD instability limits, iv) the degradation of alpha-particle confinement, v) modifications to the radial current profile, vi) ``divertor choking'' and vii) Type 1 ELMs. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-00ER54538, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  1. Full thickness burn caused by exposure to giant hogweed: delayed presentation, histological features and surgical management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2012-02-01

    We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with a full thickness chemical burn on his right pretibial area due to phytophotodermatitis (PPD) following contact with giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). Although cutaneous burns due to plants are a well-established cause of chemical burn, previous reports described partial thickness burns that healed with conservative measures. This patient presented to our unit two weeks after the initial injury with an established full thickness burn. Debridement and split thickness skin grafting was required. We presented the histological features of the debrided skin specimen and discussed potential factors leading to this unexpected full thickness injury.

  2. Burns in sub-Saharan Africa: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nthumba, Peter M

    2016-03-01

    Burns are important preventable causes of morbidity and mortality, with a disproportionate incidence in sub-Saharan Africa. The management of these injuries in sub-Saharan Africa is a challenge because of multiple other competing problems such as infectious diseases (HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria), terrorist acts and political instability. There is little investment in preventive measures, pre-hospital, in-hospital and post-discharge care of burns, resulting in high numbers of burns, high morbidity and mortality. Lack of data that can be used in legislation and policy formulation is a major hindrance in highlighting the problem of burns in this sub-region. An online search of publications on burns from sub-Saharan countries was performed. A total of 54 publications with 32,862 patients from 14 countries qualified for inclusion in the study. The average age was 15.3 years. Children aged 10 years and below represented over 80% of the burn patient population. Males constituted 55% of those who suffered burns. Scalds were the commonest cause of thermal injuries, accounting for 59% of all burns, while flame burns accounted for 33%. The burn mortality averaged 17%, or the death of one of every five burn victims. These statistics indicate the need for an urgent review of burn policies and related legislation across the sub-Saharan region to help reduce burns, and provide a safe environment for children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of burn injuries with keratinocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syring, C.; Maenig, H.J.; Von Versen, R.; Bruck, J.

    1999-01-01

    The German Institute for Cell and Tissue Replacement (DIZG) provides burned patients with skin and amnion for a temporary wound closure. Severely burned patients (>60% BSA for adults, >40% BSA for children) were supplied with autologous and allogenic grafts from cultured keratinocytes. The keratinocyte culture is done under GMP-conditions using the method of Rheinwald and Green. The 3T3 fibroblasts were irradiated with 60 Gy and used as feeder cells to produce keratinocyte sheets within 3 weeks. In this time up to 6.000 cm are available. The sheets were harvested by detachment with dispase (1,2 U/ml), fixed to gauze and transported to the hospital. The DIZG has a 3 years experience in the treatment of burns with keratinocyte sheets. The sheets were transplanted to patients in different hospitals, the total transplanted area is about 30.000 cm. This paper describes the experiences with ten severely burned patients treated with keratinocyte sheet

  4. Resorption of radionuclides through the surface of thermal burns and problems of decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'in, L.A.; Ivannikov, A.T.; Popov, B.A.; Parfenova, I.M.

    1981-01-01

    Resorption of sup(137)Cs, sup(89)Sr, sup(131)I, sup(241)Am during thermal burns of 1-3 degrees and choice of a decontamination method used simultaneously for decontamination and disinfection of burn wounds were studied. It is shown that a degree of burns effects in a certain form on skin penetrability: through burns of 1-2 degrees the resorption increases 1 5-3 times, through burns of the thir degree the resorption decreases slightly as compared to the resorption through intact skin. High efficiency of 3% soap solution for removing radionuclides from burn csurfae of skin has been established. For burns accompanied with the disturbance of epidermis integrality, when considerable absorption of radionuclides is possible, decontamination must be accomplished as soon and complete as possible [ru

