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Sample records for prevent pressure ulcers

  1. Pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Woodard, Charles R; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Long, William B; Gebhart, Jocelynn H; Ma, Eva K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to outline the predisposing factors in the development of pressure ulcers and to identify a pressure ulcer prevention program. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are areas of skin overlying bony prominences. There are four critical factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers: pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Pressure is now viewed as the single most important etiologic factor in pressure ulcer formation. Prolonged immobilization, sensory deficit, circulatory disturbances, and poor nutrition have been identified as important risk factors in the development of pressure ulcer formation. Among the clinical assessment scales available, only two, the Braden Scale and Norton Scale, have been tested extensively for reliability and/or validity. The most commonly used risk assessment tools for pressure ulcer formation are computerized pressure monitoring and measurement of laser Doppler skin blood flow. Pressure ulcers can predispose the patient to a variety of complications that include bacteremia, osteomyelitis, squamous cell carcinoma, and sinus tracts. The three components of pressure ulcer prevention that must be considered in any patient include management of incontinence, nutritional support, and pressure relief. The pressure relief program must be individualized for non-weight-bearing individuals as well as those that can bear weight. For those that can not bear weight and passively stand, the RENAISSANCE Mattress Replacement System is recommended for the immobile patient who lies supine on the bed, the stretcher, or operating room table. This alternating pressure system is unique because it has three separate cells that are not interconnected. It is specifically designed so that deflation of each individual cell will reach a ZERO PRESSURE during each alternating pressure cycle. The superiority of this system has been documented by comprehensive clinical studies in which this system

  2. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  3. Pressure ulcers: prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Mansour

    2008-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a significant medical problem that greatly affects the geriatric population. We reviewed pertinent published data in the literature concerning the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. The development of pressure ulcers is associated with well known risk factors including unrelieved pressure, skin maceration, shear forces, malnutrition and immobility. Risk factor modification is an important aspect in prevention and treatment. When a pressure ulcer develops, various specialized support surfaces and wound care products exist to accelerate wound healing. Alternative therapeutic modalities such as ultrasonic mist and wound vacuum therapy are increasingly being used with success for such ulcers. Pressure ulcers are typically the consequence of underlying medical conditions that should be treated appropriately in order for the wound to heal.

  4. Pressure ulcer prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyder, Courtney H

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews 218 published and unpublished research reports of pressure ulcer prevention and management by nurse researchers and researchers from other disciplines. The electronic databases MEDLINE (1966-July 2001), CINAHL (1982-June 2001), AMED (1985-July 2001), and EI Compedex Plus (1980-June 2001) were selected for the searches because of their focus on health and applied research. Moreover, evaluations of previous review articles and seminal studies that were published before 1966 are also included. Research conducted worldwide and published in English between 1930 and 2001 was included for review. Studies using descriptive, correlational, longitudinal, and randomized control trials were included. This review found that numerous gaps remain in our understanding of effective pressure ulcer prevention and management. Moreover, the majority of pressure ulcer care is derived from expert opinion rather than empirical evidence. Thus, additional research is needed to investigate pressure ulcer risk factors of ethnic minorities. Further studies are needed that examine the impact of specific preventive interventions (e.g., turning intervals based on risk stratification) and the cost-effectiveness of comprehensive prevention programs to prevent pressure ulcers. Finally, an evaluation is needed of various aspects of pressure ulcer management (e.g., use of support surfaces, use of adjunctive therapies) and healing of pressure ulcers.

  5. [Prevention of pressure ulcer (bedsore)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedmak, Dijana; Vrhovec, Marina; Huljev, Dubravko

    2013-10-01

    Although progress in many fields of science, medicine and technology is evident, we are still witnessing the appearance of bedsores and its consequences. However, in the last fifty years there has been considerable progress in the understanding of its causes, prevention and treatment. Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers are complicated by the many misconceptions. However, with due knowledge of the process of healing of acute and chronic wounds and of the pathophysiological processes, in many cases chronic wounds, like pressure ulcers, can now be prevented and cured, and thus reduce the cost of treatment, as well as the mortality rate.

  6. Effective interventions for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Joanna

    This article examines the causes of pressure ulcers and provides an overview of the best advice available in preventing them in the clinical setting. This should enable nurses to provide more effective interventions for preventing patients from developing pressure ulcers.

  7. Prevention of pressure ulcers : Systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kavonen, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Treating a pressure ulcer takes lots of nursing personnel's time and is costly both in terms of human suffering and use of resources. The purpose of this study was to collect and assamble research data about the prevention of pressure ulcers. The study was done as a systematic literature review. With the results, the knowledge and know-how of pressure ulcers' prevention can be increased and updated. The results can be utilised by everyone working with pressure ulcers. The systematic ...

  8. Lying Posture Classification for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Phyo Wai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers are a common problem among patients with limited mobility, such as those bed-bound and wheelchair-bound. Constant and prolonged applied pressure is one of the extrinsic factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers. Analyzing lying postures together with interface pressure measurements from a pressure sensitive bed helps revealing pressure hot spots that can potentially lead to pressure ulcer development. We propose an intelligent system that features lying posture classification with pressure hot spots identification based on interface pressure measurements to possibly identify potential pressure ulcer risk and to provide effective preventive measures. Experimental outcomes correctly classify different lying postures with an accuracy of up to 93%. The proposed system is expected to assist caregivers to detect risk evidence and to provide timely and appropriate interventions for effective pressure ulcer prevention.

  9. Pressure ulcers : predicting factors, prevention and costs

    OpenAIRE

    Demarré, Liesbet

    2014-01-01

    The research outline pursued with this thesis can be divided in three parts. In the first part, studies to compare the effectiveness of several interventions for the prevention of pressure ulcers were conducted. Pressure ulcer prevention focusses on the reduction of the amount and duration of pressure and shear. An alternating device intermittently removes pressure and shear from vulnerable areas. It provides pressure relief via cyclic inflating and deflating air cells. Systematic reviews an...

  10. Preventing Ischial Pressure Ulcers: II. Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilton M. Kaplan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pressure ulcers (PUs are common and debilitating wounds that arise when immobilized patients cannot shift their weight. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES has been investigated for Pressure Ulcer Prevention (PUP for over 20 years. Historically gluteus maximus (GM has been considered an important actuator in attempting to redistribute seated pressures through NMES.

  11. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-06

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

  12. Support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Elizabeth; Jammali-Blasi, Asmara; Bell-Syer, Sally E M; Dumville, Jo C; Middleton, Victoria; Cullum, Nicky

    2015-09-03

    Pressure ulcers (i.e. bedsores, pressure sores, pressure injuries, decubitus ulcers) are areas of localised damage to the skin and underlying tissue. They are common in the elderly and immobile, and costly in financial and human terms. Pressure-relieving support surfaces (i.e. beds, mattresses, seat cushions etc) are used to help prevent ulcer development. This systematic review seeks to establish:(1) the extent to which pressure-relieving support surfaces reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers compared with standard support surfaces, and,(2) their comparative effectiveness in ulcer prevention. In April 2015, for this fourth update we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 15 April 2015) which includes the results of regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 3). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials, published or unpublished, that assessed the effects of any support surface for prevention of pressure ulcers, in any patient group or setting which measured pressure ulcer incidence. Trials reporting only proxy outcomes (e.g. interface pressure) were excluded. Two review authors independently selected trials. Data were extracted by one review author and checked by another. Where appropriate, estimates from similar trials were pooled for meta-analysis. For this fourth update six new trials were included, bringing the total of included trials to 59.Foam alternatives to standard hospital foam mattresses reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in people at risk (RR 0.40 95% CI 0.21 to 0.74). The relative merits of alternating- and constant low-pressure devices are unclear. One high-quality trial suggested that alternating-pressure mattresses may be more cost effective than alternating-pressure overlays in a UK context.Pressure-relieving overlays on the operating table reduce postoperative pressure ulcer incidence

  13. Support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Cullum, N; McInnes, E; Bell-Syer, SE; Legood, R

    2004-01-01

    : Pressure ulcers (also known as bedsores, pressure sores, decubitus ulcers) are areas of localised damage to the skin and underlying tissue due to pressure, shear or friction. They are common in the elderly and immobile and costly in financial and human terms. Pressure-relieving beds, mattresses and seat cushions are widely used as aids to prevention in both institutional and non-institutional settings. : This systematic review seeks to answer the following questions: to what extent do press...

  14. Support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention

    OpenAIRE

    McInnes, E; Bell-Syer, SE; Dumville, JC; Legood, R; Cullum, NA

    2008-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers (also known as bedsores, pressure sores, decubitus ulcers) are areas of localised damage to the skin and underlying tissue due to pressure, shear or friction. They are common in the elderly and immobile and costly in financial and human terms. Pressure-relieving beds, mattresses and seat cushions are widely used as aids to prevention in both institutional and non-institutional settings. Objectives This systematic review seeks to answer the following questions: (1) t...

  15. Pressure ulcer prevention: utilizing unlicensed assistive personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker Sewill, Danielle K; Van Sell, Sharon; Kindred, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide education to the RN regarding pressure ulcer prevention and best practice interventions. This investigation focuses on the definition of a pressure ulcer, risk factors for pressure ulcers, and the benefits and importance of using unlicensed assistive personnel to help prevent pressure ulcers. A comprehensive literature review was completed using the Texas Woman's University Library, the Texas Christian University Library, and the World Wide Web. The search engine used was Google. The databases included were CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. The literature was current, defined as from the last 10 years, and the primary language searched was English. Full-text articles from these databases were included as well as print publications from the university collections. The key search terms from the literature review included (a) pressure ulcer, (b) prevention, (c) unlicensed assistive personnel, (d) nursing assistant, (e) theory of nursing knowledge, (f) incidence, (g) prevalence, (h) Braden scale, (i) moisture, and (j) repositioning. Best practice guidelines were reviewed via the Joanna Briggs database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, Cochrane Library, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the National Institutes of Health. Literature was synthesized to define evidence-based practices that would justify the use of unlicensed assistive personnel for the prevention and care of pressure ulcers.

  16. The prevention and management of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, P S; Allman, R M

    1989-11-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common problem for older persons. Complications associated with pressure ulcers include infection and even death for some patients. Pressure is the primary pathogenic factor, but shearing forces, friction, and moisture are also important. Immobility, nutritional status, and age-related factors seem to be significant risk factors. Preventive care includes use of assessment tools to identify high risk patients, frequent repositioning, air or foam mattresses that reduce pressure over bony prominences, as well as careful attention to optimizing the overall patient condition. When pressure ulcers do develop, the treatment plan should include adequate nutrition including protein, vitamin C, and zinc supplements as indicated; systemic antibiotics for sepsis, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, or the prevention of bacterial endocarditis; and local wound care that eliminates necrotic tissue, decreases bacterial load, and provides a physiologic, pressure-free environment allowing the wound to heal. Specialized beds may be considered in some patients, particularly those with larger ulcers. Surgery is an option in older persons who are operative candidates. For some patients with pressure ulcers, appropriate treatment goals may focus on providing comfort rather than curing the ulcer.

  17. Massage therapy for preventing pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinhong; Sun, Zhongren; Yue, Jinhuan

    2015-06-17

    Pressure ulcers affect approximately 10% of patients in hospitals and the elderly are at highest risk. Several studies have suggested that massage therapy may help to prevent the development of pressure ulcers, but these results are inconsistent. To assess the evidence for the effects of massage compared with placebo, standard care or other interventions for prevention of pressure ulcers in at-risk populations.The review sought to answer the following questions:Does massage reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers of any grade?Is massage safe in the short- and long-term? If not, what are the adverse events associated with massage? We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (8 January 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to 8 January 2015), Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process Other Non-Indexed Citations 8 January 2015), Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 8 January 2015), and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 8 January 2015). We did not apply date or language restrictions. We planned to include all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised controlled trials (Q-RCTs) that evaluated the effects of massage therapy for the prevention of pressure ulcers. Our primary outcome was the proportion of people developing a new pressure ulcer of any grade. Two review authors independently carried out trial selection. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. No studies (RCTs or Q-RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. Therefore, neither a meta-analysis nor a narrative description of studies was possible. There are currently no studies eligible for inclusion in this review. It is, therefore, unclear whether massage therapy can prevent pressure ulcers.

  18. Enhancing Documentation of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Interventions: A Quality Improvement Strategy to Reduce Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Therese M; Thompson, Susan L; Halvorson, Anna M; Zeitler, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers requires the implementation of evidence-based interventions. A quality improvement project was conducted to provide nurses with data on the frequency with which pressure ulcer prevention interventions were performed as measured by documentation. Documentation reports provided feedback to stakeholders, triggering reminders and reeducation. Intervention reports and modifications to the documentation system were effective both in increasing the documentation of pressure ulcer prevention interventions and in decreasing the number of avoidable hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  19. Preventing pressure ulcers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Madhuri; Gill, Sudeep S; Rochon, Paula A

    2006-08-23

    Pressure ulcers are common in a variety of patient settings and are associated with adverse health outcomes and high treatment costs. To systematically review the evidence examining interventions to prevent pressure ulcers. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL (from inception through June 2006) and Cochrane databases (through issue 1, 2006) were searched to identify relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). UMI Proquest Digital Dissertations, ISI Web of Science, and Cambridge Scientific Abstracts were also searched. All searches used the terms pressure ulcer, pressure sore, decubitus, bedsore, prevention, prophylactic, reduction, randomized, and clinical trials. Bibliographies of identified articles were further reviewed. Fifty-nine RCTs were selected. Interventions assessed in these studies were grouped into 3 categories, ie, those addressing impairments in mobility, nutrition, or skin health. Methodological quality for the RCTs was variable and generally suboptimal. Effective strategies that addressed impaired mobility included the use of support surfaces, mattress overlays on operating tables, and specialized foam and specialized sheepskin overlays. While repositioning is a mainstay in most pressure ulcer prevention protocols, there is insufficient evidence to recommend specific turning regimens for patients with impaired mobility. In patients with nutritional impairments, dietary supplements may be beneficial. The incremental benefit of specific topical agents over simple moisturizers for patients with impaired skin health is unclear. Given current evidence, using support surfaces, repositioning the patient, optimizing nutritional status, and moisturizing sacral skin are appropriate strategies to prevent pressure ulcers. Although a number of RCTs have evaluated preventive strategies for pressure ulcers, many of them had important methodological limitations. There is a need for well-designed RCTs that follow standard criteria for reporting nonpharmacological

  20. Neonatal pressure ulcers: prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Molina P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pablo García-Molina,1,2 Alba Alfaro-López,1 Sara María García-Rodríguez,1 Celia Brotons-Payá,1 Mari Carmen Rodríguez-Dolz,1,2 Evelin Balaguer-López1,2 1Department of Nursing, University of Valencia, 2Research Group of Pediatric Nutrition, INCLIVA Foundation, Valencia, Spain Abstract: Health professionals should be prepared to respond to the needs of hospitalized neonates. The health team must consider multiple situations, where the neonate is at risk of having an adverse effect. One of the main interventions that health professionals must practice when interacting with hospitalized newborns is skin care. Neonates often suffer from diaper rash or intravenous drugs extravasation. Recently, hospitalized neonates and especially those in an unstable clinical situation are also at a risk of developing pressure ulcers. The presence of a pressure ulcer in a neonate can lead to serious problems to survival (eg, sepsis, clinical instability. This is the reason why, with this literature review, we attempt to answer questions from health professionals caring for neonates about the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Keywords: infant, pressure ulcer, treatment, prevention, wound, assessment

  1. Lying Posture Classification for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Wai, Aung Phyo; Foo, Siang Fook; Huang, Weimin; Biswas, Jit; Hsia, Chi-Chun; Liou, Koujuch; Yap, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common problem among patients with limited mobility, such as those bed-bound and wheelchair-bound. Constant and prolonged applied pressure is one of the extrinsic factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers. Analyzing lying postures together with interface pressure measurements from a pressure sensitive bed helps revealing pressure hot spots that can potentially lead to pressure ulcer development. We propose an intelligent system that features lying postur...

  2. Evaluation of Repositioning in Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Källman, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To reduce the risk for pressure ulcers, repositioning of immobile patients is an important standard nursing practice. However, knowledge on how this preventive intervention is carried out among elderly immobile patients is limited and to what extent patients perform minor movements between nursing staff-induced repositionings is largely unknown, but these movements might have implications for the repositioning intervention. Different lying positions are used in repositioning sch...

  3. Attitudes of Nurses Toward Pressure Ulcer Prevention: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Shirley M

    2014-01-01

    Despite the existence of accepted guidelines to prevent pressure ulcers, interventions are not performed consistently. Many variables, including nurses' attitudes, contribute to the development of pressure ulcers. A review of the literature on nurses' attitudes toward pressure ulcer prevention is provided.

  4. Dynamic sitting to prevent pressure ulcers in spinal cord injured

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reenalda, Jasper

    2009-01-01

    At present, clinical interventions and research efforts are not fully successful in defining the risk of pressure ulcer development and as such in eventually preventing pressure ulcers. As a result, the prevalence and incidence values of pressure ulcers remain unacceptably high. It is common sense

  5. Does regular repositioning prevent pressure ulcers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapfl, Lee Ann; Gray, Mikel

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to pressure is the primary etiologic factor of a pressure ulcer (PU) and effective preventive interventions must avoid or minimize this exposure. Therefore, frequent repositioning of the patient has long been recommended as a means of preventing PU. To review the evidence on the efficacy of repositioning as a PU prevention intervention. A systematic review of electronic databases MEDLINE and CINAHL, from January 1960 to July 2008, was undertaken. Studies were limited to prospective randomized clinical trials or quasi-experimental studies that compared repositioning to any other preventive interventions or any study that compared various techniques of repositioning such as turning frequency. Only those studies that measured the primary outcome of interest, PU incidence, were included in our review. Limited evidence suggests that repositioning every 4 hours, when combined with an appropriate pressure redistribution surface, is just as effective for the prevention of facility- acquired PUs as a more frequent (every 2 hour) regimen. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether a 30 degrees lateral position is superior to a 90 degrees lateral position or a semi-Fowler's position. The current regulatory and legal environment has focused increased attention on PU prevention. Pressure redistribution methods and the frequency of application are among the first factors scrutinized when a PU develops. Our clinical experience validates that regular movement of the immobilized patient is important, but evidence defining the optimal frequency of repositioning or optimal positioning is lacking.

  6. Pressure ulcer prevention and pressure-relieving surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, Maureen

    Although rarely subject to media attention, political interest or research funding, pressure ulcers, and their almost inevitable increase in incidence, detrimentally affect the quality of life of thousands of patients, both in the hospital and community setting. In addition, the costs to the NHS of pressure-ulcer-related care in hospitals is estimated to be pounds sterling 1.8-pounds sterling 2.5 billion annually. Many pressure ulcers that develop could have been prevented, and there are several up-to-date, easily-accessible sources of evidence to guide decision-making regarding appropriate interventions in pressure care. Consideration and assessment of the patient holistically, followed by appropriate intervention and evaluation, is the key to any prevention strategy.

  7. Repositioning for pressure ulcer prevention in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Chaboyer, Wendy P; McInnes, Elizabeth; Kent, Bridie; Whitty, Jennifer A; Thalib, Lukman

    2014-04-03

    A pressure ulcer (PU), also referred to as a 'pressure injury', 'pressure sore', or 'bedsore' is defined as an area of localised tissue damage that is caused by unrelieved pressure, friction or shearing forces on any part of the body. PUs commonly occur in patients who are elderly and less mobile, and carry significant human and economic impacts. Immobility and physical inactivity are considered to be major risk factors for PU development and the manual repositioning of patients in hospital or long-term care is a common pressure ulcer prevention strategy. The objectives of this review were to:1) assess the effects of repositioning on the prevention of PUs in adults, regardless of risk or in-patient setting;2) ascertain the most effective repositioning schedules for preventing PUs in adults; and3) ascertain the incremental resource consequences and costs associated with implementing different repositioning regimens compared with alternate schedules or standard practice. We searched the following electronic databases to identify reports of the relevant randomised controlled trials: the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 06 September 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 8); Ovid MEDLINE (1948 to August, Week 4, 2013); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 2013, Week 35); EBESCO CINAHL (1982 to 30 August 2013); and the reference sections of studies that were included in the review. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), published or unpublished, that assessed the effects of any repositioning schedule or different patient positions and measured PU incidence in adults in any setting. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We included three RCTs and one economic study representing a total of 502 randomised participants from acute and long-term care settings. Two trials compared the 30º and 90º tilt positions using similar repositioning frequencies (there was a

  8. Pressure ulcer prevention is everyone's business: the PUPS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenman, Juliet; Marks-Maran, Di

    2017-03-23

    Prevention of pressure ulcers is one of the greatest healthcare challenges in terms of reducing patient harm. The literature shows that although numerous reports and policy documents have been published, pressure ulcer prevention remains an ongoing challenge. A number of innovations have been published offering practising nurses and managers ideas for raising awareness of skin care and preventing pressure ulcers. The majority of these have focused on patients in hospital settings with very little in the literature related to care-home and community initiatives. This article reports on an innovative approach to education for pressure ulcer prevention through collaboration between patients, carers and health and social care professionals.

  9. Bridging the theory-practice gap in pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zena

    Pressure ulcers are a largely preventable problem, but the incidence can impact negatively on the ability of the health service to deliver effective and quality care. Pressure ulcers commonly occur in the very old, the malnourished and those with acute illness. As pressure ulcers most commonly occur in the hospital setting, this can increase both length of stay and costs to the health service. As a result, prevention and management strategies should be core components in the strategic planning of healthcare services. This article discusses the importance of education and knowledge in pressure ulcers, and the onus of the nurse to put theory into practice in order to prevent this problem.

  10. A critical care network pressure ulcer prevention quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joanna; Richardson, Annette

    2015-03-30

    Pressure ulcer prevention is an important safety issue, often underrated and an extremely painful event harming patients. Critically ill patients are one of the highest risk groups in hospital. The impact of pressure ulcers are wide ranging, and they can result in increased critical care and the hospital length of stay, significant interference with functional recovery and rehabilitation and increase cost. This quality improvement project had four aims: (1) to establish a critical care network pressure ulcer prevention group; (2) to establish baseline pressure ulcer prevention practices; (3) to measure, compare and monitor pressure ulcers prevalence; (4) to develop network pressure ulcer prevention standards. The approach used to improve quality included strong critical care nursing leadership to develop a cross-organisational pressure ulcer prevention group and a benchmarking exercise of current practices across a well-established critical care Network in the North of England. The National Safety Thermometer tool was used to measure pressure ulcer prevalence in 23 critical care units, and best available evidence, local consensus and another Critical Care Networks' bundle of interventions were used to develop a local pressure ulcer prevention standards document. The aims of the quality improvement project were achieved. This project was driven by successful leadership and had an agreed common goal. The National Safety Thermometer tool was an innovative approach to measure and compare pressure ulcer prevalence rates at a regional level. A limitation was the exclusion of moisture lesions. The project showed excellent engagement and collaborate working in the quest to prevent pressure ulcers from many critical care nurses with the North of England Critical Care Network. A concise set of Network standards was developed for use in conjunction with local guidelines to enhance pressure ulcer prevention. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  11. Pressure ulcer prevention and treatment knowledge of Jordanian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammad Y N; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Anthony, Denis

    2013-02-01

    The aims of the study were to determine: (1) Jordanian nurses' level of knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment of hospitalized patients based on guidelines for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. (2) Frequency of utilization of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment interventions in clinical practice. (3) Variables that are associated with nurses' utilization of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment interventions. Pressure ulcers are common and previous studies have shown education, knowledge and attitude affect implementation of interventions. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from 460 nurses between June 2010 and November 2010. We used a questionnaire, which was informed by earlier work and guidelines, to collect data about nurses' knowledge and practice of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. Knowledge and education show an association with implementation of prevention, and demographic variables do not. Similarly knowledge and type of hospital showed an association with implementing treatment. Of concern the use of "donuts" and massage are reported in use. Although pressure ulcer care is well known by nurses, inappropriate pressure ulcer interventions were reported in use. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A resource-efficient planning for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadabbas, Sarah; Yousefi, Rasoul; Nourani, Mehrdad; Faezipour, Miad; Tamil, Lakshman; Pompeo, Matthew Q

    2012-11-01

    Pressure ulcer is a critical problem for bed-ridden and wheelchair-bound patients, diabetics, and the elderly. Patients need to be regularly repositioned to prevent excessive pressure on a single area of body, which can lead to ulcers. Pressure ulcers are extremely costly to treat and may lead to several other health problems, including death. The current standard for prevention is to reposition at-risk patients every two hours. Even if it is done properly, a fixed schedule is not sufficient to prevent all ulcers. Moreover, it may result in nurses being overworked by turning some patients too frequently. In this paper, we present an algorithm for finding a nurse-effort optimal repositioning schedule that prevents pressure ulcer formation for a finite planning horizon. Our proposed algorithm uses data from a commercial pressure mat assembled on the beds surface and provides a sequence of next positions and the time of repositioning for each patient.

  13. An evaluation of preventing pressure ulcers in the urinary meatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal; Markovski, Igor; Fishlov, Anton; Naveh, Re-Ut

    2013-01-01

    As many as 5% of male hospital patients develop pressure ulcers. This brief study was done to obtain more research about this topic by evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention designed to prevent pressure ulcers in the urinary meatus as a result of urethral catheterization. Implications for critical care nurses are included.

  14. Prevention and management of pressure ulcers: support surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zena; Stephen Haynes, Jackie; Callaghan, Rosie

    Pressure ulcers are a common and debilitating problem in health care, impacting negatively on health-related quality of life and compounding challenges in achieving patient safety targets. Pressure ulcer prevention is a multidisciplinary team effort, involving a myriad of interventions, such as nutrition, skin care and repositioning. This article discusses the factors influencing pressure ulcer development, and then elaborates on the principles of prevention. This is followed by a focused discussion on the use of redistribution devices and the importance of the cover of such equipment in contributing to achieving good standards in prevention.

  15. Pressure ulcer prevention in intensive care patients: guidelines and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Eman S M; Dassen, Theo; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2009-04-01

    Pressure ulcers are a potential problem in intensive care patients, and their prevention is a major issue in nursing care. This study aims to assess the allocation of preventive measures for patients at risk for pressure ulcers in intensive care and the evidence of applied pressure ulcer preventive measures in intensive care settings in respect to the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) and Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) guidelines for pressure ulcer prevention. The design of this study was a cross-sectional study (point prevalence). Setting The study setting was intensive care units. The sample consisted of 169 patients - 60 patients from surgical wards, 59 from interdisciplinary wards and 50 from medical intensive care wards. The study results revealed that pressure reducing devices like mattresses (alternating pressure air, low air loss and foam) are applied for 58 (36.5%) patients, and all of these patients are at risk for pressure ulcer development. Most patients receive more than one nursing intervention, especially patients at risk. Nursing interventions applied are skin inspection, massage with moisture cream, nutrition and mobility (81.8%, 80.5%, 68.6% and 56.6%) respectively. Moreover, all applied pressure ulcer preventive measures in this study are in line with the guidelines of the EPUAP and AHCPR except massage which is applied to 8.8% of all patients. The use of pressure reducing devices and nursing interventions in intensive care patients are in line with international pressure ulcer guidelines. Only massage, which is also being used, should be avoided according to the recommendation of national and international guidelines.

  16. Pressure ulcer prevention in patients with advanced illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Chu, E Foy; Reddy, Madhuri

    2013-03-01

    Pressure ulcers can be challenging to prevent, particularly in patients with advanced illnesses. This review summarizes the relevant literature since 2011. Through a MEDLINE and CINAHL database search from January 1, 2011 to June 1, 2012, a total of 14 abstracts were found addressing the prevention of pressure ulcers in persons with advanced illness. Search terms included pressure ulcer, prevention, and control. Advanced illness was defined as patients transitioning from curative to supportive and palliative care. Ten original studies and four review articles specifically addressed pressure ulcer prevention. There were four articles that specifically addressed patients with advanced illness. The studies varied in quality. One systematic review, one randomized controlled trial, three prospective trials, two retrospective trials, one cost-effectiveness analysis, one quality improvement project, one comparative descriptive design, and four review articles were found. The interventions for pressure ulcer prevention were risk assessment, repositioning, surface selection, nutritional support and maintenance of skin integrity with or without incontinence. The quality of pressure ulcer prevention studies in persons with advanced illness is poor. Increased number and higher quality studies are needed to further investigate this important topic for these fragile patients.

  17. Pressure ulcer prevention and treatment: use of prophylactic dressings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid K

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen Reid,1 Elizabeth A Ayello,2 Afsaneh Alavi,3 1Department of Nursing Practice and Education, Bridgepoint Active Healthcare, Toronto, Canada; 2School of Nursing, Excelsior College, Albany, NY, USA; 3Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Abstract: The management of pressure ulcers is challenging for health care providers across disciplines. Pressure ulcers have significant impact on emotional and physical wellbeing, quality of life, and health care costs. The use of wound dressings could be an important and cost-effective strategy in preventing pressure ulcers. The main types of dressings that are examined for this purpose in the literature are foam, hydrocolloid, and films. Some small studies have shown a preventative role for sacral dressings with low-shear backings, though they raise concerns about over-hydration of the skin. Further research demonstrates the application of barrier films over bony prominences to have a prophylactic effect; however, adhesive dressings can also contribute to shearing forces on the skin. There is a vast body of research that examines the use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers; however, there is limited high-level evidence, such as randomized control trials. A 2013 Cochrane review indicated that there is a paucity of high-level evidence to support the prophylactic use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers; this paper will examine the emerging literature and consider its relevance to pressure ulcer prevention protocols. Keywords: quality of life, hydrocolloid dressing, topical agent

  18. [Prevention of pressure ulcers--review of the evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaul, Efraim

    2008-10-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to constitute a health problem for people who are physically limited or bedridden, particularly among the elderly and victims of spinal cord injuries. The problem exists across the entire health framework, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities and homes. The prevention of pressure ulcers is of prime importance, as most of them are preventable by means of a high level of awareness and by implementing preventive measures. These measures must be taken from the moment of admission or immobilization. Such preventive measures can save much suffering and expense to the family and the medical establishment alike. A pressure ulcer may develop in a matter of hours, whereas the cure takes many months, if at all. The complications of pressure ulcers are protean: they may serve as a conduit of pathogens, to prolong hospitalization, and to increase the risk of death. The diminution of the quality of life of the affected patient results from pain, discomfort, unpleasant odors from discharges, isolation and resultant depression. The prevention of pressure ulcers requires the involvement of a number of interventions, most of which have not undergone rigorous prospective randomized controlled studies. Recently, a systematic review has been undertaken to evaluate just such interventions. The preventive interventions that were reviewed include devices to relieve pressure, repositioning, exercise to assist bladder control, nutritional supplementation and moisturizing skin. The resultant recommendations appear in this review article.

  19. Nutritional interventions for preventing and treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Gero; Fink, Astrid

    2014-06-12

    Pressure ulcers affect approximately 10% of people in hospitals and older people are at highest risk. A correlation between inadequate nutritional intake and the development of pressure ulcers has been suggested by several studies, but the results have been inconsistent. To evaluate the effects of enteral and parenteral nutrition on the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. In March 2014, for this first update, we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Trials Register, the Cochrane Central register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library), the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (The Cochrane Library), the Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA) (The Cochrane Library), the Cochrane Methodology Register (The Cochrane Library), NHS Economic Evaluation Database (The Cochrane Library), Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL. No date, language or publication status limits were applied. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of enteral or parenteral nutrition on the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers, which measured the incidence of new ulcers, ulcer healing or changes in pressure ulcer severity. There were no restrictions on types of patient, setting, date, publication status or language. Two review authors independently screened for inclusion, and disagreement was resolved by discussion. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed quality using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias. We included 23 RCTs, many were small (between 9 and 4023 participants, median 88) and at high risk of bias.Eleven trials compared a combination of nutritional supplements, consisting of a minimum of energy and protein in different dosages, for the prevention of pressure ulcers. A meta-analysis of eight trials (6062 participants) that compared the effects of mixed nutritional supplements with standard hospital diet found no clear evidence of an effect of supplementation on pressure

  20. Risk assessment scales for pressure ulcer prevention: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L; Garcia-Fernandez, Francisco Pedro; Lopez-Medina, Isabel Ma; Alvarez-Nieto, Carmen

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports a systematic review conducted to determine the effectiveness of the use of risk assessment scales for pressure ulcer prevention in clinical practice, degree of validation of risk assessment scales, and effectiveness of risk assessment scales as indicators of risk of developing a pressure ulcer. Pressure ulcers are an important health problem. The best strategy to avoid them is prevention. There are several risk assessment scales for pressure ulcer prevention which complement nurses' clinical judgement. However, some of these have not undergone proper validation. A systematic bibliographical review was conducted, based on a search of 14 databases in four languages using the keywords pressure ulcer or pressure sore or decubitus ulcer and risk assessment. Reports of clinical trials or prospective studies of validation were included in the review. Thirty-three studies were included in the review, three on clinical effectiveness and the rest on scale validation. There is no decrease in pressure ulcer incidence was found which might be attributed to use of an assessment scale. However, the use of scales increases the intensity and effectiveness of prevention interventions. The Braden Scale shows optimal validation and the best sensitivity/specificity balance (57.1%/67.5%, respectively); its score is a good pressure ulcer risk predictor (odds ratio = 4.08, CI 95% = 2.56-6.48). The Norton Scale has reasonable scores for sensitivity (46.8%), specificity (61.8%) and risk prediction (OR = 2.16, CI 95% = 1.03-4.54). The Waterlow Scale offers a high sensitivity score (82.4%), but low specificity (27.4%); with a good risk prediction score (OR = 2.05, CI 95% = 1.11-3.76). Nurses' clinical judgement (only considered in three studies) gives moderate scores for sensitivity (50.6%) and specificity (60.1%), but is not a good pressure ulcer risk predictor (OR = 1.69, CI 95% = 0.76-3.75). There is no evidence that the use of risk assessment scales decreases pressure

  1. Risk assessment tools for the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zena E H; Cowman, Seamus

    2014-02-05

    Use of pressure ulcer risk assessment tools or scales is a component of the assessment process used to identify individuals at risk of developing a pressure ulcer. Indeed, use of a risk assessment tool is recommended by many international pressure ulcer prevention guidelines, however it is not known whether using a risk assessment tool makes a difference to patient outcomes. We conducted a review to provide a summary of the evidence pertaining to pressure ulcer risk assessment in clinical practice. To determine whether using structured, systematic pressure ulcer risk assessment tools, in any health care setting, reduces the incidence of pressure ulcers. In December 2013, for this second update, we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the use of structured, systematic, pressure ulcer risk assessment tools with no structured pressure ulcer risk assessment, or with unaided clinical judgement, or RCTs comparing the use of different structured pressure ulcer risk assessment tools. Two review authors independently assessed titles and abstracts of the studies identified by the search strategy for eligibility, obtained full versions of potentially relevant studies and screened these against the inclusion criteria. We included two studies in this review. One small, cluster randomised study found no statistical difference in pressure ulcer incidence in patients who were assessed by nurses using the Braden risk assessment tool (n=74) compared with patients assessed by nurses who had receiving training and then used unstructured risk assessment (n=76) (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.77) and those patients assessed by nurses using unstructured risk assessment alone (n=106) (RR 1.43, 95% CI 0.77 to 2.68). The second study was a large single blind randomised controlled study which compared

  2. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers.Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series.PRESSURE ULCER PREVENTION: an evidence based analysisThe cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation)MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC PRESSURE ULCERS: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) PURPOSE: A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers()SettingCanadian Prevalence,% (95% CI)Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n)Acute care25 (23.8-26.3)23.9-29.7 (3418)Nonacute care30 (29.3-31.4)30.0-53.3 (1165)Community care15 (13.4-16.8)13.2 (91)Mixed health care22 (20.9-23.4)13.1-25.7 (3100)All health care settings26 (25

  3. Best Practices for Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the Burn Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Julia; Ann Raible, Mary; Hajduk, Gina; Collavo, Jacqueline

    The State of Pennsylvania Hospital Engagement Network, in collaboration with a hospital system in Southwestern Pennsylvania, established a goal of reducing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers by 20%. A 6-month unfavorable trend of nurse-sensitive clinical indicators called for immediate process improvement. A retrospective chart review resulted in identification of predominant risk factors placing the burn patient at high risk for pressure ulcer formation. Implementations of pressure ulcer prevention measures were inconsistent. Nurses demonstrated varied levels of knowledge about products used for prevention. It became imperative to examine processes within the unit and provide nursing with education, access to skin care supplies, and advanced skin/wound care products for maintaining skin integrity. Creation of evidence-based guidelines was necessary to improve patient outcomes. A collaborative team approach influenced nursing and physician awareness of pressure ulcer risk. Evidence-based prevention guidelines were developed, and consistency in early intervention was achieved, supporting our culture of safety. A change in interprofessional collaborative practice and positive trend in pressure ulcer incidence data supports the success of our program.

  4. Universal Pressure Ulcer Prevention Bundle With WOC Nurse Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Megan; Finch Guthrie, Patricia; Kraft, Wendy; Reicks, Patty; Skay, Carol; Beal, Alan L

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a universal pressure ulcer prevention bundle (UPUPB) applied to intensive care unit (ICU) patients combined with proactive, semiweekly WOC nurse rounds. The UPUBP was compared to a standard guideline with referral-based WOC nurse involvement measuring adherence to 5 evidence-based prevention interventions and incidence of pressure ulcers. The study used a quasi-experimental, pre-, and postintervention design in which each phase included different subjects. Descriptive methods assisted in exploring the content of WOC nurse rounds. One hundred eighty-one pre- and 146 postintervention subjects who met inclusion criteria and were admitted to ICU for more than 24 hours participated in the study. The research setting was 3 ICUs located at North Memorial Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Data collection included admission/discharge skin assessments, chart reviews for 5 evidence-based interventions and patient characteristics, and WOC nurse rounding logs. Study subjects with intact skin on admission identified with an initial skin assessment were enrolled in which prephase subjects received standard care and postphase subjects received the UPUPB. Skin assessments on ICU discharge and chart reviews throughout the stay determined the presence of unit-acquired pressure ulcers and skin care received. Analysis included description of WOC nurse rounds, t-tests for guideline adherence, and multivariate analysis for intervention effect on pressure ulcer incidence. Unit assignment, Braden Scale score, and ICU length of stay were covariates for a multivariate model based on bivariate logistic regression screening. The incidence of unit-acquired pressure ulcers decreased from 15.5% to 2.1%. WOC nurses logged 204 rounds over 6 months, focusing primarily on early detection of pressure sources. Data analysis revealed significantly increased adherence to heel elevation (t = -3.905, df = 325, P pressure ulcers (P intervention increased the

  5. The provision of therapy mattresses for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnamenta, Fania

    2017-03-23

    Preventing pressure ulcers is complex and involves skin care, the provision of therapy mattresses, repositioning, the management of incontinence and adequate nutritional support. This article describes a model of therapy mattress provision that is based on non-powered products. Evaluating the efficiency of this model is challenging, due to the complexities of care, but Safety Thermometer data and incidents reports offer reassurance that non-powered therapy mattresses can provide adequate pressure ulcer prevention. Therapy mattress provision is only one of the five interventions and these are described in details to give readers a fuller picture of the model used at the author's trust.

  6. [Prevention of ulcers by pressure as a universal right].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Jaime Zabala

    2013-02-01

    The title of the article matches the of the "Declaration of Rio de Janeiro on the prevention of ulcers by pressure as a Universal right" [ 1], promoted by numerous groups and associations related to the problematic of ulcers by pressure (UPP) at the international level, and is a decisive step for joint efforts to give visibility to a problem of global dimension. Efforts previously, and in what refers to our country, have been left reflected in statements [2] pressure driven by the National group for study and advice on ulcers and wounds chronicles (GNEAUPP). The Declaration dealt with masterfully what will be our thesis, beyond a clinical problem--that is--the UPP, and specifically its prevention, constitute a problem primarily ethical character and, more specifically, minimum ethics, as we already reflected more widely in another article [3], by what remains essential to influencing this aspect often underestimated.

  7. Assessing the adequacy of pressure ulcer prevention in hospitals: a nationwide prevalence survey

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderwee, Katrien; Defloor, Tom; Beeckman, Dimitri; Demarré, Liesbet; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Durme, Therese; Gobert, Micheline

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The development of a pressure ulcer is an adverse event and is often avoidable if adequate preventive measures are applied. No large-scale data, based on direct patient observations, are available regarding the pressure ulcer preventive interventions used in hospitals. Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain insight into the adequacy of interventions used to prevent pressure ulcers in Belgian hospitals. Methods: A cross-sectional, multi-centre pressure ulcer preval...

  8. Pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Madhuri

    2011-04-28

    Unrelieved pressure or friction of the skin, particularly over bony prominences, can lead to pressure ulcers in up to one third of people in hospitals or community care, and one fifth of nursing home residents. Pressure ulcers are more likely in people with reduced mobility and poor skin condition, such as older people or those with vascular disease. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of preventive interventions in people at risk of developing pressure ulcers? What are the effects of treatments in people with pressure ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 64 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: air-filled vinyl boots, air-fluidised supports, alternating-pressure surfaces (including mattresses), alternative foam mattresses, constant low-pressure supports, debridement, electric profiling beds, electrotherapy, hydrocellular heel supports, low-air-loss beds (including hydrotherapy beds), low-level laser therapy, low-tech constant-low-pressure supports, medical sheepskin overlays, nutritional supplements, orthopaedic wool padding, pressure-relieving overlays on operating tables, pressure-relieving surfaces, repositioning (regular "turning"), seat cushions, standard beds, standard care, standard foam mattresses, standard tables, surgery, therapeutic ultrasound, topical lotions and

  9. Silicone pressure-reducing pads for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Maria A

    2014-06-01

    Pressure ulcers, a key quality of care indicator, cause emotional distress to the patient, affecting quality of life. They also have significant financial implications for the NHS. Pressure ulcer prevention and management are fundamental aspects of nursing. This article reports on the Wirral Community Trust's policy and guidelines for the maintenance of skin integrity. Tissue viability nurses have a duty to review and assess new prevention devices and dressings as they become available to ensure a high standard of care is provided. A report of an evaluation of the use of KerraPro in combination with current best practice guidelines for the prevention or treatment of pressure ulcers is provided. The author concludes that silicone pressure-reducing pads are a valuable tool in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers when used in combination with recommendations from the latest guidelines.

  10. Microcontrolled air-mattress for ulcer by pressure prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasluosta, Cristian F; Fontana, Juan M; Beltramone, Diego A; Taborda, Ricardo A M

    2007-01-01

    An ulcer by pressure is produced when a constant pressure is exerted over the skin. This generates the collapse of the blood vessels and, therefore, a lack in the contribution of the necessary nutrients for the affected zone. As a consequence, the skin deteriorates, eventually causing an ulcer. In order to prevent it, a protocol must be applied to the patient, which is reflected on time and cost of treatment. There are some air mattresses available for this purpose, but whose performance does not fulfill all requirements. The prototype designed in our laboratory is based on the principle of the air mattress. Its objective is to improve on existing technologies and, due to an increased automation, reduce time dedication for personnel in charge of the patient. A clinical experience was made in the local Emergencies Hospital and also in an institution dedicated to aged patients care. In both cases, the results obtained and the comments from the personnel involved were favorable

  11. Pressure mapping to prevent pressure ulcers in a hospital setting: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunningberg, Lena; Sedin, Inga-Maj; Andersson, Sara; Pingel, Ronnie

    2017-07-01

    Pressure ulcers cause suffering to patients and costs to society. Reducing pressure at the interface between the patient's body and the support surface is a valid clinical intervention for reducing the risk of pressure ulcers. However, studies have shown that knowledge of how to reduce pressure and shear and to prevent pressure ulcers is lacking. To evaluate the effect of a pressure mapping system on pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence in a hospital setting. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial. A geriatric/internal medical ward with 26 beds in a Swedish university hospital. 190 patients were recruited (intervention: n=91; control: n=99) over a period of 9 months. Patients were eligible if they were over 50 years old, admitted to the ward between Sunday 4pm and Friday 4pm, and expected to stay in the ward ≥3 days. The continuous bedside pressure mapping system displays the patient's pressure points in real-time colour imagery showing how pressure is distributed at the body-mat interface. The system gives immediate feedback to staff about the patient's pressure points, facilitating preventive interventions related to repositioning. It was used from admittance to discharge from the ward (or 14 days at most). Both intervention and control groups received standard pressure ulcer prevention care. No significant difference in the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers was shown between intervention and control groups. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in the intervention group was 24.2% on day 1 and 28.2% on day 14. In the control group the corresponding numbers were 18.2% and 23.8%. Seven of 69 patients (10.1%) in the intervention group and seven of 81 patients (8.6%) in the control group who had no pressure ulcers on admission developed category 1 and category 2 ulcers during their hospital stay. The incidence rate ratio between the intervention and control groups was 1.13 (95% CI: 0.34-3.79). This study failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect of a

  12. Pressure ulcer prevention: making a difference across a health authority?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Heidi; Downie, Fiona; McIntyre, Lyn; Peters, Jeremy

    Pressure ulcers (PUs), their cause and prevention have been discussed in the literature for many decades. Their prevention and management has been the core of a tissue viability nurse's daily clinical and strategic workload. The important point to acknowledge is that not all PUs can be prevented but it is believed most of them can and all preventative measures must be implemented and evaluated. Initial efforts focused on establishing a baseline of incidence and prevalence. More recently, the Department of Health has proposed that PUs could be eliminated in 95% of all NHS patients and incentivised the measurement of PUs and other harms by use of the NHS Safety Thermometer through the introduction of a new initiative. A research company was commissioned to explore which communications interventions would be effective in helping health professionals to prevent and treat PUs. A campaign was subsequently set in motion to educate and inform clinical staff on the cause and prevention of PUs.

  13. Assessing the adequacy of pressure ulcer prevention in hospitals: a nationwide prevalence survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwee, Katrien; Defloor, Tom; Beeckman, Dimitri; Demarré, Liesbet; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Durme, Thérèse; Gobert, Micheline

    2011-03-01

    The development of a pressure ulcer is an adverse event and is often avoidable if adequate preventive measures are applied. No large-scale data, based on direct patient observations, are available regarding the pressure ulcer preventive interventions used in hospitals. The aim of this study was to obtain insight into the adequacy of interventions used to prevent pressure ulcers in Belgian hospitals. A cross-sectional, multi-centre pressure ulcer prevalence study was performed in Belgian hospitals. The methodology used to measure pressure ulcer prevalence was developed by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. The data collection instrument includes five categories of data: general data, patient data, risk assessment, skin observation and prevention. The total sample consisted of 19,968 patients. The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers Category I-IV was 12.1%. Only 10.8% of the patients at risk received fully adequate prevention in bed and while sitting. More than 70% of the patients not at risk received some pressure ulcer prevention while lying or sitting. Generally, there is a limited use of adequate preventive interventions for pressure ulcers in hospitals, which reflects a rather low quality of preventive care. The implementation of pressure ulcer guidelines requires more attention. The pressure ulcer prevention used in practice should be re-evaluated on a regular basis.

  14. Preventing Ischial Pressure Ulcers: I. Review of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilton M. Kaplan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pressure ulcers (PUs are common and debilitating wounds that arise when immobilized patients cannot shift their weight. Treatment is expensive and recurrence rates are high. Pathophysiological mechanisms include reduced bulk and perfusion of chronically atrophic muscles as well as prolonged occlusion of blood flow to soft tissues from lack of voluntary postural shifting of body weight. This has suggested that PUs might be prevented by reanimating the paralyzed muscles using neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES. A review of the published literature over the past 2 decades is detailed.

  15. Design and Evaluation of a Pressure and Temperature Monitoring System for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farve Daneshvar Fard

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pressure ulcers are tissue damages resulting from blood flow restriction, which occurs when the tissue is exposed to high pressure for a long period of time. These painful sores are common in patients and elderly, who spend extended periods of time in bed or wheelchair. In this study, a continuous pressure and temperature monitoring system was developed for pressure ulcer prevention. Materials and Methods The monitoring system consists of 64 pressure and 64 temperature sensors on a 40×50 cm2 sheet. Pressure and temperature data and the corresponding maps were displayed on a computer in real-time. Risk assessment could be performed by monitoring and recording absolute pressure and temperature values, as well as deviations over time. Furthermore, a posture detection procedure was proposed for sitting posture identification. Information about the patient’s movement history may help caregivers make informed decisions about the patient’s repositioning and ulcer prevention strategies. Results Steady temporal behaviour of the designed system and repeatability of the measurements were evaluated using several particular tests. The results illustrated that the system could be utilized for continuous monitoring of interface pressure and temperature for pressure ulcer prevention. Furthermore, the proposed method for detecting sitting posture was verified using a statistical analysis. Conclusion A continuous time pressure and temperature monitoring system was presented in this study. This system may be suited for pressure ulcer prevention given its feasibility for simultaneous monitoring of pressure and temperature and alarming options. Furthermore, a method for detecting different sitting postures was proposed and verified. Pressure ulcers in wheelchair-bound patients may be prevented using this sitting posture detection method.

  16. Pressure Relief Behaviors and Weight Shifting Activities to Prevent Pressure Ulcers in Persons with SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    pressure relief maneuvers on ischial interface pressure and blood flow in people with spinal cord injury”, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 95 no.7, pp. 1350-1357, July 2014. ...0 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0387 TITLE: Pressure Relief Behaviors and Weight-Shifting Activities to Prevent Pressure Ulcers in Persons with...Annual Report 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2015 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pressure Relief Behaviors and Weight-Shifting

  17. Implementing a pressure ulcer prevention bundle into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Fiona; Perrin, Anne-Marie; Kiernan, Martin

    The implementation of a care bundle approach to delivering fundamental care in practice is now a recognised and effective way of translating research into practice, offering consistent care with resulting positive outcomes for the patient. A care bundle consists ofa relatively small number of interventions for every patient to whom the bundle is applied. However, there must be evidence behind each individual intervention to indicate, if delivered, how it will reduce the risk to the patient. This paper reports on a strategy for developing and implementing a pressure ulcer (PU) combined prevention care bundle/ care plan into practice. The effectiveness of the care bundle can be measured when it is in use in the practice setting with an audit tool.

  18. Exploring practice variation in preventive pressure-ulcer care using data from a clinical data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, InSook; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Chung, Eunja

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to explore pressure ulcer incidences and practice variations in the nursing intervention provided for preventive pressure-ulcer care to patients either with pressure ulcers or at risk of pressure ulcers, and to examine them in relation to the patients' medical problems and the characteristics of the nurses who cared for them. The narrative nursing notes of 427 intensive-care patients who were discharged in 2007 that were documented at the point-of-care using standardized nursing statements were extracted from a clinical data repository at a teaching hospital in Korea and analyzed. The frequencies of five nursing interventions for pressure-ulcer prevention were compared between pressure-ulcer and pressure-ulcer risk groups, as were the characteristics of the nurses who were treating the patients in these two groups. Nursing interventions for pressure-ulcer prevention were also assessed relative to the patients' medical problems. The overall incidence of pressure ulcers was 15.0%. Position change was the most popular nursing intervention provided for pressure-ulcer prevention in both the pressure-ulcer and at-risk groups, followed by skin care. There was a statistically significant tendency toward a greater frequency of providing skin care and nutritional care in the at-risk group than in the pressure-ulcer group. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean frequencies of nursing interventions relative to the patients' medical problems in the pressure-ulcer group. However, frequencies of nursing interventions did differ significantly between patients with neurological problems and those with other medical problems in the at-risk group. Analysis of the nurses' characteristics revealed that more nursing interventions were documented by those who were younger, less experienced, and more educated. A standardized nursing-terminology-based electronic nursing record system allowed us to monitor the variations in nursing practice

  19. The Australian medical sheepskin prevents pressure ulcers: a combined multilevel analysis of three RCTs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mistiaen, P.; Jolley, D.; McGowan, S.; Hickey, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Francke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Pressure ulcers can to a large extent be prevented by implementing best practice care. For many of the devices to help in the prevention of pressure ulcers there is lack of evidence-based knowledge about their effectiveness. In this study we performed an individual patient data

  20. The impact of nurses' values on the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuriwo, Ray

    Values are perceived to be a key determinant of people's behaviour and actions. There is a limited amount of research into the value that nurses place on the prevention of pressure ulcers, but past studies have suggested that nurses place a low value on pressure ulcer prevention. This article describes a study that was undertaken to ascertain what value nurses place on pressure ulcer prevention. The participants in this study (n=16) were recruited from the non-acute adult medical wards of 14 hospitals of one NHS trust and a local university. Data were gathered via semi-structured interviews, then transcribed and analysed via Straussian grounded theory. The findings of this study show that the value that nurses place on pressure ulcer prevention is important because all nurses attempt to work in line with the value that they place on pressure ulcer prevention. The nurses who place a high value on pressure ulcer prevention appear to be more proactive and determined to deliver care that protects the care of their patients' skin. However, the findings suggest that the efforts of nurses to prevent pressure ulcers are often impeded by environmental factors like bed management, and the differing values placed on ulcer prevention by colleagues. It also shows that interventions to protect the skin of patients are often undertaken by healthcare assistants and students because nurses are too busy carrying out other tasks.

  1. Adapting pressure ulcer prevention for use in home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Daley, Christine Makosky

    2011-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines on pressure ulcer (PU)prevention have been written primarily for inpatient settings,but we currently lack data as to how these guidelines have been adapted for use in home health care. The purpose of this study was to delineate interventions and activities used to prevent PU in home health care. Focus group study using text analysis. A focus group was conducted with 9 certified wound care nurses who practiced in home health care at least 50% of the time. Most of the participants had 10 or more years of home health experience and 5 or more years of wound care experience. The single 75-minute focus group was convened by teleconference and audiotaped. A semistructured moderator's guide was used to lead the discussion. Transcribed data were analyzed using standard text analysis. Preliminary results were distributed to focus group participants for review, comment, or clarification, and refined as needed. Certified wound care nurse participants used an array of interventions, including those recommended by clinical practice guidelines, to prevent PU in home health patients.However, specific activities differed from those performed in hospitals and nursing homes. Interventions unique to homehealth care included (1) assessment of patients' economic and insured status to determine implementation options, (2) assessment of caregiving resources and caregivers' ability to manage PU prevention, and (3) collaboration with community resources and health care vendors to obtain needed prevention materials and supplies. Findings provide insight into guideline adaptation in home health care and suggest that PU prevention in the homehealth care setting is more complex than that in hospitals and nursing homes and requires significant skills in communication and collaboration.

  2. Assessment of common interventions and perceived barriers to pressure ulcer prevention in southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilesanmi, Rose Ekama; Olabisi, Prisca

    2014-01-01

    We examined the interventions used by nurses to prevent pressure ulcers in 3 hospitals in south west Nigeria and perceived barriers to effective nursing pressure ulcer prevention interventions. One hundred ninety-three nurses were purposively selected from neurological, orthopedic, intensive care, and accident and emergency units of participating hospitals. Study sites were 3 teaching hospitals in south west Nigeria (Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Lagos; University College Hospital, Ibadan; and Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospital Ile-Ife). Data were collected via a structured questionnaire designed for this study. It included 3 sections: demographic information, practices used for pressure ulcer prevention, and perceived barriers to prevention. Sections of the questionnaire that queried interventions and perceived barriers to pressure ulcer prevention were evaluated for face and content validity. Reliability was evaluated via internal consistency; the split half reliability was 0.82. Similar practices regarding pressure ulcer prevention were found across the 3 hospitals. The most commonly used intervention was patient repositioning every 2 hours; the least used intervention was completion of a validated pressure ulcer risk scale. Nurses described using interventions that have not proved effective for pressure ulcer prevention such as massaging bony prominences and application of talcum powder. Nurses identified 2 principal factors that act as barriers to successful prevention of pressure ulcers: inadequate manpower and inadequate supply of linens on the wards. Nurses use a combination of evidence-based interventions, along with interventions that have not proved effective for pressure ulcer prevention. We recommend development of national standards for pressure ulcer prevention in Nigeria that are based on current best evidence and consistent with current international guidelines.

  3. Implementing a pressure ulcer prevention program and enhancing the role of the CWOCN: impact on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiser, Barbara; Rochette, Jana; Philbin, Shawna; Lowerhouse, Nancy; Terburgh, Catherine; Pietsch, Catherine

    2006-02-01

    Hospitals in the US are increasingly concerned with the rising number of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. To reduce its 2002-2003 average hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence rate of 9.2%, a regional medical center in southeastern US initiated a process improvement and education program. Quarterly pressure ulcer prevalence studies were conducted and the Medical Intensive Care Unit was found to have the highest number of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers among the five units participating in the study. As part of a new Pressure Ulcer Strategic Plan, significant changes were made to the organizational infrastructure and processes, which included implementing the Braden Risk Scale Assessment Tool in place of the Norton Risk Scale, developing a pressure ulcer prevention protocol, creating Pressure Ulcer/Skin Tear Physician orders for nurses, establishing a Skin Resource Team, and providing additional education, training, and other relevant resources. Better appreciation for and enhanced utilization of Certified Wound Ostomy Continence Nurses were encouraged. New support surfaces were purchased. Implementing these changes resulted in a decrease in the quarterly hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence in participating units, including the Medical Intensive Care Unit where rates dropped from a high of 29% to near 0%. Clinicians now approach pressure ulcers as preventable rather than inevitable and view Certified Wound Ostomy Continence Nurses as resources and clinical experts for prevention and treatment. Overall quality of care and financial resource utilization also have substantially improved.

