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Sample records for prevent hip fractures

  1. [Delirium prevention and treatment in elderly hip fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, María José; Formiga, Francesc; Vidán, M Teresa

    2014-04-22

    The fracture of the proximal femur or hip fracture in the elderly usually happens after a fall and carries a high morbidity and mortality. One of the most common complications during hospitalization for hip fracture is the onset of delirium or acute confusional state that in elderly patients has a negative impact on the hospital stay, and prognosis, worsening functional ability, cognitive status and mortality. Also the development of delirium during hospitalization increases health care costs. Strategies to prevent and treat delirium during hospitalization for hip fracture have been less studied. In this context, this paper aims to conduct a review of the literature on strategies that exist in the prevention and treatment of delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  3. Secondary prevention of fractures after hip fracture: a qualitative study of effective service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, S; Judge, A; Cooper, C; Javaid, M K; Farmer, A; Gooberman-Hill, R

    2016-05-01

    There is variation in how services to prevent secondary fractures after hip fracture are delivered and no consensus on best models of care. This study identifies healthcare professionals' views on effective care for the prevention of these fractures. It is hoped this will provide information on how to develop services. Hip fracture patients are at high risk of subsequent osteoporotic fractures. Whilst fracture prevention services are recommended, there is variation in delivery and no consensus on best models of care. This study aims to identify healthcare professionals' views on effective care for prevention of secondary fracture after hip fracture. Forty-three semi-structured interviews were undertaken with healthcare professionals involved in delivering fracture prevention across 11 hospitals in one English region. Interviews explored views on four components of care: (1) case finding, (2) osteoporosis assessment, (3) treatment initiation, and (4) monitoring and coordination. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, anonymised and coded using NVivo software. Case finding: a number of approaches were discussed. Multiple methods ensured there was a 'backstop' if patients were overlooked. Osteoporosis assessment: there was no consensus on who should conduct this. The location of the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanner influenced the likelihood of patients receiving a scan. Treatment initiation: it was felt this was best done in inpatients rather request initiation in the post-discharge/outpatients period. Monitoring (adherence): adherence was a major concern, and participants felt more monitoring could be conducted by secondary care. Coordination of care: participants advocated using dedicated coordinators and formal and informal methods of communication. A gap between primary and secondary care was identified and strategies suggested for addressing this. A number of ways of organising effective fracture prevention services after hip fracture were

  4. Hip fractures. Epidemiology, risk factors, falls, energy absorption, hip protectors, and prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B

    1997-01-01

    have a high risk of hip fracture (annual rate of 5-6%), and the incidence of falls is about 1,500 falls/1,000 persons/year. Most hip fractures are a result of a direct trauma against the hip. The incidence of falls on the hip among nursing home residents is about 290 falls/1,000 persons/year and about......%, corresponding to 9 out of 247 residents saved from sustaining a hip fracture. The review points to the essentials of the development of hip fracture, which constitutes; risk of fall, type of fall, type of impact, energy absorption, and lastly bone strength, which is the ultimate and last permissive factor......The present review summarizes the pathogenic mechanisms leading to hip fracture based on epidemiological, experimental, and controlled studies. The estimated lifetime risk of hip fracture is about 14% in postmenopausal women and 6% in men. The incidence of hip fractures increases exponentially...

  5. [Hip fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisová, Drahomíra; Salášek, Martin; Pavelka, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Hip fractures are ranked among the frequent injuries. These fractures have been often coupled with high energy trauma in children and in patients with normal bone structure, low energy trauma and osteoporotic fracture (fragility fracture) is typical in elder patients. Hip fractures are divided into five groups: femoral head fracture, femoral neck fracture, pertrochanteric, intertrochateric and subtrochanteric fracture. Surgical treatment is indicated in all patients unless contraindications are present. Long bed rest has been accompanied by a high risk of development of thromboembolic disease, pneumonia and bed sore. Healing in the wrong position and nonunions are often the result of conservative treatment. Screw osteosynthesis is performed in isolated femoral head factures. Three cannulated screws or a DHS plate (dynamic hip screw) are used in fractures of the femoral neck with normal femoral head perfusion, total hip replacement is recommended in elder patients and in case of loss of blood supply of the femoral head. Pertrochanteric and intertrochanteric fractures can be stabilized by the femoral nails (PFN, PFN A, PFH - proximal femoral nail), nails are suitable for minimally invasive insertion and provide higher stability in the shaft, or plates (DHS) designed for stable pertronchanteric and intertrochanteric fractures. Subtrochanteric fractures can be fixed also intramedullary (nails - PFN long, PFN A long) and extramedullary (plates - DCS dynamic condylar screw, proximal femoral LCP - locking compression plate). Open reduction with internal plate fixation is advantageous for pathological fractures, as biopsy sampling can be performed. Hip fracture rehabilitation is integral part of the treatment, including walking on crutches or with a walker with partial weight bearing for at least six weeks.

  6. Martial arts fall training to prevent hip fractures in the elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, B.E.; Smulders, E.; Kam, D. de; Duysens, J.E.J.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Hip fractures are a common and serious consequence of falls. Training of proper fall techniques may be useful to prevent hip fractures in the elderly. The results suggested that martial arts fall techniques may be trainable in older individuals. Better performance resulted in a reduced impact force.

  7. Is prophylactic fixation a cost-effective method to prevent a future contralateral fragility hip fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucett, Scott C; Genuario, James W; Tosteson, Anna N A; Koval, Kenneth J

    2010-02-01

    : A previous hip fracture more than doubles the risk of a contralateral hip fracture. Pharmacologic and environmental interventions to prevent hip fracture have documented poor compliance. The purpose of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of prophylactic fixation of the uninjured hip to prevent contralateral hip fracture. : A Markov state-transition model was used to evaluate the cost and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for unilateral fixation of hip fracture alone (including internal fixation or arthroplasty) compared with unilateral fixation and contralateral prophylactic hip fixation performed at the time of hip fracture or unilateral fixation and bilateral hip pad protection. Prophylactic fixation involved placement of a cephalomedullary nail in the uninjured hip and was initially assumed to have a relative risk of a contralateral fracture of 1%. Health states included good health, surgery-related complications requiring a second operation (infection, osteonecrosis, nonunion, and malunion), fracture of the uninjured hip, and death. The primary outcome measure was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio estimated as cost per QALY gained in 2006 US dollars with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios below $50,000 per QALY gained considered cost-effective. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the impact of patient age, annual mortality and complication rates, intervention effectiveness, utilities, and costs on the value of prophylactic fixation. : In the baseline analysis, in a 79-year-old woman, prophylactic fixation was not found to be cost-effective (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio = $142,795/QALY). However, prophylactic fixation was found to be a cost-effective method to prevent contralateral hip fracture in: 1) women 71 to 75 years old who had 30% greater relative risk for a contralateral fracture; and 2) women younger than age 70 years. Cost-effectiveness was greater when the additional costs of prophylaxis were less than $6000. However, for

  8. Preventing future fractures: effectiveness of an orthogeriatric fracture liaison service compared to an outpatient fracture liaison service and the standard management in patients with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Antonio; Fernández-Conde, Sonia; Ojeda, Soledad; Torres-Hernández, Laura; Hernández-Carballo, Carolina; Bernardos, Idoia; Rodríguez, Sinforiano; Laynez, Pedro

    2017-12-11

    An observational study was carried out in two hospitals in patients > 65 years admitted for hip fracture. At 6 months, 15% of patients in the hospital with orthogeriatric standard care and 75% in the hospital with fracture liaison service were receiving bisphosphonates. Many patients with fractures are discharged without preventive therapy against further fractures. We sought to compare the effectiveness of an orthogeriatric fracture liaison service (FLS), outpatient FLS, and the standard care after hip fractures in prevention of future fractures. An observational study was carried out in two hospitals in patients > 65 years of age, admitted between March and July 2016 for fractures. The Candelaria hospital (HUNSC) has no specific protocol for secondary prevention, while at the Negrin Hospital (HUGCDN), an FLS nurse visits the inpatients, gathers metabolic history, instructs regarding the diet, exercises, and fall prevention, and completes a discharge report regarding osteoporosis treatment. The prescription rate of osteoporosis treatment was analyzed at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge. We also analyzed the data of patients with hip fractures who attended the outpatient FLS before March 2016. We included a total of 185 inpatients with a mean age of 82 years and 73% were women. At admission, 8% of the patients in HUNSC and 10% in HUGCDN were receiving bisphosphonates. At discharge, the percentages were 8 and 96%, while at 6 months they were 15 and 75%, respectively (p < 0.001). The outpatient FLS recorded 206 hip fractures (27% of discharges for fractures), with 77% adherence to treatment at 6 months. Compared with the conventional management, the FLS model for inpatients with hip fractures achieved a fivefold increase in the adherence to treatment at 6 months, similar to the rates of outpatient FLS.

  9. Danish, national cross-sectional observational study on the prevalence of prior major osteoporotic fractures in adults presenting with hip fracture—limitations and scope for fracture liaison services in prevention of hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, A.; Abrahamsen, B.; Johansen, P. B.

    2018-01-01

    . Identification of vertebral fractures in particular is lacking. Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of prior major osteoporotic fractures (MOF) in the prior 10 years preceding hip fracture in order to provide information about the potential for prevention of hip fractures...... if occurring more than 6 months before the present fracture. Results: A total of 28% of hip fracture patients (32% of women and 19% of men) had at least one recognized MOF in the preceding 10 years. Forearm and humerus fractures constituted > 70% of prior MOF. In both genders, vertebral fractures only...... represented a small percentage (2.6%) of previously recognized MOF. Men were less likely than women to have experienced a prior MOF, chiefly due to fewer forearm and humerus fractures. Conclusion: The majority of hip fractures—and in particular hip fractures in men—occur without a previously treated MOF...

  10. Internal Medicine Hospitalists' Perceived Barriers and Recommendations for Optimizing Secondary Prevention of Osteoporotic Hip Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng Keong; Loh, Kah Poh; Goff, Sarah L

    2017-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health concern affecting an estimated 10 million people in the United States. To the best of our knowledge, no qualitative study has explored barriers perceived by medicine hospitalists to secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fractures. We aimed to describe these perceived barriers and recommendations regarding how to optimize secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fracture. In-depth, semistructured interviews were performed with 15 internal medicine hospitalists in a tertiary-care referral medical center. The interviews were analyzed with directed content analysis. Internal medicine hospitalists consider secondary osteoporotic hip fracture prevention as the responsibility of outpatient physicians. Identified barriers were stratified based on themes including physicians' perception, patients' characteristics, risks and benefits of osteoporosis treatment, healthcare delivery system, and patient care transition from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. Some of the recommendations include building an integrated system that involves a multidisciplinary team such as the fracture liaison service, initiating a change to the hospital policy to facilitate inpatient care and management of osteoporosis, and creating a smooth patient care transition to the outpatient setting. Our study highlighted how internal medicine hospitalists perceive their role in the secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fractures and what they perceive as barriers to initiating preventive measures in the hospital. Inconsistency in patient care transition and the fragmented nature of the existing healthcare system were identified as major barriers. A fracture liaison service could remove some of these barriers.

  11. Implementation of secondary fracture prevention services after hip fracture: a qualitative study using extended Normalization Process Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Drew, Sarah; Judge, Andrew; May, Carl; Farmer, Andrew; Cooper, Cyrus; Javaid, M Kassim; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background National and international guidance emphasizes the need for hospitals to have effective secondary fracture prevention services, to reduce the risk of future fractures in hip fracture patients. Variation exists in how hospitals organize these services, and there remain significant gaps in care. No research has systematically explored reasons for this to understand how to successfully implement these services. The objective of this study was to use extended Normalization Process Theo...

  12. Hip fracture prevention with a multifactorial educational program in elderly community-dwelling Finnish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkarinen, T; Löyttyniemi, E; Välimäki, M

    2013-12-01

    Guidelines suggest identification of women at fracture risk by bone density measurement and subsequently pharmacotherapy. However, most women who sustain a hip fracture do not have osteoporosis in terms of bone density. The present non-pharmacological intervention among elderly women unselected for osteoporosis reduced hip fracture risk by 55 % providing an alternative approach to fracture prevention. Hip fractures are expensive for society and cause disability for those who sustain them. We studied whether a multifactorial non-pharmacological prevention program reduces hip fracture risk in elderly women. A controlled trial concerning 60- to 70-year-old community-dwelling Finnish women was undertaken. A random sample was drawn from the Population Information System and assigned into the intervention group (IG) and control group (CG). Of the 2,547 women who were invited to the IG, 1,004 (39 %) and of the 2,120 invited to the CG, 1,174 (55 %) participated. The IG participated in a fracture prevention program for 1 week at a rehabilitation center followed by review days twice. The CG received no intervention. During the 10-year follow-up, both groups participated in survey questionnaire by mail. Outcome of interest was occurrence of hip fractures and changes in bone-health-related lifestyle. During the follow-up, 12 (1.2 %) women in the IG and 29 (2.5 %) in the CG sustained a hip fracture (P = 0.039). The determinants of hip fractures by stepwise logistic regression were baseline smoking (odds ratio (OR) 4.32 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 2.14-8.71), age OR 1.15/year (95 % CI 1.03-1.28), fall history OR 2.7 (95 % CI 1.24-5.9), stroke history OR 2.99 (95 % CI 1.19-7.54) and participating in this program OR 0.45 (95 % CI 0.22-0.93). Starting vitamin D and calcium supplement use was more common in the IG compared with the CG. The results suggest that this non-pharmacological fracture prevention program may reduce the risk of hip fractures in elderly

  13. Martial arts fall training to prevent hip fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, B E; Smulders, E; de Kam, D; Duysens, J; Weerdesteyn, V

    2010-02-01

    Hip fractures are a common and serious consequence of falls. Training of proper fall techniques may be useful to prevent hip fractures in the elderly. The results suggested that martial arts fall techniques may be trainable in older individuals. Better performance resulted in a reduced impact force. Hip fractures are a common and serious consequence of falls. Fall training may be useful to prevent hip fractures in the elderly. This pilot study determined whether older individuals could learn martial arts (MA) fall techniques and whether this resulted in a reduced hip impact force during a sideways fall. Six male and nineteen female healthy older individuals completed a five-session MA fall training. Before and after training, force and kinematic data were collected during volitional sideways falls from kneeling position. Two MA experts evaluated the fall performance. Fear of falling was measured with a visual analog scale (VAS). After fall training, fall performance from a kneeling position was improved by a mean increase of 1.6 on a ten-point scale (P < 0.001). Hip impact force was reduced by a mean of 8% (0.20 N/N, P = 0.016). Fear of falling was reduced by 0.88 on a VAS scale (P = 0.005). MA techniques may be trainable in older individuals, and a better performance may reduce the hip impact force in a volitional sideways fall from a kneeling position. The additional reduction of fear of falling might result in the prevention of falls and related injuries.

  14. Hip fracture - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 55. Read More Broken bone Hip fracture surgery Hip pain Leg MRI scan Osteoporosis - overview Patient Instructions Getting your home ready - knee or hip surgery Osteomyelitis - discharge Review ...

  15. Percutaneous internal fixation with Y-STRUT® device to prevent both osteoporotic and pathological hip fractures: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, François H; Tselikas, Lambros; Carteret, Thibault; Lapuyade, Bruno; De Baere, Thierry; Le Huec, Jean Charles; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2017-02-09

    We studied Y-STRUT® (Hyprevention, France), a new percutaneous internal fixation device, in combination with bone cementoplasty to prevent hip fracture. Between February 2013 and February 2015, a total of 16 femoral necks in 4 osteoporotic and 12 oncologic patients have been considered for prophylactic consolidation in this prospective multicentre pilot study involving 4 different hospitals. These consolidations were performed percutaneously under fluoroscopic guidance using Y-STRUT®, a dedicated internal fixation device. For osteoporotic patients, orthopaedic surgeons performed the prophylactic consolidations immediately after surgical treatment of a hip fracture (same anaesthesia) in the opposite side. For oncologic patients, without current hip fracture but considered at risk (Mirels score ≥8), interventional radiologists performed the procedures. We report the preliminary results of feasibility, safety and tolerance of these preventive consolidations using Y-STRUT®. Four patients (mean 83 years old) had prophylactic consolidation because of a severe osteoporosis (mean T-score -3.30) resulting in first hip fractures. Ten patients (mean 61 years old) were treated because of impending pathological fractures (mean Mirels score 9) related to femoral neck osteolytic metastases. All the procedures were performed with success. Wound healing was achieved in all cases with no access site complication. Radiographic exams performed at 3 months follow-up revealed that Y-STRUT® was well integrated in the bone. For the osteoporotic cohort, mean pain was 0.9 ± 0.7 at 3 weeks. For the oncologic cohort, it decreases from 3.6 ± 2.9 at baseline to 2.4 ± 0.9 at 2 months. Preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility and safety of Y-STRUT® implantation as well as the tolerance of the device.

  16. Social inequality and hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, N. C.; Hansen, L.; Judge, A.

    2015-01-01

    fracture (ICD10: S720, S721, S722 and S729) were identified from 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2011. Hip fracture patients were matched 1:1 on age, gender and year of fracture to a non-hip fracture control. An individual's education attainment was defined as basic, secondary or higher, and their income...... and year of fracture, and education and year of fracture, to describe whether the association of income or education with rates of hip fracture changed over time. Results: There were 69,774 hip fracture patients and 69,709 controls (both mean age 81.2 years) with complete data on income and education. Both...

  17. [Treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Juliana; Bliemel, Christopher; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Bücking, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Hip fractures are among the most common fractures in elderly people. The annual number of femoral fractures is even expected to increase because of an aging society. Due to the high number of comorbidities, there are special challenges in treating geriatric hip fracture patients, which require a multidisciplinary management. This includes surgical treatment allowing full weight bearing in the immediate postoperative period, osteoporosis treatment and falls prevention as well as an early ortho-geriatric rehabilitation program. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Compliance of an elderly hip fracture population with secondary preventative measures. Efficacy of a simple clinical practice intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Street, John

    2012-02-03

    Secondary pharmaceutical measures are effective in all age groups for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures. This prospective study determines the demographics of 566 consecutive osteoporotic hip fractures presenting to a Level 1 Trauma Center. We examine the efficacy of simple treatment recommendations for pharmaceutical treatment of osteoporosis and the factors determining general practitioner and patient compliance with these recommendations in a community setting. One out of four patients (24.5%) had sustained a previous fragility fracture. Mean age was 80 years. Twenty five percent were resident in a nursing home and only 10% were taking anti-resorptive therapy preoperatively. In hospital mortality was 6%, and 39% of recruited patients were dead at 12 months. By this time more than half the survivors were resident in a nursing home. The compliance with anti-resorptive therapy had increased to over 70% consequent to our simple recommendations. Significant differences in GP and patient compliance were observed between nursing home and own residence dwellers. This study demonstrates the efficacy of a simple clinical practice intervention in increasing patient and GP compliance with secondary fracture prevention measures. We also discuss many of the confounding issues determining this compliance.

  19. Excess mortality following hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; van Staa, T; Ariely, R

    2009-01-01

    Summary This systematic literature review has shown that patients experiencing hip fracture after low-impact trauma are at considerable excess risk for death compared with nonhip fracture/community control populations. The increased mortality risk may persist for several years thereafter, highlig......Summary This systematic literature review has shown that patients experiencing hip fracture after low-impact trauma are at considerable excess risk for death compared with nonhip fracture/community control populations. The increased mortality risk may persist for several years thereafter...... and excess mortality rates for hip fracture. Although a lack of consistent study design precluded any formal meta-analysis or pooled analysis of the data, we have shown that hip fracture is associated with excess mortality (over and above mortality rates in nonhip fracture/community control populations......) during the first year after fracture ranging from 8.4% to 36%. In the identified studies, individuals experienced an increased relative risk for mortality following hip fracture that was at least double that for the age-matched control population, became less pronounced with advancing age, was higher...

  20. Hip Fractures among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Home & Recreational Safety Older Adult Falls Important Facts about Falls Costs of Falls Hip Fractures Among Older Adults Older Adult Falls Programs Compendium of Effective Fall Interventions, 3rd Edition ...

  1. Hip fracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allows your surgeon to use an x-ray machine to see how well the parts of your hip bone line up. The surgeon ... allows your surgeon to use an x-ray machine to see how well the parts of your hip bone line up. The surgeon ...

  2. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment for Prevention of Delirium After Hip Fracture: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Lynn; Henderson, Victoria; Caslake, Robert

    2017-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in prevention of delirium after hip fracture. Systematic review and metaanalysis. Ward based models on geriatrics wards and visiting team based models on orthopaedics wards were included. Four trials (three European, one U.S.; 973 participants) were identified. Two assessed ward-based, and two assessed team-based interventions. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases; Clinicaltrials.gov; and the Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched. Reference lists from full-text articles were reviewed. Incidence of delirium was the primary outcome. Length of stay, delirium severity, institutionalization, long-term cognition and mortality were predefined secondary outcomes. Duration of delirium was included as a post hoc outcome. There was a significant reduction in delirium overall (relative risk (RR) = 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.69-0.94) in the intervention group. Post hoc subgroup analysis found this effect to be preserved in the team-based intervention group (RR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.61-0.98) but not the ward-based group. No significant effect was observed on any secondary outcome. There was a reduction in the incidence of delirium after hip fracture with CGA. This is in keeping with results of non-randomized controlled trials and trials in other populations. Team-based interventions appeared superior in contrast to the Ellis CGA paper, but it is likely that heterogeneity in interventions and population studied affected this. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. The TARGET project in Tuscany: the first disease management model of a regional project for the prevention of hip re-fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Prisco; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Nuti, Ranuccio; Rizzuti, Carla; Giorni, Loredano; Giovannini, Valtere; Metozzi, Alessia; Merlotti, Daniela

    2010-09-01

    The official inquiry on osteoporosis in Italy, promoted by the Italian Senate in 2002 concluded that proper preventive strategies should be adopted at regional level in order to prevent osteoporotic fractures. Tuscany is the first Italian region who has promoted an official program (the TARGET project) aimed to reduce osteoporotic fractures by ensuring adequate treatment to all people aged ≥65 years old who experience a hip fragility fracture. this paper provides information concerning the implementation of TARGET project in Tuscany, assuming that it may represent an useful model for similar experiences to be promoted in other Italian Regions and across Europe. we have examined the model proposed for the regional program, and we have particularly analyzed the in-hospital and post-hospitalization path of hip fractured patients aged >65 years old in Tuscany after the adoption of TARGET project by Tuscany healthcare system and during its ongoing start-up phase. orthopaedic surgeons have been gradually involved in the project and are increasingly fulfilling all the clinical prescriptions and recommendations provided in the project protocol. Different forms of cooperation between orthopaedic surgeons and other clinical specialists have been adopted at each hospital for the treatment of hip fractured elderly patients. GPs involvement needs to be fostered both at regional and local level. The effort of Tuscany region to cope with hip fractures suffered from elderly people must be acknowledged as an interesting way of addressing this critical health problem. Specific preventive strategies modelled on the Tuscany TARGET project should be implemented in other Italian regions.

  4. Hip fractures in old men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Rondanelli, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Describe 289 hip fractures that were admitted at Hospital Universitario del Valle between November 1, 2003 and June 30, 2004. The patients had the first appointment at 2.7 days after the fallen, 60% the patients were women, at he age average were 75 years. In the hospital 228 patients were operated (79%). The surgery was realized in average at the twelve days after than they were admitted at the hospital. The days in the hospital were in average 17.5 days. The index of Katz at the admission was 3.96 and the Parker index was 6.56. The mortality in the hospital was of 30 patients (11%). The following during six months was in 114 patients of the people that were operated; we found loss of initial reduction the hip fracture in 10% and infection in 4%

  5. Increasing incidence of hip fracture in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongtriratanachai, Prasit; Luevitoonvechkij, Sirichai; Songpatanasilp, Thawee; Sribunditkul, Siripoj; Leerapun, Taninnit; Phadungkiat, Sompant; Rojanasthien, Sattaya

    2013-01-01

    Hip fracture is a major health problem in Thailand. This study attempted to examine the incidence, related factors, and trends of hip fracture in Chiang Mai, Thailand. All hip fracture data among patients aged 50 yr or older were collected from hospitals in Chiang Mai, Thailand from August 1, 2006 to July 3, 2007. Data from the 1997 Chiang Mai hip fracture study were used for comparison. In the study period, 690 hip fractures were reported: 203 males and 487 females (male to female ratio was 1 to 2.4), with a mean age of 76.7 yr. The estimated cumulative incidence was 181.0 per 100,000, and the adjusted incidence was 253.3 (males: 135.9; females: 367.9). A simple fall was the most common mechanism (79%) of fracture, and 80% of the hip fractures occurred in patients aged 70 yr or older. The highest incidence of hip fracture was observed in patients older than 85 yr (1239). At 6 mo postfracture, most patients (61%) used a walking aid. Compared with the 1997 data, hip fracture incidence had increased by an average of 2% per yr, and the incidence of hip fracture had increased significantly from August 1, 2006 to July 31, 2007, especially in patients older than 75 yr. In patients older than 84 yr, the incidence increased by a factor of 2. Urgent strategies for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, and hence hip fracture, are needed. Copyright © 2013 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of medication reviews performed by a physician on treatment with fracture-preventing and fall-risk-increasing drugs in older adults with hip fracture-a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Christina; Wallerstedt, Susanna M

    2013-09-01

    To investigate whether medication reviews increase treatment with fracture-preventing drugs and decrease treatment with fall-risk-increasing drugs. Randomized controlled trial (1:1). Departments of orthopedics, geriatrics, and medicine at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. One hundred ninety-nine consecutive individuals with hip fracture aged 65 and older. Medication reviews, based on assessments of risks of falls and fractures, regarding fracture-preventing and fall-risk-increasing drugs, performed by a physician, conveyed orally and in written form to hospital physicians during the hospital stay, and to general practitioners after discharge. Primary outcomes were changes in treatment with fracture-preventing and fall-risk-increasing drugs 12 months after discharge. Secondary outcomes were falls, fractures, deaths, and physicians' attitudes toward the intervention. At admission, 26% of intervention and 29% of control participants were taking fracture-preventing drugs, and 12% and 11%, respectively, were taking bone-active drugs, predominantly bisphosphonates. After 12 months, 77% of intervention and 58% of control participants were taking fracture-preventing drugs (P = .01), and 29% and 15%, respectively, were taking bone-active drugs (P = .04). Mean number of fall-risk-increasing drugs per participants was 3.1 (intervention) and 3.1 (control) at admission and 2.9 (intervention) and 3.1 (control) at 12 months (P = .62). No significant differences in hard endpoints were found. The responding physicians (n = 65) appreciated the intervention; on a scale from 1 (very bad) to 6 (very good), the median rating was 5 (interquartile range (IQR) 4-6) for the oral part and 5 (IQR 4-5.5) for the text part. Medication reviews performed and conveyed by a physician increased treatment with fracture-preventing drugs but did not significantly decrease treatment with fall-risk-increasing drugs in older adults with hip fracture. Prescribing physicians appreciated

  7. Resolving controversies in hip fracture care: the need for large collaborative trials in hip fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Sprague, Sheila; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Einhorn, Thomas; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Haidukewych, George; Keating, John; Koval, Kenneth; Rosen, Clifford; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Motsitsi, Silas; Pei, Fuxing; Yang, Tian-fu; Zhou, Zong-ke; Arora, Shobha; Babhulkar, Sushrut; Bhargava, Rakesh; Desai, Mohan M.; Dhillon, Mandeep S.; Gill, Harpreet Singh; Goel, S. C.; Reddy, A. V. Gurava; Jain, Anil K.; Kalore, Niraj V.; Kammatkar, Nitin; Kumar, Vijay; Malhorta, Rajesh; Marthandam, S. S. K.; Pankaj, Amite; Patinharayil, Gopinathan; Rai, B. Sachidanand; Ramteke, Alankar Ambadas; Sancheti, Parag K.; Thakkar, Navin N.; Thomas, George S.; Robinson, Dror; Steinberg, Ely; Higuchi, Fujio; Kawamura, Sumito; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Sawaguchi, Takeshi; Park, Myung-Sik; Yun, Ho Hyun; Poduval, Murali; Siddiqui, Ahmed; Chang, Je-Ken; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Fu, Yin-Chih; Lu, Yen-Mou; Acaroglu, Emre; Alpasian, Mumtaz; Atilla, Bulent; Ayvaz, Mehmet; Caglar, Omur; Tokgozoglu, Mazhar; Gray, Peter Campbell; Harris, Ian; O'Sullivan, Michael; Page, Richard Samuel; Parker, David; Richardson, Martin; Solomon, Michael; Tetsworth, Kevin; Walker, Richard; Williams, Simon; Devane, Peter; Broos, Paul; Djurdjevic, Dragan; Brink, Ole; Jalovaara, Pekka; Ristiniemi, Jukka; Blum, Jochen; Bonnaire, Felix; Gerich, Tosten G.; Herrwerth, Volker; Klein, Michael; Knopp, Werner; Krettek, Christian; Mueller-Daniels, Holger; Ochs, Uwe; Oestern, Hans-Joerg; Pohlemann, Tim; Schandelmaier, Peter; Schreiber, Thomas; Seekamp, Andreas; Stuermer, Klaus Michael; Walde, Tim; Walde, Hans-Joachim; Weise, Kuno; Synnott, Keith; Grosso, Elena; Moroni, Antonio; Albers, G. H. Robert; de Ridder, Victor; Goslings, J. Carel; Haaglanden, M. C.; Heetveld, Martin J.; Jukema, Gerolt N.; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Rhemrev, S.; Segers, Michiel J. M.; Simmermacher, Roger; van der Elst, Maarten; van der Vis, Harm; van Vugt, Arie; Verhofstad, Michael H. J.; Bugge, Wilhelm; Figved, Wender; Frihagen, Frede; Madsen, Jan Erik; Nordsletten, Lars; Solheim, Ludvig Fjeld; Giannoudis, Peter V.; Kanakaris, Nikolaos; Parker, Martyn; Willett, Keith; Ekholm, Carl; Larsson, Sune; Rogmark, Cecilia; Abuzgaya, Fathi Hadi; Ackerman, Carel W.; Adachi, Jonathan Rick; Adili, Anthony; Bogoch, Earl A.; Bohm, Eric; Botsford, Deke John; Bourne, Robert B.; Buckley, Richard E.; Coles, Chad P.; Daniels, Timothy; de Beer, Justin; Devereaux, P. J.; Duffy, Paul; Farrokhyar, Forough; Feibel, Robert J.; Flores, Luis A.; Frank, Cyril B.; Glazebrook, Mark; Goetz, Thomas J.; Gordon, John A.; Gross, Michael; Guyatt, Gordon; Heron, Tim; Hoey, Steven; Josefchak, Robert G.; Kaminker, Richard S.; Karanicolas, Paul Jack; Kendall, Richard; Kim, Paul R.; Korbyl, Robert; Korley, Robert; Kreder, Hans J.; Kwan, Stephen; Laflamme, Yves; Leighton, Ross K.; Leone, James; Lincoln, Lawrence; MacCon, Kieran; Martin, David C.; Mastogiacomo, Frank; Mathew, George; McAllister, Patrick; McCormack, Robert G.; McKerrell, Jeffrey G.; Moro, Jaydeep K.; Murnaghan, John J.; Naudie, Douglas; O'Brien, Peter J.; O'Farrell, Terrance A.; Ogilvie, Rick A.; Oliver, John; Panagiotopoulos, Kostantinos; Perey, Bertrand; Perlau, Robert J. R.; Peterson, Devin C.; Petrisor, Brad; Pototschnik, Ralph; Pugh, David; Puloski, Shannon K. T.; Rerri, Bernard E.; Rittenhouse, Bryan R.; Rogakou, Cleo C.; Rosen, Leonard; Russell, Robert; Salo, Paul T.; Sanders, David; Smit, Arno; Song, John Young; Southcott, W. Peter; Tountas, Apostolos; Venugopal, Vikram; Waddell, James P.; Wai, Eugene; Walter, Stephen; Willits, Kevin; Yach, Jeff D.; Zalzal, Paul; Zarzour, Zane; Agarwal, Animesh; Anglen, Jeffrey O.; Appel, Marc; Archdeacon, Michael T.; Ballard, William Timothy; Barzideh, Sam; Berry, Daniel J.; Bezwada, Hari P.; Bhattacharyya, Timothy; Blotter, Robert H.; Bouxsein, Mary Larsen; Brown, Gregory A.; Brown, Thomas E.; Camuso, Matthew R.; Cole, Peter A.; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Crist, Brett D.; Davila, Maria Guerrero; Della Rocca, Gregory; Devinney, Dennis Scott; DiMaio, Frank R.; Dirschl, Doug; Duffy, Gervan; Duwelius, Paul; Egol, Kenneth J.; Ellis, Thomas; Ferguson, Tania; Finnegan, Maureen; Garino, Jonathan P.; Gill, Gurdev S.; Gorczyca, John; Gruen, Gary S.; Haidukewych, George John; Hak, David J.; Hammerberg, Mark; Harris, Adam; Harris, Mitchel; Iorio, Richard; Jadhav, Avinash; Jennings, James E.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Jiranek, William; Karges, David; Kregor, Phil; Kwartowitz, Mark A.; Lammens, Peter; Le, Theodore Toan; Leach, Patrick B.; LeCroy, Charles Michael; Levin, Paul; Lewis, Courtland; Liporace, Frank; Lorich, Dean; Louis, Steven; Lozman, Jeffrey; Lyden, John; Macaulay, William B.; Mansour, Edward Shawn; Marcus, Randall Evan; Markel, David; Masonis, John; Meinberg, Eric; Meldrum, Daniel; Meldrum, Russell; Moon, Charles N.; Moore, Thomas; Mormino, Matthew A.; Navid, David; Obremskey, William; Parvizi, Javad; Patney, Michael J.; Phieffer, Laura S.; Prayson, Michael; Probe, Robert; Prokuski, Laura; Reddix, Robert N.; Reilly, Mark C.; Ricci, William; Roberts, Craig S.; Sems, Andy; Sekundiak, Todd; Schmidt, Andrew; Schwappach, John; Sirkin, Michael; Stewart, Rena L.; Strauss, Elton; Switzer, Julie A.; Taunt, Charles J.; Tejwani, Nirmal; Vallier, Heather A.; Waldman, Barry; Web, Larry; Williams, Joseph; Wilson, Frederic; Wright, George; Ziran, Bruce; Zura, Robert D.; Torga-Spak, Roger; Reyes, Mario; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Barquet, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Hip fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the burden of disability associated with hip fractures globally vindicate the need for high-quality research to advance the care of patients with hip fractures. Historically, large, multi-centre randomized controlled

  8. Risk factor for first-incident hip fracture in Taiwanese postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Ping Chen

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: While total hip BMD is the strongest predictor of hip fracture, increasing awareness of osteoporosis prevention by educating people about good lifestyle habits and how to maintain BMD is prioritized for preventing the first-incident hip fracture in Taiwanese women.