  5. Anti-scar Treatment for Deep Partial-thickness Burn Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    applied topically to deep partial-thickness burn wounds reduced α-SMA protein expression ( ELISA ). Mouse burn wounds were treated with PFD twice...immediately and at 48 hrs post- burn. α-SMA in wound skin homogenates was assayed by ELISA . α-SMA protein was significantly lower in mice treated with...Inflammatory cytokines in wound skin homogenates were assayed by ELISA . This early treatment during the inflammatory stage of healing significantly reduced

  6. Burn Depth Estimation Using Thermal Excitation and Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Yee, M.L.

    1998-12-17

    Accurate estimation of the depth of partial-thickness burns and the early prediction of a need for surgical intervention are difficult. A non-invasive technique utilizing the difference in thermal relaxation time between burned and normal skin may be useful in this regard. In practice, a thermal camera would record the skin's response to heating or cooling by a small amount-roughly 5{degrees} Celsius for a short duration. The thermal stimulus would be provided by a heat lamp, hot or cold air, or other means. Processing of the thermal transients would reveal areas that returned to equilibrium at different rates, which should correspond to different burn depths. In deeper thickness burns, the outside layer of skin is further removed from the constant-temperature region maintained through blood flow. Deeper thickness areas should thus return to equilibrium more slowly than other areas. Since the technique only records changes in the skin's temperature, it is not sensitive to room temperature, the burn's location, or the state of the patient. Preliminary results are presented for analysis of a simulated burn, formed by applying a patch of biosynthetic wound dressing on top of normal skin tissue.

  7. The effectiveness of a skin care program for the prevention of contact dermatitis in health care workers (the Healthy Hands Project): study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanipoor, Maryam; Kezic, Sanja; Sluiter, Judith K; Rustemeyer, Thomas

    2017-02-28

    Health care workers (HCW) are at high risk for developing occupational hand dermatitis (HD) due to frequent exposure to 'wet work'. Amongst HCWs, nurses are at highest risk, with an estimated point prevalence of HD ranging between 12 and 30%. The burden of disease is high with chronicity, sick leave, risk of unemployment and impaired quality of life. Despite evidence from the medical literature on the risk factors and the importance of skin care in the prevention of HD, in practice, compliance to skin care protocols are below 30%. New preventive strategies are obviously needed. This is a cluster randomized controlled trial, focusing on nurses performing wet work. In total, 20 wards are recruited to include 504 participating nurses in the study at baseline. The wards will be randomized to an intervention or a control group and followed up for 18 months. The intervention consists of the facilitation of creams being available at the wards combined with the continuous electronic monitoring of their consumption with regular feedback on skin care performance in teams of HCWs. Both the intervention and the control group receive basic education on skin protection (as 'care as usual'). Every 6 months, participants of both groups will fill in the questionnaires regarding exposure to wet work and skin protective behavior. Furthermore, skin condition will be assessed and samples of the stratum corneum collected. The effect of the intervention will be measured by comparing the change in Hand Eczema Severity Index (HECSI score) from baseline to 12 months. The Natural Moisturizing Factor (NMF) levels, measured in the stratum corneum as an early biomarker of skin barrier damage, and the total consumption of creams per ward will be assessed as a secondary outcome. This trial will assess the clinical effectiveness of an intervention program to prevent hand dermatitis among health care workers TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register (NTR), identification number NTR5564

  8. Pediatric burn wound impetigo after grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikins, Kimberly; Prasad, Narayan; Menon, Seema; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    Modern burn care techniques have reduced the risk of infection of the acute burn wound, resulting in more rapid healing and a lower incidence of graft loss. Secondary breakdown may still occur. The loss of epithelium in association with multifocal superficial abscesses and ulceration has been termed burns impetigo. This may result in considerable morbidity and require prolonged treatment. The events preceding development, the impact on the patient, and the ideal treatment appear unclear and poorly reported. In 5 years, between 2006 and 2011, 406 pediatric burns were treated with skin grafts, with 7% developing burns impetigo. Time to resolution ranged from 5 to 241 days: the mean time to complete healing was greatest with conservative management (96 days), followed by antibacterial dressings (37 days), oral antibiotics (36 days), topical steroids (16 days), and oral antibiotics in combination with topical steroids (13.5 days). Burns impetigo resulted in significant morbidity, requiring multiple visits to the treatment center and prolonged symptoms. Delay in diagnosis and treatment resulted in worse outcomes. Prompt consideration of burns impetigo should occur when postgraft patients present with suggestive clinical signs and treatment with oral antibiotics plus topical steroids should be considered.