  4. Risk, prevalence and prevention of pressure ulcers in three Swedish healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunningberg, L

    2004-07-01

    This cross-sectional survey set out to delineate risk, prevalence and prevention of pressure ulcers in a university hospital, a general hospital and a nursing home in Sweden. It also looked at the differences in risk factors and preventive strategies between patients with and without pressure ulcers. The one-day survey followed the methodology developed by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP). It was conducted on Tuesday 5 February 2002. Each patient was visited by two registered nurses, their skin was inspected and any pressure ulcer classified according to the EPUAP grading system. A total of 695 patients were included: 612 from the university hospital, 38 from the general hospital and 45 from the nursing home. The prevalence of pressure ulcers was 23.9% (university hospital), 13.2% (general hospital) and 20.0% (nursing home). Most (60-66%) of the pressure ulcers in the hospitals were assessed as grade I. Only half of the patients at risk or with pressure ulcers were placed on a pressure-reducing mattress and a third of these patients had a plan for repositioning. Significant variables associated with pressure ulcers were old age, geriatric care, low Braden score and incontinence. Prevalence of pressure ulcers was higher than expected. Results relating to both prevalence of pressure ulcers (grade I excluded) and the preventive care given to patients at risk or with pressure ulcers accord with those of a larger Dutch study. Attention must focus on the appropriate risk-assessment skills, highlighting grade I as pressure damage, and the use of appropriate preventive strategies, based on the level of risk.

  5. Nursing assessment: impact on type and cost of interventions to prevent pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, G M; Gardner, S; Frantz, R A

    1998-11-01

    To describe pressure ulcer preventive interventions and their cost, and to compare the preventive intervention use and cost with level of risk. Comparative, descriptive design. A large midwestern Veteran's Affairs Medical Center with 260 long-term care beds. Thirty-one chair- or bed-bound residents from 1 long-term care unit comprised the study sample. The outcome variables included demographic information (patient record), Braden Risk Assessment score, institutional risk assessment score (Pressure Ulcer Risk Tool), type and frequency of preventive interventions, and the related costs. Subjects were assessed on a weekly basis for type and frequency of preventive intervention and for the development of a pressure ulcer. Each subject was observed until death, discharge, pressure ulcer formation, or the end of the 3-month study period. The 3-month pressure ulcer incidence rate was 13%. All subjects were at risk for pressure ulcer development according to Braden scores; whereas only 74% were assessed at risk with use of the facility's risk assessment tool. Preventive measures included regular repositioning (87%); 67% were placed on mattress support surfaces. There was no relationship between level of risk (facility risk tool score) and type of prevention used. The total cost of pressure ulcer prevention to the nursing unit was $14,926, representing a mean of $497 per subject, and $5.55 per subject per day. As compared with previous studies, the higher cost of prevention described in this study may be attributed to inadequate linkage of preventive interventions to risk level.

  6. Prevention of Tracheostomy-Related Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Thomas R; Jacobs, Natalie; Hondorp, Brian; Crawford, Laura; Boudreau, Lisa R; Jeffe, Jill; Stein, Brian; LoSavio, Phillip

    2017-04-01

    Objective To determine if standardization of perioperative tracheostomy care procedures decreased the incidence of hospital-acquired tracheostomy-related pressure ulcers. Methods All patients at least 18 years old who underwent placement of a tracheostomy tube in the operating room from July 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015, were cared for postoperatively through an institutionally adopted quality improvement protocol. This included 4 elements: (1) placement of a hydrocolloid dressing underneath the tracheostomy flange in the postoperative period, (2) removal of plate sutures within 7 days of the tracheostomy procedure, (3) placement of a polyurethane foam dressing after suture removal, and (4) neutral positioning of the head. One year after the bundle was initiated, a retrospective analysis was performed to compare the percentage of tracheostomy patients who developed pressure ulcers versus the preintervention period. Results The incidence of tracheostomy-related pressure ulcers decreased from 20 of 183 tracheostomies (10.93%) prior to use of the standardized protocol to 2 of 155 tracheostomies (1.29%). Chi-square analysis showed a significant difference between the groups, with a P value of .0003. Discussion Adoption of this care bundle at our institution resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of hospital-acquired tracheostomy-related pressure ulcers. The impact of any single intervention within our protocol was not assessed and could be an area of further investigation. Implications for Practice Adoption of a standardized posttracheostomy care bundle at the institution level may result in the improved care of patients with tracheostomies and specifically may reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers.

  7. Pressure Ulcers in Adults: Prediction and Prevention. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This package includes a clinical practice guideline, quick reference guide for clinicians, and patient's guide to predicting and preventing pressure ulcers in adults. The clinical practice guideline includes the following: overview of the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers; clinical practice guideline (introduction, risk assessment tools…

  8. Are pressure redistribution surfaces or heel protection devices effective for preventing heel pressure ulcers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkin, Joan; Gray, Mikel

    2009-01-01

    Heel pressure ulcers are recognized as second in prevalence only to pressure ulcer (PU) on the heel among hospitalized patients, and recent studies suggest their incidence may be higher than even sacral ulcers. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify and evaluate whether pressure redistribution surfaces or heel protection devices are effective for the prevention of heel ulcers. We searched CINAHL and MEDLINE databases, using the keywords "pressure ulcer" and "heel," which we also searched the Cochrane Library, using the key terms "pressure ulcer," "heel," and "support surface." We hand searched the ancestry of pertinent research reports and review articles in order to identify additional studies. Inclusion criteria were (1) any study that compared one or more pressure redistribution surfaces or heel protection devices designed specifically to prevent heel PU and (2) any study comparing 2 or more pressure redistribution surfaces designed to prevent PU that specifically reported differences in the incidence of heel PU. Exclusion criteria were (1) studies that did not measure heel PU incidence as an outcome, (2) studies without an English language abstract, and (3) studies that reported overall PU incidence but did not analyze heel PU incidence separately. Clinical evidence concerning the efficacy of pressure redistribution surfaces or heel protection devices is sparse. Existing evidence suggests that pressure redistribution surfaces vary in their ability to prevent heel pressure ulcers, but there is insufficient evidence to determine which surfaces are optimal for this purpose. A single study suggests that a wedge-shaped viscoelastic foam cushion is superior to standard foam pillows for preventing heel PU, but further research is needed before a definitive conclusion concerning this issue can be reached. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether heel protection devices are more effective than a standard hospital foam pillow for the prevention

  9. Assessing evidence supporting redistribution of pressure for pressure ulcer prevention: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprigle, Stephen; Sonenblum, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The formation and underlying causes of pressure ulcers (PUs) are quite complex, with multiple influencing factors. However, by definition pressure ulcers cannot form without loading, or pressure, on tissue. Clinical interventions typically target the magnitude and/or duration of loading. Pressure magnitude is managed by the selection of support surfaces and postural supports as well as body posture on supporting surfaces. Duration is addressed via turning and weight shifting frequency as well as with the use of dynamic surfaces that actively redistribute pressure on the body surfaces. This article shows that preventative interventions must be targeted to both magnitude and duration and addresses the rationale behind several common clinical interventions--some with more scientific evidence than others.

  10. Role of Nutrition in the Treatment and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David R

    2014-08-01

    Undernutrition has been associated with pressure ulcers in epidemiological studies over several decades. Accumulating evidence from recent systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials has shown that nutrition therapy has only modest effects on prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Since undernutrition should be responsive to the provision of adequate nutrients, the poor response suggests a different nutrition construct is required. Weight loss and changes in acute inflammatory reactants may reflect the syndrome of cachexia rather than simple undernutrition. Nutrition prescriptions should be individually tailored to persons with pressure ulcers with regard to both macro- and micronutrients. This review evaluates effects of malnutrition on pressure ulcers and analyzes effects of nutrition on pressure ulcer prevention and healing. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. Patient perceptions of the role of nutrition for pressure ulcer prevention in hospital: an interpretive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shelley; Desbrow, Ben; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to explore (a) patients' perceptions of the role of nutrition in pressure ulcer prevention; and (b) patients' experiences with dieticians in the hospital setting. Interpretive qualitative study. The sample comprised 13 females and 7 males. Their mean age was 61.3 ± 12.6 years (mean ± SD), and their average hospital length of stay was 7.4 ± 13.0 days. The research setting was a public health hospital in Australia. In this interpretive study, adult medical patients at risk of pressure ulcers due to restricted mobility participated in a 20 to 30 minute interview using a semi-structured interview guide. Interview questions were grouped into 2 domains; perceptions on the role of nutrition for pressure ulcer prevention; and experiences with dieticians. Recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Within the first domain, 'patient knowledge of nutrition in pressure ulcer prevention,' there were varying patient understandings of the role of nutrition for prevention of pressure ulcers. This is reflected in 5 themes: (1) recognizing the role of diet in pressure ulcer prevention; (2) promoting skin health with good nutrition; (3) understanding the relationship between nutrition and health; (4) lacking insight into the role of nutrition in pressure ulcer prevention; and (5) acknowledging other risk factors for pressure ulcers. Within the second domain, patients described their experiences with and perceptions on dieticians. Two themes emerged, which expressed differing opinions around the role and reputation of dieticians; they were receptive of dietician input; and displaying ambivalence towards dieticians' advice. Hospital patients at risk for pressure ulcer development have variable knowledge of the preventive role of nutrition. Patients had differing perceptions of the importance and value of information provided by dieticians.

  12. Nutritional intervention trials for preventing and treating pressure ulcer.

    OpenAIRE

    Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Rondeau, Virginie

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of nutritional supplementation on dietary intake and on pressure ulcer development in critically ill older patients. The multi-center trial involved 19 wards stratified according to specialty and recruitment for critically ill older patients; 9 wards were randomly selected for nutritional intervention (nutritional intervention group), consisting of the daily distribution of two oral supplements, with each supplement containg 200 kcal, for 15 ...

  13. The quality of pressure ulcer prediction and prevention in home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, Sandra

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of pressure ulcer prediction and prevention in home health care. Randomly selected Medicare-certified home care agencies in four midwestern states were surveyed. The overall response rate was 44% (n = 128). Approximately half (57.8%) of the responding agencies assessed all patients for pressure ulcer risk upon admission; another 4.7% assessed only chair or bed-bound patients. Clinical nursing judgment was the most commonly (72%) used method for assessing risk; only 21% of the agencies used a validated tool such as the Braden Scale or the Norton Scale to identify those at risk. Approximately one third of the reporting agencies had prediction and/or prevention policies. Only 18.0% of home health care agencies identified recommended interventions in a pressure ulcer prevention protocol. Findings suggest opportunities for improvement in pressure ulcer prediction and prevention practice in home health care.

  14. The cost of prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarré, Liesbet; Van Lancker, Aurélie; Van Hecke, Ann; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Grypdonck, Maria; Lemey, Juul; Annemans, Lieven; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2015-11-01

    Pressure ulcers impose a substantial financial burden. The need for high-quality health care while expenditures are constrained entails the interest to calculate the cost of preventing and treating pressure ulcers and their impact on patients, healthcare, and society. The aim of this paper is to provide insight into the cost of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in an adult population. A systematic literature review was performed to conform the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines for systematic reviews. The search strategy contained index terms and key words related to pressure ulcers and cost. The search was performed in Medline, CINAHL, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, Embase, and EconLit covering articles up to September 2013. Reference lists and conference abstracts were screened. Articles were eligible if they reported on direct medical cost of pressure ulcer prevention or treatment, and provided national cost estimates, cost per patient, or cost per patient per day. The Consensus on Health Economic Criteria checklist was used to assess methodological quality of the included studies. In total, 2542 records were retrieved. After assessing eligibility, 17 articles were included. Five articles reported on both the cost of prevention and treatment, three articles reported on cost of prevention, and nine articles reported on the cost of pressure ulcer treatment. All articles were published between 2001 and 2013. Cost of pressure ulcer prevention per patient per day varied between 2.65 € to 87.57 € across all settings. Cost of pressure ulcer treatment per patient per day ranged from 1.71 € to 470.49 € across different settings. The methodological heterogeneity among studies was considerable, and encompassed differences regarding type of health economic design, perspective, cost components, and health outcomes. Cost of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment differed considerable between studies. Although the cost to provide pressure ulcer prevention

  15. Are labour-intensive efforts to prevent pressure ulcers cost-effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiesen, Anne Sofie Mølbak; Nørgaard, Kamilla; Andersen, Marie Frederikke Bruun; Møller, Klaus Meyer; Ehlers, Lars Holger

    2013-10-01

    Pressure ulcers are a major problem in Danish healthcare with a prevalence of 13-43% among hospitalized patients. The associated costs to the Danish Health Care Sector are estimated to be €174.5 million annually. In 2010, The Danish Society for Patient Safety introduced the Pressure Ulcer Bundle (PUB) in order to reduce hospital-acquired pressure ulcers by a minimum of 50% in five hospitals. The PUB consists of evidence-based preventive initiatives implemented by ward staff using the Model for Improvement. To investigate the cost-effectiveness of labour-intensive efforts to reduce pressure ulcers in the Danish Health Care Sector, comparing the PUB with standard care. A decision analytic model was constructed to assess the costs and consequences of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers during an average hospital admission in Denmark. The model inputs were based on a systematic review of clinical efficacy data combined with local cost and effectiveness data from the Thy-Mors Hospital, Denmark. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) was conducted to assess the uncertainty. Prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers by implementing labour-intensive effects according to the PUB was cost-saving and resulted in an improved effect compared to standard care. The incremental cost of the PUB was -€38.62. The incremental effects were a reduction of 9.3% prevented pressure ulcers and 0.47% prevented deaths. The PSAs confirmed the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER)'s dominance for both prevented pressure ulcers and saved lives with the PUB. This study shows that labour-intensive efforts to reduce pressure ulcers on hospital wards can be cost-effective and lead to savings in total costs of hospital and social care. The data included in the study regarding costs and effects of the PUB in Denmark were based on preliminary findings from a pilot study at Thy-Mors Hospital and literature.

  16. The effect of educative interventions on the pressure ulcer prevention knowledge of nursing professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes,Luciana Magnani; Caliri,Maria Helena Larcher; Haas,Vanderlei José

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the effect of the educative interventions on nursing staff knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention in Intensive Care Centers (ICC). It is a descriptive-comparative study. METHODS: Data were collected from nursing team members before and after educative interventions using a knowledge test with true-false questions related to pressure ulcer prevention and description as a research instrument. RESULTS: Seven registered nurses participated in the pre-interven...

  17. Reducing hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence through a focused prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joan A

    2008-02-01

    To provide health care organizations with strategies for decreasing the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence was measured every 6 months for 4.5 years while multiple strategies were implemented. The study took place in a not-for-profit, 548-bed, 2-hospital system in Southwest Florida. All adult patients with the exception of those admitted for obstetric or mental health care. An assortment of interventions were implemented, including electronic medical records, risk assessment tied to automatic consults, pressure relief measures including new equipment and personnel augmentation, and an interdisciplinary team to decide on protocols. Hospital-acquired prevalence rate for all pressure ulcers was reduced by 81%. The rate for heel ulcers alone was reduced by 90%. A pressure ulcer prevention program has been developed, which has shown a trend toward improved patient outcomes with a resultant cost savings.

  18. Elevation devices for the prevention of heel pressure ulcers: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Rosie; Palfreyman, Simon

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this systematic literature review was to gain insight into the effectiveness of off-loading devices to prevent heel pressure ulcers within the acute hospital setting. Heels have been identified as the second most common site for pressure ulcers. Devices which off-load pressure can include pillows, wedges and boots. It is unclear as to which method or device is best at preventing pressure ulcers. A systematic review was carried out through the search of electronic databases and bibliographies of relevant publications. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews that compared devices which off-load heels to prevent pressure ulcers were identified. A total of five studies were included in the review. The methodological quality of the studies was generally poor. The studies reported that heel-boot elevation devices appeared more beneficial. However, poor compliance with wearing the devices was identified, as well as a perceived increased risk of falls. There were little data on cost-effectiveness. There is little high-quality trial evidence to support the routine use of heel devices to prevent pressure ulcers. However, they may have a role to play within a multifaceted programme of pressure-ulcer prevention.

  19. Support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention: A network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chunhu; Dumville, Jo C; Cullum, Nicky

    2018-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a prevalent and global issue and support surfaces are widely used for preventing ulceration. However, the diversity of available support surfaces and the lack of direct comparisons in RCTs make decision-making difficult. To determine, using network meta-analysis, the relative effects of different support surfaces in reducing pressure ulcer incidence and comfort and to rank these support surfaces in order of their effectiveness. We conducted a systematic review, using a literature search up to November 2016, to identify randomised trials comparing support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention. Two reviewers independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We grouped the support surfaces according to their characteristics and formed evidence networks using these groups. We used network meta-analysis to estimate the relative effects and effectiveness ranking of the groups for the outcomes of pressure ulcer incidence and participant comfort. GRADE was used to assess the certainty of evidence. We included 65 studies in the review. The network for assessing pressure ulcer incidence comprised evidence of low or very low certainty for most network contrasts. There was moderate-certainty evidence that powered active air surfaces and powered hybrid air surfaces probably reduce pressure ulcer incidence compared with standard hospital surfaces (risk ratios (RR) 0.42, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.29 to 0.63; 0.22, 0.07 to 0.66, respectively). The network for comfort suggested that powered active air-surfaces are probably slightly less comfortable than standard hospital mattresses (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.94; moderate-certainty evidence). This is the first network meta-analysis of the effects of support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention. Powered active air-surfaces probably reduce pressure ulcer incidence, but are probably less comfortable than standard hospital surfaces. Most prevention evidence was of low or

  20. Organisational strategies to implement hospital pressure ulcer prevention programmes: findings from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soban, Lynn M; Kim, Linda; Yuan, Anita H; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2017-09-01

    To describe the presence and operationalisation of organisational strategies to support implementation of pressure ulcer prevention programmes across acute care hospitals in a large, integrated health-care system. Comprehensive pressure ulcer programmes include nursing interventions such as use of a risk assessment tool and organisational strategies such as policies and performance monitoring to embed these interventions into routine care. The current literature provides little detail about strategies used to implement pressure ulcer prevention programmes. Data were collected by an e-mail survey to all chief nursing officers in Veterans Health Administration acute care hospitals. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were used to summarise survey responses and evaluate relationships between some variables. Organisational strategies that support implementation of a pressure ulcer prevention programme (policy, committee, staff education, wound care specialists, and use of performance data) were reported at high levels. Considerable variations were noted in how these strategies were operationalised within individual hospitals. Organisational strategies to support implementation of pressure ulcer preventive programmes are often not optimally operationalised to achieve consistent, sustainable performance. The results of the present study highlight the role and influence of nurse leaders on pressure ulcer prevention program implementation. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Organizational Strategies to Implement Hospital Pressure Ulcer Prevention Programs: Findings from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOBAN, LYNN M.; KIM, LINDA; YUAN, ANITA H.; MILTNER, REBECCA S.

    2017-01-01

    Aim To describe the presence and operationalization of organizational strategies to support implementation of pressure ulcer prevention programs across acute care hospitals in a large, integrated healthcare system. Background Comprehensive pressure ulcer programs include nursing interventions such as use of a risk assessment tool and organizational strategies such as policies and performance monitoring to embed these interventions into routine care. The current literature provides little detail about strategies used to implement pressure ulcer prevention programs. Methods Data were collected by an email survey to all Chief Nursing Officers in Veterans Health Administration acute care hospitals. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were used to summarize survey responses and evaluate relationships between some variables. Results Organizational strategies that support pressure ulcer prevention program implementation (policy, committee, staff education, wound care specialists, and use of performance data) were reported at high levels. Considerable variations were noted in how these strategies were operationalized within individual hospitals. Conclusion Organizational strategies to support implementation of pressure ulcer preventive programs are often not optimally operationalized to achieve consistent, sustainable performance. Implications for Nursing Management The results of this study highlight the role and influence of nurse leaders on pressure ulcer prevention program implementation. PMID:27487972

  2. Quality improvement in nursing homes in Texas: results from a pressure ulcer prevention project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Robert L; Warren, Kevin; Bean, Gloria; Gabbard, Bethany; Lyder, Courtney H; Bing, Mark; McCauley, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcer prevalence, cost, associated mortality, and potential for litigation are major clinical problems in nursing homes despite guidelines for prevention and treatment. To improve the use of pressure ulcer prevention procedures at nursing homes in Texas through implementation of process of care system changes in collaboration with a state quality improvement organization (QIO). Preintervention and postintervention measurement of performance for process of care quality indicators and of pressure ulcer incidence rates. Twenty nursing homes in Texas. Quality improvement teams at participating nursing homes. Data were abstracted from medical records on performance measures (quality indicators) and pressure ulcer incidence rates between November 2000 and August 2002. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Process of care system changes consisting of tools and education to prevent pressure ulcers were introduced to participating nursing homes. Participating nursing homes showed statistically significant improvement in 8 out of 12 quality indicators. Pressure ulcer incidence rates also decreased, although not quite significantly. Furthermore, facilities with the greatest improvement in quality indicator scores had significantly lower pressure ulcer incidence rates than the facilities with the least improvement in quality indicator scores (S = 131.0, P = .03). This suggests that the interventions positively affected not only the process of care but also led to a decrease in pressure ulcer incidences. These results show that nursing homes in a collaborative effort with a QIO were able to improve their processes of care. Although significant improvement was noted on most of the quality indicators, opportunity remains for further improvement. Furthermore, these results suggest that implementation of process of care system changes by nursing homes in a collaborative relationship with a QIO may yield improvements in measures of patient outcome (eg, pressure

  3. Braden Scale cumulative score versus subscale scores: are we missing opportunities for pressure ulcer prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, Molly M

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer incidence rates continue to rise in the United States in the acute care setting despite efforts to extinguish them, and pressure ulcers are a nursing-sensitive quality indicator. The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk instrument has been shown to be a valid and reliable instrument for assessing pressure ulcer risk. This case study represented 1 patient out of a chart audit that reviewed 20 patients with confirmed hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The goal of the audit was to determine whether these ulcers might be avoided if preventive interventions based on Braden subscale scores versus the cumulative score were implemented. This case study describes a patient who, deemed at low risk for pressure ulcer development based on cumulative Braden Scale, may have benefited from interventions based on the subscale scores of sensory perception, activity, and mobility. Further research is needed to determine whether interventions based on subscales may be effective for preventing pressure ulcers when compared to a protocol based exclusively on the cumulative score.

  4. Preventing in-facility pressure ulcers as a patient safety strategy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Nancy; Schoelles, Karen M

    2013-03-05

    Complications from hospital-acquired pressure ulcers cause 60,000 deaths and significant morbidity annually in the United States. The objective of this systematic review is to review evidence regarding multicomponent strategies for preventing pressure ulcers and to examine the importance of contextual aspects of programs that aim to reduce facility-acquired pressure ulcers. CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PreMEDLINE were searched for articles published from 2000 to 2012. Studies (any design) that implemented multicomponent initiatives to prevent pressure ulcers in adults in U.S. acute and long-term care settings and that reported pressure ulcer rates at least 6 months after implementation were selected. Two reviewers extracted study data and rated quality of evidence. Findings from 26 implementation studies (moderate strength of evidence) suggested that the integration of several core components improved processes of care and reduced pressure ulcer rates. Key components included the simplification and standardization of pressure ulcer-specific interventions and documentation, involvement of multidisciplinary teams and leadership, use of designated skin champions, ongoing staff education, and sustained audit and feedback.

  5. Pressure Ulcers Surveillance Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Esin Gencer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pressure ulcer is a chronic wound. It reduces the quality of life of the elderly and individuals with restricted range of motion. It prolongs hospital stay and increases the risk of complications. The cost is quite high. Preventive actions for the prevention of pressure ulcers should be developed. Planning protocols and standards of care are among the main targets. Material and Method: Research was conducted in one-year period between 2012 May and 2013 May on patients who were followed up in Akdeniz University Hospital clinics and intensive care unit with pressure ulcers. The research population consisted of 569 patients. Patient data were recorded in SPSS 16 for Windows program. Statistical analyzes were performed with retrospective methods. The demographic characteristics of patients with pressure ulcers were analyzed as frequency and descriptive statistics. Prevalence and incidence of one year were calculated. Results: Of the patients, 58% were males, 42% were females. Of the patients, 36% were in the age range of 61-80 years, and their average length of stay was 42,9 days. Of the patients, 70% were at stage 2 and 3. In 15% of patients pressure ulcers occurred on the first day of hospitalization. Pressure ulcers were developed between days 2 and 10 in 59% of the patients. Prevalence rate was 2.5%, the incidence was 1.9%, the prevalence rate was 5.9% in the intensive care unit. Conclusion: It is easier to prevent pressure ulcers than treating.

  6. Nursing practice in the prevention of pressure ulcers: an observational study of German Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoviattalab, Khadijeh; Hashemizadeh, Haydeh; D'Cruz, Gibson; Halfens, Ruud J G; Dassen, Theo

    2015-06-01

    The study aimed to establish the range and extent of preventive interventions undertaken by nurses for patients who are at high risk of developing or currently have a pressure ulcer. Since 2000, the German National Expert Standard for the prevention of pressure ulcers has provided evidence-based recommendations, but limited studies have been published on its adherence in hospitals. There are also limited observational studies that investigated whether patients who are at risk of or have pressure ulcers are provided with appropriate preventative measures. A nonparticipant observational descriptive design was used. A sample of 32 adult patients who were at high risk of developing or currently had a pressure ulcer were observed during all shifts in medical and surgical wards in two general hospitals in Germany. A range of preventive interventions that were in line with the German National Expert Standard was observed. The most frequent preventive measures were 'cleaning the patients' skin' and 'minimizing exposure to moisture' that were undertaken in more than 90% of all patients. The least frequent measures were 'patient and relative education', 'assessment and recording of nutritional status'. This study demonstrates that the pressure ulcers preventive interventions as set out in the German National Expert Standard were not fully implemented. The study highlights the need for further studies on the barriers that impede the undertaking of the interventions that may prevent the development or deterioration of pressure ulcers and the delivery of evidence-based preventative care. This study provides an insight into the extent of pressure ulcers preventive practices used by nurses. The results may serve as a basis for developing an effective strategy to improve nursing practice in this area and the promotion of evidence-based practice. However, our results refer to two general hospitals and for a broader population, further studies with larger data samples are needed.

  7. [Pressure ulcer prevention in German hospitals. An analysis of nursing practice with regard to guideline recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielitz, Harald; Hertel, Frank; Mertens, Elke; Halfens, Ruud

    2007-03-01

    Pressure ulcers are still a common health problem. Prevention and therapy of pressure ulcers require extensive nursing resources. Based on epidemiological data the use of preventive interventions and devices in hospital patients at risk was analysed. One object of this study was to compare the nursing practice with the recommendations given by a national practice guideline about pressure ulcer prevention by the German Network for Quality Development in Nursing (DNQP). Since 2002 each year a study has been conducted in order to investigate the prevalence of pressure ulcers in German hospitals. For the present study data of 9159 patients at pressure ulcer risk collected in three years (from 2002 to 2004) were analysed. In the course of the investigated period interventions and devices were increasingly adjusted to the recommendations of the guideline. This trend appears to be slightly, but it is noticeable. The number of process requirements realised for each patient increased particularly if patients showed a high risk or a pressure ulcer was already present. To improve the quality of care preferably all process criteria according to the guideline should be considered if preventive measures are planned.

  8. Interventions for pressure ulcers: a summary of evidence for prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Ross A; Cullum, Nicky A

    2018-03-01

    Narrative review. Pressure ulcers are a common complication in people with reduced sensation and limited mobility, occurring frequently in those who have sustained spinal cord injury. This narrative review summarises the evidence relating to interventions for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers, in particular from Cochrane systematic reviews. It also aims to highlight the degree to which people with spinal cord injury have been included as participants in randomised controlled trials included in Cochrane reviews of such interventions. Global. The Cochrane library (up to July 2017) was searched for systematic reviews of any type of intervention for the prevention or treatment of pressure ulcers. A search of PubMed (up to July 2017) was undertaken to identify other systematic reviews and additional published trial reports of interventions for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. The searches revealed 38 published systematic reviews (27 Cochrane and 11 others) and 6 additional published trial reports. An array of interventions is available for clinical use, but few have been evaluated adequately in people with SCI. The effects of most interventions for preventing and treating pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury are highly uncertain. Existing evaluations of pressure ulcer interventions include very few participants with spinal cord injury. Subsequently, there is still a need for high-quality randomised trials of such interventions in this patient population.

  9. Pressure ulcer prevention in the intensive care unit: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flike, Kimberlee

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a growing problem in health care, particularly in the intensive care unit where patients are often unstable and skin care can be overshadowed by airway, breathing, and circulation. In an effort to acknowledge this growing problem, a pressure ulcer protocol based on the subscales of the Braden Scale was developed for the intensive care population. The tool highlights specific interventions for each of its 6 subscales and provides criteria for the application of a preventive sacral dressing. A case study of a suspected deep tissue injury that resulted in a stage III pressure ulcer is used as an example of how this new tool can be applied to assist in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

  10. A randomized clinical trial on preventing pressure ulcers with wheelchair seat cushions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienza, David; Kelsey, Sheryl; Karg, Patricia; Allegretti, Ana; Olson, Marian; Schmeler, Mark; Zanca, Jeanne; Geyer, Mary Jo; Kusturiss, Marybeth; Holm, Margo

    2010-12-01

    To determine the efficacy of skin protection wheelchair seat cushions in preventing pressure ulcers in the elderly nursing home population. Clinical trial with participants assigned at random to a skin protection or segmented foam cushion. Two hundred thirty-two participants were recruited between June 2004 and May 2008 and followed for 6 months or until pressure ulcer incidence. Twelve nursing homes. Nursing home residents aged 65 and older who were using wheelchairs for 6 or more hours per day and had a Braden score of 18 or less and a combined Braden activity and mobility score of 5 or less. Participants were recruited from a referred sample. All participants were provided with a fitted wheelchair and randomized into skin protection (SPC, n=113) or segmented foam (SFC, n=119) cushion groups. The SPC group received an air, viscous fluid and foam, or gel and foam cushion. The SFC group received a 7.6-cm crosscut foam cushion. Pressure ulcer incidence over 6 months for wounds near the ischial tuberosities (IT ulcers) were measured. Secondary analysis was performed on combined IT ulcers and ulcers over the sacrum and coccyx (sacral ulcers). One hundred eighty participants reached a study end point, and 42 were lost to follow-up. Ten did not receive the intervention. There were eight (6.7%) IT ulcers in the SFC group and one (0.9%) in the SPC group (P=.04). There were 21 (17.6%) combined IT and sacral ulcers in the SFC group and 12 (10.6%) in the SPC group (P=.14). Skin protection cushions used with fitted wheelchairs lower pressure ulcer incidence for elderly nursing home residents and should be used to help prevent pressure ulcers. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Assessing evidence supporting redistribution of pressure for pressure ulcer prevention: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Sharon Sonenblum, PhD; Stephen Sprigle, PhD, PT

    2011-01-01

    The formation and underlying causes of pressure ulcers (PUs) are quite complex, with multiple influencing factors. However, by definition pressure ulcers cannot form without loading, or pressure, on tissue. Clinical interventions typically target the magnitude and/or duration of loading. Pressure magnitude is managed by the selection of support surfaces and postural supports as well as body posture on supporting surfaces. Duration is addressed via turning and weight shifting frequency as well...

  12. The Role of Pressure Offloading on Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing and Prevention of Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A

    2016-09-01

    An increased plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of plantar foot ulcers in people with diabetes mellitus, and ulcers are a precursor of lower extremity amputation. In this article, the evidence is reviewed that relieving areas of increased plantar pressure (ie, offloading) can heal plantar foot ulcers and prevent their recurrence. Noninfected, nonischemic neuropathic plantar forefoot ulcers should heal in 6 to 8 weeks with adequate offloading. Recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews show that nonremovable knee-high devices are most effective. This is probably because they eliminate the problem of nonadherence with the use of a removable device. Studies show a large discrepancy between evidence-based recommendations on offloading and what is used in clinical practice. Many clinics continue to use methods that are less effective or have not been proven to be effective, while ignoring evidence-based methods. Strategies are proposed to address this issue, notably the adoption and implementation of recent international guidelines by professional societies and a stronger focus of clinicians on expedited healing. For the prevention of plantar foot ulcer recurrence in high-risk patients, 2 recent trials have shown that the incidence of recurrence can be significantly reduced with custom-made footwear that has a demonstrated pressure-relieving effect through guidance by plantar pressure measurements, under the condition that the footwear is worn. This review helps to inform clinicians about effective offloading treatment for healing plantar foot ulcers and preventing their recurrence.

  13. Preventing pressure ulcers--Are pressure-redistributing support surfaces effective? A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Elizabeth; Jammali-Blasi, Asmara; Bell-Syer, Sally; Dumville, Jo; Cullum, Nicky

    2012-03-01

    To undertake a systematic review of the effectiveness of pressure redistributing support surfaces in the prevention of pressure ulcers. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Cochrane Wound Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. The reference sections of included trials were searched for further trials. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials, published or unpublished, which assessed the effects of support surfaces in preventing pressure ulcers (of any grade), in any patient group, in any setting compared to any other support surface, were sought. Two reviewers extracted and summarised details of eligible trials using a standardised form and assessed the methodological quality of each trial using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Fifty-three eligible trials were identified with a total of 16,285 study participants. Overall the risk of bias in the included trials was high. Pooled analysis showed that: (i) foam alternatives to the standard hospital foam mattress reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in people at risk (RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.21-0.74) and Australian standard medical sheepskins prevent pressure ulcers compared to standard care (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.31-0.74). Pressure-redistributing overlays on the operating table compared to standard care reduce postoperative pressure ulcer incidence (RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.33-0.85). While there is good evidence that higher specification foam mattresses, sheepskins, and that some overlays in the operative setting are effective in preventing pressure ulcers, there is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions on the value of seat cushions, limb protectors and various constant low pressure devices. The relative merits of higher-tech constant low pressure and alternating pressure for prevention are unclear. More robust trials are required to address these research gaps. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevention of pressure ulcers with a static air support surface: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraes, Brecht; van Leen, Martin; Schols, Jos; Van Hecke, Ann; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2018-03-05

    The aims of this study were to identify, assess, and summarise available evidence about the effectiveness of static air mattress overlays to prevent pressure ulcers. The primary outcome was the incidence of pressure ulcers. Secondary outcomes included costs and patient comfort. This study was a systematic review. Six electronic databases were consulted: Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed (Medline), CINAHL (EBSCOhost interface), Science direct, and Web of Science. In addition, a hand search through reviews, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of the included studies was performed to identify additional studies. Potential studies were reviewed and assessed by 2 independent authors based on the title and abstract. Decisions regarding inclusion or exclusion of the studies were based on a consensus between the authors. Studies were included if the following criteria were met: reporting an original study; the outcome was the incidence of pressure ulcer categories I to IV when using a static air mattress overlay and/or in comparison with other pressure-redistribution device(s); and studies published in English, French, and Dutch. No limitation was set on study setting, design, and date of publication. The methodological quality assessment was evaluated using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program Tool. Results were reported in a descriptive way to reflect the exploratory nature of the review. The searches included 13 studies: randomised controlled trials (n = 11) and cohort studies (n = 2). The mean pressure ulcer incidence figures found in the different settings were, respectively, 7.8% pressure ulcers of categories II to IV in nursing homes, 9.06% pressure ulcers of categories I to IV in intensive care settings, and 12% pressure ulcers of categories I to IV in orthopaedic wards. Seven comparative studies reported a lower incidence in the groups of patients on a static air mattress overlay. Three studies reported a statistical (P < .1) lower

  15. [A Structural Equation Model of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Action in Clinical Nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook Ja; Park, Ok Kyoung; Park, Mi Yeon

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct and test a structural equation model for pressure ulcer prevention action by clinical nurses. The Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behavior were used as the basis for the study. A structured questionnaire was completed by 251 clinical nurses to analyze the relationships between concepts of perceived benefits, perceived barriers, attitude, subjective norm, perceived control, intention to perform action and behavior. SPSS 22.0 and AMOS 22.0 programs were used to analyze the efficiency of the hypothesized model and calculate the direct and indirect effects of factors affecting pressure ulcer prevention action among clinical nurses. The model fitness statistics of the hypothetical model fitted to the recommended levels. Attitude, subjective norm and perceived control on pressure ulcer prevention action explained 64.2% for intention to perform prevention action. The major findings of this study indicate that it is essential to recognize improvement in positive attitude for pressure ulcer prevention action and a need for systematic education programs to increase perceived control for prevention action.

  16. Support surfaces in the prevention of pressure ulcers in surgical patients: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Karoline Faria; Nascimento, Kleiton Gonçalves; Nicolussi, Adriana Cristina; Chavaglia, Suzel Regina Ribeiro; de Araújo, Cleudmar Amaral; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2017-08-01

    To assess the scientific evidence about the types of support surfaces used in intraoperative surgical practice in the prevention of pressure ulcers due to surgical positioning. This is an integrative literature review. The electronic databases Cochrane, PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Lilacs, and CINAHL were used. The descriptors surgical patients, support surfaces, perioperative care, patient positioning, and pressure ulcer were used in the search strategy. Articles that addressed the use of support surfaces intraoperatively, published between 1990 and 2016, were selected. The PRISMA guidelines were used to structure the review. Of 18 evaluated studies, most were in English, followed by Portuguese and Spanish; most were performed by nurses. The most commonly cited support surfaces were viscoelastic polymer, micropulse mattresses, gel based mattresses, and foam devices. There are gaps in knowledge regarding the most efficient support surfaces and the specifications of the products used to prevent pressure ulcers due to surgical positioning. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. The effectiveness of three types of alternating pressure air mattresses in the prevention of pressure ulcers in Belgian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarré, Liesbet; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann; Grypdonck, Maria; Clays, Els; Vanderwee, Katrien; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2013-10-01

    To compare the effectiveness of multi-stage and one-stage alternating low-pressure air mattresses (ALPAM) and alternating pressure air mattress (APAM) overlays in preventing pressure ulcers among hospitalized patients, data were pooled (N = 617) from a study of patients allocated to multi-stage ALPAM (n = 252) or one-stage ALPAM (n = 264), and another study of patients allocated to APAM overlay (n = 101). Cumulative pressure ulcer incidence was 4.9% (n = 30) over 14 days. Fewer ulcers developed on multi-stage ALPAM compared with APAM overlay (OR = 0.33; 95% CI [0.11, 0.97]), but no difference was found between one-stage ALPAM and APAM overlay (OR = 0.40; 95% CI [0.14, 1.10]). Time to develop ulcers did not differ by mattress type. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention: A network meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhu Shi

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers are a prevalent and global issue and support surfaces are widely used for preventing ulceration. However, the diversity of available support surfaces and the lack of direct comparisons in RCTs make decision-making difficult.To determine, using network meta-analysis, the relative effects of different support surfaces in reducing pressure ulcer incidence and comfort and to rank these support surfaces in order of their effectiveness.We conducted a systematic review, using a literature search up to November 2016, to identify randomised trials comparing support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention. Two reviewers independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We grouped the support surfaces according to their characteristics and formed evidence networks using these groups. We used network meta-analysis to estimate the relative effects and effectiveness ranking of the groups for the outcomes of pressure ulcer incidence and participant comfort. GRADE was used to assess the certainty of evidence.We included 65 studies in the review. The network for assessing pressure ulcer incidence comprised evidence of low or very low certainty for most network contrasts. There was moderate-certainty evidence that powered active air surfaces and powered hybrid air surfaces probably reduce pressure ulcer incidence compared with standard hospital surfaces (risk ratios (RR 0.42, 95% confidence intervals (CI 0.29 to 0.63; 0.22, 0.07 to 0.66, respectively. The network for comfort suggested that powered active air-surfaces are probably slightly less comfortable than standard hospital mattresses (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.94; moderate-certainty evidence.This is the first network meta-analysis of the effects of support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention. Powered active air-surfaces probably reduce pressure ulcer incidence, but are probably less comfortable than standard hospital surfaces. Most prevention evidence was

  19. Pressure ulcer risk assessment and prevention: a systematic comparative effectiveness review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Dana, Tracy; Bougatsos, Christina; Blazina, Ian; Starmer, Amy J; Reitel, Katie; Buckley, David I

    2013-07-02

    Pressure ulcers are associated with substantial health burdens but may be preventable. To review the clinical utility of pressure ulcer risk assessment instruments and the comparative effectiveness of preventive interventions in persons at higher risk. MEDLINE (1946 through November 2012), CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, grant databases, clinical trial registries, and reference lists. Randomized trials and observational studies on effects of using risk assessment on clinical outcomes and randomized trials of preventive interventions on clinical outcomes. Multiple investigators abstracted and checked study details and quality using predefined criteria. One good-quality trial found no evidence that use of a pressure ulcer risk assessment instrument, with or without a protocolized intervention strategy based on assessed risk, reduces risk for incident pressure ulcers compared with less standardized risk assessment based on nurses' clinical judgment. In higher-risk populations, 1 good-quality and 4 fair-quality randomized trials found that more advanced static support surfaces were associated with lower risk for pressure ulcers compared with standard mattresses (relative risk range, 0.20 to 0.60). Evidence on the effectiveness of low-air-loss and alternating-air mattresses was limited, with some trials showing no clear differences from advanced static support surfaces. Evidence on the effectiveness of nutritional supplementation, repositioning, and skin care interventions versus usual care was limited and had methodological shortcomings, precluding strong conclusions. Only English-language articles were included, publication bias could not be formally assessed, and most studies had methodological shortcomings. More advanced static support surfaces are more effective than standard mattresses for preventing ulcers in higher-risk populations. The effectiveness of formal risk assessment instruments and associated intervention protocols compared with less standardized

  20. Personalized modeling for real-time pressure ulcer prevention in sitting posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luboz, Vincent; Bailet, Mathieu; Boichon Grivot, Christelle; Rochette, Michel; Diot, Bruno; Bucki, Marek; Payan, Yohan

    2018-02-01

    Ischial pressure ulcer is an important risk for every paraplegic person and a major public health issue. Pressure ulcers appear following excessive compression of buttock's soft tissues by bony structures, and particularly in ischial and sacral bones. Current prevention techniques are mainly based on daily skin inspection to spot red patches or injuries. Nevertheless, most pressure ulcers occur internally and are difficult to detect early. Estimating internal strains within soft tissues could help to evaluate the risk of pressure ulcer. A subject-specific biomechanical model could be used to assess internal strains from measured skin surface pressures. However, a realistic 3D non-linear Finite Element buttock model, with different layers of tissue materials for skin, fat and muscles, requires somewhere between minutes and hours to compute, therefore forbidding its use in a real-time daily prevention context. In this article, we propose to optimize these computations by using a reduced order modeling technique (ROM) based on proper orthogonal decompositions of the pressure and strain fields coupled with a machine learning method. ROM allows strains to be evaluated inside the model interactively (i.e. in less than a second) for any pressure field measured below the buttocks. In our case, with only 19 modes of variation of pressure patterns, an error divergence of one percent is observed compared to the full scale simulation for evaluating the strain field. This reduced model could therefore be the first step towards interactive pressure ulcer prevention in a daily set-up. Copyright © 2017 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A systematic review of economic evaluations assessing interventions aimed at preventing or treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfreyman, Simon J; Stone, Patricia W

    2015-03-01

    Pressure ulcers have an adverse impact on patients and can also result in additional costs and workload for healthcare providers. Interventions to prevent pressure ulcers are focused on identifying at risk patients and using systems such as mattresses and turning to relieve pressure. Treatments for pressure ulcers are directed towards promoting wound healing and symptom relief. Both prevention and treatments have associated costs for healthcare providers. The aim of this study was to systematically review the economic evidence for prevention and treatment interventions for pressure ulcers. A systematic review of comparative clinical studies that evaluate interventions to either prevent or treat pressure ulcers. Searches of the major electronic databases were conducted to identify citations that reported costs or economic analysis for interventions directed towards prevention or treatment of pressure ulcers. Only comparative clinical studies were included. Review articles, case-series, non-randomised studies, and studies in a foreign language that did not have an abstract in English were excluded from the review. Decisions regarding inclusion or exclusion were based on a consensus of the authors after review of the title or abstract. Potential citations were obtained for more detailed review and assessed against the inclusion criteria. The studies identified for inclusion were assessed against the 24 key criteria contained in the CHEERS checklist. Costs were standardised to US dollars and adjusted for inflation to 2012 rates. The searches identified 105 potential studies. After review of the citations a total of 23 studies were included: 12 examined prevention interventions and 11 treatments. Review against the CHEERS criteria showed that the majority of included trials had poor reporting and a lack of detail regarding how costs were calculated. Few studies reported more than aggregate costs of treatments with only a small number reporting unit cost outcomes

  2. A cost-effectiveness analysis of two different repositioning strategies for the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Grace; Jones, Katie; Neilson, Julie; Avital, Liz; Collier, Mark; Stansby, Gerard

    2015-12-01

    To assess the cost effectiveness of two repositioning strategies and inform the 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence clinical guideline recommendations on pressure ulcer prevention. Pressure ulcers are distressing events, caused when skin and underlying tissues are placed under pressure sufficient to impair blood supply. They can have a substantial impact on quality of life and have significant resource implications. Repositioning is a key prevention strategy, but can be resource intensive, leading to variation in practice. This economic analysis was conducted to identify the most cost-effective repositioning strategy for the prevention of pressure ulcers. The economic analysis took the form of a cost-utility model. The clinical inputs to the model were taken from a systematic review of clinical data. The population in the model was older people in a nursing home. The economic model was developed with members of the guideline development group and included costs borne by the UK National Health Service. Outcomes were expressed as costs and quality adjusted life years. Despite being marginally more clinically effective, alternating 2 and 4 hourly repositioning is not a cost-effective use of UK National Health Service resources (compared with 4 hourly repositioning) for this high risk group of patients at a cost-effectiveness threshold of £20,000 per quality adjusted life years. These results were used to inform the clinical guideline recommendations for those who are at high risk of developing pressure ulcers. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Preventing Ischial Pressure Ulcers: III. Clinical Pilot Study of Chronic Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilton M. Kaplan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: BIONs™ (BIOnic Neurons are injectable, wireless microstimulators that make chronic BION Active Seating (BAS possible for pressure ulcer prevention (PUP. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES produces skeletal motion and activates trophic factors, counteracting three major etiological mechanisms leading to pressure ulcers (PUs: immobility, soft-tissue atrophy, and ischemia. Companion papers I and II reviewed prior experience with NMES for PUP, and analyzed the biomechanical considerations, respectively. This paper presents a treatment strategy derived from this analysis, and the clinical results of the first three cases.

  4. The Healthy Skin Project: changing nursing practice to prevent and treat hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour-Burton, Teri; Fields, Willa; Outlaw, Lanie; Deleon, Elvira

    2013-06-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers are serious clinical complications that can lead to increased length of stay, pain, infection, and, potentially, death. The surgical progressive care unit at Sharp Grossmont Hospital, San Diego, California, developed the multidisciplinary Healthy Skin Project to decrease the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The previous treatment plan was reviewed and modified according to current evidence-based practice. The project consisted of 3 components: creation of a position for a unit-based wound liaison nurse, staff education, and involvement of the nursing assistants. The wound liaison nurse developed and conducted bimonthly skin audits, which revealed inconsistencies in clinical practice and documentation. Education for the staff was accomplished via a self-learning module, case presentations, and 1-on-1 training. In addition, a pressure ulcer algorithm tool was developed to demonstrate step-by-step wound management and documentation. From Spring 2003 through Summer 2006, the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers ranged from 0.0% to 18.92%, with a mean of 4.85%. After implementation of the project, the prevalence decreased to 0.0% for 17 of 20 quarters, through 2011. Prevention and a multidisciplinary approach are effective in reducing the occurrence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  5. [Topical administration of an hyperoxygenated fatty acid compound. Preventive and curative effects on pressure ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torra i Bou, Joan-Enric; Rueda López, Justo; Segovia Gómez, Teresa; Bermejo Martínez, Mariano

    2003-01-01

    Hyper-oxygenized acidic fats are a very useful topical use product for preventing pressure ulcers and to treat stage I pressure ulcers. Mepentol is a hyper-oxygenized acidic fats product (linoleic acid, gamma linolenic acid, oleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, palmitoleic acid, arachidonic acid and eicosenoic acid) with extracts of Equisetum Avrense and Hypericum Perforatum. It works in three main facets: improve as is possible the epidermis's resistance, repair the damage to the epidermis produced by a prolonged pressure, and restore capillary circulation and counter arrest the effect of oxygen radicals produced during reactive hyperemia which are caused by periods of prolonged pressure. The exclusive formula, based on hyperoxygenized acidic fats and the above referred plant extracts, gives to Mepentol a demonstrated effectiveness, and also special features, like speed of action, great speed of topical absorption and a peculiar fragrance. PATIENTS, MATERIAL AND METHOD: In order to evaluate the tissue level effect of Mepentol, we carried out an experimental research project based on two different objectives: determine the effect at capillary circulation level in heels of healthy volunteers and in patients under risk of developing pressure ulcers, a well as in the treatment of stage I pressure ulcers in patients under high risk of developing pressure ulcers. To do so, the authors determined the capillary blood flow by means of a Doppler laser flow meter. After the application of a hyper-oxygenized acidic fats product, the authors noted an increase of 122.29 +/- 68.74% in flow units related to base values. The authors also observed an increase in microcirculation in heels of patients under high risk of developing pressure ulcers, as well as those who suffer from stage I lesions. These increases remain constant over long periods of time. Based on the tests carried out, Mepentol shows an undoubtable effect which improves local circulation in zones under risk of

  6. Systematic review of the use of prophylactic dressings in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michael; Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Brindle, Ct; Call, Evan; Dealey, Carol; Santamaria, Nick

    2014-10-01

    This systematic review considers the evidence supporting the use of prophylactic dressings for the prevention of pressure ulcer. Electronic database searches were conducted on 25 July 2013. The searches found 3026 titles and after removal of duplicate records 2819 titles were scanned against the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of these, 2777 were excluded based on their title and abstract primarily because they discussed pressure ulcer healing, the prevention and treatment of other chronic and acute wounds or where the intervention was not a prophylactic dressing (e.g. underpads, heel protectors and cushions). Finally, the full text of 42 papers were retrieved. When these 42 papers were reviewed, 21 were excluded and 21 were included in the review. The single high-quality randomised controlled trial (RCT) and the growing number of cohort, weak RCT and case series all suggest that the introduction of a dressing as part of pressure ulcer prevention may help reduce pressure ulcer incidence associated with medical devices especially in immobile intensive care unit patients. There is no firm clinical evidence at this time to suggest that one dressing type is more effective than other dressings. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevention: a burn surgeon's team approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguiña, Pirko; Kirkland-Walsh, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) are a problem that has been under increased scrutiny in recent years. To help reduce the incidence of HAPUs and to improve their management, a burn unit-centered wound care team was established. The team decided to pursue two goals: to identify opportunities for improvement that may help prevent HAPUs and to evaluate all available support surfaces to identify those that might best help with pressure redistribution. To identify opportunities for improvement, the team studied each new case of HAPUs throughout our hospital with a forensic chart review for a 3-year period. To identify the best support surfaces to help reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers, we evaluated all support surfaces available at our institution by pressure mapping in healthy volunteers. From 3 years of collecting and reporting data for quality improvement, we identified 23 patients with HAPUs and obtained more than 800 data sets from pressure mapping in healthy volunteers. Most (23/24; 96%) patients with HAPUs identified in this series had undergone a surgical procedure. The results of the quality improvement studies are presented. We conclude that prevention planning of HAPUs needs to be improved in patients undergoing surgery, in particular. No single support surface can prevent pressure ulcers, but use of overlays may help reduce peak pressures over bony prominences.

  8. Protocol of prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José García Sánchez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The care of wounds, specially the ones produced by the pressure, has been and it keeps on being a challenge for all the health professionals, especially for nurses, which still today cannot be considered as totally solved.Nobody may deny the magnitude of the problem that chronic wounds nowadays supposes in this country. There are thousands of people who demand nursing assistance everyday to take care of the problems derived from chronic wounds.Starting off of these premises it has been considered to approach a standardized and protocolized performance of the professionals regarding the care of wounds, to unify criteria that favour the continuity of cares between the different levels and that all the nursing actions were suppported by a common norm, being possible to register, evaluate and research them.The unification of criteria and performance guidelines in the prevention and treatment of the wounds is one of the main objectives that we marked ourselves due to the increasing number of prophylactic and therapeutic options available, that makes it necessary to prepare nurses for making them being able to choose the most suitable tool to reach the objectives marked in the care of wounds.

  9. The prevalence, prevention and multilevel variance of pressure ulcers in Norwegian hospitals: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredesen, Ida Marie; Bjøro, Karen; Gunningberg, Lena; Hofoss, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are preventable adverse events. Organizational differences may influence the quality of prevention across wards and hospitals. To investigate the prevalence of pressure ulcers, patient-related risk factors, the use of preventive measures and how much of the pressure ulcer variance is at patient, ward and hospital level. A cross-sectional study. Six of the 11 invited hospitals in South-Eastern Norway agreed to participate. Inpatients ≥18 years at 88 somatic hospital wards (N=1209). Patients in paediatric and maternity wards and day surgery patients were excluded. The methodology for pressure ulcer prevalence studies developed by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel was used, including demographic data, the Braden scale, skin assessment, the location and severity of pressure ulcers and preventive measures. Multilevel analysis was used to investigate variance across hierarchical levels. The prevalence was 18.2% for pressure ulcer category I-IV, 7.2% when category I was excluded. Among patients at risk of pressure ulcers, 44.3% had pressure redistributing support surfaces in bed and only 22.3% received planned repositioning in bed. Multilevel analysis showed that although the dominant part of the variance in the occurrence of pressure ulcers was at patient level there was also a significant amount of variance at ward level. There was, however, no significant variance at hospital level. Pressure ulcer prevalence in this Norwegian sample is similar to comparable European studies. At-risk patients were less likely to receive preventive measures than patients in earlier studies. There was significant variance in the occurrence of pressure ulcers at ward level but not at hospital level, indicating that although interventions for improvement are basically patient related, improvement of procedures and organization at ward level may also be important. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    prevention programs, including pressure relief regimes and selection of support surfaces , to optimize tissue heath during initial rehabilitation. Study...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0618 TITLE: Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury...Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  11. Pressure ulcer prevention in German healthcare facilities: adherence to national expert standard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilborn, Doris; Dassen, Theo

    2010-01-01

    The German National Expert Standard "Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Nursing" provides evidence-based recommendations. This study shows that interventions that are not recommended are still being used in nursing practice, especially in those institutions in which the National Expert Standard was not used during the development of these procedures. A systematic evaluation, by rounds or case meetings, of nursing preventive interventions that are performed is indicated.

  12. Exploring preventive interventions and risk factors of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers: A retrospective matched case-control design.

    OpenAIRE

    Aljezawi, Ma'en

    2011-01-01

    Previous literature showed weak and sometimes contradictory evidence regarding the best interventions to prevent pressure ulcers and the best factors that can serve as predictors for ulceration. The aim of this study was to explore effective interventions and associated risk factors in the area of pressure ulcer. A retrospective approach was used to explore such interventions and risk factors in a more natural clinical environment than found in a prospective study. While retrospective stu...

  13. Candesartan restores pressure-induced vasodilation and prevents skin pressure ulcer formation in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danigo, Aurore; Nasser, Mohamad; Bessaguet, Flavien; Javellaud, James; Oudart, Nicole; Achard, Jean-Michel; Demiot, Claire

    2015-02-18

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blockers have beneficial effects on neurovascular complications in diabetes and in organ's protection against ischemic episodes. The present study examines whether the AT1R blocker candesartan (1) has a beneficial effect on diabetes-induced alteration of pressure-induced vasodilation (PIV, a cutaneous physiological neurovascular mechanism which could delay the occurrence of tissue ischemia), and (2) could be protective against skin pressure ulcer formation. Male Swiss mice aged 5-6 weeks were randomly assigned to four experimental groups. In two groups, diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg.kg(-1)). After 6 weeks, control and STZ mice received either no treatment or candesartan (1 mg/kg-daily in drinking water) during 2 weeks. At the end of treatment (8 weeks of diabetes duration), C-fiber mediated nociception threshold, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PIV were assessed. Pressure ulcers (PUs) were then induced by pinching the dorsal skin between two magnetic plates for three hours. Skin ulcer area development was assessed during three days, and histological examination of the depth of the skin lesion was performed at day three. After 8 weeks of diabetes, the skin neurovascular functions (C-fiber nociception, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PIV) were markedly altered in STZ-treated mice, but were fully restored by treatment with candesartan. Whereas in diabetes mice exposure of the skin to pressure induced wide and deep necrotic lesions, treatment with candersartan restored their ability to resist to pressure-induced ulceration as efficiently as the control mice. Candesartan decreases the vulnerability to pressure-induced ulceration and restores skin neurovascular functions in mice with STZ-induced established diabetes.