  9. Hip fracture in hospitalized medical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zapatero Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study is to analyze the incidence of hip fracture as a complication of admissions to internal medicine units in Spain. Methods We analyzed the clinical data of 2,134,363 adults who had been admitted to internal medicine wards. The main outcome was a diagnosis of hip fracture during hospitalization. Outcome measures included rates of in-hospital fractures, length of stay and cost. Results A total of 1127 (0.057% admittances were coded with an in-hospital hip fracture. In hospital mortality rate was 27.9% vs 9.4%; p  Conclusions In-hospital hip fracture notably increased mortality during hospitalization, doubling the mean length of stay and mean cost of admission. These are reasons enough to stress the importance of designing and applying multidisciplinary plans focused on reducing the incidence of hip fractures in hospitalized patients.

  10. No association between hip geometry and four common polymorphisms associated with fracture: the Danish osteoporosis prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, N; Madsen, J S; Bladbjerg, E M; Beck Jensen, J E; Jørgensen, N R; Langdahl, B; Abrahamsen, B; Brixen, K

    2009-04-01

    Both osteoporosis and hip geometry are independently associated with fracture risk. There is a significant genetic contribution to the risk of osteoporosis, and evidence provided by twin studies has suggested that hip geometry may also in part be genetically programmed. Polymorphisms in a number of genes, including those coding for methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR c.677C > T), the purinergic P2X(7) receptor (Glu496Ala and Ile568Asn), and the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5 exon 9 [c.266A > G]), have been associated with an increased fracture incidence and/or reduced bone mineral density (BMD). The aim of the present study was to test whether these polymorphisms influence hip structural geometry in perimenopausal women. The four polymorphisms were genotyped in 800 healthy recently perimenopausal women never using hormone replacement therapy. BMD of the femoral neck was measured using a Hologic QDR-2000 densitometer and femoral neck axis length, neck width, neck shaft angle, and femoral head diameter were measured from the screen images. Genotype frequencies were compatible with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. No significant differences between homozygotes for the minor allele and carriers of the common allele regarding parameters of hip geometry were demonstrated. According to the anthropometric characteristics of the subjects, only body height in the MTHFR TT genotype group was significantly different from the combined CT/CC genotype group (P T, P2X(7) (Glu496Ala), P2X(7) (Ile568Asn), and LRP5 exon 9 (c.266A > G) polymorphisms.

  11. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged [greater than or equal] 65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research…

  12. Reducing falls and resulting hip fractures among older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J A; Olson, S

    2000-03-31

    Fall-related injuries are the leading cause of injury deaths and disabilities among older adults (i.e., persons aged > or = 65 years). The most serious fall injury is hip fracture; one half of all older adults hospitalized for hip fracture never regain their former level of function. In 1996, a total of 340,000 hospitalizations for hip fracture occurred among persons aged > or = 65 years, and 80% of these admissions occurred among women. From 1988 to 1996, hip fracture hospitalization rates for women aged > or = 65 years increased 23%. Risk factors for falls include increasing age, muscle weakness, functional limitations, environmental hazards, use of psychoactive medications, and a history of falls. Age is also a risk factor for hip fracture. Women aged > or = 85 years are nearly eight times more likely than women aged 65-74 years to be hospitalized for hip fracture. White women aged > or = 65 years are at higher risk for hip fracture than black women. Other riskfactors for hip fracture include lack of physical activity, osteoporosis, low body mass index, and a previous hip fracture. Because approximately 95% of hip fractures result from falls, minimizing fall risk is a practical approach to reducing these serious injuries. Research demonstrates that effective fall prevention strategies require a multifaceted approach with both behavioral and environmental components. Important elements include education and skill building to increase knowledge about fall risk factors, exercise to improve strength and balance, home modifications to reduce fall hazards, and medication assessment to minimize side effects (e.g., dizziness and grogginess). Coordination needs to be improved among the diverse Federal, state, and local organizations that conduct fall prevention activities. The effectiveness of existing fall prevention programs among specific groups of women (e.g., those aged > or = 85 years or living with functional limitations) needs careful evaluation. New primary fall

  13. Tight intra-operative blood pressure control versus standard care for patients undergoing hip fracture repair - Hip Fracture Intervention Study for Prevention of Hypotension (HIP-HOP) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moppett, Iain Keith; White, Stuart; Griffiths, Richard; Buggy, Donal

    2017-07-25

    Hypotension during anaesthesia for hip fracture surgery is common. Recent data suggest that there is an association between the lowest intra-operative blood pressure and mortality, even when adjusted for co-morbidities. This is consistent with data derived from the wider surgical population, where magnitude and duration of hypotension are associated with mortality and peri-operative complications. However, there are no trial to data to support more aggressive blood pressure control. We are conducting a three-centre, randomised, double-blinded pilot study in three hospitals in the United Kingdom. The sample size will be 75 patients (25 from each centre). Randomisation will be done using computer-generated concealed tables. Both participants and investigators will be blinded to group allocation. Participants will be aged >70 years, cognitively intact (Abbreviated Mental Test Score 7 or greater), able to give informed consent and admitted directly through the emergency department with a fractured neck of the femur requiring operative repair. Patients randomised to tight blood pressure control or avoidance of intra-operative hypotension will receive active treatment as required to maintain both of the following: systolic arterial blood pressure >80% of baseline pre-operative value and mean arterial pressure >75 mmHg throughout. All participants will receive standard hospital care, including spinal or general anaesthesia, at the discretion of the clinical team. The primary outcome is a composite of the presence or absence of defined cardiovascular, renal and delirium morbidity within 7 days of surgery (myocardial injury, stroke, acute kidney injury, delirium). Secondary endpoints will include the defined individual morbidities, mortality, early mobility and discharge to usual residence. This is a small-scale pilot study investigating the feasibility of a trial of tight intra-operative blood pressure control in a frail elderly patient group with known high morbidity

  14. SIGN HIP construct: Achieving hip fracture fixation without using an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the 6 week follow-up, there was 1 (1.5%) case of infection and 8 (11.8%) cases of varus collapse. Conclusion: Using the SIGN Hip Construct, hip fracture fixation can be achieved safely without an image intensifier. This implant may be a good alternative in developing countries where access to fluoroscopy is limited or ...

  15. Epidemiology of hip fractures in Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Harumi; Owan, Ichiro; Kudoh, Hirohisa; Horizono, Hidehiro; Arakaki, Kaoru; Ikema, Yasunari; Shinjo, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Kaori; Kanaya, Fuminori

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the current incidence of hip fractures in Okinawa prefecture and compared the data with those obtained in our previous study, which was conducted using similar methods in 1987/1988. All patients, aged 50 years or older and residing in Okinawa, admitted to Okinawa hospitals in 2004 for a fresh hip fracture were identified from hospital registries. Details were obtained from the medical records and radiographs of all patients and classified according to fracture type (cervical or trochanteric), age, sex, and fracture location. Subtrochanteric fractures and pathological fractures were excluded. A total of 1,349 patients (242 men and 1,107 women) were admitted for a fresh hip fracture in 2004. Their average age was 76.9 years for men and 82.4 years for women. There were 671 cervical fractures, 654 trochanteric fractures, and 24 unclassified proximal femoral fractures. Comparing the data from 1987/1988 to those from 2004, the total number of hip fractures increased by 188%, from 469 to 1,349. The age-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000, standardized to the 2000 US population, were 75.7 and 296.1 in 1987/1988 and 123.6 and 420 in 2004 for men and women, respectively. The incidence rates in all age groups (at 5-year intervals) were higher in 2004 than in 1987/1988, indicating that people 50 years of age or older became more susceptible to hip fractures. Accordingly, the accretion of the hip fracture incidence rate was greater than that which could be explained purely by changes in population size and structure.

  16. SIGN HIP CONSTRUCT: ACHIEVING HIP FRACTURE FIXATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elderly has made stable reduction and internal fixation the preferred treatment. .... anaemia, 1 had concomitant spine injury, and another had widespread ... infection (1.5%) and 8 cases of varus collapse (11.8%). (Table 4). Table 3. Stable versus unstable fracture and mechanism of injury. Type of fracture. MTA. No. (%). Fall.

  17. Epidemiology of hip fracture: Worldwide geographic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K Dhanwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a major health problem, especially in elderly populations, and is associated with fragility fractures at the hip, spine, and wrist. Hip fracture contributes to both morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The demographics of world populations are set to change, with more elderly living in developing countries, and it has been estimated that by 2050 half of hip fractures will occur in Asia. This review conducted using the PubMed database describes the incidence of hip fracture in different regions of the world and discusses the possible causes of this wide geographic variation. The analysis of data from different studies show a wide geographic variation across the world, with higher hip fracture incidence reported from industrialized countries as compared to developing countries. The highest hip fracture rates are seen in North Europe and the US and lowest in Latin America and Africa. Asian countries such as Kuwait, Iran, China, and Hong Kong show intermediate hip fracture rates. There is also a north-south gradient seen in European studies, and more fractures are seen in the north of the US than in the south. The factors responsible of this variation are population demographics (with more elderly living in countries with higher incidence rates and the influence of ethnicity, latitude, and environmental factors. The understanding of this changing geographic variation will help policy makers to develop strategies to reduce the burden of hip fractures in developing countries such as India, which will face the brunt of this problem over the coming decades.

  18. An updated hip fracture projection in Asia: The Asian Federation of Osteoporosis Societies study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lung Cheung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hip fracture is a major public health problem. Earlier studies projected that the total number of hip fracture will increase dramatically by 2050, and most of the hip fracture will occur in Asia. To date, only a few studies provided the updated projection, and none of them focused on the hip fracture projection in Asia. Thus, it is essential to provide the most up to date prediction of hip fracture in Asia, and to evaluate the total direct medical cost of hip fracture in Asia. Methods: We provide the updated projection of hip fracture in 9 Asian Federation of Osteoporosis Societies members using the most updated incidence rate and projected population size. Results: We show that the number of hip fracture will increase from 1,124,060 in 2018 to 2,563,488 in 2050, a 2.28-fold increase. This increase is mainly due to the changes on the population demographics, especially in China and India, which have the largest population size. The direct cost of hip fracture will increase from 9.5 billion United State dollar (USD in 2018 to 15 billion USD in 2050, resulting a 1.59-fold increase. A 2%–3% decrease in incidence rate of hip fracture annually is required to keep the total number of hip fracture constant over time. Conclusions: The results show that hip fracture remains a key public health issue in Asia, despite the available of better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of fracture over the recent years. Healthcare policy in Asia should be aimed to reduce the burden of hip fracture. Keywords: Hip fracture, Asia, Osteoporosis, Incidence

  19. Hip fracture audit: the Nottingham experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, N; Boulton, C; Morris, C; Moran, C

    2010-12-01

    The hip fracture audit in Nottingham started in May 1999. Using our data, we have developed the Nottingham Hip Fracture score and are able to predict long-term survival. High quality data collection is best achieved by trained staff dedicated to data collection and analysis. We have found it very cost-effective to train audit clerks in basic data analysis and statistical techniques, allowing for rapid analysis of data. We have developed a pre-operative scoring system to predict 30-day mortality for patients undergoing hip fracture surgery and the score is calculated for all patients over 65 years. In 2008, our audit data were used to assess mortality associated with hip fractures in the geriatric population at 5 years, and to identify the influence of pre-operative age, cognitive state, mobility and residential status on long-term survival. This study allows us to identify patients with a higher chance of long-term survival and consider surgical management that may provide a better long-term outcome. The prevalence of hip fracture in our population has steadily increased over the past decade and we are able to report a fall in the 30-day mortality and the 1-year mortality with time. Using the Nottingham Hip Fracture score which identifies patients pre-operatively that are at high risk of mortality has proved extremely useful in clinical practise. The United Kingdom National Hip Fracture Database was established in 2007 to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of care for hip fracture patients. Variation in quality of care should be reduced between units and best practise adopted throughout the health service.

  20. Pre-injury demographic patterns of patients sustaining hip fractures in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnoni, I; Mohamad Adam, B; Murallitharam, M; Tajuddin, A; Jaya Purany, Sp; Manmohan, S; Phang, Hf; Pan, Ch; Kamil, Mk; Anwar Hau, M

    2012-06-01

    Hip fractures entail a growing economic burden on the health care system. Study is warranted to further our understanding of its patterns and to create increased awareness in health care providers and the public. Data was extracted from the ongoing National Orthopaedic Registry of Malaysia (NORM), for the period June 2008 till December 2009. Patients aged 50 years and above without previous pathological fracture hip fractures were included in the study. Most hip fracture patients were 70 years and above (69.5%) with a mean (SD) age of 73.8 (10.3) years. Females represented the majority of the patients in this study (68.4%). Low energy trauma (i.e. trivial fall) was to the main mechanism of hip fractures in this study (81.3%). Aging adults should be made aware of timely preventive strategies (including osteoporosis prevention) fall prevention measures, and encouraged to maintain physically active lifestyles. Hip fracture, pre-fracture status.

  1. A pragmatic study exploring the prevention of delirium among hospitalized older hip fracture patients: Applying evidence to routine clinical practice using clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmaltz Heidi N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Delirium occurs in up to 65% of older hip fracture patients. Developing delirium in hospital has been associated with a variety of adverse outcomes. Trials have shown that multi-component preventive interventions can lower delirium rates. The objective of this study was to implement and evaluate the effectiveness of an evidence-based electronic care pathway, which incorporates multi-component delirium strategies, among older hip fracture patients. We conducted a pragmatic study using an interrupted time series design in order to evaluate the use and impact of the intervention. The target population was all consenting patients aged 65 years or older admitted with an acute hip fracture to the orthopedic units at two Calgary, Alberta hospitals. The primary outcome was delirium rates. Secondary outcomes included length of hospital stay, in-hospital falls, in-hospital mortality, new discharges to long-term care, and readmissions. A Durbin Watson test was conducted to test for serial correlation and, because no correlation was found, Chi-square statistics, Wilcoxon test and logistic regression analyses were conducted as appropriate. At study completion, focus groups were conducted at each hospital to explore issues around the use of the order set. During the 40-week study period, 134 patients were enrolled. The intervention had no effect on the overall delirium rate (33% pre versus 31% post; p = 0.84. However, there was a significant interaction between study phase and hospital (p = 0.03. Although one hospital did not experience a decline in delirium rate, the delirium rate at the other hospital declined from 42% to 19% (p = 0.08. This difference by hospital was mirrored in focus group feedback. The hospital that experienced a decline in delirium rates was more supportive of the intervention. Overall, post-intervention there were no significant differences in mean length of stay (12 days post versus 14 days pre; p = 0.74, falls (6% post

  2. Risk Factors of the Hip Fractures in Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Nik-Tab'e

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The hip fractures are the most frequent cause of traumatic death after the age of 75 years, occurring more frequently in women that will make a negative impact of the patient's life style. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the risk factors of the hip fractures in elderly hospitalized in centers of education and treatment of Kerman and Rafsanjan cities in 1998-2000. Methods and Materials & Methods: This study was a descriptive method of sampling during 27 months (from 19 April 1998 to 21 July 2000 in hospitalized patients of orthopedic wards of Ali ebne Abitaleb hospital of Rafsanjan and Shahid bahonar hospital of Kerman. 257 patients who were afflicted with hip fracture were evaluated by a questionnaire with 20 statements (risk factors of hip fractures that was used to recorded information about this study: This risk factors were including age, sex, type of fracture, osteoporosis, milk consumption, muscle atrophy, environmental hazards, body mass index diseases, diabetes, previous fracture, smoking, antidepressant and anti convulsion drugs, heart disease, low mobility and activity perception disorders, age of menopause, impaired visual and nonuse external hip protector (padding. Results: The results of this study showed that many of above risk factors were effective (>50% than others. These factors were including environmental hazards (81.7%, muscle atrophy (72.8%, previous fractures (52.1%, low mobility and activity (70.8%, low milk consumption (100%, low BMI (79.8%, osteoporosis (52.1% and nonuse external hip protector (100%. Conclusion: The results of this study recommend that environmental hazards of elderly should be modified (e.g. well lighted, stair case with secure hand rail to prevent from falling Exercise and faradic current prevent muscle atrophy and improve physical fitness, muscle strength, balance and coordination. Treatment of impaired visual is important because risk of falling is decreased. Regular load

  3. Role of MRI in hip fractures, including stress fractures, occult fractures, avulsion fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachtrab, O.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Lalam, R.; Tins, B.; Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Singh, J.

    2012-01-01

    MR imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of hip fractures in all age groups, in a large spectrum of patient groups spanning the elderly and sporting population. It allows a confident exclusion of fracture, differentiation of bony from soft tissue injury and an early confident detection of fractures. There is a spectrum of MR findings which in part is dictated by the type and cause of the fracture which the radiologist needs to be familiar with. Judicious but prompt utilisation of MR in patients with suspected hip fractures has a positive therapeutic impact with healthcare cost benefits as well as social care benefits.

  4. Morbidity and mortality of hospitalized hip fractures in chronic hemodialysis

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    Georgios Vlachopanos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal bone architecture contributes to high incidence of hip fractures in chronichemodialysis (HD patients. Their clinical epidemiology is incompletely described. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to assess the implications ofhospitalization with hip fracture in HD patients compared to the nonchronic kidney disease population. Thirty-three chronic HD patients admitted with hip fracture overfiveyears were age- and sex-matched on a 1:1 ratio with controls that had hip fracture and normal renal function. Demographic characteristics, deaths, and readmissions atsixmonths,hospitalization length, time to operation, and laboratory resultswere recorded from electronic health files. Datawere compared betweenthe two groups usingpairedt-test for continuous variables and McNemar's test for categoricalvariables. The compositeendpoint of deathand/or readmission at6 months was higher in HD patients (12.1% vs. 6.2%, P<0.001. Furthermore, mean time tooperationwas more delayed due to comorbidities (4.7 vs. 2.9 days, p = 0.04. HD patients had anemia more frequently at presentation (hemoglobin below 10 mg/dL, 32.1% vs. 12.5%, P = 0.003. Finally, they were more likely to be considered toofrail for surgery and not be operated (21.2% vs. 6.2%, P<0.001. Hip fractures are associated with increased morbidity and mortality and represent an important health-care burden for chronic HD patients. Future research is needed to identify definite predictors of adverse outcomes and to implement prevention strategies.

  5. Medical Cost Analysis of the Osteoporotic Hip Fractures

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    Savaş Çamur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Osteoporotic hip fractures decrease the life expectancy for 20% about 20-50% of the patients become permanently dependent in terms of walking for the rest of their life. Life expectancy is increasing in Turkey in the last 20 years. We investigated the impact of osteoporotic hip fractures which increase the morbidity and mortality on the national economy. Materials and Methods: A total of 81 patients admitted to our emergency department with the diagnosis of femur intertrochanteric fracture and femoral neck fracture between 2008 and 2012 were included in this study. We retrospectively evaluated the medical records and the medical costs of these patients from hospital information management system. Results: Of the 81 patients 32 (39.6% males and 49 (60.4% females meeting the inclusion criteria were included in this study. The mean age was 80.1 years (range, 61-103. Twenty-three (27.5% patients had femoral neck fracture and 58 (72.5% patients had intertrochanteric femur fracture. The mean length of hospital stay was 13.4 days in intertrochanteric femur fracture and 15.5 days in femoral neck fracture; average of the total days of hospitalization of all patients was 13.9 days. The average treatment cost per patient was 5,912.36 TL for intertrochanteric fractures, 5,753.00 TL for neck fractures, and 5,863.09 TL for the whole patient population. Conclusion: Hip fracture is a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. Taking preventive measures before the fracture occurs may help to prevent this problem which has a high cost treatment and which is a substantial burden for the national economy.

  6. Hip fracture epidemiological trends, outcomes, and risk factors, 1970–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Marks

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ray MarksCity University of New York and Columbia University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Hip fractures – which commonly lead to premature death, high rates of morbidity, or reduced life quality – have been the target of a voluminous amount of research for many years. But has the lifetime risk of incurring a hip fracture decreased sufficiently over the last decade or are high numbers of incident cases continuing to prevail, despite a large body of knowledge and a variety of contemporary preventive and refined surgical approaches? This review examines the extensive hip fracture literature published in the English language between 1980 and 2009 concerning hip fracture prevalence trends, and injury mechanisms. It also highlights the contemporary data concerning the personal and economic impact of the injury, plus potentially remediable risk factors underpinning the injury and ensuing disability. The goal was to examine if there is a continuing need to elucidate upon intervention points that might minimize the risk of incurring a hip fracture and its attendant consequences. Based on this information, it appears hip fractures remain a serious global health issue, despite some declines in the incidence rate of hip fractures among some women. Research also shows widespread regional, ethnic and diagnostic variations in hip fracture incidence trends. Key determinants of hip fractures include age, osteoporosis, and falls, but some determinants such as socioeconomic status, have not been well explored. It is concluded that while more research is needed, well-designed primary, secondary, and tertiary preventive efforts applied in both affluent as well as developing countries are desirable to reduce the present and future burden associated with hip fracture injuries. In this context, and in recognition of the considerable variation in manifestation and distribution, as well as risk factors underpinning hip fractures, well-crafted comprehensive, rather

  7. [Clinical pathway for hip fracture patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez López, Pilar; Sánchez Hernández, Natalia; Paniagua Tejo, Sonsoles; Valverde García, José Antonio; Montero Díaz, Margarita; Alonso García, Noelia; Freites Esteve, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Hip fracture in the elderly often occurs in patients with high co-morbidity. Effective management requires a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach. To evaluate the effect of a quality improvement intervention in the detection and treatment of complications in elderly patients admitted for hip fracture. A comparative study was conducted between two groups of patients admitted for hip fracture prior to 2010, and after a quality improvement intervention in 2013. The intervention consisted of implementing improved multidisciplinary measures in accordance with recent scientific evidence. The degree of compliance of the implemented measures was quantified. Patients admitted due to hip fracture in 2010 (216 patients) and 2013 (196 patients) were similar in age, sex, Barthel Index, and a reduced Charlson Index, although there were more comorbidities in 2013. After implementation of the protocols, the detection of delirium, malnutrition, anemia, and electrolyte disturbances increased. A larger number of patients in 2013 were precribed intravenous iron (24% more) and osteoporosis treatment (61.3% more). The average stay was reduced by 45.3% and surgical delay by 29.4%, achieving better functional efficiency. The implementation of a clinical pathway in geriatric patients with hip fracture is useful to detect and treat complications at an early stage, and to reduce pre-operative and overall stay, all without a negative clinical or functional impact. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving care after hip fracture: the fracture? Think osteoporosis (FTOP) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Naomi; Kennedy, Courtney; Fisher, Pauline; Dolovich, Lisa; Farrauto, Leonardo; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2013-12-05

    Hip fractures are a common and serious consequence of osteoporosis, and hip fracture patients are at high risk for recurrence. Appropriate pharmacotherapy reduces this risk and is associated with reduced mortality after hip fracture, but a care gap exists for fracture prevention in these patients. This evaluation determined rates of osteoporosis treatment and bone mineral density (BMD) testing in hip fracture patients following discharge from a rehabilitation unit. A prospective cohort study of hip fracture patients aged ≥ 50 on an inpatient rehabilitation unit in 2008 and 2011. Patients were seen by a nurse specialist, and encouraged to see their family physician for further assessment and treatment. Physicians were sent a letter indicating the need to follow up with their patient. Patients were contacted following discharge from hospital to determine treatment rates. Of 310 eligible hip fracture patients admitted to the rehabilitation unit in the years studied, 207 patients were reached post-discharge and provided data. Of patients who were not previously taking osteoporosis medication, 59% of patients from the 2008 cohort, and 42% of patients from the 2011 cohort had osteoporosis treatment initiated by six months following discharge. By 2 months following discharge, 46% of patients in the 2008 cohort had a new BMD performed or scheduled, while this was true for 14% of patients from the 2011 cohort. 35% of patients in 2011 had not seen their family physician by 2 months following discharge. Rates for osteoporosis treatment and BMD testing were higher than those reported in the literature for patients not enrolled in case manager programs. BMD testing declined from 2008 to 2011. Lower treatment rates may be due to concerns regarding reports of possible association between bisphosphonate use and atypical fractures. Improving rates of patient follow-up with family physicians will be important for increasing hip fracture treatment rates after discharge.

  9. Is the association between hip fractures and seasonality modified by influenza vaccination? An ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, M; Yitshak-Sade, M; Beacher, L; Carmeli, M; Mandelboim, M; Siris, E; Novack, V

    2017-09-01

    Osteoporotic hip fractures in 4344 patients were more common during winter. Lower temperatures were associated with higher rates of fracture only in those not vaccinated for influenza. Influenza outbreaks increased the risk of hip fractures. Further studies are needed to assess whether influenza vaccination can prevent hip fractures. Winter seasonality of osteoporotic hip fracture incidence has been demonstrated, yet the explanation for the association is lacking. We hypothesize that the seasonality of osteoporotic hip fracture can be explained by an association between hip fractures and seasonal influenza outbreaks. This retrospective cohort study included all patients admitted to Soroka University Medical Center with a diagnosis of osteoporotic hip fracture (ICD-9 code 820) between the years 2001 and 2013. Patients with malignancies, trauma, and age under 50 were excluded. In a time series analysis, we examined the association between hip fracture incidence and seasonality adjusted for meteorological factors, and population rates of influenza infection and vaccination using Poisson models. Four thousand three hundred forty-four patients with a hip fracture were included (69% females, mean age 78). Daily fracture rates were significantly higher in winter (1.1 fractures/day) compared to summer, fall, and spring (0.79, 0.90, and 0.91; p risk only in those not vaccinated for influenza (n = 2939, for every decrease of 5 °C, RR 1.08, CI 1.02-1.16; p risk for hip fracture, adjusted for seasons and temperature, was 1.26 2 weeks following a week with high infection burden (CI 1.05;1.51 p = 0.01), while the temperature was not significantly associated with the fracture risk. Under dry and warm desert climate, winter hip fracture incidence increase might be associated with influenza infection, and this effect can be negated by influenza vaccination.

  10. Comanagement of Geriatric Patients With Hip Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Gregory J. Della; Moylan, Kyle C.; Crist, Brett D.; Volgas, David A.; Stannard, James P.; Mehr, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this 3-year retrospective, controlled, cohort study is to characterize an interdisciplinary method of managing geriatric patients with hip fracture. All patients aged 65 years or older admitted to a single academic level I trauma center during a 3-year period with an isolated hip fracture were included as participants for this study. Thirty-one geriatric patients with hip fracture were treated with historical methods of care (cohort 1). The comparison group of 115 similar patients was treated under a newly developed, institutional comanagement hip fracture protocol (cohort 2). There were no differences in age, sex distribution, or comorbidity distribution between the 2 cohorts. Patients requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission decreased significantly from 48% in cohort 1 to 23% in cohort 2 (P = .0091). Length of ICU stay for patients requiring ICU admission also decreased significantly, from a mean of 8.1 days in cohort 1 to 1.8 days in cohort 2 (P = .024). Total hospital stay decreased significantly, from a mean of 9.9 days in cohort 1 to 7.1 days in cohort 2 (P = .021). Although no decrease in in-hospital mortality rates was noted from cohort 1 to cohort 2, a trend toward decreased 1-year mortality rates was seen after implementation of the hip fracture protocol. Hospital charges decreased significantly, from US$52 323 per patient in cohort 1 to US$38 586 in cohort 2 (P = .0183). Implementation of a comanagement protocol for care of geriatric patients with hip fracture, consisting of admission to a geriatric primary care service, standardized perioperative assessment regimens, expeditious surgical treatment, and continued primary geriatric care postoperatively, resulted in reductions in lengths of stay, ICU admissions, and hospital costs per patient. On an annualized basis, this represented a savings of over US$700 000 for our institution. PMID:23936734

  11. Anchorage strategies in geriatric hip fracture management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knobe Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an enormous humanitarian and socioeconomic need to improve the quality and effectiveness of care for patients with hip fracture. To reduce mechanical complications in the osteosynthesis of proximal femoral fractures, improved fixation techniques have been developed including blade or screw-anchor devices, locked minimally invasive or cement augmentation strategies. However, despite numerous innovations and advances regarding implant design and surgical techniques, systemic and mechanical complication rates remain high. Treatment success depends on secure implant fixation in often-osteoporotic bone as well as on patient-specific factors (fracture stability, bone quality, comorbidity, and gender and surgeon-related factors (experience, correct reduction, and optimal screw placement in the head/neck fragment. For fracture fixation, the anchorage of the lag screw within the femoral head plays a crucial role depending on the implant’s design. Meta-analyses and randomized controlled studies demonstrate that there is a strong trend towards arthroplasty treating geriatric femoral neck fractures. However, for young adults as well as older patients with less compromised bone quality, or in undisplaced fractures, head-preserving therapy is preferred as it is less invasive and associated with good functional results. This review summarizes the evidence for the internal fixation of femoral neck fractures and trochanteric femoral fractures in elderly patients. In addition, biomechanical considerations regarding implant anchorage in the femoral head including rotation, migration, and femoral neck shortening are made. Finally, cement augmentation strategies for hip fracture implants are evaluated critically.

  12. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces Among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients Across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged ≥65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research nurses at baseline and on alternating days for 21 days. Information on PRSS use and pressure ulcer risk factors was recorded at each assessment visit. Other information was o...

  13. Role of calf muscle stimulation in the prevention of DVT in Indian patients undergoing surgeries for fractures around the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Goyal

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The role of peroperative calf muscle electrostimulation for DVT prophylaxis remains controversial. The risk of developing DVT in patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint is very less in patients analysed in our series.