  9. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  10. Biologic and synthetic skin substitutes: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Khoo, Teng Lye; Mohd Yussof, Shah Jumaat

    2010-09-01

    The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. Skin substitutes have important roles in the treatment of deep dermal and full thickness wounds of various aetiologies. At present, there is no ideal substitute in the market. Skin substitutes can be divided into two main classes, namely, biological and synthetic substitutes. The biological skin substitutes have a more intact extracellular matrix structure, while the synthetic skin substitutes can be synthesised on demand and can be modulated for specific purposes. Each class has its advantages and disadvantages. The biological skin substitutes may allow the construction of a more natural new dermis and allow excellent re-epithelialisation characteristics due to the presence of a basement membrane. Synthetic skin substitutes demonstrate the advantages of increase control over scaffold composition. The ultimate goal is to achieve an ideal skin substitute that provides an effective and scar-free wound healing.

  11. Biologic and synthetic skin substitutes: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Ahmad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. Skin substitutes have important roles in the treatment of deep dermal and full thickness wounds of various aetiologies. At present, there is no ideal substitute in the market. Skin substitutes can be divided into two main classes, namely, biological and synthetic substitutes. The biological skin substitutes have a more intact extracellular matrix structure, while the synthetic skin substitutes can be synthesised on demand and can be modulated for specific purposes. Each class has its advantages and disadvantages. The biological skin substitutes may allow the construction of a more natural new dermis and allow excellent re-epithelialisation characteristics due to the presence of a basement membrane. Synthetic skin substitutes demonstrate the advantages of increase control over scaffold composition. The ultimate goal is to achieve an ideal skin substitute that provides an effective and scar-free wound healing.

  12. Supplementation with Vitis vinifera L. skin extract improves insulin resistance and prevents hepatic lipid accumulation and steatosis in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Izabelle Barcellos; de Bem, Graziele Freitas; Cordeiro, Viviane Silva Cristino; da Costa, Cristiane Aguiar; de Carvalho, Lenize Costa Reis Marins; da Rocha, Ana Paula Machado; da Costa, Gisele França; Ognibene, Dayane Teixeira; de Moura, Roberto Soares; Resende, Angela Castro

    2017-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most common complications of obesity. The Vitis vinifera L. grape skin extract (ACH09) is an important source of polyphenols, which are related to its antioxidant and antihyperglycemic activities. We hypothesized that ACH09 could also exert beneficial effects on metabolic disorders associated with obesity and evaluated ACH09's influence on high-fat (HF) diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in C57BL/6 mice. The animals were fed a standard diet (10% fat, control) or an HF diet (60% fat, HF) with or without ACH09 (200mg/[kg d]) for 12weeks. Our results showed that ACH09 reduced HF diet-induced body weight gain, prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and steatosis, and improved hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. The underlying mechanisms of these beneficial effects of ACH09 may involve the activation of hepatic insulin-signaling pathway because the expression of phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phosphorylated Akt serine/threonine kinase 1, and glucose transporter 2 was increased by ACH09 and correlated with improvement of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. ACH09 reduced the expression of the lipogenic factor sterol regulatory-element binding protein-1c in the liver and upregulated the lipolytic pathway (phosphorylated liver kinase B1/phosphorylated adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase), which was associated with normal hepatic levels of triglyceride and cholesterol and prevention of steatosis. ACH09 prevented the hepatic oxidative damage in HF diet-fed mice probably by restoration of antioxidant activity. In conclusion, ACH09 protected mice from HF diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. The regulation of hepatic insulin signaling pathway, lipogenesis, and oxidative stress may contribute to ACH09's protective effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Skin abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... Skin abscesses are common and affect people of all ages. They occur when an infection causes pus ...