  14. Pressure ulcer prevention and healing using alternating pressure mattress at home: the PARESTRY project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaume, S; Marty, M

    2015-08-01

    Specialised pressure-relieving supports reduce or relieve the interface pressure between the skin and the support surface. The comparative effectiveness of dynamic support surfaces is debated. The aim of this study is to examine the impact of using an alternating pressure air mattress (APAM) on pressure ulcer (PU) incidence in patients receiving home-based care. A second aim was to determine the level of patient/family satisfaction with comfort and gain the views of the care team that used the APAM. The PARESTRY study was a prospective observational study conducted in patients with a high risk of PUs (Braden score prevention groups consisted of patients with no PU at baseline who were in bed for at least 20 hours a day. Patients at baseline with a category 3 or 4 PU or a category 1 or 2 PU in association with poor general health or end-of-life status were included in the secondary prevention group. All patients were laid on an APAM. The primary end point was the % of patients with a worsening skin condition in the pressure area (heel, sacrum, ischium) at day 90 or at the end of the study. The primary analysis was done on the full analysis set (patients included with at least a second assessment), using the last observation carried forward technique to handle missing data, at day 90. A 95% confidence interval was calculated. Analysis was performed on 92 patients (30 in primary prevention and 62 in secondary prevention). The average time spent in bed was 22.7 (SD 2.7) hours a day and 22.6 (SD 2.2) hours in the primary and secondary prevention groups, respectively. At baseline, in the secondary group, 77% of patients had a sacral PU, 63% a heel PU, 8% an ischial tuberosity PU and 45% a PU in another area, a number of patients having multiple PUs. In the primary prevention group, 63% (19/30) of patients dropped out of the study (5 were hospitalised, 9 died, 5 other causes). In the secondary prevention group, 61% (38/62) dropped out (7 were hospitalised, 23 died, 8

  15. Systematic review of behavioral and educational interventions to prevent pressure ulcers in adults with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Alison M; Blanchard, Jeanine; Garber, Susan L; Vigen, Cheryl Lp; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence A

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the efficacy of behavioral or educational interventions in preventing pressure ulcers in community-dwelling adults with spinal cord injury (SCI). Cochrane, Clinical Trials, PubMed, and Web of Science were searched in June 2016. The search combined related terms for pressure ulcers, spinal cord injury, and behavioral intervention. Each database was searched from its inception with no restrictions on year of publication. Inclusion criteria required that articles were (a) published in a peer-reviewed journal in English, (b) evaluated a behavioral or educational intervention for pressure ulcer prevention, (c) included community-dwelling adult participants aged 18 years and older with SCI, (d) measured pressure ulcer occurrence, recurrence, or skin breakdown as an outcome, and (e) had a minimum of 10 participants. All study designs were considered. Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts. Extracted information included study design, sample size, description of the intervention and control condition, pressure ulcer outcome measures, and corresponding results. The search strategy yielded 444 unique articles of which five met inclusion criteria. Three were randomized trials and two were quasi-experimental designs. A total of 513 participants were represented. The method of pressure ulcer or skin breakdown measurement varied widely among studies. Results on pressure ulcer outcomes were null in all studies. Considerable methodological problems with recruitment, intervention fidelity, and participant adherence were reported. At present, there is no positive evidence to support the efficacy of behavioral or educational interventions in preventing pressure ulcer occurrence in adults with SCI.

  16. Novel Pressure-Sensing Smart Insole System Used for the Prevention of Pressure Ulceration in the Insensate Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson R. Alfonso, BS, BA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Wounds of the foot challenge reconstructive surgeons to manage multiple factors: sensibility, stability, and durability. In this article, we focus on the insensate foot, which poses challenges to wound prevention with its propensity to develop pressure ulceration. The authors present the innovative use of a pressure-sensing smart insole system (SurroSense Rx, Orpyx Medical Technologies Inc., Calgary, Canada in the management of the insensate foot in a patient following foot reconstruction. The pressure-sensing smart insole system provided unique feedback to both patient and provider in ways that contributed to the prevention of pressure ulcer recurrence, as well as highlight the importance of prescribed footwear in both the affected and unaffected foot. Wearable real-time monitoring and feedback faces the challenge of patient adherence. Future studies are indicated to examine the specific behaviors that are associated with favorable outcomes and long-term behavior changes.

  17. mobilityRERC state of the science conference: Individualizing pressure ulcer risk and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprigle, Stephen; Sonenblum, Sharon; Conner-Kerr, Teresa

    2013-11-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) remain a costly and, often avoidable, complication of full time wheelchair use. Clinicians routinely evaluate PU risk to assist in selecting devices and interventions that may prevent PUs from occurring. Clinical assessment of risk can be evaluated in many different manners, both formally and informally and, typically, is based on combinations of demographic, disability and client-reported behavioral factors. Many of these factors add to PU risk because they impact the physiology and/or biomechanics of the skin and tissue. This article results from a presentation during the Wheeled Mobility Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC's) State of the Science Conference in 2012. The presentation's purpose was to present issues and concepts related to pressure ulcer prevention and set the stage for group discussion which followed the presentation. This article progresses through the current state of the science related to PU risk, starting with the tissue and cellular changes resulting from pressure, through the impact that external loading has on blood flow and tissue deformation, and ending with clinical assessment of risk based upon demographic and behavioral factors. Factors leading to the development of PUs are numerous and varied, but the defining factor is excessive external loading or pressure on the skin. The amount of pressure needed to cause tissue damage varies widely within and across individuals--based on anatomy and the presence or absence of bony structures under the area of interest, tissue stiffness and other individual characteristics, and most importantly--the amount of tissue deformation that occurs. Clinicians routinely evaluate wheelchair users with respect to pressure ulcer risk, however, objective risk measurements that inform prescription are not readily available. A need exists to provide clinicians with objective measurements of pressure ulcer risk that can inform individualized interventions.

  18. Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in the daily lives of intensivist nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiany Alencar Rolim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Exploratory study aimed to identify activities of prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers planned and implemented by nurses in the Intensive Care Unit; the importance ascribed to the interventions; and the difficulties to carry out those interventions. The study took place in the Intensive Care Unit of a University Hospital, with participation of nine nurses. The data, collected by means of interviews, were analyzed in the light of the discourse of the collective subject technique. Data revealed that changes in position stand out as a prevention measure and dressings are the main care in the treatment of pressure ulcer. The difficulties reported by nurses indicate limitations in human resources regarding number, training, and lack of involvement of the team; and in material resources to promote comfort and safety to the patient.

  19. Evaluation of the pressure ulcer prevention clinical decision report for bedside nurses in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsma, A; Tschannen, D; Guo, Y; Kazemi, J

    2011-01-01

    Hospital stays for patients with pressure ulcers (PU) increased nearly 80% from 1992 to 2006. Most PU's developed during an admission, often despite preventive efforts from clinical staff. Data from Electronic medical records (EMR's) were used to prepare daily patient risk factor and PU information for nurses to help prevent PU development and exacerbations. THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO DETERMINE WHETHER: 1) dissemination of an automated daily report with patient risk and current status of pressure ulcers ("PU Daily") helps prevent the development of pressure ulcers, and 2) using the PU Daily information impacts the severity of pressure ulcers that develop in an acute care setting. A pre-post study with four control units was designed to determine the impact of the PU Daily in intensive care units (ICU) in a large medical center. The control units included ICU's using the same EMR and similar complexity of cases with a high risk of developing a PU. The pre-post study took place over a six month period (March - August 2009). A total of 6,735 cases were included in the study. The intervention unit showed a significant decrease (p = 0.004) in PU's at post-evaluation; none of the four comparison units showed a decrease at the pintervention led to a significant reduction in the total number of PU's documented (p intervention with the PU Daily showed a significant decrease in the total PU's and severity of PU's and allowed for implementation of interventions that help prevent the development of PU's. As EMR's become more widely available, this intervention showed a reduction in PU's. Future studies should further develop this intervention and include multiple institutions and patient populations.

  20. Nursing interventions to prevent pressure ulcers in intensive care units : systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Lage, Isabel; Novais, Rui Manuel Freitas; Magalhães, Maria Manuela Almendra; Vilaça, Simão; Araújo, Odete

    2014-01-01

    Publicada na "Revista Saúde Pública", vol. 48, nr. spec. (May 2014) ; ISSN 0034-8910 , ISSN 1518-8787 (online) Introduction: It is estimated that Pressure Ulcer (PU) ranges from 0.4% to 38% in acute care worldwide, causing high costs in treatments, delaying functional recovery and deferring discharge hospital. Objective: To identify and synthesize primary studies which comprehend interventions focused on prevention of PU in critical care units. Methods: A systematic review follow...

  1. A framework of quality improvement interventions to implement evidence-based practices for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Mishra, Manish K; Makic, Mary Beth F; Valuck, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    To enhance the learner's competence with knowledge about a framework of quality improvement (QI) interventions to implement evidence-based practices for pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Summarize the process of creating and initiating the best-practice framework of QI for PrU prevention.2. Identify the domains and QI interventions for the best-practice framework of QI for PrU prevention. Pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention is a priority issue in US hospitals. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel endorses an evidence-based practice (EBP) protocol to help prevent PrUs. Effective implementation of EBPs requires systematic change of existing care units. Quality improvement interventions offer a mechanism of change to existing structures in order to effectively implement EBPs for PrU prevention. The best-practice framework developed by Nelson et al is a useful model of quality improvement interventions that targets process improvement in 4 domains: leadership, staff, information and information technology, and performance and improvement. At 2 academic medical centers, the best-practice framework was shown to physicians, nurses, and health services researchers. Their insight was used to modify the best-practice framework as a reference tool for quality improvement interventions in PrU prevention. The revised framework includes 25 elements across 4 domains. Many of these elements support EBPs for PrU prevention, such as updates in PrU staging and risk assessment. The best-practice framework offers a reference point to initiating a bundle of quality improvement interventions in support of EBPs. Hospitals and clinicians tasked with quality improvement efforts can use this framework to problem-solve PrU prevention and other critical issues.

  2. Measuring the quality of pressure ulcer prevention: A systematic mapping review of quality indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Hahnel, Elisabeth; Lichterfeld-Kottner, Andrea; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Büscher, Andreas

    2017-11-27

    The aim of this study was to provide a systematic overview of available pressure ulcer prevention quality indicators and to evaluate the underlying empirical evidence. A systematic mapping review was conducted with combined searches in Embase and Medline, and websites of relevant institutions and organisations. The eligibility criteria were clear use of the term "quality indicator" regarding pressure ulcer prevention; English or German language; and all settings, populations, and types of resources, including articles, brochures, and online material. In total, n = 146 quality indicators were identified. Most indicators were published in the United States (n = 50). The majority of indicators was developed for the hospital setting (n = 102). Process indicators were the most common (n = 71), followed by outcome indicators (n = 49). Less than half of identified indicators appeared to be practically used. Evidence supporting the validity and reliability were reported for n = 25 and n = 30 indicators respectively. The high number of indicators demonstrate the importance of measuring pressure ulcer prevention quality. This is not an indicator of our ability to accurately measure and evaluate this construct. There is an urgent need to develop evidence-based and internationally comparable indicators to help improve patient care and safety worldwide. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Turning frequency in adult bedridden patients to prevent hospital-acquired pressure ulcer: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocelyn Chew, H-S; Thiara, Emelia; Lopez, Violeta; Shorey, Shefaly

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify current research on turning frequencies of adult bed-bound patients and inform future turning practices for hospitals based on evidence-based practice. We undertook a scoping review framework that provided a transparent and systematic methodology using 8 electronic databases (CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane Library, ScienceDirect, PsycINFO, Scopus, ProQuest, and Web of Science) to identify articles published from 2000 to 2016. Articles were included if they focused on the prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers related to the frequency of turning or repositioning of bed-bound patients. Literature search and data extraction were performed independently by 3 authors. The study followed the PRISMA guidelines. In total, 911 articles were identified, of which 10 were eligible. Of the eligible articles, 8 studies could not reach a conclusion on the effective frequency of turning and duration for repositioning patients to prevent the development of pressure ulcers. Only 2 studies found significant differences among the intervention and control groups. Results regarding turning and repositioning schedules are inconclusive; however, the topic needs further exploration to improve the outdated guidelines surrounding pressure ulcer prevention. This may, in turn, make the work of nurses more efficient and make treatment cost-effective for both the patients and the hospitals. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Nurses' knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention in ogun state, Nigeria: results of a pilot survey .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilesanmi, Rose Ekama; Ofi, Bola Abosede; Adejumo, Prisca Olabisi

    2012-02-01

     Pressure ulcer (PU) development remains a significant complication among at-risk patients. Optimal prevention strategies start with knowledge about current evidence-based prevention interventions. A pilot study was conducted to describe nurses' level of knowledge of PU preventive interventions and to test the reliability of the Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Test (PUKT) among Nigerian nurses. One hundred, eleven (111) nurses were purposively selected from specific wards of a state teaching hospital in South West Nigeria. While 106 nurses (95.5%) correctly identified patients at risk for PU development, 78 participants (70.3%) had low (prevention intervention knowledge scores. No significant differences in PU prevention intervention knowledge scores were observed between nurses with different educational backgrounds (P = 0.317) or years of working experience (P >0.005). The Cronbach's alpha coefficient for reliability was 0.861. The results of this study confirm that many PU prevention interventions in Nigeria are based on tradition and that a structured educational approach is needed to enable Nigerian nurses to provide evidence-based PU prevention interventions.

  5. Pressure-ulcer management and prevention in acute and primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newham, Roger; Hudgell, Lynne

    This article describes a study to ascertain what it is like to follow the processes in practice for prevention and management of pressure ulcers as one aspect of care among others. The participants in this study were bands 5 and 6 staff nurses and healthcare assistants (HCAs) (n=72) recruited from two acute and two primary NHS trusts. Data were gathered from open-ended questions via an online survey (n=61) and interviews (n=11). The interviews were transcribed and all the data were analysed by thematic analysis. The findings show that participants believe there has been a high-profile imposition of guidelines and policies by management during at least the past 18 months, resulting in perceived good outcomes in the form of fewer pressure ulcers generally and less fragmentation of care, particularly within primary care. However, a number of perceived obstacles to the implementation of recommended interventions remain, notably lack of time and lack of knowledge.

  6. Manualization of occupational therapy interventions: illustrations from the pressure ulcer prevention research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Fogelberg, Donald; Diaz, Jesus; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The manualization of a complex occupational therapy intervention is a crucial step in ensuring treatment fidelity for both clinical application and research purposes. Toward the latter end, intervention manuals are essential for ensuring trustworthiness and replicability of randomized controlled trials that aim to provide evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy. In this article, we review the literature on the process of intervention manualization. We then illustrate the prescribed steps through our experience in implementing the University of Southern California/Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center's collaborative Pressure Ulcer Prevention Project. In this research program, qualitative research provided the initial foundation for manualization of a multifaceted occupational therapy intervention designed to reduce the incidence of medically serious pressure ulcers in adults with spinal cord injury.

  7. Manualization of Occupational Therapy Interventions: Illustrations from the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Fogelberg, Donald; Diaz, Jesus; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The manualization of a complex occupational therapy intervention is a crucial step in ensuring treatment fidelity for both clinical application and research purposes. Towards this latter end, intervention manuals are essential for assuring trustworthiness and replicability of randomized controlled trials (RCT’s) that aim to provide evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy. In this paper, literature on the process of intervention manualization is reviewed. The prescribed steps are then illustrated through our experience in implementing the University of Southern California/Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center’s collaborative Pressure Ulcer Prevention Project (PUPP). In this research program, qualitative research provided the initial foundation for manualization of a multifaceted occupational therapy intervention designed to reduce incidence of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with SCI. PMID:22214116

  8. Randomised, controlled trial of alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays for the prevention of pressure ulcers: PRESSURE (pressure relieving support surfaces) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Jane; Cranny, Gillian; Iglesias, Cynthia; Nelson, E Andrea; Hawkins, Kim; Phillips, Angela; Torgerson, David; Mason, Su; Cullum, Nicky

    2006-06-17

    To compare whether differences exist between alternating pressure overlays and alternating pressure mattresses in the development of new pressure ulcers, healing of existing pressure ulcers, and patient acceptability. Pragmatic, open, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. 11 hospitals in six NHS trusts. 1972 people admitted to hospital as acute or elective patients. Participants were randomised to an alternating pressure mattress (n = 982) or an alternating pressure overlay (n = 990). The proportion of participants developing a new pressure ulcer of grade 2 or worse; time to development of new pressure ulcers; proportions of participants developing a new ulcer within 30 days; healing of existing pressure ulcers; and patient acceptability. Intention to treat analysis found no difference in the proportions of participants developing a new pressure ulcer of grade 2 or worse (10.7% overlay patients, 10.3% mattress patients; difference 0.4%, 95% confidence interval--2.3% to 3.1%, P = 0.75). More overlay patients requested change owing to dissatisfaction (23.3%) than mattress patients (18.9%, P = 0.02). No difference was found between alternating pressure mattresses and alternating pressure overlays in the proportion of people who develop a pressure ulcer. ISRCTN 78646179.

  9. Spinal Cord Injury and Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Using Functional Activity in Pressure Relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Stinson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. People with spinal cord injury (SCI are at increased risk of pressure ulcers due to prolonged periods of sitting. Concordance with pressure relieving movements is poor amongst this population, and one potential alternative to improve this would be to integrate pressure relieving movements into everyday functional activities. Objectives. To investigate both the current pressure relieving behaviours of SCI individuals during computer use and the application of an ergonomically adapted computer-based activity to reduce interface pressure. Design. Observational and repeated measures design. Setting. Regional Spinal Cord Injury Unit. Participants. Fourteen subjects diagnosed with SCI (12 male, 2 female. Intervention.Comparing normal sitting to seated movements and induced forward reaching positions. Main Outcome Measures. Interface pressure measurements: dispersion index (DI, peak pressure index (PPI, and total contact area (CA. The angle of trunk tilt was also measured. Results. The majority of movements yielded less than 25% reduction in interface pressure compared to normal sitting. Reaching forward by 150% of arm length during an adapted computer activity significantly reduced DI (P<0.05, angle of trunk tilt (p<0.05, and PPI for both ischial tuberosity regions (P<0.001 compared to normal sitting. Conclusion. Reaching forward significantly redistributed pressure at the seating interface, as evidenced by the change in interface pressures compared to upright sitting.

  10. Pressure ulcer risk assessment and prevention: what difference does a risk scale make? A comparison between Norway and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, E; Moore, Z; van Etten, M; Strapp, H

    2014-07-01

    To explore similarities and differences in nurses' views on risk assessment practices and preventive care activities in a context where patients' risk of developing pressure ulcers is assessed using clinical judgment (Norway) and a context where patients' risk of developing pressure ulcers is assessed using a formal structured risk assessment combined with clinical judgement (Ireland). A descriptive, qualitative design was employed across two different care settings with a total of 14 health care workers, nine from Norway and five from Ireland. Regardless of whether risk assessment was undertaken using clinical judgment or formal structured risk assessment, identified risk factors, at risk patients and appropriate preventive initiatives discussed by participant were similar across care settings. Furthermore, risk assessment did not necessarily result in the planning and implementation of appropriate pressure ulcer prevention initiatives. Thus, in this instance, use of a formal risk assessment tool does not seem to make any difference to the planning, initiation and evaluation of pressure ulcer prevention strategies. Regardless of the method of risk assessment, patients at risk of developing pressure ulcers are detected, suggesting that the practice of risk assessment should be re-evaluated. Moreover, appropriate preventive interventions were described. However, the missing link between risk assessment and documented care planning is of concern and barriers to appropriate pressure ulcer documentation should be explored further. This work is partly funded by a research grant from the Norwegian Nurses Organisation (NNO) (Norsk Sykepleierforbund NSF) in 2012. The authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

  11. Randomized clinical trial comparing 2 support surfaces: results of the Prevention of Pressure Ulcers Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Linda J; Reynolds, Tim M; Park, Carol; Rithalia, Shyam; Gonsalkorale, M; Birch, Jan; Torgerson, David; Iglesias, Cynthia

    2003-11-01

    To determine whether a viscoelastic polymer (energy absorbing) foam mattress was superior to a standard hospital mattress for pressure ulcer prevention and to analyze the cost-effectiveness in comparison with standard hospital mattresses. Unblinded, randomized, prospective trial. Elderly acute care, rehabilitation, and orthopedic wards at 3 hospitals in the United Kingdom. 1168 patients at risk of developing pressure ulcers (Waterlow score, 15 to 20), with a median age of 83 years (25th to 75th percentile range, 79-87). Participants were allocated to either the experimental equipment (CONFOR-Med mattress/cushion combination) or a standard mattress/cushion combination; all were given standard nursing care. Pressure areas were observed daily. Development of nonblanching erythema. A significant decrease in the incidence of blanching erythema (26.3% to 19.9%; P =.004) and a nonsignificant decrease in the incidence of nonblanching erythema occurred in participants allocated to the experimental equipment. However, when the survival curve plots were analyzed at 7 days, both categories showed statistically significant decreases (P =.0015 and P =.042, respectively). Participants on standard equipment had a relative odds ratio of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.69) for developing blanching erythema or worse and 1.46 (95% CI, 0.90-1.82) for developing nonblanching erythema or worse. To prevent nonblanching erythema, the number needed to treat (NNT) was 41.9 (95% CI, -82.6-15.3). To prevent any erythema (blanching or nonblanching), the NNT was 11.5 (95% CI, 41.6-9.3). Participants with blanching or nonblanching erythema were significantly less mobile than participants with normal skin and more likely to have worsening mobility (P pressure ulcer status, mattress type was not associated with difference in mobility. Regardless of prevention routine, pressure ulcers occur. In this study, the experimental equipment showed statistical significance to standard equipment

  12. Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Nancy; Horn, Susan D; Rapp, Mary; Stern, Anita; Barrett, Ryan; Watkiss, Michael; Krahn, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Pressure at the interface between bony prominences and support surfaces, sufficient to occlude or reduce blood flow, is thought to cause pressure ulcers (PrUs). Pressure ulcers are prevented by providing support surfaces that redistribute pressure and by turning residents to reduce length of exposure. We aim to determine optimal frequency of repositioning in long-term care (LTC) facilities of residents at risk for PrUs who are cared for on high-density foam mattresses. We recruited residents from 20 United States and 7 Canadian LTC facilities. Participants were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 turning schedules (2-, 3-, or 4-hour intervals). The study continued for 3 weeks with weekly risk and skin assessment completed by assessors blinded to group allocation. The primary outcome measure was PrU on the coccyx or sacrum, greater trochanter, or heels. Participants were mostly female (731/942, 77.6%) and white (758/942, 80.5%), and had a mean age of 85.1 (standard deviation [SD] ± 7.66) years. The most common comorbidities were cardiovascular disease (713/942, 75.7%) and dementia (672/942, 71.3%). Nineteen of 942 (2.02%) participants developed one superficial Stage 1 (n = 1) or Stage 2 (n = 19) ulcer; no full-thickness ulcers developed. Overall, there was no significant difference in PrU incidence (P = 0.68) between groups (2-hour, 8/321 [2.49%] ulcers/group; 3-hour, 2/326 [0.61%]; 4-hour, 9/295 [3.05%]. Pressure ulcers among high-risk (6/325, 1.85%) versus moderate-risk (13/617, 2.11%) participants were not significantly different (P = 0.79), nor was there a difference between moderate-risk (P = 0.68) or high-risk allocation groups (P = 0.90). Results support turning moderate- and high-risk residents at intervals of 2, 3, or 4 hours when they are cared for on high-density foam replacement mattresses. Turning at 3-hour and at 4-hour intervals is no worse than the current practice of turning every 2 hours. Less frequent turning might increase sleep, improve quality of

  13. Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Nancy; Horn, Susan D.; Rapp, Mary; Stern, Anita; Barrett, Ryan; Watkiss, Michael; Krahn, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Background Pressure at the interface between bony prominences and support surfaces, sufficient to occlude or reduce blood flow, is thought to cause pressure ulcers (PrUs). Pressure ulcers are prevented by providing support surfaces that redistribute pressure and by turning residents to reduce length of exposure. Objective We aim to determine optimal frequency of repositioning in long-term care (LTC) facilities of residents at risk for PrUs who are cared for on high-density foam mattresses. Methods We recruited residents from 20 United States and 7 Canadian LTC facilities. Participants were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 turning schedules (2-, 3-, or 4-hour intervals). The study continued for 3 weeks with weekly risk and skin assessment completed by assessors blinded to group allocation. The primary outcome measure was PrU on the coccyx or sacrum, greater trochanter, or heels. Results Participants were mostly female (731/942, 77.6%) and white (758/942, 80.5%), and had a mean age of 85.1 (standard deviation [SD] ± 7.66) years. The most common comorbidities were cardiovascular disease (713/942, 75.7%) and dementia (672/942, 71.3%). Nineteen of 942 (2.02%) participants developed one superficial Stage 1 (n = 1) or Stage 2 (n = 19) ulcer; no full-thickness ulcers developed. Overall, there was no significant difference in PrU incidence (P = 0.68) between groups (2-hour, 8/321 [2.49%] ulcers/group; 3-hour, 2/326 [0.61%]; 4-hour, 9/295 [3.05%]. Pressure ulcers among high-risk (6/325, 1.85%) versus moderate-risk (13/617, 2.11%) participants were not significantly different (P = 0.79), nor was there a difference between moderate-risk (P = 0.68) or high-risk allocation groups (P = 0.90). Conclusions Results support turning moderate- and high-risk residents at intervals of 2, 3, or 4 hours when they are cared for on high-density foam replacement mattresses. Turning at 3-hour and at 4-hour intervals is no worse than the current practice of turning every 2 hours. Less frequent

  14. Randomised, controlled trial of alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays for the prevention of pressure ulcers: PRESSURE (pressure relieving support surfaces) trial

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare whether differences exist between alternating pressure overlays and alternating pressure mattresses in the development of new pressure ulcers, healing of existing pressure ulcers, and patient acceptability. Design Pragmatic, open, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. Setting 11 hospitals in six NHS trusts. Participants 1972 people admitted to hospital as acute or elective patients. Interventions Participants were randomised to an alternating pressure mattress (n = 98...

  15. Prevention of Pressure Ulcers Among People With Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groah, Suzanne L; Schladen, Manon; Pineda, Cynthia G; Hsieh, Ching-Hui J

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the literature on the effectiveness of bed and wheelchair positioning and repositioning in the prevention of pressure ulcers (PUs) in both the spinal cord injury (SCI) and non-SCI populations. Systematic review. PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and EMBASE were queried with the subject heading terms "pressure sore," "pressure ulcer," "position or turn in bed, wheelchair," "pressure relief," and "pressure release." All study design types that assessed the effectiveness of bed and wheelchair positioning and pressure relief maneuvers in any patient group and in any setting were sought. Three independent reviewers extracted and summarized details of eligible trials using a standardized method. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of each trial using the American Academy of Neurology guidelines. When reviewers were not able to reach consensus, a third independent reviewer served as tiebreaker. We identified 2820 publications, of which 49 met inclusion criteria. Of these publications, the subject population was 2834 (923 persons with SCI, 717 persons without SCI, and 1194 healthy control subjects). Among studies examining pressure related to position or repositioning in bed or sitting, procedures for measuring skin pressure and metabolism were highly variable by anatomic location, measurement technique, outcome measure, study site, participant characteristics, and description of position/turning for bed and seated interventions. Numerous factors can influence tissue interface pressures, and no prospective studies had been performed to determine a causal relationship between interface pressure and skin breakdown. Several studies suggest that skin response to pressure differs between subjects with and without SCI. Conflicting results and insufficient evidence for optimal bed and seated positioning and turning and pressure relief maneuvers to prevent PUs in both SCI and non-SCI populations were limiting factors. Although there is no clear

  16. [Pressure ulcers in intensive care: assessment of risk and prevention measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizpitarte Pegenaute, Eva; García de Galdiano Fernández, Ana; Zugazagoitia Ciarrusta, Nerea; Margall Coscojuela, María Angeles; Asiain Erro, María Carmen

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) are associated to greater patient morbidity and mortality. Thus, all prevention measures are very important. In order to establish the appropriate care early, the first measure is the identification of patients at risk of developing PU, using specific scales. 1) to assess the risk of developing PU in the patients admitted in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), using the Waterlow scale; 2) to identify patients with PU and to analyse the possible relationship between them and the measured risk; 3) to analyse the preventive care received by patients for its prevention. This descriptive study analysed the risk of developing PU in 91 critical patients with a stay greater than 3 days. To measure the risk the Waterlow scale (modified by Weststrate in 1998), that included 14 risk factors, was used. Sociodemographic data, cause of admission, patients with PU, its location and grade and care applied were also collected. Risk grade obtained on the Waterlow scale was: without risk (ulcer, in 10 of them it was present on admission. Their score obtained on the scale was risk in 2 patients, high risk in 5 and very high risk in the remaining 6. A statistically significant difference was found between the mean score of risk of the 13 patients who had ulcer and the remaining sample (21.85-16.83; p = 0.005). When the risk factors included in the scale and its relationship with the presence of ulcer were analysed, statistically significant difference was only found in the "heart failure" factor (vasoconstrictor treatment), p = 0.045. No association was found between age, gender, diagnosis and presence of ulcer. Regarding the daily care applied to patients, the following results were obtained: skin hydration and hygiene were done in 100% of the patients, patient repositioning were done every 2 hours or more frequently in 80% of the patients, every 3 hours in 10% and in the remaining 10%, with a frequency greater than 4 hours. Heel protection was applied in 57% of the

  17. Comparative effectiveness of quality improvement interventions for pressure ulcer prevention in academic medical centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Makic, Mary Beth F; Mishra, Manish K; Campbell, Jonathan D; Nair, Kavita V; Wald, Heidi L; Valuck, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    Prevention of pressure ulcers, one of the hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) targeted by the 2008 nonpayment policy of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), is a critical issue. This study was conducted to determine the comparative effectiveness of quality improvement (QI) interventions associated with reduced hospital-acquired pressure ulcer (HAPU) rates. In an quasi-experimental design, interrupted time series analyses were conducted to determine the correlation between HAPU incidence rates and adoption of QI interventions. Among University HealthSystem Consortium hospitals, 55 academic medical centers were surveyed from September 2007 through February 2012 for adoption patterns of QI interventions for pressure ulcer prevention, and hospital-level data for 5,208 pressure ulcer cases were analyzed. Between- and within-hospital reduction significance was tested with t-tests post-CMS policy intervention. Fifty-three (96%) of the 55 hospitals used QI interventions for pressure ulcer prevention. The effect size analysis identified five effective interventions that each reduced pressure ulcer rates by greater than 1 case per 1,000 patient discharges per quarter: leadership initiatives, visual tools, pressure ulcer staging, skin care, and patient nutrition. The greatest reductions in rates occurred earlier in the adoption process (pinterventions had clinically meaningful associations with reduced stage III and IV HAPU incidence rates in 55 academic medical centers. These QI interventions can be used in support of an evidence-based prevention protocol for pressure ulcers. Hospitals can not only use these findings from this study as part of a QI bundle for preventing HAPUs.

  18. The Effect of New Guideline Training among Iranian Nurses for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Baghaei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the effect of training of new guideline on Pressure ulcer (PU prevention in the intensive care units (ICUs. PU is the third costly disorder with high mortality and morbidity. Thus reduction of PU incidence is very important and effective step for health systems. PU is one of the most common medical conditions, occurring in both hospital and community settings, in all age groups, but mostly among the elderly, the immobile, and patients with severe acute and chronic illnesses or neurological deficits. This semi-experimental study was conducted on high-risk patients with a Norton scale score of 16, while they had daily care for PU prevention. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups of intervention and control patients in each. The control group was assessed with routine care o PU prevention in the first three months of the study. Then the nurses were trained with the new guideline and after that the data were collected again in the second three months period. The data were analyzed through the SPSS statistical software (version 13. results showed that new guideline training program was associated with decreased risk of PU. Education of the new guideline on PU is an effective way to decrease the rate of PU in (ICUs. Training the new care guideline of the PU prevention for the involved nurses probably can reduce the incidence rate of pressure ulcer.

  19. Stop them at the door: should a pressure ulcer prevention protocol be implemented in the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denby, Abby; Rowlands, Aletha

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocol in the emergency department (ED). Using data abstraction, a descriptive analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between ED length of stay and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers for those patients who were directly admitted to the hospital from the ED. During 2006, 32,664 patients sought medical attention through the ED. Seventy-five percent of the total patient population admitted was admitted from the ED. One hundred twenty-five of those patients developed hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, 99.2% of which had an ED length of stay greater than 2 hours prior to hospital admission. Findings of this study suggest early nursing interventions are needed to prevent hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  20. The Role of Pressure Offloading on Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing and Prevention of Recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.

    2016-01-01

    An increased plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of plantar foot ulcers in people with diabetes mellitus, and ulcers are a precursor of lower extremity amputation. In this article, the evidence is reviewed that relieving areas of increased plantar pressure (ie, offloading) can

  1. Preventing facial pressure ulcers in patients under non-invasive mechanical ventilation: a randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, D Peña; Domínguez, D Vazquez; Fernández, L Hernanz; Magariño, A Santano; González, V Jimenez; Klepzing, J V García; Montesinos, J V Beneit

    2017-03-02

    To comparatively assess the efficacy of four different therapeutic strategies to prevent the development of facial pressure ulcers (FPUs) related to the use of non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) with oro-nasal masks in critically ill hospitalised patients. This randomised control trial was performed at the high dependency unit in the University General Hospital Gregorio Marañón in Madrid, Spain. Overall, 152 patients with acute respiratory failure were recruited. All patients were hospitalised and received NIV through oro-nasal masks. The Norton tool was used to evaluate the general risk of developing pressure ulcers (PUs). Subjects were divided into four groups, each of them receiving a different treatment. Tissue assessment and preventive care were performed by a member of the research team. The incidence of FPUs was significantly lower in the group receiving a solution of hyperoxygenated fatty acids (HOFA) when compared with each of the other therapeutic strategies: direct mask (p=0.055), adhesive thin dressing (p=0.03) and adhesive foam dressing (pfacial skin in contact with the oro-nasal masks showed the highest efficacy in the prevention of NIV-related FPUs.

  2. Braden Scale risk assessments and pressure ulcer prevention planning: what's the connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Morris A; Maklebust, Joann

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between risk assessment scores on Braden subscales and nurses' selection of 10 commonly used best-practice pressure ulcer (PU) preventive interventions. Exploratory secondary data analysis, using a descriptive correlational design. A total of 377 Braden Scale PU risk assessments were made on 102 patients at different levels of risk. Assessments were made by RNs working at 3 different acute care hospitals. RNs making risk assessments also used an intervention checklist to select from 10 commonly used preventive interventions that should be implemented based on patient level of risk on each Braden subscale. The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk was used to guide risk assessments. The Registered Nurses Intervention Checklist was used to identify PU preventive interventions that should be implemented. Braden subscale ratings influenced nurses' endorsement of preventive interventions in 2 distinct ways. First, endorsement of most (9 out of 10) preventive interventions was influenced by risk information embedded in unique combinations of Braden subscale assessments. Second, there appears to be a predictable pattern of increase in the likelihood of endorsing an intervention as Braden subscale scores decreased and the level of risk increased. Variability in Braden subscale ratings differentially predicts nurses' endorsements of selected PU-prevention interventions. Also, there is a predictable pattern of increase in the likelihood of endorsing a preventive intervention as PU risk levels increase, a pattern that may be related to the timing of risk assessment and PU-prevention planning activities.

  3. Pressure ulcer prevention in nursing homes: nurse descriptions of individual and organization level factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Magnabosco, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Sustaining pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) in nursing homes has been difficult to achieve. Implementation science researchers suggest that identification of individual staff and organizational factors influencing current practices is essential to the development of an effective and customized plan to implement practice changes in a specific setting. A mixed methods approach was used to describe nurses' perceptions of individual and organization-level factors influencing performance of PUP in two Veterans Health Administration (VHA) nursing homes prior to implementation of a national VHA initiative on Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers (HAPUs). Individual interviews of 16 nursing staff were conducted. Individual factors influencing practice were a personal sense of responsibility to Veterans and belief in the effectiveness and importance of preventive measures. Organizational factors were existence of cooperative practices between nursing assistants and licensed nurses in assessing risk; teamwork, communication, and a commitment to Veterans' well-being. Integration and reinforcement of such factors in the development and maintenance of customized plans of PUP initiatives is recommended. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  4. The cost-effectiveness of a patient centred pressure ulcer prevention care bundle: Findings from the INTACT cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Jennifer A; McInnes, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Webster, Joan; Gillespie, Brigid M; Banks, Merrilyn; Thalib, Lukman; Wallis, Marianne; Cumsille, Jose; Roberts, Shelley; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-10-01

    Pressure ulcers are serious, avoidable, costly and common adverse outcomes of healthcare. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a patient-centred pressure ulcer prevention care bundle compared to standard care. Cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses of pressure ulcer prevention performed from the health system perspective using data collected alongside a cluster-randomised trial. Eight tertiary hospitals in Australia. Adult patients receiving either a patient-centred pressure ulcer prevention care bundle (n=799) or standard care (n=799). Direct costs related to the intervention and preventative strategies were collected from trial data and supplemented by micro-costing data on patient turning and skin care from a 4-week substudy (n=317). The time horizon for the economic evaluation matched the trial duration, with the endpoint being diagnosis of a new pressure ulcer, hospital discharge/transfer or 28days; whichever occurred first. For the cost-effectiveness analysis, the primary outcome was the incremental costs of prevention per additional hospital acquired pressure ulcer case avoided, estimated using a two-stage cluster-adjusted non-parametric bootstrap method. The cost-benefit analysis estimated net monetary benefit, which considered both the costs of prevention and any difference in length of stay. All costs are reported in AU$(2015). The care bundle cost AU$144.91 (95%CI: $74.96 to $246.08) more per patient than standard care. The largest contributors to cost were clinical nurse time for repositioning and skin inspection. In the cost-effectiveness analysis, the care bundle was estimated to cost an additional $3296 (95%CI: dominant to $144,525) per pressure ulcer avoided. This estimate is highly uncertain. Length of stay was unexpectedly higher in the care bundle group. In a cost-benefit analysis which considered length of stay, the net monetary benefit for the care bundle was estimated to be -$2320 (95%CI -$3900, -$1175) per patient, suggesting the care

  5. Effectiveness of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Strategies for Adult Patients in Intensive Care Units: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyib, Nahla; Coyer, Fiona

    2016-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are associated with substantial health burden, but could be preventable. Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) prevention has become a priority for all healthcare settings, as it is considered a sign of quality of care providing. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are at higher risk for HAPUs development. Despite the availability of published prevention strategies, there is a little evidence about which strategies can be safely integrated into routine standard care and have an impact on HAPUs prevention. The aim was to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of single strategies designed to reduce the incidence and prevalence of HAPUs development in ICUs. The search strategy was designed to retrieve studies published in English across CINAHL, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, Scopus, and Mednar between 2000 and 2015. All adult ICU participants were aged 18 years or over. This review included randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental and comparative studies. The studies that were selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical-appraisal instruments. The review included 25 studies, and the meta-analysis revealed a statistically significant effect of a silicon foam dressing strategy in reducing HAPUs incidence (effect size = 4.62; 95% CI: 0.05-0.29; p prevention of HAPUs development in the ICU was limited, which precludes strong conclusions. The review provides an evidence-based guide to future priorities for clinical practice. In particular, a silicone foam dressing has positive impact in reducing sacrum and heel HAPUs incidence in the ICU. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Prevention of pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit: a randomized trial of 2 viscoelastic foam support surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurek, Pakize; Yavuz, Meryem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare whether differences exist between 2 viscoelastic foam support surfaces in the development of new pressure ulcers. There is evidence to support the use of viscoelastic foam over standard hospital foam to reduce pressure. A comparative effectiveness study was done to compare 2 viscoelastic foam support surfaces. A randomized controlled trial was carried out. The study was performed in 2 intensive care units between October 1, 2008, and January 4, 2010. Patients (n = 105) admitted to intensive care unit were randomly assigned to viscoelastic foam 1 (n = 53) or viscoelastic foam 2 support surface (n = 52). In total, 42.8% of all patients developed a new pressure ulcer of stage 1 or worse. By stages, pressure ulcer incidence was 28.6%, 13.3%, and 1.0% for stages 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was no significant difference in pressure ulcer incidence between the viscoelastic foam 1 and 2 groups (X2 = 0.07, df = 1, P > .05). No difference was found between 2 different viscoelastic foam surfaces in the prevention of pressure ulcers in patients treated in intensive care. Pressure ulcer incidence in critically ill patients remains high. Nurses must compare current products for effectiveness and develop innovative systems, processes, or devices to deliver best practices.

  7. Use of a sacral silicone border foam dressing as one component of a pressure ulcer prevention program in an intensive care unit setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Nancy S; Blanck, Alyson W; Smith, Lisa; Cross, Maribeth; Andersson, Liane; Polito, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Danbury Hospital, Danbury, Connecticut, experienced 79 pressure ulcers. As a result, pressure ulcer-prevention interventions were standardized in critical care and medical-surgical units and education was provided to all direct patient care staff about principles of skin care and prevention. Following these efforts, 53 ICU patients developed pressure ulcers in the sacral area in fiscal year 2009, representing a 12.5% incidence for the ICU as compared to a 3.4% overall pressure ulcer incidence for the total hospital. In order to achieve additional reduction in pressure ulcer incidence, we replicated an initiative that called for application of a silicone foam dressing every 3 days to determine its effect on sacral pressure ulcer incidence in the ICU. We found that the use of the dressing further diminished the incidence of sacral pressure ulcers in our patients.

  8. Prevention of Pressure Ulcers in the Acute Care Setting: New Innovations and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jacquelynn P; McLaughlin, Jillian M; Li, Ramon T; Phillips, Linda G

    2016-09-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) challenge many in the healthcare field requiring costly and complex care. PUs result from prolonged ischemia and subsequent soft-tissue injury caused by unrelieved pressure over a bony prominence. Proper risk assessment and implementation of prevention strategies for PUs are crucial to providing comprehensive care while reducing healthcare costs. The emphasis has led to the expansion of research in PU prevention technologies in the recent years. The aim of this review is to present an evidence-based summary of some of the new innovations in PU prevention. A literature search was performed. Articles were included if the article discussed the cost, prevalence, assessment, diagnosis, and/or prevention of PUs. The literature search was limited to 2013 to 2016. A total of 1393 potential studies were identified using the search criteria. Three hundred fifty-three articles were reviewed and when possible, preference for inclusion was given to those studies with a higher level of evidence or those discussing novel ideas/innovations. The summary of topics explored includes the following: the use of risk assessment scales as an adjunct in risk identification, the benefit of alternative support surfaces to aid in prevention as compared with standard hospital mattresses, effective repositioning strategies, silicone prophylactic dressing for shear reduction, microclimate control, nutritional considerations, use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injury patients, and the importance of patient participation.

  9. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation and pressure ulcer prevention after the 2005 South Asian Earthquake: a CBR case study from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishtie, Jawad; Chishtie, Farrukh; Yoshida, Karen; Balogh, Robert

    2018-03-07

    The 2005 South Asian earthquake led to large-scale injuries and disabilities in northern Pakistan, which were dealt with using various approaches. In this regard, a community-based rehabilitation approach was initiated in the Muzaffarabad district of Pakistan in early 2006, focused on preventing complications among persons with Spinal Cord Injury. This case study briefly describes its development, aims and service provision components, in addition to the distribution of injuries from the disaster. Pressure ulcer prevention education, its recall and decrease in prevalence over a year are presented as key outcomes and illuminate the process of implementing rehabilitation in this context. This case study presents findings from a larger internal program evaluation in 2010-11. The study design was cross-sectional, to elicit recall of education components and the resulting prevalence of pressure ulcers over the year, in 33 randomly selected persons with Spinal Cord Injury. Outcomes included retention of knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention, practices and reduction in the prevalence of pressure ulcers over the last year. We also conducted a narrative literature review on the types of injuries and complications in the Spinal Cord population from Northern Pakistan. Hospital cohort studies reported "spine" injuries at 5%, while persons with spinal cord injury were identified as the most underserved needing rehabilitation services after the quake. Results from the evaluation of prevention education revealed that all 33 respondents were trained in detection of pressure ulcers, while 32 recalled "danger signs" for which they would seek immediate help. All correctly recalled postural change timings, however, their actual practices differed. Twenty-seven respondents (82%) reported no pressure ulcers over the last year. The decrease in pressure ulcer prevalence over the last year in persons with spinal cord injury highlights the strengths of the community-based rehabilitation

  10. Pressure ulcer prevention in Australia: the role of the nurse practitioner in changing practice and saving lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimus, Margo; Maclellan, Lorna; Li, Pui Iris

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports on a successful nurse practitioner-led Pressure Ulcer Prevention Program (PUPP), established with members from nursing, allied health and senior management, within a regional area health service in Australia. The aims of PUPP were to quantify the prevalence of pressure ulcers within the health organisation, evaluate the policy compliances, identify cost effectiveness by implementing appropriate pressure redistributing surfaces and raise awareness of pressure ulcer prevention amongst all levels of clinical staff. The strategies include annual point prevalence study across 41 facilities, mattress replacement and online education program. The prevalence survey data were collected by skin inspection and chart audits by the trained surveyors. Since this quality improvement program commenced in 2008, it has demonstrated a reduction in pressure ulcer prevalence by 16.4%, increased pressure ulcer risk assessment by 7.9% and use of appropriate pressure-relieving devices by 46.5%, which led to cost saving of AUD 500 000. This paper highlights the patient and organisation benefits that management and clinicians can accomplish through a systemic collaborative approach, in particular with strong support from the Area Executive Team of the health organisation. © 2011 The Authors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  11. Risk assessment and prevention of pressure ulcers: a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Mir, Tanveer P; Starkey, Melissa; Denberg, Thomas D

    2015-03-03

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations based on the comparative effectiveness of risk assessment scales and preventive interventions for pressure ulcers. This guideline is based on published literature on this topic that was identified by using MEDLINE (1946 through February 2014), CINAHL (1998 through February 2014), the Cochrane Library, clinical trials registries, and reference lists. Searches were limited to English-language publications. The outcomes evaluated for this guideline include pressure ulcer incidence and severity, resource use, diagnostic accuracy, measures of risk, and harms. This guideline grades the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations by using ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians, and the target patient population is patients at risk for pressure ulcers. ACP recommends that clinicians should perform a risk assessment to identify patients who are at risk of developing pressure ulcers. (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). ACP recommends that clinicians should choose advanced static mattresses or advanced static overlays in patients who are at an increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). ACP recommends against using alternating-air mattresses or alternating-air overlays in patients who are at an increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. (Grade: weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence).

  12. Care in prevention of pressure ulcers of bedridden patients at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Laurenti M. Ayala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the catchment area of a Basic Health Unit in Joinville/SC patients bedridden at home. We aimed to characterize the risk of bedridden for developing pressure ulcers, describing the factors favorable to its emergence, and evaluate adherence to treatment prescribed to prevent this injury. This is a descriptive study. Data collection was carried out through an instrument containing identification data, clinical conditions of patients and the application of the Braden scale. It was evaluated 12 patients bedridden. The average age of the patients evaluated was 80.5 years. Most were white, with low education and dependent on public health services. All patients had some underlying disease, the most frequent the Stroke (CVA. The laid up time was 67 months (± 53. The mobility and sensory perception were completely or limited to 83% and 50% of the evaluated, respectively. 67% of users had very poor nutritional status or inadequate and 92% constantly moist or too moist skin. Low fluid intake was present for all participants. Adherence to prescribed care of the caregivers was partial. At the end of the study it was found that the findings are consistent with the literature data and the studied patients had an elevated risk for developing pressure ulcers, since the factors favorable to the appearance of the lesion showed with high frequencies.

  13. Assessment of nurses' knowledge on evidence-based preventive practices for pressure ulcer risk reduction in patients with impaired mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akese, M I; Adejumo, P O; Ilesanmi, R E; Obilor, H N

    2014-09-01

    The increase in the prevalence of pressure ulcer among patients with impaired physical mobility has currently been associated with nurses' inadequate knowledge of preventive interventions. To assess nurses' knowledge of pressure ulcer identification/staging, risk factors and evidence-based preventive practices. This descriptive study was carried out at the University Teaching Hospital Maiduguri (UMTH), Borno State, Nigeria. Total sampling technique was utilized in the recruitment of the study participants. An adapted 75-item-pressure ulcer questionnaire was used for data collection. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. The hypotheses on nurses' knowledge were tested at 0.05 level of significance using Chi square test. A total of 219 nurses participated in this study with response rate of 68.0%. The nurses' years of professional practice ranged from 1 to 35 years with a mean of 11.7 (± 7.8) years. Approximately, 73% of the nurses demonstrated a low level of knowledge of pressure ulcer identification/staging, 69.4% demonstrated an average level of knowledge of risk factors and 79.9% demonstrated high level of knowledge of preventive practices. The relationship between nurses' knowledge of risk factors and knowledge of preventive practices (p = 0.37) was not significant. Nurses demonstrated a knowledge deficit in core areas on pressure ulcer identification/staging, risk factors' assessment and evidence-based preventive practices. In order to address this dearth, there is a need to institute an educational-based practice-guideline on pressure ulcer prevention for nurses.

  14. Preventing Heel Pressure Ulcers: Sustained Quality Improvement Initiative in a Canadian Acute Care Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna-Bull, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    The setting for this quality improvement initiative designed to reduce the prevalence of facility-acquired heel pressure ulcers was a regional, acute-care, 490-bed facility in Ontario, Canada, responsible for dialysis, vascular, and orthopedic surgery. An interdisciplinary skin and wound care team designed an evidence-based quality improvement initiative based on a systematic literature review and standardization of heel offloading methods. The prevalence of heel pressure ulcers was measured at baseline (immediately prior to implementation of initiative) and at 1 and 4 years following implementation. The prevalence of facility-acquired heel pressure ulcers was 5.8% when measured before project implementation. It was 4.2% at 1 year following implementation and 1.6% when measured at the end of the 4-year initiative. Outcomes demonstrate that the initiative resulted in a continuous and sustained reduction in facility-acquired heel pressure ulcer incidence over a 4-year period.

  15. The physiological response of soft tissue to periodic repositioning as a strategy for pressure ulcer prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodhouse, M.; Worsley, P.R.; Voegeli, D.; Schoonhoven, L.; Bader, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individuals who have reduced mobility are at risk of developing pressure ulcers if they are subjected to sustained static postures. To reduce this risk, clinical guidelines advocate healthcare professionals reposition patients regularly. Automated tilting mechanisms have recently been

  16. Prevention of pressure ulcers: a descriptive study in 3 intensive care units in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Hafize; Karadag, Ayise

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive study was to describe the level of preventive care provided to intensive care unit (ICU) patients at risk for development of pressure ulcers (PU). Our study population comprised 126 nurses working at coronary ICU, cardiovascular surgery ICU, or a gastroenterology ICU of State Hospital in the Republic of Turkey. The study sample consisted of 30 nurses selected from these units using a layered sampling method. Data were collected using the following 4 forms: (1) ICU evaluation form, (2) demographic questionnaire form, (3) Braden Scale, and (4) observation form. The observation form was developed by the investigator to record PU prevention interventions made by the study nurses. Nurses were observed while giving care to patients at risk according to Braden Scale scores and each action of the nurses to prevent PU was recorded. Data were collected until 90 observations (3 observations with each of 30 nurses) were completed. Nurses did not consistently engage in interventions recommended for prevention of PU. Subjects did not consistently use the risk-evaluation scale, document position changes on the appropriate form, and train auxiliary personnel about PU prevention. The most frequently fulfilled behaviors for PU prevention were avoiding hot water when cleansing the skin, helping the patient eat, avoiding placing the patient directly on a trochanter, refraining from using improper support material, and use of pressure-redistribution surfaces. The least fulfilled behaviors were (1) application of a skin barrier or protectant on moist skin and (2) application of a moisturizer to dry or compromised skin, protecting the skin during patient transfer, repositioning, and documenting prevention interventions. This study demonstrates that critical care nurses do not consistently provide preventive care for PU.

  17. Development and psychometric validation of PUKAT 2·0, a knowledge assessment tool for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manderlier, Bénédicte; Van Damme, Nele; Vanderwee, Katrien; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a tool to measure the knowledge of nurses on pressure ulcer prevention. PUKAT 2·0 is a revised and updated version of the Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Assessment Tool (PUKAT) developed in 2010 at Ghent University, Belgium. The updated version was developed using state-of-the-art techniques to establish evidence concerning validity and reliability. Face and content validity were determined through a Delphi procedure including both experts from the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) and the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) (n = 15). A subsequent psychometric evaluation of 342 nurses and nursing students evaluated the item difficulty, discriminating power and quality of the response alternatives. Furthermore, construct validity was established through a test-retest procedure and the known-groups technique. The content validity was good and the difficulty level moderate. The discernment was found to be excellent: all groups with a (theoretically expected) higher level of expertise had a significantly higher score than the groups with a (theoretically expected) lower level of expertise. The stability of the tool is sufficient (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient = 0·69). The PUKAT 2·0 demonstrated good psychometric properties and can be used and disseminated internationally to assess knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. 77 FR 72865 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for “Mobilizing Data for Pressure Ulcer Prevention...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... the continued integration of nursing content into SNOMED CT, as well as the development of common... tool, and second, the broader goal to promote the integration of nursing content into common... integration with PHR/EHR interface Application of the HL7 Pressure Ulcer Prevention Domain Analysis Model (DAM...

  19. Pressure Ulcer Risk and Prevention Practices in Pediatric Patients: A Secondary Analysis of Data from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmus, Ivy; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about pressure ulcer prevention practice among pediatric patients. To describe the frequency of pressure ulcer risk assessment in pediatric patients and pressure ulcer prevention intervention use overall and by hospital unit type, a descriptive secondary analysis was performed of data submitted to the National Database for Nursing Quality Indicators® (NDNQI®) for at least 3 of the 4 quarters in 2012. Relevant data on pressure ulcer risk from 271 hospitals across the United States extracted from the NDNQI database included patient skin and pressure ulcer risk assessment on admission, time since the last pressure ulcer risk assessment, method used to assess pressure ulcer risk, and risk status. Extracted data on pressure ulcer prevention included skin assessment, pressure-redistribution surface use, routine repositioning, nutritional support, and moisture management. These data were organized by unit type and merged with data on hospital characteristics for the analysis. The sample included 39 984 patients ages 1 day to 18 years on 678 pediatric acute care units (general pediatrics, pediatric critical care units, neonatal intensive care units, pediatric step-down units, and pediatric rehabilitation units). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze study data. Most of the pediatric patients (33 644; 89.2%) were assessed for pressure ulcer risk within 24 hours of admission. The Braden Q Scale was frequently used to assess risk on general pediatrics units (75.4%), pediatric step-down units (85.5%), pediatric critical care units (81.3%), and pediatric rehabilitation units (56.1%). In the neonatal intensive care units, another scale or method was used more often (55% to 60%) to assess pressure ulcer risk. Of the 11 203 pediatric patients (39%) determined to be at risk for pressure ulcers, the majority (10 741, 95.8%) received some kind of pressure ulcer prevention intervention during the 24 hours preceding the NDNQI pressure ulcer survey. The frequency

  20. Pressure-redistribution surfaces for prevention of surgery-related pressure ulcers: a meta-analysis .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Yan; Chen, Hong-Lin; Xu, Xu-Juan

    2013-04-01

    Pressure-redistribution surfaces are generally recommended to prevent pressure ulcers (PUs) in high-risk patients, but their use in surgery-related PU prevention remains controversial. A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the relative preventive impact of pressure-redistribution surfaces versus standard hospital mattresses (usually a hospital-issue, foam-based mattress) on the incidence of surgery-related PUs. Systematic literature searches were performed using the terms pressure ulcer, operation, surgery, mattress, foam, polymer, pad, overlay, surface, and interface. Country, race, language, and publication year of articles was not restricted; randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials were eligible for analysis. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for surgery-related PU incidence in patients using support surfaces versus standard mattress were calculated by random-effects model. Of the 316 studies identified, 10 involving a total of 1,895 patients were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Seven studies were randomized, controlled and three were quasi-randomized controlled trials. Patients who were provided a support surface had a significantly decreased incidence of surgery-related PUs (OR 0.31 [95% CI 0.17-0.59]) compared to patients using a standard mattress. Subgroup analysis showed pressure-redistribution surfaces used intra-operatively did not decrease the incidence of surgery-related PUs (OR 0.59, [95% CI 0.34-1.01]), but PU incidence decreased with postoperative (OR 0.07 [95% CI 0.01-0.49]) as well as with intra-operative and postoperative use (OR 0.20 [95% CI 0.06-0.73]). Funnel plot diagrams suggest a minimal risk of bias. Sensitivity analysis did not materially change the result of the main metaanalysis. Postoperative use of pressure-redistribution surfaces can effectively decrease the incidence of surgery-related PUs, but evidence to substantiate intra-operative use is insufficient. Patients at high risk for surgery

  1. Evaluation of Cueing Innovation for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Using Staff Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Tracey L; Kennerly, Susan; Corazzini, Kirsten; Porter, Kristie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth A

    2014-07-25

    The purpose of the manuscript is to describe long-term care (LTC) staff perceptions of a music cueing intervention designed to improve staff integration of pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention guidelines regarding consistent and regular movement of LTC residents a minimum of every two hours. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI) model guided staff interviews about their perceptions of the intervention's characteristics, outcomes, and sustainability. This was a qualitative, observational study of staff perceptions of the PrU prevention intervention conducted in Midwestern U.S. LTC facilities (N = 45 staff members). One focus group was held in each of eight intervention facilities using a semi-structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, and summaries for each category were compared across groups. The a priori codes (observability, trialability, compatibility, relative advantage and complexity) described the innovation characteristics, and the sixth code, sustainability, was identified in the data. Within each code, two themes emerged as a positive or negative response regarding characteristics of the innovation. Moreover, within the sustainability code, a third theme emerged that was labeled "brainstormed ideas", focusing on strategies for improving the innovation. Cueing LTC staff using music offers a sustainable potential to improve PrU prevention practices, to increase resident movement, which can subsequently lead to a reduction in PrUs.