  14. Higher incidence of hip fracture in newly diagnosed schizophrenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher incidence of hip fracture in newly diagnosed schizophrenic patients in Taiwan. Hip fracture is a major public health concern due to its poor outcome and serious socioeconomic burden in older people (1). Evidence has shown that many factors are related to increased risk of hip fracture, but psychiatric diseases are ...

  15. Superior dislocation hip with anterior column acetabular fracture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Superior variety of anterior dislocation of the hip is a rare injury. Its occurrence with acetabular fractures has been documented infrequently. We report a case of superior dislocation of the hip with anterior column acetabular fracture. Open reduction of the hip and internal fixation of the fracture was carried out using a twin ...

  16. Perioperative lateral trochanteric wall fractures: sliding hip screw versus percutaneous compression plate for intertrochanteric hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Joshua; Pillai, Gita; Ugliailoro, Anthony D; Yang, Edward

    2011-04-01

    This study was performed to determine the incidence of perioperative lateral wall fractures with a standard sliding hip screw (SHS) versus a percutaneous compression plate (PCCP) using identical meticulous closed reduction techniques in both groups. Retrospective analysis of a prospective trauma registry. Urban Level I trauma center. Over a 7-year period, 337 patients with intertrochanteric hip fractures were treated with either a SHS or a PCCP at our institution. The PCCP group (Group 1) consisted of 200 patients, of which 141 (71%) had adequate images to be included in the study. The SHS group (Group 2) consisted of 137 patients, of which 100 (73%) had adequate images to be included in the study. Closed reduction and plate application with either a standard sliding hip screw or a percutaneous compression plate for an Orthopaedic Trauma Association 31A1 or 31A2 intertrochanteric hip fracture. : Radiographic evidence of lateral trochanteric wall fracture as measured by intraoperative and perioperative radiographs. There was an overall lateral wall fracture incidence of 20% in the SHS group versus 1.4% in the PCCP group (P fracture types, there was a lateral wall fracture incidence of 29.8% in the SHS group versus 1.9% in the PCCP group (P trochanteric wall fracture compared with the SHS group. This difference became greater when just unstable intertrochanteric fractures were analyzed. An anatomic reduction, combined with a device (PCCP) that uses small-diameter defects in the lateral trochanteric wall, essentially eliminates perioperative lateral trochanteric wall fractures.

  17. Mechanical evaluation of adjunctive fixation for prevention of periprosthetic femur fracture with the Zurich cementless total hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Antonio; Peck, Jeffrey N; Chao, Peini; Choate, Christina J; Barousse, Dan; Conrad, Bryan

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate whether cerclage wire or a lateral plate increases the peak-torque load to failure, compared to femora without adjunctive fixation, in femora implanted with Zurich Cementless stems. In vitro biomechanical study. Paired femora from adult dogs (n = 24) weighing 28-35 kg. Pairs of femora were implanted with a stem and randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups: cerclage or plate. Within each pair, either 3 loop cerclage wires or a laterally applied 12-hole Advanced Locking Plate System 10-mm plate (ALPS 10) were implanted in a femur, whereas the contralateral femur acted as control with no adjunctive fixation. After application of a static axial load each specimen was loaded to failure in torsion. Peak torque load at failure was compared between femora with each adjunctive fixation and the control using a paired t-test; P plated group (P plates and with cerclage were 13.9% and 7.2% stronger in torsion than the femora without fixation, respectively. Adjunctive fixation with a laterally applied ALPS 10 may aid in the prevention of peri-prosthetic fractures associated with Zurich Cementless medium stems. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  18. Survival times of patients with a first hip fracture with and without subsequent major long-bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angthong, Chayanin; Angthong, Wirana; Harnroongroj, Thos; Naito, Masatoshi; Harnroongroj, Thossart

    2013-01-01

    patients with hip fracture, with or without subsequent fractures, need the same robust holistic care. The risks of subsequent fractures should be addressed in patients with hip fracture and should be reduced where possible by education regarding fracture prevention and regular rehabilitation programs. Efforts should be made to decrease the rates of major long-bone fractures and their burdens, even though such fractures have only a minor effect on survival in community-dwelling individuals.

  19. Zoledronic acid and clinical fractures and mortality after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, Kenneth W; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Magaziner, Jay S

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality is increased after a hip fracture, and strategies that improve outcomes are needed. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 1065 patients were assigned to receive yearly intravenous zoledronic acid (at a dose of 5 mg), and 1062 patients were assi...

  20. Risk Factors for Hip Fracture in Older Home Care Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, Jeff; Cook, Richard J.; Byrne, Kerry; Hirdes, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little information is available on hip fracture risks among community-dwelling persons receiving home care. Our aim was to identify risk factors for hip fracture from health information routinely collected for older home care clients. Methods This was a cohort study involving secondary analysis of data on 40,279 long-stay (>60 days) home care clients aged 65 and older in Ontario, Canada; occurrence of hip fracture as well as potential risk factor information were measured using the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI)/Minimum Data Set–Home Care assessment instrument. Results In all, 1,003 clients (2.5%) had hip fracture on follow-up assessment. Older (85+ vs 65–74, relative risk [95% confidence interval]: 0.52 [0.43–0.64]) clients are at increased risk; males are at reduced risk [0.60 (0.51–0.70)]. Other risk factors include osteoporosis (1.19 [1.03–1.36]), falls (1.31 [1.15–1.49]), unsteady gait (1.18 [1.03–1.36]), use of ambulation aide (1.39 [1.21–1.59]), tobacco use (1.42, [1.13–1.80]), severe malnutrition (2.61 [1.67–4.08]), and cognitive impairment (1.30 [1.12–1.51]). Arthritis (0.86 [0.76–0.98]) and morbid obesity (0.34 [0.16–0.72]) were associated with reduced risk. Males and females demonstrated different risk profiles. Conclusions Important risk factors for hip fracture can be identified from routinely collected data; these could be used to identify at-risk clients for further investigation and prevention strategies [22]. PMID:19196903

  1. Ferric carboxymaltose with or without erythropoietin for the prevention of red-cell transfusions in the perioperative period of osteoporotic hip fractures: a randomized contolled trial. The PAHFRAC-01 project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabeu-Wittel Máximo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around one third to one half of patients with hip fractures require red-cell pack transfusion. The increasing incidence of hip fracture has also raised the need for this scarce resource. Additionally, red-cell pack transfusions are not without complications which may involve excessive morbidity and mortality. This makes it necessary to develop blood-saving strategies. Our objective was to assess safety, efficacy, and cost-effictveness of combined treatment of i.v. ferric carboxymaltose and erythropoietin (EPOFE arm versus i.v. ferric carboxymaltose (FE arm versus a placebo (PLACEBO arm in reducing the percentage of patients who receive blood transfusions, as well as mortality in the perioperative period of hip fracture intervention. Methods/Design Multicentric, phase III, randomized, controlled, double blinded, parallel groups clinical trial. Patients > 65 years admitted to hospital with a hip fracture will be eligible to participate. Patients will be treated with either a single dosage of i.v. ferric carboxymaltose of 1 g and subcutaneous erythropoietin (40.000 IU, or i.v. ferric carboxymaltose and subcutaneous placebo, or i.v. placebo and subcutaneous placebo. Follow-up will be performed until 60 days after discharge, assessing transfusion needs, morbidity, mortality, safety, costs, and health-related quality of life. Intention to treat, as well as per protocol, and incremental cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed. The number of recruited patients per arm is set at 102, a total of 306 patients. Discussion We think that this trial will contribute to the knowledge about the safety and efficacy of ferric carboxymaltose with/without erythropoietin in preventing red-cell pack transfusions in patients with hip fracture. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01154491.

  2. One-year mortality after hip fracture in older individuals: the effects of delirium and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Harvey, Lara; Brodaty, Henry; Draper, Brian; Close, Jacqueline

    2017-09-01

    Delirium is common in older hip fracture patients, yet its association with mortality after hip fracture remains uncertain. This study aimed to determine whether delirium was associated with all-cause one-year mortality after hip fracture in older patients and whether the effect of delirium was independent of dementia status. A retrospective analysis of linked hospitalisation and mortality data for patients aged ≥65 years with a hip fracture during 1 January 2010 to 30 June 2014 in New South Wales, Australia. The association between delirium and mortality after a hip fracture was assessed using Cox proportional hazard regression. There were 4,065 (14.6%) of 27,888 hip fracture hospitalisations identified with delirium during hospitalisation. Individuals with delirium had a higher age-adjusted rate of all-cause one-year mortality after hip fracture compared to individuals without delirium (35.3% versus 23.9%). After adjusting for covariates, the risk of all-cause mortality was increased at one-year post-admission for older individuals compared to those aged 65-69 years, for individuals with multiple comorbidities, dementia (Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.14; 95%CI:1.08-1.20), delirium (HR: 1.19; 95%CI:1.12-1.26), and who had an Intensive Care Unit admission (HR: 1.44; 95%CI:1.31-1.59). Comorbid delirium did not add additional mortality risk for individuals with a hip fracture who have dementia. Delirium identified in hospital was associated with all-cause one-year mortality after hip fracture in older Australians without dementia. As delirium is potentially preventable, better systematic assessment and documentation of a hip fracture patient's cognitive state is warranted to select the most effective strategies to prevent and manage delirium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Majority of hip fractures occur as a result of a fall and impact on the greater trochanter of the femur: a prospective controlled hip fracture study with 206 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkkari, J; Kannus, P; Palvanen, M; Natri, A; Vainio, J; Aho, H; Vuori, I; Järvinen, M

    1999-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to learn how hip fracture patients fall, and to compare the mechanics of their falls with those falls that did not result in hip fracture. In this way we sought to obtain reliable insight into the etiology and pathogenesis of hip fracture and fracture prevention. A total of 206 consecutive patients with fresh hip fracture and 100 controls were interviewed and examined between October 1994 and May 1996. The only inclusion criterion was that the fracture had occurred within 24 hours of hospital admittance. The control subjects were admitted from the same community after an accidental fall that did not result in hip fracture. The characteristics of the accident were determined by personal interview and examination of the patients within 24 hours of the event. In 98% of the hip fracture patients, the fracture was a result of a fall. The majority of the patients (76%) reported that they had fallen directly to the side. Forty-eight fracture cases had one or more eyewitnesses and their reports supported this observation. In 56% of the hip fracture patients, a fresh subcutaneous hematoma was seen on the greater trochanter of the proximal femur; such a hematoma was rare in the controls (6%) (P < 0. 001), and this gave evidence for the direct impact of the greater trochanter during the fall of the hip fracture subjects. Most of the elderly fallers who fractured a hip did not manage to break the fall, e.g., with an outstretched arm. In conclusion, our results suggest that a typical hip fracture is the result of a fall and a subsequent impact on the greater trochanter of the proximal femur. The clinical implication of this finding is that effective prevention of hip fractures could be achieved by the diminution of the number and severity of falls of the elderly. We suggest that the severity of the falls (impacts on the greater trochanter) could be decreased by an external hip protector.

  4. The risk of second hip fracture is decreased with compliant and persistent use of bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise; Vestergaard, Peter; Petersen, Karin Dam

    , previously employed by the same authors in a cost of illness study, was modified to estimate the cost-effectiveness of bisphosphonate treatment is Danish fracture patients above 50 years. The model applied an incidence-based, bottom-up approach from a societal perspective and, thus, included direct...... discounted at 3% rate. This model includes all Danish citizens above 50 years of age with a fracture during the study period. The model inputs have been estimated from Danish registries and published peer-reviewed literature. The applied effectiveness measure was the number of hip fractures, based...... the average cost was EUR 13,395 and 0.17 hip fractures per woman. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) resulted in a cost saving of EUR 18,623 per prevented hip fracture. In the alendronate treatment arm, the average cost and effect was EUR 5,631 and 0.16 hip fractures per man. The no treatment arm...

  5. Osteoporotic pertrochanteric hip fractures: management and current controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorich, Dean G; Geller, David S; Nielson, Jason H

    2004-01-01

    The treatment of intertrochanteric hip fractures has evolved over the past 80 years because of a better understanding of fracture anatomy, application of biomechanical principles, and novel technologic advances. Surgical treatment of intertrochanteric hip fractures is the current standard of care, with short-term goals of fracture stabilization and early patient mobilization and the long-term objective of restoring patients to their previous level of independence and function. Treatment for stable intertrochanteric hip fractures includes use of percutaneous intramedullary devices and open reduction and internal fixation using a sliding hip screw. To date, none of these devices has shown any clear clinical advantage over the dynamic hip screw. Intramedullary fixation has multiple theoretical advantages for the treatment of unstable fracture patterns; however, it remains unclear if ultimate functional outcome warrants the added expense of such treatment. For patients with a reverse obliquity fracture pattern, the advantage of the intramedullary construct has been shown.

  6. Contralateral hip fractures and other osteoporosis-related fractures in hip fracture patients: Incidence and risk factors. An observational cohort study of 1,229 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.H. Vochteloo (Anne); B.L. Borger van der Burg (Boudewijn); M.L. Röling (Maarten); D.H.-J. van Leeuwen (Diederik); P. van den Berg (Peter); A.H.P. Niggebrugge (Arthur); M.R. de Vries (Mark); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); R.M. Bloem (Rolf); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); P. Pilot (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To report risk factors, 1-year and overall risk for a contralateral hip and other osteoporosis-related fractures in a hip fracture population. Methods: An observational study on 1,229 consecutive patients of 50 years and older, who sustained a hip fracture between January 2005

  7. The association between hip fracture and hip osteoarthritis: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Englund Martin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been reports both supporting and refuting an inverse relationship between hip fracture and hip osteoarthritis (OA. We explore this relationship using a case-control study design. Methods Exclusion criteria were previous hip fracture (same side or contralateral side, age younger than 60 years, foreign nationality, pathological fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and cases were radiographic examinations were not found in the archives. We studied all subjects with hip fracture that remained after the exclusion process that were treated at Akureyri University Hospital, Iceland 1990-2008, n = 562 (74% women. Hip fracture cases were compared with a cohort of subjects with colon radiographs, n = 803 (54% women to determine expected population prevalence of hip OA. Presence of radiographic hip OA was defined as a minimum joint space of 2.5 mm or less on an anteroposterior radiograph, or Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or higher. Possible causes of secondary osteoporosis were identified by review of medical records. Results The age-adjusted odds ratio (OR for subjects with hip fracture having radiographic hip OA was 0.30 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.12-0.74 for men and 0.33 (95% CI 0.19-0.58 for women, compared to controls. The probability for subjects with hip fracture and hip OA having a secondary cause of osteoporosis was three times higher than for subjects with hip fracture without hip OA. Conclusion The results of our study support an inverse relationship between hip fractures and hip OA.

  8. Increased prevalence of fall risk factors in older people following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrington, C; Lord, S R

    1998-01-01

    Many people who suffer a hip fracture do not achieve full functional recovery. Simple tests of physical function such as quadriceps strength and postural sway may provide insight into why this population is at increased risk of experiencing further falls and fractures and assist in developing rehabilitation strategies for preventing falls. To determine whether impairments in a range of physiological measures and specific medical conditions are more prevalent in people who have suffered a fall-related hip fracture than in a matched sample of community-dwelling people without a history of falls. This case-control study involved 88 older people. The hip fracture group comprised 44 persons aged 64-94 years, assessed on average 7 months following a fall-related hip fracture. An age- and sex-matched control group (older persons who had not fallen in a 12-month period before recruitment) was drawn randomly from community samples. Compared with the control group, the hip fracture group had markedly reduced quadriceps strength and increased body sway when tested on firm and compliant (foam rubber) surfaces. Patients in the hip fracture group also had higher prevalence rates of poor vision, arthritis and stroke, were taking more medications, were less physically active and perceived themselves to be at greater risk of falling than the control group. No significant differences were apparent for cardiovascular conditions, subjective health status and psychoactive medication use between the groups. Multivariate analyses identified quadriceps strength and body sway on the compliant surface as the most important variables for distinguishing between the hip fracture and no hip fracture groups. These two variables correctly classified 92% of the cases, with equal sensitivity and specificity. The findings identify an increased prevalence of certain physical fall risk factors among older persons who have suffered a hip fracture. Decreased quadriceps strength and increased postural

  9. Cemented total hip arthroplasty following acetabular fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C E H; MacDonald, D; Moran, M; White, T O; Patton, J T; Keating, J F

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of cemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) following a fracture of the acetabulum, with evaluation of risk factors and comparison with a patient group with no history of fracture. Between 1992 and 2016, 49 patients (33 male) with mean age of 57 years (25 to 87) underwent cemented THA at a mean of 6.5 years (0.1 to 25) following acetabular fracture. A total of 38 had undergone surgical fixation and 11 had been treated non-operatively; 13 patients died at a mean of 10.2 years after THA (0.6 to 19). Patients were assessed pre-operatively, at one year and at final follow-up (mean 9.1 years, 0.5 to 23) using the Oxford Hip Score (OHS). Implant survivorship was assessed. An age and gender-matched cohort of THAs performed for non-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA) or avascular necrosis (AVN) (n = 98) were used to compare complications and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). The mean time from fracture to THA was significantly shorter for patients with AVN (2.2 years) or protrusio (2.2 years) than those with post-traumatic OA (9.4 years) or infection (8.0 years) (p = 0.03). Nine contained and four uncontained defects were managed with autograft (n = 11), bulk allograft (n = 1), or trabecular metal augment (n = 1). Initial fracture management (open reduction and internal fixation or non-operative), timing of THA (>// 10 mm) were significantly higher following acetabular fracture compared with atraumatic OA/AVN and OHSs were inferior: one-year OHS (35.7 v ersus 40.2, p = 0.026); and final follow-up OHS (33.6 v ersus 40.9, p = 0.008). Cemented THA is a reasonable option for the sequelae of acetabular fracture. Higher complication rates and poorer PROMs, compared with patients undergoing THA for atraumatic causes, reflects the complex nature of these cases. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1399-1408. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  10. Multidisciplinary osteoporosis management of post low-energy trauma hip-fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupski, Nicole; Alexander, Ivy M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to increase awareness of osteoporosis incidence in patients with hip fracture among providers and allied health professionals, to increase osteoporosis recognition and treatment in post hip-fracture patients, and to provide guidance on how to improve continuity of care and collaboration between members of the multidisciplinary healthcare team. Recent evidence from the literature is reviewed to identify effective management strategies for post low-energy trauma hip-fracture patients and prevention of future osteoporotic fracture, regardless of osteoporosis diagnosis prior to the initial fracture. Despite the availability of accurate screening technologies and highly efficacious antiosteoporosis medications, implementation of these measures for low-energy trauma hip-fracture patients remains critically low. This is because of a number of factors including hesitancy to integrate care across specialty lines, lack of reliable referral systems, and resistance to change. There is also a lack of recognition of the connection between low-energy trauma hip fracture and osteoporosis by many healthcare professionals. All members of the multidisciplinary care team are called to action to adopt osteoporosis evaluation and treatment strategies that research has shown to be effective on a larger scale in the post hip-fracture setting. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. Hidden blood loss after surgery for hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, N B; Kehlet, H

    2006-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the total blood loss associated with surgery for fracture of the hip and to identify risk factors for increased blood loss. We prospectively studied 546 patients with hip fracture. The total blood loss was calculated on the basis of the haemoglobin difference, the number...

  12. Fear of falling in older patients after hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschedijk, Johannes Hermanus Maria (Jan)

    2016-01-01

    FoF is possibly one of the most important factors in patients after hip fracture, with a substantial impact on the final results of the rehabilitation process. Moreover, patients with hip fracture who rehabilitate in a SNF with high rates of comorbidity and complications, may have even worse

  13. Trochanteric Soft Tissue Thickness and Hip Fracture in Older Men

    OpenAIRE

    Nielson, Carrie M.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Freitas, Sinara S.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Orwoll, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Greater thickness of the tissue extending laterally from the greater trochanter has been associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in women. The effect of trochanteric soft tissue thickness on the risk of incident hip fracture has not been evaluated in men.

  14. Feasibility of progressive strength training shortly after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jan; Kristensen, Morten T

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a 6-wk progressive strength-training programme commenced shortly after hip fracture surgery in community-dwelling patients.......To investigate the feasibility of a 6-wk progressive strength-training programme commenced shortly after hip fracture surgery in community-dwelling patients....

  15. HIP FRACTURES IN OLDER PATIENTS: TRAJECTORIES OF DISABILITY AFTER SURGERY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarden, J. J.; van der Esch, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Schaaf, M.; de Rooij, S. E.; Buurman, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hip fracture in older patients often lead to permanent disabilities and can result in mortality. Objective: To identify distinct disability trajectories from admission to one-year post-discharge in acutely hospitalized older patients after hip fracture. Design: Prospective cohort study,

  16. Hip fractures in older patients : Trajectories of disability after surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarden, J. J.; van der Esch, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Schaaf, M.; de Rooij, S. E.; Buurman, B. M.

    Background: Hip fracture in older patients often lead to permanent disabilities and can result in mortality. Objective: To identify distinct disability trajectories from admission to one-year post-discharge in acutely hospitalized older patients after hip fracture. Design: Prospective cohort study,

  17. Predictors of incident depression after hip fracture surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Banerjee, S.; Horan, M.; Baldwin, R.; Pendleton, N.; Proctor, R.; Tarrier, N.; Woodward, Y.; Burns, A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Depression after hip fracture surgery is prevalent and associated with increased mortality rates and impaired functional recovery. The incidence of new-onset depressive symptoms in patients initially not depressed after hip fracture surgery and their relationship with functional recovery

  18. Role of nutritional supplementation in elderly patients with hip fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Grigg, Megan; Arora, Manit; Diwan, Ashish D.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the ageing population there is an increasing incidence of hip fractures in the elderly. Oral nutritional supplements are being widely used to improve clinical outcomes and mortality post-hip fractures. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the effects of oral nutritional supplements on elderly patients with hip fractures. A search of EMBASE (1988–present) and MEDLINE (1946–present) with the search terms: “nutritional supplement” AND “hip fracture”; “nutritiona...

  19. [Treatment of anemia in hip fracture surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Pascual, E

    2015-06-01

    Repairing hip fractures is one of the most common surgical procedures and has greater morbidity and mortality. This procedure is also a process that involves a greater need for blood products. Numerous factors influence morbidity, mortality and the use of blood products: patient age, concomitant diseases and drug treatments that change hemostasis and hemorrhaging (preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative), which are usually significant. On top of all this is the presence in a high percentage of cases of preoperative anemia, which can have one or more causes. It is therefore essential to establish an appropriate management of perioperative anemia and optimize the transfusion policy. The aim of this review is to briefly analyze the epidemiology of hip fractures as well as establish a basis for treating perioperative anemia and transfusion policies, proposing guidelines and recommendations for clinical management based on the most current studies. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Anaemia impedes functional mobility after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, N.B.; Kristensen, M.T.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    mobility in the early post-operative phase after a hip fracture surgery and is an independent risk factor for patients not being able to walk post-operatively. The potential for a liberal transfusion policy to improve the rehabilitation potential in hip fracture patients with anaemia should be investigated......BACKGROUND: the impact of anaemia on the outcome after a hip fracture surgery is controversial, but anaemia can potentially decrease the physical performance and thereby impede post-operative rehabilitation. We therefore conducted a prospective study to establish whether anaemia affected functional...... mobility in the early post-operative phase after a hip fracture surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: four hundred and eighty seven consecutive hip fracture patients, treated according to a well-defined multimodal rehabilitation programme with a uniform, liberal transfusion threshold, were studied. Hb...

  1. Trochanteric hip fracture during cardioversion therapy. A case report

    OpenAIRE

    J. Gómez; J. Albareda; L. Ezquerra

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Trochanteric hip fractures in elderly patients with osteoporosis are commonly caused by low energy trauma. The cardioversion therapy is an extremely rare cause of this type of fracture. Presentation of case: We report the case of a woman with hip fracture after cardioversion. Discussion: We discuss the production mechanism of this injury and the importance of the care of the osteoporotic bone under these therapies. Conclusion: The propofol sedation should be complemente...

  2. Role of nutritional supplementation in elderly patients with hip fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Grigg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ageing population there is an increasing incidence of hip fractures in the elderly. Oral nutritional supplements are being widely used to improve clinical outcomes and mortality post-hip fractures. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the effects of oral nutritional supplements on elderly patients with hip fractures. A search of EMBASE (1988–present and MEDLINE (1946–present with the search terms: “nutritional supplement” AND “hip fracture”; “nutritional supplement” AND “femoral neck fracture”; “nutritional supplement” AND “intertrochanteric fracture”; “nutritional supplement” AND “subcapital fracture”; “hip fracture” AND “vitamin supplement”; “hip fracture” AND “protein supplement”; “hip fracture” AND “nutrient supplement” was carried out. Additionally, the reference lists of articles were searched for relevant areas of study. Few studies showed that oral nutritional supplementation led to a more positive clinical outcome amongst elderly patients suffering hip fractures. Most studies found little or nil positive results. Thus, the role of oral nutritional supplementation on post-hip fracture mortality, infection/complication rates, and hospitalisation/rehabilitation time amongst elderly patients is unclear. There is a need for a broader, randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial on the effect of oral nutritional supplements and particularly on the supplements used commonly.

  3. The influence of renal dialysis and hip fracture sites on the 10-year mortality of elderly hip fracture patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Li-Wei; Hwang, Yi-Ting; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Liang, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Jinn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hip fractures in older people requiring dialysis are associated with high mortality. Our study primarily aimed to evaluate the specific burden of dialysis on the mortality rate following hip fracture. The secondary aim was to clarify the effect of the fracture site on mortality. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database to analyze nationwide health data regarding dialysis and non-dialysis patients ≥65 years who sustained a first fragility-related hip fracture during the period from 2001 to 2005. Each dialysis hip fracture patient was age- and sex-matched to 5 non-dialysis hip fracture patients to construct the matched cohort. Survival status of patients was followed-up until death or the end of 2011. Survival analyses using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models and the Kaplan-Meier estimator were performed to compare between-group survival and impact of hip fracture sites on mortality. A total of 61,346 hip fracture patients were included nationwide. Among them, 997 dialysis hip fracture patients were identified and matched to 4985 non-dialysis hip fracture patients. Mortality events were 155, 188, 464, and 103 in the dialysis group, and 314, 382, 1505, and 284 in the non-dialysis group, with adjusted hazard ratios (associated 95% confidence intervals) of 2.58 (2.13–3.13), 2.95 (2.48–3.51), 2.84 (2.55–3.15), and 2.39 (1.94–2.93) at 0 to 3 months, 3 months to 1 year, 1 to 6 years, and 6 to 10 years after the fracture, respectively. In the non-dialysis group, survival was consistently better for patients who sustained femoral neck fractures compared to trochanteric fractures (0–10 years’ log-rank test, P fractures was better than that of patients with trochanteric fractures only within the first 6 years post-fracture (0–6 years’ log-rank, P fracture patients. Survival outcome was better for non-dialysis patients with femoral neck fractures compared to those with

  4. Trends in mortality following hip fracture in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Joan C; Srinivasan, Sowmya; Chandra, Malini; Patton, Mary; Budayr, Amer; Liu, Lucy H; Lau, Gene; Grimsrud, Christopher D

    2015-03-01

    To examine contemporary trends in mortality following hip fracture among older postmenopausal women in an integrated healthcare delivery system. Retrospective cohort study of 13,550 women aged ≥65 years with hip fracture during 2000 to 2010. Demographic factors, comorbidity index score, fracture history, early rehospitalization, and all-cause mortality within 1 year following hip fracture were examined using health plan databases and records. Temporal trends, risk factors, and the association of race/ethnicity and mortality within 1 year post fracture were examined using multivariable logistic regression. Among 13,550 women with hip fracture, 84.6% were aged ≥75 years: 83.6% were white, 2.8% black, 5.6% Hispanic, 4.5% Asian, and 3.5% of other/unknown race. Following hip fracture, 2.4% died during the index hospitalization, while 12.3% were rehospitalized within 30 days of discharge. Infection, pneumonia, and cardiovascular conditions were the most common nonorthopedic indications for readmission. Mortality rates at 6 months (17%) and 1 year (22.8%) following hip fracture were high and increased with age. Greater comorbidity and early rehospitalization were associated with increased mortality risk, while Asian and Hispanic race/ethnicity were associated with lower mortality risk (vs white). Temporal trends demonstrated a small but significant reduction in mortality risk during 2004 to 2010. While hip fracture morbidity and mortality remain high, temporal trends suggest recent declines in mortality risk, with risk of death following hip fracture lower for Asian and Hispanic women. Future studies should examine potential benefits of targeted interventions within integrated healthcare settings and factors contributing to observed racial/ethnic differences in post fracture survival.

  5. Fracture fixation in the operative management of hip fractures (FAITH): an international, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Nauth, A. (Aaron); Creek, A.T. (Aaron T.); Zellar, A. (Abby); Lawendy, A.-R. (Abdel-Rahman); Dowrick, A. (Adam); Gupta, A. (Ajay); Dadi, A. (Akhil); Kampen, A.; Yee, A. (Albert); Vries, Alexander; de Mol van Otterloo, A. (Alexander); Garibaldi, A. (Alisha); Liew, A. (Allen); McIntyre, A.W. (Allison W.); Prasad, A.S. (Amal Shankar)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground Reoperation rates are high after surgery for hip fractures. We investigated the effect of a sliding hip screw versus cancellous screws on the risk of reoperation and other key outcomes. Methods For this international, multicentre, allocation concealed randomised controlled trial, we enrolled patients aged 50 years or older with a low-energy hip fracture requiring fracture fixation from 81 clinical centres in eight countries. Patients were assigned by minimisation with a...

  6. OCCURRENCE AND INCIDENCE OF THE 2ND HIP FRACTURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SCHRODER, HM; Petersen, KK; ERLANDSEN, M

    1993-01-01

    % of the trochanteric fractures were preceded by a contra-lateral fracture of the same type. The mean interval between fractures was 3.3 years, and there was no significant difference between genders or among fracture types. The risk of the first fracture was 1.6 per 1000 men per year and 3.6 per 1000 women......During a 16-year period, 256 second hip fractures were found in 3898 persons 40 years of age and older who had a previous hip fracture. Ninety-two percent of the second fractures were contra-lateral, and 68% of these were the same type as the first. Thus, 62% of the femoral neck and 72......, and for the second fracture 15 per 1000 men per year and 22 per 1000 women. This increase was highly significant for both genders, especially for men....

  7. Older Male Physicians Have Lower Risk of Trochanteric but Not Cervical Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Nien Shen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoporosis is pathophysiologically related to trochanteric fractures, and this condition is more preventable by lifestyle modifications than cervical fractures. We investigated whether older physicians, who are health-conscious people, are at a lower risk of hip fractures because of fewer trochanteric fractures. Methods: Data regarding older (≥65 years physicians (n = 4303 and matched non-medical persons (control were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance claims. All of the subjects were obtained from NHIRD with index dates from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2008. Cox proportional hazard and competing risk regression models were established to estimate the hazard ratio (HR of hip fracture associated with older physicians. Results: The incidence rates of trochanteric fractures were lower in older physicians than in controls (1.73 and 3.07 per 1000 person-years, respectively, whereas the rates of cervical fractures were similar between the two groups (2.45 and 2.12 per 1000 person-years, respectively. Older physicians yielded 46% lower hazard of trochanteric fractures than controls (adjusted HR 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.37–0.79; by contrast, hazards of cervical fractures were comparable between the two groups. The HRs estimated from the competing risk models remained unchanged. Conclusions: Our findings indicated that health risk awareness may pose a significant preventive effect on trochanteric hip fractures.