  14. 'Care and Prevent': rationale for investigating skin and soft tissue infections and AA amyloidosis among people who inject drugs in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M; Brathwaite, R; McGowan, Catherine R; Ciccarone, D; Gilchrist, G; McCusker, M; O'Brien, K; Dunn, J; Scott, J; Hope, V

    2018-05-08

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among people who inject drugs (PWID). International data indicate up to one third of PWID have experienced an SSTI within the past month. Complications include sepsis, endocarditis and amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis. AA amyloidosis is a serious sequela of chronic SSTI among PWID. Though there is a paucity of literature reporting on AA amyloidosis among PWID, what has been published suggests there is likely a causal relationship between AA amyloidosis and injecting-related SSTI. If left untreated, AA amyloidosis can lead to renal failure; premature mortality among diagnosed PWID is high. Early intervention may reverse disease. Despite the high societal and individual burden of SSTI among PWID, empirical evidence on the barriers and facilitators to injecting-related SSTI prevention and care or the feasibility and acceptability of AA amyloidosis screening and treatment referral are limited. This study aims to fill these gaps and assess the prevalence of AA amyloidosis among PWID. Care and Prevent is a UK National Institute for Health Research-funded mixed-methods study. In five phases (P1-P5), we aim to assess the evidence for AA amyloidosis among PWID (P1); assess the feasibility of AA amyloidosis screening, diagnostic and treatment referral among PWID in London (P2); investigate the barriers and facilitators to AA amyloidosis care (P3); explore SSTI protection and risk (P4); and co-create harm reduction resources with the affected community (P5). This paper describes the conceptual framework, methodological design and proposed analysis for the mixed-methods multi-phase study. We are implementing the Care and Prevent protocol in London. The systematic review component of the study has been completed and published. Care and Prevent will generate an estimate of AA amyloidosis prevalence among community recruited PWID in London, with implications for the development of screening

  15. High-tension electrical-arc-induced thermal burns caused by railway overhead cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, J

    1991-10-01

    Eleven patients with high-tension electrical-arc-induced thermal burns due to railway overhead cables were treated at the Bratislava Burn Department during a relatively short period of 18 months. All the injuries occurred by the same mechanism, that is persons climbing on top of railway carriages and approaching the 25,000 V a.c. overhead cables. All the burns were the result of an electrical arc passing externally to the body, with subsequent ignition of the victim's clothes. The cutaneous burns, ranging from 24 to 79 per cent of the BSA, were mostly deep partial to full skin thickness injuries. One patient died on day 5 postburn, the other survived. In spite of high-tension aetiology, no true electrical injuries appear to have occurred and no amputations were necessary. The pathophysiology and possible preventive measures are discussed. It must be stressed that arcing can be induced by an earthed object approaching, but not touching, a cable carrying a high voltage.

  16. Quantification of thermal damage in skin tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐峰; 文婷; 卢天健; Seffen; Keith

    2008-01-01

    Skin thermal damage or skin burns are the most commonly encountered type of trauma in civilian and military communities. Besides, advances in laser, microwave and similar technologies have led to recent developments of thermal treatments for disease and damage involving skin tissue, where the objective is to induce thermal damage precisely within targeted tissue structures but without affecting the surrounding, healthy tissue. Further, extended pain sensation induced by thermal damage has also brought great...

  17. Photocatalytic antibacterial effect of ZnO nanoparticles into coaxial electrospun PCL fibers to prevent infections from skin injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado-Prone, G.; Silva-Bermúdez, P.; García-Macedo, J. A.; Almaguer-Flores, A.; Ibarra, C.; Velasquillo-Martínez, C.