  2. Evaluation of Cueing Innovation for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Using Staff Focus Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey L. Yap

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the manuscript is to describe long-term care (LTC staff perceptions of a music cueing intervention designed to improve staff integration of pressure ulcer (PrU prevention guidelines regarding consistent and regular movement of LTC residents a minimum of every two hours. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI model guided staff interviews about their perceptions of the intervention’s characteristics, outcomes, and sustainability. Methods: This was a qualitative, observational study of staff perceptions of the PrU prevention intervention conducted in Midwestern U.S. LTC facilities (N = 45 staff members. One focus group was held in each of eight intervention facilities using a semi-structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, and summaries for each category were compared across groups. Results: The a priori codes (observability, trialability, compatibility, relative advantage and complexity described the innovation characteristics, and the sixth code, sustainability, was identified in the data. Within each code, two themes emerged as a positive or negative response regarding characteristics of the innovation. Moreover, within the sustainability code, a third theme emerged that was labeled “brainstormed ideas”, focusing on strategies for improving the innovation. Implications: Cueing LTC staff using music offers a sustainable potential to improve PrU prevention practices, to increase resident movement, which can subsequently lead to a reduction in PrUs.

  3. Cost effectiveness of an air-inflated static overlay for pressure ulcer prevention: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermette, Sophie; Reeves, Isabelle; Lemaire, Jacques

    2012-08-01

     Numerous pressure-relieving surfaces of varying costs are available for the prevention of pressure ulcers. There is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions regarding the efficacy or merits of using more expensive technologies. The purpose of this unblinded, randomized, prospective study was to compare the clinical and the cost effectiveness of an inflated overlay with rented, pressure-relieving surfaces for the prevention of pressure ulcers. Patients in a 257-bed acute care facility were included if they had a Braden score of ≤ 14, had no skin lesion(s), were ≥ 18 years, weighed pressure ulcers and comfort; Fisher's exact and chi- squared tests were used to assess categorical data, and unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney statistic tests were used to compare continuous variables. Comparative cost of support surface use was determined at the end of the study. In the control group, 50 patients used an MSO and 5 patients used an LALDM; in the experimental group, 55 patients used an ISO. No significant difference in pressure ulcer incidence was found between the control (n = 6) and experimental groups (n = 2) (11% versus 4%, respectively; P = 0.2706), and there was no significant difference in comfort (90% versus 85%; P = 0.7129). However, a significant difference was noted in total cost ($13,606 CAD versus $3,364 CAD, P ≤ 0.001); the ISO was less expensive. The use of an ISO offers a cost-effective option for the prevention of pressure ulcers in a moderate to very high-risk population. .

  4. Could lateral tilt mattresses be the answer to pressure ulcer prevention and management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Sylvie

    2017-03-01

    Pressure ulcers have been part of illness for thousands of years and are not reducing in number. Traditionally, since the Crimean War, patients have been ritually repositioned every 2 hours, regardless of the individual need. Pressure ulcers occur mainly on bony prominences, and so it makes sense to reposition into the 30 degree tilt, off of bony prominences. Nevertheless, this still takes time in order to reposition on a regular basis. It is time to look at automatic repositioning, reducing nursing time, increasing patient comfort and releasing carers to provide more social support to the patients.

  5. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  6. Approaches that use software to support the prevention of pressure ulcer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchione, F G; Araújo, L M Q; Araújo, L V

    2015-10-01

    The incidence and costs for pressure ulcer (PU) treatment remain high even though preventive methods are applied. Approaches that use software to support the prevention of PU are presented in the literature to make it more effective. Identify the state of art of the approaches that use software to support the prevention of PUs. A systematic literature review was performed to analyze approaches that use software to support the prevention of PU. ACM, IEEE, PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL and Embase databases have been searched with a predetermined search string to identify primary studies. We selected the ones that met the established inclusion criteria. Thirty-six articles met the inclusion criteria. To support prevention, most approaches monitor the patient to provide information about exposure to pressure, temperature level, humidity level and estimated body position in bed providing risk factor intensity charts and intensity maps. The main method to perform patient's monitoring is using sensors installed on the mattress, but recently, alternative methods have been proposed such as electronic sensors and tactile sensory coils. Part of the approaches performs automated management of the risk factors using ventilation tubes and mattresses with porous cells to decrease body's temperature and movable cells to automatically redistribute the pressure over the body. Matters as cost of the approach, patient comfort and hygiene of the monitoring equipment is only briefly discussed in the selected articles. No experiments have been conducted to evidence the approached may reduce PU incidence. Currently, approaches that use software to support the prevention of PU provide relevant information to health professionals such as risk factor intensity charts and intensity maps. Some of them can even automatically manage risk factors in a limited way. Yet, the approaches are based on risk factor monitoring methods that require patient's contact with the monitoring equipment. Therefore, some

  7. Pressure ulcer prevalence and perceptions on prevention: a hospital-wide survey of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alison L; Walia, Gurjot S; Bello, Ricardo; Aquino, Carla S; Sacks, Justin M

    2018-04-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) remain a problem despite numerous prevention initiatives. To understand why, it is necessary to know health professionals' perceptions regarding the importance of prevention, and the usability of current initiatives. We hypothesised that positive perceptions of existing initiatives would not be correlated with low HAPU prevalence, and that health professionals would perceive the initiatives to have a low usability. A two-part, online survey was developed and distributed electronically to nurses, in-training physicians and attending physicians, across all inpatient and perioperative departments of an academic hospital. Part one of the survey was the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Staff Attitude Scale on beliefs regarding PU prevention; part two was additional questions on the usability of existing preventative initiatives. The results of the survey were compared with quarterly HAPU prevalence data by hospital unit. In total, 839 health professionals completed the survey (579 nurses, 131 residents, 119 attending physicians). The mean score for the AHRQ survey was 42.5 (≥40 denoting positive perceptions). There was a moderate correlation between AHRQ scores and prevalence of HAPUs (r=-0.60, p=0.402). For usability, repositioning was felt to be the most effective intervention (mean: 4.54, standard deviation (SD): 0.64), while educational posters were felt to be the least effective (mean: 3.31, SD: 0.99). Respondents generally rated satisfaction much lower, with no single initiative significantly better than the others (range: 3.21-3.79). Perceived effectiveness and satisfaction were all positively correlated. High HAPU prevalence, despite position perceptions, suggests that prevention methods are not as effective as thought, or they are not being used as widely as they should. Further research should take advantage of positive attitudes by prospectively investigating the usability of novel interventions.

  8. Comprehensive programs for preventing pressure ulcers: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhauser, Andrea; VanDeusen Lukas, Carol; Parker, Victoria; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Zulkowski, Karen; Berlowitz, Dan

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the evidence supporting the combined use of interventions to prevent pressure ulcers (PrUs) in acute care and long-term-care facilities. A systematic review of the literature describing multifaceted PrU prevention programs was performed. Articles were included if they described an intervention implemented in acute care settings or long-term-care facilities, incorporated more than 1 intervention component, involved a multidisciplinary team, and included information about outcomes related to the intervention. Twenty-four studies were identified. Recurring components used in the development and implementation of PrU prevention programs included preparations prior to the start of a program, PrU prevention best practices, staff education, clinical monitoring and feedback, skin care champions, and cues to action. Ten studies reported PrU prevalence rates; 9 of them reported decreased prevalence rates at the end of their programs. Of the 6 studies reporting PrU incidence rates, 5 reported a decrease in incidence rates. Four studies measured care processes: 1 study reported an overall improvement; 2 studies reported improvement on some, but not all, measures; and 1 study reported no change. There is a growing literature describing multipronged, multidisciplinary interventions to prevent PrUs in acute care settings and long-term-care facilities. Outcomes reported in these studies suggest that such programs can be successful in reducing PrU prevalence or incidence rates. However, to strengthen the level of evidence, sites should be encouraged to rigorously evaluate their programs and to publish their results.

  9. Support surfaces for intraoperative prevention of pressure ulcers in patients undergoing surgery: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ba'; Teague, Laura; Mahoney, James; Goodman, Laurie; Paulden, Mike; Poss, Jeff; Li, Jianli; Sikich, Nancy Joan; Lourenco, Rosemarie; Ieraci, Luciano; Carcone, Steven; Krahn, Murray

    2011-07-01

    Patients who undergo prolonged surgical procedures are at risk of developing pressure ulcers. Recent systematic reviews suggest that pressure redistribution overlays on operating tables significantly decrease the associated risk. Little is known about the cost effectiveness of using these overlays in a prevention program for surgical patients. Using a Markov cohort model, we evaluated the cost effectiveness of an intraoperative prevention strategy with operating table overlays made of dry, viscoelastic polymer from the perspective of a health care payer over a 1-year period. We simulated patients undergoing scheduled surgical procedures lasting ≥90 min in the supine or lithotomy position. Compared with the current practice of using standard mattresses on operating tables, the intraoperative prevention strategy decreased the estimated intraoperative incidence of pressure ulcers by 0.51%, corresponding to a number-needed-to-treat of 196 patients. The average cost of using the operating table overlay was $1.66 per patient. Compared with current practice, this intraoperative prevention strategy would increase slightly the quality-adjusted life days of patients and by decreasing the incidence of pressure ulcers, this strategy would decrease both hospital and home care costs for treating fewer pressure ulcers originated intraoperatively. The cost savings was $46 per patient, which ranged from $13 to $116 by different surgical populations. Intraoperative prevention was 99% likely to be more cost effective than the current practice. In patients who undergo scheduled surgical procedures lasting ≥90 min, this intraoperative prevention strategy could improve patients' health and save hospital costs. The clinical and economic evidence support the implementation of this prevention strategy in settings where it has yet to become current practice. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of a pilot Pressure Ulcer Prevention Initiative (PUPI) for patients with traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, J E; Bélanger, L M A; Park, S E; Shen, T; Rivers, C S; Dvorak, M F; Street, J T; Noonan, V K

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether implementation of a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Initiative (PUPI) changed the assessment and treatment of patients with a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in an acute care setting, and improved patient outcomes. The success of implementation was evaluated by examining the percentage of patients with completed occupational therapist (OT) skin care assessments and prescriptions for therapeutic support surfaces (TSS; i.e., mattresses) before implementation (historical, cohort 1) and after implementation (experimental, cohort 2). Patient outcomes were evaluated by examining changes in PU incidence, severity, timing and recurrence, as well as PU prevalence and satisfaction with life in the community. Final analysis included 70 patients in cohort 1 and 73 in cohort 2. OT skin care assessment documentation (31% to 60%; pprevention but no statistically significant improvements in PU-related patient outcomes were demonstrated. Results from this study identified facilitators and barriers to implementation and highlighted the complexity and difficulty of instituting effective preventative or therapeutic interventions for this population in an acute care setting. This information will assist with refinements of the PUPI and inform similar future initiatives.

  11. Effectiveness of pressure ulcer prevention strategies for adult patients in intensive care units: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyib, Nahla; Coyer, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of pressure ulcer (PU) prevention strategies on the incidence of hospital-acquired PUs in the intensive care unit (ICU).More specifically, the objectives are to identify the effectiveness of utilizing PU prevention strategies such as risk assessment, skin assessment, skin care, nutrition, position and repositioning, education and training, medical devices care or other strategies designed to manage the risk factors for PU development and reduce the incidence of PUs in ICUs.

  12. Multicenter comparison of the efficacy on prevention of pressure ulcer in postoperative patients between two types of pressure-relieving mattresses in China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Qixia; Li, Xiaohua; Zhang, Aiqin; Guo, Yanxia; Liu, Yahong; Liu, Haiying; Qu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Yajun; Guo, Xiujun; Liu, Li; Zhang, Liyan; Bo, Suping; Jia, Jing; Chen, Yuejuan; Zhang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Present study is designed to evaluate the effects of preventing pressure ulcer in surgical patients with two types of pressure-relieving mattresses. Methods: 1074 surgical patients from 12 hospitals in China were divided into A group (static air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours, n = 562) and B group (power pressure air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours, n = 512). The patient was subjected to a pressure-relieving mattress and observed from 0-5 days after surgery. In...

  13. Advancing a smart air cushion system for preventing pressure ulcers using projection Moiré for large deformation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheng-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Lee, Carina Jean-Tien; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    A pressure ulcer is one of the most important concerns for wheelchair bound patients with spinal cord injuries. A pressure ulcer is a localized injury near the buttocks that bear ischial tuberosity oppression over a long period of time. Due to elevated compression to blood vessels, the surrounding tissues suffer from a lack of oxygen and nutrition. The ulcers eventually lead to skin damage followed by tissue necrosis. The current medical strategy is to minimize the occurrence of pressure ulcers by regularly helping patients change their posture. However, these methods do not always work effectively or well. As a solution to fundamentally prevent pressure ulcers, a smart air cushion system was developed to detect and control pressure actively. The air cushion works by automatically adjusting a patient's sitting posture to effectively relieve the buttock pressure. To analyze the correlation between the dynamic pressure profiles of an air cell with a patient's weight, a projection Moiré system was adopted to measure the deformation of an air cell and its associated stress distribution. Combining a full-field deformation imaging with air pressure measured within an air cell, the patient's weight and the stress distribution can be simultaneously obtained. By integrating a full-field optical metrology with a time varying pressure sensor output coupled with different active air control algorithms for various designs, we can tailor the ratio of the air cells. Our preliminary data suggests that this newly developed smart air cushion has the potential to selectively reduce localized compression on the tissues at the buttocks. Furthermore, it can take a patient's weight which is an additional benefit so that medical personnel can reference it to prescribe the correct drug dosages.

  14. Prevention of falls, malnutrition and pressure ulcers among older persons - nursing staff's experiences of a structured preventive care process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannering, Christina; Ernsth Bravell, Marie; Johansson, Linda

    2017-05-01

    A structured and systematic care process for preventive work, aimed to reduce falls, pressure ulcers and malnutrition among older people, has been developed in Sweden. The process involves risk assessment, team-based interventions and evaluation of results. Since development, this structured work process has become web-based and has been implemented in a national quality registry called 'Senior Alert' and used countrywide. The aim of this study was to describe nursing staff's experience of preventive work by using the structured preventive care process as outlined by Senior Alert. Eight focus group interviews were conducted during 2015 including staff from nursing homes and home-based nursing care in three municipalities. The interview material was subjected to qualitative content analysis. In this study, both positive and negative opinions were expressed about the process. The systematic and structured work flow seemed to only partly facilitate care providers to improve care quality by making better clinical assessments, performing team-based planned interventions and learning from results. Participants described lack of reliability in the assessments and varying opinions about the structure. Furthermore, organisational structures limited the preventive work. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Multicenter comparison of the efficacy on prevention of pressure ulcer in postoperative patients between two types of pressure-relieving mattresses in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qixia; Li, Xiaohua; Zhang, Aiqin; Guo, Yanxia; Liu, Yahong; Liu, Haiying; Qu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Yajun; Guo, Xiujun; Liu, Li; Zhang, Liyan; Bo, Suping; Jia, Jing; Chen, Yuejuan; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Present study is designed to evaluate the effects of preventing pressure ulcer in surgical patients with two types of pressure-relieving mattresses. Methods: 1074 surgical patients from 12 hospitals in China were divided into A group (static air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours, n = 562) and B group (power pressure air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours, n = 512). The patient was subjected to a pressure-relieving mattress and observed from 0-5 days after surgery. Indications include the Braden scores, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) incidence and stage. Results: The Braden scores between two groups in five days after surgery were no significant (P > 0.05). The incidence of HAPU between two groups in same days also was no significant (1.07% vs. 0.98%, P > 0.05). The incidence of Stage I and stage II pressure ulcers in group A and B were 1.07% (6/562) and 0.98% (5/512), respectively (χ2 = 0.148, P = 0.882). Conclusion: The effects of preventing pressure ulcer in surgical patients with two types of pressure-relieving mattresses are similar, but the protocol by static air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours is benefit when no power. PMID:25356144

  16. Multicenter comparison of the efficacy on prevention of pressure ulcer in postoperative patients between two types of pressure-relieving mattresses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qixia; Li, Xiaohua; Zhang, Aiqin; Guo, Yanxia; Liu, Yahong; Liu, Haiying; Qu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Yajun; Guo, Xiujun; Liu, Li; Zhang, Liyan; Bo, Suping; Jia, Jing; Chen, Yuejuan; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Present study is designed to evaluate the effects of preventing pressure ulcer in surgical patients with two types of pressure-relieving mattresses. 1074 surgical patients from 12 hospitals in China were divided into A group (static air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours, n = 562) and B group (power pressure air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours, n = 512). The patient was subjected to a pressure-relieving mattress and observed from 0-5 days after surgery. Indications include the Braden scores, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) incidence and stage. The Braden scores between two groups in five days after surgery were no significant (P > 0.05). The incidence of HAPU between two groups in same days also was no significant (1.07% vs. 0.98%, P > 0.05). The incidence of Stage I and stage II pressure ulcers in group A and B were 1.07% (6/562) and 0.98% (5/512), respectively (χ(2) = 0.148, P = 0.882). The effects of preventing pressure ulcer in surgical patients with two types of pressure-relieving mattresses are similar, but the protocol by static air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours is benefit when no power.

  17. Process evaluation of a cluster-randomised trial testing a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shelley; McInnes, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Wallis, Marianne; Banks, Merrilyn; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-02-13

    As pressure ulcers contribute to significant patient burden and increased health care costs, their prevention is a clinical priority. Our team developed and tested a complex intervention, a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle promoting patient participation in care, in a cluster-randomised trial. The UK Medical Research Council recommends process evaluation of complex interventions to provide insight into why they work or fail and how they might be improved. This study aimed to evaluate processes underpinning implementation of the intervention and explore end-users' perceptions of it, in order to give a deeper understanding of its effects. A pre-specified, mixed-methods process evaluation was conducted as an adjunct to the main trial, guided by a framework for process evaluation of cluster-randomised trials. Data was collected across eight Australian hospitals but mainly focused on the four intervention hospitals. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected across the evaluation domains: recruitment, reach, intervention delivery and response to intervention, at both cluster and individual patient level. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. In the context of the main trial, which found a 42% reduction in risk of pressure ulcer with the intervention that was not significant after adjusting for clustering and covariates, this process evaluation provides important insights. Recruitment and reach among clusters and individuals was high, indicating that patients, nurses and hospitals are willing to engage with a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle. Of 799 intervention patients in the trial, 96.7% received the intervention, which took under 10 min to deliver. Patients and nurses accepted the care bundle, recognising benefits to it and describing how it enabled participation in pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) care. This process evaluation found no major failures

  18. Investigation of knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of nursing staff in oncology hospital regarding the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Vangelatou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Approximately 300 million people, 3% of the world population, need palliative care or terminal care each year, including prevention and care of pressure ulcers. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, practices and attitudes of nurses of an oncology hospital in Greece on the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study in an Oncology Hospital of Athens. The study population was nurses and their assistants working in the particular hospital. Data collection was conducted by using a specially designed research tool. In total, 150 questionnaires were distributed and 115 were collected (response rate 76.7%. The study lasted 6 months (from July 2016 to December 2016. The statistical analysis was performed with the statistical program SPSS for Windows (version 21 statistical software. Results: The study sample consisted of 115 nurses and their assistants, age 41.6 (±6.8 years old. The average length of employment of the participants was 17.1(±7.5 years. Of the total sample, 16 (13.9% participants reported that the hospital they work organize training seminars/courses for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Almost all participants (99.1% answered correctly to the definition of pressure ulcers. Only 42.6% of the respondents answered correctly for the best position to prevent pressure sores, while most answered correctly to the questions concerning the risk factors for the development of pressure ulcers. About half of participants (48 reported that the clinic they work use an assessment scale for pressure ulcers and 35 (72.9% participants completed it once a day. On the total of 27 questions, the correct answers given by respondents were 20.9 (±2.8 or 77.7% with a minimum of 8 (29.6% and maximum 27 (100% correct answers. Conclusions: Although oncology patients often experience problems with depression, however, the hospital did not seem to systematically

  19. Pressure ulcers: treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Madhuri

    2015-12-11

    Unrelieved pressure or friction of the skin, particularly over bony prominences, can lead to pressure ulcers in up to one third of people in hospitals or community care, and one fifth of nursing home residents. Pressure ulcers are more likely in people with reduced mobility and poor skin condition, such as older people or those with vascular disease. We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with pressure ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2014 (Clinical Evidence overviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this overview). At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 307 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 203 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 163 studies and the further review of 40 full publications. Of the 40 full articles evaluated, seven systematic reviews and two RCTs were added at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for 15 PICO combinations. In this systematic overview, we categorised the efficacy for 15 interventions based on information about the effectiveness and safety of air-fluidised supports, alternating-pressure surfaces (including mattresses), debridement, dressings, electrotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen, low-air-loss beds, low-level laser therapy, low-tech constant-low-pressure supports, nutritional supplements, seat cushions, surgery, therapeutic ultrasound, topical negative pressure, and topical phenytoin.

  20. Preventing pressure ulcers in hospitals: A systematic review of nurse-focused quality improvement interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soban, Lynn M; Hempel, Susanne; Munjas, Brett A; Miles, Jeremy; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2011-06-01

    A systematic review of the literature on nurse-focused interventions conducted in the hospital setting informs the evidence base for implementation of pressure ulcer (PU) prevention programs. Despite the availability of published guidelines, there is little evidence about which interventions can be successfully integrated into routine care through quality improvement (QI). The two previous literature syntheses on PU prevention have included articles from multiple settings but have not focused specifically on QI. A search of six electronic databases for publications from January 1990 to September 2009 was conducted. Trial registries and bibliographies of retrieved studies and reviews, and Internet sites of funding agencies were also searched. Using standardized forms, two independent reviewers screened publications for eligibility into the sample; data were abstracted and study quality was assessed for those that passed screening. Thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Most of them used a before-and-after study design in a single site. Intervention strategies included PU-specific changes in combination with educational and/or QI strategies. Most studies reported patient outcome measures, while fewer reported nursing process of care measures. For nearly all the studies, the authors concluded that the intervention had a positive effect. The pooled risk difference for developing PUs was -.07 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.0976, -0.0418) comparing the pre- and postintervention status. Future research can build the evidence base for implementation through an increased emphasis on understanding the mechanisms by which improved outcomes are achieved and describing the conditions under which specific intervention strategies are likely to succeed or fail.

  1. Improving Outcomes by Implementing a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Program (PUPP): Going beyond the Basics

    OpenAIRE

    Amparo Cano; Debbie Anglade; Hope Stamp; Fortunata Joaquin; Jennifer A. Lopez; Lori Lupe; Steven P. Schmidt; Daniel L. Young

    2015-01-01

    A multidisciplinary process improvement program was initiated at the University of Miami Hospital (UMH) in 2009 to identify the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) at the institution and to implement interventions to reduce the incidence of HAPU. This deliberate and thoughtful committee-driven process evaluated care, monitored results, and designed evidence-based strategic initiatives to manage and reduce the rate of HAPU. As a result all inpatient beds were replaced with s...

  2. The physiological response of soft tissue to periodic repositioning as a strategy for pressure ulcer prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Woodhouse, Marjolein; Worsley, Peter; Voegeli, David; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Bader, Dan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: individuals who have reduced mobility are at risk of developing pressure ulcers if they are subjected to sustained static postures. To reduce this risk, clinical guidelines advocate healthcare professionals reposition patients regularly. Automated tilting mechanisms have recently been introduced to provide periodic repositioning. This study compared the performance of such a prototype mattress to conventional manual repositioning.Methods: ten healthy participants (7 male and 3 fem...

  3. Systematic review of the use of Statistical Process Control methods to measure the success of pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michael; Young, Trudie; Fallon, Maureen

    2018-02-15

    Successful prevention of pressure ulcers is the end product of a complex series of care processes including, but not limited to, the assessment of vulnerability to pressure damage; skin assessment and care; nutritional support; repositioning; and the use of beds, mattresses, and cushions to manage mechanical loads on the skin and soft tissues. The purpose of this review was to examine where and how Statistical Process Control (SPC) measures have been used to assess the success of quality improvement initiatives intended to improve pressure ulcer prevention. A search of 7 electronic bibliographic databases was performed on May 17th, 2017, for studies that met the inclusion criteria. SPC methods have been reported in 9 publications since 2010 to interpret changes in the incidence of pressure ulcers over time. While these methods offer rapid interpretation of changes in incidence than is gained from a comparison of 2 arbitrarily selected time points pre- and post-implementation of change, more work is required to ensure that the clinical and scientific communities adopt the most appropriate SPC methods. © 2018 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The minimum data set pressure ulcer indicator: does it reflect differences in care processes related to pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in nursing homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates-Jensen, Barbara M; Cadogan, Mary; Osterweil, Dan; Levy-Storms, Lené; Jorge, Jennifer; Al-Samarrai, Nahla; Grbic, Valena; Schnelle, John F

    2003-09-01

    To determine whether nursing homes (NHs) that score in the extreme quartiles of pressure ulcer (PU) prevalence as reported on the Minimum Data Set (MDS) PU quality indicator provide different PU care. Descriptive, cohort. Sixteen NHs. Three hundred twenty-nine NH residents at risk for PU development as determined by the PU Resident Assessment Protocol of the MDS. : Sixteen care process quality indicators (10 specific to PU care processes, five related to nutrition, and one related to incontinence management) were scored using medical record data, direct human observation, interviews, and data from wireless thigh movement monitors. There were no differences between homes with low- and high-PU prevalence rates reported on the MDS PU quality indicator on most care processes. NHs with high PU prevalence rates used pressure-reduction surfaces more frequently and were better at documentation of four wound characteristics when PUs were present. No measure of PU care processes was better in low-PU NHs. Neither low- nor high-PU prevalence NHs routinely repositioned residents every 2 hours, even though 2-hour repositioning was documented in the medical record for nearly all residents. The assumption that homes with fewer PUs and thus low PU prevalence according to the MDS PU quality indicator are providing better PU care was not supported in this sample. NHs that scored low on the MDS PU quality indicator did not provide significantly better care than NHs that scored high. All NHs could improve PU prevention, as evidenced by the poor performance on prevention care processes by low- and high-PU NHs. The MDS PU quality indicator is not a useful measure of the quality of PU care in NHs and can be misleading if not presented with an explanation of the meaning of the indicator.

  5. An ex vivo porcine skin model to evaluate pressure-reducing devices of different mechanical properties used for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ching-Yan C; Holmes, David F; Thomason, Helen A; Stephenson, Christian; Derby, Brian; Hardman, Matthew J

    2016-11-01

    Pressure ulcers are complex wounds caused by pressure- and shear-induced trauma to skin and underlying tissues. Pressure-reducing devices, such as dressings, have been shown to successfully reduce pressure ulcer incidence, when used in adjunct to pressure ulcer preventative care. While pressure-reducing devices are available in a range of materials, with differing mechanical properties, understanding of how a material's mechanical properties will influence clinical efficacy remains limited. The aim of this study was to establish a standardized ex vivo model to allow comparison of the cell protection potential of two gel-like pressure-reducing devices with differing mechanical properties (elastic moduli of 77 vs. 35 kPa). The devices also displayed differing energy dissipation under compressive loading, and resisted strain differently under constant load in compressive creep tests. To evaluate biological efficacy we employed a new ex vivo porcine skin model, with a confirmed elastic moduli closely matching that of human skin (113 vs. 119 kPa, respectively). Static loads up to 20 kPa were applied to porcine skin ex vivo with subsequent evaluation of pressure-induced cell death and cytokine release. Pressure application alone increased the percentage of epidermal apoptotic cells from less than 2% to over 40%, and increased cellular secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. Co-application of a pressure-reducing device significantly reduced both cellular apoptosis and cytokine production, protecting against cellular damage. These data reveal new insight into the relationship between mechanical properties of pressure-reducing devices and their biological effects. After appropriate validation of these results in clinical pressure ulcer prevention with all tissue layers present between the bony prominence and external surface, this ex vivo porcine skin model could be widely employed to optimize design and evaluation of devices aimed at reducing pressure

  6. Practices and outcomes: pressure ulcer management in nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Mary Pat; Nelson, Francine; Slomka, Jacquelyn; Persson, Diane; Cron, Stanley G; Bergstrom, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare reported pressure ulcer prevention and treatment practices in nursing facilities with high prevalence of pressure ulcers versus nursing facilities with low prevalence of pressure ulcers. A 26-item survey on implementation of nationally accepted standards for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment was mailed to directors of nursing in all 68 nursing facilities in an urban county. There were no statistically significant differences on reported pressure ulcer prevention interventions based on pressure ulcer prevalence. When treating pressure ulcers, respondents of facilities with high prevalence of pressure ulcers reported more frequent pain assessments, more frequent use of low air-loss beds, and daily wound assessments. The study failed to support the hypothesis that nursing facilities with low prevalence of pressure ulcers report using more guideline-recommended pressure ulcer prevention and treatment interventions than facilities with high prevalence of pressure ulcers. Reported adherence to recommended interventions for repositioning and pressure relief measures, moisture management, and attention to nutrition exceeded 60% in all facilities. The disparity between reported interventions and pressure ulcer prevalence rates offers an opportunity for future collaborative quality improvement projects, research, and the need for leadership to develop systems of care to ensure the use of pressure ulcer prevention guidelines.

  7. [PRESSURE ULCER – WHAT’S NEW]?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, M; Novinščak, T

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is defined as a wound resulting from tissue ischemia due to prolonged continuous pressure on the protruding parts of the body. Pressure ulcer is a significant health problem that more often affects the elderly and disabled. It can be noticed that a large number of patients who end up on prolonged and severe treatment are released from the hospital to home care without or with mild degree pressure ulcers. Therefore, the conclusion is that patient care in hospital conditions is satisfactory. It is important to emphasize the importance of maintaining the same level of care for patients at a high risk of pressure ulcers, considering all recommendations and innovations in preventing development of pressure ulcers.

  8. Creating a pressure ulcer prevention algorithm: systematic review and face validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijswijk, Lia; Beitz, Janice M

    2013-11-01

    Pressure ulcer (PU) prevention is a care imperative supported by substantive evidence, but translating that knowledge into clinical decision-making at the point of care remains challenging. The purpose of this study was to create a succinct, evidence-based algorithm for inclusion in an existing industry-sponsored, evidence-based wound care program that will: 1) help clinicians assess and document overall patient PU risk; 2) help clinicians assess and address modifiable PU risk factors; and 3) guide clinicians toward an evidence-based protocol of care for patients with impaired skin integrity. First, using a systematic literature review and the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT), a one-page algorithm containing 26 distinct decision points/steps was developed with study quality ratings for all publications identified. Second, based on the quality-of-evidence ratings, the strength of each recommendation was obtained for each decision point/ step. Lastly, face validation and subsequent instrument revision based on analytic input occurred. Twelve (12) wound care experts were asked to review each decision step and rate its appropriateness/relevance on a 4-point Likert scale, where 1 = not relevant/appropriate and 4 = very relevant and appropriate. Average scores and a content validity index (CVI) were calculated for the algorithm and each individual component. Two components, the use of high-quality foam and medical grade sheepskin for at-risk patients, had sufficient evidence to receive an A strength of recommendation. However, the latter had a very low CVI (0.18). One other step, frequency of assessment for current or recent history of limited mobility (B strength of recommendation), had a low CVI (0.7). The overall literature-based level of evidence was good, but overall evidence gaps remain. The overall mean score was 3.6 (SD 0.8) with a CVI of 0.89 (out of 1). Both scores indicate strong face validity. This is the first PU prevention algorithm based on

  9. Study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of a comprehensive pressure ulcer prevention programme for private for-profit nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Enid Wai-yung; Lee, Paul Hong; Yeung, Kwan-mo

    2016-01-18

    Because the demand for government-subsidized nursing homes in Hong Kong outstrips the supply, the number of for-profit private nursing homes has been increasing rapidly. However, the standard of care in such homes is always criticized. Pressure ulcers are a major long-term care issue that is closely associated with the quality of care delivered in nursing home settings. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a pressure ulcer prevention programme for residents in private for-profit nursing homes. This is a two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial with an estimated sample size of 1088 residents and 74 care staff from eight for-profit private nursing homes. Eligible nursing homes will be those classified as category A2 homes in the Enhanced Bought Place Scheme (EBPS), having a capacity of around 130-150 beds, and no structured PU prevention protocol and/or programmes in place. Care staff will be health workers, personal care workers, and nurses who are front-line staff providing direct care to residents. Eight nursing homes will be randomly assigned to either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will be provided with an intensive training programme and will be involved in the implementation of a 16-week pressure ulcer prevention protocol, while the control group will deliver the usual pressure ulcer prevention care. The study outcomes are the pressure ulcer prevention knowledge and skills of the care staff and the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers. Data on the knowledge and skills of care staff, and prevalence of pressure ulcer will be collected at the base line, and then at the 8(th) week and at completion of the implementation of the protocol. The assessment of the incidence of pressures will start from before the commencement of the intensive training course to the end of the implementation of the protocol. In view of the negative impact of pressure ulcers, it is important to have an effective and evidence

  10. A comparison between the use of intravenous bags and the Heelift suspension boot to prevent pressure ulcers in orthopedic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Isabel

    2012-03-01

    The heel is the second most common area where patients develop pressure ulcers (PrUs). Some of the interventions commonly used today to prevent PrUs have not been empirically tested, whereas other interventions have been studied and shown to prevent heel PrUs. Currently, there are no specific studies comparing a pressure-relieving suspension boot with the use of intravenous bags. This quasi-experimental study compared the use of these interventions to determine which intervention was more effective for heel-pressure relief. The target population consisted of a convenience sample of 30 patients admitted to the hospital for hip or knee surgery. Subjects were randomized to intravenous bags or pressure-relieving suspension boots. Daily pressure assessment of heels and the Achilles area was completed using validated pressure scales. Data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical program and were then used to determine the extent to which signs and symptoms of pressure were associated with each intervention. The results demonstrated a significant difference between the pressure-relieving suspension boot and the intravenous bag as heel-pressure-relief methods. Based on the statistical results of this study, the pressure-relieving suspension boot (Heelift; DM Systems Inc, Evanston, Illinois) was the better clinical intervention for patients with decreased mobility.

  11. Using hospital administrative data to evaluate the knowledge-to-action gap in pressure ulcer preventive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herck, Pieter; Sermeus, Walter; Jylha, Virpi; Michiels, Dominik; Van den Heede, Koen

    2009-04-01

    Issues of overuse, underuse and misuse are paramount and lead to avoidable morbidity and mortality. Although evidence-based practice is advocated, the widespread implementation of this kind of practice remains a challenge. This is also the case for evidence-based practice related to the prevention of pressure ulcers, which varies widely in process and outcome in Belgian hospital care. One major obstacle to bridging this knowledge-to-action gap is data availability. We propose using large-scale hospital administrative data combined with the latest evidence-based methods as part of the solution to this problem. To test our proposal, we applied this approach to pressure ulcer prevention, using an administrative dataset with regard to 6030 patients in 22 Belgian hospitals as a sample of nationally available data. Methods include a systematic review approach, evidence grading, recommendations formulation, algorithm construction, programming of the rule set and application on the database. We found that Belgian hospitals frequently failed to provide appropriate prevention care. Significant levels of underuse, up to 28.4% in pressure ulcer prevention education and 17.5% in the use of dynamic systems mattresses, were detected. Figures for overuse were mostly not significant. Misuse couldn't be assessed. These results demonstrate that this approach can indeed be successfully used to bridge the knowledge-to-action gap in medical practice, by implementing an innovative method to assess underuse and overuse in hospital care. The integrative use of administrative data and clinical applications should be replicated in other patient groups, other datasets and other countries.

  12. Implementing trials of complex interventions in community settings: The USC – Rancho Los Amigos Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Florence; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Carlson, Mike; Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Vigen, Cheryl; Hay, Joel; Mallinson, Trudy; Blanchard, Jeanine; Unger, Jennifer B.; Garber, Susan L.; Diaz, Jesus; Florindez, Lucia I.; Atkins, Michal; Rubayi, Salah; Azen, Stanley Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized trials of complex, non-pharmacologic interventions implemented in home and community settings, such as the University of Southern California (USC)–Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center (RLANRC) Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS), present unique challenges with respect to: (a) participant recruitment and retention, (b) intervention delivery and fidelity, (c) randomization and assessment, and (d) potential inadvertent treatment effects. Purpose We describe the methods employed to address the challenges confronted in implementing PUPS. In this randomized controlled trial, we are assessing the efficacy of a complex, preventive intervention in reducing the incidence of, and costs associated with, the development of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury. Method Individuals with spinal cord injury recruited from RLANRC were assigned to either a 12-month preventive intervention group or a standard care control group. The primary outcome is the incidence of serious pressure ulcers with secondary endpoints including ulcer-related surgeries, medical treatment costs, and quality of life. These outcomes are assessed at 12 and 24 months after randomization. Additionally, we are studying the mediating mechanisms that account for intervention outcomes. Results PUPS has been successfully implemented, including recruitment of the target sample size of 170 participants, assurance of the integrity of intervention protocol delivery with an average 90% treatment adherence rate, and enactment of the assessment plan. However, implementation has been replete with challenges. To meet recruitment goals, we instituted a five-pronged approach customized for an underserved, ethnically diverse population. In intervention delivery, we increased staff time to overcome economic and cultural barriers to retention and adherence. To ensure treatment fidelity and replicability, we monitored intervention protocol delivery in accord

  13. Implementing trials of complex interventions in community settings: the USC-Rancho Los Amigos pressure ulcer prevention study (PUPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Florence; Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Carlson, Mike; Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Vigen, Cheryl; Hay, Joel; Mallinson, Trudy; Blanchard, Jeanine; Unger, Jennifer B; Garber, Susan L; Diaz, Jesus; Florindez, Lucia I; Atkins, Michal; Rubayi, Salah; Azen, Stanley Paul

    2014-04-01

    Randomized trials of complex, non-pharmacologic interventions implemented in home and community settings, such as the University of Southern California (USC)-Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center (RLANRC) Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS), present unique challenges with respect to (1) participant recruitment and retention, (2) intervention delivery and fidelity, (3) randomization and assessment, and (4) potential inadvertent treatment effects. We describe the methods employed to address the challenges confronted in implementing PUPS. In this randomized controlled trial, we are assessing the efficacy of a complex, preventive intervention in reducing the incidence of, and costs associated with, the development of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury. Individuals with spinal cord injury recruited from RLANRC were assigned to either a 12-month preventive intervention group or a standard care control group. The primary outcome is the incidence of serious pressure ulcers with secondary endpoints including ulcer-related surgeries, medical treatment costs, and quality of life. These outcomes are assessed at 12 and 24 months after randomization. Additionally, we are studying the mediating mechanisms that account for intervention outcomes. PUPS has been successfully implemented, including recruitment of the target sample size of 170 participants, assurance of the integrity of intervention protocol delivery with an average 90% treatment adherence rate, and enactment of the assessment plan. However, implementation has been replete with challenges. To meet recruitment goals, we instituted a five-pronged approach customized for an underserved, ethnically diverse population. In intervention delivery, we increased staff time to overcome economic and cultural barriers to retention and adherence. To ensure treatment fidelity and replicability, we monitored intervention protocol delivery in accordance with a rigorous plan. Finally, we

  14. The effectiveness of footwear and offloading interventions to prevent and heal foot ulcers and reduce plantar pressure in diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, S A; Valk, G D; van Deursen, R W; Armstrong, D G; Caravaggi, C; Hlavácek, P; Bakker, K; Cavanagh, P R

    2008-01-01

    Footwear and offloading techniques are commonly used in clinical practice for the prevention and treatment of foot ulcers in diabetes, but the evidence base to support this use is not well known. The goal of this review was to systematically assess the literature and to determine the available evidence on the use of footwear and offloading interventions for ulcer prevention, ulcer treatment, and plantar pressure reduction in the diabetic foot. A search was made for reports on the effectiveness of footwear and offloading interventions in preventing or healing foot ulcers or reducing plantar foot pressure in diabetic patients published prior to May 2006. Both controlled and uncontrolled studies were included. Assessment of the methodological quality of studies and data extraction was independently performed by two reviewers. Interventions were assigned into four subcategories: casting, footwear, surgical offloading and other offloading techniques. Of 1651 articles identified in the baseline search, 21 controlled studies were selected for grading following full text review. Another 108 uncontrolled and cross-sectional studies were examined. The evidence to support the use of footwear and surgical interventions for the prevention of ulceration is meagre. Evidence was found to support the use of total contact casts and other non-removable modalities for treatment of neuropathic plantar ulcers. More studies are needed to support the use of surgical offloading techniques for ulcer healing. Plantar pressure reduction can be achieved by several modalities including casts, walkers, and therapeutic footwear, but the diversity in methods and materials used limits the comparison of study results. This systematic review provides support for the use of non-removable devices for healing plantar foot ulcers. Furthermore, more high-quality studies are urgently needed to confirm the promising effects found in both controlled and uncontrolled studies of footwear and offloading

  15. Prospective observational study of single- or multi-compartment pressure ulcer prevention cushions: PRESCAROH project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaume, S; Marty, M; Colin, D

    2017-09-02

    In patients with reduced mobility, specialised pressure-relieving supports (mattresses, beds and cushions) are widely used to reduce or relieve the interface pressure between the skin and support surfaces to prevent incidence of pressure ulcers (PUs). The primary objective of these two observational studies was to assess the incidence of PUs in patients at high risk of PUs, seated in a wheelchair using a single- or multi-compartment air cushion. The level of patient satisfaction with the comfort and the views of the care team that used the air cushions were considered as secondary objectives. The PRESCAROH project was two prospective observational studies conducted in patients free of PUs at baseline and at high risk of PUs (Braden score ≤13 or ≤16 for people with spinal cord injury). Patients had to spend more than eight hours a day in a wheelchair and use either a single-compartment air cushion (patient without asymmetry of support) for the first study or a multi-compartment air cushion (patient with asymmetry of support) for the second study. The primary end point was the percentage of patients in whom a PU (sacrum and/or ischium) developed over a 35-day period. The analysis was performed on the full-analysis set (FAS) of patients included with at least a second assessment. We recruited 152 patients, 78 seated on a single-compartment air cushion (SiCAC group) and 74 on a multi-compartment air cushion (MuCAC group), in the two independent studies. All patients were included in the FAS (n=152). Most patients had spinal cord injuries. The average time spent sitting was 10.2 (standard deviation (SD): 2.3) hours a day in the SiCAC group and 9.1 (SD: 1.9) hours a day in the MuCAC group. In the SiCAC group, 6.4% (5/78) of patients dropped out of the study (one patient because of pulmonary infection and four patients for cushion installation problems). In the MuCAC group, 8.1% (6/74) of patients dropped out of the study (three patients because of adverse events not

  16. Improving Outcomes by Implementing a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Program (PUPP): Going beyond the Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Amparo; Anglade, Debbie; Stamp, Hope; Joaquin, Fortunata; Lopez, Jennifer A; Lupe, Lori; Schmidt, Steven P; Young, Daniel L

    2015-07-17

    A multidisciplinary process improvement program was initiated at the University of Miami Hospital (UMH) in 2009 to identify the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) at the institution and to implement interventions to reduce the incidence of HAPU. This deliberate and thoughtful committee-driven process evaluated care, monitored results, and designed evidence-based strategic initiatives to manage and reduce the rate of HAPU. As a result all inpatient beds were replaced with support surfaces, updated care delivery protocols were created, and monitored, turning schedules were addressed, and a wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) nurse and support staff were hired. These initial interventions resulted in a decrease in the prevalence of HAPU at UMH from 11.7% of stage II to IV ulcers in the second quarter, 2009 to 2.1% the third quarter. The rate remained at or near the 2009 UMH benchmark of 3.1% until the first quarter of 2012 when the rate rose to 4.1%. At that time new skin products were introduced into practice and continuing re-education was provided. The rate of HAPU dropped to 2.76% by the second quarter of 2012 and has remained steadily low at 1%-2% for nine consecutive quarters.

  17. Improving Outcomes by Implementing a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Program (PUPP: Going beyond the Basics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Cano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A multidisciplinary process improvement program was initiated at the University of Miami Hospital (UMH in 2009 to identify the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU at the institution and to implement interventions to reduce the incidence of HAPU. This deliberate and thoughtful committee-driven process evaluated care, monitored results, and designed evidence-based strategic initiatives to manage and reduce the rate of HAPU. As a result all inpatient beds were replaced with support surfaces, updated care delivery protocols were created, and monitored, turning schedules were addressed, and a wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC nurse and support staff were hired. These initial interventions resulted in a decrease in the prevalence of HAPU at UMH from 11.7% of stage II to IV ulcers in the second quarter, 2009 to 2.1% the third quarter. The rate remained at or near the 2009 UMH benchmark of 3.1% until the first quarter of 2012 when the rate rose to 4.1%. At that time new skin products were introduced into practice and continuing re-education was provided. The rate of HAPU dropped to 2.76% by the second quarter of 2012 and has remained steadily low at 1%–2% for nine consecutive quarters.

  18. A quasi-experimental study to assess the effect of technology-assisted training on correct endorsement of pressure ulcer preventive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklebust, JoAnn; Magnan, Morris A

    2009-02-01

    The two-fold purpose of the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) Braden Scale Training Module is to teach nurses to use the Braden Scale to correctly assess pressure ulcer risk and to effectively plan risk-based prevention interventions. A pre-test, post-test, two-group, quasi-experimental study was conducted to evaluate the effect of web-based DMC Braden Scale Training on staff nurses' ability to correctly endorse the use or non-use of 10 commonly-used risk-based pressure ulcer preventive interventions for patients at different levels of risk for pressure ulceration. "Regular" or "new" users of the Braden Scale from three hospitals assessed 102 patients. On eight out of 10 preventive interventions, the percentages of correct endorsements were higher for patients at extreme levels of risk (generally not at risk or high/very high risk) than they were for patients at midlevels of risk. Correct endorsement of prevention interventions was unaffected by group membership. Training substantially improved ability to correctly endorse interventions, but for new user only. Importantly, patients at midlevels of risk may be more vulnerable to pressure ulceration than their risk assessments indicate simply because nurses have great difficulty determining which preventive interventions should be implemented for this group of patients. Alternative approaches to training are needed to ensure that regular users of the Braden Scale are adequately prepared to use risk-based information to effectively plan pressure ulcer prevention.

  19. The physiological response of soft tissue to periodic repositioning as a strategy for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Marjolein; Worsley, Peter R; Voegeli, David; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Bader, Dan L

    2015-02-01

    Individuals who have reduced mobility are at risk of developing pressure ulcers if they are subjected to sustained static postures. To reduce this risk, clinical guidelines advocate healthcare professionals reposition patients regularly. Automated tilting mechanisms have recently been introduced to provide periodic repositioning. This study compared the performance of such a prototype mattress to conventional manual repositioning. Ten healthy participants (7 male and 3 female, aged 23-66 years) were recruited to compare the effects of an automated tilting mattress to standard manual repositioning, using the 30° tilt. Measures during the tilting protocols (supine, right and left tilt) included comfort and safety scores, interface pressures, inclinometer angles and transcutaneous gas tensions (sacrum and shoulder). Data from these outcomes were compared between each protocol. Results indicated no significant differences for either interface pressures or transcutaneous gas responses between the two protocols (P>0.05 in both cases). Indeed a small proportion of participants (~30%) exhibited changes in transcutaneous oxygen and carbon dioxide values in the shoulder during a right tilt for both protocols. The tilt angles at the sternum and the pelvis were significantly less in the automated tilt compared to the manual tilt (mean difference=9.4-11.5°, Pmattress. Although further studies are required to assess its performance in maintaining tissue viability, an automated tilting mattress offers the ability to periodically reposition vulnerable individuals, with potential economic savings to health services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoon Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of "prevention is better than cure" suits this condition the most.

  1. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Karoon; Chauhan, Neha

    2012-05-01

    Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of "prevention is better than cure" suits this condition the most.

  2. Pressure ulcer pain: a systematic literature review and national pressure ulcer advisory panel white paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Langemo, Diane; Cuddigan, Janet

    2009-02-01

    Pain is an ever-present problem in patients with pressure ulcers. As an advocate for persons with pressure ulcers, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) is concerned about pain. To synthesize available pressure ulcer pain literature, a systematic review was performed of English language literature, specific to human research, 1992 to April 2008, using PubMed and the Cumulative Index in Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Fifteen relevant papers were found; they examined pain assessment tools, topical analgesia for pain management, and/or descriptions of persons with pressure ulcer pain. Studies had small sample sizes and included only adults. The literature established that 1) pressure ulcers cause pain; 2) pain assessment was typically found to be self-reported using different versions of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Faces Rating Scale, or Visual Analog Scale; 3) pain assessment instruments should be appropriate to patient cognitive level and medical challenges; 4) in some cases, topical medications can ease pain and although information on systemic medication is limited, pain medications have been found to negatively affect appetite; and 5) wound treatment is painful, particularly dressing changes. Research gaps include the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcer pain, the impact of pain on nutrition, and pressure ulcer pain considerations for special groups (eg, children, end-of-life patients, and bariatric patients). The NPUAP presents this white paper as the current scientific know-ledge base on the topic. Research regarding the multidimensional aspects of pressure ulcer pain is strongly recommended.

  3. Use of the Braden Scale for pressure ulcer risk assessment in a community hospital setting: the role of total score and individual subscale scores in triggering preventive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, Molly M; Morris, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether pressure ulcer preventive interventions are implemented when a total Braden Scale score reflects that the patient is at risk. A retrospective chart review was completed for 20 patients with confirmed hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs). A convenience sample of 20 patients with HAPUs confirmed by a certified wound nurse was systematically selected from 63 charts. The study setting was a 200-bed acute care facility in the Midwestern United States. A retrospective review of 20 patient charts was conducted. Data collected included daily Braden Scale scores and subscale scores, along with pressure ulcer preventive intervention implementation for at-risk (cumulative Braden Scale scores ≤ 18) and not-at-risk (cumulative Braden Scale scores > 18) days. Data were collected both before and after pressure ulcer occurrence. The occurrence of preventive interventions was compared between at-risk and not-at-risk patient days. Nineteen percent of not-at-risk patient days were found to have lower subscale scores, indicating a need for focused preventive interventions. The day before an HAPU occurred, the mean Braden Scale score was 13.7 ± 2.8 (mean ± SD) for those who were provided an intervention and 18.5 ± 2.3 for those not provided an intervention (t = 3.89, P = .001). Sixty-three percent of at-risk patients received some intervention the day before an HAPU occurred, while 20% of not-at-risk patients received some intervention. Routine use of a pressure ulcer risk assessment tool is considered necessary for a comprehensive pressure ulcer prevention program. Planning preventive care according to the subscale scores of the Braden Scale may be more effective for prevention of HAPUs in some cases.

  4. Comparison of two repositioning schedules for the prevention of pressure ulcers in patients on mechanical ventilation with alternating pressure air mattresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Francisco; Colmenero, Manuel; Pérez-Pérez, Ana María; Roldán, Delphine; Jiménez-Quintana, María del Mar; Mañas, María Reyes; Sánchez-Moya, María Angustias; Guerrero, Carmen; Moral-Marfil, María Ángeles; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Fernández-Mondéjar, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    The objective was to compare the effectiveness of repositioning every 2 or 4 h for preventing pressure ulcer development in patients in intensive care unit under mechanical ventilation (MV). This was a pragmatic, open-label randomized clinical trial in consecutive patients on an alternating pressure air mattress (APAM) requiring invasive MV for at least 24 h in a university hospital in Spain. Eligible participants were randomly assigned to groups for repositioning every 2 (n = 165) or 4 (n = 164) h. The primary outcome was the incidence of a pressure ulcer of at least grade II during ICU stay. A pressure ulcer of at least grade II developed in 10.3% (17/165) of patients turned every 2 h versus 13.4% (22/164) of those turned every 4 h (hazard ratio [HR] 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46-1.71, P = 0.73). The composite end point of device-related adverse events was recorded in 47.9 versus 36.6% (HR 1.50, CI 95% 1.06-2.11, P = 0.02), unplanned extubation in 11.5 versus 6.7% (HR 1.77, 95% CI 0.84-3.75, P = 0. 13), and endotracheal tube obstruction in 36.4 versus 30.5%, respectively (HR 1.44, 95% CI 0.98-2.12, P = 0.065). The median (interquartile range) daily nursing workload for manual repositioning was 21 (14-27) versus 11 min/patient (8-15) (P repositioning frequency (2 versus 4 h) in patients under MV and on an APAM did not reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers. However, it did increase device-related adverse events and daily nursing workload.

  5. An evaluation of fluid immersion therapy for the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, P R; Parsons, B; Bader, D L

    2016-12-01

    Individuals with impaired mobility can spend prolonged periods on support surfaces, increasing their risk of developing pressure ulcers. Manufacturers have developed mattresses to maximise contact area. The present study evaluated both the biomechanical and physiological responses to lying postures on a Fluid Immersion Simulation mattress. Seventeen healthy participants were recruited to evaluate the mattress during three prescribed settings of immersion (high, medium and low). Parameters reflecting biomechanical and physiological responses, and the microclimate were monitored during three postures (supine, lateral and high-sitting) over a 90minute test session. Transcutaneous oxygen and carbon dioxide gas responses were categorised according to three criteria and data were compared between each condition. Results indicated that interface pressures remained consistent, with peak sacral values ranging from 21 to 27mmHg across all immersion settings and postures. The majority of participants (82%) exhibited minimal changes in gas tensions at the sacrum during all test conditions. By contrast, three participants exhibited decreased oxygen with increased carbon dioxide tensions for all three immersion settings. Supine and high sitting sacral microclimate values ranged between 30.1-30.6°C and 42.3-44.5% for temperature and relative humidity respectively. During lateral tilt there was a reduction of 1.7-2.5°C and 3.3-5.3% in these values. The majority of participants reported high comfort scores, although a few experienced bottoming out during the high-sitting posture at the high immersion setting. Fluid Immersion Simulation provides an intelligent approach to increase the support area. Further research is required to provide evidence based guidance on the use of personalised support surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Using a Lean Six Sigma Approach to Yield Sustained Pressure Ulcer Prevention for Complex Critical Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Elizabeth A; Manta, Christine J; Goldsack, Jennifer C; Collins, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    Under value-based purchasing, Medicare withholds reimbursements for hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrence and rewards hospitals that meet performance standards. With little evidence of a validated prevention process, nurse managers are challenged to find evidence-based interventions. The aim of this study was to reduce the unit-acquired pressure ulcer (UAPU) rate on targeted intensive care and step-down units by 15% using Lean Six Sigma (LSS) methodology. An interdisciplinary team designed a pilot program using LSS methodology to test 4 interventions: standardized documentation, equipment monitoring, patient out-of-bed-to-chair monitoring, and a rounding checklist. During the pilot, the UAPU rate decreased from 4.4% to 2.8%, exceeding the goal of a 15% reduction. The rate remained below the goal through the program control phase at 2.9%, demonstrating a statistically significant reduction after intervention implementation. The program significantly reduced UAPU rates in high-risk populations. LSS methodologies are a sustainable approach to reducing hospital-acquired conditions that should be broadly tested and implemented.

  7. A systematic review of electrical stimulation for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in people with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang Qin; Moody, Julie; Traynor, Michael; Dyson, Sue; Gall, Angela

    2014-11-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) can confer benefit to pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and treatment in spinal cord injuries (SCIs). However, clinical guidelines regarding the use of ES for PU management in SCI remain limited. To critically appraise and synthesize the research evidence on ES for PU prevention and treatment in SCI. Review was limited to peer-reviewed studies published in English from 1970 to July 2013. Studies included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, prospective cohort studies, case series, case control, and case report studies. Target population included adults with SCI. Interventions of any type of ES were accepted. Any outcome measuring effectiveness of PU prevention and treatment was included. Methodological quality was evaluated using established instruments. Twenty-seven studies were included, 9 of 27 studies were RCTs. Six RCTs were therapeutic trials. ES enhanced PU healing in all 11 therapeutic studies. Two types of ES modalities were identified in therapeutic studies (surface electrodes, anal probe), four types of modalities in preventive studies (surface electrodes, ES shorts, sacral anterior nerve root implant, neuromuscular ES implant). The methodological quality of the studies was poor, in particular for prevention studies. A significant effect of ES on enhancement of PU healing is shown in limited Grade I evidence. The great variability in ES parameters, stimulating locations, and outcome measure leads to an inability to advocate any one standard approach for PU therapy or prevention. Future research is suggested to improve the design of ES devices, standardize ES parameters, and conduct more rigorous trials.