  8. Older Male Physicians Have Lower Risk of Trochanteric but Not Cervical Hip Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hsiu-Nien; Lin, Wei-Ting; Lu, Chin-Li; Li, Chung-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is pathophysiologically related to trochanteric fractures, and this condition is more preventable by lifestyle modifications than cervical fractures. We investigated whether older physicians, who are health-conscious people, are at a lower risk of hip fractures because of fewer trochanteric fractures. Methods: Data regarding older (≥65 years) physicians (n = 4303) and matched non-medical persons (control) were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance claims. All of the subjects were obtained from NHIRD with index dates from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2008. Cox proportional hazard and competing risk regression models were established to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of hip fracture associated with older physicians. Results: The incidence rates of trochanteric fractures were lower in older physicians than in controls (1.73 and 3.07 per 1000 person-years, respectively), whereas the rates of cervical fractures were similar between the two groups (2.45 and 2.12 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Older physicians yielded 46% lower hazard of trochanteric fractures than controls (adjusted HR 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.37–0.79); by contrast, hazards of cervical fractures were comparable between the two groups. The HRs estimated from the competing risk models remained unchanged. Conclusions: Our findings indicated that health risk awareness may pose a significant preventive effect on trochanteric hip fractures. PMID:25689999

  9. Influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the different types of hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhong; Lin, Jinkuang; Cai, Siqing; Yan, Lisheng; Pan, Yuancheng; Yao, Xuedong; Zhuang, Huafeng; Wang, Peiwen; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were 95 menopausal females of age ≥ 50 years with fragility fracture of hip, including 55 cases of femoral neck fracture and 40 cases of trochanteric fracture. Another 63 non-fractured females with normal bone mineral density (BMD) were chosen as control. BMD, hip axis length, neck-shaft angle and structural parameters including cross surface area, cortical thickness and buckling ratio were detected and compared. Compared with control group, the patients with femoral neck fracture or trochanteric fractures had significantly lower BMD of femoral neck, as well as lower cross surface area and cortical thickness and higher buckling ratio in femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were no significant differences of BMD and structural parameters in the femoral neck fracture group and intertrochanteric fracture group. Hip axis length and neck-shaft angle were not significantly different among three groups. The significant changes of BMD and proximal femur geometry were present in the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. The different types of hip fractures cannot be explained by these changes.

  10. Influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the different types of hip fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were 95 menopausal females of age ≥ 50 years with fragility fracture of hip, including 55 cases of femoral neck fracture and 40 cases of trochanteric fracture. Another 63 non-fractured females with normal bone mineral density (BMD were chosen as control. BMD, hip axis length, neck-shaft angle and structural parameters including cross surface area, cortical thickness and buckling ratio were detected and compared. Compared with control group, the patients with femoral neck fracture or trochanteric fractures had significantly lower BMD of femoral neck, as well as lower cross surface area and cortical thickness and higher buckling ratio in femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were no significant differences of BMD and structural parameters in the femoral neck fracture group and intertrochanteric fracture group. Hip axis length and neck-shaft angle were not significantly different among three groups. The significant changes of BMD and proximal femur geometry were present in the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. The different types of hip fractures cannot be explained by these changes.

  11. Experiences of well-being and suffering after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dependency and limited functional ability is common when older people fracture their hip. Experiences of well-being seem to be important during recovery and when living with a hip fracture as a balancing of suffering. Evidence exists that self-confidence is important during rehabilita...... whole. Conclusion: The meta-synthesis provided evidence that both the sufferings and the possibilities of older people need to be addressed during rehabilitation to support experiences of well-being, independency and confidence after a hip fracture. The study contributed with evidence...

  12. Improving Hip Fracture Care in Ireland: A Preliminary Report of the Irish Hip Fracture Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Ellanti

    2014-01-01

    IHFD is a clinically led web-based audit. We summarize the data collected on hip fractures from April 2012 to March 2013 from 8 centres. Results. There were 843 patients with the majority being (70% female. The 80–89-year age group accounted for the majority of fractures (44%. Most (71% sustained a fall at home. Intertrochanteric fractures (40% were most common. Only 28% were admitted to an orthopaedic ward within 4 hours. The majority (97% underwent surgery with 44% having surgery within 36 hours. Medical optimization (35% and lack of theatre space (26% accounted for most of the surgical delay. While 29% were discharged home, 33% were discharged to a nursing home or other long-stay facilities. There was a 4% in-hospital mortality rate. Conclusions. Several key areas in both the database and aspects of patient care needing improvement have been highlighted. The implementation of similar databases has led to improved hip fracture care in other countries and we believe this can be replicated in Ireland.

  13. Pilot case-control investigation of risk factors for hip fractures in the urban Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra Nidhi

    2010-03-01

    , increased body mass index, and higher activity levels have a significant protective effect on hip fracture. On the other hand, caffeine intake and decreased agility increase the risk of hip fracture. Future studies should be done in order to direct primary preventive programs for hip fracture in India.

  14. Clinical Practice Guidelines Decrease Unnecessary Echocardiograms Before Hip Fracture Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Chris; Swart, Eric; Seymour, Rachel; Patt, Joshua; Karunakar, Madhav A

    2017-04-19

    Preoperative assessment of geriatric patients with a hip fracture may include transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), which increases resource utilization and cost and may delay surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate preoperative TTE utilization at a single institution in order to determine (1) how often TTE is ordered in accordance with clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), (2) how frequently TTE reveals cardiac disease that may alter medical or anesthesia management, and (3) whether following CPGs reduces unnecessary TTE utilization without potentially missing important disease. A retrospective review of data on 100 geriatric patients with a hip fracture who had undergone preoperative TTE was performed. Charts were reviewed to evaluate if TTE had been obtained in accordance with the published CPGs from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA). TTE reports were reviewed for the presence of disease that was important enough to cause modifications in anesthesia or perioperative management, including new left ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction, moderate or severe valvular disease, and pulmonary hypertension. Finally, the sensitivity and specificity of accordance with the ACC/AHA CPGs for predicting which patients would have TTE that identified important disease were calculated. The TTE was ordered in accordance with the published ACC/AHA CPGs for 66% of the patients. TTE revealed disease with the potential to modify anesthesia or medical management in 14% of the patients-for all of whom the TTE had been indicated according to ACC/AHA guidelines (i.e., the guidelines were 100% sensitive). In this study population, following the ACC/AHA guidelines could have prevented the performance of TTE in 34% of the patients without missing any disease (40% specificity). Preoperative TTE for patients with a hip fracture is frequently obtained outside the recommendations of established CPGs. Utilization of CPGs such as the ACC

  15. Affective functioning after delirium in elderly hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slor, C.J.; Witlox, J.; Jansen, R.W.M.M.; Adamis, D.; Meagher, D.J.; Tieken, E.; Houdijk, A.P.J.; van Gool, W.A.; Eikelenboom, P.; de Jonghe, J.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Delirium in elderly patients is associated with various long-term sequelae that include cognitive impairment and affective disturbances, although the latter is understudied. Methods: For a prospective cohort study of elderly patients undergoing hip fracture surgery, baseline

  16. Focal osteoporosis defects play a key role in hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kenneth E S; Skingle, Linda; Gee, Andrew H; Turmezei, Thomas D; Johannesdottir, Fjola; Blesic, Karen; Rose, Collette; Vindlacheruvu, Madhavi; Donell, Simon; Vaculik, Jan; Dungl, Pavel; Horak, Martin; Stepan, Jan J; Reeve, Jonathan; Treece, Graham M

    2017-01-01

    Hip fractures are mainly caused by accidental falls and trips, which magnify forces in well-defined areas of the proximal femur. Unfortunately, the same areas are at risk of rapid bone loss with ageing, since they are relatively stress-shielded during walking and sitting. Focal osteoporosis in those areas may contribute to fracture, and targeted 3D measurements might enhance hip fracture prediction. In the FEMCO case-control clinical study, Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) was applied to clinical computed tomography (CT) scans to define 3D cortical and trabecular bone defects in patients with acute hip fracture compared to controls. Direct measurements of trabecular bone volume were then made in biopsies of target regions removed at operation. The sample consisted of CT scans from 313 female and 40 male volunteers (158 with proximal femoral fracture, 145 age-matched controls and 50 fallers without hip fracture). Detailed Cortical Bone Maps (c.5580 measurement points on the unfractured hip) were created before registering each hip to an average femur shape to facilitate statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Areas where cortical and trabecular bone differed from controls were visualised in 3D for location, magnitude and statistical significance. Measures from the novel regions created by the SPM process were then tested for their ability to classify fracture versus control by comparison with traditional CT measures of areal Bone Mineral Density (aBMD). In women we used the surgical classification of fracture location ('femoral neck' or 'trochanteric') to discover whether focal osteoporosis was specific to fracture type. To explore whether the focal areas were osteoporotic by histological criteria, we used micro CT to measure trabecular bone parameters in targeted biopsies taken from the femoral heads of 14 cases. Hip fracture patients had distinct patterns of focal osteoporosis that determined fracture type, and CBM measures classified fracture type better than a

  17. Excess mortality for operated geriatric hip fracture in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, L P; Ho, A Wh; Wong, S H

    2016-02-01

    Geriatric hip fracture places an increasing burden to health care systems around the world. We studied the latest epidemiology trend of geriatric hip fracture in Hong Kong, as well as the excess mortality for patients who had undergone surgery for hip fracture. This descriptive epidemiology study was conducted in the public hospitals in Hong Kong. All patients who underwent surgery for geriatric hip fracture in public hospitals from January 2000 to December 2011 were studied. They were retrieved from the Clinical Management System of the Hospital Authority of Hong Kong. Relevant data were collected using the Clinical Data Analysis and Reporting System of the Hospital Authority. The actual and projected population size, and the age- and sex-specific mortality rates were obtained from the Census and Statistics Department of Hong Kong. The 30-day, 1-year and 5-year mortality, and excess mortality following surgery for geriatric hip fracture were calculated. There was a steady increase in the incidence of geriatric hip fracture in Hong Kong. The annual risk of geriatric hip fracture was decreasing in both sexes. Female patients aged 65 to 69 years had the lowest 1-year and 5-year mortality of 6.91% and 23.80%, respectively. Advancing age and male sex were associated with an increase in mortality and a higher excess mortality rate following surgery. The incidence of geriatric hip fracture is expected to increase in the future. The exact reason for a higher excess mortality rate in male patients remains unclear and should be the direction for future studies.

  18. Post-operative rounds by anaesthesiologists after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, N B; Christensen, D S; Krasheninnikoff, M

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to optimize the peri-operative care of hip fracture patients through multidisciplinary intervention have focused on orthopaedic-geriatric liaisons, which have not resulted in significant outcome changes. The early phase of rehabilitation could potentially be optimized through a multidisci......Efforts to optimize the peri-operative care of hip fracture patients through multidisciplinary intervention have focused on orthopaedic-geriatric liaisons, which have not resulted in significant outcome changes. The early phase of rehabilitation could potentially be optimized through...

  19. Perineal anterior dislocation of the hip with avulsion fracture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic anterior dislocation of the hip is rare even in children. Very uncommon also is the perineal variant of the inferior type of anterior dislocation with concomitant avulsion fracture of the greater trochanter. We report such a case highlighting the peculiarity of its management. No similar case of triumvirate injury of the hip ...

  20. Improvements in hip fracture incidence counterbalanced by the rise of other fracture types: data from Spain 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirera, Eva; Pérez, Katherine; Santamariña-Rubio, Elena; Novoa, Ana M; Olabarria, Marta

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the incidence of injury in older people has increased. The aim of this study is to address the hypothesis that this increase is due to an increase in the incidence of some injuries that, while less common than hip fractures, are sufficient jointly to counteract the decrease or stabilisation in hip fracture rates observed in most countries. We performed a descriptive study of trends using data from the National Hospital Discharge Register. We included individuals 65 years and older who were discharged from a Spanish hospital during the period 2000-2010 with at least one injury diagnosis in the primary diagnosis field on the discharge form. The dependent variables were the following injury groups, classified using the Barell Matrix: hip fracture, shoulder and upper arm fractures, forearm and elbow fractures, thoracic fractures, lower leg and ankle fractures, and TBI type 1 internal injury. Incidence rates were calculated per 100,000 inhabitants (data from National Statistics Institute) and stratified by sex and age group. Trends, in terms of Annual Percent Change (APC), were assessed using Poisson Regression with discharge year as the independent variable. Hip fracture continues to be the most important injury type in older people. Thoracic fractures and TBI internal injuries are more common in men, while fractures in the upper extremities are more common in women. All injuries increased in frequency with age, except lower leg and ankle fractures, which decreased. While a secular decreasing trend in hip fracture was noted, the incidences of fractures of the shoulder and upper arm, forearm and elbow, and lower leg and ankle, as well as of TBI type 1 internal injuries have increased steadily. Although hip fracture continue to be the most common type of injury in older people, this study has allowed identifying other types of injury that are becoming increasingly common. These trends are driving paradigm changes in the burden of injuries requiring

  1. Fracture prevention in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geusens, PP; Sambrook, P.N.; Lems, W.F.

    2009-01-01

    The lifetime risk of experiencing a fracture in 50-year-old men is lower (20%) than the risk in women (50%). Consequently, much less research has been carried out on osteoporosis and fracture risk in men. Differences in the risk and incidence of fractures between men and women are related to

  2. Mediterranean Diet and Hip Fracture in Swedish Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byberg, Liisa; Bellavia, Andrea; Larsson, Susanna C; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2016-12-01

    A Mediterranean diet, known to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, may also influence the risk of hip fracture although previous studies present discrepant results. We therefore aimed to determine whether the rate of hip fracture was associated with degree of adherence to a Mediterranean diet. We combined two Swedish cohort studies consisting of 37,903 men and 33,403 women (total n = 71,333, mean age 60 years) free of previous cardiovascular disease and cancer who answered a medical and a food-frequency questionnaire in 1997. A modified Mediterranean diet score (mMED; range, 0 to 8 points) was created based on high consumption of fruits and vegetables, legumes and nuts, whole grains, fermented dairy products, fish, and olive/rapeseed oil, moderate intake of alcohol, and low intake of red and processed meat. Incident hip fractures between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2012, were retrieved from the National Patient Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for potential confounders were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Differences in age at hip fracture were calculated using multivariable Laplace regression. During follow-up, 3175 hip fractures occurred at a median age of 73.3 years. One unit increase in the mMED was associated with 6% lower hip fracture rate (adjusted HR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.96) and with a 3-month higher median age at hip fracture (50th percentile difference = 2.8 months; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.2). Comparing the highest quintile of adherence to the mMED (6 to 8 points) with the lowest (0 to 2 points) conferred an adjusted HR of hip fracture of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.89) and a 12-month higher median age of hip fracture (50th percentile difference = 11.6 months; 95% CI, 4.2 to 19.0). Results were similar in men and women. We conclude that higher adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet is associated with lower risk of future hip fracture. © 2016 American Society for

  3. Differential impact of some risk factors on trochanteric and cervical hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Sari; Gurevich, Alexander; Sagiv, Shaul; Guller, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the potential distinct risk factors associated with trochanteric and cervical hip fractures. Elderly patients aged 65 years and older (n = 1161) were admitted to the orthopedic department with hip fractures during the years 2006-2011. Demographic and clinical data, as well as routine blood tests, were retrieved from the patient electronic medical records. Approximately 58% of patients had trochanteric fractures and 42% had cervical fractures. Women were more likely to have trochanteric fractures than men (P = 0.002). Female sex, frailty, falls, diabetes and subnormal calcium, as well as subnormal hemoglobin levels, were significant risk factors for trochanteric fractures (OR 1.39, P = 0.0202, OR 1.36, P = 0.0166, OR 1.49, P = 0.0015, OR 1.33, P = 0.0343, OR 0.68, P = 0.0054, OR 0.70, P = 0.0036, respectively). Patients with Parkinson's disease were at a lower risk for trochanteric fractures (OR 0.6, P = 0.007). As there are some differences between risk factors for trochanteric and cervical hip fractures, there is a need for further studies in order to understand the etiology of fractures and to be able to carry out effective preventive efforts. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. Factors affecting functional prognosis of patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M T

    2011-01-01

    Having a hip fracture is considered one of the most fatal fractures for elderly people, resulting in impaired function, and increased morbidity and mortality. This challenges clinicians in identifying patients at risk of worse outcome, in order to optimise and intensify treatment in these patient......, older age and having a low prefracture functional level are considered strong factors....

  5. Hip geometry and femoral neck fractures: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajar, Jonny Karunia; Taufan, Taufan; Syarif, Muhammad; Azharuddin, Azharuddin

    2018-04-01

    Several studies have reported hip geometry to predict the femoral neck fractures. However, they showed inconsistency. To determine the association between hip geometry and femoral neck fractures. Published literature from PubMed and Embase databases (until May 25 th , 2017) was searched for eligible publications. The information related to (1) name of first author; (2) year of publication; (3) country of origin; (4) sample size of cases and controls and (5) mean and standard deviation of cases and controls were extracted. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the association between hip geometry and femoral neck fractures were assessed using random or fixed effect model. A Comprehensive Meta-analysis software, version 2.0, was used to analyse the data. A total of 11 studies were included in this study. Our results showed that increase in hip axis length (OR 95% CI = 1.53 [1.06-2.21], p  = 0.025), femoral neck angle (OR 95% CI = 1.47 [1.01-2.15], p  = 0.044) and neck width (OR 95% CI = 2.68 [1.84-3.91], p  < 0.001) was associated with the risk of femoral neck fractures, whereas we could not find the correlation between femoral neck axis length and the risk of femoral neck fractures. There is strong evidence that elevated hip axis length, femoral neck angle and neck width are the risk factor for femoral neck fractures. The Translational Potential of this Article : Determining the hip axis length, femoral neck angle and neck width that are most highly associated with femoral neck fracture may allow clinicians to more accurately predict which individuals are likely to experience femoral neck fractures in the future.

  6. The risk of major and any (non-hip) fragility fracture after hip fracture in the United Kingdom : 2000-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson-Smith, D; Klop, C; Elders, P J M; Welsing, P M J; van Schoor, N; Leufkens, H G M; Harvey, N C; van Staa, T P; de Vries, F

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The risk of a subsequent major or any fracture after a hip fracture and secular trends herein were examined. Within 1 year, 2.7 and 8.4% of patients sustained a major or any (non-hip) fracture, which increased to 14.7 and 32.5% after 5 years. Subsequent fracture rates increased during

  7. Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease, Osteoporosis, and Hip Fractures: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Rison

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic idiopathic Parkinson’s disease are at a high risk for fractures, particularly of the hip. The causes may be multifactorial, including poor balance and other forms of neurological dysfunction. Osteopenia and osteoporosis leading to decreased bone mass are common in these patients. We report a case of a male patient with a long-standing history of Parkinson’s disease on chronic high-dose carbidopa-levodopa who suffered a hip fracture. The relationship of Parkinson’s disease and carbidopa-levodopa use with osteopenia and hip fractures is discussed, emphasizing the crucial need for prevention in this patient population along with medical and surgical treatment.

  8. Assessment of HIT Antibody Complex in Hip Fracture Patients Receiving Enoxaparin or Unfractionated Heparin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffin, Justin W; Hopkinson, William J; Rud-Lassen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease is a common complication of hip fracture in the elderly. Anticoagulants represent a standard of care in preventing postoperative thrombotic complications following surgical fixation. We asked whether levels of antibody to heparin-platelet factor 4 (PF4) complex were...... differentially present in unfractionated heparin (UFH) versus Enoxaparin, following hip fracture and whether one particular subtype of antibodies was more prevalent. Plasma samples from elderly patients sustaining a hip fracture treated with either enoxaparin or UFH were collected pre- and postoperatively...... of antiheparin-PF4 antibodies and a greater prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) subtype. Heparin and enoxaparin are capable of generating heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) antibodies in elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery but perhaps not to the same extent. When comparing low...

  9. Hip arthroplasty in failed intertrochanteric fractures in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javahir A Pachore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Failed intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients are surgical challenge with limited options. Hip arthroplasty is a good salvage procedure even though it involves technical issues such as implant removal, bone loss, poor bone quality, trochanteric nonunion and difficulty of surgical exposure. Materials and Methods: 30 patients of failed intertrochanteric fractures where hip arthroplasty was done between May 2008 and December 2011 were included in study. 13 were males and 17 were females with average age of 67.3 years. There were 2 cemented bipolar arthroplasties, 19 uncemented bipolar, 4 cemented total hip arthroplasty and 5 uncemented total hip arthroplasties. 16 patients had a trochanteric nonunion, which was treated by tension band principles. Total hip was considered where there was acetabular damage due to the penetration of implant. Results: The average followup was 20 months (range 6-48 months. Patients were followed up from 6 to 48 months with average followup of 20 months. None of the patients were lost to followup. There was no dislocation. All patients were ambulatory at the final followup. Conclusion: A predictable functional outcome can be achieved by hip arthroplasty in elderly patients with failed intertrochanteric fractures. Though technically demanding, properly performed hip arthroplasty can be a good salvage option for this patient group.

  10. Risk Factors for Hip Fracture in Japanese Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamashita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for hip fracture in Japanese older populations are understudied compared with Western countries arguably due to the relatively lower prevalence rates in Japan. Nationally representative data from the Nihon University Japanese Longitudinal Study of Aging were analyzed using logistic regression to examine possible risk factors of hip fractures, separately for older women (n = 2,859 and older men (n = 2,108. Results showed that older Japanese women with difficulty bending their knees (OR = 1.9, with diabetes (OR = 1.7 times, and/or with more activity of daily living limitations (OR = 1.1 had higher risks of hip fracture. Older Japanese men with difficulty bending their knees (OR = 2.6, who use more external prescription drugs (OR = 1.9, and with cancer (OR = 2.0 times had higher risks of hip fracture. Further considerations of gender- and culture-specific factors along with the identified risk factors may provide insights into future intervention programs for hip fracture in Japanese older populations.

  11. Trochanteric Soft Tissue Thickness and Hip Fracture in Older Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Carrie M.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Freitas, Sinara S.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Orwoll, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Greater thickness of the tissue extending laterally from the greater trochanter has been associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in women. The effect of trochanteric soft tissue thickness on the risk of incident hip fracture has not been evaluated in men. Methods: We measured trochanteric soft tissue thickness by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for all incident hip fracture cases (n = 70) and 222 randomly selected noncases in older men (≥65 yr) enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study. Differences in tissue thickness between cases and controls were examined. Changes in fall force and factor-of-risk (the ratio of force from a sideways fall to femoral bone strength) associated with tissue thickness were determined. The relative risk for incident hip fracture per sd decrease in tissue thickness was calculated. Results: Mean trochanteric soft tissue thickness did not differ significantly between cases and noncases (29.1 ± 11.9 vs 31.0 ± 11.5 mm; P = 0.2). Although increased tissue thickness reduced both the estimates of fall force and the factor-of-risk, tissue thickness was not associated with the risk of hip fracture (age- and bone mineral density-adjusted relative risk per sd decrease in tissue thickness = 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.70–1.16). Conclusions: In this study of elderly community-dwelling men, we found no significant association between trochanteric soft tissue thickness and incident hip fracture. Trochanteric soft tissue thickness in these men was less than previously reported in older women and may explain the difference between these results and those reported in women. PMID:19017753

  12. Predictors of not regaining basic mobility after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulsbæk, Signe; Larsen, Rikke Faebo; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Regaining basic mobility after hip fracture surgery is a milestone in the in-hospital rehabilitation. The aims were to investigate predictors for not regaining basic mobility at the fifth post-operative day and at discharge after undergoing hip fracture surgery. METHOD: In a prospective...... on first post-operative day (OR = 3.3) (p values: 0.009-surgery, who are not able to complete physiotherapy on first post-operative day, are at a greater risk of not regaining basic mobility during hospitalization....... This highlights the importance of physiotherapy as part of the interdisciplinary treatment. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION: Regaining abilities in basic mobility after hip fracture surgery is a primary goal of rehabilitation during hospitalization in the acute ward. The following factors are indentified...

  13. Hip Fracture Types in Canadian Men and Women Change Differently with Age: A Population-Level Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Crilly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background We have previously reported a gender difference in the occurrence of hip fracture type with age in our local population. In the current report, we have explored this phenomenon in a Canadian population using five years of data from a national administrative database. We have compared community-dwelling and institutionalized individuals to determine if frailty is important and has a differential effect on the type of hip fracture experienced. Methods Hospitalization records from 2005 to 2009, in which the most responsible diagnosis, that is the diagnosis causing the admission to hospital, was a hip fracture, were obtained from the Discharge Abstract Database of the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Hip fracture type was identified using the Canadian Classification of Health Interventions and the International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision, Canada (ICD-10-CA. Hip fracture proportions were calculated for the study period and stratified by age group and sex. Results The relative proportion of intertrochanteric fractures in women rose from 35% in the youngest group (55–59 years to 51% in the oldest group (84+ years; P < 0.0001. In men, the proportions remain relatively stable (47% and 44%, respectively. Community and institutionalized patients showed the same pattern. Conclusions The change in the proportion of the two hip fracture types that occur in women but not men may point to differences in the etiology and consequently the approaches to prevention for the two fracture types. Level of frailty did not seem to be important.

  14. Hip Fracture Types in Canadian Men and Women Change Differently with Age: A Population-Level Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilly, Richard G; Kloseck, Marita; Mequanint, Selam

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported a gender difference in the occurrence of hip fracture type with age in our local population. In the current report, we have explored this phenomenon in a Canadian population using five years of data from a national administrative database. We have compared community-dwelling and institutionalized individuals to determine if frailty is important and has a differential effect on the type of hip fracture experienced. Hospitalization records from 2005 to 2009, in which the most responsible diagnosis, that is the diagnosis causing the admission to hospital, was a hip fracture, were obtained from the Discharge Abstract Database of the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Hip fracture type was identified using the Canadian Classification of Health Interventions and the International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision, Canada (ICD-10-CA). Hip fracture proportions were calculated for the study period and stratified by age group and sex. The relative proportion of intertrochanteric fractures in women rose from 35% in the youngest group (55-59 years) to 51% in the oldest group (84+ years; P hip fracture types that occur in women but not men may point to differences in the etiology and consequently the approaches to prevention for the two fracture types. Level of frailty did not seem to be important.

  15. Rivaroxaban to Prevent Pulmonary Embolism after Hip or Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Prevent Pulmonary Embolism After Hip or Knee Replacement Deborah Cios , John Fanikos Download PDF https://doi. ... Rivaroxaban to Prevent Clots After Hip or Knee Replacement Many different medications are used to prevent blood ...

  16. Complications and institutionalization are almost doubled after second hip fracture surgery in the elderly patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steenhoven, Tim J; Staffhorst, Bas; Van de Velde, Samuel K; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Verhofstad, Michiel H J

    2015-03-01

    To determine patient and hip fracture characteristics, early postoperative complication rate, and need for institutionalization at the time of discharge from the hospital in patients treated for a second contralateral hip fracture. During a 6-year period (2003-2009), 71 patients (60 women and 11 men; age range, 54-94 years) underwent first hip fracture surgery and subsequent contralateral hip fracture surgery at our hospital. Variables, including age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification (ASA), AO fracture classification, time between both hip fractures, rate and severity of early postoperative complications, and destination of discharge were obtained from the electronic medical records. Data from both hospitalization periods were compared. Forty-six percent of second hip fractures occurred within 2 years after the first hip fracture. After the first hip fracture surgery, 13 patients had 1 or multiple complications compared with 23 patients after a second hip fracture surgery (P = 0.02). The mean time (±SD) between the first and second hip fractures in patients without complications after the second injury was 4.3 (±4.2) years, compared with 2.6 (±2.1) years in patients with complications after the second injury (P = 0.03). The mean ASA classification of patients without complications after the second hip fracture surgery was 2.6 (±0.6) versus 3.0 (±0.6) in patients with complications (P = 0.04). After the first hip fracture surgery, 27 patients (38%) were discharged to an institutional care facility, whereas 72% of patients resided at an institutional care facility after a second hip fracture. Early complication rate in patients sustaining a second contralateral hip fracture was almost twice that documented after the first hip fracture. After the second hip fracture surgery, most patients resided in an institutional care facility. Prognostic level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  17. Hip Fracture in the Elderly Patients: A Sentinel Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koso, Riikka E; Sheets, Charles; Richardson, William J; Galanos, Anthony N

    2018-04-01

    Hip fracture in the elderly patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. There is great need for advance care planning should a patient fail to rehabilitate or experience an adverse event during or after recovery. This study was performed to evaluate for palliative care consultation and changes in code status and/or advance directives in elderly patients with hip fracture. We performed a retrospective review of 186 consecutive patients aged 65 years and older with a hip fracture due to a low-energy fall who underwent surgery at a large academic institution between August 1, 2013, and September 1, 2014. Risk factors assessed were patient demographics, home status, mobility, code status, comorbidities, medications, and hospitalizations prior to injury. Outcomes of interest included palliative care consultation, complications, mortality, and most recent code status, mobility, and home. About 186 patients with hip fractures were included. Three patients died, and 12 (6.5%) sustained major complications during admission. Nearly one-third (51 patients) died upon final follow-up approximately 1.5 years after surgery. Of the patients who died, palliative care consulted on 6 (11.8%) during initial admission. Eleven (21.6%) were full code at death. Three patients underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and 1 underwent massive transfusion and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to changing their code status to do not attempt resuscitation. Hip fracture in elderly patients is an important opportunity to reassess the patient's personal health-care priorities. Advance directives, goals of care, and code status documentation should be updated in all elderly patients with hip fracture, should the patient's health decompensate.

  18. Cortisol, insulin, and glucose and the risk of delirium in older adults with hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, Peter H.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; van Oosten, Hannah E.; van Munster, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relationship between perioperative delirium and cortisol, glucose, and insulin in older adults acutely admitted for hip fracture. Prospective cohort study. Tertiary university center. Consecutive individuals aged 65 and older acutely admitted for hip fracture were invited to

  19. Trends in post osteoporotic hip fracture care from 2010 to 2014 in a private hospital in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swan Sim Yeap

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Following a low-trauma hip fracture, approximately 72% of patients were not started on active antiosteoporosis therapy. Of those who were, the median duration of treatment was 1 month. This represents a missed opportunity for the prevention of future fractures.

  20. Total hip arthroplasty with cementless cup after acetabular fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Alfonso Lugones

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Acetabular fractures are a common cause of degenerative hip arthritis. The incidence of post-traumatic osteoarthritis has been reported between 12% and 57% and avascular necrosis of the femoral head may occur in 2% to 40% after posterior fracture dislocation. The fracture is often caused by major trauma in road accidents, at work or during sports, and patients usually present for total hip replacement (THR at an earlier age than the general arthritic population. We describe and analyze our patients with uncemented acetabular reconstruction in post-traumatic arthritis and compare them with THR in non-traumatic arthritis. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 19 patients who underwent uncemented acetabular reconstruction due to post-traumatic arthritis secondary to acetabular fracture. Results The average age at the time of arthroplasty was 52.2 years (19-83. The age at the time of fracture was 47.9 years (16-81. The average time between the acetabular fracture and THR was 52.4 months (4-360. The average follow-up was 4.25 years. No acetabular component loosening or infections were seen in either group. The Harris Hip Score at an average follow-up of 4.25 years was 89.3 (57-99. The follow-up in the control group with non-traumatic arthritis was 4.9 years, and the Harris Hip Score was 94.1 points (78-100. There were no significant difference in the Harris Hip Score between groups (p = 0.24. Conclusion Uncemented acetabular reconstruction in post-traumatic arthritis secondary to acetabular fracture is a more difficult procedure than routine arthroplasty in patient with non-traumatic arthritis. In the short-term there are no clinical or radiographic differences in THR with uncemented acetabular cups in post-traumatic arthritis patients compared to patients with non-traumatic arthritis.

  1. Hip fracture discrimination by the Achilles Insight QUS imaging device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Iraklion, Crete (Greece)]. E-mail: damilaki@med.uoc.gr; Papadokostakis, George [Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Perisinakis, Kostas [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Maris, Thomas G. [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Karantanas, Apostolos H. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Iraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2007-07-15

    The importance of osteoporosis as a major health problem is well recognized. Its major clinical manifestation is low energy fractures. Considerable effort has been directed towards search of noninvasive methods for assessing osteoporotic fracture risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) variables measured by a new heel QUS imaging device to discriminate between postmenopausal women with and without hip fracture. The subjects included 30 postmenopausal female patients with hip fracture and 30 age-matched healthy women. Measurements were acquired using the Achilles Insight QUS imaging device. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were carried out using the Lunar Prodigy DXA scanner. Achilles Insight provides images of the heel bone and measures broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS) values in a circular region of interest. A third QUS variable, the stiffness index (SI) was also determined. The short-term precision for healthy subjects was 2.05%, 0.17% and 1.91% for BUA, SOS and SI, respectively. Corresponding values for patients with fractures were 1.80%, 0.16% and 2.04%. All QUS variables measured using the Achilles Insight were significant discriminators of hip fractures (area under ROC curve = 0.77, 0.74 and 0.77 for BUA, SOS and SI, respectively). BMD measurements of the hip had the greatest discriminatory ability (area under ROC curve = 0.88). Statistically significant differences were found between the area under the ROC curve of BMD and the corresponding curves of the QUS variables (P < 0.05 for each of the three comparisons). QUS variables measured by Achilles Insight can be expected to be useful as indicators of the risk of hip fracture in postmenopausal women.