    2017-02-01

    Antibacterial studies of inorganic nanoparticles (nps) have become important due to the increased bacterial resistance against antibiotics. We used Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO nps), which possess excellent photocatalytic properties with a wide band gap (Eg), are listed as "generally recognized as safe" by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and have shown antibacterial activity (AA) against many bacterial strains. The AA of ZnO nps is partly attributed to the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) by photocatalysis. When ZnO nps in aqueous media are illuminated with an energy water and Oxygen molecules to generate hydroxyl-radical (OH• ), superoxide-radical (O2 •- ) and hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2). These ROS induce cell membrane damage resulting in cell death. However, the application of inorganic nps in medical treatments is limited due to the possible long-term side effects of nps release. To prevent its release, ZnO nps were dispersed into Polycaprolactone (PCL) fibers obtained by electrospinning technique. To optimize the use of ZnO nps concentration, we developed coreshell coaxial electrospun fibers where the core corresponded to PCL and the shell to a mixture of ZnO nps/PCL. Thus, ZnO nps were only dispersed on the surface of the fibers increasing its superficial contact area. We evaluated the AA against E. coli of different electrospun ZnO nps/PCL fibers under two different conditions: UVA pre-illumination and darkness. Preliminary results suggest that the AA against E. coli is better when electrospun ZnO nps/PCL were preilluminated with UVA than under darkness conditions.

  18. Trends of reactive hyperaemia responses to repetitive loading on skin tissue of rats - Implications for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapp, Jong-Heng; Kamil, Raja; Rozi, M; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah; Loqman, M Y; Ezamin, A R; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Abu Bakar, Zuki

    2017-08-01

    Tissue recovery is important in preventing tissue deterioration, which is induced by pressure and may lead to pressure ulcers (PU). Reactive hyperaemia (RH) is an indicator used to identify people at risk of PU. In this study, the effect of different recovery times on RH trend is investigated during repetitive loading. Twenty-one male Sprague-Dawley rats (seven per group), with body weight of 385-485 g, were categorised into three groups and subjected to different recovery times with three repetitive loading cycles. The first, second, and third groups were subjected to short (3 min), moderate (10 min), and prolonged (40 min) recovery, respectively, while fixed loading time and pressure (10 min and 50 mmHg, respectively). Peak hyperaemia was measured in the three cycles to determine trends associated with different recovery times. Three RH trends (increasing, decreasing, and inconsistent) were observed. As the recovery time is increased (3 min vs. 10 min vs. 40 min), the number of samples with increasing RH trend decreases (57% vs. 29% vs. 14%) and the number of samples with inconsistent RH trend increases (29% vs. 57% vs. 72%). All groups consists of one sample with decreasing RH trend (14%). Results confirm that different recovery times affect the RH trend during repetitive loading. The RH trend may be used to determine the sufficient recovery time of an individual to avoid PU development. Copyright © 2017 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Soo; Jeon, Jong Hyun; Hong, Aram; Yang, Hyeong Tae; Yim, Haejun; Cho, Yong Suk; Kim, Do-Hern; Hur, Jun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Chun, Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Seo, Cheong Hoon