  8. Become the PPUPET Master: Mastering Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment With the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, David J; Mooney, JoAnn; Ropele, Diana; Kett, Alysha; Vander Laan, Karen J

    2015-01-01

    Hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) are serious, debilitating, and preventable complications in all inpatient populations. Despite evidence of the development of pressure ulcers in the pediatric population, minimal research has been done. Based on observations gathered during quarterly HAPU audits, bedside nursing staff recognized trends in pressure ulcer locations that were not captured using current pressure ulcer risk assessment tools. Together, bedside nurses and nursing leadership created and conducted multiple research studies to investigate the validity and reliability of the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Footwear and offloading interventions to prevent and heal foot ulcers and reduce plantar pressure in patients with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, S A; van Deursen, R W; Armstrong, D G; Lewis, J E A; Caravaggi, C F; Cavanagh, P R

    2016-01-01

    Footwear and offloading techniques are commonly used in clinical practice for preventing and healing of foot ulcers in persons with diabetes. The goal of this systematic review is to assess the medical scientific literature on this topic to better inform clinical practice about effective treatment. We searched the medical scientific literature indexed in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane database for original research studies published since 1 May 2006 related to four groups of interventions: (1) casting; (2) footwear; (3) surgical offloading; and (4) other offloading interventions. Primary outcomes were ulcer prevention, ulcer healing, and pressure reduction. We reviewed both controlled and non-controlled studies. Controlled studies were assessed for methodological quality, and extracted key data was presented in evidence and risk of bias tables. Uncontrolled studies were assessed and summarized on a narrative basis. Outcomes are presented and discussed in conjunction with data from our previous systematic review covering the literature from before 1 May 2006. We included two systematic reviews and meta-analyses, 32 randomized controlled trials, 15 other controlled studies, and another 127 non-controlled studies. Several randomized controlled trials with low risk of bias show the efficacy of therapeutic footwear that demonstrates to relief plantar pressure and is worn by the patient, in the prevention of plantar foot ulcer recurrence. Two meta-analyses show non-removable offloading to be more effective than removable offloading for healing plantar neuropathic forefoot ulcers. Due to the limited number of controlled studies, clear evidence on the efficacy of surgical offloading and felted foam is not yet available. Interestingly, surgical offloading seems more effective in preventing than in healing ulcers. A number of controlled and uncontrolled studies show that plantar pressure can be reduced by several conservative and surgical approaches. Sufficient

  10. The effect of a simple 3-step pressure relieving strategy for preventing pressure ulcers: an explorative longitudinal study from 2002-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leen, Martin W F; Schols, Jos M G A; Hovius, Steven E R; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2014-10-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) still form an important and distressing problem in Dutch nursing homes. Pressure ulcer prevention protocols are generally based on current guidelines. The authors developed an alternative 3-step protocol to help prevent pressure ulcers. The effects of this new 3-step protocol on the prevalence of pressure ulcers in patients at risk of developing PUs in the Avoord nursing homes in Etten-Leur/Zundert (Netherlands) were calculated. In addition, the protocol's general cost effects were explored. Data on the prevalence of PUs and the use of preventive measures were derived from the annual independent International Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems of Maastricht University (Landelijke prevalentiemeting Zorgproblemen [LPZ]). This annual measurement was implemented in 1998 and measures care problems such as the prevalence of PUs and related preventive measures. Data on patients at risk of developing PUs at the Avoord nursing homes in Etten- Leur/Zundert (Netherlands) were analyzed and compared with national data between 2002 and 2011. The introduction of the 3-step protocol resulted in a significant reduction of the nosocomial prevalence of category 2-4 PUs. The prevalence was reduced from 8.7% to 0.5% during the first year and remained stable at about 2% throughout the rest of the study period. The prevalence at the national level also decreased during this period, but not as much, and was still significantly higher in 2011. The use of alternated systems decreased to almost 1%. Use of static air mattresses showed an almost linear rise in the Avoord nursing homes from the start of the implementation of the protocol, while the trend for both types of mattresses remained stable on a national level. Introducing the static air mattress instead of the more expensive alternating mattresses helped to reduce the mean daily costs of mattresses at the Avoord nursing homes by more than 70% compared to national figures. The workload of the nursing staff

  11. A new pressure ulcer conceptual framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, S.; Nixon, J.; Keen, J.; Wilson, L.; McGinnis, E.; Dealey, C.; Stubbs, N.; Farrin, A.; Dowding, D.; Schols, J.M.; Cuddigan, J.; Berlowitz, D.; Jude, E.; Vowden, P.; Schoonhoven, L.; Bader, D.L.; Gefen, A.; Oomens, C.W.; Nelson, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: This paper discusses the critical determinants of pressure ulcer development and proposes a new pressure ulcer conceptual framework. BACKGROUND: Recent work to develop and validate a new evidence-based pressure ulcer risk assessment framework was undertaken. This formed part of a Pressure UlceR

  12. The effect of pressure-relieving surfaces on the prevention of heel ulcers in a variety of settings: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicosia, Gisella; Gliatta, Angela E; Woodbury, M Gail; Houghton, Pamela E

    2007-09-01

    This meta-analysis investigated the effectiveness of a pressure-relieving intervention on the incidence of heel pressure ulcers in a variety of settings. Literature searches of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were conducted for English-language articles that investigated the effect of pressure relief interventions with or without concurrent prevention programs on the number of heel ulcers occurring on adult humans in a controlled clinical design. Full articles were selected from citations based upon consensus between at least two independent reviewers. Methodological quality of each study was assessed using the Jadad and PEDro scales. A quantitative analysis was performed to determine and compare relative risk (RR) between pressure relief programs/devices that were classified according to similarity of interventions. Fourteen studies that involved a total of 1457 subjects were selected from a total of 105 full articles reviewed. Pressure-reducing/relieving surfaces were associated with a significantly lower incidence of heel ulcers compared with standard hospital mattresses (RR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.26-0.93, P ulcers. There is evidence to support the use of certain air or foam mattresses/overlays in the prevention of heel pressure ulcers when compared with a standard hospital mattress. There is insufficient research available at this time to determine if heel-protective devices can prevent heel pressure ulcers. These results need to be interpreted with caution given the relatively low number and poor quality of research articles available to date.

  13. Implementing a Novel Guideline to Prevent Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers in a Trauma Population: A Patient-Safety Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Crystal; Elkbuli, Adel; Benson, Brenda; Young, Elizabeth; Morejon, Orlando; Boneva, Dessy; Hai, Shaikh; McKenney, Mark

    2018-03-26

    The development of hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) is a common complication associated with immobilization and prolonged hospitalization in trauma patients. Our semi-annual Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) report identified HAPUs as an outlier complication. We employed a hospital-wide initiative to reduce the incidence of HAPUs among our trauma patient population. Our study aimed to determine if the implemented measures would decrease HAPUs incidence rates. We reviewed adult trauma patients over a 3 year period. The novel care-based platform and preventive measures on reducing HAPUs included 7 components. 1) Pressure reducing beds, 2) Improved and protocolized nutritional support, 3) Mandatory 2-hour change of posture, 4) Turning clocks, 5) Early surgical intervention, 6) Spot checks by our wound care nurse and 7) Education to patients and care givers. Paired-sample t-test and Chi Squared analyses were used with significance defined as ppatients were admitted to our trauma services in the study period. Of these, 89 patients developed HAPUs, had an average age of 57.9 years and 48(54%) were female. The Injury Severity Score ranged from 1 to 75 with a mean of 20 in patients with HAPUs compared to 8 in patients without HAPUs during the same study period. The incidence of HAPUs at our institution was initially 1.36%, decreased to 0.98% in year 2, and 0.39% in year 3 (p-value=0.002). The novel seven-step care- based process changes, acquisition of specialized equipment and educational initiatives implemented was associated with a significant decrease in the incidence rates of Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. What makes a good head positioner for preventing occipital pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzengold, Rona; Gefen, Amit

    2017-11-27

    Patients who are stationary endure prolonged soft tissue distortions and deformations at contact areas between their body and the support surface, which may lead to the onset of pressure ulcers (PUs) over time. A novel technology for patient positioning employs innovation in materials science, specifically viscoelastic materials with shape memory properties that compose the Z-Flo™ head positioner (Mölnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden). Head positioners are generally known to reduce the occurrence of PUs in scalp tissues and the ears, but quantitative assessments of their biomechanical efficacy are missing in the literature. To determine potential differences in mechanical loads formed in the soft tissues of the back of the head while in contact with 2 head positioner types, Z-Flo vs flat medical foam, we developed 2 comparable finite element model configurations, both including the same 3-dimensional adult head. For both model variants, stresses in skin and fat peaked at the occiput. The skin at the back of the resting head is subjected to greater stress values with respect to fat; however, the Z-Flo positioner reduced the exposure of both skin and fat tissues to elevated stresses considerably (by a factor of 3) compared to the medical foam support. We found the Z-Flo device effective in reducing tissue loads at the surface of the head as well as internally in scalp tissues, with a particular strength in reducing internal tissue shear. The Z-Flo device achieves this protective quality through highly effective immersion and envelopment of the back of the head, generated in the process of manual moulding of the device in preparation for use. Additional protection is achieved through the viscoelastic response of the filling material of this positioner, which relaxes promptly and considerably under the weight of the head (by more than 2-fold within approximately 1 s) as opposed to the elastic recoil of the foam that pushes back on scalp tissues. © 2017

  15. Are Evidence-based Practices Associated With Effective Prevention of Hospital-acquired Pressure Ulcers in US Academic Medical Centers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Gibbons, Robert D; Valuck, Robert J; Makic, Mary B F; Mishra, Manish K; Pronovost, Peter J; Meltzer, David O

    2016-05-01

    In 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) established nonpayment policies resulting from costliness of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) to hospitals. This prompted hospitals to adopt quality improvement (QI) interventions that increase use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for HAPU prevention. To evaluate the longitudinal impact of CMS policy and QI adoption on HAPU rates. We characterized longitudinal adoption of 25 QI interventions that support EBPs through hospital leadership, staff, information technology, and performance and improvement. Quarterly counts of HAPU incidence and inpatient characteristics were collected from 55 University HealthSystem Consortium hospitals between 2007 and 2012. Mixed-effects regression models tested the longitudinal association of CMS policy, HAPU coding, and QI on HAPU rates. The models assumed level-2 random intercepts and random effects for CMS policy and EBP implementation to account for between-hospital variability in HAPU incidence. Controlling for all 25 QI interventions, specific updates to EBPs for HAPU prevention had a significant, though modest reduction on HAPU rates (-1.86 cases/quarter; P=0.002) and the effect of CMS nonpayment policy on HAPU prevention was much greater (-11.32 cases/quarter; P<0.001). HAPU rates were significantly lower after changes in CMS reimbursement. Reductions are associated with hospital-wide implementation of EBPs for HAPU prevention. Given that administrative data were used, it remains unknown whether these improvements were due to changes in coding or improved quality of care.

  16. Enteral nutritional support in prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Rebecca J; Ek, Anna-Christina; Engfer, Meike; Moore, Zena; Rigby, Paul; Wolfe, Robert; Elia, Marinos

    2005-08-01

    There have been few systematic reviews and no meta-analyses of the clinical benefits of nutritional support in patients with, or at risk of developing, pressure ulcers. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to address the impact of enteral nutritional support on pressure ulcer incidence and healing and a range of other clinically relevant outcome measures in this group. Fifteen studies (including eight randomised controlled trials (RCTs)) of oral nutritional supplements (ONS) or enteral tube feeding (ETF), identified using electronic databases (including Pub Med and Cochrane) and bibliography searches, were included in the systematic review. Outcomes including pressure ulcer incidence, pressure ulcer healing, quality of life, complications, mortality, anthropometry and dietary intake were recorded, with the aim of comparing nutritional support versus routine care (e.g. usual diet and pressure ulcer care) and nutritional formulas of different composition. Of these 15 studies, 5 RCTs comparing ONS (4 RCTs) and ETF (1 RCT) with routine care could be included in a meta-analysis of pressure ulcer incidence. Meta-analysis showed that ONS (250-500 kcal, 2-26 weeks) were associated with a significantly lower incidence of pressure ulcer development in at-risk patients compared to routine care (odds ratio 0.75, 95% CI 0.62-0.89, 4 RCTs, n=1224, elderly, post-surgical, chronically hospitalised patients). Similar results were obtained when a combined meta-analysis of ONS (4 RCT) and ETF (1 RCT) trials was performed (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.62-0.88, 5 RCTs, n=1325). Individual studies showed a trend towards improved healing of existing pressure ulcers with disease-specific (including high protein) versus standard formulas, although robust RCTs are required to confirm this. Although some studies indicate that total nutritional intake is improved, data on other outcome measures (quality of life) are lacking. This systematic review shows enteral nutritional

  17. The effectiveness of the Australian Medical Sheepskin for the prevention of pressure ulcers in somatic nursing home patients: a prospective multi-centre randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN17553857).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mistiaen, P.; Achterberg, W.; Ament, A.; Halfens, R.; Huizinga, J.; Montgomery, K.; Post, H.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Francke, A.

    2010-01-01

    A multicenter prospective randomized clinical trial was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of the Australian Medical Sheepskin (AMS) in the prevention of sacral pressure ulcers in somatic nursing home patients. Patients were randomized at admission and were then followed daily for 30 days.

  18. The relationship among pressure ulcer risk factors, incidence and nursing documentation in hospital-acquired pressure ulcer patients in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan

    2016-08-01

    To explore the quality/comprehensiveness of nursing documentation of pressure ulcers and to investigate the relationship between the nursing documentation and the incidence of pressure ulcers in four intensive care units. Pressure ulcer prevention requires consistent assessments and documentation to decrease pressure ulcer incidence. Currently, most research is focused on devices to prevent pressure ulcers. Studies have rarely considered the relationship among pressure ulcer risk factors, incidence and nursing documentation. Thus, a study to investigate this relationship is needed to fill this information gap. A retrospective, comparative, descriptive, correlational study. A convenience sample of 196 intensive care units patients at the selected medical centre comprised the study sample. All medical records of patients admitted to intensive care units between the time periods of September 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012 were audited. Data used in the analysis included 98 pressure ulcer patients and 98 non-pressure ulcer patients. The quality and comprehensiveness of pressure ulcer documentation were measured by the modified European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Pressure Ulcers Assessment Instrument and the Comprehensiveness in Nursing Documentation instrument. The correlations between quality/comprehensiveness of pressure ulcer documentation and incidence of pressure ulcers were not statistically significant. Patients with pressure ulcers had longer length of stay than patients without pressure ulcers stay. There were no statistically significant differences in quality/comprehensiveness scores of pressure ulcer documentation between dayshift and nightshift. This study revealed a lack of quality/comprehensiveness in nursing documentation of pressure ulcers. This study demonstrates that staff nurses often perform poorly on documenting pressure ulcer appearance, staging and treatment. Moreover, nursing documentation of pressure ulcers does not provide a complete

  19. Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury patients in Gombe, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... or units with trained manpower and adequate equipment will go a long way to reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers among SCI patients. Key Words: Spinal cord injury, neurological impairment, pressure ulcer, prevention, pressure relieving devices. Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma Vol.3(1) 2004: 57-60 ...

  20. Self-management interventions to improve skin care for pressure ulcer prevention in people with spinal cord injuries: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Justine; Swaine, Jillian; Presseau, J.; Aspinall, Arlene; Jaglal, Susan; White, Barry; Wolfe, Dalton; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers are a serious, common, lifelong, and costly secondary complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Community-dwelling people with a SCI can prevent them with appropriate skin care (i.e. pressure relieving activities, skin checks). Adherence to skin care remains suboptimal however, and self-management interventions that focus on improving this have been designed. Little is known on their content, effectiveness, or theoretical basis. The aim of the proposed systematic re...

  1. Repositioning for treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zena E H; Cowman, Seamus

    2015-01-05

    Pressure, from lying or sitting on a particular part of the body results in reduced oxygen and nutrient supply, impaired drainage of waste products and damage to cells. If a patient with an existing pressure ulcer continues to lie or bear weight on the affected area, the tissues become depleted of blood flow and there is no oxygen or nutrient supply to the wound, and no removal of waste products from the wound, all of which are necessary for healing. Patients who cannot reposition themselves require assistance. International best practice advocates the use of repositioning as an integral component of a pressure ulcer management strategy. This review has been conducted to clarify the role of repositioning in the management of patients with pressure ulcers. To assess the effects of repositioning patients on the healing rates of pressure ulcers. For this third update we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 28 August 2014); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 7); Ovid MEDLINE (2013 to August Week 3 2014); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations 29 August, 2014); Ovid EMBASE (2012 to 29 August, 2014); and EBSCO CINAHL (2012 to 27 August 2014). We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing repositioning with no repositioning, or RCTs comparing different repositioning techniques, or RCTs comparing different repositioning frequencies for the review. Controlled clinical trials (CCTs) were only to be considered in the absence of RCTs. Two authors independently assessed titles and, where available, abstracts of the studies identified by the search strategy for their eligibility. We obtained full versions of potentially relevant studies and two authors independently screened these against the inclusion criteria. We identified no studies that met the inclusion criteria. Despite the widespread use of repositioning as a component of the management plan for

  2. Prevention of heel pressure ulcers among older patients--from ambulance care to hospital discharge: A multi-centre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bååth, Carina; Engström, Maria; Gunningberg, Lena; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of an early intervention, a heel suspension device boot, on the incidence of heel pressure ulcers among older patients (aged 70+). Pressure ulcers are a global healthcare issue; furthermore, the heel is an exposed location. Research indicates that preventive nursing interventions starting during the ambulance care and used across the acute care delivery chain are seldom used. A multi-centre randomized control study design was used. Five ambulance stations, two emergency departments and 16 wards at two Swedish hospitals participated. Altogether, 183 patients were transferred by ambulance to the emergency department and were thereafter admitted to one of the participating wards. Significantly fewer patients in the intervention group (n=15 of 103; 14.6%) than the control group (n=24 of 80; 30%) developed heel pressure ulcers during their hospital stay (p=0.017). Pressure ulcer prevention should start early in the acute care delivery chain to increase patient safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [CHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF PRESSURE ULCER INFECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kučišec-Tepeš, N

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a localized injury of the skin and/or adjacent tissue, usually above bone protrusions. It is a result of pressure or pressure combined with shear stress, friction and humidity. With regard to long life and delayed healing, it is a chronic wound. Pressure ulcer appears as a consequence of a combination of micro-embolism, ischemia and myonecrosis. These pathophysiological processes provide an ideal medium for proliferation of microorganisms, predominantly bacteria, and development of infection. Progression in the development of pressure ulcer is a dynamic process manifesting in phases, each of which is characterized by its own physiological-anatomical peculiarities and microbiological status. An open lesion without protective barrier becomes contaminated immediately, and, shortly afterwards, colonized by physiological microflora of the host and microbes from the environment. In the absence of preventive measures, the wound becomes critically colonized and infected. The characteristic of chronic wound/pressure ulcer is that it is colonized, and the infection develops depending on various factors in 5% to 80% of cases. The ability of microbes to cause infection depends on a number of factors, which include the pathogen and the host. The number and quantity of virulent factors, microbes, determines the virulence coefficient, which is responsible for overcoming the host’s immune system and development of infection. In the development of pressure ulcer infection, two essential microbial factors predominate, i.e. the presence of adhesin and association with biofilm. Thus, pressure ulcer infection as a chronic wound is characterized by a polymicrobial and heterogeneous population of microbes, domination of biofilm phenotype as a primary factor of virulence present in 90% of cases, phenotype hypervariability of species, and resistance or tolerance of the etiological agents to all types of biocides. The most significant virulence factor is biofilm. It is a

  4. Pressure ulcer grading and appropriate equipment selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Sarah

    2014-08-12

    This article explores the process and rationale for designing a poster to support community nurses in selecting appropriate pressure-relieving equipment based on accurate risk assessment and correct pressure ulcer grading. The project was prompted by the requirement to update community nurses' knowledge and ensure pressure-relieving equipment selection was evidence-based and not reliant on personal preference. The 2012 NHS Midlands and East 'Stop the pressure' campaign provided community nurses with a framework for pressure ulcer prevention and management. The attention to support surfaces highlighted the need for appropriate equipment. However the tissue viability team found that the introduction of this pathway alone did not help with the practical issues of appropriate equipment selection. The poster was designed with consideration as to how adults learn, and by looking to the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycle. This provided the framework for enabling new ideas and changes to practice to be tested on a small scale before full implementation.

  5. Skin assessment of patients at risk of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteing, Nicola L

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in the community and in acute settings is a concern for patients and healthcare professionals. The high cost to healthcare services of treating individuals with pressure ulcers means prevention is much cheaper than cure. Nurses have a responsibility to implement and participate in prevention programmes to decrease the incidence of pressure ulcers. Assessment is the first stage in prevention. This article focuses on the assessment of pressure areas, providing the reader with the knowledge of where and when skin assessment should take place and what needs to be assessed.

  6. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Nutritional Support for the Prevention of Pressure Ulcers in High-Risk Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffaha, Haitham W; Roberts, Shelley; Chaboyer, Wendy; Gordon, Louisa G; Scuffham, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of nutritional support compared with standard care in preventing pressure ulcers (PrUs) in high-risk hospitalized patients. An economic model using data from a systematic literature review. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials on the efficacy of nutritional support in reducing the incidence of PrUs was conducted. Modeled cohort of hospitalized patients at high risk of developing PrUs and malnutrition simulated during their hospital stay and up to 1 year. Standard care included PrU prevention strategies, such as redistribution surfaces, repositioning, and skin protection strategies, along with standard hospital diet. In addition to the standard care, the intervention group received nutritional support comprising patient education, nutrition goal setting, and the consumption of high-protein supplements. The analysis was from a healthcare payer perspective. Key outcomes of the model included the average costs and quality-adjusted life years. Model results were tested in univariate sensitivity analyses, and decision uncertainty was characterized using a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Compared with standard care, nutritional support was cost saving at AU $425 per patient and marginally more effective with an average 0.005 quality-adjusted life years gained. The probability of nutritional support being cost-effective was 87%. Nutritional support to prevent PrUs in high-risk hospitalized patients is cost-effective with substantial cost savings predicted. Hospitals should implement the recommendations from the current PrU practice guidelines and offer nutritional support to high-risk patients.

  7. The effect of a silicone border foam dressing for prevention of pressure ulcers and incontinence-associated dermatitis in intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Hee

    2014-01-01

    We measured the effect of a silicone border foam dressing on the development of pressure ulcers (PUs) and incontinence-associated dermatitis in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Nonrandomized comparison cohort (quasi-experimental) study. One hundred and two patients (>40 years of age) with a Braden Scale score of 16 or less who were admitted to 2 ICUs at the Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, South Korea, participated in the study. Pressure ulcer development was determined based on 2009 Guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. Incontinence-associated dermatitis was measured using the Incontinence Associated Dermatitis and its Severity (IADS) instrument. Fifty-two subjects were assigned to the experimental group (standard PU preventive care routine plus application of the silicone border foam dressing), and 50 subjects were assigned to the control group (standard PU preventive care alone). The number of patients who developed PU in the experimental group was compared with that from the control group using the chi-square test (χ). The IADS score of the experimental group was measured and compared with those of the control group, using an independent t test. Logistic regression was carried out to analyze the relationship between the IADS score and PU development. Both the incidence of PU development and IADS scores were significantly lower (χ = 21.722, P border foam dressing decreased PU development and reduced the IADS score. Pressure ulcer development was found to be related to IADS score; the incidence of PU development significantly increased as IADS score increased.

  8. Pressure ulcer risk in spinal cord injury: predictors of ulcer status over 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, S L; Rintala, D H; Hart, K A; Fuhrer, M J

    2000-04-01

    To identify predictors of pressure ulcers in men with spinal cord injury over a 3-year period. Longitudinal, two-panel, cohort. Community. One hundred eighteen men with spinal cord injury. Interviews, questionnaires, and physical examinations were completed in two phases, 3 years apart. Information obtained included demographic and spinal cord injury characteristics; ulcer history; health beliefs and practices; measures of impairment, disability, and handicap; and skin integrity. Thirty-one percent of the participants reported having a pressure ulcer in the 12 months before Phase 2. Some Phase 1 predictors of self-reported ulcers in the year before Phase 2 were a younger age at onset of spinal cord injury, previous pressure ulcer surgery, and the presence of a pressure ulcer in the year before Phase 1. On examination at Phase 2, 59% presented with an ulcer. Phase 1 predictors of ulcer presence at Phase 2 examination were similar to predictors for self-reported ulcers. Individuals with the identified predictive characteristics are at greater risk for developing pressure ulcers. These individuals should receive additional interventions to reduce that risk. Potential interventions include more systematic and frequent follow-up, frequent review of pressure ulcer prevention and management strategies, and provision of needed personal assistance and relevant equipment.

  9. Compression for preventing recurrence of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea; Bell-Syer, Sally E M

    2014-09-09

    Up to 1% of adults will have a leg ulcer at some time. The majority of leg ulcers are venous in origin and are caused by high pressure in the veins due to blockage or weakness of the valves in the veins of the leg. Prevention and treatment of venous ulcers is aimed at reducing the pressure either by removing/repairing the veins, or by applying compression bandages/stockings to reduce the pressure in the veins.The majority of venous ulcers heal with compression bandages, however ulcers frequently recur. Clinical guidelines therefore recommend that people continue to wear compression, usually in the form of hosiery (tights, stockings, socks) after their ulcer heals, to prevent recurrence. To assess the effects of compression (socks, stockings, tights, bandages) in preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. If compression does prevent ulceration compared with no compression, then to identify whether there is evidence to recommend particular levels of compression (high, medium or low, for example), types of compression, or brands of compression to prevent ulcer recurrence after healing. For this second update we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 4 September 2014) which includes the results of regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 8). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs)evaluating compression bandages or hosiery for preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. Two review authors undertook data extraction and risk of bias assessment independently. Four trials (979 participants) were eligible for inclusion in this review. One trial in patients with recently healed venous ulcers (n = 153) compared recurrence rates with and without compression and found that compression significantly reduced ulcer recurrence at six months (Risk ratio (RR) 0.46, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.76).Two trials compared high-compression hosiery (equivalent to UK class 3) with

  10. Lifestyle intervention for adults with spinal cord injury: Results of the USC-RLANRC Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Mike; Vigen, Cheryl Lp; Rubayi, Salah; Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Blanchard, Jeanine; Atkins, Michal; Bates-Jensen, Barbara; Garber, Susan L; Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Diaz, Jesus; Florindez, Lucia I; Hay, Joel W; Mallinson, Trudy; Unger, Jennifer B; Azen, Stanley Paul; Scott, Michael; Cogan, Alison; Clark, Florence

    2017-04-17

    Medically serious pressure injuries (MSPrIs), a common complication of spinal cord injury (SCI), have devastating consequences on health and well-being and are extremely expensive to treat. We aimed to test the efficacy of a lifestyle-based intervention designed to reduce incidence of MSPrIs in adults with SCI. A randomized controlled trial (RCT), and a separate study wing involving a nonrandomized standard care control group. Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, a large facility serving ethnically diverse, low income residents of Los Angeles County. Adults with SCI, with history of one or more MSPrIs over the past 5 years: N=166 for RCT component, N=66 in nonrandomized control group. The Pressure Ulcer Prevention Program, a 12-month lifestyle-based treatment administered by healthcare professionals, largely via in-home visits and phone contacts. Blinded assessments of annualized MSPrI incidence rates at 12 and 24 months, based on: skin checks, quarterly phone interviews with participants, and review of medical charts and billing records. Secondary outcomes included number of surgeries and various quality-of-life measures. Annualized MSPrI rates did not differ significantly between study groups. At 12 months, rates were .56 for intervention recipients, .48 for randomized controls, and .65 for nonrandomized controls. At follow-up, rates were .44 and .39 respectively for randomized intervention and control participants. Evidence for intervention efficacy was inconclusive. The intractable nature of MSPrI threat in high-risk SCI populations, and lack of statistical power, may have contributed to this inability to detect an effect. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01999816.

  11. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces Among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients Across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged ≥65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research nurses at baseline and on alternating days for 21 days. Information on PRSS use and pressure ulcer risk factors was recorded at each assessment visit. Other information was o...

  12. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged [greater than or equal] 65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research…

  13. Therapeutic ultrasound for pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba-Akbari Sari, A; Flemming, K; Cullum, N A; Wollina, U

    2006-07-19

    Pressure ulcers have been recorded as occurring in 5 to 32% of patients admitted to a UK District General Hospital (the precise rate depends on case-mix) and 4 to 7% in the community. They represent a major burden of sickness and reduced quality of life for patients and their carers, and are costly to health service providers. Pressure ulcers are treated by using wound dressings, relieving pressure on the wound, by treating concurrent conditions which may delay healing, and by the use of physical therapies such as electrical stimulation, laser therapy and ultrasound. To assess the effect of therapeutic ultrasound on the healing of pressure ulcers. We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in May 2006. In addition we hand searched journals, conference proceedings, bibliographies and reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing therapeutic ultrasound with sham ultrasound or standard treatment. Two authors independently checked the result of the search to identify relevant RCTs. Details of eligible studies were extracted and summarised using a data extraction sheet. Attempts were made to obtain missing information by contacting authors. Data extraction was checked by a second author. Meta-analysis was used to combine the results of trials where the interventions and outcome measures were sufficiently similar. Three trials involving 146 people were included. Two RCTs compared ultrasound therapy with sham ultrasound and the third compared a combination of ultrasound and ultraviolet light with laser and with standard treatment. Neither of the two RCTs comparing ultrasound with sham found a significant difference in healing rates. The trials were pooled, in the absence of significant heterogeneity. There was no evidence of benefit associated with the use of ultrasound in the treatment of pressure ulcers. In the three-arm comparison there was no statistically significant

  14. A Secondary Analysis of Longitudinal Prevalence Data to Determine the Use of Pressure Ulcer Preventive Measures in Dutch Nursing Homes, 2005-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leen, Martin Wf; Schols, Joseph Mga; Hovius, Steven Er; Halfens, Ruud Jg

    2017-09-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are an important and distressing problem in Dutch nursing homes. A secondary analysis of longitudinal data from the Dutch National Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems (LPZ) - an annual, multicenter, point-prevalence survey - was conducted for the years 2005-2014 to determine the use of specific recommended PU preventive measures from the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel 1998, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel 2009, and the 2002 and 2011 Dutch PU guidelines. Preventive care was investigated among nursing home residents at risk for PUs and included skin care (moisturization); nutritional and hydration status assessment and optimization; and pressure redistribution involving mattresses, cushions, and heel pressure-relieving strategies and devices. Following abstraction from the study database, data for 3 at-risk groups were distinguished: 1) residents with a Braden score of 17, 18, or 19; 2) residents with a Braden score below 17; and 3) residents with a PU. Data were aggregated at the institutional level. Differences were tested with multiple regression analyses. The mean number of residents over the study period was 5435, the mean age was 82.8 years, and the mean Braden score was 15.3. None of the recommended preventive measures from the guidelines consulted was applied 100% of the time: preventive skin care measures were used in 25.1% to 63.8% of cases and dehydration and/or malnutrition were identified and managed in 27.8% to 65.6% of patients. Pressure redistribution with special types of mattresses was used in 85.2% of patients, cushions in (wheel)chairs were used in 64.8% of patients, and heels were offloaded in 57.8% of patients. The results regarding repositioning for the 3 groups, respectively, showed a maximum use of 9.7%, 30.3%, and 65.6%; the higher the PU risk, the more preventive measures were used. Although the results show a decrease in the percent of category 2 through

  15. Increased Adoption of Quality Improvement Interventions to Implement Evidence-Based Practices for Pressure Ulcer Prevention in U.S. Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Mishra, Manish K; Makic, Mary Beth F; Wald, Heidi L; Campbell, Jonathan D; Nair, Kavita V; Valuck, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    In 2008, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services enacted a nonpayment policy for stage III and IV hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs), which incentivized hospitals to improve prevention efforts. In response, hospitals looked for ways to support implementation of evidence-based practices for HAPU prevention, such as adoption of quality improvement (QI) interventions. The objective of this study was to quantify adoption patterns of QI interventions for supporting evidence-based practices for HAPU prevention. This study surveyed wound care specialists working at hospitals within the University HealthSystem Consortium. A questionnaire was used to retrospectively describe QI adoption patterns according to 25 HAPU-specific QI interventions into four domains: leadership, staff, information technology (IT), and performance and improvement. Respondents indicated QI interventions implemented between 2007 and 2012 to the nearest quarter and year. Descriptive statistics defined patterns of QI adoption. A t-test and statistical process control chart established statistically significant increase in adoption following nonpayment policy enactment in October 2008. Increase are described in terms of scope (number of QI domains employed) and scale (number of QI interventions within domains). Fifty-three of the 55 hospitals surveyed reported implementing QI interventions for HAPU prevention. Leadership interventions were most frequent, increasing in scope from 40% to 63% between 2008 and 2012; "annual programs to promote pressure ulcer prevention" showed the greatest increase in scale. Staff interventions increased in scope from 32% to 53%; "frequent consult driven huddles" showed the greatest increase in scale. IT interventions increased in scope from 31% to 55%. Performance and improvement interventions increased in scope from 18% to 40%, with "new skin care products . . ." increasing the most. Academic medical centers increased adoption of QI interventions

  16. Cost-effectiveness and value of information analysis of nutritional support for preventing pressure ulcers in high-risk patients: implement now, research later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffaha, Haitham W; Roberts, Shelley; Chaboyer, Wendy; Gordon, Louisa G; Scuffham, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    Pressure ulcers are a major cause of mortality, morbidity, and increased healthcare cost. Nutritional support may reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients who are at risk of pressure ulcer and malnutrition. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of nutritional support in preventing pressure ulcers in high-risk hospitalised patients, and to assess the value of further research to inform the decision to implement this intervention using value of information analysis (VOI). The analysis was from the perspective of Queensland Health, Australia using a decision model with evidence derived from a systematic review and meta-analysis. Resources were valued using 2014 prices and the time horizon of the analysis was one year. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate net monetary benefits (NB) and to calculate VOI measures. Compared with standard hospital diet, nutritional support was cost saving at AU$425 per patient, and more effective with an average 0.005 quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained. At a willingness-to-pay of AU$50,000 per QALY, the incremental NB was AU$675 per patient, with a probability of 87 % that nutritional support is cost-effective. The expected value of perfect information was AU$5 million and the expected value of perfect parameter information was highest for the relative risk of developing a pressure ulcer at AU$2.5 million. For a future trial investigating the relative effectiveness of the interventions, the expected net benefit of research would be maximised at AU$100,000 with 1,200 patients in each arm if nutritional support was perfectly implemented. The opportunity cost of withholding the decision to implement the intervention until the results of the future study are available would be AU$14 million. Nutritional support is cost-effective in preventing pressure ulcers in high-risk hospitalised patients compared with standard diet. Future research to reduce decision uncertainty is worthwhile; however, given the

  17. Clinical use of interface pressure to predict pressure ulcer development: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reenalda, Jasper; Jannink, Michiel; Nederhand, Marc; IJzerman, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a large problem in subjects who use a wheelchair for their mobility. These ulcers originate beneath the bony prominences of the pelvis and progress outward as a consequence of prolonged pressure. Interface pressure is used clinically to predict and prevent pressure ulcers. However, the relation between interface pressure and the development of pressure ulcers is not clear. A systematic review was performed to address the research question of whether interface pressure can be used to predict the development of pressure ulcers or to determine the prognosis of an ulcer once developed. Seven studies were identified that measured interface pressure and used the development or healing of pressure ulcers as an outcome measure. There appears to be a weak qualitative relation between interface pressure and the development of pressure ulcers. However, no conclusive clinical threshold for the interface pressure can be given. This, combined with the influence of individual characteristics, the low internal validity of interface pressure measurement for the prediction of pressure ulcers, and an incongruent relation between pressure magnitude and duration, results in the fact that no quantification of the predictive or prognostic value of interface pressure can be given.

  18. Preventing pressure ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coulson I, eds. Treatment of Skin Disease: Comprehensive Therapeutic Strategies . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ... Caring for muscle spasticity or spasms Eating extra calories when sick - adults ...

  19. Multi-stage versus single-stage inflation and deflation cycle for alternating low pressure air mattresses to prevent pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients: a randomised-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarré, L; Beeckman, D; Vanderwee, K; Defloor, T; Grypdonck, M; Verhaeghe, S

    2012-04-01

    and deflation of the air cells does not result in a significantly lower pressure ulcer incidence compared to an alternating low pressure air mattress with a standard single-stage inflation and deflation cycle of the air cells. Both alternating mattress types are equally effective to prevent pressure ulcer development. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pressure ulcer risk in ancillary services patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Monica S

    2010-01-01

    Although pressure ulcer prevention has received considerable attention in the literature since the 1960s, little has been published about the risk of pressure injury to patients undergoing procedures in diagnostic and interventional ancillary units such as radiology, renal dialysis, cardiac, and vascular procedure laboratories. In the only research study found in this population, the incidence of pressure injury in patients undergoing lengthy radiology procedures was 53.8%. Therefore, I reviewed the research literature in order to identify which specific factors are most likely to place persons undergoing ancillary procedures at risk for pressure injury. Sufficient evidence was found to implicate high interface pressures on ancillary support surfaces, shear incurred from patient movement and positioning, advanced age, severe neurologic impairment, anesthesia and sedation, fever, sepsis, and hypotension as risk factors for pressure injury while receiving services from interventional ancillary units.

  1. A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of soft silicone multi-layered foam dressings in the prevention of sacral and heel pressure ulcers in trauma and critically ill patients: the border trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Nick; Gerdtz, Marie; Sage, Sarah; McCann, Jane; Freeman, Amy; Vassiliou, Theresa; De Vincentis, Stephanie; Ng, Ai Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Liu, Wei; Knott, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    The prevention of hospital acquired pressure ulcers in critically ill patients remains a significant clinical challenge. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of multi-layered soft silicone foam dressings in preventing intensive care unit (ICU) pressure ulcers when applied in the emergency department to 440 trauma and critically ill patients. Intervention group patients (n = 219) had Mepilex(®) Border Sacrum and Mepilex(®) Heel dressings applied in the emergency department and maintained throughout their ICU stay. Results revealed that there were significantly fewer patients with pressure ulcers in the intervention group compared to the control group (5 versus 20, P = 0·001). This represented a 10% difference in incidence between the groups (3·1% versus 13·1%) and a number needed to treat of ten patients to prevent one pressure ulcer. Overall there were fewer sacral (2 versus 8, P = 0·05) and heel pressure ulcers (5 versus 19, P = 0·002) and pressure injuries overall (7 versus 27, P = 0·002) in interventions than in controls. The time to injury survival analysis indicated that intervention group patients had a hazard ratio of 0·19 (P = 0·002) compared to control group patients. We conclude that multi-layered soft silicone foam dressings are effective in preventing pressure ulcers in critically ill patients when applied in the emergency department prior to ICU transfer. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. What is the best support surface in prevention and treatment, as of 2012, for a patient at risk and/or suffering from pressure ulcer sore? Developing French guidelines for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, D; Rochet, J-M; Ribinik, P; Barrois, B; Passadori, Y; Michel, J-M

    2012-10-01

    The use of support surfaces in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers prevention is an important part of care for a patient at risk and/or suffering from sore(s). Define which support surfaces to use in prevention and treatment of at-risk and/or pressure sore patients. A systematic review of the literature querying the several Pascal Biomed, PubMed and Cochrane Library databases from 2000 through 2010. RESULTS (GRADE A): In prevention, a structured foam mattress is more efficient than a standard hospital mattress. An alternating pressure mattress is more effective than a visco-elastic mattress limiting the occurrence heel pressure ulcers, but those that do occur are more serious. A low-air-loss bed is more efficient than a mixed pulsating air mattress in prevention of heel pressure ulcers. Some types of sheepskin can reduce sacral pressure ulcer incidence in orthopedic patients. Use of an overlay on an operating table limits the occurrence of peroperative and postoperative pressure ulcers. An air-fluidized bed improves pressure ulcer healing. The data in the literature are not always relevant and do not suffice to dictate a clinician's choices. We are compelled to recognize the methodological limitations of many studies, the lack of corporate interest in conducting such studies and the relatively small number of available trials. However, the effectiveness of some support surfaces reaches a sufficient level of evidence, especially when they are associated with postural, hydration and nutritional measures. Support surfaces are recommended in prevention and treatment of patients at risk and/or already suffering from pressure ulcer, and their use should constitute part of an overall preventive or curative strategy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Phototherapy for treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiehfeng; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Chan, Edwin S Y; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lo, Heng-Lien Daniel

    2014-07-11

    A pressure ulcer is defined as "an area of localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue, usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear". The use of phototherapy - that is, light (or laser) used as an adjuvant, non-surgical intervention, with the aim of having a therapeutic effect on healing - has increased recently. To determine the effects of phototherapy on the healing of pressure ulcers. In January 2014, we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid EMBASE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); and EBSCO CINAHL. We did not restrict the search by language or publication date. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of phototherapy (in addition to standard treatment) with sham phototherapy (in addition to standard treatment), another type of phototherapy (in addition to standard treatment) or standard or conventional treatment alone. Two review authors assessed studies for relevance and design according to the selection criteria, extracted data and evaluated study quality. The authors made attempts to obtain missing data by contacting study authors. Disagreement was resolved by consensus and discussion with a third review author. We identified seven RCTs involving 403 participants. All the trials were at unclear risk of bias. Trials compared the use of phototherapy with standard care only (six trials) or sham phototherapy (one trial). Only one of the trials included a third arm in which another type of phototherapy was applied. Overall, there was insufficient evidence to determine the relative effects of phototherapy for healing pressure ulcers. Time to complete healing was reported in three studies. Two studies showed the ultraviolet (UV) treated group had a shorter mean time to complete healing than the control group (mean difference -2.13 weeks (95% CI -3.53 to -0.72, P

  4. Does participating in a clinical trial affect subsequent nursing management? Post-trial care for participants recruited to the INTACT pressure ulcer prevention trial: A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Bucknall, Tracey; Wallis, Marianne; McInnes, Elizabeth; Roberts, Shelley; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-06-01

    Participation in a clinical trial is believed to benefit patients but little is known about the post-trial effects on routine hospital-based care. To describe (1) hospital-based, pressure ulcer care-processes after patients were discharged from a pressure ulcer prevention, cluster randomised controlled trial; and (2) to investigate if the trial intervention had any impact on subsequent hospital-based care. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 133 trial participants who developed a pressure ulcer during the clinical trial. We compared outcomes and care processes between participants who received the pressure ulcer prevention intervention and those in the usual care, control group. We also compared care processes according to the pressure ulcer stage. A repositioning schedule was reported for 19 (14.3%) patients; 33 (24.8%) had a dressing applied to the pressure ulcer; 17 (12.8) patients were assessed by a wound care team; and 20 (15.0%) were seen by an occupational therapist. Patients in the trial's intervention group were more likely to have the presence of a pressure ulcer documented in their chart (odds ratio (OR) 8.18, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 3.64-18.36); to be referred to an occupational therapist OR 0.92 (95% CI 0.07; 0.54); to receive a pressure relieving device OR 0.31 (95% CI 0.14; 0.69); or a pressure relieving mattress OR 0.44 (95% CI 0.20; 0.96). Participants with Stage 2 or unstageable ulcers were more likely than others to have dressings applied to their wounds (p=pressure ulcer status and care is poor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Systematic review of nutritional support in pressure ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, D; Aller, R

    2007-07-01

    Pressure ulcer is an area of localised damage to the skin and underlying tissue caused by pressure, shear, friction and/or combination of these things. Prevalence of this entity is between 3 and 66%, depending of the patients and the pathology. Pressure ulcer is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. One of the most important risk factors to develop a pressure ulcer is nutritional status. We can use different interventional strategies, first of all (primary intervention) before the patient has developed a ulcer and secondly, the treatment of a established ulcer (secondary prevention). In the most important primary prevention study with 662 patients, two oral nutritional supplements per day were given to the patients. The incidence of pressure ulcer was 40% (118/295) in the interventional group and 48% (181/377) in control group. A relative risk to develop a pressure ulcer with supplementation of 0.83 (CI95%: 0.70 a 0.99). In the studies with secondary prevention, when we analyze in an individual way the different nutrients, zinc has not demonstrated the utility in an independent way. Vitamin C shows contradictory data in two randomized clinical trial with the same dose (500 mg each 12 hours). Recently, some randomized clinical trials have demonstrated an improvement in healing rates with enhanced enteral formulas (zinc, arginine, vitamin C). Oral supplementation without taking account micronutrients decreases risk of pressure ulcer. However, studies of secondary prevention due to heterogeneity have not let clear conclusions. However, enteral enhanced formula could improve ulcer healing.

  6. Inter-rater reliability of the EPUAP pressure ulcer classification system using photographs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defloor, T.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many classification systems for grading pressure ulcers are discussed in the literature. Correct identification and classification of a pressure ulcer is important for accurate reporting of the magnitude of the problem, and for timely prevention. The reliability of pressure ulcer

  7. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient′s quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described.

  8. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Support surface interface pressure, microenvironment, and the prevalence of pressure ulcers: an analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Steven I; Ranganathan, Vinoth K; Sahgal, Vinod

    2007-10-01

    External pressure is the most frequently considered stress factor in the formation of ulcers. A review and analysis of existing literature addressing the relationship between pressure ulcer prevalence and interface pressures at various anatomic sites was conducted. Results suggest a nearly non-existent or slightly negative correlation between interface pressure and ulcer prevalence in general and spinal cord injured populations, respectively. Despite limitations of the analysis methods used, the observed lack of a direct relationship confirms the results of other studies and suggests that ulcer formation also may involve factors secondary to pressure and mechanical factors (eg, temperature, moisture, duration of the applied load, atrophy, and posture). Based on currently available information, clinicians should include these considerations when selecting a support surface. Studies directly relating primary stress factors and tissue viability with prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers are needed to better understand the benefits of pressure-relieving support surfaces and to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment.

  10. [Innovation in pressure ulcer care: application of electrotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Susana Postigo; Puerta Francisco Rivera

    2013-02-01

    Nowadays, pressure ulcers are a mayor health problem with serious consequences for the patient, directly influence by the increase of morbid-mortality and the detriment of the quality of life. Today we know that the best care for pressure ulcers is the prevention and every effort must be oriented in this direction, specially when it is estimated that almost the 95% of the pressure ulcers are preventable and a 60% of the occasions are initiated and developed in hospital. The study's objective is to promote healing of ulcers with a joint technical nursing care and the application of electric current by physiotherapist. This is a descriptive research design and intervention. The sample is composed grade IV ulcer patients who are admitted to the high level of nursing care unit in Complejo Asistencial Benito Menni (Ciempozuelos-Madrid). These patients have different associated pathologies and the study shows the process from the beginning of the ulcer until the end of treatment. The most relevant results show that the application of electric currents favors nursing techniques, promoting a better and faster cleaning, vascularization and subsequent the healing of ulcers.

  11. Analysis of Qualitative Interviews about the Impact of Information Technology on Pressure Ulcer Prevention Programs: Implications for the Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Marilyn Murphy; Wipke-Tevis, Deidre D.; Alexander, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare pressure ulcer prevention programs in 2 long term care facilities (LTC) with diverse Information Technology Sophistication (ITS), one with high sophistication and one with low sophistication, and to identify implications for the Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse (WOC Nurse) Design Secondary analysis of narrative data obtained from a mixed methods study. Subjects and Setting The study setting was 2 LTC facilities in the Midwestern United States. The sample comprised 39 staff from 2 facilities, including 26 from a high ITS facility and 13 from the low ITS facility. Respondents included Certified Nurse Assistants,, Certified Medical Technicians, Restorative Medical Technicians, Social Workers, Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses, Information Technology staff, Administrators, and Directors. Methods This study is a secondary analysis of interviews regarding communication and education strategies in two longterm care agencies. This analysis focused on focus group interviews, which included both direct and non-direct care providers. Results Eight themes (codes) were identified in the analysis. Three themes are presented individually with exemplars of communication and education strategies. The analysis revealed specific differences between the high ITS and low ITS facility in regards to education and communication involving pressure ulcer prevention. These differences have direct implications for WOC nurses consulting in the LTC setting. Conclusions Findings from this study suggest that effective strategies for staff education and communication regarding PU prevention differ based on the level of ITS within a given facility. Specific strategies for education and communication are suggested for agencies with high ITS and agencies with low ITS sophistication. PMID:25945822

  12. Beyond the pressure ulcer blame game: reflections for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, M

    2000-05-01

    The concept of skin wounds caused primarily as a result of external physical forces has been the focus of many healthcare professionals for decades. Unfortunately, some of the choices made regarding the definition, description, and topical management of pressure ulcers hampers the appreciation of the complexity of issues that generally accompany the occurrence of these wounds. As the healthcare industry increasingly focuses on quality and accountability, industry watchdogs continue to develop metrics to evaluate quality of care while legal professionals demand more accountability for healthcare interventions. The management of pressure ulcers is often scrutinized and many healthcare providers are often unfairly accused of neglect. The occurrence of pressure ulcers, when viewed as a failure of the healthcare system, prevents the comprehensive and constructive attention this topic deserves. Therefore, as wound care providers, we must change the image of pressure ulcers and provide a more balanced portrayal of the influences, treatments, and likely outcomes of these wounds. We must separate fact from fiction and reality from the psychological reaction that pressure ulcers evoke. It is now time to recreate a dialogue for pressure ulcers that is productive, realistic, and likely to result in the advancement of care.

  13. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, S Raja; Periasamy, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 - the foot at risk, Class 2 - superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 - the crippled foot and Class 4 - the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot.

  14. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, S. Raja; Periasamy, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 – the foot at risk, Class 2 – superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 – the crippled foot and Class 4 – the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot. PMID:28216809

  15. EPUAP classification system for pressure ulcers: European reliability study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeckman, D.; Schoonhoven, L.; Fletcher, J.; Furtado, K.; Gunningberg, L.; Heyman, H.; Lindholm, C.; Paquay, L.; Verdu, J.; Defloor, T.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: This paper is a report of a study of the inter-observer reliability of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel pressure ulcer classification system and of the differential diagnosis between moisture lesions and pressure ulcers. BACKGROUND: Pressure ulcer classification is a valuable tool to

  16. Virtual Breakthrough Series, Part 1: Preventing Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection and Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkoff, Lisa; Neily, Julia; King, Beth J; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Krein, Sarah; Young-Xu, Yinong; Boar, Shoshana; Mills, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    In 2014 the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) implemented a Virtual Breakthrough Series (VBTS) collaborative to help VHA facilities prevent hospital-acquired conditions: catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs). During the prework phase, participating facilities assembled a multidisciplinary team, assessed their current system for CAUTI or HAPU prevention, and examined baseline data to set improvement aims. The action phase consisted of educational conference calls, coaching, and monthly team reports. Learning was conducted via phone, web-based options, and e-mail. The CAUTI bundle focused on four key principles: (1) avoidance of indwelling urinary catheters, (2) proper insertion technique, (3) proper catheter maintenance, and (4) timely removal of the indwelling catheter. The HAPU bundle focused on assessment and inspection, pressure-relieving surfaces, turning and repositioning, incontinence management, and nutrition/hydration assessment and intervention. For the 18 participating units, the mean aggregated CAUTI rate decreased from 2.37 during the prework phase to 1.06 per 1,000 catheter-days during the action (implementation) phase (p model for implementing a virtual model for improvement. Copyright 2016 The Joint Commission.

  17. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS:

  18. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: We

  19. Complex interventions for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Ruben C; Dorresteijn, Johannes A N; Kriegsman, Didi M W; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can lead to the amputation of feet and legs, is a major problem for people with diabetes mellitus, and can cause substantial economic burden. Single preventive strategies have not been shown to reduce the incidence of foot ulceration to a significant extent.

  20. IPARZINE-SKR study: randomized, double-blind clinical trial of a new topical product versus placebo to prevent pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú, José; Soldevilla, Javier

    2012-10-01

    This study compared the efficacy of a new topical agent (IPARZINE-4A-SKR) on preventing category I pressure ulcers (PUs) over a 2-week period, compared with a placebo. A double-blind, randomised, multi-centre, placebo-controlled clinical trial in two parallel groups was conducted. The primary objective was to compare PU incidence between groups. Hospital and socio-sanitary centre patients (n = 194) at risk of developing a PU (Braden scale) were randomised into two groups. The intervention group included 99 patients, and the placebo group comprised 95 patients. Patients were comparable in terms of age, sex and PU risk. In both groups, patients had a high risk of developing PUs. The product was applied on the sacrum, trochanters and heels. Six PUs (incidence = 6·1%) were detected in the intervention group versus seven (incidence = 7·4%) in the placebo group. Differences were not statistically significant (z = 0·08; P = 0·94), relative risk = 0·82 (95% confidence interval = 0·29–2·36). The main limitation of the study was the sample size and, therefore, the main difficulty encountered was in determining whether the product is ineffective or simply has not been used with sufficient patients. In conclusion, it is not possible to confirm that there are any differences between the studied and the placebo treatments in the prevention of PUs. The results obtained were similar to those obtained in studies of PU prevention using products based on topical fatty acids.

  1. TEAM-UP for quality: a cluster randomized controlled trial protocol focused on preventing pressure ulcers through repositioning frequency and precipitating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Tracey L; Kennerly, Susan M; Horn, Susan D; Bergstrom, Nancy; Datta, Santanu; Colon-Emeric, Cathleen

    2018-02-20

    Pressure ulcers/injuries (PrUs), a critical concern for nursing homes (NH), are responsible for chronic wounds, amputations, septic infections, and premature deaths. PrUs occur most commonly in older adults and NH residence is a risk factor for their development, with at least one of every nine U.S. NH residents experiencing a PrU and many NHs having high incidence and prevalence rates, in some instances well over 20%. PrU direct treatment costs are greater than prevention costs, making prevention-focused protocols critical. Current PrU prevention protocols recommend repositioning residents at moderate, high, and severe risk every 2 h. The advent of visco-elastic (VE) high-density foam support-surfaces over the past decade may now make it possible to extend the repositioning interval to every 3 or 4 h without increasing PrU development. The TEAM-UP (Turn Everyone And Move for Ulcer Prevention) study aims to determine: 1) whether repositioning interval can be extended for NH residents without compromising PrU incidence and 2) how changes in medical severity interact with changes in risk level and repositioning schedule to predict PrU development. In this proposed cluster randomized study, 9 NHs will be randomly assigned to one of three repositioning intervals (2, 3, or 4 h) for a 4-week period. Each enrolled site will use a single NH-wide repositioning interval as the standard of care for residents at low, moderate, and high risk of PrU development (N = 951) meeting the following criteria: minimum 3-day stay, without PrUs, no adhesive allergy, and using VE support surfaces (mattresses). An FDA-cleared patient monitoring system that records position/movement of these residents via individual wireless sensors will be used to visually cue staff when residents need repositioning and document compliance with repositioning protocols. This study will advance knowledge about repositioning frequency and clinically assessed PrU risk level in relation to PrU incidence

  2. Medical device-related pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black JM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Joyce M Black,1 Peggy Kalowes2 1Adult Health and Illness Department, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 2Nursing Research and Innovation, Long Beach Memorial Miller Children’s & Women’s Hospital, Long Beach, CA, USA Abstract: Pressure ulcers from medical devices are common and can cause significant morbidity in patients of all ages. These pressure ulcers appear in the shape of the device and are most often found from the use of oxygen delivery devices. A hospital program designed to reduce the number of pressure ulcers from medical devices was successful. The program involved the development of a team that focused on skin, the results were then published for the staff to track their performance, and it was found that using foam dressings helped reduce the pressure from the device. The incidence of ulcers from medical devices has remained at zero at this hospital since this program was implemented. Keywords: pressure ulcer, medical device related

  3. Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers.Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series.PRESSURE ULCER PREVENTION: an evidence based analysisThe cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation)MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC PRESSURE ULCERS: an evidence-based analysis The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions?Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by as much as 400%, to increase the frequency

  4. Nurses' pressure ulcer related judgements and decisions in clinical practice: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuriwo, Ray; Dowding, Dawn

    2014-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are considered to be an adverse outcome of care that should never occur in clinical practice. The formation of a pressure ulcer is also perceived to be an indicator of poor quality nursing care. Therefore, pressure ulcer prevention is a priority for nurses, healthcare professionals and healthcare organisations throughout the world. A key factor in pressure ulcer prevention and management is individual nurse decision making. To synthesise the literature on the judgement and decision making of nurses in relation to the assessment, prevention, grading and management of pressure ulcers in all care settings (hospital and community). A systematic search of published literature relating to judgement and decision making in nurses, with a focus on the prevention and management of pressure ulcers. A search of electronic databases from 1992 to present, together with hand searching of the reference lists of retrieved publications, to identify published papers that reported results of studies evaluating the decision making of nurses in relation to the prevention and management of pressure ulcers. Abstracts were independently reviewed by two authors and full text of potentially relevant articles retrieved. Each paper included in this systematic review was evaluated using recognised appraisal criteria relevant to the specific study design. Included papers provided empirical data on key aspects of nurses' pressure ulcer related judgements and decision making. Data were synthesised into themes using narrative analysis. Sixteen studies and one systematic review were included in the review, focusing on pressure ulcer risk assessment, pressure ulcer prevention, grading of pressure ulcers and treatment decisions. The results indicated that assessment tools were not routinely used to identify pressure ulcer risk, and that nurses rely on their own knowledge and experience rather than research evidence to decide what skin care to deliver. Emphasising pressure ulcer risk

  5. Pressure ulcers and their associated factors in nursing home inmates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akea, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    To assess pressure ulcers and the associated risk factors, among the individuals who stayed at Yozgat Rehabilitation Care Center in Turkey. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Yozgat Rehabilitation Care Center, Turkey, from August to September 2011. Methodology: One hundred and seventy five individuals participated in the study who received care at the above nursing home and agreed to participate in the study. The data were collected with an information form of descriptive characteristics (the form included a total of 15 questions asked to get information about socio-demographic characteristics) and Braden risk assessment scale. For the data evaluation, Mann-Whitney U-test, Krushall-Wallis Variance analysis, Logistic Regression analysis were used. Statistical significance was defined by a probability level of p < 0.05. Results: The mean score of Braden risk assessment scale of the individuals was 15.0 +- 3.3 and 16.0% were under very high risk. Nine (5.1%) had pressure ulcers. The average duration of stay was 2.17 +- 0.80 years. Participants who were underweight, had lived at the rehabilitation center for a longer time, and were fed on regime 1, had a higher risk of developing pressure ulcers (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Individuals who stayed in nursing home were under very high risk of pressure ulcer. Pressure ulcers are preventable by the elimination of some risk factors and good nursing care. Such individuals should be periodically assessed in terms of risk. (author)

  6. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ii. 9. Reddy M, Gill SS, Rochon PA. Preventing pressure ulcers : a systematic review . JAMA 2006;296(8):974-84. 10. Yarkony GM, Heinemann, A.W...and customized interventions that will be tested in future randomized controlled trials. 4 SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability... review . Spinal Cord 1996;34(5):255-63. 3. Carlson CE, King, R.B., Kirk, P.M., Temple, R., Heinemann, A. Incidence and correlates of pressure ulcer

  7. Traditional classroom education versus computer-based learning: how nurses learn about pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esche, Carol Ann; Warren, Joan I; Woods, Anne B; Jesada, Elizabeth C; Iliuta, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Nurse Professional Development specialist is to utilize the most effective educational strategies when educating staff nurses about pressure ulcer prevention. More information is needed about the effect of computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on pressure ulcer education for the staff nurse. This study compares computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on immediate and long-term knowledge while evaluating the impact of education on pressure ulcer risk assessment, staging, and documentation.