  2. Hip fracture discrimination by the Achilles Insight QUS imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damilakis, John; Papadokostakis, George; Perisinakis, Kostas; Maris, Thomas G.; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of osteoporosis as a major health problem is well recognized. Its major clinical manifestation is low energy fractures. Considerable effort has been directed towards search of noninvasive methods for assessing osteoporotic fracture risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) variables measured by a new heel QUS imaging device to discriminate between postmenopausal women with and without hip fracture. The subjects included 30 postmenopausal female patients with hip fracture and 30 age-matched healthy women. Measurements were acquired using the Achilles Insight QUS imaging device. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were carried out using the Lunar Prodigy DXA scanner. Achilles Insight provides images of the heel bone and measures broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS) values in a circular region of interest. A third QUS variable, the stiffness index (SI) was also determined. The short-term precision for healthy subjects was 2.05%, 0.17% and 1.91% for BUA, SOS and SI, respectively. Corresponding values for patients with fractures were 1.80%, 0.16% and 2.04%. All QUS variables measured using the Achilles Insight were significant discriminators of hip fractures (area under ROC curve = 0.77, 0.74 and 0.77 for BUA, SOS and SI, respectively). BMD measurements of the hip had the greatest discriminatory ability (area under ROC curve = 0.88). Statistically significant differences were found between the area under the ROC curve of BMD and the corresponding curves of the QUS variables (P < 0.05 for each of the three comparisons). QUS variables measured by Achilles Insight can be expected to be useful as indicators of the risk of hip fracture in postmenopausal women

  3. The burden of osteoporotic hip fractures in Portugal: costs, health related quality of life and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, A; Lourenço, Ó; da Silva, J A P

    2015-11-01

    The study rationale was to provide a detailed overview of the costs, quality of life and mortality of hip fractures in Portugal. Mean individual fracture-related costs were estimated at €13,434 [12,290; 14,576] for the first year and €5985 [4982; 7045] for the second year following the fracture. Osteoporotic fractures represent a remarkable burden to health care systems and societies worldwide, which will tend to increase as life expectancy expands and lifestyle changes favour osteoporosis. The cost-effectiveness evaluation of intervention strategies demands accurate data on the epidemiological and economical reality to be addressed. Information was collected retrospectively on consumption of resources and changes in quality of life attributable to fracture as well as mortality, regarding 186 patients randomly selected to represent the distribution of hip fractures in the Portuguese population, in terms of gender, age and geographical provenience. Data were cross-tabulated with socio-demographic variables and individual resource consumption to estimate the burden of disease. A societal perspective was adopted, including direct and indirect costs. Multivariate analyses were carried out to assess the main determinants of health-related quality of life (HrQoL). Mean individual fracture-related costs were estimated at €13,434 [12,290; 14,576] for the first year and €5985 [4982; 7045] for the second year following the fracture. In 2011 the economic burden attributable to osteoporotic hip fractures in Portugal could be estimated at €216 million. Mean reduction in HrQoL 12 months after fracture was estimated at 0.34. Regression analysis showed that age was associated with a higher loss of HrQoL, whereas education had the opposing effect. We observed 12 % excess mortality in the first year after hip fracture, when compared to the gender and age-matched general population. Results of this study indicate that osteoporotic hip fractures are, also in Portugal

  4. Is mortality after hip fracture associated with surgical delay or admission during weekends and public holidays?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Cecilie Laubjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Riis, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures are associated with high mortality, but the cause of this is still not entirely clear. We investigated the effect of surgical delay, weekends, holidays, and time of day admission on mortality in hip fracture patients.......Hip fractures are associated with high mortality, but the cause of this is still not entirely clear. We investigated the effect of surgical delay, weekends, holidays, and time of day admission on mortality in hip fracture patients....

  5. Fracture fixation in the operative management of hip fractures (FAITH): an international, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauth, A. (Aaron); Creek, A.T. (Aaron T.); Zellar, A. (Abby); Lawendy, A.-R. (Abdel-Rahman); Dowrick, A. (Adam); Gupta, A. (Ajay); Dadi, A. (Akhil); A. van Kampen (A.); Yee, A. (Albert); A.C. de Vries (Alexander); de Mol van Otterloo, A. (Alexander); Garibaldi, A. (Alisha); Liew, A. (Allen); McIntyre, A.W. (Allison W.); Prasad, A.S. (Amal Shankar); Romero, A.W. (Amanda W.); Rangan, A. (Amar); Oatt, A. (Amber); Sanghavi, A. (Amir); Foley, A.L. (Amy L.); Karlsten, A. (Anders); Dolenc, A. (Andrea); Bucknill, A. (Andrew); Chia, A. (Andrew); Evans, A. (Andrew); Gong, A. (Andrew); Schmidt, A.H. (Andrew H.); Marcantonio, A.J. (Andrew J.); Jennings, A. (Andrew); Ward, A. (Angela); Khanna, A. (Angshuman); Rai, A. (Anil); Smits, A.B. (Anke B.); Horan, A.D. (Annamarie D.); Brekke, A.C. (Anne Christine); Flynn, A. (Annette); Duraikannan, A. (Aravin); Stødle, A. (Are); van Vugt, A.B. (Arie B.); Luther, A. (Arlene); Zurcher, A.W. (Arthur W.); Jain, A. (Arvind); Amundsen, A. (Asgeir); Moaveni, A. (Ash); Carr, A. (Ashley); Sharma, A. (Ateet); Hill, A.D. (Austin D.); Trommer, A. (Axel); Rai, B.S. (B. Sachidananda); Hileman, B. (Barbara); Schreurs, B. (Bart); Verhoeven, B. (Bart); Barden, B.B. (Benjamin B.); Flatøy, B. (Bernhard); B.I. Cleffken (Berry); Bøe, B. (Berthe); Perey, B. (Bertrand); Hanusch, B.C. (Birgit C.); Weening, B. (Brad); B. Fioole (Bram); Rijbroek, B. (Bram); Crist, B.D. (Brett D.); Halliday, B. (Brett); Peterson, B. (Brett); Mullis, B. (Brian); Richardson, C.G. (C. Glen); Clark, C. (Callum); Sagebien, C.A. (Carlos A.); C. van der Pol (Carmen); Bowler, C. (Carol); Humphrey, C.A. (Catherine A.); Coady, C. (Catherine); Koppert, C.L. (Cees L.); Coles, C. (Chad); Tannoury, C. (Chadi); DePaolo, C.J. (Charles J.); Gayton, C. (Chris); Herriott, C. (Chris); Reeves, C. (Christina); Tieszer, C. (Christina); Dobb, C. (Christine); Anderson, C.G. (Christopher G.); Sage, C. (Claire); Cuento, C. (Claudine); Jones, C.B. (Clifford B.); Bosman, C.H.R. (Coks H.R.); Linehan, C. (Colleen); C.P. van der Hart (Cor P.); Henderson, C. (Corey); Lewis, C.G. (Courtland G.); Davis, C.A. (Craig A.); Donohue, C. (Craig); Mauffrey, C. (Cyril); Sundaresh, D.C. (D. C.); Farrell, D.J. (Dana J.); Whelan, D.B. (Daniel B.); Horwitz, D. (Daniel); Stinner, D. (Daniel); Viskontas, D. (Darius); Roffey, D.M. (Darren M.); Alexander, D. (David); Karges, D.E. (David E.); Hak, D. (David); Johnston, D. (David); Love, D. (David); Wright, D.M. (David M.); Zamorano, D.P. (David P.); Goetz, D.R. (David R.); Sanders, D. (David); Stephen, D. (David); Yen, D. (David); Bardana, D. (Davide); Olakkengil, D.J. (Davy J); Lawson, D. (Deanna); Maddock, D. (Deborah); Sietsema, D.L. (Debra L.); Pourmand, D. (Deeba); D. den Hartog (Dennis); Donegan, D. (Derek); D. Heels-Ansdell (Diane); Nam, D. (Diane); Inman, D. (Dominic); Boyer, D. (Dory); Li, D. (Doug); Gibula, D. (Douglas); Price, D.M. (Dustin M.); Watson, D.J. (Dylan J.); Hammerberg, E.M. (E. Mark); Tan, E.T.C.H. (Edward T.C.H.); E.J.R. de Graaf (Eelco); Vesterhus, E.B. (Elise Berg); Roper, E. (Elizabeth); Edwards, E. (Elton); E.H. Schemitsch (Emil); E.R. Hammacher (Eric); Henderson, E.R. (Eric R.); Whatley, E. (Erica); Torres, E.T. (Erick T.); Vermeulen, E.G.J. (Erik G.J.); Finn, E. (Erin); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); Wai, E.K. (Eugene K.); Bannister, E.R. (Evan R.); Kile, E. (Evelyn); Theunissen, E.B.M. (Evert B.M.); Ritchie, E.D. (Ewan D.); Khan, F. (Farah); Moola, F. (Farhad); Howells, F. (Fiona); F. de Nies (Frank); F.H.W.M. van der Heijden (Frank); de Meulemeester, F.R.A.J. (Frank R.A.J.); F. Frihagen (Frede); Nilsen, F. (Fredrik); Schmidt, G.B. (G. Ben); Albers, G.H.R. (G.H. Robert); Gudger, G.K. (Garland K.); Johnson, G. (Garth); Gruen, G. (Gary); Zohman, G. (Gary); Sharma, G. (Gaurav); Wood, G. (Gavin); G.W.M. Tetteroo (Geert); Hjorthaug, G. (Geir); Jomaas, G. (Geir); Donald, G. (Geoff); Rieser, G.R. (Geoffrey Ryan); Reardon, G. (Gerald); Slobogean, G.P. (Gerard P.); G.R. Roukema (Gert); Visser, G.A. (Gijs A.); Moatshe, G. (Gilbert); Horner, G. (Gillian); Rose, G. (Glynis); Guyatt, G. (Gordon); Chuter, G. (Graham); Etherington, G. (Greg); Rocca, G.J.D. (Gregory J. Della); Ekås, G. (Guri); Dobbin, G. (Gwendolyn); Lemke, H.M. (H. Michael); Curry, H. (Hamish); H. Boxma (Han); Gissel, H. (Hannah); Kreder, H. (Hans); Kuiken, H. (Hans); H.L.F. Brom; Pape, H.-C. (Hans-Christoph); H.M. van der Vis (Harm); Bedi, H. (Harvinder); Vallier, H.A. (Heather A.); Brien, H. (Heather); Silva, H. (Heather); Newman, H. (Heike); H. Viveiros (Helena); van der Hoeven, H. (Henk); Ahn, H. (Henry); Johal, H. (Herman); H. Rijna; Stockmann, H. (Heyn); Josaputra, H.A. (Hong A.); Carlisle, H. (Hope); van der Brand, I. (Igor); I. Dawson (Imro); Tarkin, I. (Ivan); Wong, I. (Ivan); Parr, J.A. (J. Andrew); Trenholm, J.A. (J. Andrew); J.C. Goslings (Carel); Amirault, J.D. (J. David); Broderick, J.S. (J. Scott); Snellen, J.P. (Jaap P.); Zijl, J.A.C. (Jacco A.C.); Ahn, J. (Jaimo); Ficke, J. (James); Irrgang, J. (James); Powell, J. (James); Ringler, J.R. (James R.); Shaer, J. (James); Monica, J.T. (James T.); J. Biert (Jan); Bosma, J. (Jan); Brattgjerd, J.E. (Jan Egil); J.P.M. Frölke (Jan Paul); J.C. Wille (Jan); Rajakumar, J. (Janakiraman); Walker, J.E. (Jane E.); Baker, J.K. (Janell K.); Ertl, J.P. (Janos P.); de Vries, J.P.P.M. (Jean Paul P.M.); Gardeniers, J.W.M. (Jean W.M.); May, J. (Jedediah); Yach, J. (Jeff); Hidy, J.T. (Jennifer T.); Westberg, J.R. (Jerald R.); Hall, J.A. (Jeremy A.); van Mulken, J. (Jeroen); McBeth, J.C. (Jessica Cooper); Hoogendoorn, J. (Jochem); Hoffman, J.M. (Jodi M.); Cherian, J.J. (Joe Joseph); Tanksley, J.A. (John A.); Clarke-Jenssen, J. (John); Adams, J.D. (John D.); Esterhai, J. (John); Tilzey, J.F. (John F.); Murnaghan, J. (John); Ketz, J.P. (John P.); Garfi, J.S. (John S.); Schwappach, J. (John); Gorczyca, J.T. (John T.); Wyrick, J. (John); Rydinge, J. (Jonas); Foret, J.L. (Jonathan L.); Gross, J.M. (Jonathan M.); Keeve, J.P. (Jonathan P.); Meijer, J. (Joost); J.J. Scheepers (Joris J.); Baele, J. (Joseph); O'Neil, J. (Joseph); Cass, J.R. (Joseph R.); Hsu, J.R. (Joseph R.); Dumais, J. (Jules); Lee, J. (Julia); Switzer, J.A. (Julie A.); Agel, J. (Julie); Richards, J.E. (Justin E.); Langan, J.W. (Justin W.); Turckan, K. (Kahn); Pecorella, K. (Kaili); Rai, K. (Kamal); Aurang, K. (Kamran); Shively, K. (Karl); K.J.P. van Wessem; Moon, K. (Karyn); Eke, K. (Kate); Erwin, K. (Katie); Milner, K. (Katrine); K.J. Ponsen (Kees-jan); Mills, K. (Kelli); Apostle, K. (Kelly); Johnston, K. (Kelly); Trask, K. (Kelly); Strohecker, K. (Kent); Stringfellow, K. (Kenya); Kruse, K.K. (Kevin K.); Tetsworth, K. (Kevin); Mitchell, K. (Khalis); Browner, K. (Kieran); Hemlock, K. (Kim); Carcary, K. (Kimberly); Jørgen Haug, K. (Knut); Noble, K. (Krista); Robbins, K. (Kristin); Payton, K. (Krystal); Jeray, K.J. (Kyle J.); Rubino, L.J. (L. Joseph); Nastoff, L.A. (Lauren A.); Leffler, L.C. (Lauren C.); L.P. Stassen (Laurents); O'Malley, L.K. (Lawrence K.); Specht, L.M. (Lawrence M.); L. Thabane (Lehana); Geeraedts, L.M.G. (Leo M.G.); Shell, L.E. (Leslie E.); Anderson, L.K. (Linda K.); Eickhoff, L.S. (Linda S.); Lyle, L. (Lindsey); Pilling, L. (Lindsey); Buckingham, L. (Lisa); Cannada, L.K. (Lisa K.); Wild, L.M. (Lisa M.); Dulaney-Cripe, L. (Liz); L.M.S.J. Poelhekke; Govaert, L. (Lonneke); Ton, L. (Lu); Kottam, L. (Lucksy); L.P.H. Leenen (Luke); Clipper, L. (Lydia); Jackson, L.T. (Lyle T.); Hampton, L. (Lynne); de Waal Malefijt, M.C. (Maarten C.); M.P. Simons; M. van der Elst (Maarten); M.W.G.A. Bronkhorst (Maarten); Bhatia, M. (Mahesh); M.F. Swiontkowski (Marc ); Lobo, M.J. (Margaret J.); Swinton, M. (Marilyn); Pirpiris, M. (Marinis); Molund, M. (Marius); Gichuru, M. (Mark); Glazebrook, M. (Mark); Harrison, M. (Mark); Jenkins, M. (Mark); MacLeod, M. (Mark); M.R. de Vries (Mark); Butler, M.S. (Mark S.); Nousiainen, M. (Markku); van ‘t Riet, M. (Martijne); Tynan, M.C. (Martin C.); Campo, M. (Martin); M.G. Eversdijk (Martin); M.J. Heetveld (Martin); Richardson, M. (Martin); Breslin, M. (Mary); Fan, M. (Mary); Edison, M. (Matt); Napierala, M. (Matthew); Knobe, M. (Matthias); Russ, M. (Matthias); Zomar, M. (Mauri); de Brauw, M. (Maurits); Esser, M. (Max); Hurley, M. (Meghan); Peters, M.E. (Melissa E.); Lorenzo, M. (Melissa); Li, M. (Mengnai); Archdeacon, M. (Michael); Biddulph, M. (Michael); Charlton, M. (Michael); McDonald, M.D. (Michael D.); McKee, M.D. (Michael D.); Dunbar, M. (Michael); Torchia, M.E. (Michael E.); Gross, M. (Michael); Hewitt, M. (Michael); Holt, M. (Michael); Prayson, M.J. (Michael J.); M.J.R. Edwards (Michael); Beckish, M.L. (Michael L.); Brennan, M.L. (Michael L.); Dohm, M.P. (Michael P.); Kain, M.S.H. (Michael S.H.); Vogt, M. (Michelle); Yu, M. (Michelle); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); Segers, M.J.M. (Michiel J.M.); M.J.M. Segers (Michiel); Siroen, M.P.C. (Michiel P.C.); M.R. Reed (Mike); Vicente, M.R. (Milena R.); M.M.M. Bruijninckx (Milko); Trivedi, M. (Mittal); M. Bhandari (Mohit); Moore, M.M. (Molly M.); Kunz, M. (Monica); Smedsrud, M. (Morten); Palla, N. (Naveen); Jain, N. (Neeraj); Out, N.J.M. (Nico J.M.); Simunovic, N. (Nicole); Simunovic, N. (Nicole); N.W.L. Schep (Niels); Müller, O. (Oliver); Guicherit, O.R. (Onno R.); O.J.F. van Waes (Oscar); Wang, O. (Otis); P. Doornebosch (Pascal); Seuffert, P. (Patricia); Hesketh, P.J. (Patrick J.); Weinrauch, P. (Patrick); Duffy, P. (Paul); Keller, P. (Paul); Lafferty, P.M. (Paul M.); Pincus, P. (Paul); P. Tornetta III (Paul); Zalzal, P. (Paul); McKay, P. (Paula); Cole, P.A. (Peter A.); de Rooij, P.D. (Peter D.); Hull, P. (Peter); Go, P.M.N.Y.M. (Peter M.N.Y.M.); P. Patka (Peter); Siska, P. (Peter); Weingarten, P. (Peter); Kregor, P. (Philip); Stahel, P. (Philip); Stull, P. (Philip); P. Wittich (Philippe); P.A.R. Rijcke (Piet); P.P. Oprel (Pim); Devereaux, P.J. (P. J.); Zhou, Q. (Qi); Lee Murphy, R. (R.); Alosky, R. (Rachel); Clarkson, R. (Rachel); Moon, R. (Raely); Logishetty, R. (Rajanikanth); Nanda, R. (Rajesh); Sullivan, R.J. (Raymond J.); Snider, R.G. (Rebecca G.); Buckley, R.E. (Richard E.); Iorio, R. (Richard); Farrugia, R.J. (Richard J); Jenkinson, R. (Richard); Laughlin, R. (Richard); R.P.R. Groenendijk (Richard); Gurich, R.W. (Richard W.); Worman, R. (Ripley); Silvis, R. (Rob); R. Haverlag (Robert); Teasdall, R.J. (Robert J.); Korley, R. (Robert); McCormack, R. (Robert); Probe, R. (Robert); Cantu, R.V. (Robert V.); Huff, R.B. (Roger B.); R.K.J. Simmermacher; Peters, R. (Rolf); Pfeifer, R. (Roman); Liem, R. (Ronald); Wessel, R.N. (Ronald N.); Verhagen, R. (Ronald); Vuylsteke, R. (Ronald); Leighton, R. (Ross); McKercher, R. (Ross); R.W. Poolman (Rudolf); Miller, R. (Russell); Bicknell, R. (Ryan); Finnan, R. (Ryan); Khan, R.M. (Ryan M.); Mehta, S. (Samir); Vang, S. (Sandy); Singh, S. (Sanjay); Anand, S. (Sanjeev); Anderson, S.A. (Sarah A.); Dawson, S.A. (Sarah A.); Marston, S.B. (Scott B.); Porter, S.E. (Scott E.); Watson, S.T. (Scott T.); S. Festen (Sebastiaan); Lieberman, S. (Shane); Puloski, S. (Shannon); Bielby, S.A. (Shea A.); Sprague, S. (Sheila); Hess, S. (Shelley); MacDonald, S. (Shelley); Evans, S. (Simone); Bzovsky, S. (Sofia); Hasselund, S. (Sondre); Lewis, S. (Sophie); Ugland, S. (Stein); Caminiti, S. (Stephanie); Tanner, S.L. (Stephanie L.); S.M. Zielinski (Stephanie); Shepard, S. (Stephanie); Sems, S.A. (Stephen A.); Walter, S.D. (Stephen D.); Doig, S. (Stephen); Finley, S.H. (Stephen H.); Kates, S. (Stephen); Lindenbaum, S. (Stephen); Kingwell, S.P. (Stephen P.); Csongvay, S. (Steve); Papp, S. (Steve); Buijk, S.E. (Steven E.); S. Rhemrev (Steven); Hollenbeck, S.M. (Steven M.); van Gaalen, S.M. (Steven M.); Yang, S. (Steven); Weinerman, S. (Stuart); Subash, (); Lambert, S. (Sue); Liew, S. (Susan); S.A.G. Meylaerts (Sven); Blokhuis, T.J. (Taco J.); de Vries Reilingh, T.S. (Tammo S.); Lona, T. (Tarjei); Scott, T. (Taryn); Swenson, T.K. (Teresa K.); Endres, T.J. (Terrence J.); Axelrod, T. (Terry); van Egmond, T. (Teun); Pace, T.B. (Thomas B.); Kibsgård, T. (Thomas); Schaller, T.M. (Thomas M.); Ly, T.V. (Thuan V.); Miller, T.J. (Timothy J.); Weber, T. (Timothy); Le, T. (Toan); Oliver, T.M. (Todd M.); T.M. Karsten (Thomas); Borch, T. (Tor); Hoseth, T.M. (Tor Magne); Nicolaisen, T. (Tor); Ianssen, T. (Torben); Rutherford, T. (Tori); Nanney, T. (Tracy); Gervais, T. (Trevor); Stone, T. (Trevor); Schrickel, T. (Tyson); Scrabeck, T. (Tyson); Ganguly, U. (Utsav); Naumetz, V. (V.); Frizzell, V. (Valda); Wadey, V. (Veronica); Jones, V. (Vicki); Avram, V. (Victoria); Mishra, V. (Vimlesh); Yadav, V. (Vineet); Arora, V. (Vinod); Tyagi, V. (Vivek); Borsella, V. (Vivian); W.J. Willems (Jaap); Hoffman, W.H. (W. H.); Gofton, W.T. (Wade T.); Lackey, W.G. (Wesley G.); Ghent, W. (Wesley); Obremskey, W. (William); Oxner, W. (William); Cross, W.W. (William W.); Murtha, Y.M. (Yvonne M.); Murdoch, Z. (Zoe)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground Reoperation rates are high after surgery for hip fractures. We investigated the effect of a sliding hip screw versus cancellous screws on the risk of reoperation and other key outcomes. Methods For this international, multicentre, allocation concealed randomised controlled

  6. Fracture fixation in the operative management of hip fractures (FAITH) : an international, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauth, Aaron; Creek, Aaron T.; Zellar, Abby; Lawendy, Abdel Rahman; Dowrick, Adam; Gupta, Ajay; Dadi, Akhil; van Kampen, Albert; Yee, Albert; de Vries, Alexander C.; de Mol van Otterloo, Alexander; Garibaldi, Alisha; Liew, Allen; McIntyre, Allison W.; Prasad, Amal Shankar; Romero, Amanda W.; Rangan, Amar; Oatt, Amber; Sanghavi, Amir; Foley, Amy L.; Karlsten, Anders; Dolenc, Andrea; Bucknill, Andrew; Chia, Andrew; Evans, Andrew; Gong, Andrew; Schmidt, Andrew H.; Marcantonio, Andrew J.; Jennings, Andrew; Ward, Angela; Khanna, Angshuman; Rai, Anil; Smits, Anke B; Horan, Annamarie D.; Brekke, Anne Christine; Flynn, Annette; Duraikannan, Aravin; Stødle, Are; van Vugt, Arie B.; Luther, Arlene; Zurcher, Arthur W.; Jain, Arvind; Amundsen, Asgeir; Moaveni, Ash; Carr, Ashley; Sharma, Ateet; Hill, Austin D.; Trommer, Axel; Rai, B. Sachidananda; Hileman, Barbara; Schreurs, Bart; Verhoeven, Bart A N; Barden, Benjamin B.; Flatøy, Bernhard; Cleffken, Berry I.; Bøe, Berthe; Perey, Bertrand; Hanusch, Birgit C.; Weening, Brad; Fioole, Bram; Rijbroek, Bram; Crist, Brett D.; Halliday, Brett; Peterson, Brett; Mullis, Brian; Richardson, C. Glen; Clark, Callum; Sagebien, Carlos A.; van der Pol, Carmen C.; Bowler, Carol; Humphrey, Catherine A.; Coady, Catherine; Koppert, Cees L.; Coles, Chad; Tannoury, Chadi; DePaolo, Charles J.; Gayton, Chris; Herriott, Chris; Reeves, Christina; Tieszer, Christina; Dobb, Christine; Anderson, Christopher G.; Sage, Claire; Cuento, Claudine; Jones, Clifford B.; Bosman, Coks H.R.; Linehan, Colleen; van der Hart, Cor P.; Henderson, Corey; Lewis, Courtland G.; Davis, Craig A.; Donohue, Craig; Mauffrey, Cyril; Sundaresh, D. C.; Farrell, Dana J.; Whelan, Daniel B.; Horwitz, Daniel; Stinner, Daniel; Viskontas, Darius; Roffey, Darren M.; Alexander, David; Karges, David E.; Hak, David; Johnston, David; Love, David; Wright, David M.; Zamorano, David P.; Goetz, David R.; Sanders, David; Stephen, David; Yen, David; Bardana, Davide; Olakkengil, Davy J.; Lawson, Deanna; Maddock, Deborah; Sietsema, Debra L.; Pourmand, Deeba; Den Hartog, Dennis; Donegan, Derek; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Nam, Diane; Inman, Dominic; Boyer, Dory; Li, Doug; Gibula, Douglas; Price, Dustin M.; Watson, Dylan J.; Hammerberg, E. Mark; Tan, Edward C T H; de Graaf, Eelco J.R.; Vesterhus, Elise Berg; Roper, Elizabeth; Edwards, Elton; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Hammacher, Eric R.; Henderson, Eric R.; Whatley, Erica; Torres, Erick T.; Vermeulen, Erik G.J.; Finn, Erin; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Wai, Eugene K.; Bannister, Evan R.; Kile, Evelyn; Theunissen, Evert B.M.; Ritchie, Ewan D.; Khan, Farah; Moola, Farhad; Howells, Fiona; de Nies, Frank; van der Heijden, Frank H.W.M.; de Meulemeester, Frank R.A.J.; Frihagen, Frede; Nilsen, Fredrik; Schmidt, G. Ben; Albers, G. H.Robert; Gudger, Garland K.; Johnson, Garth; Gruen, Gary; Zohman, Gary; Sharma, Gaurav; Wood, Gavin; Tetteroo, Geert W.M.; Hjorthaug, Geir; Jomaas, Geir; Donald, Geoff; Rieser, Geoffrey Ryan; Reardon, Gerald; Slobogean, Gerard P.; Roukema, Gert R.; Visser, Gijs A.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Horner, Gillian; Rose, Glynis; Guyatt, Gordon; Chuter, Graham; Etherington, Greg; Rocca, Gregory J.Della; Ekås, Guri; Dobbin, Gwendolyn; Lemke, H. Michael; Curry, Hamish; Boxma, Han; Gissel, Hannah; Kreder, Hans; Kuiken, Hans; Brom, Hans L.F.; Pape, Hans Christoph; van der Vis, Harm M.; Bedi, Harvinder; Vallier, Heather A.; Brien, Heather; Silva, Heather; Newman, Heike; Viveiros, Helena; van der Hoeven, Henk; Ahn, Henry; Johal, Herman; Rijna, Herman; Stockmann, Heyn; Josaputra, Hong A.; Carlisle, Hope; van der Brand, Igor; Dawson, Imro; Tarkin, Ivan; Wong, Ivan; Parr, J. Andrew; Trenholm, J. Andrew; Goslings, J Carel; Amirault, J. David; Broderick, J. Scott; Snellen, Jaap P.; Zijl, Jacco A.C.; Ahn, Jaimo; Ficke, James; Irrgang, James; Powell, James; Ringler, James R.; Shaer, James; Monica, James T.; Biert, Jan; Bosma, Jan; Brattgjerd, Jan Egil; Frölke, Jan Paul M.; Wille, Jan; Rajakumar, Janakiraman; Walker, Jane E.; Baker, Janell K.; Ertl, Janos P.; De Vries, Jean-Paul P. M.; Gardeniers, Jean W.M.; May, Jedediah; Yach, Jeff; Hidy, Jennifer T.; Westberg, Jerald R.; Hall, Jeremy A.; van Mulken, Jeroen; McBeth, Jessica Cooper; Hoogendoorn, Jochem M; Hoffman, Jodi M.; Cherian, Joe Joseph; Tanksley, John A.; Clarke-Jenssen, John; Adams, John D.; Esterhai, John; Tilzey, John F.; Murnaghan, John; Ketz, John P.; Garfi, John S.; Schwappach, John; Gorczyca, John T.; Wyrick, John; Rydinge, Jonas; Foret, Jonathan L.; Gross, Jonathan M.; Keeve, Jonathan P.; Meijer, Joost; Scheepers, Joris J.G.; Baele, Joseph; O'Neil, Joseph; Cass, Joseph R.; Hsu, Joseph R.; Dumais, Jules; Lee, Julia; Switzer, Julie A.; Agel, Julie; Richards, Justin E.; Langan, Justin W.; Turckan, Kahn; Pecorella, Kaili; Rai, Kamal; Aurang, Kamran; Shively, Karl; van Wessem, Karlijn; Moon, Karyn; Eke, Kate; Erwin, Katie; Milner, Katrine; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Mills, Kelli; Apostle, Kelly; Johnston, Kelly; Trask, Kelly; Strohecker, Kent; Stringfellow, Kenya; Kruse, Kevin K.; Tetsworth, Kevin; Mitchell, Khalis; Browner, Kieran; Hemlock, Kim; Carcary, Kimberly; Jørgen Haug, Knut; Noble, Krista; Robbins, Kristin; Payton, Krystal; Jeray, Kyle J.; Rubino, L. Joseph; Nastoff, Lauren A.; Leffler, Lauren C.; Stassen, Laurents P.S.; O'Malley, Lawrence K.; Specht, Lawrence M.; Thabane, Lehana; Geeraedts, Leo M.G.; Shell, Leslie E.; Anderson, Linda K.; Eickhoff, Linda S.; Lyle, Lindsey; Pilling, Lindsey; Buckingham, Lisa; Cannada, Lisa K.; Wild, Lisa M.; Dulaney-Cripe, Liz; Poelhekke, Lodewijk M.S.J.; Govaert, Lonneke; Ton, Lu; Kottam, Lucksy; Leenen, Luke P.H.; Clipper, Lydia; Jackson, Lyle T.; Hampton, Lynne; de Waal Malefijt, Maarten C.; Simons, Maarten P.; van der Elst, Maarten; Bronkhorst, Maarten W.G.A.; Bhatia, Mahesh; Swiontkowski, Marc; Lobo, Margaret J.; Swinton, Marilyn; Pirpiris, Marinis; Molund, Marius; Gichuru, Mark; Glazebrook, Mark; Harrison, Mark; Jenkins, Mark; MacLeod, Mark; de Vries, Mark R.; Butler, Mark S.; Nousiainen, Markku; van ‘t Riet, Martijne; Tynan, Martin C.; Campo, Martin; Eversdijk, Martin G.; Heetveld, Martin J.; Richardson, Martin; Breslin, Mary; Fan, Mary; Edison, Matt; Napierala, Matthew; Knobe, Matthias; Russ, Matthias; Zomar, Mauri; de Brauw, Maurits; Esser, Max; Hurley, Meghan; Peters, Melissa E.; Lorenzo, Melissa; Li, Mengnai; Archdeacon, Michael; Biddulph, Michael; Charlton, Michael R; McDonald, Michael D.; McKee, Michael D.; Dunbar, Michael; Torchia, Michael E.; Gross, Michael; Hewitt, Michael; Holt, Michael; Prayson, Michael J.; Edwards, Michael J R; Beckish, Michael L.; Brennan, Michael L.; Dohm, Michael P.; Kain, Michael S.H.; Vogt, Michelle; Yu, Michelle; Verhofstad, Michiel H J; Segers, Michiel J M; Segers, Michiel J M; Siroen, Michiel P.C.; Reed, Mike; Vicente, Milena R.; Bruijninckx, Milko M.M.; Trivedi, Mittal; Bhandari, Mohit; Moore, Molly M.; Kunz, Monica; Smedsrud, Morten; Palla, Naveen; Jain, Neeraj; Out, Nico J.M.; Simunovic, Nicole; Simunovic, Nicole; Schep, Niels W. L.; Müller, Oliver; Guicherit, Onno R.; Van Waes, Oscar J.F.; Wang, Otis; Doornebosch, Pascal G.; Seuffert, Patricia; Hesketh, Patrick J.; Weinrauch, Patrick; Duffy, Paul; Keller, Paul; Lafferty, Paul M.; Pincus, Paul; Tornetta, Paul; Zalzal, Paul; McKay, Paula; Cole, Peter A.; de Rooij, Peter D.; Hull, Peter; Go, Peter M.N.Y.M.; Patka, Peter; Siska, Peter; Weingarten, Peter; Kregor, Philip; Stahel, Philip; Stull, Philip; Wittich, Philippe; de Rijcke, Piet A.R.; Oprel, Pim; Devereaux, P. J.; Zhou, Qi; Lee Murphy, R.; Alosky, Rachel; Clarkson, Rachel; Moon, Raely; Logishetty, Rajanikanth; Nanda, Rajesh; Sullivan, Raymond J.; Snider, Rebecca G.; Buckley, Richard E.; Iorio, Richard; Farrugia, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Richard; Laughlin, Richard; Groenendijk, Richard P R; Gurich, Richard W.; Worman, Ripley; Silvis, Rob; Haverlag, Robert; Teasdall, Robert J.; Korley, Robert; McCormack, Robert; Probe, Robert; Cantu, Robert V.; Huff, Roger B.; Simmermacher, Rogier K J; Peters, Rolf; Pfeifer, Roman; Liem, Ronald; Wessel, Ronald N.; Verhagen, Ronald; Vuylsteke, Ronald J C L M; Leighton, Ross; McKercher, Ross; Poolman, Rudolf W; Miller, Russell; Bicknell, Ryan; Finnan, Ryan; Khan, Ryan M.; Mehta, Samir; Vang, Sandy; Singh, Sanjay; Anand, Sanjeev; Anderson, Sarah A.; Dawson, Sarah A.; Marston, Scott B.; Porter, Scott E.; Watson, Scott T.; Festen, Sebastiaan; Lieberman, Shane; Puloski, Shannon; Bielby, Shea A.; Sprague, Sheila; Hess, Shelley; MacDonald, Shelley; Evans, Simone; Bzovsky, Sofia; Hasselund, Sondre; Lewis, Sophie; Ugland, Stein; Caminiti, Stephanie; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Zielinski, Stephanie M.; Shepard, Stephanie; Sems, Stephen A.; Walter, Stephen D.; Doig, Stephen; Finley, Stephen H.; Kates, Stephen; Lindenbaum, Stephen; Kingwell, Stephen P.; Csongvay, Steve; Papp, Steve; Buijk, Steven E.; Rhemrev, Steven J.; Hollenbeck, Steven M.; van Gaalen, Steven M.; Yang, Steven; Weinerman, Stuart; Lambert, Sue; Liew, Susan; Meylaerts, Sven A.G.; Blokhuis, Taco J.; de Vries Reilingh, Tammo S.; Lona, Tarjei; Scott, Taryn; Swenson, Teresa K.; Endres, Terrence J.; Axelrod, Terry; van Egmond, Teun; Pace, Thomas B.; Kibsgård, Thomas; Schaller, Thomas M.; Ly, Thuan V.; Miller, Timothy J.; Weber, Timothy; Le, Toan; Oliver, Todd M.; Karsten, Tom M.; Borch, Tor; Hoseth, Tor Magne; Nicolaisen, Tor; Ianssen, Torben; Rutherford, Tori; Nanney, Tracy; Gervais, Trevor; Stone, Trevor; Schrickel, Tyson; Scrabeck, Tyson; Ganguly, Utsav; Naumetz, V.; Frizzell, Valda; Wadey, Veronica; Jones, Vicki; Avram, Victoria; Mishra, Vimlesh; Yadav, Vineet; Arora, Vinod; Tyagi, Vivek; Borsella, Vivian; Willems, W. Jaap; Hoffman, W. H.; Gofton, Wade T.; Lackey, Wesley G.; Ghent, Wesley; Obremskey, William; Oxner, William; Cross, William W.; Murtha, Yvonne M.; Murdoch, Zoe