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn. One hundred and forty-six burn patients with hypertrophic scar(s) were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. All patients received standard rehabilitation therapy for hypertrophic scars and 76 patients (massage group) additionally received burn scar rehabilitation massage therapy. Both before and after the treatment, we determined the scores of visual analog scale (VAS) and itching scale and assessed the scar characteristics of thickness, melanin, erythema, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), sebum, and elasticity by using ultrasonography, Mexameter(®), Tewameter(®), Sebumeter(®), and Cutometer(®), respectively. The scores of both VAS and itching scale decreased significantly in both groups, indicating a significant intragroup difference. With regard to the scar characteristics, the massage group showed a significant decrease after treatment in scar thickness, melanin, erythema, TEWL and a significant intergroup difference. In terms of scar elasticity, a significant intergroup difference was noted in immediate distension and gross skin elasticity, while the massage group significant improvement in skin distensibility, immediate distension, immediate retraction, and delayed distension. Our results suggest that burn rehabilitation massage therapy is effective in improving pain, pruritus, and scar characteristics in hypertrophic scars after burn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. [The clinical use of cryopreserved human skin allografts for transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Chacón-Gómez, María; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio; Barrera-Lopez, Araceli; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Querevalu-Murillo, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The biological recovery of human skin allografts is the gold standard for preservation in Skin Banks. However, there is no worldwide consensus about specific allocation criteria for preserved human skin allografts with living cells. A report is presented on the results of 5 years of experience of using human skin allografts in burned patient in the Skin and Tissue Bank at the "Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" The human skin allografts were obtained from multi-organ donors. processed and preserved at -80 °C for 12 months. Allocation criteria were performed according to blood type match, clinical history, and burned body surface. Up to now, the Skin and Tissue Bank at 'Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" has processed and recovered 125,000 cm(2) of human skin allografts. It has performed 34 surgical implants on 21 burned patients. The average of burn body surface was 59.2%. More than two-thirds (67.7%) of recipients of skin allografts were matched of the same to type blood of the donor, and 66.6% survived after 126 days hospital stay. It is proposed to consider recipient's blood group as allocation criteria to assign tissue; and use human skin allografts on patiens affected with burns over 30% of body surface (according the "rule of the 9"). Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. [Fat grafting in facial burns sequelae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viard, R; Bouguila, J; Voulliaume, D; Comparin, J-P; Dionyssopoulos, A; Foyatier, J-L

    2012-06-01

    Fat graft is now part of the armamentarium in face plastic surgery. It is successfully used in burn scars. The aim of our study is the discussion of the value of this technique in optimizing cosmetic result of burns face sequelae. Fifteen adult patients (10 females and five males) with scars resulting from severe burns 2 to 9 years previously were selected. The patients were treated by injection of adipose tissue harvested from abdominal subcutaneous fat and processed according to Coleman's technique. Two to three injections were administered at the dermohypodermal junction. Ages, sexes, aetiology of burn, facial burn sequelae, recipient sites, quantity of fat injected, aesthetic results are discussed. Patient age ranged from 21 to 55 years (average: 38). The mean follow-up of the study was 66 months (23-118). Patients received 7.5 (5-11) facial restorative surgeries before fat graft. Patients underwent two sessions of fat transfer, 33cc average per session. We did not report any complications. The clinical appearance, discussed by three surgeons and subjective patient feelings, after a 6-month follow-up period, suggests considerable improvement in the mimic features, skin texture, and thickness. The result is good in 86% of cases and acceptable in the other cases. Burns sequelae offer local conditions which justify special cannula can cross fibrosis and explaining the value of multiplying the sessions. Indications for lipostructure include four distinct nosological situations, sometimes combined. Lipostructure can restore a missing relief, filling a localized depression, reshape a lack of face volume or smooth a scarring skin. Fat graft seems to complete and improve the results of the standard surgical approach in burned face. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Southern pine beetle infestations in relation to forest stand conditions, previous thinning, and prescribed burning: evaluation of the Southern Pine Beetle Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    John T. Nowak; James R. Meeker; David R. Coyle; Chris A. Steiner; Cavell Brownie

    2015-01-01

    Since 2003, the Southern Pine Beetle Prevention Program (SPBPP) (a joint effort of the USDA Forest Service and Southern Group of State Foresters) has encouraged and provided cost-share assistance for silvicultural treatments to reduce stand/forest susceptibility to the southern pine beetle (SPB)(Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann) in the southeastern United States....

  3. Assessment of organ culture for the conservation of human skin allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautier, A; Sabatier, F; Stellmann, P; Andrac, L; Nouaille De Gorce, Y; Dignat-George, F; Magalon, G