  8. Vicair Academy Mattress in the prevention of pressure damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Fiona

    There are many costs associated with the development of pressure ulcers, both in terms of the patient experience and those associated with healing. If patients who are deemed to be at risk are identified and suitable preventive equipment is provided, incidence of pressure ulcer development can be reduced significantly. Pressure-reducing mattresses are primarily used to prevent pressure ulcers from occurring, in conjunction with other preventive measures, such as repositioning. The Vicair Academy Mattress, manufactured by Vicair BV and distributed by Gerald Simonds, uses Vicair's 'dry air' flotation system to offer maximum pressure and shear protection to patients who are at high risk of developing pressure ulcers.

  9. Efficacy and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Evidence-Based Nursing Interventions to Maintain Tissue Integrity to Prevent Pressure Ulcers and Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avşar, Pınar; Karadağ, Ayişe

    2018-02-01

    A reduction in tissue tolerance promotes the development of pressure ulcers (PUs) and incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD). To determine the cost-effectiveness and efficacy of evidence-based (EB) nursing interventions on increasing tissue tolerance by maintaining tissue integrity. The study involved 154 patients in two intensive care units (77 patients, control group; 77 patients, intervention group). Data were collected using the following: patient characteristics form, Braden PU risk assessment scale, tissue integrity monitoring form, PU identification form, IAD and severity scale, and a cost table of the interventions. Patients in the intervention group were cared for by nurses trained in the use of the data collection tools and in EB practices to improve tissue tolerance. Routine nursing care was given to the patients in the control group. The researcher observed all patients in terms of tissue integrity and recorded the care-related costs. Deterioration of tissue integrity was observed in 18.2% patients in the intervention group compared to 54.5% in the control group (p prevention in the intervention and control groups was X¯ = $204.34 ± 41.07 and X¯ = $138.90 ± 1.70, respectively. It is recommended that EB policies and procedures are developed to improve tissue tolerance by maintaining tissue integrity. Although the cost of EB preventive initiatives is relatively high compared to those that are not EB, the former provide a significant reduction in the prevalence of tissue integrity deterioration. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  10. A new pressure ulcer conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Susanne; Nixon, Jane; Keen, Justin; Wilson, Lyn; McGinnis, Elizabeth; Dealey, Carol; Stubbs, Nikki; Farrin, Amanda; Dowding, Dawn; Schols, Jos M G A; Cuddigan, Janet; Berlowitz, Dan; Jude, Edward; Vowden, Peter; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Bader, Dan L; Gefen, Amit; Oomens, Cees W J; Nelson, E Andrea

    2014-10-01

    This paper discusses the critical determinants of pressure ulcer development and proposes a new pressure ulcer conceptual framework. Recent work to develop and validate a new evidence-based pressure ulcer risk assessment framework was undertaken. This formed part of a Pressure UlceR Programme Of reSEarch (RP-PG-0407-10056), funded by the National Institute for Health Research. The foundation for the risk assessment component incorporated a systematic review and a consensus study that highlighted the need to propose a new conceptual framework. Discussion Paper. The new conceptual framework links evidence from biomechanical, physiological and epidemiological evidence, through use of data from a systematic review (search conducted March 2010), a consensus study (conducted December 2010-2011) and an international expert group meeting (conducted December 2011). A new pressure ulcer conceptual framework incorporating key physiological and biomechanical components and their impact on internal strains, stresses and damage thresholds is proposed. Direct and key indirect causal factors suggested in a theoretical causal pathway are mapped to the physiological and biomechanical components of the framework. The new proposed conceptual framework provides the basis for understanding the critical determinants of pressure ulcer development and has the potential to influence risk assessment guidance and practice. It could also be used to underpin future research to explore the role of individual risk factors conceptually and operationally. By integrating existing knowledge from epidemiological, physiological and biomechanical evidence, a theoretical causal pathway and new conceptual framework are proposed with potential implications for practice and research. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Documentation and record-keeping in pressure ulcer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamanga, Edwin; Ward, Renee

    2015-05-06

    National and international guidelines recommend the use of clinical assessments and interventions to prevent pressure-related skin damage. This includes the categorisation of pressure ulcers as avoidable or unavoidable, which is challenging in clinical practice, mainly because of poor documentation and record-keeping for care delivered. Documentation and record-keeping are influenced by the individual's employing organisation, maintenance procedures for documentation and record-keeping, and local auditing processes. A transfer sticker to enable patient assessment and promote pressure ulcer documentation was designed and implemented. The transfer sticker captures the date, time and location of a pressure ulcer preventive risk assessment and the plan of care to be implemented. The increased clarity of record of care achieved by using the transfer sticker has enabled the number of avoidable hospital-acquired pressure ulcers resulting from poor documentation on admission or ward transfers to be reduced. The transfer sticker helps staff identify patients at risk and allows interventions to be implemented in a timely manner.

  12. Clinical effectiveness of a silicone foam dressing for the prevention of heel pressure ulcers in critically ill patients: Border II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, N; Gerdtz, M; Liu, W; Rakis, S; Sage, S; Ng, A W; Tudor, H; McCann, J; Vassiliou, T; Morrow, F; Smith, K; Knott, J; Liew, D

    2015-08-01

    Critically ill patients are at high risk of developing pressure ulcers (PU), with the sacrum and heels being highly susceptible to pressure injuries. The objective of our study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a new multi-layer, self-adhesive soft silicone foam heel dressing to prevent PU development in trauma and critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). A cohort of critically ill patients were enrolled at the Royal Melbourne Hospital. Each patient had the multi-layer soft silicone foam dressing applied to each heel on admission to the emergency department. The dressings were retained with a tubular bandage for the duration of the patients' stay in the ICU. The skin under the dressings was examined daily and the dressings were replaced every three days. The comparator for our cohort study was the control group from the recently completed Border Trial. Of the 191 patients in the initial cohort, excluding deaths, loss to follow-up and transfers to another ward, 150 patients were included in the final analysis. There was no difference in key demographic or physiological variables between the cohorts, apart from a longer ICU length of stay for our current cohort. No PUs developed in any of our intervention cohort patients compared with 14 patients in the control cohort (n=152; psilicone foam dressing under investigation was clinically effective in reducing ICU-acquired heel PUs. The findings also support previous research on the clinical effectiveness of multi-layer soft silicone foam dressings for PU prevention in the ICU.

  13. Footwear and offloading interventions to prevent and heal foot ulcers and reduce plantar pressure in patients with diabetes: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, S. A.; van Deursen, R. W.; Armstrong, D. G.; Lewis, J. E. A.; Caravaggi, C. F.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Footwear and offloading techniques are commonly used in clinical practice for preventing and healing of foot ulcers in persons with diabetes. The goal of this systematic review is to assess the medical scientific literature on this topic to better inform clinical practice about effective treatment.

  14. The effectiveness of footwear and offloading interventions to prevent and heal foot ulcers and reduce plantar pressure in diabetes: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, S. A.; Valk, G. D.; van Deursen, R. W.; Armstrong, D. G.; Caravaggi, C.; Hlavácek, P.; Bakker, K.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Footwear and offloading techniques are commonly used in clinical practice for the prevention and treatment of foot ulcers in diabetes, but the evidence base to support this use is not well known. The goal of this review was to systematically assess the literature and to determine the

  15. Design, application and impact of quality improvement 'theme months' in orthopaedic nursing: a mixed method case study on pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unbeck, Maria; Sterner, Eila; Elg, Mattias; Fossum, Bjöörn; Thor, Johan; Pukk Härenstam, Karin

    2013-04-01

    While there is growing awareness of quality problems in healthcare systems, it remains uncertain how best to accomplish and sustain improvement over time. To report on the design and application of quality improvement theme months in orthopaedic nursing, and evaluate the impact on pressure ulcer as an example. Retrospective mixed method case study with time series diagrams. An orthopaedic department at a Swedish university hospital. The interventions were led by nursing teams and focused on one improvement theme at a time in two-month cycles, hence the term 'improvement theme months'. These included defined objectives, easy-to-use follow-up measurement, education, changes to daily routines, "reminder months" and data feedback. The study draws on retrospective record data regarding one of the theme topics, pressure ulcer risk assessment and prevalence, in 2281 orthopaedic admissions during January 2007-October 2010 through point prevalence measurement one-day per month. Data were analysed in time series diagrams and through comparison to annual point prevalence data from mandatory county council-wide measurements prior to, during and after interventions from 2003 to 2010. By using document analysis we reviewed concurrent initiatives at different levels in the healthcare organisation and related them to the improvement theme months and their impact. The 46 monthly point prevalence samples ranged from 28 to 66 admissions. Substantial improvements were found in risk assessment rates for pressure ulcers both in the longitudinal follow-up (ppressure ulcer rate was observed in the annual county council-wide measurements. In the longitudinal data, wider variation in the pressure ulcer rate was seen (ppressure ulcer rates during the final ten-month period in 2010, compared to the baseline period in 2007 (p=0.004). Improvements were moderate the first years and needed reinforcement to be maintained. The theme month design and the way it was applied in this case showed

  16. Comparing the effects of 3 different pressure ulcer prevention support surfaces on the structure and function of heel and sacral skin: An exploratory cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomova-Simitchieva, Tsenka; Lichterfeld-Kottner, Andrea; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2017-12-26

    Special support surfaces are key in pressure ulcer prevention. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of 3 different types of mattresses (reactive gel, active alternating air, basic foam) on skin properties of the sacral and heel skin after 2 hours loading. Fifteen healthy females (median age 66 years) were included. Transepidermal water loss, skin surface temperature, erythema, stratum corneum hydration, epidermal hydration, skin extensibility, elastic function, and recovery as well as skin roughness parameters were measured under controlled room conditions before loading, immediately after loading, and 20 minutes post-loading in the supine position on the different mattresses. The highest increases in transepidermal water loss, skin temperature, and erythema were observed for the foam mattress after loading, indicating higher deformation and occlusion. Cutaneous stiffness decreased in all 3 groups, indicating structural changes during loading. There was a substantial decrease of mean roughness at the heel skin in the foam group, leading to a flattening of the skin surface. Study results indicate that the type of support surface influences skin structure and function during loading. The gel and air mattress appeared to be more protective compared with the foam mattress, but the differences between the gel and air were minor. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Pressure ulcers presentations and management at Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the presentation and management of patients with pressure ulcers. Design: A prospective study. Setting: The Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) and National Spinal Injury Hospital (NSIH). Subjects: One hundred and thirteen patients were evaluated. Ninety six patients from KNH and seventeen from ...

  18. Alginate dressings for treating pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo C. Dumville

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Pressure ulcers, also known as bedsores, decubitus ulcers and pressure injuries, are localised areas of injury to the skin or the underlying tissue, or both. Dressings are widely used to treat pressure ulcers and there are many options to choose from including alginate dressings. A clear and current overview of current evidence is required to facilitate decision-making regarding dressing use for the treatment of pressure ulcers. This review is part of a suite of Cochrane reviews investigating the use of dressings in the treatment of pressure ulcers. Each review will focus on a particular dressing type. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of alginate dressings for treating pressure ulcers in any care setting. METHODS: Search methods: For this review, in April 2015 we searched the following databases the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library; Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations; Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. There were no restrictions based on language or date of publication. Selection criteria: Published or unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs comparing the effects of alginate with alternative wound dressings or no dressing in the treatment of pressure ulcers (stage II or above. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. MAIN RESULTS: We included six studies (336 participants in this review; all studies had two arms. The included studies compared alginate dressings with six other interventions that included: hydrocolloid dressings, silver containing alginate dressings, and radiant heat therapy. Each of the six comparisons included just one study and these had limited participant numbers and short follow-up times. All the evidence was of low or very low quality. Where data were available there was no evidence

  19. Prevalence of pressure ulcers in three university teaching hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul

    2012-02-03

    AIM: Pressure ulceration is a significant, but preventable, cause of morbidity and resource utilisation in hospital populations. Data on pressure ulcer prevalence in Ireland are limited. This study aims to determine (i) the point-prevalence of pressure ulcers in three teaching hospitals in Ireland and (ii) risk factors for their development. METHODS: Eight teams of one doctor and one nurse visited 672 adult patients over a 2-day period in three teaching hospitals. Each patient was examined and pressure ulcers graded with the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel system. Mental test score, Barthel index, type of support surface, length of stay, documentation of risk assessment and serum albumin were recorded. RESULTS: Point-prevalence of pressure ulceration was 18.5%. Seventy-seven percent of pressure ulcers were hospital-acquired, 49% grade 1, 37% grade 2, 11% grade 3 and 3% grade 4. Reduced mobility, urinary incontinence, cognitive impairment, low serum albumin and length of stay were significantly associated with pressure ulcers. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found reduced mobility (odds ratio 8.84; 95% CI 5.04-15.48, p<0.0001) and length of stay (odds ratio 1.02; 95% CI 1.01-1.02, p<0.0001) to be predictive of the presence of pressure ulcers. Age, gender and risk assessment documentation were not associated with pressure ulcers. Sixty-five percent of patients with pressure ulcers were positioned on appropriate support surfaces. DISCUSSION: Point-prevalence of pressure ulceration was 18.5%, similar to international data. Regular audit of prevalence, prevention and management strategies may raise awareness, influence resource allocation and ultimately improve patient care.

  20. Clinical Informatics and Its Usefulness for Assessing Risk and Preventing Falls and Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teigland, Christie; Gardiner, Richard; Li, Hailing; Byrne, Colene

    2005-01-01

    .... It does so by providing timely Web-based reports alerting staff to the likelihood of an adverse outcome, along with individualized resident risk profiles to guide preventive care plan development...

  1. Guideline implementation results in a decrease of pressure ulcer incidence in critically ill patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, E.H. de; Pickkers, P.; Schoonhoven, L.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Feuth, T.; Achterberg, T. van

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the short-term and long-term effects of a hospital-wide pressure ulcer prevention and treatment guideline on both the incidence and the time to the onset of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Adult intensive care department

  2. Pressure ulcers: knowledge and attitude of nurses and nursing assistants in Belgian nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demarre, L.; Vanderwee, K.; Defloor, T.; Verhaeghe, S.; Schoonhoven, L.; Beeckman, D.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: To gain insight into the knowledge and attitudes of nurses and nursing assistants and to study the correlation between knowledge, attitudes and the compliance with the pressure ulcer prevention guidelines provided to residents at risk of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: There is a

  3. Self-management interventions to improve skin care for pressure ulcer prevention in people with spinal cord injuries: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Justine; Swaine, Jillian; Presseau, J; Aspinall, Arlene; Jaglal, Susan; White, Barry; Wolfe, Dalton; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2016-09-06

    Pressure ulcers are a serious, common, lifelong, and costly secondary complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Community-dwelling people with a SCI can prevent them with appropriate skin care (i.e. pressure relieving activities, skin checks). Adherence to skin care remains suboptimal however, and self-management interventions that focus on improving this have been designed. Little is known on their content, effectiveness, or theoretical basis. The aim of the proposed systematic review is to synthesize the literature on self-management interventions to improve skin care in people with a SCI. Specific objectives are to describe these interventions in relation to their content, effectiveness, theory base, and adherence to reporting guidelines for intervention description. The search strategy will combine an electronic search of nine bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, PsycInfo, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Rehabdata, CIRRIE, PEDro, ERIC) and two trial registers with a manual search of relevant reference lists. Predefined eligibility criteria will be applied in a two-phase selection process involving title and abstract screening, followed by full-text screening. A data extraction spreadsheet will be applied to included papers. Intervention content will be coded using two taxonomies (behaviour change taxonomy; PRISMS self-management support taxonomy). A validated tool (Theory Coding Scheme) and the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) will be used to examine theoretical basis and assess adherence to reporting guidelines for intervention description. A small number of heterogeneous studies are likely to be included in this review therefore a narrative synthesis is planned. This systematic review will help identify the gaps and priorities to guide future research activities in this area. PROSPERO CRD42016033191.

  4. The turn team: a novel strategy for reducing pressure ulcers in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Mary D; Cross, Linda C; Dunlap, Martha; Rencher, Rugenia; Larkins, Elizabeth R; Carpenter, David L; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-03-01

    Pressure ulcers cause significant morbidity and mortality in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). The purpose of this study was to determine if a dedicated team tasked with turning and repositioning all hemodynamically stable SICU patients could decrease the formation of pressure ulcers. A total of 507 patients in a 20-bed SICU in a university hospital were assessed for pressure ulcers using a point prevalence strategy, between December 2008 and September 2010, before and after implementation of a team tasked with turning and repositioning all hemodynamically stable patients every 2 hours around the clock. At baseline, when frequent turning was encouraged but not required, a total of 42 pressure ulcers were identified in 278 patients. After implementation of the turn team, a total of 12 pressure ulcers were identified in 229 patients (p < 0.0001). The preintervention group included 34 stage I and II ulcers and 8 higher stage ulcers. After implementation of the turn team, there were 7 stage I and II ulcers and 5 higher stage ulcers. The average Braden score was 16.5 in the preintervention group and 13.4 in the postintervention group (p = 0.04), suggesting that pressure ulcers were occurring in higher risk patients after implementation of the turn team. A team dedicated to turning SICU patients every 2 hours dramatically decreased the incidence of pressure ulcers. The majority of stage I and stage II ulcers appear to be preventable with an aggressive intervention aimed at pressure ulcer prevention. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [THE ROLE OF PRESSURE ULCER SURROUNDING SKIN PREPARATION PRIOR TO THE APPLICATION OF WOUND DRESSING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulišić, S Marinović

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcer develops as a result of many factors, primarily pressure, tensile forces and ischemia with immobility and incontinence. Targeted and properly designed preventive measures reduce the incidence and complications of pressure ulcers, among which the most common are infections. An important preventive measure is protection of the surrounding skin before the application of wound dressings. Skin changes dictate the use of emollients and topical therapy according to dermatological status.

  6. Nurse Assistant Communication Strategies About Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory L

    2015-07-01

    There is growing recognition of benefits of sophisticated information technology (IT) in nursing homes (NHs). In this research, we explore strategies nursing assistants (NAs) use to communicate pressure ulcer prevention practices in NHs with variable IT sophistication measures. Primary qualitative data were collected during focus groups with NAs in 16 NHs located across Missouri. NAs (n = 213) participated in 31 focus groups. Three major themes referencing communication strategies for pressure ulcer prevention were identified, including Passing on Information, Keeping Track of Needs and Information Access. NAs use a variety of strategies to prioritize care, and strategies are different based on IT sophistication level. NA work is an important part of patient care. However, little information about their work is included in communication, leaving patient records incomplete. NAs' communication is becoming increasingly important in the care of the millions of chronically ill elders in NHs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Prevention and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jonathan Zhang Ming; Ng, Natasha Su Lynn; Thomas, Cecil

    2017-03-01

    The rising prevalence of diabetes estimated at 3.6 million people in the UK represents a major public health and socioeconomic burden to our National Health Service. Diabetes and its associated complications are of a growing concern. Diabetes-related foot complications have been identified as the single most common cause of morbidity among diabetic patients. The complicating factor of underlying peripheral vascular disease renders the majority of diabetic foot ulcers asymptomatic until latter evidence of non-healing ulcers become evident. Therefore, preventative strategies including annual diabetic foot screening and diabetic foot care interventions facilitated through a multidisciplinary team have been implemented to enable early identification of diabetic patients at high risk of diabetic foot complications. The National Diabetes Foot Care Audit reported significant variability and deficiencies of care throughout England and Wales, with emphasis on change in the structure of healthcare provision and commissioning, improvement of patient education and availability of healthcare access, and emphasis on preventative strategies to reduce morbidities and mortality of this debilitating disease. This review article aims to summarise major risk factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. It also considers the key evidence-based strategies towards preventing diabetic foot ulcer. We discuss tools used in risk stratification and classifications of foot ulcer.

  8. The Braden Q+P: a pediatric perioperative pressure ulcer risk assessment and intervention tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Patricia A; Curley, Martha A Q

    2012-09-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to be a personally and financially expensive complication of surgery and hospitalization. The effects of anesthesia, immobilization during surgery, and use of multiple medical devices all place the surgical patient at high risk for pressure-related skin injury. As part of a comprehensive pressure ulcer prevention initiative, nurses in the cardiac and main ORs at Children's Hospital Boston, Massachusetts, became concerned that current pressure ulcer risk assessment tools did not adequately capture the intense but short-term risk posed in the operating and procedural suites. A team, formed to investigate this matter, developed a tool to guide nursing assessment of patient risk and to plan nursing interventions to prevent pressure ulcers. Results after implementation of the Braden Q+P tool appear to show improvement in preventing pressure ulcers. Increased awareness of pressure ulcer prevention, a hospital focus on skin care, and nursing education about pressure ulcers supported this improvement. Copyright © 2012 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anabolic steroids for treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Cho; Whittaker, Maxine A

    2017-06-20

    Pressure ulcers, also known as bed sores, pressure sores or decubitus ulcers develop as a result of a localised injury to the skin or underlying tissue, or both. The ulcers usually arise over a bony prominence, and are recognised as a common medical problem affecting people confined to a bed or wheelchair for long periods of time. Anabolic steroids are used as off-label drugs (drugs which are used without regulatory approval) and have been used as adjuvants to usual treatment with dressings, debridement, nutritional supplements, systemic antibiotics and antiseptics, which are considered to be supportive in healing of pressure ulcers. Anabolic steroids are considered because of their ability to stimulate protein synthesis and build muscle mass. Comprehensive evidence is required to facilitate decision making, regarding the benefits and harms of using anabolic steroids. To assess the effects of anabolic steroids for treating pressure ulcers. In March 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE (including In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched clinical trials registries for ongoing and unpublished studies, and scanned reference lists of relevant included studies as well as reviews, meta-analyses and health technology reports to identify additional studies. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. Published or unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of anabolic steroids with alternative treatments or different types of anabolic steroids in the treatment of pressure ulcers. Two review authors independently carried out study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment. The review contains only one trial with a total of 212 participants, all with spinal cord injury and open pressure ulcers classed as stage III and IV. The participants were

  10. Avaliação da utilização de protocolos na prevenção de úlceras por pressão Evaluation of the use of protocols in the prevention of pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosilene Alves de Almeida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: A úlcera por pressão é um problema de saúde que repercute com elevados custos e consequências biopsicossociais sobre os portadores. Para reduzir sua incidência, protocolos de prevenção são utilizados, sendo importante enfatizar o impacto desta estratégia sobre as práticas de saúde e na qualidade de vida do paciente. Objetivo: Este artigo objetiva revisar o impacto da utilização de protocolos de prevenção de úlcera por pressão sobre sua incidência e na assistência. Materiais e Métodos: O estudo é de revisão sistemática fundamentado em publicações disponíveis em meio eletrônico. Foram selecionados 07 trabalhos, do período de 2002 a 2010, encontrados nas bases de dados Medline, Lilacs, IBECS e Cochrane, utilizando os descritores “úlcera por pressão ou úlcera de pressão ou escara de decúbito e protocolo”. Resultados: Três estudos mostraram redução da incidência de úlcera por pressão de 23 para 5%, 60 para 15%, 43 para 28%, com relato de eficácia do protocolo em 79% dos pacientes. Outros revelaram incidências de 0,2 e 2,77% após aplicação do protocolo. Incidências de 23,5 e 25,8% foram verificadas em unidades intensivas após o uso de protocolos. Ademais, a adoção de protocolos para prevenção de úlcera por pressão é uma decisão estratégica eficaz, que além de diminuir a incidência, otimiza recursos, melhora a qualidade da assistência, fortalece as práticas assistenciais. Conclusão: Os protocolos promovem impactos positivos sobre a prevenção das úlceras por pressão e a qualidade de vida das pessoas, sendo um recurso essencial para um cuidado humanizado pautado nas necessidades de saúde.Introduction: Pressure ulcer is a medical condition that involves high costs and biopsychosocial consequences for the patients. Prevention protocols have been used to reduce pressure ulcers incidence, and it is important to emphasize the impact of this strategy on the health care

  11. Pressure Ulcer Surveillance in Neurotrauma Patients at a Level One Trauma Centre in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annu Babu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Pressure ulcers are a multifactorial, prevalent, and preventable morbidity. They cause a burden both financially and emotionally, to the individual, their family and doctor, and to society as a whole. Pressure ulcers are extremely difficult to treat; therefore, prevention is key. Methods: We started a Wound Care Surveillance Program in 2012 involving nurses, physiotherapists, and doctors. We intended to prevent the occurrence of pressure ulcers, ensure early detection, and facilitate the healing process. The Braden scale was used to stratify patients’ risk. The number of patients observed in our study was 2,974 over a one-year period. Results: The pressure sore prevalence was 3.1%. Younger and middle-aged patients were most commonly affected; 27% of these patients did not survive. Mortality was not attributed to the pressure ulcer directly. The most common mode of injury was road traffic accidents. Most of our patients had just a single pressure area affected, most commonly the sacrum. Most patients were managed with debridement and dressings while 12% received surgical treatment. Of those with stage one ulcers, 29% healed completely at two months. In stage two and three patients, 17% and 6% healed in two months, respectively, and this number was zero in stage four patients. Conclusion: The Wound Care Surveillance Program has been a very effective strategy for the prevention and management of pressure ulcers. Stage two ulcers were the most common in our setup. Braden scoring, traditionally used to screen these ulcers, can be used as a predictive and prognostic tool to predict healing of pressure ulcers. Poor healing is expected in higher staged ulcers and patients with spinal injury and major solid organ injury and those who need a tracheostomy. Home-based care is not up to mark in our society and accounts for most of the cases in the follow-up.

  12. Foam dressings for treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rachel M; Gillespie, Brigid M; Thalib, Lukman; Higgins, Niall S; Whitty, Jennifer A

    2017-10-12

    Pressure ulcers, also known as pressure injuries and bed sores, are localised areas of injury to the skin or underlying tissues, or both. Dressings made from a variety of materials, including foam, are used to treat pressure ulcers. An evidence-based overview of dressings for pressure ulcers is needed to enable informed decision-making on dressing use. This review is part of a suite of Cochrane Reviews investigating the use of dressings in the treatment of pressure ulcers. Each review will focus on a particular dressing type. To assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of foam wound dressings for healing pressure ulcers in people with an existing pressure ulcer in any care setting. In February 2017 we searched: the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE (including In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid Embase; EBSCO CINAHL Plus and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED). We also searched clinical trials registries for ongoing and unpublished studies, and scanned reference lists of relevant included studies as well as reviews, meta-analyses and health technology reports to identify additional studies. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. Published or unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs, that compared the clinical and cost effectiveness of foam wound dressings for healing pressure ulcers (Category/Stage II or above). Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias and data extraction. A third reviewer resolved discrepancies between the review authors. We included nine trials with a total of 483 participants, all of whom were adults (59 years or older) with an existing pressure ulcer Category/Stage II or above. All trials had two arms, which compared foam dressings with other dressings for treating pressure ulcers.The certainty of evidence ranged from low to very low due

  13. [Microbiology of pressure and vascular ulcer infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Balbuena, Jorge; García Madero, Rodrigo; Segovia Gómez, Teresa; Cantero Caballero, Miriea; Sánchez Romero, Isabel; Ramos Martínez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcer (PU) infection is a significant clinical problem in many elderly patients. To determine the microbiology of PU and vascular ulcer (VU) infections by conducting a cross-sectional study of outpatients treated in a chronic wounds unit over an 18 month period. Sixty six patients with PU infection and 159 patients with an infected VU were identified. The PUs were located below the knee in 36 patients (52%). Patients with pressure ulcers had a higher proportion of institutionalization, cognitive impairment, inability to walk, and sphincter incontinence. There was a greater number of infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae (52%, P=.002) and fewer S. aureus infections (24%, P<.001) in patients with a PU compared to those with those with a VU. Forty-one percent of S. aureus strains isolated in all the patients were resistant to methicillin (MRSA). The proportion of Enterobacteriaceae infections was similar in patients with infection of pelvic girdle PU and in those located below the knee. PU patients suffer a higher rate of infection by enterobacteria. The most common pathogen in UV infections is S. aureus. The proportion of MRSA infection in patients with chronic wounds is high. The microbiology of the infection in the pelvic girdle PU is similar to those located below the knee. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. The trend of pressure ulcer prevalence rates in German hospitals: results of seven cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Wilborn, Doris; Dassen, Theo; Lahmann, Nils

    2009-05-01

    Pressure ulcer prevalence rates provide useful information about the magnitude of this health problem. Only limited information on pressure ulcers in Germany was available before 2001. The purpose of this study was to compare results of seven pressure ulcer prevalence surveys which were conducted annually between 2001 and 2007 and to explore whether pressure ulcer prevalence rates decreased. The second aim was to evaluate if the measured prevalence rates of our sample could be generalised for all German hospitals. Results of seven point pressure ulcer prevalence studies conducted in 225 German hospitals were analysed. Chi-square tests, chi-square trend tests and one-way ANOVA to assess differences and trends across the years were applied. The sample was stratified according to pressure ulcer risk and speciality. Finally, study samples were compared with the potential population. In total data of 40,247 hospital patients were analysed. The overall pressure ulcer prevalence rate in German hospitals was 10.2%. Patient samples of each year were comparable regarding gender, age and pressure ulcer risk. Pressure ulcer prevalence rates decreased from 13.9% (year 2001) to 7.3% (year 2007) (pcare units remained stable. With some limitations our study results are representative for all hospitals within Germany. It is highly probable that the decrease of prevalence rates was due to an increased awareness of the pressure ulcer problem in Germany and subsequent efforts to improve pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. The quality of clinical practice regarding pressure ulcer prevention and treatment has improved. However, pressure ulcers are still relevant and require attention. In 2007, one out of 10 hospital patients who were at pressure ulcer risk had at least one pressure related skin damage.

  15. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  16. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure ...

  17. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What is “skin tolerance” and how can it be ... play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure sores among ...

  18. The first national pressure ulcer prevalence survey in county council and municipality settings in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunningberg, Lena; Hommel, Ami; Bååth, Carina; Idvall, Ewa

    2013-10-01

    To report data from the first national pressure ulcer prevalence survey in Sweden on prevalence, pressure ulcer categories, locations and preventive interventions for persons at risk for developing pressure ulcers. A cross-sectional research design was used in a total sample of 35,058 persons in hospitals and nursing homes. The methodology used was that recommended by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. The prevalence of pressure ulcers was 16.6% in hospitals and 14.5% in nursing homes. Many persons at risk for developing pressure ulcers did not receive a pressure-reducing mattress (23.3-27.9%) or planned repositioning in bed (50.2-57.5%). Despite great effort on the national level to encourage the prevention of pressure ulcers, the prevalence is high. Public reporting and benchmarking are now available, evidence-based guidelines have been disseminated and national goals have been set. Strategies for implementing practices outlined in the guidelines, meeting goals and changing attitudes must be further developed. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A novel system to tackle hospital acquired pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renganathan, B S; Preejith, S P; Nagaiyan, Sridhar; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2016-08-01

    Hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) is a major problem that affects around one in twenty patients who are admitted in hospital with sudden illness. These ulcers often occur when patients have limited mobility and cannot change positions in bed on their own. Traditionally, the occurrence of HAPUs has been minimized by turning the patient every 2 hours to alternating lateral and supine positions, and by using pressure redistributing mattresses. In many healthcare facilities, such a patient repositioning schedule is not always maintained owing to low caregiver compliance to turning protocols. Difficulty in monitoring patient position continuously, lack of turn reminders/alerts and suboptimal caregiver staffing ratio increases the occurrence of HAPUs. A novel method to address the need for improved pressure ulcer prevention is presented. The proposed method consists of a wearable device which continuously monitors the patient's position and communicates wirelessly with a tablet which enables alerts to be sent to the caregiver when a patient turn is due in accordance with the protocol adopted by the hospital. The patient's position is continuously monitored and the turning procedure carried out is logged and updated on the hospital's cloud system, thereby enabling centralized monitoring. Under a controlled setting, system was able to continuously monitor patient's position and can accurately detect standard patient positions.

  20. Foot ulcers in the diabetic patient, prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Wu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie C Wu1, Vickie R Driver1, James S Wrobel2, David G Armstrong21Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research,William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, and National Center of Limb Salvage, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research, Dr. William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Lower extremity complications in persons with diabetes have become an increasingly significant public health concern in both the developed and developing world. These complications, beginning with neuropathy and subsequent diabetic foot wounds frequently lead to infection and lower extremity amputation even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In order to diminish the detrimental consequences associated with diabetic foot ulcers, a common-sense-based treatment approach must be implemented. Many of the etiological factors contributing to the formation of diabetic foot ulceration may be identified using simple, inexpensive equipment in a clinical setting. Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers can be accomplished in a primary care setting with a brief history and screening for loss of protective sensation via the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. Specialist clinics may quantify neuropathy, plantar foot pressure, and assess vascular status with Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial blood pressure indices. These measurements, in conjunction with other findings from the history and physical examination, may enable clinicians to stratify patients based on risk and help determine the type of intervention. Other effective clinical interventions may include patient education, optimizing glycemic control, smoking cessation, and diligent foot care. Recent technological advanced combined with better understanding of the wound healing process have resulted in a myriad of advanced

  1. SURGICAL RECONSTRUCTION IN PRESSURE ULCERS- A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE WORKHORSE FLAP OPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeja Rajan T. M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pressure ulcers can significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality by chronic infections. Radical debridement of all devitalised and infected tissues followed by a reconstructive algorithm for soft tissue padding over bony prominences to prevent recurrent breakdown are the mainstay of surgical management of pressure ulcers. Choice of the soft tissue flap for reconstruction is influenced by the dimensions of ulcers, local tissue availability and surgeon’s preferences. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective study includes 140 patients with spinal injuries having pressure ulcers of NPUAP grade III and IV treated surgically over a period of four years. The demographics of pressure ulcers, the workhorse flap options as well as the outcome were analysed. RESULTS The pressure ulcers were seen predominantly in males (93.6% of 40-49 years’ age group (42.8%. Ischial pressure ulcers (n=104 constituted 74.2% followed by sacral pressure ulcers (n=24 that is 17.1% and trochanteric pressure ulcers (n=12 in 8.6%. Debridement and direct closure of wound were possible only in 10 cases. Majority (92.8% of patients needed additional tissues for wound coverage. Our workhorse fasciocutaneous flaps were rotation flaps from the gluteal region or posterior thigh with medial or lateral based designs (34.2%. Local muscle tissue was used in 64 cases (46% either as gluteal, tensor fascia lata and biceps femoris myocutaneous flaps or gluteus maximus, hamstring or gracilis muscle fillers in myoplasty. CONCLUSIONS Rotation flap along with myoplasty were our workhorse flap options in majority of the pressure ulcers. But, our future perspective is to spare muscle and use more fasciocutaneous perforator flaps for reconstruction according to evidence-based clinical practice.

  2. Reducing the incidence of pressure ulcers in critical care units: a 4-year quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Annette; Peart, Joanna; Wright, Stephen E; McCullagh, Iain J

    2017-06-01

    Critical care patients often have several risk factors for pressure ulceration and implementing prevention interventions have been shown to decrease risk. We identified a high incidence of pressure ulcers in the four adult critical care units in our organization. Therefore, avoiding pressure ulceration was an important quality priority. We undertook a quality improvement programme aimed at reducing the incidence of pressure ulceration using an evidence-based bundle approach. A bundle of technical and non-technical interventions were implemented supported by clinical leadership on each unit. Important components were evidence appraisals; changes to mattresses; focussed risk assessment alongside mandating patients at very high risk to be repositioned two hourly; and staff training to increase awareness of how to prevent pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcer numbers, incidence and categories were collected continuously and monitored monthly by unit staff. Pressure ulcer rates reduced significantly from 8.08/100 patient admissions to 2.97/100 patient admissions, an overall relative rate reduction of 63% over 4 years. The greatest reduction was seen in the most severe category of pressure ulceration. The average estimated cost saving was £2.6 million (range £2.1-£3.1). A quality improvement programme including technical and non-technical interventions, data feedback to staff and clinical leadership was associated with a sustained reduction in the incidence of pressure ulceration in the critically ill. Strategies used in this programme may be transferable to other critical care units to bring more widespread patient benefit. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  4. Preventing High Blood Pressure

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    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... meal and snack options can help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty ...

  5. The effect of a patient centred care bundle intervention on pressure ulcer incidence (INTACT): A cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Bucknall, Tracey; Webster, Joan; McInnes, Elizabeth; Gillespie, Brigid M; Banks, Merrilyn; Whitty, Jennifer A; Thalib, Lukman; Roberts, Shelley; Tallott, Mandy; Cullum, Nicky; Wallis, Marianne

    2016-12-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers are a serious patient safety concern, associated with poor patient outcomes and high healthcare costs. They are also viewed as an indicator of nursing care quality. To evaluate the effectiveness of a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle in preventing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers among at risk patients. Pragmatic cluster randomised trial. Eight tertiary referral hospitals with >200 beds each in three Australian states. 1600 patients (200/hospital) were recruited. Patients were eligible if they were: ≥18 years old; at risk of pressure ulcer because of limited mobility; expected to stay in hospital ≥48h and able to read English. Hospitals (clusters) were stratified in two groups by recent pressure ulcer rates and randomised within strata to either a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle or standard care. The care bundle was theoretically and empirically based on patient participation and clinical practice guidelines. It was multi-component, with three messages for patients' participation in pressure ulcer prevention care: keep moving; look after your skin; and eat a healthy diet. Training aids for patients included a DVD, brochure and poster. Nurses in intervention hospitals were trained in partnering with patients in their pressure ulcer prevention care. The statistician, recruiters, and outcome assessors were blinded to group allocation and interventionists blinded to the study hypotheses, tested at both the cluster and patient level. The primary outcome, incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, which applied to both the cluster and individual participant level, was measured by daily skin inspection. Four clusters were randomised to each group and 799 patients per group analysed. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.035. After adjusting for clustering and pre-specified covariates (age, pressure ulcer present at baseline, body mass index, reason for admission, residence and number of comorbidities on

  6. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing ...

  7. Association between presence of pneumonia and pressure ulcer formation following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shilpa; Karg, Patricia E; Boninger, Michael L; Brienza, David M

    2017-07-01

    To determine if the presence of pneumonia and pressure ulcers are associated in individuals with an acute spinal cord injury during acute care and rehabilitation hospitalizations. Retrospective, secondary analyses of data obtained from the Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems enrolled from 1993 until 2006 Setting: Acute care hospitalization and inpatient rehabilitation facilities Participants: A cohort of individuals hospitalized in acute care (n = 3,098) and inpatient rehabilitation (n = 1,768) was included in the analysis. Frequencies of pressure ulcer formation and episodes of pneumonia were noted in both settings. Not applicable. Pressure ulcer formation and diagnosis of pneumonia Results: The development of pressure ulcers, including stage I, was 20.3% acute care and 21.1% during in inpatient rehabilitation. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed a significant association of pneumonia with occurrence of pressure ulcers (P ≤ 0.001, OR = 2.3 and 2.2 respectively), the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grades (P pneumonia, after adjusting for injury severity, age, sex, and utilization of mechanical ventilation. Impaired inflammatory response and decreased mobility in individuals with pneumonia may predispose these individuals to develop pressure ulcers. Surveillance and preventive measures for pressure ulcers should be rigorous in individuals with SCI and pneumonia.

  8. Effectiveness of turning with unequal time intervals on the incidence of pressure ulcer lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwee, K; Grypdonck, M H F; De Bacquer, D; Defloor, Tom

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports a study investigating whether repositioning patients lying on a pressure-reducing mattress alternately for 2 hours in a lateral position and 4 hours in a supine position reduces the incidence of pressure ulcers in comparison with repositioning every 4 hours. Repositioning is commonly recognized as an effective preventive measure. Almost no research has been carried out so far on the necessary turning frequencies to prevent pressure ulcer lesions. The pressure is higher in a lateral than in a supine position. A two-arm randomized controlled trial was conducted in 16 Belgian elder care nursing homes. Patients with non-blanchable erythema were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. In the experimental group (n = 122), patients were repositioned alternately 2 hours in a lateral position and 4 hours in a supine position. In the control group (n = 113), patients were repositioned every 4 hours. The sitting protocol was identical in both groups. Pressure areas were observed daily and classified according to the four grades of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. In the experimental group, 16.4% patients developed a pressure ulcer lesion (grade 2-4), while 21.2% did so in the control group. The incidence was not statistically significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.40). The severity (P = 0.65) and location (P = 0.19) of pressure ulcer lesions, and the time to developing them (P = 0.29) were also similar in both groups. No patient developed a pressure ulcer at the hips. A considerable number of patients changed from a lateral to a supine position between the turning intervals. More frequent repositioning on a pressure-reducing mattress does not necessarily lead to fewer pressure ulcer lesions and consequently cannot be considered as a more effective preventive measure.

  9. [Analysis of statutory health insurance data concerning utilization of support surfaces for pressure ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Falk; Scharnetzky, Elke; Deitermann, Bernhilde; Glaeske, Gerd

    2006-10-01

    Support surfaces are commonly used to prevent and treat pressure ulcers. Up to now little is known about their application in Germany. We conducted a cross-sectional study using claims data of the Gmuender ErsatzKasse (GEK) for the year 2004 to analyse the utilization of support surfaces for pressure ulcers in primary care. Based on age- and sex-specific treatment prevalences for individuals with at least one prescription, prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated. A total of 1999 subjects with a mean age of 63.4 years (SD: 20.7) received support surfaces for pressure ulcers. With respect to the numbers of prescriptions (n = 2421) alternating pressure mattresses (31.6%), air-filled rings (13.5%) and various seat cushions (13.0%) were used frequently, whereas foam mattresses only came to 4.7%. The treatment prevalence increases continuously with age with no sex-specific differences. Using the 50-59 year olds as a reference, men aged 90+ (PR: 43.94; 95% CI: 31.46-61.37) as well as women aged 90+ (PR: 40.61; 95% CI: 30.77-53.60) received approximately 40-times more often support surfaces for pressure ulcers. Support surfaces for pressure ulcers are commonly used in the elderly. Our study suggests that their application does not correspond to the best available evidence. Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers as well as the selection of support surfaces should be seen as an interdisciplinary task.

  10. Electronic versus paper records: documentation of pressure ulcer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Ahmad; Tawalbeh, Loai I; AlAzzam, Manar; AlBashtawy, Mohammed; Batiha, Abdul-Monim

    The documentation of patient data on health records is a vital component of the care process. Accurate and complete recording of this data is a necessary practice. The adoption of electronic health records to improve the quality of nursing documentation is on the rise. This study compares the accuracy and completeness of pressure ulcer data documentation between electronic and paper records. A descriptive, comparative design with a retrospective review of patient records. Settings and sample: Two hospitals were chosen purposefully, one using electronic recording of patient data and the other using paper records. In the first phase, all hospitalised patients aged 18 years and over were inspected for pressure ulcers. In the second phase, the files of patients with pressure ulcers were audited. Of the 52 patients with ulcers found in the hospital that used an electronic system, 43 of their records documented the pressure ulcers (83%). Of the 55 patients with pressure ulcers in the hospital using paper records, 39 files had corresponding documentation of the presence of a pressure ulcer (71%). In terms of accuracy and completeness, more comprehensive documentation practice was found on the electronic health records compared with paper records. However, both types of systems have shortcomings in the practice of pressure ulcer data documentation.

  11. Prevalence, incidence and associated factors of pressure ulcers in home palliative care patients: A retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Dante, Angelo; D'Angelo, Daniela; Lamarca, Luciano; Mastroianni, Chiara; Petitti, Tommasangelo; Piredda, Michela; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2018-01-01

    Terminally ill patients are at high risk of pressure ulcers, which have a negative impact on quality of life. Data about pressure ulcers' prevalence, incidence and associated factors are largely insufficient. To document the point prevalence at admission and the cumulative incidence of pressure ulcers in terminally ill patients admitted to an Italian home palliative care unit, and to analyse the patients' and caregivers' characteristics associated with their occurrence. Retrospective chart review. Patients ( n = 574) with a life expectancy ⩽6 months admitted to a palliative home care service were included in this study. The prevalence and incidence rates were 13.1% and 13.0%, respectively. The logistic regression models showed body mass index ( p 70 and >1 caregiver at home as the dichotomous variables predictors of presenting with a pressure ulcer at time of admission and during home palliative care. The notable pressure ulcers' incidence and prevalence rates suggest the need to include this issue among the main outcomes to pursue during home palliative care. The accuracy of body mass index, Braden Scale and Karnofsky Performance Scale in predicting the pressure ulcers risk is confirmed. Therefore, they appear as essential tools, in combination with nurses' clinical judgment, for a structured approach to pressure ulcers prevention. Further research is needed to explore the home caregivers' characteristics and attitudes associated with the occurrence of pressure ulcers and the relations between their strategies for pressure ulcer prevention and gender-related patient's needs.

  12. Predictive models for pressure ulcers from intensive care unit electronic health records using Bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewprag, Pacharmon; Newton, Cheryl; Vermillion, Brenda; Hyun, Sookyung; Huang, Kun; Machiraju, Raghu

    2017-07-05

    We develop predictive models enabling clinicians to better understand and explore patient clinical data along with risk factors for pressure ulcers in intensive care unit patients from electronic health record data. Identifying accurate risk factors of pressure ulcers is essential to determining appropriate prevention strategies; in this work we examine medication, diagnosis, and traditional Braden pressure ulcer assessment scale measurements as patient features. In order to predict pressure ulcer incidence and better understand the structure of related risk factors, we construct Bayesian networks from patient features. Bayesian network nodes (features) and edges (conditional dependencies) are simplified with statistical network techniques. Upon reviewing a network visualization of our model, our clinician collaborators were able to identify strong relationships between risk factors widely recognized as associated with pressure ulcers. We present a three-stage framework for predictive analysis of patient clinical data: 1) Developing electronic health record feature extraction functions with assistance of clinicians, 2) simplifying features, and 3) building Bayesian network predictive models. We evaluate all combinations of Bayesian network models from different search algorithms, scoring functions, prior structure initializations, and sets of features. From the EHRs of 7,717 ICU patients, we construct Bayesian network predictive models from 86 medication, diagnosis, and Braden scale features. Our model not only identifies known and suspected high PU risk factors, but also substantially increases sensitivity of the prediction - nearly three times higher comparing to logistical regression models - without sacrificing the overall accuracy. We visualize a representative model with which our clinician collaborators identify strong relationships between risk factors widely recognized as associated with pressure ulcers. Given the strong adverse effect of pressure ulcers

  13. Reducing pressure ulcer prevalence rates in the long-term acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Catherine T; Trigilia, Donna; Houle, Tracy L; Delong, Sandra; Rosenblum, David

    2009-04-01

    Information about pressure ulcer prevalence, prevention, and optimal management strategies in the long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) setting is sparse. Although care processes in other patient care settings have been reported to affect pressure ulcer prevalence rates, the effect of such programs in the LTACH is unknown. To reduce perceived above-average pressure ulcer prevalence rates and improve care processes, a 108-bed LTACH used a failure mode and effects analysis to identify and address high-priority areas for improvement. Areas in need of improvement included a lack of 1) wound care professionals, 2) methods to consistently document prevention and wound data, and 3) an interdisciplinary wound care team approach, as well as a faulty electronic medical record. While prevalence data were collected, policies and procedures based on several published guidelines were developed and incorporated into the pressure ulcer plan of care by the newly established wound care team. Improved assessment and documentation methods, enhanced staff education, revised electronic records, wound care product reviews, and a facility-wide commitment to improved care resulted in a reduction of facility-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence from 41% at baseline to an average of 4.2% during the following 12 months as well as fewer missing electronic record data (improves care practices and reduces pressure ulcer prevalence in the LTACH. Studies to increase knowledge about the LTACH patient population and their unique needs and risk profiles are needed.

  14. Pressure-reducing interventions among persons with pressure ulcers: results from the first three national pressure ulcer prevalence surveys in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bååth, Carina; Idvall, Ewa; Gunningberg, Lena; Hommel, Ami

    2014-02-01

    The overall aim of this study was to describe preventive interventions among persons with pressure ulcer (PU) in three nationwide PU prevalence surveys in Sweden. A cross-sectional research design was used; more than 70 000 persons from different hospitals and nursing homes participated in the three prevalence surveys conducted in March 2011, October 2011 and March 2012. The methodology used was that recommended by the European Pressure Ulcers Advisory Panel. The overall prevalence of PU categories I-IV in hospitals was 16.6%, 14.4% and 16.1%, respectively. Corresponding figures for nursing homes were 14.5%, 14.2% and 11.8%, respectively. Heel protection/floating heels and sliding sheets were more frequently planned for persons with PU category I. Despite the three prevalence studies that have showed high prevalence of PU the use of preventing interventions is still not on an acceptable level. Heel protection/floating heels and sliding sheets were more frequently planned for persons with PUs, and individual-planned repositioning also increased. However, when persons already have a PU they should all have pressure-reducing preventive interventions to prevent the development of more PUs. Preventing PUs presents a challenge even when facilities have prevention programmes. A PU prevention programme requires an enthusiastic leader who will maintain the team's focus and direction for all staff involved in patient care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The Nursing Diagnosis of risk for pressure ulcer: content validation

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    Cássia Teixeira dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to validate the content of the new nursing diagnosis, termed risk for pressure ulcer. Method: the content validation with a sample made up of 24 nurses who were specialists in skin care from six different hospitals in the South and Southeast of Brazil. Data collection took place electronically, through an instrument constructed using the SurveyMonkey program, containing a title, definition, and 19 risk factors for the nursing diagnosis. The data were analyzed using Fehring's method and descriptive statistics. The project was approved by a Research Ethics Committee. Results: title, definition and seven risk factors were validated as "very important": physical immobilization, pressure, surface friction, shearing forces, skin moisture, alteration in sensation and malnutrition. Among the other risk factors, 11 were validated as "important": dehydration, obesity, anemia, decrease in serum albumin level, prematurity, aging, smoking, edema, impaired circulation, and decrease in oxygenation and in tissue perfusion. The risk factor of hyperthermia was discarded. Conclusion: the content validation of these components of the nursing diagnosis corroborated the importance of the same, being able to facilitate the nurse's clinical reasoning and guiding clinical practice in the preventive care for pressure ulcers.

  16. Microclimate and development of pressure ulcers and superficial skin changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Saldy; Okuwa, Mayumi; Shigeta, Yoshie; Dai, Misako; Iuchi, Terumi; Rahman, Sulaiman; Usman, Awaluddin; Kasim, Sukmawati; Sugama, Junko; Nakatani, Toshio; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the microclimate and development of pressure ulcers and superficial skin changes. A prospective cohort study was conducted in an acute care ward in Indonesia. Risk factors for pressure ulcers and superficial skin changes were identified based on the Bergstrom Braden conceptual model. Microclimate data were collected every 3 days for 15 days while the development of pressure ulcers and superficial skin changes was observed every day. Pressure ulcers and superficial skin changes were developed in 20 of the 71 participants. Total mean difference in skin temperature was higher for patients with pressure ulcers and superficial skin changes (0·9 ± 0·6°C) compared with controls (0·6 ± 0·8°C) (P = 0·071). Binary logistic regression predictor values for pressure ulcers and superficial skin changes were 0·111 for type of sheet and 0·347 for Braden Scale results. In conclusion, difference in skin temperature seems to be a predictor for pressure ulcer development and superficial skin changes, while synthetic fibre sheets are able to maintain a beneficial microclimate. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Pressure ulcers in palliative ward patients: hyponatremia and low blood pressure as indicators of risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sternal D

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Danuta Sternal,1 Krzysztof Wilczyński,2 Jan Szewieczek2 1Department of Nursing and Paramedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bielsko-Biala, Bielsko-Biala, 2Department of Geriatrics, School of Health Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland Background: Prevention strategies for pressure ulcer formation remain critical in patients with an advanced illness. We analyzed factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in a palliative care ward setting.Patients and methods: This study was a retrospective analysis of 329 consecutive patients with a mean age (± standard deviation of 70.4±11.8 years (range: 30–96 years, median 70.0 years; 55.3% women, who were admitted to the Palliative Care Department between July 2012 and May 2014.Results: Patients were hospitalized for mean of 24.8±31.4 days (1–310 days, median 14 days. A total of 256 patients (77.8% died in the ward and 73 patients (22.2% were discharged. Two hundred and six patients (62.6% did not develop pressure ulcers during their stay in the ward, 84 patients (25.5% were admitted with pressure ulcers, and 39 patients (11.9% developed pressure ulcers in the ward. Four factors assessed at admission appear to predict the development of pressure ulcers in the multivariate logistic regression model: Waterlow score (odds ratio [OR] =1.140, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.057–1.229, P=0.001, transfer from other hospital wards (OR =2.938, 95% CI =1.339–6.448, P=0.007, hemoglobin level (OR =0.814, 95% CI =0.693–0.956, P=0.012, and systolic blood pressure (OR =0.976, 95% CI =0.955–0.997, P=0.023. Five other factors assessed during hospitalization appear to be associated with pressure ulcer development: mean evening body temperature (OR =3.830, 95% CI =1.729–8.486, P=0.001, mean Waterlow score (OR =1.194, 95% CI =1.092–1.306, P<0.001, the lowest recorded sodium concentration (OR =0.880, 95% CI =0.814

  18. Ulcer piercing: cleansing of complicated diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers by positive pressure irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, M

    2014-02-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy of the ulcer piercing procedure, which allows constant cleansing of the ulcer and facilitates a positive pressure irrigation of any pierced hidden tracts, in order to reduce the negative impact of stasis on wound healing. We designed a surgical procedure of ulcer piercing and drainage with a silastic tube, which allows positive pressure irrigation of any pierced tracts. This procedure was performed in a continuous series of 25 selected diabetic patients affected by a Wagner stage 3 ulcer of the toe (n=16), metatarsal midfoot (n=5) and plantar Charcot foot (n=4), and with adequate foot arterial blood supply. Within 6 months of the ulcer piercing procedure, 23/25 of ulcers had completely healed. In two further cases, the ulcer piercing ring was still in place after 3 and 5 months, progressively healing with no active signs of infection. Taking into consideration the advantages and the lack of side effects afforded by this procedure, ulcer piercing represents a small but effective step towards an easier and safer approach to treating complicated diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers with adequate arterial blood supply. There were no external sources of funding for this study. The author has no conflicts of interest to declare with regard to the manuscript or its content.