    2017-01-01

    Background Reoperation rates are high after surgery for hip fractures. We investigated the effect of a sliding hip screw versus cancellous screws on the risk of reoperation and other key outcomes. Methods For this international, multicentre, allocation concealed randomised controlled trial, we

  7. Immediate results of treatment periprosthetic femoral fractures after hip replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Khominets

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periprosthetic fractures are one of the most serious complications after hip replacement. Nineteen periprosthetic femoral fractures operated on during the period 2011-2015 were followed-up retrospectively. Periprosthetic fractures were classified according to the Vancouver classification. The functional results were evaluated using Harrison scale. Bone healing and implant stability were evaluated clinically, on plain radiographs and computed tomography. The periprosthetic fractures in all patients occurred in the postoperative period. Time from operation until fracture varied from 2 weeks to 11 years. A wedge-shaped cemented or cementless stems were implanted during the first surgery: Versys ET, Spotorno, CPT (Zimmer, США: cementless fixation was performed in 16 (84,2% patients, hybrid -in 2 (10,5% and cemented fixation - in 1 (5,3% patient. The fractures of greater trochanter were diagnosed in all patients with type A periprosthetic fractures. In type B1 periprosthetic fracture (8 patients open reduction, cerclage wiring and internal plate osteosynthesis were applied. Loosening stems in 3 patients with type B2 fractures were replaced with Wagner cementless revision component (Wagner SL Revision Stem. Angle-stable plate osteosynthesis and cerclage wiring were also performed. Closed reduction and internal minimal invasive plate osteosynthesis were performed in patients with type C periprosthetic fractures. Bone consolidation was achieved in 18 (94,7% patients, the average term was 14,3±5,2 weeks. The average Harris hip score in all patients 3 months after treatment was 64,9±16,7 points, and in 12 patients (63,2% after a year - 86,5±15,9. Femoral periprosthetic fractures require a specialized approach to choosing the treatment tactic depending on the fracture type and quality of bone tissue. It is necessary to evaluate the femoral component stability, especially in differential diagnosis of type B1 and B2 periprosthetic fractures. Computed

  8. Arthroscopic removal of intraarticular fragments following fracture dislocation of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagaria Vaibhav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of posterior dislocation of hip with fracture of posterior lip of acetabulum, with retained fracture fragments after a successful closed reduction. The fractured fragments were removed by arthroscopy of the hip. The technique of hip arthroscopy used in removing the fragments is discussed.

  9. Risk of hip fracture after osteoporosis fractures. 451 women with fracture of lumbar spine, olecranon, knee or ankle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B; Lund, B

    1993-01-01

    In a follow-up study during 1976-1984, the risk of a subsequent hip fracture was investigated in women aged 60-99 years, hospitalized for the following fractures: lumbar spine (n 70), olecranon (n 52), knee (n 129) and ankle (n 200). Follow-up ranged from 0 to 9 years. Observation time of the 4...... different fractures were 241, 180, 469, and 779, person-years, respectively. In women aged 60-79 years with one of the following fractures the relative risk of a subsequent hip fracture was increased by 4.8 (lumbar spine), 4.1 (olecranon), 3.5 (knee) and 1.5 (ankle). The relative risk of hip fracture showed...

  10. Risk-factors for surgical delay following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Reig, J; Salvador Marín, J; Ferrández Martínez, J; Orozco Beltrán, D; Martínez López, J F

    To identify pre-operative risk factors for surgical delay of more than 2 days after admission in patients older than 65 years with a hip fracture. A prospective observational study was conducted on 180 hip fractures in patients older than 65 years of age admitted to our hospital from January 2015 to April 2016. The data recorded included, patient demographics, day of admission, pre-fracture comorbidities, mental state, level of mobility and physical function, type of fracture, antiaggregant and anticoagulant medication, pre-operative haemoglobin value, type of treatment, and surgical delay. The mean age of the patients was 83.7 years. The mean Charlson Index was 2.8. The pre-fracture baseline co-morbidities were equal or greater than 2 in 70% of cases. Mean timing of surgery was 3.1 days. At the time of admission, 122 (67.7%) patients were fit for surgery, of which 80 (44.4%) underwent surgery within 2 days. A Charlson index greater than 2, anticoagulant therapy, and admission on Thursday to Saturday, were independently associated with a surgical delay greater than 2 days. The rate of hip fracture patients undergoing surgery within 2 days is low. Risk factors associated to surgical delay are non-modifiable. However, their knowledge should allow the development of protocols that can reduce surgical delay in this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of Mental Disorders in Nosocomial Infections after Hip Fracture Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Guerado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between mental disorders (MDs and iatrogenic complications after hip fracture surgery has been poorly studied. Among iatrogenic complications, nosocomial infections (NIs are a major factor in hip fracture surgery. The aim of this paper was to determine whether patients with a MD and a hip fracture develop more NIs after hip surgery than patients with no MD. We studied 912 patients who underwent surgery for a hip fracture (223 patients with a MD who underwent surgery for a hip fracture and 689 control patients without a MD who also underwent surgery for a hip fracture and followed them after surgery. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using simple and multiple logistic regression analysis (confidence interval, crude and adjusted odds ratios, and P value. We found that MDs, gender, and comorbidities were not associated with a higher risk of developing a NI after surgery for a hip fracture. Only age increases the risk of a NI.

  12. Dementia and delirium, the outcomes in elderly hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosk, C.A. (Christina A.); Mus, M. (Marnix); Vroemen, J.P.A.M. (Jos P. A. M.); T. van der Ploeg (Tjeerd); D.I. Vos (Dagmar); Elmans, L.H.G.J. (Leon H. G. J.); L. van der Laan (Lyckle)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Delirium in hip fractured patients is a frequent complication. Dementia is an important risk factor for delirium and is common in frail elderly. This study aimed to extend the previous knowledge on risk factors for delirium and the consequences. Special attention was given to

  13. Hip hemiarthroplasty for femoral neck fractures using the modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In spite of the soft tissue contractures and osteoporosis associated with late presentation, there was no case of intraoperative fractures. The patients had good hip abduction postoperatively. In addition, there was no intraoperative nerve or vascular injury. Conclusion: The short-term results in this group of patients showed ...

  14. Machine Learning Principles Can Improve Hip Fracture Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Christian; Eiken, Pia; Vestergaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Apply machine learning principles to predict hip fractures and estimate predictor importance in Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-scanned men and women. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry data from two Danish regions between 1996 and 2006 were combined with national Danish patient data...

  15. Posterior Hip Dislocation with Ipsilateral Femoral Neck Fracture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fracture of the right ankle. (Fig. 3 3). Total hip athroplasty was advised but due to financial constraints they could not afford to buy the implant. A decision was made to perform a hemi athroplasty with a bipolar implant. The intact femoral head was found lodged in the partly lacerated gluteal muscles and the the acetabulum ...

  16. Affective functioning after delirium in elderly hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slor, Chantal J.; Witlox, Joost; Jansen, René W. M. M.; Adamis, Dimitrios; Meagher, David J.; Tieken, Esther; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Gool, Willem A.; Eikelenboom, Piet; de Jonghe, Jos F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Delirium in elderly patients is associated with various long-term sequelae that include cognitive impairment and affective disturbances, although the latter is understudied. For a prospective cohort study of elderly patients undergoing hip fracture surgery, baseline characteristics and affective and

  17. Development and delivery of patient treatment in the Trondheim Hip Fracture Trial. A new geriatric in-hospital pathway for elderly patients with hip fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saltvedt Ingvild

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip fractures are common among frail elderly persons and often have serious consequences on function, mobility and mortality. Traditional treatment of these patients is performed in orthopedic departments without additional geriatric assessment. However, studies have shown that interdisciplinary geriatric treatment may be beneficial compared to traditional treatment. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether treatment of these patients in a Department of Geriatrics (DG during the entire hospital stay gives additional benefits as compared to conventional treatment in a Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (DOS. Findings A new clinical pathway for in-hospital treatment of hip fracture patients was developed. In this pathway patients were treated pre-and postoperatively in DG. Comprehensive geriatric assessment was performed as an interdisciplinary, multidimensional, systematic assessment of all patients focusing on each patient’s capabilities and limitations as recommended in guidelines and systematic reviews. Identification and treatment of co-morbidities, pain relief, hydration, oxygenation, nutrition, elimination, prevention and management of delirium, assessment of falls and osteoporosis were emphasized. Discharge planning started as early as possible. Initiation of rehabilitation with focus on early mobilisation and development of individual plans was initiated in hospital and continued after discharge from hospital. Fracture specific treatment was based upon standard treatment for the hospital, expert opinions and a review of the literature. Conclusion A new treatment program for old hip fracture patients was developed, introduced and run in the DG, the potential benefits of which being compared with traditional care of hip fracture patients in the DOS in a randomised clinical trial.

  18. Dual head screw hip nailing for trochanteric fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, George N.; Galanopoulos, Ioannis P.; Vottis, Christos Th.; Karamanis, Eirinaios; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: There are limited information and inconclusive results for dual head screw intramedullary hip nails for trochanteric fractures. Therefore, we performed a prospective study to evaluate the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients operated with this implant. Methods: We prospectively studied 79 patients (61 women and 18 men; mean age: 84.7 years; range: 65–96 years) with a low-energy trochanteric fracture, treated with a dual head screw intramedullary hip nail from 2013 to 2016. The mean follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 1–3 years); seven patients were lost to follow up. This left 72 patients for further analysis. We evaluated the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients. Results: Fracture healing was evident in 70 patients (97.2%) at 2–3 months postoperatively. One patient experienced cut-out and z-effect phenomenon of the head screws. Another patient experienced a periprosthetic femoral diaphysis fracture at the distal tip of the nail. A third patient experienced an acute postoperative superficial skin infection that was treated successfully with wound dressing changes and a course of antibiotics. Sixteen patients (22.2%) deceased within 12 months postoperatively. In the remaining patients, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) at 12 months postoperatively was excellent in 16 (28.6%), good in 23 (41.1%), fair in 10 (17.8%), and poor in 7 patients (12.5%). The function declined after the patients’ fracture. Fair and poor results were related to age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3 fracture types. Conclusion: The dual head screw intramedullary hip nail is associated with high healing and low complication rates for intertrochanteric fractures. The function of the patients is good or excellent in most cases; however, it declines, especially for those patients with age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3 fracture types

  19. Dual head screw hip nailing for trochanteric fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavrogenis Andreas F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are limited information and inconclusive results for dual head screw intramedullary hip nails for trochanteric fractures. Therefore, we performed a prospective study to evaluate the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients operated with this implant. Methods: We prospectively studied 79 patients (61 women and 18 men; mean age: 84.7 years; range: 65–96 years with a low-energy trochanteric fracture, treated with a dual head screw intramedullary hip nail from 2013 to 2016. The mean follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 1–3 years; seven patients were lost to follow up. This left 72 patients for further analysis. We evaluated the healing of fractures, and survival, function, and complications of patients. Results: Fracture healing was evident in 70 patients (97.2% at 2–3 months postoperatively. One patient experienced cut-out and z-effect phenomenon of the head screws. Another patient experienced a periprosthetic femoral diaphysis fracture at the distal tip of the nail. A third patient experienced an acute postoperative superficial skin infection that was treated successfully with wound dressing changes and a course of antibiotics. Sixteen patients (22.2% deceased within 12 months postoperatively. In the remaining patients, the Harris Hip Score (HHS at 12 months postoperatively was excellent in 16 (28.6%, good in 23 (41.1%, fair in 10 (17.8%, and poor in 7 patients (12.5%. The function declined after the patients’ fracture. Fair and poor results were related to age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3 fracture types. Conclusion: The dual head screw intramedullary hip nail is associated with high healing and low complication rates for intertrochanteric fractures. The function of the patients is good or excellent in most cases; however, it declines, especially for those patients with age > 85 years, poor pre-fracture level of function, and AO/OTA-31-A3

  20. Fractured Inferior Pubic Ramus with Ipsilateral Total Hip Replacement: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkhell Radha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pubic rami fractures are common. They are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. These fractures are usually classified as stable injuries and traditionally receive limited orthopaedic input. Management typically involves hospital admission and early input from physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Early mobilisation is advocated as a central part of managing these patients, with emphasis on secondary prevention. We report a case diagnosed as minimally displaced inferior pubic ramus fracture in a patient with an ipsilateral total hip replacement (THR. The patient was mobilised early and despite analgesia continued to complain of groin pain. Repeat radiographs showed a fracture of the acetabulum with displacement of the acetabular component of the hip replacement. We advocate early orthopaedic input for all pubic rami fractures, particularly in patients with hip arthroplasty, and thorough investigation including a CT scan of the pelvis to exclude acetabular extension prior to mobilisation.

  1. Effects of Pre-Fracture Depressive Illness and Post-Fracture Depressive Symptoms on Physical Performance Following Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, Alan M.; Shardell, Michelle; Orwig, Denise; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Ostir, Glenn; Hicks, Gregory E.; Miller, Ram R.; Hochberg, Marc C.; Magaziner, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the impact of pre-fracture depressive illness and post-fracture depressive symptoms on changes in physical performance after hip fracture. Design Longitudinal observational cohort. Setting Baltimore metropolitan area. Participants Older adults (n=255) with hip fracture who underwent Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) assessments at two, six, or twelve months post fracture. Measurements Pre-fracture depressive illness (from medical records) at baseline and post-fracture depressive symptoms at two months (using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) were measured. Physical performance was measured using the SPPB, a composite metric of functional status with a score ranging from zero to twelve. Weighted estimating equations assessed mean SPPB over time comparing participants with and without pre-fracture depressive illness and subjects with and without post-fracture depressive symptoms. Results Participants with pre-fracture depressive illness had an SPPB increase of 0.4 units (95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.5, 1.3) from two to six months, smaller than the increase of 1.0 SPPB unit (95% CI: 0.4, 1.6) in those without pre-fracture depressive illness. Participants with post-fracture depressive symptoms had an SPPB increase of 0.2 units (95% CI: −1.0, 1.5) from two to twelve months, while subjects without post-fracture depressive symptoms had a larger increase of 1.2 units (95% CI: 0.6, 1.8) over the same time period. However, pre-fracture depressive illness and post-fracture depressive symptoms were not significantly associated with SPPB. Conclusions Neither pre-fracture depressive illness nor post-fracture depressive symptoms were significantly associated with changes in physical performance after hip fracture, but the magnitude of estimates suggested possible clinically meaningful effects on functional recovery. PMID:27673273

  2. The Role of BMI in Hip Fracture Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinleye, Sheriff D; Garofolo, Garret; Culbertson, Maya Deza; Homel, Peter; Erez, Orry

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is an oft-cited cause of surgical morbidity and many institutions require extensive supplementary screening for obese patients prior to surgical intervention. However, in the elderly patients, obesity has been described as a protective factor. This article set out to examine the effect of body mass index (BMI) on outcomes and morbidity after hip fracture surgery. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried for all patients undergoing 1 of 4 surgical procedures to manage hip fracture between 2008 and 2012. Patient demographics, BMI, and known factors that lead to poor surgical outcomes were included as putative predictors for complications that included infectious, cardiac, pulmonary, renal, and neurovascular events. Using χ 2 tests, 30-day postoperative complication rates were compared between 4 patient groups stratified by BMI as low weight (BMI BMI = 20-30), obese (BMI = 30-40), and morbidly obese (BMI > 40). A total of 15 108 patients underwent surgery for hip fracture over the examined 5-year period. Of these, 18% were low weight (BMI BMI = 20-30), 13% were obese (BMI = 30-40), and 2% were morbidly obese (BMI > 40). The low-weight and morbidly obese patients had both the highest mortality rates and the lowest superficial infection rates. There was a significant increase in blood transfusion rates that decreased linearly with increasing BMI. Deep surgical site infection and renal failure increased linearly with increasing BMI, however, these outcomes were confounded by comorbidities. This study demonstrates that patients at either extreme of the BMI spectrum, rather than solely the obese, are at greatest risk of major adverse events following hip fracture surgery. This runs contrary to the notion that obese hip fracture patients automatically require additional preoperative screening and perioperative services, as currently implemented in many institutions.

  3. Determinants of time to surgery for patients with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltzer, Justin; Mitchell, Rebecca J; Toson, Barbara; Harris, Ian A; Close, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    Guidelines for hip fracture care suggest that patients with hip fracture should undergo surgery on the day of or day after admission to hospital. This study examined factors affecting time to surgery for hip fracture extracted from existing administrative datasets in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. A retrospective analysis of patients with hip fracture aged 65 years and over undergoing surgical intervention in NSW public hospitals between 1 July 2000 and 30 June 2011. A multinomial logistic model was used to identify factors impacting on time to surgery from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2011. A total of 49,317 hip fracture procedures were recorded during 2000-2001 to 2010-2011. Sixty-four per cent of patients received operative treatment on the day of or day after admission. Co-morbidity, type of surgical procedure and day of presentation all impacted significantly on time to surgery. Fourteen per cent required an inter-hospital transfer prior to receiving operative intervention. Transferred patients were 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.31-2.85) times more likely to wait 2-4 days and 3.2 times more likely to wait 5 or more days (95% CI: 2.77-3.76) for surgery compared with patients presenting to an operating hospital. Significant variation exists between hospitals in the time to surgery that is not solely explained by measures of case mix or geography. Opportunities exist to consider other factors contributing to this variation and to ensure timely access to surgical intervention in the future. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  4. Management of anticoagulation in hip fractures: A pragmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassa, Rafik; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Yacine; Hujazi, Ihab; Sevenoaks, Hannah; Dunkow, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Hip fractures are common and increasing with an ageing population. In the United Kingdom, the national guidelines recommend operative intervention within 36 hours of diagnosis. However, long-term anticoagulant treatment is frequently encountered in these patients which can delay surgical intervention. Despite this, there are no set national standards for management of drug-induced coagulopathy pre-operatively in the context of hip fractures.The aim of this study was to evaluate the management protocols available in the current literature for the commonly encountered coagulopathy-inducing agents.We reviewed the current literature, identified the reversal agents used in coagulopathy management and assessed the evidence to determine the optimal timing, doses and routes of administration.Warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists (VKA) can be reversed effectively using vitamin K with a dose in the range of 2 mg to 10 mg intravenously to correct coagulopathy.The role of fresh frozen plasma is not clear from the current evidence while prothrombin complex remains a reliable and safe method for immediate reversal of VKA-induced coagulopathy in hip fracture surgery or failed vitamin K treatment reversal.The literature suggests that surgery should not be delayed in patients on classical antiplatelet medications (aspirin or clopidogrel), but spinal or regional anaesthetic methods should be avoided for the latter. However, evidence regarding the use of more novel antiplatelet medications (e.g. ticagrelor) and direct oral anticoagulants remains a largely unexplored area in the context of hip fracture surgery. We suggest treatment protocols based on best available evidence and guidance from allied specialties.Hip fracture surgery presents a common management dilemma where semi-urgent surgery is required. In this article, we advocate an evidence-based algorithm as a guide for managing these anticoagulated patients. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:394-402. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160083.

  5. Hip fractures and Parkinson's disease: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomber, Ross; Alshameeri, Zeiad; Masia, Antonio Francesco; Mela, Federico; Parker, Martyn J

    2017-12-01

    There are no specific guidelines for treating Parkinson's disease patients who present with a hip fracture. Here we present a large cohort of patients with Parkinson's disease who suffered hip fractures. Our aim was to assess for differences between a Parkinson's disease population and a non-Parkinson's disease population with hip fractures and make recommendations on management guidelines. We performed a comprehensive analysis of prospectively collected data on all patients with hip fracture who were admitted into our department over a period of 29 years. In total 9225 patients with hip fractures were included in this study, 452 (4.9%) patients had Parkinson's disease. The mobility scores were worse pre- and post-operatively in the Parkinson's group as were mini-mental scores and ASA grade. Post-operative complications were similar between the two groups, with no difference in dislocation rate or wound complications. However, other outcomes including mobility and mortality rate at 1year were worse in the Parkinson's group. These patients also had a longer hospital stay and were more likely to be immobile and discharged to an institution. We recommend that Parkinson's disease patients should be assessed more thoroughly in the peri-operative period and arrangement for rehab and discharge planning should commence as soon as possible following admission. The consent process should reflect longer hospital stays, worse mobility, higher mortality and increased likelihood of discharge to institution but concern over increased complications, specifically dislocation was not evident in our data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical inactivity and pain in older men and women with hip fracture history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpakoski, Anu; Portegijs, Erja; Kallinen, Mauri; Sihvonen, Sanna; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Alen, Markku; Rantanen, Taina; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2011-01-01

    physical activity as well as the role of pain management and physical activity interventions in preventing mobility limitation and disability among older people recovering from hip fracture. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Nutritional supplementation for hip fracture aftercare in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenell, Alison; Smith, Toby O; Curtain, James P; Mak, Jenson Cs; Myint, Phyo K

    2016-11-30

    effect of increased protein intake on mortality (30/181 versus 21/180; RR 1.42, 95% CI 0.85 to 2.37; 4 trials) or number of participants with complications but very low-quality and contradictory evidence of a reduction in unfavourable outcomes (66/113 versus 82/110; RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.95; 2 trials). There was no evidence of an effect on adverse events such as diarrhoea.Trials testing intravenous vitamin B1 and other water soluble vitamins, oral 1-alpha-hydroxycholecalciferol (vitamin D), high dose bolus vitamin D, different oral doses or sources of vitamin D, intravenous or oral iron, ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate versus an isonitrogenous peptide supplement, taurine versus placebo, and a supplement with vitamins, minerals and amino acids, provided low- or very low-quality evidence of no clear effect on mortality or complications, where reported.Based on low-quality evidence, one trial evaluating the use of dietetic assistants to help with feeding indicated that this intervention may reduce mortality (19/145 versus 36/157; RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.95) but not the number of participants with complications (79/130 versus 84/125). There is low-quality evidence that oral multinutrient supplements started before or soon after surgery may prevent complications within the first 12 months after hip fracture, but that they have no clear effect on mortality. There is very low-quality evidence that oral supplements may reduce 'unfavourable outcome' (death or complications) and that they do not result in an increased incidence of vomiting and diarrhoea. Adequately sized randomised trials with robust methodology are required. In particular, the role of dietetic assistants, and peripheral venous feeding or nasogastric feeding in very malnourished people require further evaluation.

  8. Management of Hip Fractures in Lateral Position without a Fracture Table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Pahlavanhosseini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Hip fracture Management in supine position on a fracture table with biplane fluoroscopic views has some difficulties which leads to prolongation of surgery and increasing x- rays’ dosage. The purpose of this study was to report the results and complications of hip fracture management in lateral position on a conventional operating table with just anteroposterior fluoroscopic view.  Methods:  40 hip fractures (31 trochanteric and 9 femoral neck fractures were operated in lateral position between Feb 2006 and Oct 2012. Age, gender, fracture classification, operation time, intra-operation blood loss, reduction quality, and complications were extracted from patients’ medical records. The mean follow-up time was 30.78±22.73 months (range 4-83. Results: The mean operation time was 76.50 ± 16.88 min (range 50 – 120 min.The mean intra-operative blood loss was 628.75 ± 275.00 ml (range 250-1300ml. Anatomic and acceptable reduction was observed in 95%of cases. The most important complications were malunion (one case in trochanteric group, avascular necrosis of oral head and nonunion (each one case in femoral neck group.  Conclusions:  It sounds that reduction and fixation of hip fractures in lateral position with fluoroscopy in just anteroposterior view for small rural hospitals may be executable and probably safe.

  9. [Hip arthroplasty for the severe comminuted proximal femoral fracture with psilateral acetabulum fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Bo; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Huang, Chong-Xin; Liao, Tian-Cheng; Wang, An

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the results of hip arthroplasty for the treatment of severe comminuted proximal femoral fracture with ipsilateral acetabulum fracture. From June 2007 to September 2013, 8 patients (8 hips) with severe comminuted proximal femoral fracture combined with ipsilateral acetabulum fracture were treated with hip arthroplasty. All patients were male and using biological prosthesis. Aged from 33 to 64 years old with an average of 41.9 years. According to Harris score in aspect of pain, function, range of motion to evaluate clinical effects. There was no untoward reaction in 8 patients. And bed rest at 3 months after operation, waiting for acetabulum fracture healed to out-of-bed activity. There was no complications such as pneumonia, bedsore and so on in the patients. Follow-up time was from 9 to 72 months with an average of 35.8 months, the wound healed, there was no the subsidence and loosening of prosthesis, no dislocation and infection. The mean of Harris score was 87.5 points after operation. The effect of the hip replacement in treating severe comminuted proximal femoral fracture with ipsilateral acetabulum fracture is confirmed. It can restore motor function and reduce traumatic complication, may serve as a substitute for internal fixation of difficult operation. The long-term efficacy is necessary to further observe.

  10. [Is Mapuche ethnicity a risk factor for hip fracture in aged?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapunar, Jorge; Bravo, Paulina; Schneider, Hermann; Jiménez, Marcela

    2003-10-01

    Ethnic factors are involved in the risk for osteoporosis and hip fracture. To assess the effect of Mapuche ethnicity on the risk of hip fracture. A case control study. Cases were subjects over 55 years of age admitted, during one year, for hip fracture not associated to major trauma or tumors. Controls were randomly chosen from other hospital services and paired for age with cases. The magnitude of the association between ethnicity and hip fracture was expressed as odds ratio in a logistic regression model. In the study period, 156 cases with hip fracture were admitted. The proportion of subjects with Mapuche origin was significantly lower among cases than controls (11.8 and 26.5% respectively, p Mapuche ethnicity was associated with hip fracture with an odds radio of 0.14 (p = 0.03, 95% CI 0.03-0.8). In this sample, Mapuche ethnicity is a protective factor for hip fracture.

  11. Reduction of femoral fractures in long-term care facilities: the Bavarian fracture prevention study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Becker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hip fractures are a major public health burden. In industrialized countries about 20% of all femoral fractures occur in care dependent persons living in nursing care and assisted living facilities. Preventive strategies for these groups are needed as the access to medical services differs from independent home dwelling older persons at risk of osteoporotic fractures. It was the objective of the study to evaluate the effect of a fall and fracture prevention program on the incidence of femoral fracture in nursing homes in Bavaria, Germany. METHODS: In a translational intervention study a fall prevention program was introduced in 256 nursing homes with 13,653 residents. The control group consisted of 893 nursing homes with 31,668 residents. The intervention consisted of staff education on fall and fracture prevention strategies, progressive strength and balance training, and on institutional advice on environmental adaptations. Incident femoral fractures served as outcome measure. RESULTS: In the years before the intervention risk of a femoral fracture did not differ between the intervention group (IG and control group (CG. During the one-year intervention period femoral fracture rates were 33.6 (IG and 41.0/1000 person years (CG, respectively. The adjusted relative risk of a femoral fracture was 0.82 (95% CI 0.72-0.93 in residents exposed to the fall and fracture prevention program compared to residents from CG. CONCLUSIONS: The state-wide dissemination of a multi-factorial fall and fracture prevention program was able to reduce femoral fractures in residents of nursing homes.