    2008-03-01

    Human skin allografts are used in the treatment of severe burns and their preservation is therefore critical for optimal clinical benefit. Current preservation methods, such as 4 degrees C storage or cryopreservation, cannot prevent the decrease of tissue viability. The aim of this study was to assess viability and function of skin allografts in a new skin organ culture model, allowing conservation parameters as close as possible to physiological conditions: 32 degrees C, air-liquid interface and physiological skin tension. Twelve skin samples, harvested from 6 living surgical donors, were conserved 35 days in two conditions: conservation at 4 degrees C and organ culture. Viability and function of skin samples were investigated at Day 0, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 using cell culture methods (trypan blue exclusion, Colony Forming Efficiency and Growth Rate), histopathological and histoenzymological studies (Ki67 immunostaining). In the two conditions, fibroblast and keratinocyte viability was progressively affected by storage, with a significant decrease observed after 35 days. No statistical difference could be observed between the two conditions. The two methods were also comparable regarding alterations of fibroblast and keratinocyte culture parameters, which were respectively significantly reduced at Day 7 and 21, compared to fresh skin. By contrast, histopathological and histoenzymological studies revealed a better preservation of skin architecture and proliferative potential at 4 degrees C, as compared to organ culture. These results indicate that skin organ culture does not provide significant advantages for skin allograft preservation. However, its potential use as an experimental model to study skin physiology and wound healing should be further evaluated.

  4. Post-burn scars and scar contractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Arun

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The mortality and morbidity from burns have diminished tremendously over the last six to seven decades. However, these do not truly reflect whether the victim could go back to society as a useful person or not and lead a normal life because of the inevitable post-burn scars, contractures and other deformities which collectively have aesthetic and functional considerations. This article gives an overview of the post-burn scars and scar contractures, especially their prevention, minimisation and principles of management.

  5. Design and methods for a cluster randomized trial of the Sunless Study: A skin cancer prevention intervention promoting sunless tanning among beach visitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merriam Philip

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin cancer is the most prevalent yet most preventable cancer in the US. While protecting oneself from ultraviolet radiation (UVR can largely reduce risk, rates of unprotected sun exposure remain high. Because the desire to be tan often outweighs health concerns among sunbathers, very few interventions have been successful at reducing sunbathing behavior. Sunless tanning (self-tanners and spray tans, a method of achieving the suntanned look without UVR exposure, might be an effective supplement to prevention interventions. Methods and Design This cluster randomized trial will examine whether a beach-based intervention that promotes sunless tanning as a substitute for sunbathing and includes sun damage imaging and sun safety recommendations is superior to a questionnaire only control group in reducing sunbathing frequency. Female beach visitors (N = 250 will be recruited from 2 public beaches in eastern Massachusetts. Beach site will be the unit of randomization. Follow-up assessment will occur at the end of the summer (1-month following intervention and 1 year later. The primary outcome is average sunbathing time per week. The study was designed to provide 90% power for detecting a difference of .70 hours between conditions (standard deviation of 2.0 at 1-year with an intra-cluster correlation coefficient of 0.01 and assuming a 25% rate of loss to follow-up. Secondary outcomes include frequency of sunburns, use of sunless tanning products, and sun protection behavior. Discussion Interventions might be improved by promoting behavioral substitutes for sun exposure, such as sunless tanners, that create a tanned look without exposure to UVR. Trial registration NCT00403377

  6. Skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolery-Lloyd, Heather; Kammer, Jenna N

    2011-01-01

    Skin tightening describes the treatment of skin laxity via radiofrequency (RF), ultrasound, or light-based devices. Skin laxity on the face is manifested by progressive loss of skin elasticity, loosening of the connective tissue framework, and deepening of skin folds. This results in prominence of submandibular and submental tissues. Genetic factors (chronological aging) and extrinsic factors (ultraviolet radiation) both contribute to skin laxity. There are many RF, ultrasound, and light-based devices directed at treating skin laxity. All of these devices target and heat the dermis to induce collagen contraction. Heating of the dermis causes collagen denaturation and immediate collagen contraction in addition to long-term collagen remodeling. Via RF, light, or ultrasound, these skin tightening devices deliver heat to the dermis to create new collagen and induce skin tightening. This chapter will provide an overview of the various skin tightening devices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Optimization of burn referrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiband, Hanna K; Lundin, Kira; Alsbjørn, Bjarne

    2014-01-01