  19. [PRESSURE ULCER – HEALTHCARE QUALITY AND PATIENT SAFETY INDICATOR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesarić, J

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is an undesired event for patient, frequently used in quality monitoring as an indicator of healthcare quality and patient safety. According to legal regulations in the Republic of Croatia, pressure ulcer is included in the group of indicators of other undesired events (patient safety) and healthcare institutions are obliged to monitor the applicable indicator and submit report to the Agency every six months. Annual reports on the patient safety indicators are available on the Agency website. The article presents the descriptive list of indicators and descriptive list for the Pressure Ulcer indicator.

  20. Prevention of foot ulcers in the at-risk patient with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, J J; Price, P E; Lavery, L A; Monteiro-Soares, M; Rasmussen, A; Jubiz, Y; Bus, S A

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes is extremely important to help reduce the enormous burden of foot ulceration on both patient and health resources. A comprehensive analysis of reported interventions is not currently available, but is needed to better inform caregivers about effective prevention. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the effectiveness of interventions to prevent first and recurrent foot ulcers in persons with diabetes who are at risk for ulceration. The available medical scientific literature in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane database was searched for original research studies on preventative interventions. Both controlled and non-controlled studies were selected. Data from controlled studies were assessed for methodological quality by two independent reviewers. From the identified records, a total of 30 controlled studies (of which 19 RCTs) and another 44 non-controlled studies were assessed and described. Few controlled studies, of generally low to moderate quality, were identified on the prevention of a first foot ulcer. For the prevention of recurrent plantar foot ulcers, multiple RCTs with low risk of bias show the benefit for the use of daily foot skin temperature measurements and consequent preventative actions, as well as for therapeutic footwear that demonstrates to relieve plantar pressure and that is worn by the patient. To prevent recurrence, some evidence exists for integrated foot care when it includes a combination of professional foot treatment, therapeutic footwear and patient education; for just a single session of patient education, no evidence exists. Surgical interventions can be effective in selected patients, but the evidence base is small. The evidence base to support the use of specific self-management and footwear interventions for the prevention of recurrent plantar foot ulcers is quite strong, but is small for the use of other, sometimes widely applied, interventions and is

  1. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. Methods. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C. A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. Results. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80±19.18; C: 22,97±25,47; p = 0.0005, rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90±2.48; C: 8.6±1.05; p = 0.0005 and total PUSH score (E: 7.35±3.17; C: 11.85±2.35; p = 0,0003. The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. Conclusion. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  2. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durović, Aleksandar; Marić, Dragan; Brdareski, Zorica; Jevtić, Miodrag; Durdević, Slavisa

    2008-12-01

    Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E) were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C). A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80 +/- 19.18; C: 22,97 +/- 25,47; p = 0.0005), rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90 +/- 2.48; C: 8.6 +/- 1.05; p = 0.0005) and total PUSH score (E: 7.35 +/- 3.17; C: 11.85 +/- 2.35; p = 0,0003). The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  3. [Impact of interventions in the pressure ulcer rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya Farías, I; Febré, N

    To evaluate the impact of a risk management program for prevention of pressure ulcers (PUs) in an adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU). A quantitative, prospective study performed with a «before and after» evaluation, and designed in three stages: 1) PU incidence study; 2) Intervention by implementing a risk management program, and 3) Assessment of the impact. Adherence to the preventive measures showed a significant increase (11.7%) between the first month of the program and the final month (58.5%) of the assessment. Initial PU rate was 20.9, with a decrease in the rate to 14.0 per 1000 bed occupancy days (Pprevention measures, was effective in reducing the rate of PU in the period under study by more than 33%. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  5. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores ... sores? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By ...

  6. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from ... Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa ...

  7. Preventing Pressure Sores

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  8. Preventing Pressure Sores

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  9. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, ... do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in ... play_arrow What are the six stages of a pressure sore and how ...

  10. Evaluation of skin perfusion pressure to assess refractory foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, M; Mihara, S; Takahagi, S; Iwamoto, K; Hiragun, T; Hide, M

    2017-05-02

    The number of patients with foot gangrene caused by critical ischaemia and severe infection is increasing significantly in developed countries. The measurement of perilesional skin blood flow by skin perfusion pressure (SPP) is useful to select the appropriate treatment of gangrenous lesions, in that it is not affected by calcifications of blood vessels. However, the prognosis of a foot ulcer may also be affected by the level of blood sugar and infections. This study aimed to validate the use of SPP in cases of foot gangrene and ulcers in patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and infection. Clinical symptoms, ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and SPP were assessed to evaluate the condition of each foot ulcer. Every foot ulcer was treated as independent, even if a participant had multiple ulcers. All ulcers for which we measured SPP were subject to the analysis. All ulcers were purely ischaemic in nature and were exclusively located on the foot or toes. Data were collected from 117 foot ulcers on 91 toes and feet from 65 patients. Almost all SPP values in healed cases were > 27 mmHg. There were three patients whose ulcers failed to heal by conservative treatments were complicated with severe infection. However, no effect of DM on the relationship between SPP values and prognosis was observed. Logistic regression analysis of all ulcers except for the 5 cases complicated with infection revealed that those with 30 mmHg or lower SPP values are likely to heal by conservative treatment with 23% or lower probability, whereas any ulcer with more than 50 mmHg SPP value and without severe infection may heal without the need for further operations with 80% or higher probability. The combination of SPP and careful evaluation of infection may be a good parameter to decide the appropriate treatment for ischaemic skin ulcers, regardless of the complication of DM.

  11. Pressure ulcer occurrence following the great East Japan Earthquake: observations from a disaster medical assistance team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

     Persons with limited mobility are at risk for pressure ulcers. The development of pressure ulcers following earthquakes has been reported secondary to disaster-related spinal cord injury. In the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake, members of a disaster medical assistance team (DMAT), which included plastic surgeons and wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) nurses working in acute care hospitals, temporary clinics, evacuation centers, and the community noticed an increase in the number of requests for pressure ulcer care. A review of hospital records and verbal reports from the community suggested that the incidence of Stage III and Stage IV pressure ulcers was 7.7% in an acute care hospital and 26.4% in home care patients - almost 10 times higher than the normal reported incidence in Japan. Patients were mostly elderly and did not have spinal cord injuries. Alternating-pressure air mattresses stopped working, alternative pressure-redistribution devices could not be delivered, caregivers could not reach the homebound, and evacuation centers did not have enough mattresses. It is believed that the high percentage of elderly living in the affected areas of Japan, combined with limited resources, manpower, and the absence of utilities, increased the number of persons with deep pressure ulcers. Following natural disasters, DMAT wound care specialists can make important contributions to the prevention of these wounds while providing much-needed care to prevent pressure ulcer-related complications. Clinician observations suggest that the risk of pressure-related injuries following a natural disaster is high, especially among the elderly.

  12. Pressure ulcer research: where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Krzysztof S

    The physiology and pathology of pressure defence mechanisms have been little studied and are not understood. No critical risk factors have been identified and populations of patients identified as being 'at risk' by risk calculators and clinical impression often have small numbers of patients who are really susceptible to pressure ulcers (PUs). Prevention trials must therefore have large sample sizes to enable significant results to be observed, or must be carried out in patient populations with a high PU incidence. Many trials have been carried out in orthopaedic patients but results may not be generalizable. Measurement of physical parameters (e.g. interface pressure), useful for adapting support surfaces for individual patients and designing new support systems, is unlikely to identify the aetiology of PUs and, without validation from clinical trials, predict the efficacy of interventions. In future it may be better to sample other groups, such as critical care patients for trials, as the findings might prove more generalizable. The effects of interventions should also be researched at the healthcare system level rather than that of product or risk factor. However, only the physiological study of PU aetiology is likely to advance our knowledge and ability to prevent PUs more effectively.

  13. Development and validation of a pressure ulcer risk assessment tool for acute hospital patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Karen Nicola; Barker, Anna Lucia; Kamar, Jeannette

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a pressure ulcer risk assessment for acute hospitals. This tool was developed in a cohort of 342 patients with a mean age 63 years (SD 19.82) and validated in a second cohort of 165 patients with a mean age 68 years (SD 18.40). Risk factors for inclusion on The Northern Hospital Pressure Ulcer Prevention Plan (TNH-PUPP) were identified from the literature then examined and weighted using logistic regression. Risk factors included on the TNH-PUPP were requires assistance to move in bed (odds ratio [OR] 5.15; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.49-10.65), admission to intensive care during current admission (OR 2.98; 95% CI: 1.33-6.67), aged ≥ 65 years (OR 2.81; 95% CI: 1.24-6.36), reduced sensation (OR 2.29; 95% CI: 1.19-4.42), and cognitive impairment (OR 2.26; 95% CI: 1.09-4.67). The TNH-PUPP was validated in a prospective sample. The new tool had high diagnostic validity (area under the receiver operating curve=0.86), consistent in the validation sample (area under the receiver operating curve=0.90). The TNH-PUPP has a moderate positive predictive value (development=0.50; validation=0.13), and a high negative predictive value (development=0.94; validation=0.99) enabling low-risk patients to be screened out, as noncandidates for pressure ulcer prevention interventions. An accurate pressure ulcer risk assessment has been developed and validated, which identifies a high-risk group to whom limited pressure ulcer prevention resources should be directed. The TNH-PUPP facilitates effective resource allocation and is likely to reduce unnecessary patient harm and costs from pressure ulcers in acute hospitals. © 2010 by the Wound Healing Society.

  14. A retrospective study to determine the incidence of pressure ulcers in burn patients using an alternating pressure mattress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Joseph M; Wilson, Joan; Rinker, Connie; Law, Edward; Craft-Coffman, Beretta

    2003-08-01

    In immobilized patients, unrelieved pressure can create decubitus ulcers over bony prominences. Those burn patients who require prolonged bed rest, are prone to the development of such problems. Various methods of reducing pressure on these areas, including frequent turning and the use of air fluidized and low air loss beds, have been adopted to attempt to prevent the development of this complication. The Pegasus Renaissance alternating pressure mattress is such a device, intended to reduce the incidence of decubitus ulcers. It was introduced at our burn unit and evaluated over a 29-month period. During the study period, 186 (13.4%) of 1390 acutely burned patients, believed to be at high risk for the development of decubiti, were placed on this mattress. Other patients were treated in the standard hospital bed. Care was otherwise the same. No decubitus ulcers developed in any of the patients treated on the Pegasus Renaissance mattress.

  15. The prevention of diabetic foot ulceration: how biomechanical research informs clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank E. DiLiberto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Implementation of interprofessional clinical guidelines for the prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration has demonstrated positive effects regarding ulceration and amputation rates. Current foot care recommendations are primarily based on research regarding the prevention of ulcer recurrence and focused on reducing the magnitude of plantar stress (pressure overload. Yet, foot ulceration remains to be a prevalent and debilitating consequence of Diabetes Mellitus. There is limited evidence targeting the prevention of first-time ulceration, and there is a need to consider additional factors of plantar stress to supplement current guidelines. Objectives The first purpose of this article is to discuss the biomechanical theory underpinning diabetic foot ulcerations and illustrate how plantar tissue underloading may precede overloading and breakdown. The second purpose of this commentary is to discuss how advances in biomechanical foot modeling can inform clinical practice in the prevention of first-time ulceration. Discussion Research demonstrates that progressive weight-bearing activity programs to address the frequency of plantar stress and avoid underloading do not increase ulceration risk. Multi-segment foot modeling studies indicate that dynamic foot function of the midfoot and forefoot is compromised in people with diabetes. Emerging research demonstrates that implementation of foot-specific exercises may positively influence dynamic foot function and improve plantar stress in people with diabetes. Conclusion Continued work is needed to determine how to best design and integrate activity recommendations and foot-specific exercise programs into the current interprofessional paradigm for the prevention of first-time ulceration in people with Diabetes Mellitus.

  16. Development of Marjolin's ulcer following successful surgical treatment of chronic sacral pressure sore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, M.A.; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2008-01-01

    of surgical excision and successful closure of the wound, the patient developed Marjolin's ulcer 2.5 years later. Yet it illustrates the primary importance of preventing the development pressure sores, of aggressive (surgical) therapy with healing when they do arise and of taking frequent biopsies...

  17. Organizational culture, team climate, and quality management in an important patient safety issue: nosocomial pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Marije; Halfens, Ruud J G; van der Weijden, Trudy; Wensing, Michel; Akkermans, Reinier; Grol, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly, policy reform in health care is discussed in terms of changing organizational culture, creating practice teams, and organizational quality management. Yet, the evidence for these suggested determinants of high-quality care is inconsistent. To determine if the type of organizational culture (Competing Values Framework), team climate (Team Climate Inventory), and preventive pressure ulcer quality management at ward level were related to the prevalence of pressure ulcers. Also, we wanted to determine if the type of organizational culture, team climate, or the institutional quality management related to preventive quality management at the ward level. In this cross-sectional observational study multivariate (logistic) regression analyses were performed, adjusting for potential confounders and institution-level clustering. Data from 1274 patients and 460 health care professionals in 37 general hospital wards and 67 nursing home wards in the Netherlands were analyzed. The main outcome measures were nosocomial pressure ulcers in patients at risk for pressure ulcers (Braden score ≤ 18) and preventive quality management at ward level. No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate, or preventive quality management at the ward level and the prevalence of nosocomial pressure ulcers. Institutional quality management was positively correlated with preventive quality management at ward level (adj. β 0.32; p team climate, or preventive quality management at the ward level. These results would therefore not subscribe the widely suggested importance of these factors in improving health care. However, different designs and research methods (that go beyond the cross-sectional design) may be more informative in studying relations between such complex factors and outcomes in a more meaningful way. Copyright ©2010 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Pressure ulcers in an age of managed care: a nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharestani, M

    1999-05-01

    Successful competition for acquisition of capitated groups and maintenance of existing managed care contracts require demonstrations of cost controls, positive clinical outcomes, and customer satisfaction. In preparation for, and in response to managed care, healthcare providers must assure equality in their supply and demand equation if they are to survive and prosper. Iatrogenic pressure ulcers represent a major healthcare problem illustrative of this point. Successful pressure ulcer prevention and treatment programs in all practice settings demand: 1) administrative support, 2) access to staffing and supplies, 3) multidisciplinary ownership, 4) integration of science-based knowledge of risk factors, risk assessment tools, pathophysiology, and appropriate management into clinical practice, and 5) dissemination of knowledge.

  19. [Nursing diagnoses for patients at risk of developing pressure ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Thiago Moura; de Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; Caetano, Joselany Áfio; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimenez; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to identify nursing diagnoses in critical patients at risk of developing pressure ulcer. It was carried out at an Intensive Care Unit in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, using an intentional sample of thirteen subjects at risk of pressure ulcer, evaluated according to the Waterlow scale. In total, 45 nursing diagnoses were evidenced, seventeen of which were clinically significant for the development of pressure ulcer. The frequency levels for nine of these nursing diagnoses were ≥ 80%, mainly: Impaired skin integrity (100%), Impaired walking (87%), Impaired swallowing (80%), Impaired bed mobility (80%) and Impaired gas exchange (80%). The knowledge of those nursing diagnoses is important in detecting the effects and clinical basis of skin lesions.

  20. A novel model of human skin pressure ulcers in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés A Maldonado

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pressure ulcers are a prevalent health problem in today's society. The shortage of suitable animal models limits our understanding and our ability to develop new therapies. This study aims to report on the development of a novel and reproducible human skin pressure ulcer model in mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Male non-obese, diabetic, severe combined immunodeficiency mice (n = 22 were engrafted with human skin. A full-thickness skin graft was placed onto 4×3 cm wounds created on the dorsal skin of the mice. Two groups with permanent grafts were studied after 60 days. The control group (n = 6 was focused on the process of engraftment. Evaluations were conducted with photographic assessment, histological analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH techniques. The pressure ulcer group (n = 12 was created using a compression device. A pressure of 150 mmHg for 8 h, with a total of three cycles of compression-release was exerted. Evaluations were conducted with photographic assessment and histological analysis. RESULTS: Skin grafts in the control group took successfully, as shown by visual assessment, FISH techniques and histological analysis. Pressure ulcers in the second group showed full-thickness skin loss with damage and necrosis of all the epidermal and dermal layers (ulcer stage III in all cases. Complete repair occurred after 40 days. CONCLUSIONS: An inexpensive, reproducible human skin pressure ulcer model has been developed. This novel model will facilitate the development of new clinically relevant therapeutic strategies that can be tested directly on human skin.

  1. Reduced pressure for fewer pressure ulcers: can real-time feedback of interface pressure optimise repositioning in bed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunningberg, Lena; Carli, Cheryl

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to (i) describe registered nurses' and assistant nurses' repositioning skills with regard to their existing attitudes to and theoretical knowledge of pressure ulcer (PU) prevention, and (ii) evaluate if the continuous bedside pressure mapping (CBPM) system provides staff with a pedagogic tool to optimise repositioning. A quantitative study was performed using a descriptive, comparative design. Registered nurses (n = 19) and assistant nurses (n = 33) worked in pairs, and were instructed to place two volunteers (aged over 70 years) in the best pressure-reducing position (lateral and supine), first without viewing the CBPM monitor and then again after feedback. In total, 240 positionings were conducted. The results show that for the same person with the same available pressure-reducing equipment, the peak pressure varied considerably between nursing pairs. Reducing pressure in the lateral position appeared to be the most challenging. Peak pressures were significantly reduced, based on visual feedback from the CBPM monitor. The number of preventive interventions also increased, as well as patients' comfort. For the nurses as a group, the knowledge score was 59·7% and the attitude score was 88·8%. Real-time visual feedback of pressure points appears to provide another dimension to complement decision making with respect to PU prevention. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Patterns of recurrent pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury: identification of risk and protective factors 5 or more years after onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, James S; Broderick, Lynne

    2004-08-01

    To identify risk and protective factors associated with a history of recurrent pressure ulcers among participants with spinal cord injury (SCI). A mail survey was used to identify factors associated with the presence or absence of recurrent pressure ulcers. A large specialty hospital in the southeastern United States. All participants had traumatic SCI, were nonambulatory, 18 years or older, and had been injured at least 5 years. A total of 826 subjects participated, 633 of whom reported a pressure ulcer history that could be classified as to whether they did or did not have a history of recurrent pressure ulcers. Not applicable. History of pressure ulcers was measured by a single item that required participants to classify their history into 1 of 5 options, ranging from never having any pressure ulcers to having almost continuous pressure ulcers, often requiring hospitalization. Those who either never had a pressure ulcer or had them mostly for a short period after SCI onset were classified as nonrecurrent, whereas those who reported at least 1 per year were classified as recurrent. Seventy percent of the participants failed to report recurrent pressure ulcers (never had any or had them only immediately after SCI onset), whereas 13% reported a clear pattern of recurring pressure ulcers of 1 or more per year. Logistic regression analyses suggested several general behaviors were protective for recurrent pressure ulcers, including lifestyle, exercise, and diet. Yet none of the behaviors generally recommended during inpatient rehabilitation specifically to prevent pressure ulcers (eg, skin checks weight shifts) were associated with pressure ulcer history. Only 2 risk behaviors were identified (number of cigarettes smoked, use of medication for sleep), although several proxy variables were related to pressure ulcer history. Pressure ulcer history is a more viable measure of pressure ulcer outcomes than measures taken at a single point in time (current), over a brief

  3. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A; van Netten, Jaap J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration poses a heavy burden on the patient and the healthcare system, but prevention thereof receives little attention. For every euro spent on ulcer prevention, ten are spent on ulcer healing, and for every randomized controlled trial conducted on prevention, ten are conducted on healing. In this article, we argue that a shift in priorities is needed. For the prevention of a first foot ulcer, we need more insight into the effect of interventions and practices already applied globally in many settings. This requires systematic recording of interventions and outcomes, and well-designed randomized controlled trials that include analysis of cost-effectiveness. After healing of a foot ulcer, the risk of recurrence is high. For the prevention of a recurrent foot ulcer, home monitoring of foot temperature, pressure-relieving therapeutic footwear, and certain surgical interventions prove to be effective. The median effect size found in a total of 23 studies on these interventions is large, over 60%, and further increases when patients are adherent to treatment. These interventions should be investigated for efficacy as a state-of-the-art integrated foot care approach, where attempts are made to assure treatment adherence. Effect sizes of 75-80% may be expected. If such state-of-the-art integrated foot care is implemented, the majority of problems with foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes can be resolved. It is therefore time to act and to set a new target in diabetic foot care. This target is to reduce foot ulcer incidence with at least 75%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Microbial pattern of pressure ulcer in pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramita, D. A.; Khairina; Lubis, N. Z.

    2018-03-01

    Pressure ulcer (PU) is a localized trauma to the skin and or tissue beneath which lies in bony prominence due to pressure or pressure that combines with a sharp surface. Several studies have found that PU is a common problem in pediatrics population. Infection at the site of a PU is the most common complication in which the PU may host a resistant microorganism and may turn into a local infection that will be the source of bacteremia in hospitalized patients. To reveal which is the most common microbial species that underlie in pressure ulcer of pediatrics patients.A cross-sectional study was conducted in July-September 2017, involving 18 PU pediatric patients in Haji Adam Malik Hospital. To each subject, swab culture from the ulcer was madein microbial laboratory in Haji Adam Malik Hospital to determine the microbial pattern. This study found that the most common microbial pattern in pressure ulcers of pediatrics patient in Haji Adam Malik Hospital is Acinetobacter baumannii (22.2%).

  5. Aplicabilidade do protocolo de prevenção de úlcera de pressão em unidade de terapia intensiva Applicability of the prevention protocol of pressure ulcers in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuelly Wedja do Nascimento Lima e Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O não desenvolvimento da úlcera de pressão de pacientes graves em terapia intensiva é um grande desafio para a enfermagem. Portanto, é relevante a prevenção para que se garanta um cuidado de boa qualidade. O objetivo da pesquisa foi avaliar a aplicabilidade da escala de Braden em pacientes de terapia intensiva. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo baseado na avaliação de todos os pacientes internados na unidade de terapia intensiva adulto, no período 14 de Julho a 10 de Agosto de 2009. A coleta de dados foi realizada através da aplicação da escala de Braden por três juízes, identificando os riscos para o desenvolvimento da úlcera de pressão. Para a análise dos dados foi utilizado o Software estatístico SAS Na avaliação do grau de coincidência entre os juízes utilizou-se valor kappa (IC=95%. RESULTADOS: Quanto aos fatores de risco relacionados: 36,4% apresentavam leve limitação à percepção sensorial, 50,9% pele ocasionalmente úmida; 97,3% restritos ao leito; 39,1% muito limitados à mobilidade, 45% nutrição provavelmente inadequada, 61,8% apresentaram problema quanto à fricção e cisalhamento. Quanto à concordância entre os juízes (38,1% a 100,0% foram registradas em nutrição e atividade física; a hipótese do Kappa populacional nulo foi rejeitada; análise entre pares de examinadores de coincidência (41,7% a 100,0% foi registrada no item umidade e atividade física, os valores de Kappa variaram de 0,13 a 1. CONCLUSÕES: Observou-se elevado risco para ulcera de pressão em pacientes de terapia intensiva. Esse instrumento parece ser adequado para auxiliar na implementação de medidas de prevenção.OBJECTIVE: The avoidance of pressure ulcers development in critically ill patients is a major nursing challenge. Prevention is thus relevant for assurance of high quality care. This study aimed to evaluate the applicability of the Braden scale in intensive care unit patients. METHODS: This was a prospective

  6. Eficacia de los ácidos grasos hiperoxigenados en la prevención de las úlceras por presión Hyperoxygenated fatty acid effectiveness in the prevention of the pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso López Escribano

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Conocer la eficacia de los ácidos grasos hiperoxigenados en la prevención de las úlceras por presión. Determinar el nivel de evidencia del uso de los ácidos grasos hiperoxigenados en la prevención de las úlceras por presión. Material y método: Se realizó una búsqueda bibliográfica en Cochrane library, The Joanna Briggs Institute, Pubmedmedline y Cuiden, siendo solamente seleccionados ensayos clínicos. Para su evaluación se han seguido las recomendaciones del Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASPe junto al sistema GRADE para la valoración de la calidad de la evidencia y la fuerza de las recomendaciones. Resultados: En the Cochrane Library no aparece ningún documento, mientras que en The Joanna Briggs Institute aparece un bestpractice donde no se hace ninguna referencia a los AGHO. En el resto de bases encontramos 2 ensayos clínicos aleatorizados, que cumplían los criterios CASPe. En el estudio de Gallart, et al. sobre una muestra de 192 pacientes se observó una incidencia de UPP del 19% en el grupo intervención frente al 35% del grupo placebo (p Objectives: To know the scientific evidence about hyperoxygenated fatty acid effectiveness in the prevention of the pressure ulcers and to evaluate, through the bibliography consulted, their clinical effectiveness. Material and method: There was made a compilation of information in the Cochrane library, The Joanna Briggs Institute, Pubmed-medline and Cuiden. There were only selected clinical trials, for which evaluation it has been followed the recommendations of Critical Apraisal Skill Program together with GRADE system in order to value the quality of the evidence and the strength of the recommendation. Results: No documents have been found in the Cochrane library, whereas in The Joanna Briggs Institute has been found a bestpractice where there is no reference to the hyperoxygenated fatty acid. In the rest of the databases just two randomised clinical trials that

  7. [PRESSURE ULCER TREATMENT EXPERIENCE AT CLINICAL DEPARTMENT OF PLASTIC, RECONSTRUCTIVE AND AESTHETIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, S; Žic, R; Martić, K; Rudman, F; Vlajčić, Z; Milanović, R; Roje, Z; Munjiza, A; Rajković, I; Gorjanc, B; Held, R; Maletić, A; Tucaković, H; Stanec, Z

    2016-01-01

    Results of this clinical study on surgical treatment of pressure ulcers at Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Dubrava University Hospital showed that there was no difference between the 2011-2016 and 2003-2008 periods, indicating continuation of good surgical treatment planning and appropriate postoperative care. Despite the smaller number of hospitalized patients in the 2011-2016 period (31 patients and 42 reconstructive procedures), the number of reconstructive procedure was similar to the recent 2003-2008 period (47 patients and 57 reconstructive procedures). The best results of reconstruction of sacral region pressure ulcer were achieved with fasciocutaneous and musculocutaneous flaps. Whenever possible, depending on the extent of the defect, musculocutaneous flaps should be preferred for reconstruction. It is especially suitable for pressure ulcer recurrence. For ischial region reconstruction, good results can be obtained by mobilizing the semimembranosus and/or semitendinosus in defect gap. For trochanteric region, the tensor fascia lata flap is a good choice. For maximal functional and reconstructive results, a multidisciplinary approach in pressure ulcer treatment has the leading role in the modern concept of wound healing. Surgical treatment should always include radical debridement, ostectomy and well planned defect reconstruction. Conservative treatment should be support to surgical treatment with a focus on patient health care and high hygiene measures. In recent years (2011-2016), the usage of better conservative treatment led to reduction of patient hospital stay and surgical treatment of pressure ulcer. Further ‘wound care’ nurses training in Croatia can lead the trend towards advanced practice nursing in pressure ulcer prevention and conservative treatment.

  8. Plantar Pressure as a Risk Assessment Tool for Diabetic Foot Ulceration in Egyptian Patients with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfat A. Fawzy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetic foot ulceration is a preventable long-term complication of diabetes. In the present study, peak plantar pressures (PPP and other characteristics were assessed in a group of 100 Egyptian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers. The aim was to study the relationship between plantar pressure (PP and neuropathy with or without ulceration and trying to clarify the utility of pedobarography as an ulceration risk assessment tool in patients with diabetes. Subjects and Methods A total of 100 patients having diabetes were selected. All patients had a comprehensive foot evaluation, including assessment for neuropathy using modified neuropathy disability score (MNDS, for peripheral vascular disease using ankle brachial index, and for dynamic foot pressures using the MAT system (Tekscan. The studied patients were grouped into: (1 diabetic control group (DC, which included 37 patients who had diabetes without neuropathy or ulceration and MNDS ≤ 2; (2 diabetic neuropathy group (DN, which included 33 patients who had diabetes with neuropathy and MNDS >2, without current or a history of ulceration; and (3 diabetic ulcer group (DU, which included 30 patients who had diabetes and current ulceration, seven of those patients also gave a history of ulceration. Results PP parameters were significantly different between the studied groups, namely, forefoot peak plantar pressure (FFPPP, rearfoot peak plantar pressure (RFPPP, forefoot/rearfoot ratio (F/R, forefoot peak pressure gradient (FFPPG rearfoot peak pressure gradient (RFPPG, and forefoot peak pressure gradient/rearfoot peak pressure gradient (FFPPG/RFPPG ( P 0.05. FFPPP, F/R ratio, FFPPG, and FFPPG/RFPPG correlated significantly with the severity of neuropathy according to MNDS ( P < 0.05. These same variables as well as MNDS were also significantly higher in patients with foot deformity compared to those without deformity ( P < 0.05. Using the receiver operating

  9. Pressure Ulcer or Decubitus : clinical and etiological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU), also called bedsores or decubitus, present a significant problem in healthcare. This thesis addresses some aspects of the aetiology of PU. The possible benefit of interventions with nutrional supplementation and the use of a risk assessment tool are evaluated. The role of

  10. Nutritional intervention in pressure ulcer guidelines: an inventory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, J.M.G.A.; Jager van der Ende, M.A. de

    2004-01-01

    Nutritional data from the literature and the high prevalence of malnutrition in patients at risk of pressure ulcers (PUs) or with established PU mandate structural nutritional actions in these patients. Guidelines can help to improve nutritional alertness in professionals and promote structural

  11. Review article – The effects of clinical support surfaces onpressure as a risk factor in the development of pressure ulcers, from a radiographical perspective: a narrative literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Lutjeber; C. Everton; S. Angmorterh; K. Nodeland; A.P. Franco; P. Collé; S. Rième; M. Siddika; W. Brito; J. Webb; S. Bird

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pressure ulcers are a high cost, high volume issue for health and medical care providers, having a detrimental effect on patients and relatives. Pressure ulcer prevention is widely covered in the literature, but little has been published regarding the risk to patients in the radiographical

  12. Fatores de risco para úlcera de pressão: subsídios para a prevenção Risk factors for pressure ulcers: subsidy to prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Mancussi e Faro

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Uma das complicações mais severas para a pessoa com lesão medular é a úlcera de pressão. Sendo assim a prevenção destas feridas e a identificação de fatores de risco são necessidades prementes para o enfermeiro. Trata-se de um estudo decorrente de uma pesquisa mais abrangente, que abordou a assistência de enfermagem ao lesado medular em reabilitação buscando identificar os fatores de risco para úlcera de pressão utilizando os registros das enfermeiras nos históricosde enfermagem e a Taxonomia I da NANDA e analisar as intervenções de enfermagem preconizados face ao diagnóstico potencial para prejuízo na integridade da pele. Os fatores de risco identificados referem-se às alterações decorrentes da lesão neurológica, história prévia de ferida e lesão inicial. As intervenções de enfermagem preconizadas totalizaram. 16, com caráter de orientação ao paciente e à família voltadas para higiene corporal, mudança de decúbito, posicionamento no leito e em cadeira de rodas, denotando pertinência ao diagnóstico elaborado.Pressure ulcers is one of the most severe complication in the spinal cord injuried patients begin the prevention aspects and the early identification of the risk factors are imperative action for the nursing assistance of these patients. This study evaluated the nursing care plans for these patients that at the time of the study were already included in the rehabilitation program in order to identify the risk factors for the pressure ulcer development by analysing the nursing documentation adapting the Taxonomy of NANDA. Evaluate the nursing procedures proposed to the diagnosis risk for impaired skin integrity. The identified risk factors are referred to the phisical alterations determinate by the neurologic lesion, wound's history and inicial lesions. The proposed nursing procedures were sea:teen (16 that infasezed patient and family's instructions on body cleaning, position on bed and wheel chair

  13. Risks and risk-analysis for the development of pressure ulcers in surgical patients

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Bastiaan Paul Johan Aart

    2006-01-01

    With prevalence figures of 13% for university hospitals and 23% for general hospitals, pressure ulcers are a major health care issue in The Netherlands. Pressure ulcers in surgical patients are frequently encountered, as is illustrated by reported incidence rates up to 66%. The number of patients at risk will probably also grow, due to an ageing population. In an extensive review of literature on pressure ulcers in ICU patients, figures on pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence are presented...

  14. Extracts of Benincasa hispida prevent development of experimental ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, J K; Adiga, G; Vats, V; Rathi, S S

    2001-12-01

    Benincasa hispida (B. hispida) is recommended in Ayurveda for the management of peptic ulcers. Therefore, anti-ulcerogenic activity of different extracts of B. hispida (fresh juice, supernatant and residue fraction of centrifuged juice, alcoholic and petroleum ether extract) were studied in aspirin plus restraint, swimming stress, indomethacin plus histamine and serotonin-induced ulcers in rats and mice. The oral feeding of different doses of the extract significantly reduced the ulcer index produced by various ulcerogens. The anti-ulcerogenic effect was dose-dependent in stress induced model of ulcer and not in other models. B. hispida probably has a CNS component in prevention of stress induced ulceration. However, antihistaminic, anti-cholinergic effects and prevention of disturbance in gastric micro-circulation as possible modes of action cannot be ruled out. Chronic toxicity studies carried out for 3 months revealed no deleterious effect of fresh juice of B. hispida on various hematological and biochemical parameters studied. Thus, extracts of B. hispida may be considered to be a drug of natural origin possessing anti-ulcer activity.

  15. Pressure map technology for pressure ulcer patients: can we handle the truth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeo, Matthew Q

    2013-02-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to trial new pressure mapping technology for patients with pressure ulcers. Pressure mapping data was recorded during 3 phases of technology implementation, as nurses became increasingly familiar with pressuremapping technology in a 55-bed, long-term acute care (LTAC) facility in North Texas. Forty-three patients with pressure ulcers were selected for the study. Patients with pressure ulcers, or who were considered at high risk for developing pressure ulcers based on a Braden score of ≤ 12, were selected to utilize a pressure-sensing device system. Turning timeliness improved greatly from the baseline phase to the last phase. The average turning after the 2-hour alarm decreased from 120 minutes to 44 minutes, and the median time to turning decreased from 39 minutes to 17 minutes. If time past 2 hours is considered the most damaging time to tissue, these reductions (average and median) represented 63% and 56% less potential tissue damage. Pressure mapping technology is in its infancy and this paper discusses implications for the future, including barriers to implementation and potential advanced applications. While only changes in nursing practice were measured in this study, the changes observed suggest the technology can be instrumental in reducing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and improving the healing of pressure wounds in the future. .

  16. Longitudinal Outcomes of Home Care in Korea to Manage Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunhee

    2017-06-01

    Home care provides preventive, support, and treatment services to economically vulnerable community populations. In this study, we examined the outcomes of a home care program for pressure ulcers (PrUs) in an economically vulnerable group. The 184 participants were admitted with PrUs and received services from a home care agency in South Korea during a study window of 5 years. The changes in PrU staging over time were analyzed in relation to the agency's home care data and the participants' health data. At enrollment, approximately 60% had a single ulcer; 40% had two or more. Most patients' ulcers were at stages 3 or 4, and most patients were bedridden. The maximum odds of reduced ulcer size from one measurement point to the next was estimated at 14.3% for ulcers in stages 1 and 2, 33.4% of those in stage 3, and 25.5% of those in stage 4; more than 10% of ulcers healed completely within a year. PrUs were a serious problem in this community-dwelling economically vulnerable group, and home care played a critical role in providing health care to this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Improved care of foot ulcer using foot pressure measurement and foot care method sheet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinen, Takaaki; Iha, Hiroyuki; Miyagi, Chiaki; Yusa, Masaru; Taira, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Kinuko

    2008-09-01

    At this sanatorium, the number of foot bottom ulcer patients was 13 and the tenure of the foot bottom ulcer was average 11 years. According to the treatment that was not unified, we thought about the cause of the prolongation. Therefore, we made evaluation and care method sheet ("foot care sheet") of the ulcer for the unification. We used the foot pressure measurement system (F-scan) to 4 patients for the pressure dispersion of the ulcer. We devised the protection law of the ulcer, and an ulcer did not require pressure more than 5 kilos/cm2. We recorded the size of the ulcer, weight of the liquid from ulcer, a photograph to care sheet once a week. I performed ulcer protection law and management with the foot care sheet to 4 patients for average 4 months. As a result, the ulcers of 3 patients out of 4 patients became small.

  18. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers in geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, J; Beeckman, D

    2015-12-01

    The key characteristics of geriatric patients are advanced age, multimorbidity, a decrease of psychical performance and care dependency. In addition, advanced age, chronic and acute diseases and treatments (e.g. polypharmacy) lead, either directly or indirectly, to a wide range of skin and tissue problems. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers (PUs) belong to the most prevalent in geriatric settings. Prolonged exposure of the skin to urine and/or stool can cause an irritant contact dermatitis. Skin surface 'wetness', increased skin surface pH, digestive intestinal enzymes, repeated skin cleansing activities, and a possible occlusive environment contribute to irritation and inflammation. Prevention and treatment includes activities to maintain and to enhance continence and to limit, to reduce exposure of the skin to urine and stool, and to promote healing and reepithelialisation. In frail aged skin, it is recommended to use incontinence products with smooth and breathable materials with maximum absorption capacity. Immediate skin cleansing after soiling using mild cleansers and protective and caring leave-on products are recommended. PUs are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue caused by sustained deformations of skin and underlying soft tissues. PUs management includes risk assessment, repositioning and mobilization, and the use of appropriate support surfaces. Patients must be never positioned directly on an existing PU. Especially at end of life, the PU closure and wound healing may not be the primary therapeutic goal.

  19. Risk factors for pressure ulcer development in Intensive Care Units: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Serrano, M; González Méndez, M I; Carrasco Cebollero, F M; Lima Rodríguez, J S

    Pressure ulcers represent a significant problem for patients, professionals and health systems. Their reported incidence and prevalence are significant worldwide. Their character iatrogenic states that its appearance is preventable and its incidence is an indicator of scientific and technical quality both in primary care and specialized care. The aim of this review was to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients. The PRISMA Declaration recommendations have been followed and adapted to studies identifying risk factors. A qualitative systematic review of primary studies has been performed and a search was conducted of the PubMed, The Cochrane Library, Scopus and Web of Science databases. Methodological limitations in observational studies have been considered. From 200 references, 17 fulfilled the eligibility criteria. These studies included 19,363 patients admitted to intensive care units. Six studies were classified as high quality and 11 were classified as moderate quality. Risk factors that emerged as predictive of pressure ulcers development more frequently included age, length of ICU stay, diabetes, time of MAP <60-70mmHg, mechanical ventilation, length of mechanical ventilation, intermittent haemodialysis or continuous veno-venous haemofiltration therapy, vasopressor support, sedation and turning. There is no single factors which can explain the occurrence of pressure ulcers. Rather, it is an interplay of factors that increase the probability of its development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  20. [Mapping the nursing care with the NIC for patients in risk for pressure ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Gabriela Silva; Santos, Cássia Teixeira Dos; Menegon, Dóris Baratz; Mello, Bruna Schroeder; Azambuja, Fernanda; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2014-06-01

    To identify the nursing care prescribed for patients in risk for pressure ulcer (PU) and to compare those with the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) interventions. Cross mapping study conducted in a university hospital. The sample was composed of 219 adult patients hospitalized in clinical and surgical units. The inclusion criteria were: score ≤ 13 in the Braden Scale and one of the nursing diagnoses, Self-Care deficit syndrome, Impaired physical mobility, Impaired tissue integrity, Impaired skin integrity, Risk for impaired skin integrity. The data were collected retrospectively in a nursing prescription system and statistically analyzed by crossed mapping. It was identified 32 different nursing cares to prevent PU, mapped in 17 different NIC interventions, within them: Skin surveillance, Pressure ulcer prevention and Positioning. The cross mapping showed similarities between the prescribed nursing care and the NIC interventions.

  1. Mapping the nursing care with the NIC for patients in risk for pressure ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gabriela Silva Pereira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To identify the nursing care prescribed for patients in risk for pressure ulcer (PU and to compare those with the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC interventions. Method: Cross mapping study conducted in a university hospital. The sample was composed of 219 adult patients hospitalized in clinical and surgical units. The inclusion criteria were: score ≤ 13 in the Braden Scale and one of the nursing diagnoses, Self-Care deficit syndrome, Impaired physical mobility, Impaired tissue integrity, Impaired skin integrity, Risk for impaired skin integrity. The data were collected retrospectively in a nursing prescription system and statistically analyzed by crossed mapping. Result: It was identified 32 different nursing cares to prevent PU, mapped in 17 different NIC interventions, within them: Skin surveillance, Pressure ulcer prevention and Positioning. Conclusion: The cross mapping showed similarities between the prescribed nursing care and the NIC interventions.

  2. When patient safety and skills development go hand in hand through targeted prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in patients with spinal-cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard, Randi; Bonne, Stine

    2017-01-01

    be prevented and patient safety increased. It has, however, proved difficult to achieve continuous and systematic PU/wound care. The Spinal Cord Injury Centre of Western Denmark has developed the PU/wound patrol, a new initiative that has also been tested and evaluated among the Centre’s nursing staff. Aims...... - to increase patient safety through conscious, targeted monitoring and treatment by nurses of all types of PU/wounds observed in patients at the Centre - to ensure a high degree of professionalism in rehabilitative nursing care given to patients with PU/wounds, by developing nursing skills Method The PU....../wound patrol consists of two experienced nurses who examine patients with PU/wounds each week, or every other week, alongside the care staff who work with the patient. The PU/wound patrol’s assistance consists in measuring, photographing, caring, treating, documenting the PU/wound. Furthermore they plan future...

  3. Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Ulcers KidsHealth / For Teens / Ulcers What's in this article? ... is that the real story? What Is an Ulcer? An ulcer is a sore, which means it's ...

  4. All at-risk patients are not created equal: analysis of Braden pressure ulcer risk scores to identify specific risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tescher, Ann N; Branda, Megan E; Byrne, T J O; Naessens, James M

    2012-01-01

    To improve identification of risk factors for pressure ulcer development and enhance targeted interventions and prevention strategies. The records of 12,566 adult patients hospitalized in intensive or progressive care units within Mayo Clinic were analyzed. Inclusion criteria were Braden Scale of 18 or less during the hospitalization; exclusion criteria were preexisting pressure ulcer or length of stay less than 24 hours. This study is a retrospective cohort analysis of electronic medical record data from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2007. Only iatrogenic stage 2 to 4 pressure ulcers were considered as incident events. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from the medical record, including total Braden Scale score and Braden subscale scores at hospital admission, length of stay, admission to the intensive care unit at the time of hospitalization, and presence of acute respiratory failure, acute renal failure, or diabetes. Time to event was calculated based on time from admission to pressure ulcer occurrence or to hospital discharge. Four hundred sixteen (3.3%) of patients developed a pressure ulcer during their hospitalizations. The Braden Scale score total by itself was found to be highly predictive of pressure ulcer development (P ≤ .0001, C = 0.71), as were all individual subscores. The friction/shear subscale had the greatest predictive power among Braden Scale scores (subscores and total score) (C = 0.83). The multivariate model after selection included 5 Braden Scale subscales, surgery, and acute respiratory failure (C = 0.91). The total Braden Scale score is predictive of pressure ulcer development but does not assist the clinician to develop an individualized targeted prevention plan. In contrast, the use of subscale scores can enhance prevention programs and resource utilization by focusing care on the risk factors specific to the individual patient.

  5. LongoVital in the prevention of recurrent aphthous ulceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A; Hougen, H P; Klausen, B

    1990-01-01

    LongoVital (LV) (DK. Reg. No. 5178/75) is a herbal based tablet enriched with recommended doses of vitamins. The present study was undertaken to investigate prevention of recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) during 6 months' daily intake of LV as compared with placebo in a double-blind, randomized...

  6. Preliminary use of a hydrogel containing enzymes in the treatment of stage II and stage III pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Linda K S; Ciufi, Brandi; Gokoo, Charles F

    2005-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers but they remain a significant healthcare problem, particularly among the elderly. Treatment may include the use of wound dressings such as hydrogels as well as debridement products that contain relatively high concentrations of various enzymes. Unlike enzymes found in debridement products, low concentrations of endopeptidase enzymes can cleave to denatured proteins. Many endopeptidases have been reported to enhance the healing process. To evaluate the effect of a hydrogel wound dressing containing a combination of endopeptidases on pressure ulcers, a 12-week prospective preliminary study was conducted involving 10 nursing home patients with Stage II (n = 3) or Stage III (n = 7) ulcers that had failed to respond to previous treatments. Seven subjects (three with Stage II ulcers and four with Stage III ulcers) completed the study. Healing was based on wound closure by re-epithelialization as determined by area measurement and clinical assessment. All three Stage II ulcers and two of the Stage III ulcers healed completely; four Stage III ulcers were categorized as healing (>60% improvement) after 12 weeks of care. No dressing-related adverse events occurred and subject acceptance of the product, including comfort, was high. These results suggest that additional studies designed to define the possible contribution of endopeptidase enzymes in wound healing are warranted.

  7. Evaluation of four non-invasive methods for examination and characterization of pressure ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E.S.; Karlsmark, T.

    2008-01-01

    , we here report on usability of four non-invasive techniques for evaluation of pressure ulcers. Methods: Fifteen pressure ulcers in stage 0-IV were examined using four different non-invasive techniques [redness index, skin temperature, skin elasticity (i.e. retraction time), and ultrasound scanning...... at all pressure ulcers, but none at the reference points. The skin retraction time was often higher at the location of a pressure ulcer than at the reference location. We found no correlation between the stage of the ulcers and temperature, redness index, subepidermal layer thickness, or retraction time...

  8. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration poses a heavy burden on the patient and the healthcare system, but prevention thereof receives little attention. For every euro spent on ulcer prevention, ten are spent on ulcer healing, and for every randomized controlled trial conducted on prevention, ten are conducted on

  9. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a pressure sore? play_arrow What are the causes of pressure sores in people with spinal cord injuries? play_arrow Why are pressure sores so serious? play_arrow What is "sepsis," and why is it dangerous? play_arrow How ...

  10. Avaliação de protocolo de prevenção e tratamento de úlceras de pressão Evaluation of a prevention protocol of pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Louro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: As úlceras de pressão (UP constituem um importante problema de saúde, em particular nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTI. O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar o número, grau e escore total das UP na admissão, durante a internação e na alta. Determinar quais os fatores que influenciaram o seu aparecimento e desenvolvimento, assim como verificar a sua incidência e prevalência. MÉTODO: Todos os pacientes internados na UTI por período superior que 24 horas foram, prospectivamente, incluídos e acompanhados durante um ano. Foram excluídos 70 pacientes por dados insuficientes. A todos foi aplicado o mesmo protocolo de prevenção e de tratamento (placas hidrocolóides, hidrogel, se necrose presente e alginato de cálcio, se UP com sangramento. RESULTADOS: Foram estudados 155 pacientes. Dezoito apresentavam UP na admissão e 40 a desenvolveram durante a internação, totalizando 125 UP. A prevalência foi de 37,41% e a incidência de 25,8%. O aparecimento de novas UP ocorreu, em média, no 7º dia de internação. Dos pacientes internados 79% mantiveram-se estáveis e/ou melhorados. O SAPS 2 dos pacientes admitidos com UP foi superior aos dos pacientes sem UP, 54 ± 8,7 e 44 ± 17, respectivamente (p = 0,015. Na alta o número de UP foi significativamente maior nos pacientes classificados como de alto risco avaliados pela escala de Norton adaptada (p = 0,039. Os pacientes que evoluíram para óbito apresentaram mais UP que os demais (p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pressure ulcers (PU constitute an important health problem in particular in the intensive care unit (ICU. The objective of the study was to identify the number, degree and total score of PU on admission, ICU stay and discharge as well as to recognize factors influencing the appearance or development of PU and to identify the number of healed PU, thus so the incidence and prevalence. METHODS: All patients admitted > 24 hrs were prospectively included

  11. A systematic review of therapeutic interventions for pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Mary Ann; Teasell, Robert W; Wolfe, Dalton L; Keast, David; Mortenson, William B; Aubut, Jo-Anne L

    2009-02-01

    To systematically review evidence on the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in those with a spinal cord injury (SCI). For this evidence-based review, the following data sources were used: MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO. To be selected for inclusion in the current review, there had to have been an intervention, studies had to have 3 or more subjects, and 50% or more of the participating group had to have an SCI. Data extracted included study design, subject demographics, inclusion and exclusion criteria, study type, sample size, outcome measures used, and study results. Articles selected for this review were organized into 1 of 2 categories: prevention or treatment. Within each broad category, several smaller ones were created, and articles were grouped according to the prevention (direct or indirect) or treatment intervention discussed. Of the 26 articles selected for inclusion in the systematic review, 7 were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that dealt with treatment for pressure ulcers, and there was 1 RCT on prevention. Despite the cost-effectiveness of prevention, little research exists on preventative interventions, and what does exist is mostly level 4 evidence. More research is needed for both prevention and treatment, but especially the former.

  12. Negative pressure wound therapy for treating leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumville, Jo C; Land, Lucy; Evans, Debra; Peinemann, Frank

    2015-07-14

    Leg ulcers are open skin wounds that occur between the ankle and the knee that can last weeks, months or even years and are a consequence of arterial or venous valvular insufficiency. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a technology that is currently used widely in wound care and is promoted for use on wounds. NPWT involves the application of a wound dressing to the wound, to which a machine is attached. The machine applies a carefully controlled negative pressure (or vacuum), which sucks any wound and tissue fluid away from the treated area into a canister. To assess the effects of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for treating leg ulcers in any care setting. For this review, in May 2015 we searched the following databases: the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 21 May 2015); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 4); Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to 20 May 2015); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations 20 May 2015); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 20 May 2015); EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 21 May 2015). There were no restrictions based on language or date of publication. Published or unpublished randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of NPWT with alternative treatments or different types of NPWT in the treatment of leg ulcers. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We included one study, with 60 randomized participants, in the review. The study population had a range of ulcer types that were venous arteriolosclerotic and venous/arterial in origin. Study participants had recalcitrant ulcers that had not healed after treatment over a six-month period. Participants allocated to NPWT received continuous negative pressure until they achieved 100% granulation (wound preparation stage). A punch skin-graft transplantation was conducted and the wound then exposed to further NPWT for four days followed by standard care

  13. Frequency of pressure ulcers in patients with spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.H.; Ahmed, K.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of pressure ulcers in patients with spinal cord injury. To compare frequency of pressure ulcers in complete and incomplete spinal cord injury using ASIA impairment scale.Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Departments of Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine Rawalpindi, from Jun 2013 to Jan 2014. Material and Methods: After permission from the hospital ethical committee and informed consent, spinal cord injury (SCI) patients were included from the outdoor and the indoor departments of Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine Rawalpindi from June 2013 to January 2014. Patients were divided in two groups of complete SCI and incomplete SCI on the basis of American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. SPSS version 17 was used for data analysis. Results: Total 62 SCI patients were included. Mean age of patients was 36 +- 0.93 SD. Males were more in number 79% (49). On ASIA scoring 51.6% (32) were in ASIA 'A' followed by 19.4% (12), 17.7% (11) and 11.3% (7) patients in ASIA 'B', 'C' and 'D' respectively. SCI was complete in 51.6% (32) and incomplete in 48.4% (30). PU were present in 32.3% (20) patients. PU were in stage 4 in 30% (6) patients. PU were more frequent in ASIA 'A' injuries followed by 'B', 'C' and 'D' involving 43.8%, 25%,18.2% and 14.3% of patients respectively. Pressure ulcers (PU) were common in complete injuries involving 43.8% (14) than in incomplete injuries 20% (6) (p=0.041). Conclusions: Pressure ulsers were more common complication detected after spinal cord injury with more frequency in complete spinal cord injury. (author)

  14. At risk of pressure ulcers - a nursing diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubica Poledníková

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was content validation of the nursing diagnosis of at Risk of Impaired Skin Integrity by a sample of Slovak nurse-experts. It focuses on identifying the major risk factors in pressure ulcer development. Design: Retrospective study. Methods: The Diagnostic Content Validity Model designed by Fehring was used for validation of the nursing diagnosis; we used it to establish the significance of the risk factors of the nursing diagnosis of at Risk of Impaired Skin Integrity in relation to pressure ulcer development. Correlation analysis was used for evaluation of the relationships between the risk factors. The sample consisted of 126 nurse-experts in accordance with modified Fehring criteria. Results: Out of 23 items, the nurses rated nine as significant (the most frequently present risk factors (the weighted scores are shown in brackets: physical immobilisation (0.92, skeletal prominence (0.9, imbalanced nutritional state (0.86, moisture (0.86, mechanical factors (e.g., shearing forces, pressure, restraint (0.84, a Norton Scale score of 14 ≥ points (0.81, hyperthermia (0.81, excretions (0.77, and extremes of age (0.76. Statistically significant correlations, which are positive and range between 0.2 and 0.4, were found between some risk factors. The strongest correlations were found between moisture and mechanical factors (r = 0.4008 and moisture and physical immobilization (r = 0.3072. Conclusion: Using the DCV model, the experts identified nine significant risk factors which can be predictors of pressure ulcer development.

  15. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What parts of the body are most likely to develop pressure sores? play_arrow Is ... daily skin inspections? play_arrow What are the most important things for someone with a spinal cord ...

  16. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow How long is the typical healing time for a pressure sore? play_arrow Why do ... com is an informational and support website for families facing spinal cord injuries. The website does not ...

  17. Continuous bedside pressure mapping and rates of hospital-associated pressure ulcers in a medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Robert; Ghaznavi, Amir M; Mahan, Meredith; Craft, Susan; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2014-03-01

    Critically ill patients are vulnerable to the development of hospital-associated pressure ulcers (HAPUs). Positioning of patients is an essential component of pressure ulcer prevention because it off-loads areas of high pressure. However, the effectiveness of such positioning is debatable. A continuous bedside pressure mapping (CBPM) device can provide real-time feedback of optimal body position though a pressure-sensing mat that displays pressure images at a patient's bedside, allowing off-loading of high-pressure areas and possibly preventing HAPU formation. A prospective controlled study was designed to determine if CBPM would reduce the number of HAPUs in patients treated in our medical intensive care unit. In 2 months, 422 patients were enrolled and assigned to beds equipped with or without a CBPM device. Patients' skin was assessed daily and weekly to determine the presence and progress of HAPUs. All patients were turned every 2 hours. CBPM patients were repositioned to off-load high-pressure points during turning, according to a graphic display. The number of newly formed HAPUs was the primary outcome measured. A χ(2) test was then used to compare the occurrence of HAPUs between groups. HAPUs developed in 2 of 213 patients in the CBPM group (0.9%; both stage II) compared with 10 of 209 in the control group (4.8%; all stage II; P = .02). Significantly fewer HAPUs occurred in the CBPM group than the control group, indicating the effectiveness of real-time visual feedback in repositioning of patients to prevent the formation of new HAPUs.

  18. Comparison of air-fluidized therapy with other support surfaces used to treat pressure ulcers in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Rachel F; Horn, Susan D; van Rijswijk, Lia; Pietsch, Catherine; Smout, Randall J

    2005-02-01

    To provide empirical evidence comparing pressure ulcer healing rates between different support surfaces, data were analyzed from eligible residents with pressure ulcers (N = 664) enrolled in the National Pressure Ulcer Long-Term Care Study, a retrospective pressure ulcer prevention and treatment study. Support surfaces were categorized as: Group 1 (static overlays and replacement mattresses), Group 2 (low-air-loss beds, alternating pressure, and powered/non-powered overlays/mattresses), and Group 3 (air-fluidized beds). Calculation of healing rates, using the largest ulcer from each resident, found mean healing rates greatest for air-fluidized therapy (Group 3) (mean = 5.2 cm(2)/week) versus Group 1 (mean =1.5 cm(2)/week) and Group 2 (mean = 1.8 cm(2)/week) surfaces (P = 0.007). Healing rates also were assessed using 7- to 10-day "episodes"; each ulcer generated separate episode(s) that included all ulcers when residents had multiple ulcers. Mean healing rates were significantly greater for Stage III/IV ulcers on Group 3 surfaces (mean = 3.1 cm(2)/week) versus Group 1 (mean = 0.6 cm(2)/week) and Group 2 (mean = 0.7 cm(2)/week) surfaces (Group 2 versus Group 3: P = 0.0211). This finding persisted for ulcers with comparable initial baseline areas (20 cm(2) to 75 cm(2)) on Group 2 and Group 3 surfaces; healing improved on Group 3 surfaces (+2.3 cm(2)/week) versus Group 2 surfaces (-2.1 cm(2)/week, P = 0.0399). Residents on Group 3 (6 out of 82; 7.3%) and Group 1 (47 out of 461; 10.2%) surfaces had fewer hospitalizations and emergency room visits than those on Group 2 surfaces (23 out of 121; 19.0%, P = 0.01) despite significantly greater illness in residents on Group 2 and 3 versus Group 1 surfaces (P is less than 0.0001). Despite limitations inherent in retrospective studies, ulcers on Group 3 surfaces versus Groups 1 and Group 2 surfaces had statistically significant faster healing rates (particularly for Stage III/IV ulcers) with significantly fewer

  19. The development of the Glamorgan paediatric pressure ulcer risk assessment scale

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony, Denis Martin; Baharestani, M.; Willock, Jane

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a predictive pressure ulcer risk assessment scale based on patient data. METHOD: Detailed questionnaires, based on a review of the paediatric and adult literature and discussion with paediatric nurses with expertise in this area, were used to obtain data on patient characteristics from 265 inpatients in a children's hospital and 54 children with pressure ulcers and 17 children without pressure ulcers from 11 hospitals. These data were then combined to compare the charact...