  12. Preventing falls and fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulfarsson, J; Robinson, B E

    1994-11-01

    One of four persons over age 65 in the community falls; those over age 75 in institutions fall more frequently. Falls, a complex phenomena suggesting present disease and predicting future disability, are caused by interactions between the environment and dynamic balance which is determined by the quality of sensory input, central processing, and motor responses. Clinical factors which predispose to falling often produce observable disturbances in gait and balance, making observation critical in assessment. Acute illness and drug therapy produce particularly preventable falls. Therapeutic exercise and environmental modification for safety are the clinical interventions most likely to successfully prevent fall-related injury.

  13. Trend in the Age-Adjusted Incidence of Hip Fractures in South Korea: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Kyun; Kim, Jin Woo; Lee, Myung Ho; Moon, Kyung Ho; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2017-12-01

    The incidence of hip fractures has been reported to vary geographically, and its trend has also varied widely. However, the trend in the age-adjusted incidence of hip fractures has not been well studied in Korea. After we identified eligible studies presenting multiple age-adjusted incidences of hip fractures in the Korean population in PubMed, we evaluated changes in the absolute number of occurrence and calculated the annual percentage change (APC) of age-adjusted incidences of hip fractures. We have searched PubMed for the original and English-language literature on the incidence of hip fractures in the Korean population published since 2000. The studies presenting multiple age-adjusted incidences of hip fractures were selected. We evaluated the change in the absolute number of hip fractures and calculated the APC of age-adjusted incidences of hip fractures for each study. Three eligible articles were identified. The absolute number of hip fractures for both genders increased over time in all three studies although the operational definition of hip fracture differed from one another. The APC of the age-adjusted incidence of hip fractures was positive for women and negative for men. However, the change was not statistically significant in both genders during each study period (2001-2004, 2005-2008, and 2006-2010, respectively). The age-adjusted incidence of hip fractures was stable among men and women, while the absolute number of hip fractures increased for both genders in Korea. Further studies with longer study periods on age-adjusted incidences are required to better determine the trend in the incidence of hip fractures in Korea.

  14. Predictive factors of hospital stay, mortality and functional recovery after surgery for hip fracture in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja Sierra, T; Bartolomé Martín, I; Rodríguez Solís, J; Bárcena Goitiandia, L; Torralba González de Suso, M; Morales Sanz, M D; Hornillos Calvo, M

    Due to its high prevalence and serious consequences it is very important to be well aware of factors that might be related to medical complications, mortality, hospital stay and functional recovery in elderly patients with hip fracture. A prospective study of a group of 130 patients aged over 75 years admitted for osteoporotic hip fracture. Their medical records, physical and cognitive status prior to the fall, fracture type and surgical treatment, medical complications and functional and social evolution after hospitalization were evaluated. Patients with greater physical disability, more severe cognitive impairment and those who lived in a nursing home before the fracture had worse functional recovery after surgery. Treatment with intravenous iron to reduce transfusions reduced hospital stay and improved walking ability. Infections and heart failure were the most frequent medical complications and were related to a longer hospital stay. The prescription of nutritional supplements for the patients with real indication improved their physical recovery after the hip fracture CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of physical, cognitive and social status prior to hip fracture should be the basis of an individual treatment plan because of its great prognostic value. Multidisciplinary teams with continuous monitoring of medical problems should prevent and treat complications as soon as possible. Intravenous iron and specific nutritional supplements can improve functional recovery six months after hip fracture. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Are Hip-Specific Items Useful in a Quality of Life Questionnaire for Patients with Hip Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Tsauo, Jau-Yih

    2009-01-01

    Researchers measure the significance of hip fracture by the patient's impairment. The patient's quality of life (QOL) is usually also substantially affected. However, there is no specific quality of life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with hip fractures. This study was designed to determine whether adding a new set of specific questions about…

  16. Central dislocation of the hip secondary to insufficiency fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moe Thaya

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a case report of a 45-year old man who sustained a central dislocation of the hip secondary to an insufficiency fracture of the acetabulum. At the time of presentation he was on alendronate therapy for osteoporosis which had been previously investigated. CT scanning of the pelvis was useful for pre-operative planning which confirmed collapse of the femoral head but no discontinuity of the pelvis. The femoral head was morcellized and used as bone graft for the acetabular defect and an uncemented total hip replacement was performed.

  17. Femoral head vitality after intracapsular hip fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemqvist, B.

    1983-01-01

    Femoral head vitality before, during and at various intervals from the operation was determined by tetracycline labeling and/or 99 sp (m)Tc-MDP scintimetry. In a three-year follow-up, healing prognosis could be determined by scintimetry 3 weeks from operation; deficient femoral head vitality predicting healing complications and retained vitality predicting uncomplicated healing. A comparison between pre- and postoperative scintimetry indicated that further impairment of the femoral head vitality could be caused by the operative procedure, and as tetracycline labeling prior to and after fracture reduction in 370 fractures proved equivalent, it was concluded that the procedure of osteosynthesis probably was responsible for capsular vessel injury, using a four-flanged nail. The four-flanged nail was compared with a low-traumatic method of osteosynthesis, two hook-pins, in a prospective randomized 14 month study, and the postoperative femoral head vitality was significantly better in the hook-pin group. This was also clearly demonstrated in a one-year follow-up for the fractures included in the study. Parallel to these investigations, the reliability of the methods of vitality determination was found satisfactory in methodologic studies. For clinical purpose, primary atraumatic osteosynthesis, postoperative prognostic scintimetry and early secondary arthroplasty when indicated, was concluded to be the appropriate approach to femoral neck fracture treatment. (Author)

  18. Inpatient cost for hip fracture patients managed with an orthogeriatric care model in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lester Teong Jin; Wong, Seng Joung; Kwek, Ernest Beng Kee

    2017-03-01

    The estimated incidence of hip fractures worldwide was 1.26 million in 1990 and is expected to double to 2.6 million by 2025. The cost of care for hip fracture patients is a significant economic burden. This study aimed to look at the inpatient cost of hip fractures among elderly patients placed under a mature orthogeriatric co-managed system. This study was a retrospective analysis of 244 patients who were admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics of Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, in 2011 for hip fractures under a mature orthogeriatric hip fracture care path. Information regarding costs, surgical procedures performed and patient demographics was collected. The mean cost of hospitalisation was SGD 13,313.81. The mean cost was significantly higher for the patients who were managed surgically than for the patients who were managed non-surgically (SGD 14,815.70 vs. SGD 9,011.38; p average cost (SGD 2,689.99 more than if there were no complications; p = 0.011). Every additional day from admission to time of surgery resulted in an increased cost of SGD 575.89, and the difference between the average cost of surgery within 48 hours and that of surgery > 48 hours was SGD 2,716.63. Reducing the time to surgery and preventing pre- and postoperative complications can help reduce overall costs. A standardised care path that empowers allied health professionals can help to reduce perioperative complications, and a combined orthogeriatric care service can facilitate prompt surgical treatment. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  19. Elevated ferritin and circulating osteoprotegerin levels as independent predictors of hip fracture in postmenopausal women admitted for fragility fracture: time for new screening strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovetzki, Y; Zandman-Goddard, G; Feldbrin, Z; Shargorodsky, M

    2017-02-01

    Identification of risk factors may help us to understand the pathogenesis of osteoporotic hip fracture as well as to formulate development of better diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies. The present study was designed to determine the impact of multiple metabolic risk factors such as markers of systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein), immune responses-acute phase reactants (ferritin), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and bone remodeling (osteoprotegerin), for the prediction of hip fractures in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. The study group consisted of 115 postmenopausal women divided into two groups: Group 1 consisted of 49 women hospitalized in the Orthopedic Department, Wolfson Medical Center for the diagnosis of non-traumatic hip fracture and Group 2 contained 66 postmenopausal osteoporotic women without a history of hip fracture. Metabolic parameters were determined. Circulating OPG was significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (205.2 ± 177.1 vs 60.0 =/-22.3, p osteoprotegerin, are independent predictors of hip fracture in postmenopausal women hospitalized for fragility fracture.

  20. The epidemic of hip fractures: are we on the right track?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaas A Hartholt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hip fractures are a public health problem, leading to hospitalization, long-term rehabilitation, reduced quality of life, large healthcare expenses, and a high 1-year mortality. Especially older adults are at greater risk of fractures than the general population, due to the combination of an increased fall risk and osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to determine time trends in numbers and incidence rates of hip fracture-related hospitalizations and admission duration in the older Dutch population. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Secular trend analysis of all hospitalizations in the older Dutch population (≥65 years from 1981 throughout 2008, using the National Hospital Discharge Registry. Numbers, age-specific and age-adjusted incidence rates (per 10,000 persons of hospital admissions and hospital days due to a hip fracture were used as outcome measures in each year of the study. Between 1981 and 2008, the absolute number of hip fractures doubled in the older Dutch population. Incidence rates of hip fracture-related hospital admissions increased with age, and were higher in women than in men. The age-adjusted incidence rate increased from 52.0 to 67.6 per 10,000 older persons. However, since 1994 the incidence rate decreased (percentage annual change -0.5%, 95% CI: -0.7; -0.3, compared with the period 1981-1993 (percentage annual change 2.3%, 95% CI: 2.0; 2.7. The total number of hospital days was reduced by a fifth, due to a reduced admission duration in all age groups. A possible limitation was that data were obtained from a linked administrative database, which did not include information on medication use or co-morbidities. CONCLUSIONS: A trend break in the incidence rates of hip fracture-related hospitalizations was observed in the Netherlands around 1994, possibly as a first result of efforts to prevent falls and fractures. However, the true cause of the observation is unknown.

  1. Clinical Outcomes and 90-Day Costs Following Hemiarthroplasty or Total Hip Arthroplasty for Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Christine I; Vose, Joshua G; Nunley, Ryan M

    2017-09-01

    In the era of bundled payments, many hospitals are responsible for costs from admission through 90 days postdischarge. Although bundled episodes for hip fracture will have a separate target price for the bundle, little is known about the 90-day resource use burden for this patient population. Using Medicare 100% Standard Analytic Files (2010-2014), we identified patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty (THA). Patients were aged 65 and older with admitting diagnosis of closed hip fracture, no concurrent fractures of the lower limb, and no history of hip surgery in the prior 12 months baseline. Continuous Medicare-only enrollment was required. Complications, resource use, and mortality from admission through 90 days following discharge (follow-up) were summarized. Four cohorts met selection criteria for analysis: (1) hemiarthroplasty diagnosis-related group (DRG) 469 (N = 19,634), (2) hemiarthroplasty DRG 470 (N = 77,744), (3) THA DRG 469 (N = 1686), and (4) THA DRG 470 (N = 9314). All-cause mortality during the study period was 51.6%, 29.5%, 48.1%, and 24.9% with mean 90-day costs of $28,952, $19,243, $29,763, and $18,561, respectively. Most of the patients waited 1 day from admission to surgery (41%-51%). Incidence of an all-cause complication was approximately 70% in each DRG 469 cohort and 14%-16% in each DRG 470 cohort. This study confirms patients with hip fracture are a costly subpopulation. Tailored care pathways to minimize post-acute care resource use are warranted for these patients. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling seasonal variation of hip fracture in Montreal, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, Reza; Ouarda, Taha B M J; Vanasse, Alain; Orzanco, Maria Gabriela; Gosselin, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    The investigation of the association of the climate variables with hip fracture incidences is important in social health issues. This study examined and modeled the seasonal variation of monthly population based hip fracture rate (HFr) time series. The seasonal ARIMA time series modeling approach is used to model monthly HFr incidences time series of female and male patients of the ages 40-74 and 75+ of Montreal, Québec province, Canada, in the period of 1993-2004. The correlation coefficients between meteorological variables such as temperature, snow depth, rainfall depth and day length and HFr are significant. The nonparametric Mann-Kendall test for trend assessment and the nonparametric Levene's test and Wilcoxon's test for checking the difference of HFr before and after change point are also used. The seasonality in HFr indicated sharp difference between winter and summer time. The trend assessment showed decreasing trends in HFr of female and male groups. The nonparametric test also indicated a significant change of the mean HFr. A seasonal ARIMA model was applied for HFr time series without trend and a time trend ARIMA model (TT-ARIMA) was developed and fitted to HFr time series with a significant trend. The multi criteria evaluation showed the adequacy of SARIMA and TT-ARIMA models for modeling seasonal hip fracture time series with and without significant trend. In the time series analysis of HFr of the Montreal region, the effects of the seasonal variation of climate variables on hip fracture are clear. The Seasonal ARIMA model is useful for modeling HFr time series without trend. However, for time series with significant trend, the TT-ARIMA model should be applied for modeling HFr time series. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Current trends and future projections of hip fracture in South Korea using nationwide claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Y-C; Kim, T-Y; Lee, A; Lee, Y-K; Kim, H-Y; Kim, J-H; Park, C-M; Jang, S

    2016-08-01

    Incidence of hip fracture increased in Korean populations over age 50 between 2008 and 2012, and the number of fractures was predicted to increase by 1.4 times by 2025. This is important information for public health planning. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the trends in the incidence and mortality of hip fracture between 2008 and 2012 and predict the number of hip fractures in Korea through 2025 using nationwide claims data. The data managed by the National Health Insurance Service were used to identify the hip fractures in patients aged >50 years between 2008 and 2012. Projections of hip fractures were conducted using the Poisson distribution from 2016 to 2025 in Korea. The incidence of hip fractures (per 100,000) increased by 14.1 % over the 5 years of the study, by 15.8 % in women and 10.9 % in men; the older age group showed a steep rise and shift in the incidence from 2008 to 2012. The cumulative mortality rates at 1 year after hip fractures were 17.2 % (3575/20,849) in 2008 and 16.0 % (4547/28,426) in 2012. Overall standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for hip fracture were higher in men (11.93) than in women (11.22) and were higher than those in the general population in all age groups. In 2016, the total number of hip fractures was estimated to increase an overall of 1.4 times by 2025. The incidence of hip fracture continues to increase, and the related mortality is still high, although it has decreased over time. The socioeconomic burden of hip fracture is expected to increase in Korea along with the increased estimated number of fractures. Nationwide strategies should include attempts to reduce the future socioeconomic burdens of hip fractures.

  4. Sepsis Within 30 Days of Geriatric Hip Fracture Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Daniel D; Iantorno, Stephanie E; Saltzman, Bryan M; Tetreault, Matthew W; Darrith, Brian; Della Valle, Craig J

    2017-10-01

    Sepsis after hip fracture typically develops from one of the 3 potential infectious sources: urinary tract infection (UTI), pneumonia, and surgical site infection (SSI). The purpose of this investigation is to determine (1) the proportion of cases of sepsis that arises from each of these potential infectious sources; (2) baseline risk factors for developing each of the potential infectious sources; and (3) baseline risk factors for developing sepsis. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was searched for geriatric patients (aged >65 years) who underwent surgery for hip fracture during 2005-2013. Patients subsequently diagnosed with sepsis were categorized according to concomitant diagnosis with UTI, SSI, and/or pneumonia. Multivariate regression was used to test for associations while adjusting for baseline characteristics. Among the 466 patients who developed sepsis (2.4% of all patients), 157 (33.7%) also had a UTI, 135 (29.0%) also had pneumonia, and 36 (7.7%) also had SSI. The rate of sepsis was elevated in patients who developed UTI (13.0% vs 1.7%; P sepsis (21.0% vs 3.8%; P Sepsis occurs in about 1 in 40 patients after geriatric hip fracture surgery. Of these septic cases, 1 in 3 is associated with UTI, 1 in 3 with pneumonia, and 1 in 15 with SSI. The cause of sepsis is often unknown on clinical diagnosis, and this distribution of potential infectious sources allows clinicians for direct identification and treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of DXA-Based Structural Engineering Models of the Proximal Femur to Discriminate Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lang; Peel, Nicola; Clowes, Jackie A; McCloskey, Eugene V; Eastell, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Several DXA-based structural engineering models (SEMs) of the proximal femur have been developed to estimate stress caused by sideway falls. Their usefulness in discriminating hip fracture has not yet been established and we therefore evaluated these models. The hip DXA scans of 51 postmenopausal women with hip fracture (30 femoral neck, 17 trochanteric, and 4 unspecified) and 153 age-, height-, and weight-matched controls were reanalyzed using a special version of Hologic’s software that produced a pixel-by-pixel BMD map. For each map, a curved-beam, a curved composite-beam, and a finite element model were generated to calculate stress within the bone when falling sideways. An index of fracture risk (IFR) was defined over the femoral neck, trochanter, and total hip as the stress divided by the yield stress at each pixel and averaged over the regions of interest. Hip structure analysis (HSA) was also performed using Hologic APEX analysis software. Hip BMD and almost all parameters derived from HSA and SEM were discriminators of hip fracture on their own because their ORs were significantly >1. Because of the high correlation of total hip BMD to HSA and SEM-derived parameters, only the bone width discriminated hip fracture independently from total hip BMD. Judged by the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve, the trochanteric IFR derived from the finite element model was significant better than total hip BMD alone and similar to the total hip BMD plus bone width in discriminating all hip fracture and femoral neck fracture. No index was better than total hip BMD for discriminating trochanteric fractures. In conclusion, the finite element model has the potential to replace hip BMD in discriminating hip fractures. PMID:18767924

  6. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss in patients with extracapsular fractures of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tengberg, P T; Foss, N B; Palm, H

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: We chose unstable extra-capsular hip fractures as our study group because these types of fractures suffer the largest blood loss. We hypothesised that tranexamic acid (TXA) would reduce total blood loss (TBL) in extra-capsular fractures of the hip. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A single...

  7. High reliability of an algorithm for choice of implants in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Posner, Eva; Ahler-Toftehøj, Hans-Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Hip fracture treatment is controversial, with high complication rates. An algorithm for hip fracture surgery has shown reduced reoperation rates, but choice of implant is based on the commonly used fracture classifications, which were previously evaluated to be unreliable. The purpose of this study...

  8. Dementia and delirium, the outcomes in elderly hip fracture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosk CA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Christina A Mosk,1 Marnix Mus,1 Jos PAM Vroemen,1 Tjeerd van der Ploeg,2 Dagmar I Vos,1 Leon HGJ Elmans,3 Lijckle van der Laan1 1Department of Surgery, Amphia Hospital, Breda, 2Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC–University Medical Center, Rotterdam, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Amphia Hospital, Breda, the Netherlands Background: Delirium in hip fractured patients is a frequent complication. Dementia is an important risk factor for delirium and is common in frail elderly. This study aimed to extend the previous knowledge on risk factors for delirium and the consequences. Special attention was given to patients with dementia and delirium.Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study performed in the Amphia Hospital, Breda, the Netherlands. A full electronic patient file system (Hyperspace Version IU4: Epic, Inc., Verona, WI, USA was used to assess data between January 2014 and September 2015. All patients presented were aged ≥70 years with a hip fracture, who underwent surgery with osteosynthesis or arthroplasty. Patients were excluded in case of a pathological or a periprosthetic hip fracture, multiple traumatic injuries, and high-energy trauma. Patient and surgical characteristics were documented. Postoperative outcomes were noted. Delirium was screened using Delirium Observation Screening Scale and dementia was assessed from medical notes.Results: Of a total of 566 included patients, 75% were females. The median age was 84 years (interquartile range: 9. Delirium was observed in 35%. Significant risk factors for delirium were a high American Society of Anesthesiology score, delirium in medical history, functional dependency, preoperative institutionalization, low hemoglobin level, and high amount of blood transfusion. Delirium was correlated with a longer hospital stay (P=0.001, increased association with complications (P<0.001, institutionalization (P<0.001, and 6-month mortality (P<0.001. Patients with dementia (N=168 had a

  9. Older peoples' lived experiences after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    to the fracture; and for planning the data-analysis through 5-steps of meaning condensation. Conclusion Older people´s lived experiences of being active after HF are being explored and results are transferred to professionals aiming at evidence utilization to develop interventions that empathically...... by the philosophies of Heidegger and Gadamer to explore older people´s lived experiences through repeated interviews; and applying an existential framework of wellbeing where meaning and health can be understood as a balancing of mobility and dwelling. Results The systematic review reveals older peoples´ worries when...... striving for wellbeing in an active daily life after HF; steering-group meetings clarify clinical questions regarding functional ability after HF. This knowledge is the basis for developing the interview guide used when interviewing 13 at-home-living older people with limited functional ability prior...

  10. Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with the occurrence of concomitant upper limb fractures in older women who sustain a fall-related fracture of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Monaco, Marco; Vallero, Fulvia; Castiglioni, Carlotta; Di Monaco, Roberto; Tappero, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the association between serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the occurrence of simultaneous fractures of the upper limb in older women who sustain a fall-related fracture of the hip. Cross-sectional study. We investigated 472 of 480 white women consecutively admitted to a rehabilitation hospital because of a fall-related hip fracture. Twenty-seven (5.7%) of the 472 women sustained a concomitant upper-limb fracture of either distal radius (20 women) or proximal humerus (seven women). We assessed serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 14.2 ± 4.1 (mean ± SD) days after surgical repair of the hip fracture in the 472 women by an immunoenzymatic assay. Twenty-five-hydroxyvitamin D levels were significantly lower in the 27 women with concomitant fractures of both hip and upper limb than in the remaining 445 hip-fracture women: mean ± SD values were 6.5 ± 5.0 ng/ml and 11.7 ± 10.4 ng/ml respectively in the two groups (mean difference between groups 5.2 ng/ml: 95% CI 1.2-9.2; p=0.011). Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were significantly associated with concomitant fractures of the upper limb (p=0.017), after adjustment for eight potential confounders including age, height, weight, hip-fracture type, cognitive impairment, neurologic impairment, previous hip fracture, and previous upper-limb fracture. Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were significantly associated with concomitant upper-limb fractures in our sample of older women with a fall-related fracture of the hip. Preventing vitamin D deficiency may lower the incidence of simultaneous fractures due to a singe fall in elderly women. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors for cervical and trochanteric hip fractures in elderly women: a population-based 10-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Heikki; Pulkkinen, Pasi; Korpelainen, Juha; Heikkinen, Jorma; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Jämsä, Timo; Korpelainen, Raija

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated the contribution of lifestyle-related factors, calcaneal ultrasound, and radial bone mineral density (BMD) to cervical and trochanteric hip fractures in elderly women in a 10-year population-based cohort study. The study population consisted of 1,681 women (age range 70-73 years). Seventy-two percent (n = 1,222) of them participated in the baseline measurements. Calcaneal ultrasound was assessed with a quantitative ultrasound device. BMD measurements were performed at the distal and ultradistal radius by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Forward stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to find the most predictive variables for hip fracture risk. During the follow-up, 53 of the women had hip fractures, including 32 cervical and 21 trochanteric ones. The fractured women were taller and thinner and had lower calcaneal ultrasound values than those without fractures. High body mass index (BMI) was a protective factor against any hip fractures, while low functional mobility was a risk factor of hip fractures. Specifically, high BMI protected against cervical hip fractures, while low physical activity was a significant predictor of these fractures. Similarly, high BMI protected against trochanteric fractures, whereas low functional mobility and high coffee consumption were significant predictors of trochanteric fractures. Cervical and trochanteric hip fractures seem to have different risk factors. Therefore, fracture type should be taken into account in clinical fracture risk assessment and preventative efforts, including patient counseling. However, the study is not conclusive due to the limited number of observed fractures during follow-up, and the results have to be confirmed in future studies.

  12. The association between ankylosing spondylitis and the risk of any, hip, or vertebral fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Li, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Guo-Sheng; Tao, Jin-Hui; Chen, Zhu; Ma, Yan; Li, Xiang-Pei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory rheumatic disease and strongly associated with an increased risk of fractures. A great proportion of patients with AS are suffering from sustaining fractures and the aim of this study is to evaluate and quantify the association between the site of the fracture and AS by performing a meta-analysis. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed on Medline database from 1966 to August 15, 2016 and Embase database from 1980 to August 15, 2016. Studies were evaluated by 2 independent reviewers and quantitative estimates regarding the association between ankylosing spondylitis and the risk of any, hip, or vertebral fracture were presented. After the heterogeneity of selected studies was assessed by using Cochran I2 statistics, the random effect model was used to combine effect size. Publication bias was measured by Egger and Begg's regression tests. Results: A total of 6 articles were involved in our study. The results of meta-analysis revealed that AS was strongly associated with the risk of vertebral fracture (odds ratio [OR] = 4.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07–7.42) and was not significantly associated with the risk of any fracture (OR=2.00, 95%CI = 0.94–3.06) or hip fracture (OR=1.28, 95%CI =0.16–2.40). Conclusion: In the present study, a general knowledge of the association between AS and the risk of 3 kinds of fractures were presented, which could improve the ways of prevention of fracture in the patients with AS. PMID:29390254

  13. Recent hip fracture trends in Sweden and Denmark with age-period-cohort effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengren, B E; Björk, J; Cooper, C

    2017-01-01

    born thereafter however seem to have a higher hip fracture risk, and we expect a reversal of the present decline in rates, with increasing hip fracture rates in both Denmark and Sweden during the upcoming decade. CONCLUSIONS: Time trends, cohort, and period effects were different in SE and DK. This may......This study used nationwide hip fracture data from Denmark and Sweden during 1987-2010 to examine effects of (birth) cohort and period. We found that time trends, cohort, and period effects were different in the two countries. Results also indicated that hip fracture rates may increase in the not so...... far future. INTRODUCTION: The reasons for the downturn in hip fracture rates remain largely unclear but circumstances earlier in life seem important. METHODS: We ascertained hip fractures in the populations ≥50 years in Denmark and Sweden in national discharge registers. Country- and sex-specific age...

  14. Anabolic steroids for rehabilitation after hip fracture in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaqas Farooqi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Hip fracture occurs predominantly in older people, many of whom are frail and undernourished. After hip fracture surgery and rehabilitation, most patients experience a decline in mobility and function. Anabolic steroids, the synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone, have been used in combination with exercise to improve muscle mass and strength in athletes. They may have similar effects in older people who are recovering from hip fracture. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects (primarily in terms of functional outcome and adverse events of anabolic steroids after surgical treatment of hip fracture in older people. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialized Register (10 September 2013, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, 2013 Issue 8, MEDLINE (1946 to August Week 4 2013, EMBASE (1974 to 2013 Week 36, trial registers, conference proceedings, and reference lists of relevant articles. The search was run in September 2013. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials of anabolic steroids given after hip fracture surgery, in inpatient or outpatient settings, to improve physical functioning in older patients with hip fracture. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently selected trials (based on predefined inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed each study's risk of bias. A third review author moderated disagreements. Only very limited pooling of data was possible. The primary outcomes were function (for example, independence in mobility and activities of daily living and adverse events, including mortality. MAIN RESULTS: We screened 1290 records and found only three trials involving 154 female participants, all of whom were aged above 65 years and had had hip fracture surgery. All studies had methodological shortcomings that placed them at high or unclear risk of bias. Because of this high

  15. Clinical assessment of patients with isolated hip fractures associated with an upper limb fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Álvarez, J; González-Escobar, S; Gil-Garay, E

    2017-11-28

    Some patients with a hip fracture also present a concomitant upper limb fracture. We want to know whether these patients have a worse functional level and whether they have any differences in various clinical parameters compared with patients with an isolated hip fracture. We retrospectively reviewed 1061 discharge reports from the Orthogeriatrics Unit. We collected information on several clinical parameters of the fractures. Subsequently, we performed a statistical analysis of the data by comparing the associated fracture group with the isolated fracture group. We detected 44 patients with associated upper limb fracture, 90.9% were women (40) and the average age was 84.45years. Eighty-one point eight percent of the upper limb fractures were distal radius or proximal humerus. Pertrochanteric fractures were the most common (none of them were subtrochanteric fractures). Surgical delay was 2.60days and the average hospital stay was 12.30days. Sixty-four point three percent were nail surgery and 31% arthroplasty. The mean Barthel index score was 84.88 (P=.021). Fifty-two point 5 percent of the patients in the study group were referred to a functional support unit (P=.03). The in-hospital mortality rate was 4.2%, with no differences between groups. Patients with an associated fracture have a higher previous functional capacity and they are more independent. Nevertheless, after the fracture they need more help from the healthcare system for optimal functional recovery. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel technique for reducing intertrochanteric hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePalma, Anthony Andrés R; O'Halloran, Kevin; Shenoy, Kartik; Gruson, Konrad I; Sharan, Alok D

    2014-09-01

    Intertrochanteric hip fractures typically become deformed by the muscular and gravitational forces acting on the 2 main bony fragments. Traditional use of a fracture table for anatomical reduction normally corrects for the varus angulation, external rotation, and posterior sag that can occur, but, in select unstable and comminuted fractures, reduction may not be possible because of posterior sag and external rotation of the proximal fragment. These aspects of malreduction have been addressed in multiple ways, including use of unscrubbed assistants, crutches, internal rotation of the distal fragment by internal rotation of the foot, bumps and pads, and even intraoperative techniques. However, these techniques tend to adjust only 1 aspect of malreduction and may require intraoperative adjustment. In this article, we describe a novel surgical device, the pneumatic patient positioner, that can be used to address these deformities without the need for intraoperative adjustment.

  17. Association between timing of zoledronic acid infusion and hip fracture healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colón-Emeric, C; Nordsletten, L; Olson, S

    2011-01-01

    evident effect on fracture healing, even when the drug is infused in the immediate postoperative period. INTRODUCTION: Intravenous zoledronic acid 5 mg (ZOL) given after a hip fracture reduces secondary fracture rates and mortality. It has been postulated that bisphosphonates may affect healing if given...... soon after a fracture. We sought to determine whether the timing of ZOL infusion affected the risk of delayed hip fracture healing. METHODS: In the HORIZON Recurrent Fracture Trial, patients were randomized within 90 days of a low-trauma hip fracture to receive either once-yearly ZOL (n = 1...... = 0.44). There was no interaction by timing of infusion, and nonunion rates were similar even when ZOL was given within 2 weeks of hip fracture repair. NSAID use was significantly associated with delayed fracture healing (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.49-4.39; p 

  18. Association between timing of zoledronic acid infusion and hip fracture healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colón-Emeric, C; Nordsletten, L; Olson, S

    2010-01-01

    evident effect on fracture healing, even when the drug is infused in the immediate postoperative period. INTRODUCTION: Intravenous zoledronic acid 5 mg (ZOL) given after a hip fracture reduces secondary fracture rates and mortality. It has been postulated that bisphosphonates may affect healing if given...... soon after a fracture. We sought to determine whether the timing of ZOL infusion affected the risk of delayed hip fracture healing. METHODS: In the HORIZON Recurrent Fracture Trial, patients were randomized within 90 days of a low-trauma hip fracture to receive either once-yearly ZOL (n¿=¿1......¿=¿0.44). There was no interaction by timing of infusion, and nonunion rates were similar even when ZOL was given within 2 weeks of hip fracture repair. NSAID use was significantly associated with delayed fracture healing (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.49-4.39; p¿

  19. Zoledronic Acid in Reducing Clinical Fracture and Mortality after Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, Kenneth W; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Magaziner, Jay S

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality is increased after a hip fracture, and strategies that improve outcomes are needed. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 1065 patients were assigned to receive yearly intravenous zoledronic acid (at a dose of 5 mg), and 1062 patients were assi...

  20. Displaced subcapital fracture of the hip in transient osteoporosis of pregnancy : A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Fokter, S. K.; Vengust, V.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a case of displaced subcapital fracture of the hip in a woman in the third trimester of her first pregnancy. A pathological fracture occurred in a previously painful hip, and radiographs showed pronounced osteopenia of the femoral head and neck. Closed reduction and internal fixation was carried out 2 weeks after delivery when the osteopenia was still severe. Healing of the fracture followed with recovery of hip movements.

  1. Feasibility of Progressive Strength Training Implemented in the Acute Ward after Hip Fracture Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Lise; Bandholm, Thomas; Palm, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    sample of 36 patients, 18 with a cervical and 18 with a trochanteric hip fracture (27 women and 9 men, mean (SD) age of 79.4 (8.3) years) were included between June and December 2012. INTERVENTION: A daily (on weekdays) program of progressive knee-extension strength training for the fractured limb, using......IMPORTANCE: Patients with a hip fracture lose more than 50% knee-extension strength in the fractured limb within one week of surgery. Hence, immediate progressive strength training following hip fracture surgery may be rational, but the feasibility unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility...... of in-hospital progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward following hip fracture surgery, based on pre-specified criteria for feasibility. DESIGN, SETTING AND PATIENTS: A prospective cohort study conducted in an acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. A consecutive...