  20. Racial and ethnic disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers present at nursing home admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donna Z; Gurvich, Olga; Savik, Kay; Eberly, Lynn E; Harms, Susan; Mueller, Christine; Garrard, Judith; Cunanan, Kristen; Wiltzen, Kjerstie

    2017-09-01

    Pressure ulcers increase the risk of costly hospitalization and mortality of nursing home residents, so timely healing is important. Disparities in healthcare have been identified in the nursing home population but little is known about disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers. To assess racial and ethnic disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers present at nursing home admission. Multi-levels predictors, at the individual resident, nursing home, and community/Census tract level, were examined in three large data sets. Minimum Data Set records of older individuals admitted to one of 439 nursing homes of a national, for-profit chain over three years with a stages 2-4 pressure ulcer (n=10,861) were searched to the 90-day assessment for the first record showing pressure ulcer healing. Predictors of pressure ulcer healing were analyzed for White admissions first using logistic regression. The Peters-Belson method was used to assess racial or ethnic disparities among minority group admissions. A significantly smaller proportion of Black nursing home admissions had their pressure ulcer heal than expected had they been part of the White group. There were no disparities in pressure ulcer healing disadvantaging other minority groups. Significant predictors of a nonhealing of pressure ulcer were greater deficits in activities of daily living and pressure ulcer severity. Reducing disparities in pressure ulcer healing is needed for Blacks admitted to nursing homes. Knowledge of disparities in pressure ulcer healing can direct interventions aiming to achieve equity in healthcare for a growing number of minority nursing home admissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pressure ulcer dressings in critical patients: a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Dinara Raquel Araújo; Bezerra, Sandra Marina Gonçalves; Costa, Jéssica Pereira; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; Lopes, Vanessa Caminha Aguiar; Nogueira, Lidya Tolstenko

    2017-06-12

    To assess the direct cost of dressings in pressure ulcer treatment. This was a descriptive observational study conducted at an intensive care unit in the Northeast region of Brazil, between November and December 2015. Data were gathered using the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing and a form to characterize and assess costs. Values in Brazilian reais (BRL) were converted into U.S. dollars at the exchange rate of USD 0.26/BRL. Univariate and bivariate analyses were conducted. The sample consisted of 15 patients with at least stage 2 ulcers. There was a significant reduction in costs with dressing materials between the initial and final assessments (p=0.002), with a mean of USD 11.9 (±7.4). The most common topical treatments used were essential fatty acids and papain. Cost reduction was proportional to the stage of pressure ulcer. The role of nurses in creating evidence-based care plans is crucial to improve care management. Avaliar o custo direto com curativos no tratamento de lesões por pressão. Estudo observacional descritivo, realizado em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva do nordeste do Brasil, de novembro a dezembro de 2015. Foi aplicada a Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing e formulário para caracterização e avaliação de custos. Os valores da moeda brasileira (R$) foram convertidos para a moeda norte-americana (US$) à taxa de US$0,26/R$. Foram realizadas análises univariadas e bivariadas. Compuseram a amostra 15 pacientes com lesões, no mínimo, estágio 2. Houve redução significativa dos custos com materiais de curativos entre as avaliações inicial e final (p=0,002), com média de US$11,9 (±7,4). As terapias tópicas mais frequentes foram ácidos graxos essenciais e papaína. Verificou-se redução de custos proporcional aos estágios das lesões. Enfatiza-se o papel do enfermeiro na elaboração de planos de cuidados baseados em evidências para melhor gerenciamento do cuidado. Evaluar el costo directo de curativos para el tratamiento de lesiones por

  2. A Clinical Nurse Specialist-Led Interprofessional Quality Improvement Project to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbruzzo-Cota, Christina; Frecea, Monica; Kozell, Kathryn; Pere, Katalin; Thompson, Tamara; Tjan Thomas, Julie; Wong, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical nurse specialist-led interprofessional quality improvement project was to reduce hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) using evidence-based practice. Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (PUs) have been linked to morbidity, poor quality of life, and increasing costs. Pressure ulcer prevention and management remain a challenge for interprofessional teams in acute care settings. Hospital-acquired PU rate is a critical nursing quality indicator for healthcare organizations and ties directly with Mount Sinai Hospital's (MSH's) mission and vision, which mandates providing the highest quality care to patients and families. This quality improvement project, guided by the Donabedian model, was based on the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario Best Practice Guideline Risk Assessment & Prevention of Pressure Ulcers. A working group was established to promote evidence-based practice for PU prevention. Initiatives such as documentation standardization, development of staff education and patient and family educational resources, initiation of a hospital-wide inventory for support surfaces, and procurement of equipment were implemented to improve PU prevention and management across the organization. An 80% decrease in HAPUs has been achieved since the implementation of best practices by the Best Practice Guideline Pressure Ulcer working group. The implementation of PU prevention strategies led to a reduction in HAPU rates. The working group will continue to work on building interprofessional awareness and collaboration in order to prevent HAPUs and promote an organizational culture that supports staff development, teamwork and communication. This quality improvement project is a successful example of an interprofessional clinical nurse specialist-led initiative that impacts patient/family and organization outcomes through the identification and implementation of evidence-based nursing practice.

  3. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... Nurse Specialist, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago play_arrow What is a pressure sore? play_arrow What are ...

  4. [Evaluation of pressure ulcers area using the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Camila Letícia Dias dos; Cavalcante, Janaína Mortosa; Rocha Júnior, Edvar Ferreira da; Neves, Rinaldo Souza; Santana, Levy Aniceto; Guadagnin, Renato da Veiga; Brasil, Lourdes Mattos

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a lesion that affects skin layers in some regions of the body and its healing can be followed up using image processing. The analysis of pressure ulcer area is relevant to evaluate its evolution and response to therapeutic procedures. Such areas can be evaluated through contour marking with the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®. In this study 35 volunteers computed areas from two grade III pressure ulcers using these instruments. It was possible to conclude that results are clinically equivalent and so can be considered to follow up healing evolution from pressure ulcers.

  5. A randomized clinical trial comparing hydrocolloid, phenytoin and simple dressings for the treatment of pressure ulcers [ISRCTN33429693

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedmat Hossein

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pressure sores are important and common complications of spinal cord injury. Many preventive and therapeutic approaches have been tried and new trials are evolving. One relatively recent method is application of a hydrocolloid dressing (HD. In this study we compared the therapeutic effects of HD on pressure ulcer healing with two other topical applications, phenytoin cream (PC and simple dressing (SD. Methods Ninety-one stage I and stage II pressure ulcers of 83 paraplegic male victims of the Iran-Iraq war were randomly allocated to three treatment groups. Mean age and weight of the participants were 36.64 ± 6.04 years and 61.12 ± 5.08 kg, respectively. All the patients were managed in long term care units or in their homes for 8 weeks by a team of general practitioners and nurses, and the ulcer status was recorded as "Complete healing", "Partial healing", "Without improvement" and "Worsening". Results Complete healing of ulcers, regardless of location and stage, was better in the HD group than the PC [23/31(74.19% vs 12/30(40%; difference: 34.19%, 95% CI = 10.85–57.52, (P 0.05]. We performed a second analysis considering only one ulcer per patient (i.e. 83 ulcers in 83 patients. This "per patient" analysis showed that complete ulcer healing in the HD group was better than in the PC [20/28(71.4% vs 11/28 (39.3%; difference: 32.1%, 95% CI = 7.4–56.7, (P Conclusion We deduced that HD is the most effective method investigated for treating stage I and II pressure ulcers in young paraplegic men.

  6. [Venous ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms.

  7. Investigating staff knowledge of safeguarding and pressure ulcers in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousey, K; Kaye, V; McCormick, K; Stephenson, J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether nursing/care home staff regard pressure ulceration as a safeguarding issue; and to explore reporting mechanisms for pressure ulcers (PUs) in nursing/care homes. Within one clinical commissioning group, 65 staff members from 50 homes completed a questionnaire assessing their experiences of avoidable and unavoidable PUs, grading systems, and systems in place for referral to safeguarding teams. Understanding of safeguarding was assessed in depth by interviews with 11 staff members. Staff observed an average of 2.72 PUs in their workplaces over the previous 12 months, judging 45.6% to be avoidable. Only a minority of respondents reported knowledge of a grading system (mostly the EPUAP/NPUAP system). Most respondents would refer PUs to the safeguarding team: the existence of a grading system, or guidance, appeared to increase that likelihood. Safeguarding was considered a priority in most homes; interviewees were familiar with the term safeguarding, but some confusion over its meaning was apparent. Quality of written documentation and verbal communication received before residents returned from hospital was highlighted. However, respondents expressed concern over lack of information regarding skin integrity. Most staff had received education regarding ulcer prevention or wound management during training, but none reported post-registration training or formal education programmes; reliance was placed on advice of district nurses or tissue viability specialists. Staff within nursing/care homes understand the fundamentals of managing skin integrity and the importance of reporting skin damage; however, national education programmes are needed to develop knowledge and skills to promote patient health-related quality of life, and to reduce the health-care costs of pressure damage. Further research to investigate understanding, knowledge and skills of nursing/care home staff concerning pressure ulcer development and safeguarding will become increasingly

  8. Pressure-Redistributing Support Surface Use and Pressure Ulcer Incidence in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Shayna E.; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William G.; Margolis, David J.; Amr, Sania; Miller, Ram; Baumgarten, Mona

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the association between pressure-redistributing support surface (PRSS) use and incident pressure ulcers in older adults with hip fracture. DESIGN Secondary analysis of data from prospective cohort with assessments performed as soon as possible after hospital admission and on alternating days for 21 days. SETTING Nine hospitals in the Baltimore Hip Studies network and 105 postacute facilities to which participants were discharged. PARTICIPANTS Six hundred fifty-eight people aged 65 and older who underwent surgery for hip fracture. MEASUREMENTS Full-body examination for pressure ulcers; bedbound status; and PRSS use, recorded as none, powered (alternating pressure mattresses, low-air-loss mattresses, and alternating pressure overlays), or nonpowered (high-density foam, static air, or gel-filled mattresses or pressure-redistributing overlays except for alternating pressure overlays). RESULTS Incident pressure ulcers (IPUs), Stage 2 or higher, were observed at 4.2% (195/4,638) of visits after no PRSS use, 4.5% (28/623) of visits after powered PRSS use, and 3.6% (54/1,496) of visits after nonpowered PRSS use. The rate of IPU per person-day of follow-up did not differ significantly between participants using powered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs. The rate also did not differ significantly between participants using nonpowered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs, except in the subset of bedbound participants (incidence rate ratio = 0.3, 95% confidence interval = 0.1–0.7). CONCLUSION PRSS use was not associated with a lower IPU rate. Clinical guidelines may need revision for the limited effect of PRSS use, and it may be appropriate to target PRSS use to bedbound patients at risk of pressure ulcers. PMID:21649630

  9. Povezave med razjedo zaradi pritiska in ohranjanjem integritete kože pacienta v intenzivni zdravstveni obravnavi: literature review: pregled literature: Relations between pressure ulcer and patient skin integrity maintenance in intensive care:

    OpenAIRE

    Emeđi, Dragica; Skela-Savič, Brigita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The research aims to demonstrate the multidimensional needs and potential high-risk factors for developing pressure ulcer in adult patients in the intensive care. Methods: The analysis and synthesis of the evidence review from the EMERALD, CINAHL, PubMed, and ProQuest database were employed in the research. The search terms used were: "quality of care", "pressure ulcer", "prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers", "skin integrity critical care patients". The filtering search ...

  10. A retrospective study to determine the incidence of pressure ulcers in burn patients using a low air loss pressure relieving mattress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Joseph M; Wilson, Joan; Rinker, Connie; Law, Edward; Craft-Coffman, Beretta

    2003-06-01

    In immobilized patients, unrelieved pressure can create decubitus ulcers over bony prominences. Those burn patients who require prolonged bed rest, are prone to the development of such problems. Various methods of reducing pressure on these areas, including frequent turning and the use of air fluidized and low air loss beds, have been adopted to attempt to prevent the development of this complication. The Pegasus Renaissance alternating pressure mattress is such a device, intended to reduce the incidence of decubitus ulcers. It was introduced at our burn unit and evaluated over a 29-month period. During the study period, 186 (13.4%) of 1390 acutely burned patients, believed to be at high risk for the development of decubiti, were placed on this mattress. Other patients were treated in the standard hospital bed. Care was otherwise the same. No decubitus ulcers developed in any of the patients treated on the Pegasus Renaissance mattress.

  11. Prevención de úlceras por presión y lesiones musculoesqueléticas: paciente con ictus Pressure ulcer prevention and muscular and skeletal injuries: Patient with stoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Luque Moreno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Planteamos un caso clínico en el que enfermera y fisioterapeuta ponen en común procedimientos para mejorar la higiene postural de un paciente encamado con un accidente cerebrovascular y hemiplejia izquierda. Describimos analíticamente una intervención conjunta durante un mes. A pesar de que se ha mantenido el riesgo máximo de UPP objetivado inicialmente, durante este periodo no han aparecido úlceras, obteniendo un mantenimiento o aumento del rango de las articulaciones. Es importante un trabajo multidisciplinar que evite la aparición de úlceras por decúbito y de futuras lesiones musculoesqueléticas que dificultarían la posterior reeducación funcional del paciente.We propose a case in which both a nurse and a physiotherapist analyse different procedures to improve the postural hygiene of bedridden patients with stroke and left hemiplegia. We describe analitically a joint intervention for a month. Although the maximum risk of pressure ulcer (UP as mentioned before, has remained, ulcers have not appeared during that period, obtaining an increasing articulation range. Multidisciplinary work is important to avoid the appearance of bedsores and future muscular and skeletal injuries that would hinder the future rehabilitation of the patient.

  12. Measuring static seated pressure distributions and risk for skin pressure ulceration in ice sledge hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Shaun D; Dicianno, Brad E; Berthold, Justin; McCoy, Andrew; Haas, Matthew; Cooper, Rory A

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether sledge hockey players with physical disability have higher average seated pressures compared to non-disabled controls. Fifteen age-matched controls without physical disability and 15 experimental participants with physical disability were studied using a pressure mapping device to determine risk for skin pressure ulceration and the impact of cushioning and knee angle positioning on seated pressure distributions. Regardless of participant group, cushioning, or knee angle, average seated pressures exceeded clinically acceptable seated pressures. Controls had significantly higher average seated pressures than the disability group when knees were flexed, both with the cushion (p = 0.013) and without (p = 0.015). Knee extension showed significantly lower average pressures in controls, both with the cushion (p hockey players utilize positioning with larger knee flexion angles. Implications for Rehabilitation Ice sledge hockey is a fast growing adaptive sport. Adaptive sports have been associated with several positive improvements in overall health and quality of life, though may be putting players at risk for skin ulceration. Measured static seated pressure in sledges greatly exceeds current clinically accepted clinical guidelines. With modern improvements in wheelchair pressure relief/cushioning there are potential methods for improvement of elevated seated pressure in ice hockey sledges.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of nutritional intervention on healing of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisashige, Akinori; Ohura, Takehiko

    2012-12-01

    Pressure ulcers not only affect quality of life among the elderly, but also bring a large economic burden. There is limited evidence available for the effectiveness of nutritional interventions for treatment of pressure ulcers. In Japan, recently, a 60-patient randomized controlled trial of nutritional intervention on pressure ulcers demonstrated improvement in healing of pressure ulcers, compared with conventional management. To evaluate value for money of nutritional intervention on healing of pressure ulcers, cost-effective analysis was carried out using these trial results. The analysis was carried out from a societal perspective. As effectiveness measures, pressure ulcer days (PUDs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated. Prevalence of pressure ulcers was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Utility score for pressure ulcers is derived from a cross-sectional survey among health professionals related to pressure ulcers. Costs (e.g., nutritional interventions and management of pressure ulcers) were estimated from trial data during observation and follow-up. Stochastic and qualitative sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the robustness of results. For observation (12 weeks) and follow-up (12-week observation plus 4-week follow-up), nutritional intervention reduced PUDs by 9.6 and 16.2 per person, and gained 0.226 × 10(-2) QALYs and 0.382 × 10(-2) QALYs per person, respectively. In addition, costs were reduced by $542 and $881 per person, respectively. This means nutritional intervention is dominant (cost savings and greater effectiveness). The sensitivity analyses showed the robustness of these results. Economic evaluation of nutritional intervention on healing pressure ulcers from a small randomized controlled trial showed that this intervention is cost saving with health improvement. Further studies are required to determine whether this is a cost-effective intervention for widespread use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and

  14. Laser therapy in pressure ulcers: evaluation by the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing and Nursing Outcomes Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Palagi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVETo describe the pressure ulcer healing process in critically ill patients treated with conventional dressing therapy plus low-intensity laser therapy evaluated by the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH and the result of Wound Healing: Secondary Intention, according to the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC.METHODCase report study according to nursing process conducted with an Intensive Care Unit patient. Data were collected with an instrument containing the PUSH and the result of the NOC. In the analysis we used descriptive statistics, considering the scores obtained on the instrument.RESULTSA reduction in the size of lesions of 7cm to 1.5cm of length and 6cm to 1.1cm width, in addition to the increase of epithelial tissue and granulation, decreased secretion and odor.CONCLUSIONThere was improvement in the healing process of the lesion treated with adjuvant therapy and the use of NOC allowed a more detailed and accurate assessment than the PUSH.

  15. The Nursing Diagnosis of risk for pressure ulcer: content validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cássia Teixeira Dos; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-06-14

    to validate the content of the new nursing diagnosis, termed risk for pressure ulcer. the content validation with a sample made up of 24 nurses who were specialists in skin care from six different hospitals in the South and Southeast of Brazil. Data collection took place electronically, through an instrument constructed using the SurveyMonkey program, containing a title, definition, and 19 risk factors for the nursing diagnosis. The data were analyzed using Fehring's method and descriptive statistics. The project was approved by a Research Ethics Committee. title, definition and seven risk factors were validated as "very important": physical immobilization, pressure, surface friction, shearing forces, skin moisture, alteration in sensation and malnutrition. Among the other risk factors, 11 were validated as "important": dehydration, obesity, anemia, decrease in serum albumin level, prematurity, aging, smoking, edema, impaired circulation, and decrease in oxygenation and in tissue perfusion. The risk factor of hyperthermia was discarded. the content validation of these components of the nursing diagnosis corroborated the importance of the same, being able to facilitate the nurse's clinical reasoning and guiding clinical practice in the preventive care for pressure ulcers. validar o conteúdo do novo diagnóstico de enfermagem, denominado risco de úlcera por pressão. trata-se de uma validação de conteúdo, com amostra composta por 24 enfermeiros especialistas no cuidado à pele, procedentes de seis diferentes hospitais do Sul e Sudeste brasileiro. A coleta de dados ocorreu por meio eletrônico, em instrumento construído pelo programa SurveyMonkey, que continha título, definição e 19 fatores de risco para o diagnóstico de enfermagem. Os dados foram analisados pelo método de Fehring e pela estatística descritiva. O projeto foi aprovado em Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa. título, definição e sete fatores de risco foram validados como "muito importante

  16. Building a Biopsychosocial Conceptual Framework to Explore Pressure Ulcer Pain for Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junglyun; Ahn, Hyochol; Lyon, Debra E; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-01-08

    Although pressure ulcers are a prevalent condition, pain associated with pressure ulcers is not fully understood. Indeed, previous studies do not shed light on the association between pressure ulcer stages and the experience of pain. Especially, pain characteristics of suspected deep tissue injury, which is a new category that was recently added by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, are yet unknown. This is concerning because the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients has increased exponentially over the last two decades, and health care providers are struggling to ensure providing adequate care. Thus, in order to facilitate the development of effective interventions, this paper presents a conceptual framework to explore pressure ulcer pain in hospitalized patients. The concepts were derived from a biopsychosocial model of pain, and the relationships among each concept were identified through a literature review. Major propositions are presented based on the proposed conceptual framework, which integrates previous research on pressure ulcer pain, to ultimately improve understanding of pain in hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers.

  17. Risks and risk-analysis for the development of pressure ulcers in surgical patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, Bastiaan Paul Johan Aart

    2006-01-01

    With prevalence figures of 13% for university hospitals and 23% for general hospitals, pressure ulcers are a major health care issue in The Netherlands. Pressure ulcers in surgical patients are frequently encountered, as is illustrated by reported incidence rates up to 66%. The number of patients at

  18. Building a Biopsychosocial Conceptual Framework to Explore Pressure Ulcer Pain for Hospitalized Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junglyun Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although pressure ulcers are a prevalent condition, pain associated with pressure ulcers is not fully understood. Indeed, previous studies do not shed light on the association between pressure ulcer stages and the experience of pain. Especially, pain characteristics of suspected deep tissue injury, which is a new category that was recently added by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, are yet unknown. This is concerning because the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients has increased exponentially over the last two decades, and health care providers are struggling to ensure providing adequate care. Thus, in order to facilitate the development of effective interventions, this paper presents a conceptual framework to explore pressure ulcer pain in hospitalized patients. The concepts were derived from a biopsychosocial model of pain, and the relationships among each concept were identified through a literature review. Major propositions are presented based on the proposed conceptual framework, which integrates previous research on pressure ulcer pain, to ultimately improve understanding of pain in hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers.

  19. Pressure ulcers: e-learning to improve classification by nurses and nursing students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeckman, D.; Schoonhoven, L.; Boucque, H.; Maele, G. van; Defloor, T.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To detect problems when classifying pressure ulcers and to examine whether an e-learning program is able to increase the classification skills of qualified nurses and nursing students. BACKGROUND: Both the distinction between pressure ulcer grades and the differentiation between

  20. Hybrid equation/agent-based model of ischemia-induced hyperemia and pressure ulcer formation predicts greater propensity to ulcerate in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Solovyev

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers are costly and life-threatening complications for people with spinal cord injury (SCI. People with SCI also exhibit differential blood flow properties in non-ulcerated skin. We hypothesized that a computer simulation of the pressure ulcer formation process, informed by data regarding skin blood flow and reactive hyperemia in response to pressure, could provide insights into the pathogenesis and effective treatment of post-SCI pressure ulcers. Agent-Based Models (ABM are useful in settings such as pressure ulcers, in which spatial realism is important. Ordinary Differential Equation-based (ODE models are useful when modeling physiological phenomena such as reactive hyperemia. Accordingly, we constructed a hybrid model that combines ODEs related to blood flow along with an ABM of skin injury, inflammation, and ulcer formation. The relationship between pressure and the course of ulcer formation, as well as several other important characteristic patterns of pressure ulcer formation, was demonstrated in this model. The ODE portion of this model was calibrated to data related to blood flow following experimental pressure responses in non-injured human subjects or to data from people with SCI. This model predicted a higher propensity to form ulcers in response to pressure in people with SCI vs. non-injured control subjects, and thus may serve as novel diagnostic platform for post-SCI ulcer formation.

  1. Diabetic foot ulcer incidence in relation to plantar pressure magnitude and measurement location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, William R; Shofer, Jane B; Cowley, Matthew S; Ahroni, Jessie H; Cohen, Victoria; Boyko, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    We prospectively examined the relationship between site-specific peak plantar pressure (PPP) and ulcer risk. Researchers have previously reported associations between diabetic foot ulcer and elevated plantar foot pressure, but the effect of location-specific pressures has not been studied. Diabetic subjects (n=591) were enrolled from a single VA hospital. Five measurements of in-shoe plantar pressure were collected using F-Scan. Pressures were measured at 8 areas: heel, lateral midfoot, medial midfoot, first metatarsal, second through fourth metatarsal, fifth metatarsal, hallux, and other toes. The relationship between incident plantar foot ulcer and PPP or pressure-time integral (PTI) was assessed using Cox regression. During follow-up (2.4years), 47 subjects developed plantar ulcers (10 heel, 12 metatarsal, 19 hallux, 6 other). Overall mean PPP was higher for ulcer subjects (219 vs. 194kPa), but the relationship differed by site (the metatarsals with ulcers had higher pressure, while the opposite was true for the hallux and heel). A statistical analysis was not performed on the means, but hazard ratios from a Cox survival analysis were nonsignificant for PPP across all sites and when adjusted for location. However, when the metatarsals were considered separately, higher baseline PPP was significantly associated with greater ulcer risk; at other sites, this relationship was nonsignificant. Hazard ratios for all PTI data were nonsignificant. Location must be considered when assessing the relationship between PPP and plantar ulceration. © 2013.

  2. Prevalence and incidence density of unavoidable pressure ulcers in elderly patients admitted to medical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palese, Alvisa; Trevisani, Barbara; Guarnier, Annamaria; Barelli, Paolo; Zambiasi, Paola; Allegrini, Elisabetta; Bazoli, Letizia; Casson, Paola; Marin, Meri; Padovan, Marisa; Picogna, Michele; Taddia, Patrizia; Salmaso, Daniele; Chiari, Paolo; Marognolli, Oliva; Federica, Canzan; Saiani, Luisa; Ambrosi, Elisa

    2017-05-01

    To describe the prevalence and incidence density of hospital-acquired unavoidable pressure sores among patients aged ≥65 years admitted to acute medical units. A secondary analysis of longitudinal study data collected in 2012 and 2013 from 12 acute medical units located in 12 Italian hospitals was performed. Unavoidable pressure ulcers were defined as those that occurred in haemodynamically unstable patients, suffering from cachexia and/or terminally ill and were acquired after hospital admission. Data at patient and at pressure ulcer levels were collected on a daily basis at the bedside by trained researchers. A total of 1464 patients out of 2080 eligible (70.4%) were included. Among these, 96 patients (6.5%) hospital-acquired a pressure ulcer and, among 19 (19.7%) were judged as unavoidable. The incidence of unavoidable pressure ulcer was 8.5/ 100 in hospital-patient days. No statistically significant differences at patient and pressure ulcers levels have emerged between those patients that acquired unavoidable and avoidable pressure sores. Although limited, evidence on unavoidable pressure ulcer is increasing. More research in the field is recommended to support clinicians, managers and policymakers in the several implications of unavoidable pressure ulcers both at the patient and at the system levels. Copyright © 2017 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The incidence of pressure ulcers after the implementation of a prevention protocol Incidencia de las úlceras por presión tras la implementación de un protocolo de prevención Incidência de úlceras por pressão após a implementação de um protocolo de prevenção

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Marisa Brunet Rogenski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Even in the present, pressure ulcers still represent a severe health problem, particularly in Intensive Care Units (ICU. This study assesses the implementation of a protocol to prevent pressure ulcers in ICU inpatients. This prospective, descriptive and exploratory study verifies the incidence of pressure ulcers following the implementation of a prevention protocol. Data were collected from April 17th to July 15th 2009. The incidence observed in this study (23.1% was below that reported in a similar study developed in the same institution (41.02% before the implementation of the protocols to assess risk and prevent pressure ulcers. The prevention protocols are essential tools that have an impact on controlling the incidence of pressure ulcers, when used consistently.Las úlceras por presión todavía representan un problema de salud grave, especialmente en unidades de cuidados intensivos. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la aplicación de un protocolo para la prevención de úlceras por presión en pacientes de la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos. Métodos: Estudio prospectivo, descriptivo y exploratorio, en los que la incidencia de úlceras por presión tras la aplicación de un protocolo de prevención. Los datos fueron recolectados durante el período comprendido entre el 17 abril a 15 julio 2009. Resultados: La incidencia encontrada en este estudio, el 23,1%, fue inferior a la indicada en un estudio similar elaborado en la misma institución (41,02% antes de la aplicación de protocolos para la evaluación de riesgos y la prevención de úlceras por presión. Conclusiones: protocolos de prevención son herramientas fundamentales y el impacto en el control de la incidencia de úlceras por presión, cuando se usan de manera habitual.As úlceras por pressão, ainda hoje, representam sério problema de saúde, em particular nas unidades de terapia intensiva. O objetivo deste trabalho foi o de avaliar a implementação de um protocolo de

  4. The Healing Effect of Low-Temperature Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma in Pressure Ulcer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuangsuwanich, Apirag; Assadamongkol, Tananchai; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2016-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are difficult to treat. Recent reports of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma (LTAPP) indicated its safe and effectiveness in chronic wound care management. It has been shown both in vitro and vivo studies that LTAPP not only helps facilitate wound healing but also has antimicrobial efficacy due to its composition of ion and electron, free radicals, and ultraviolet ray. We studied the beneficial effect of LTAPP specifically on pressure ulcers. In a prospective randomized study, 50 patients with pressure ulcers were divided into 2 groups: Control group received standard wound care and the study group was treated with LTAPP once every week for 8 consecutive weeks in addition to standard wound care. We found that the group treated with LTAPP had significantly better PUSH (Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing) scores and exudate amount after 1 week of treatment. There was also a reduction in bacterial load after 1 treatment regardless of the species of bacteria identified.

  5. Characterization of a Murine Pressure Ulcer Model to Assess Efficacy of Adipose-derived Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Amy L; Bowles, Annie C; MacCrimmon, Connor P; Lee, Stephen J; Frazier, Trivia P; Katz, Adam J; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara; Bunnell, Bruce A; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2015-03-01

    As the world's population lives longer, the number of individuals at risk for pressure ulcers will increase considerably in the coming decades. In developed countries, up to 18% of nursing home residents suffer from pressure ulcers and the resulting hospital costs can account for up to 4% of a nation's health care budget. Although full-thickness surgical skin wounds have been used as a model, preclinical rodent studies have demonstrated that repeated cycles of ischemia and reperfusion created by exposure to magnets most closely mimic the human pressure ulcer condition. This study uses in vivo and in vitro quantitative parameters to characterize the temporal kinetics and histology of pressure ulcers in young, female C57BL/6 mice exposed to 2 or 3 ischemia-reperfusion cycles. This pressure ulcer model was validated further in studies examining the efficacy of adipose-derived stromal/stem cell administration. Optimal results were obtained with the 2-cycle model based on the wound size, histology, and gene expression profile of representative angiogenic and reparative messenger RNAs. When treated with adipose-derived stromal/stem cells, pressure ulcer wounds displayed a dose-dependent and significant acceleration in wound closure rates and improved tissue histology. These findings document the utility of this simplified preclinical model for the evaluation of novel tissue engineering and medical approaches to treat pressure ulcers in humans.

  6. Biomechanics Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Using Damaged Interface Model between Bone and Muscle in the Human Buttock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamet, Samuel Susanto; Takano, Naoki; Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Hatano, Asako; Nagasao, Tomohisa

    This paper aims at building up a computational procedure to study the bio-mechanism of pressure ulcer using the finite element method. Pressure ulcer is a disease that occurs in the human body after 2 hours of continuous external force. In the very early stage of pressure ulcer, it is found that the tissues inside the body are damaged, even though skin surface looks normal. This study assumes that tension and/or shear strain will cause damage to loose fibril tissue between the bone and muscle and that propagation of damaged area will lead to fatal stage. Analysis was performed using the finite element method by modeling the damaged fibril tissue as a cutout. By varying the loading directions and watching both tensile and shear strains, the risk of fibril tissue damage and propagation of the damaged area is discussed, which may give new insight for the careful nursing for patients, particularly after surgical treatment. It was found that the pressure ulcer could reoccur for a surgical flap treatment. The bone cut and surgical flap surgery is not perfect to prevent the bone-muscle interfacial damage.

  7. [Differentiation between moisture lesions and pressure ulcers using photographs in a critical area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Matarín, Josefa; Del Cotillo-Fuente, Mercedes; Pujol-Vila, María; Ribal-Prior, Rosa; Sandalinas-Mulero, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    To identify difficulties for nurses in differentiating between moisture lesions and pressure ulcers, proper classification of pressure ulcers to assess the adequate classification of the Grupo Nacional para el Estudio y Asesoramiento de Úlceras por Presión y Heridas Crónicas (GNEAUPP) and the degree of agreement in the correct assessment by type and category of injury. Cross-sectional study in a critical area during 2014. All nurses who agreed to participate were included. They performed a questionnaire with 14 photographs validated by experts of moisture lesions or pressure ulcers in the sacral area and buttocks, with 6 possible answers: Pressure ulcer category I, II, III, IV, moisture lesions and unknown. Demographics and knowledge of the classification system of the pressure ulcers were collected according to GNEAUPP. It involved 98% of the population (n=56); 98.2% knew the classification system of the GNEAUPP; 35.2% of moisture lesions were considered as pressure ulcers, most of them as a category II (18.9%). The 14.8% of the pressure ulcers photographs were identified as moisture lesions and 16.1% were classified in another category. The agreement between nurses earned a global Kappa index of .38 (95% CI: .29-.57). There are difficulties differentiating between pressure ulcers and moisture lesions, especially within initial categories. Nurses have the perception they know the pressure ulcers classification, but they do not classify them correctly. The degree of concordance in the diagnosis of skin lesions was low. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Plantar pressures in diabetic patients with foot ulcers which have remained healed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owings, T. M.; Apelqvist, J.; Stenström, A.; Becker, M.; Bus, S. A.; Kalpen, A.; Ulbrecht, J. S.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    The recurrence of foot ulcers is a significant problem in people with diabetic neuropathy. The purpose of this study was to measure in-shoe plantar pressures and other characteristics in a group of neuropathic patients with diabetes who had prior foot ulcers which had remained healed. This was an

  9. Unusual cause of a facial pressure ulcer: the helmet securing the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S M; Ju, R K; Lee, J H; Jun, Y J; Kim, Y J

    2015-06-01

    Many medical devices, such as pulse oximetry, ventilation masks and other splints are put on critically ill patients. Although these devices are designed to deliver relatively low physical pressure to the skin of the patient, they can still cause pressure ulcers (PUs) in critically ill patients. There are reports of medical device-related PUs on the face. Here we describe forehead skin necrosis caused by the securing helmet for the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube. It is difficult to detect this kind of PU early, because most of the patients have decreased mental status or delirium due to varix bleeding. For this reason, medical staff should be aware of the risk of developing a PU by the device and take preventive measures accordingly.

  10. Evaluation of healing of pressure ulcers through thermography: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Emília Abreu Chaves

    Full Text Available Introduction Thermography is a surface thermal radiation measurement technique whose application has been expanding in the healthcare field. The unhealed wound is a serious public health problem because it intervenes in the quality of life of patients and may cause emotional and psychological losses. The wound temperature can provide quantitative data that allow for the healing process to be monitored. The aim of this study was to verify whether thermography can be used as a method to evaluate the healing of pressure ulcers. Methods Eight participants with sacral pressure ulcers were recruited and randomly divided into two groups: A (control and B (experimental. Both groups received standard treatment for a period of four weeks, which consisted of a daily cleaning of the pressure ulcers with physiological saline (sodium chloride 0.9% followed by an alginate hydrogel dressing. The group B received light-emitting diode (LED phototherapy in addition to standard treatment, three times a week, yielding a total of 12 sessions. Photographs and thermograms of each pressure ulcer were obtained in all sessions in both groups. Results Pressure ulcers treated with LED phototherapy were healed. The pressure ulcer area of group B decreased over the 12 treatment sessions, whereas the pressure ulcer area of group A increased. The ulcer temperature of group B was higher than that of group A during the treatment (temperature difference up to 7.6%. Discussion The present study suggests a relationship between the temperature and area of pressure ulcers and proposes thermography as an adjunctive method for the evaluation of healing processes.

  11. Pressure ulcer risk assessment: retrospective analysis of Braden Scale scores in Portuguese hospitalised adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardo, Pedro; Simões, Cláudia; Alvarelhão, José; Costa, César; Simões, Carlos J; Figueira, Jorge; Simões, João L; Amado, Francisco; Amaro, António; Melo, Elsa

    2015-11-01

    To analyse the Braden Scale scores and sub-scores assessed in Portuguese hospitalised adult patients in association with their characteristics, diagnoses and length of stay. The Braden Scale is used worldwide for pressure ulcer risk assessment and supports nurses in the implementation of preventive interventions. Retrospective cohort analysis of electronic health record database from adult patients admitted to medical and surgical areas during 2012. Braden Scale scores and sub-scores of 8147 patients were associated with age, gender, type of admission (emergency service or programmed), specialty units (medical or surgical), length of stay, patient discharge (discharge, decease or transference to other hospital) and ICD-9 diagnosis. The participants with significantly lower Braden Scale scores were women, older people, hospitalised in medical units, with emergency service admission, longer hospitalisation stays and/or with vascular, traumatisms, respiratory, infection or cardiac diseases. Mobility, friction/shear forces and activity had higher contributions to the Braden Scale score, while nutrition had the lowest contribution. Approximately one-third of all participants had high risk of pressure ulcer development at admission, which led to the application of nursing preventive care. Our study demonstrated that nurses should pay special attention to patients over 50 years of age, who had significantly lower Braden Scale scores. The Braden Scale scores significantly increased in the last assessments showing that Braden Scale is sensitive to the clinical improvement of the patient. Braden Scale correlations with length of stay reveal its importance as predictor of length of stay. Nurses should use Braden Scale assessment and consider patients' characteristics and diagnoses to plan more focused preventive interventions and improve nursing care. This study could be the first step to create a preventive protocol based on institutional reality, patients' characteristics

  12. The management of pelvic pressure ulcers by myocutaneous flaps ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sex ratio was 5 men for 4 women 10 sacral ulcers were treated by gluteus maximus myocutaneous flaps, 10 trochanteric and 4 ischiatic ulcers were covered by tensor fascia lata myocutaneous flaps. The cure rate was 100%. The main complications were: infection (63.5%), serous fluid discharge (21.05%), and flap ...

  13. Costs of topical treatment of pressure ulcer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Carolina Duarte Andrade

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To evaluate the costs of a topical treatment of pressure ulcer (PU patients in a hospital unit for treatment of chronic patients in 2014. METHOD This is an activity-based costing study. This method encompasses the identification, measurement and pricing of physical and human resources consumed for dressings. RESULTS Procedure costs varied between BRL 16.41 and BRL 260.18. For PUs of the same category, of near areas and with the same type of barrier/adjuvant, the cost varied between 3.5% and 614.6%. For most dressings, the cost increased proportionally to the increase of the area and to the development of PU category. The primary barrier accounted for a high percentage of costs among all items required to the application of dressings (human and material resources. Dressings applied in sacral PUs had longer application times. CONCLUSION This study allowed us to understand the costs involved in the treatment of PUs, and it may support decision-makers and other cost-effectiveness studies.

  14. Two Methods for Turning and Positioning and the Effect on Pressure Ulcer Development: A Comparison Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated 2 methods for patient positioning on the development of pressure ulcers; specifically, standard of care (SOC) using pillows versus a patient positioning system (PPS). The study also compared turning effectiveness as well as nursing resources related to patient positioning and nursing injuries. A nonrandomized comparison design was used for the study. Sixty patients from a trauma/neurointensive care unit were included in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 teams per standard bed placement practices at the institution. Patients were identified for enrollment in the study if they were immobile and mechanically ventilated with anticipation of 3 days or more on mechanical ventilation. Patients were excluded if they had a preexisting pressure ulcer. Patients were evaluated daily for the presence of pressure ulcers. Data were collected on the number of personnel required to turn patients. Once completed, the angle of the turn was measured. The occupational health database was reviewed to determine nurse injuries. The final sample size was 59 (SOC = 29; PPS = 30); there were no statistical differences between groups for age (P = .10), body mass index (P = .65), gender (P = .43), Braden Scale score (P = .46), or mobility score (P = .10). There was a statistically significant difference in the number of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers between turning methods (6 in the SOC group vs 1 in the PPS group; P = .042). The number of nurses needed for the SOC method was significantly higher than the PPS (P ≤ 0.001). The average turn angle achieved using the PPS was 31.03°, while the average turn angle achieved using SOC was 22.39°. The difference in turn angle from initial turn to 1 hour after turning in the SOC group was statistically significant (P patients to prevent development of pressure ulcers.

  15. Nonpharmacologic Interventions to Prevent Pressure Ulcers in Older Patients: An Overview of Systematic Reviews (The Software ENgine for the Assessment and optimization of drug and non-drug Therapy in Older peRsons [SENATOR] Definition of Optimal Evidence-Based Non-drug Therapies in Older People [ONTOP] Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Montoya, Isabel; Vélez-Díaz-Pallarés, Manuel; Abraha, Iosief; Cherubini, Antonio; Soiza, Roy L; O'Mahony, Denis; Montero-Errasquín, Beatriz; Correa-Pérez, Andrea; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2016-04-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are frequent in older patients, and the healing process is usually challenging, therefore, prevention should be the first strategic line in PU management. Nonpharmacologic interventions may play a role in the prevention of PUs in older people, but most systematic reviews (SRs) have not addressed this specific population using convincing outcome measures. To summarize and critically appraise the evidence from SRs of the primary studies on nonpharmacologic interventions to prevent PUs in older patients. SR and meta-analysis of comparative studies. PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, and CINHAL (from inception to October 2013) were searched. A new search for updates in the Cochrane Database was launched in July 2014. SRs that included at least 1 comparative study evaluating any nonpharmacologic intervention to prevent PUs in older patients, in any healthcare setting, were selected. Any primary study with experimental design was then identified and included. From each primary study, quality assessment was undertaken as specified by the Cochrane Collaboration and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation working group. Interventions were identified and compared among different studies to explore the possibility of performing a meta-analysis, using the incidence of new pressure ulcers as the main outcome measure. One hundred ten SRs with 65 primary studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. The most frequent interventions explored in these trials were support surfaces (41 studies), repositioning (8), and nutrition interventions (5). High quality of evidence was not found for any intervention, mainly because of a high risk of bias and imprecision. There is moderate quality evidence to support the use of alternating pressure support mattresses over usual hospital mattresses in medical and surgical inpatients, low quality evidence to support constant low pressure devices and Australian medical sheepskin

  16. Tear production and intraocular pressure in canine eyes with corneal ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Williams

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate changes in lacrimation and intraocular pressure (IOP in dogs with unilateral corneal ulceration using the Schirmer tear test (STT and rebound (TonoVet® tonometry. IOP and STT values were recorded in both ulcerated and non-ulcerated (control eyes of 100 dogs diagnosed with unilateral corneal ulceration. Dogs presented with other ocular conditions as their primary complaint were excluded from this study. The mean ± standard deviation for STT values in the ulcerated and control eyes were 20.2±4.6 mm/min and 16.7±3.5 mm/min respectively. The mean ± standard deviation for IOP in the ulcerated and control eyes were 11.9±3.1 mmHg and 16.7±2.6 mmHg respectively. STT values were significantly higher (p<0.000001 in the ulcerated eye compared to the control eye while IOP was significantly lower (p<0.0001. There is an increase in lacrimation and a decrease in IOP in canine eyes with corneal ulceration. The higher tear production in ulcerated eyes shows the importance of measuring STT in both eyes in cases of corneal ulceration, since this increased lacrimation may mask an underlying keratoconjunctivitis sicca only evident in the contralateral eye. The lower IOP in ulcerated eyes is likely to relate to mild uveitic change in the ulcerated eye with a concomitant increase in uveoscleral aqueous drainage. While these changes in tear production and IOP in ulcerated eyes are widely recognised in both human and veterinary ophthalmology, it appears that this is the first controlled documented report of these changes in a large number of individuals.

  17. The impact of patient positioning on pressure ulcers in patients with severe ARDS: results from a multicentre randomised controlled trial on prone positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Raphaele; Baboi, Loredana; Ayzac, Louis; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Guérin, Claude

    2014-03-01

    position. Prone positioning improves survival in patients with severe ARDS and, therefore, survivors who received this intervention had a greater likelihood of having pressure ulcers documented as part of their follow-up. There are risk groups for the development of pressure ulcers in severe ARDS, and these patients need surveillance and active prevention.

  18. Occurrence and predictors of pressure ulcers during primary in-patient spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, J. H. M.; Post, M. W. M.; de Groot, S.; van der Woude, L. H. V.; van Asbeck, F. W. A.; Rol, M.

    Study design: Multicenter prospective cohort study. Objectives: To determine the occurrence and predictors for pressure ulcers in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) during primary in-patient rehabilitation. Setting: Eight Dutch rehabilitation centres with specialized SCI units. Methods: The

  19. Healing of ulcers on the feet correlated with distal blood pressure measurements in occlusive arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Lassen, N A

    1980-01-01

    The frequency of healing in subchronic ulcers in 66 feet in 62 patients with arterial occlusive disease was correlated with the systolic digital blood pressure (SDBP) and the systolic ankle blood pressure (SABP), both measured with a strain gauge, and with the skin perfusion pressure on the heel...... (SPPH) as measured with a photocell. Thirty-two patients (35 feet with ulcerations) had diabetes mellitus. The treatment was conservative. In 42 feet the ulcers healed after an average period of 5.8 months; in 24 feet major amputation became necessary after an average of 4.3 months. The frequency...... of healing correlated significantly with the three distal blood pressure parameters investigated, the closest correlation being with the SDBP measured at the final examination, i.e. just after healing of the ulcer or just before an inevitable major amputation. Of the 22 cases with SDBP below 20 mmHg only two...

  20. Treatment of Early-Stage Pressure Ulcers by Using Autologous Adipose Tissue Grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Francesco Marangi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessing pressure ulcers (PUs in early stages allows patients to receive safer treatment. Up to now, in addition to clinical evaluation, ultrasonography seems to be the most suitable technique to achieve this goal. Several treatments are applied to prevent ulcer progression but none of them is totally effective. Furthermore, the in-depth knowledge of fat regenerative properties has led to a wide use of it. With this study the authors aim at introducing a new approach to cure and prevent the worsening of early-stage PUs by using fat grafts. The authors selected 42 patients who showed clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of early-stage PUs. Values of skin thickness, fascial integrity, and subcutaneous vascularity were recorded both on the PU area and the healthy trochanteric one, used as control region. Fat grafting was performed on all patients. At three months, abnormal ultrasonographic findings, such as reduction of cutaneous and subcutaneous thickness, discontinuous fascia, and decrease in subcutaneous vascularity, all were modified with respect to almost all the corresponding parameters of the control region. Results highlight that the use of fat grafts proved to be an effective treatment for early-stage PUs, especially in the care of neurological and chronic bedridden patients.

  1. Treatment of early-stage pressure ulcers by using autologous adipose tissue grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangi, Giovanni Francesco; Pallara, Tiziano; Cagli, Barbara; Schena, Emiliano; Giurazza, Francesco; Faiella, Elio; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Persichetti, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Assessing pressure ulcers (PUs) in early stages allows patients to receive safer treatment. Up to now, in addition to clinical evaluation, ultrasonography seems to be the most suitable technique to achieve this goal. Several treatments are applied to prevent ulcer progression but none of them is totally effective. Furthermore, the in-depth knowledge of fat regenerative properties has led to a wide use of it. With this study the authors aim at introducing a new approach to cure and prevent the worsening of early-stage PUs by using fat grafts. The authors selected 42 patients who showed clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of early-stage PUs. Values of skin thickness, fascial integrity, and subcutaneous vascularity were recorded both on the PU area and the healthy trochanteric one, used as control region. Fat grafting was performed on all patients. At three months, abnormal ultrasonographic findings, such as reduction of cutaneous and subcutaneous thickness, discontinuous fascia, and decrease in subcutaneous vascularity, all were modified with respect to almost all the corresponding parameters of the control region. Results highlight that the use of fat grafts proved to be an effective treatment for early-stage PUs, especially in the care of neurological and chronic bedridden patients.

  2. Effectiveness of Enteral Nutritional Therapy in the Healing Process of Pressure Ulcers: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Blanc, Gisely; Meier, Marineli Joaquim; Stocco, Janislei Giseli Dorociaki; Roehrs, Hellen; Crozeta, Karla; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effectiveness of enteral nutritional therapy (ENT) in the healing process of pressure ulcers (PU) in adults and the elderly. METHOD A systematic review whose studies were identified through the databases of Cochrane, MEDLINE/PubMed, SciELO, LILACS, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and manual searches. It included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) without delimiting the period or language of publication, which addressed adults and elderly patients with pressure ulcers ...

  3. Effectiveness of percutaneous flexor tenotomies for the management and prevention of recurrence of diabetic toe ulcers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jennifer E; Hendry, Gordon J; Locke, John

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic toe ulcers are a potentially devastating complication of diabetes. In recent years, the percutaneous flexor tenotomy procedure for the correction of flexible claw and hammer-toe contraction deformities has been proposed as a safe and effective technique for facilitating the healing of toe-deformity related diabetic ulcers. The aim of this review is to critically appraise the evidence for the effectiveness of this surgical procedure in achieving ulcer healing, prevention of re-ulceration, and to summarise the rate of post-operative complications. A search of medical databases, was performed to locate relevant literature. Titles were screened prior to abstract and full text review to identify articles relevant to the research question. Search terms included truncations of "tenotomy", "toe", "hallux", "digit", "diabetes" and "ulcer". Peer reviewed primary research study designs specified as suitable for systematic reviews by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination were included. Studies were excluded if they used a concurrent secondary procedure or included non-diabetic patients without reporting outcomes separately. Included studies were appraised for quality using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomised Studies tool. Levels of evidence were subsequently assigned to each outcome of interest (healing rate and prevention of re-ulceration). From a total search yield of 42 articles, 5 eligible studies (all case series designs) were identified for inclusion. Included studies were of low-to-moderate methodological quality when assessed using the MINORS tool. A total of 250 flexor tenotomy procedures were performed in a total of 163 patients. Included studies generally reported good healing rates (92-100 % within 2 months) post-op follow-up), relatively few recurrences (0-18 % at 22 months median post-op follow-up), and low incidences of infection or new deformity. Transfer ulcers developing on adjacent areas as a result of shifted pressure were reported

  4. A care bundle for pressure ulcer treatment in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Lin Zuo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers (PUs are localized injuries of the skin or underlying tissue caused by prolonged pressure, exposure to shear forces or friction. PUs represent a major concern for hospitalized patients and the health professionals responsible for their wellbeing. intensive care init (ICU patients are at high risk of PU development, and the development of PUs can significantly extend the length of time a patient must remain in the ICU. Patients with PUs experience significantly increased morbidity, mortality and financial burden. A significant amount of evidence has accumulated indicating that PU prevention is an essential component of patient care. However, standardized guidelines and protocols for PU prevention in ICUs have not been universally implemented. This review aims to describe and analyze an optimized PU prevention care bundle based on the best available evidence and existing national guidelines. We distilled the available information into five main topics important for PU prevention: Risk Assessment, Skin Assessment, Support Surfaces, Nutrition and Repositioning. Further larger scale studies are needed to clinically verify the effectiveness of the care bundle.

  5. Preliminary Assessment of Photoactivated Antimicrobial Collagen on Bioburden in a Murine Pressure Ulcer Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lanzafame, Raymond J.; Stadler, Istvan; Cunningham, Ryan; Muhlbauer, Aaron; Griggs, Jacob; Soltz, Robert; Soltz, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective and background data: Overcoming bacterial antibiotic resistance requires alternative strategies. The ability of photoactivated collagen-embedded flavins (PCF) to reduce bioburden in infected pressure ulcers was investigated. Design and methods: Two pressure ulcers were created on the dorsum of female BALB/C mice (n=40, 35 g) maintaining a 5 mm skin bridge between lesions. Ulcers and surrounding skin were covered with Tegaderm™ and inoculated with 0.1 mL of 1×105 colony-forming units...

  6. Effectiveness of insoles used for the prevention of ulceration in the neuropathic diabetic foot: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Joanne; Bruce, Graham; Jones, Ray; Stenhouse, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Ulceration can be a debilitating and costly complication of the neuropathic diabetic foot. Insoles inserted into footwear are routinely used in clinical practice to help to prevent ulceration. AIM AND SCOPE OF THE REVIEW: This review evaluated the effectiveness of insoles used for the prevention of ulcer in the neuropathic diabetic foot. Databases were searched from inception to 2008, supplemented by hand searching of references and grey literature. Data extraction and methodological quality assessment were independently conducted by two reviewers following the recommendations of the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. A total of five trials met the inclusion criteria: two randomised control trials (RCTs), two case control studies, and one follow-up study. The methodological quality of the majority of studies was poor. Omitted details regarding the generalisability of results made study comparison and inference to practice difficult. There is a small amount of limited evidence indicating that insoles are effective in reducing incidence of ulceration and reducing plantar peak pressures in the diabetic neuropathic foot. No study included economic analysis or patient-based outcome measures. Insoles appear of use for the prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration, although evidence is limited. Clinical recommendation regarding type and specification of insole is not possible at this time. There is an essential need for a large well-designed RCT comparing different types of commonly used insole for the prevention of ulceration in the diabetic neuropathic foot. Outcome measures should include patient perceptions of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of high-resolution, high-frequency diagnostic ultrasound to investigate the pathogenesis of pressure ulcer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintavalle, Paul R; Lyder, Courtney H; Mertz, Philip J; Phillips-Jones, Connie; Dyson, Mary

    2006-01-01

    normal had the expected ultrasound findings for homogeneous pattern of ultrasound reflections, allowing for visualization of various skin layers (epidermis, superficial papillary dermis, deep reticular dermis, and hypodermis) and subcutaneous tissue (subdermal). However, many images (55.3%) obtained from the residents at risk for pressure ulcer development had patterns where areas within the various skin layers were not visible, interrupted by areas indicative of fluid or edema. Moreover, most images (79.7%) with abnormal ultrasound patterns did not have documentation of erythema. High-resolution ultrasound is an effective tool for the investigation of skin and soft tissue changes consistent with the documented pathogenesis of pressure ulcers. A progressive process for pressure ulcer development from deep subdermal layers to superficial dermal then epidermal layers can be inferred. Dermal edema was only present with subdermal edema. In other words, there was never evidence of dermal edema in the absence of subdermal edema. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of pressure ulcers through the use of high-resolution ultrasound to detect soft tissue damage and edema before visible clinical signs could lead to earlier and more focused pressure ulcer prevention programs, resulting in reduced pain and suffering for improved patient quality of life and wound care cost savings.

  8. Multidisciplinary and comprehensive approaches to optimal management of chronic pressure ulcers in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaul E

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Efraim Jaul Skilled Geriatric Nursing Department, Herzog Memorial Hospital, Affiliated to the Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel Abstract: The occurrence of pressure ulcers (PUs is common and poses serious problems for the frail elderly, with implications for functional disability and reduced quality of life. PUs are preventable in a majority of cases. The increase in PU occurrence, however, appears regardless of higher awareness in prevention and improvement through utilization of pressure relieving devices. Multiple changes in the elderly body systems occur over time including aging, multiple chronic conditions, and functional impairment, potentially culminating in the final pathways of geriatric syndrome, unless awareness to the development of PUs is reversible and prevented. The assumption is that the development of PUs is based on multifactorial causes (extrinsic and intrinsic factors; thus, the optimal management for elderly patients requires a comprehensive approach in all medical settings (community, hospital, and at the long term care [LTC] level. Comprehensiveness signifies looking beyond the wounds, assisting the patient through both local (wound and systemic (medical condition treatment, using a strategy of prevention and supporting quality of life. Within the multidisciplinary involvement team approach, each professional discipline contributes its own task in coordination with other disciplines to address PU prevention, assessment, and treatment. The entire medical staff and the multidisciplinary team work together and communicate frequently in order to prevent, halt at an early stage, and provide healing in a timely fashion. Limiting the formation of PUs is facilitated through early identification, treating contributing causes, eliminating all unnecessary medications, instituting supportive interventions which include the family. Understanding the relationship between the formation of PUs and the

  9. Off-loading the diabetic foot for ulcer prevention and healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavanagh, Peter R.; Bus, Sicco A.

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective studies have shown that elevated plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of many plantar ulcers in diabetic patients and that ulceration is often a precursor of lower-extremity amputation. Herein, we review the evidence that relieving areas of elevated

  10. Pressure ulcer education improves interrater reliability, identification, and classification skills by emergency nurses and physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, W.H.; Schoonhoven, L.; Schuurmans, M.J.; Veugelers, R.; Leenen, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a serious health complication that develop as a result of pressure alone or pressure in combination with shearing forces. Although PUs are typically associated with older adults and chronic illness, acutely injured trauma patients may have a particular risk

  11. Pressure ulcer education improves interrater reliability, identification, and classification skills by emergency nurses and physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, Wietske H W; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Schuurmans, Marieke J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/127722386; Veugelers, Rebekka; Leenen, Luke P H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071390596

    Introduction: Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a serious health complication that develop as a result of pressure alone or pressure in combination with shearing forces. Although PUs are typically associated with older adults and chronic illness, acutely injured trauma patients may have a particular risk

  12. Prevention of foot ulcers in the at-risk patient with diabetes: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, J. J.; Price, P. E.; Lavery, L. A.; Monteiro-Soares, M.; Rasmussen, A.; Jubiz, Y.; Bus, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes is extremely important to help reduce the enormous burden of foot ulceration on both patient and health resources. A comprehensive analysis of reported interventions is not currently available, but is needed to better inform caregivers about

  13. Análise da prevenção e tratamento das úlceras por pressão prop