  2. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs and the risk of hip fracture: a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiropoulos, Ioannis; Andersen, Morten; Nymark, Tine

    2008-01-01

    with a hip fracture during the period 1996-2004. Controls (n = 27,575) were frequency matched by age and gender. Information on use of AEDs, other drugs, and hospital contacts was available from local registers. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for hip fracture were estimated......PURPOSE: To investigate whether the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) increases the risk of hip fracture. METHODS: We performed a case-control study using data from the Funen County (population 2004: 475,000) hip fracture register. Cases (n = 7,557) were all patients admitted to county hospitals...

  3. The orthogeriatrics model of care: systematic review of predictors of institutionalization and mortality in post-hip fracture patients and evidence for interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Reig, Marta; Ahmad, Laura; Duque, Gustavo

    2012-11-01

    Hip fracture is a common serious complication of osteoporosis, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In nursing home residents, incidence rates of hip fractures are at least twice to three times higher than in community-dwellers of the same age and sex. Older adults with hip fracture have a 5- to 8-fold increased risk for all-cause mortality and much higher risk of institutionalization. Therefore, interventions to prevent institutionalization, prevent a second fracture in institutionalized patients, and decrease mortality after a hip fracture are highly needed. The orthogeriatrics model of care is a shared-care approach to patients after suffering a hip fracture. This program, which has been studied in models run by geriatricians with the assistance of a multidisciplinary team, includes a comprehensive medical and nursing admission assessment focusing on the patient's premorbid function, cognition, comorbidities, and risks is followed by a comprehensive care plan design. This systematic review describes and analyzes the interrelation between hip fracture and nursing home placement taking into consideration those evidence-based interventions to prevent later complications and future institutionalization. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Study of Hip Fracture Risk using Tree Structured Survival Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Y

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In dieser Studie wird das Hüftfraktur-Risiko bei postmenopausalen Frauen untersucht, indem die Frauen in verschiedene Subgruppen hinsichtlich dieses Risikos klassifiziert werden. Frauen in einer gemeinsamen Subgruppe haben ein ähnliches Risiko, hingegen in verschiedenen Subgruppen ein unterschiedliches Hüftfraktur-Risiko. Die Subgruppen wurden mittels der Tree Structured Survival Analysis (TSSA aus den Daten von 7.665 Frauen der SOF (Study of Osteoporosis Fracture ermittelt. Bei allen Studienteilnehmerinnen wurde die Knochenmineraldichte (BMD von Unterarm, Oberschenkelhals, Hüfte und Wirbelsäule gemessen. Die Zeit von der BMD-Messung bis zur Hüftfraktur wurde als Endpunkt notiert. Eine Stichprobe von 75% der Teilnehmerinnen wurde verwendet, um die prognostischen Subgruppen zu bilden (Trainings-Datensatz, während die anderen 25% als Bestätigung der Ergebnisse diente (Validierungs-Datensatz. Aufgrund des Trainings-Datensatzes konnten mittels TSSA 4 Subgruppen identifiziert werden, deren Hüftfraktur-Risiko bei einem Follow-up von im Mittel 6,5 Jahren bei 19%, 9%, 4% und 1% lag. Die Einteilung in die Subgruppen erfolgte aufgrund der Bewertung der BMD des Ward'schen Dreiecks sowie des Oberschenkelhalses und nach dem Alter. Diese Ergebnisse konnten mittels des Validierungs-Datensatzes reproduziert werden, was die Sinnhaftigkeit der Klassifizierungregeln in einem klinischen Setting bestätigte. Mittels TSSA war eine sinnvolle, aussagekräftige und reproduzierbare Identifikation von prognostischen Subgruppen, die auf dem Alter und den BMD-Werten beruhen, möglich. In this paper we studied the risk of hip fracture for post-menopausal women by classifying women into different subgroups based on their risk of hip fracture. The subgroups were generated such that all the women in a particular subgroup had relatively similar risk while women belonging to two different subgroups had rather different risks of hip fracture. We used the Tree Structured

  5. [SURGICAL HIP DISLOCATION APPROACH FOR TREATMENT OF FEMORAL HEAD FRACTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanfeng; Liu, Youwen; Zhu, Yingjie; Li, Jianming; Li, Wuyin; Li, Qiyi; Jia, Yudong

    2015-11-01

    To discuss the value of surgical hip dislocation approach in the treatment of femoral head fracture. A retrospectively analysis was made on the clinical data of 15 patients with femoral head fractures treated through surgical hip dislocation approach between January 2010 and February 2013. There were 11 men and 4 women with an average age of 30.8 years (range, 15-63 years). The causes included traffic accident injury in 9 cases, falling injury from height in 5 cases, and sports injury in 1 case. According to Pipkin typing, 2 cases were rated as type I, 7 cases as type II, 1 case as type III, and 5 cases as type IV. The interval of injury and operation was 2-10 days (mean, 4.1 days). Reduction was performed in 10 patients within 6 hours after injury, and then bone traction was given for 4-6 weeks except 5 patients who received reduction in the other hospital. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients after surgery without complications of dislocation and lower limbs deep venous thrombosis. The mean follow-up time was 29.9 months (range, 25-36 months). During follow-up, there was no infection, breakage of internal fixation, or nonunion of femoral greater trochanter fracture. In 3 patients having necrosis of the femoral head, 2 had no obvious symptoms [staging as IIa and IIb respectively according to Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) staging system], and 1 (stage IIIb) had nonunion of the femoral neck fracture, who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA). In 4 patients having myositis ossificans (2 cases of grade I, 1 case of grade II, and 1 case of grade III based on Brooker grading), no treatment was given in 3 cases and the focus was removed during THA in 1 case. According to the Thompson-Epstein scale at last follow-up, the results were excellent in 9 cases, good in 3 cases, fair in 1 case, and poor in 2 cases, and the excellent and good rate was 80%. Surgical hip dislocation approach can not only protect the residual vessels of the

  6. Pathogenesis of and management strategies for postoperative delirium after hip fracture: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, Martin; Foss, Nicolai; Kristensen, Billy Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative delirium is a frequent and serious complication in elderly patients following operation for hip fracture, leading to an increased risk of complications. The pathophysiological mechanisms are unresolved, but probably multifactorial. The purpose of this review is to summar......BACKGROUND: Postoperative delirium is a frequent and serious complication in elderly patients following operation for hip fracture, leading to an increased risk of complications. The pathophysiological mechanisms are unresolved, but probably multifactorial. The purpose of this review...... is to summarize current knowledge about the pathogenesis of postoperative delirium with a view to finding strategies for prevention and management. METHOD: We conducted an Internet search through the Medline database (1966-March 2003) and supplemented it with a manual search. We included 12 studies which...... specifically discussed pathogenic factors or interventions against postoperative delirium following operation for hip fracture. RESULTS: 1,823 patients were included with an average incidence of delirium of 35%. We concentrated on pre-, intra-, and postoperative risk factors. Only advanced age and dementia met...

  7. Pre-operative echocardiogram in hip fracture patients with cardiac murmur- an audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talkhani Imtiyaz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All hip fracture patients with a cardiac murmur have an echocardiogram as a part of their preoperative work-up in our unit. We performed a retrospective audit to assess the impact of obtaining a pre-operative echocardiogram on the management of hip fracture patients. Methods All hip fracture patients (N = 349 between 01/06/08 and 01/06/09 were included in the study. 29 patients had pre-operative echocardiogram (echo group. A computer generated randomised sample of 40 patients was generated from N, 'non-echo' group. Data was obtained from medical records and the Hospital Information Support System (HISS. The groups were compared using Student's t test. Approval was obtained locally from the clinical governance department for this project. Results Age and gender distribution were similar in both groups. Indication for echo was an acute cardiac abnormality in 4 cases. 25 patients had echo for no new cardiac problem (indication being cardiac murmur in 23 patients and extensive cardiac history in 2 cases. Cardiology opinion was sought in 5 cases. No patient required cardiac surgery or balloon angioplasty preoperatively. Patients having pre-operative echo had significant delay to surgery (average 2.7 days, range 0-6 days compared to 'non-echo' group (average 1.1 days, range 0-3 days, (p Conclusion We have developed departmental guidelines for expediting echo requests in hip fracture patients with cardiac murmur. A liaison has been established with our cardiology department to prioritise such patients on the Echocardiography waiting list, to prevent unnecessary avoidable delay. Careful patient selection for pre-operative echocardiography is important to avoid unnecessary delay to surgery.

  8. Affective functioning after delirium in elderly hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slor, Chantal J; Witlox, Joost; Jansen, René W M M; Adamis, Dimitrios; Meagher, David J; Tieken, Esther; Houdijk, Alexander P J; van Gool, Willem A; Eikelenboom, Piet; de Jonghe, Jos F M

    2013-03-01

    Delirium in elderly patients is associated with various long-term sequelae that include cognitive impairment and affective disturbances, although the latter is understudied. For a prospective cohort study of elderly patients undergoing hip fracture surgery, baseline characteristics and affective and cognitive functioning were assessed preoperatively. During hospital admission, presence of delirium was assessed daily. Three months after hospital discharge, affective and global cognitive functioning was evaluated again in patients free from delirium at the time of this follow-up. This study compared baseline characteristics and affective functioning between patients with and without in-hospital delirium. We investigated whether in-hospital delirium is associated with increased anxiety and depressive levels, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms three months after discharge. Among 53 eligible patients, 23 (43.4%) patients experienced in-hospital delirium after hip fracture repair. Patients who had experienced in-hospital delirium showed more depressive symptoms at follow-up after three months compared to the 30 patients without in-hospital delirium. This association persisted in a multivariate model controlling for age, baseline cognition, baseline depressive symptoms, and living situation. The level of anxiety and symptoms of PTSD at follow-up did not differ between both groups. This study suggests that in-hospital delirium is associated with an increased burden of depressive symptoms three months after discharge in elderly patients who were admitted to the hospital for surgical repair of hip fracture. Symptoms of depression in patients with previous in-hospital delirium cannot be fully explained by persistent (sub)syndromal delirium or baseline cognitive impairment.

  9. Orthogeriatric Service Reduces Mortality in Patients With Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenqvist, Charlotte; Madsen, Christian Medom; Riis, Troels

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Orthogeriatric service has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with hip fracture. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of orthogeriatrics at Bispebjerg University Hospital, Denmark. The primary outcome is mortality inhospital and after 1, 3, and 12 months...... homes had no significant decreasing mortality at any point of time in the univariate analysis. CONCLUSION: We have shown significant decreases for inhospital, 30 day, 90 day, and 1-year mortality after implementation of orthogeriatric service at Bispebjerg Hospital when adjusting for age, gender...

  10. Anabolic steroids for rehabilitation after hip fracture in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Vaqas; Berg, Maayken E L van den; Cameron, Ian D; Crotty, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Hip fracture occurs predominantly in older people, many of whom are frail and undernourished. After hip fracture surgery and rehabilitation, most patients experience a decline in mobility and function. Anabolic steroids, the synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone, have been used in combination with exercise to improve muscle mass and strength in athletes. They may have similar effects in older people who are recovering from hip fracture. To examine the effects (primarily in terms of functional outcome and adverse events) of anabolic steroids after surgical treatment of hip fracture in older people. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialized Register (10 September 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2013 Issue 8), MEDLINE (1946 to August Week 4 2013), EMBASE (1974 to 2013 Week 36), trial registers, conference proceedings, and reference lists of relevant articles. The search was run in September 2013.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials of anabolic steroids given after hip fracture surgery, in inpatient or outpatient settings, to improve physical functioning in older patients with hip fracture.Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently selected trials (based on predefined inclusion criteria), extracted data and assessed each study's risk of bias. A third review author moderated disagreements. Only very limited pooling of data was possible. The primary outcomes were function (for example, independence in mobility and activities of daily living) and adverse events, including mortality. We screened 1290 records and found only three trials involving 154 female participants, all of whom were aged above 65 years and had had hip fracture surgery. All studies had methodological shortcomings that placed them at high or unclear risk of bias. Because of this high risk of bias, imprecise results and likelihood of publication bias

  11. Fascia iliaca compartment blockade for acute pain control in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai B; Kristensen, Billy B; Bundgaard, Morten

    2007-01-01

    Hip fracture patients are in severe pain upon arrival at the emergency department. Pain treatment is traditionally based on systemic opioids. No study has examined the effect of fascia iliaca compartment blockade (FICB) in acute hip fracture pain management within a double-blind, randomized setup....

  12. Preoperative factors associated with red blood cell transfusion in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Medom; Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl; Norgaard, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a frequently used treatment in patients admitted with a fractured hip, but the use remains an area of much debate. The aim of this study was to determine preoperative factors associated with the risk of receiving a red blood cell transfusion in hip fracture...

  13. Predictors of long term mortality in older people with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Martín-Martín, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine one year mortality and predisposing factors in older people who had surgery after a hip fracture. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Public acute hospital, trauma service. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 281 patients, 65 years or older, admitted with a hip fracture within...

  14. Do clinical characteristics and outcome in nonagenarians with a hip fracture differ from younger patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vochteloo, Anne J.H.; Borger van der Burg, Boudewijn L.S.; Tuinebreijer, Wim E.; de Vries, Mark R.; Niggebrugge, Arthur H.P.; Bloem, Rolf M.; Maier, Andrea B.; Nelissen, Rob G.H.H.; Pilot, Peter

    Aim: To compare clinical characteristics and outcome of nonagenarian hip fracture patients with younger patients aged 65-89years. Methods: This was a cohort follow-up study of admissions for a hip fracture between 2005-2010 (mean follow up of 3.5years) in two teaching hospitals in the Netherlands;

  15. Effect of oral taurine on morbidity and mortality in elderly hip fracture patients: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stijn, Mireille F. M.; Bruins, Arnoud A.; Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Witlox, Joost; Teerlink, Tom; Schoorl, Margreet G.; de Bandt, Jean Pascal; Twisk, Jos W. R.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Hip fracture patients represent a large part of the elderly surgical population and face severe postoperative morbidity and excessive mortality compared to adult surgical hip fracture patients. Low antioxidant status and taurine deficiency is common in the elderly, and may negatively affect

  16. High inter-tester reliability of the new mobility score in patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M.T.; Bandholm, T.; Foss, N.B.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the inter-tester reliability of the New Mobility Score in patients with acute hip fracture. DESIGN: An inter-tester reliability study. SUBJECTS: Forty-eight consecutive patients with acute hip fracture at a median age of 84 (interquartile range, 76-89) years; 40 admitted from...

  17. Incidence rates and trends of hip/femur fractures in five European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Requena, G; Abbing-Karahagopian, V; Huerta, C

    2014-01-01

    Hip fractures represent a major public health challenge worldwide. Multinational studies using a common methodology are scarce. We aimed to estimate the incidence rates (IRs) and trends of hip/femur fractures over the period 2003-2009 in five European countries. The study was performed using seve...

  18. Mortality in British hip fracture patients, 2000-2010 : a population-based retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, Corinne; Welsing, Paco M J; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C; Elders, Petra J M; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Leufkens, Hubert G M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075255049; de Vries, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/303546670

    BACKGROUND: Data on recent trends in mortality after hip fracture are scarce. Aims were therefore to examine secular trends in all-cause and cause-specific mortality post hip fracture and to compare this to the general population from 2000 to 2010. METHODS: Population-based cohort study within the

  19. Mortality in British hip fracture patients, 2000-2010: A population-based retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, C.; Welsing, P.M.J.; Cooper, C.; Harvey, N.C.; Elders, P.J.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Leufkens, H.G.M.; de Vries, F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on recent trends in mortality after hip fracture are scarce. Aims were therefore to examine secular trends in all-cause and cause-specific mortality post hip fracture and to compare this to the general population from 2000 to 2010. Methods: Population-based cohort study within the

  20. Ageism perceived by the elderly in Taiwan following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueh-Fang; Liang, Jersey; Shyu, Yea-Ing Lotus

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative, longitudinal study explored the feelings about and responses to discrimination experiences related to perceived ageism of older persons following hip fracture. Five male and six female hip-fractured elderly patients were sampled from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to explore participants' experiences of and responses to ageism-related experiences. Data were collected in face-to-face interviews during home visits at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge from hospital, between June 2007 and December 2008. Textual data of participants' responses were analyzed by directed content analysis. All participants experienced ageism. In first 3 months after discharge, participants' main perceived ageism was positive because of their dependency and feeling overprotected by others. From 3 months to 1 year after discharge, other ageism experiences emerged: isolated because of physical restrictions and neglected. Furthermore, participants' responses were divided into two categories: disregard and tolerance of ageism, or becoming more independent because of ageism. The elderly participants considered that the influences of positive ageism in the early months after discharge reduced their autonomy and deprived them of power. This response to ageism was temporary; over time the participants tried to regain autonomy by overcoming their dependency and improving their physical functioning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ASYMMETRICAL BILATERAL HIP DISLOCATION WITH SEGMENTAL FRACTURE FEMUR: AN UNUSUAL CASE REPORT AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral traumatic hip dislocation is rarely seen. A unique case is presented, consisting of asymmetric bilateral hip dislocation with associated segmental fracture femur, resulting from fall from bus. This case represents an unusual, severe combination of injuries resulting from the fall from bus under influence of alcohol. Traumatic hip dislocation represents a true orthopaedic emergency . Given the severity of associated complications, every effort should be made to ensure pr ompt diagnosis and immediate therapy. We report our experience in the management of this complex injury pattern and review the pertinent literature on this subject. Keywords: Bilateral hip dislocation , Asymmetric hip dislocation , Segmental femur fracture , Closed reduction , Fall from bus .

  2. Delayed cementless total hip arthroplasty for neglected dislocation of hip combined with complex acetabular fracture and deficient bone stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavaskar Ashok S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Total hip arthroplasty (THA for an un-treated acetabular fracture is technically challenging and the long-term result is not so favorable. A 45-year-old fe-male patient with untreated column and comminuted poste-rior wall fracture of the acetabulum was treated in our insti-tution by reconstruction of the posterior wall using iliac strut autograft and plate stabilization of the posterior col-umn with cancellous grafting and cementless THA in a single stage. At 3 years’ follow-up, the patient was independently mobile without limb length discrepancy. Radiological evalu-ation showed well integrated components and bone grafts. No evidence of aseptic loosening or osteolysis was found. This report aims to emphasize that bony acetabular recon-struction allows the use of primary hip components, which improves prosthesis longevity and preserves bone stock for a future revision. Key words: Acetabulum; Fractures, bone; Hip dislocation; Arthroplasty, replacement, hip

  3. Corticosteroid Is Associated with Both Hip Fracture and Fracture-Unrelated Arthropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chen Kao

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate whether and how corticosteroid use was associated with serious hip arthropathy.This population-based cohort study analyzed the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database and screened the one-million random sample from the entire population for eligibility. The steroid cohort consisted of 21,995 individuals who had used systemic corticosteroid for a minimum of 6 months between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2006. They were matched 1:1 in propensity score on the index calendar date with controls who never used steroid. All participants were followed up until occurrence of serious hip arthropathy that required arthroplasty, withdrawal from the national health insurance, or the end of 2011. Surgical indication was classified as fracture-related and -unrelated. The cumulative incidence of hip arthroplasty was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The association with steroid exposure was explored by the Cox proportional hazard model.Cumulative incidences of hip arthroplasty after 12 years of follow-up were 2.96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.73-3.2% and 1.34% (95% CI, 1.2-1.51% in the steroid users and non-users, respectively (P<0.0001. The difference was evident in fracture-related arthroplasty with 1.89% (95% CI, 1.71-2.09% versus 1.10% (95% CI, 0.97-1.25%, but more pronounced in fracture-unrelated surgery, 1.09% (95% CI, 0.95-1.24% versus 0.24% (95% CI, 0.19-0.32%. Multivariate-adjusted Cox regression analysis confirmed steroid use was independently associated with both fracture-related (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.65; 95% CI, 1.43-1.91 and unrelated arthroplasty (adjusted HR, 4.21; 95% CI, 3.2-5.53. Moreover, the risk for fracture-unrelated arthropathy rose with steroid dosage, as the adjusted HR increased from 3.30 (95% CI, 2.44-4.46 in the low-dose subgroup, 4.54 (95% CI, 3.05-6.77 in intermediate-dose users, to 6.54 (95% CI, 4.74-9.02 in the high-dose counterpart (Ptrend<0.0001.Corticosteroid use is

  4. Hip Surgery Candidates: A Comparative Study of Hip Osteoarthritis and Prior Hip Fracture Patient Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess similarities and differences in patient-related characteristics before and after surgery for painful disabling hip osteoarthritis among elderly subgroups with and without a trauma history. Method: First, a cohort of 1000 hospitalized patients were assessed for trends in: perceived duration of the condition, pain intensity, functional performance ability, walking distance, body mass, and comorbidity characteristics among other factors. Then, the most salient of these patient-rel...

  5. Education, marital status, and risk of hip fractures in older men and women: the CHANCES project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, V; Orfanos, P; Feskanich, D; Michaëlsson, K; Pettersson-Kymmer, U; Ahmed, L A; Peasey, A; Wolk, A; Brenner, H; Bobak, M; Wilsgaard, T; Schöttker, B; Saum, K-U; Bellavia, A; Grodstein, F; Klinaki, E; Valanou, E; Papatesta, E-M; Boffetta, P; Trichopoulou, A

    2015-06-01

    The role of socioeconomic status in hip fracture incidence is unclear. In a diverse population of elderly, higher education was found to be associated with lower, whereas living alone, compared to being married/cohabiting, with higher hip fracture risk. Educational level and marital status may contribute to hip fracture risk. The evidence on the association between socioeconomic status and hip fracture incidence is limited and inconsistent. We investigated the potential association of education and marital status with hip fracture incidence in older individuals from Europe and USA. A total of 155,940 participants (79 % women) aged 60 years and older from seven cohorts were followed up accumulating 6456 incident hip fractures. Information on education and marital status was harmonized across cohorts. Hip fractures were ascertained through telephone interviews/questionnaires or through record linkage with registries. Associations were assessed through Cox proportional hazard regression adjusting for several factors. Summary estimates were derived using random effects models. Individuals with higher education, compared to those with low education, had lower hip fracture risk [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.84, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.72-0.95]. Respective HRs were 0.97 (95 % CI 0.82-1.13) for men and 0.75 (95 % CI 0.65-0.85) for women. Overall, individuals living alone, especially those aged 60-69 years, compared to those being married/cohabiting, tended to have a higher hip fracture risk (HR = 1.12, 95 % CI 1.02-1.22). There was no suggestion for heterogeneity across cohorts (P heterogeneity > 0.05). The combined data from >150,000 individuals 60 years and older suggest that higher education may contribute to lower hip fracture risk. Furthermore, this risk may be higher among individuals living alone, especially among the age group 60-69 years, when compared to those being married/cohabiting.

  6. Fascia iliaca block for pain control in hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillón, P; Veloso, M; Gómez, O; Salvador, J; Bartra, A; Anglés, F

    Pain treatment for patients with hip fracture has been based on the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories and opioid derived drugs. These medications have been associated with multiple adverse effects. Fascia iliaca block is a recent pain management alternative for these patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fascia iliaca block performed in the emergency room (ER) for patients over 65years of age with hip fracture. A cohort of 216 patients, from January to December 2016, was studied prospectively. Analyzed variables were: pain upon arrival at ER, pain after fascia iliaca block, need for rescue medication, protocol compliance, delay in analgesia administration and delay for surgery. Differences between visual analogue scale (VAS), before and after the fascia iliaca block, were statistically significant (P<.001). Pre-block VAS recorded was 6.16 (SD=2.82). The mean VAS reduction after the block was 2.99 (95%CI: 2.45-3.53%). Twenty-six percent of patients required morphine as rescue medication in the first 8hours after diagnosis. Compliance with protocol administration was of 84%. Fascia iliaca block was performed in a mean time of 16minutes (SD=10.33) after diagnosis. The median delay for surgery was 1 day (RIQ 25-75%: 1-2). Fascia iliaca block is a reproducible, safe and effective technique for pain management. It is a keystone in pain treatment for patients with a proximal femur fracture at our institution. Other objectives in our pain management protocol include early analgesia administration and reduction of time to surgery. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Outcomes of osteoporotic trochanteric fractures treated with cement-augmented dynamic hip screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dynamic hip screw (DHS has been the standard treatment for stable trochanteric fracture patterns, but complications of lag screw cut out from a superior aspect, due to inadequate bone anchorage, occur frequently in elderly osteoporotic patients. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA has been used as an augmentation tool to facilitate fixation stability in cadaveric femora for biomechanical studies and in pathological fractures. However, there are very few reports on the utilization of PMMA cement to prevent these complications in fresh intertrochanteric fractures. A prospective study was conducted to evaluate the outcome and efficacy of PMMA augmented DHS in elderly osteoporotic patients with intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: The study included 64 patients (AO type31-A2.1 in eight, A2.2 in 29, A2.3 in 17 patients, and 31-A3.1 in five, A3.2 in three, and A3.3 in two patients with an average age of 72 years (60 − 94 years of which 60 were available for final followup. PMMA augmentation of DHS was performed in all cases by injecting PMMA cement into the femoral head with a custommade gun designed by the authors. The clinical outcome was rated as per the Salvati and Wilson scoring system at the time of final followup of one year. Results were graded as excellent (score > 31, good (score 24 − 31, fair (score 16 − 23, and poor (score < 16. Results: Fracture united in all patients and the average time to union was 13.8 weeks (range 12 − 16 weeks. At an average followup of 18 months (range 12 − 24 months, no incidence of varus collapse or superior screw cut out was observed in any of the patients in spite of weightbearing ambulation from the early postoperative period. There was no incidence of avascular necrosis (AVN or cement penetration into the joint in our series. Most of the patients were able to regain their prefracture mobility status with a mean hip pain score of 8.6. Conclusion: Cement augmentation of DHS appears

  8. Postural balance and self-reported balance confidence in older adults with a hip fracture history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, Sanna; Kulmala, Jenni; Kallinen, Mauri; Alén, Markku; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Sipila, Sarianna

    2009-01-01

    Balance dysfunction and loss of balance confidence have been associated with functional limitations and loss of independency in daily tasks. This study examined various aspects of postural balance and balance confidence between older adults with a hip fracture history and their non-fractured counterparts. A comprehensive assessment of balance capacity in older adults with a hip fracture history may help to identify aspects of postural balance that play an important role in the mobility recovery and the avoidance of further falls. The present study comprised 79 community-dwelling older adults with a hip fracture history and 31 non-fractured subjects of the same age, who participated in balance tests including both force platform measures and functional balance testing (Berg Balance Scale, BBS). In addition, balance confidence was assessed with the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale. Persons with a hip fracture history had a markedly poorer balance control and were significantly less confident maintaining their balance during daily activities compared to the controls. Sixty percent of the subjects in the hip fracture group versus 87% of the non-fracture group (chi(2) test, p = 0.003) were able to perform the semi-tandem standing with their eyes closed. Significantly lower scores in the BBS (hip fracture group 46.3 vs. non-fracture group 52.9) and ABC (hip fracture group 59.4 vs. non-fracture group 77.5%) tests were found among the hip fracture subjects compared to the controls. In addition, the performance time in the lateral weight-shifting task (hip fracture group 13.4 vs. non-fracture group 8.4 s) was significantly slower compared to the controls. Balance impairments along with the loss of balance confidence are persistent problems among community-dwelling older adults with a history of hip fracture and may contribute to mobility limitations and the risk of falling. These areas of function and behaviour in older adults with a hip fracture history

  9. USING TRABECULAR METAL AUGMENTS FOR TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT IN PATIENTS AFTER ACETABULAR FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Tikhilov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presented the experience of treatment of two patients with hip arthritis after acetabular fracture. Both patients were treated with total hip replacement. During the operation, to manage posterior-superior bone defects of the acetabulum, augments of trabecular metal were used. Pain and limitation of motions in hip were indications for operative treatment. After a year of follow up there was no pain in hip; also recovery of motion and improved quality of life were observed.

  10. Hip fractures and pain following proton therapy for management of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valery, Raul; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Nichols, Romaine C. Jr.; Henderson, Randal; Morris, Christopher G.; Su, Zhong; Li, Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Mendenhall, William M.; Williams, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Proton therapy (PT) for prostate cancer reduces rectal and bladder dose, but increases dose to the femoral necks. We assessed the risk of hip fracture and pain in men treated with PT for prostate cancer. Material and methods: From 2006 to 2008, 382 men were treated for prostate cancer and evaluated at six-month intervals after PT for toxicities at Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Institute (UFPTI). The WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) generated annual hip-fracture risk for the cohort. The WHO FRAX tool was utilized to generate the expected number of patients with hip fractures and the observed-to-expected ratio; confidence intervals and p-value were generated with the mid-P exact test. Univariate analysis of hip pain as a function of several prognostic factors was accomplished with Fisher's exact test. Results. Median follow-up was four years (range, 0.1-5.5 years). Per FRAX, 3.02 patients were expected to develop a hip fracture without PT. Three PT patients actually developed fractures for a rate of 0.21 fractures per 100 person-years of follow-up. There was an observed-expected ratio of 0.99 (p-value not significant). Forty-eight patients (13%) reported new pain in the hip during follow-up; three required prescription analgesics. Conclusion. PT for prostate cancer did not increase hip-fractures in the first four years after PT compared to expected rates in untreated men

  11. Pre-Injury Demographic Patterns of Patients Sustaining Hip Fractures in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    I Isnoni; Mohamad Adam B; M Murallitharam; A Tajuddin; SP Jaya Purany; Manmohan S; Phang HF; Pan CH; Kamil MK; M Anwar Hau

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hip fractures entail a growing economic burden on the health care system. Study is warranted to further our understanding of its patterns and to create increased awareness in health care providers and the public. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data was extracted from the ongoing National Orthopaedic Registry of Malaysia (NORM), for the period June 2008 till December 2009. Patients aged 50 years and above without previous pathological fracture hip fractures were included in the study. RE...

  12. Simultaneous Periprosthetic Fractures of the Femur and the Acetabulum After Bipolar Hip Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia-Paraskevi; Drosos, Georgios; Vogiatzaki, Theodosia; Tilkeridis, Konstantinos; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 68 Final Diagnosis: Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum and femur after bipolar hip arthroplasty Symptoms: Inability to walk Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: Revision cup and internal fixation femur Specialty: Orhopedics and Traumatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Although periprosthetic fractures of the femur are a recognized complication of total hip arthroplasty, periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are rare. Simultaneous...

  13. Bone bruise, lipohemarthrosis, and joint effusion in CT of non-displaced hip fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geijer, Mats; Dunker, Dennis; Collin, David; Goethlin, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. A suspected occult hip fracture after normal radiography is not uncommon in an elderly person after a fall. Despite a lack of robust validation in the literature, computed tomography (CT) is often used as secondary imaging. Purpose. To assess the frequency and clinical utility of non-cortical skeletal and soft tissue lesions as ancillary fracture signs in CT diagnosis of occult hip fractures. Material and Methods. All fracture signs (cortical and trabecular fractures, bone bruise, joint effusion, and lipohemarthrosis) were recorded in 231 hip low-energy trauma cases with CT performed after normal or equivocal radiography in two trauma centers. Results. There were no fracture signs in 110 patients. Twelve of these had a joint effusion. In 121 patients with 46 cervical hip fractures and 75 trochanteric fractures one or more fracture signs were present. Cortical fractures were found in 115 patients. Bone bruise was found in 119 patients, joint effusion in 35, and lipohemarthrosis in 20 patients. Conclusion. Ancillary signs such as bone bruise and lipohemarthrosis can strengthen and sometimes indicate the diagnosis in CT of occult hip fractures. Joint effusion is a non-specific sign

  14. Bone bruise, lipohemarthrosis, and joint effusion in CT of non-displaced hip fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geijer, Mats (Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skaane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund (Sweden)), Email: mats@geijer.info; Dunker, Dennis; Collin, David; Goethlin, Jan H. (Department of Radiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Moelndal (Sweden))

    2012-03-15

    Background. A suspected occult hip fracture after normal radiography is not uncommon in an elderly person after a fall. Despite a lack of robust validation in the literature, computed tomography (CT) is often used as secondary imaging. Purpose. To assess the frequency and clinical utility of non-cortical skeletal and soft tissue lesions as ancillary fracture signs in CT diagnosis of occult hip fractures. Material and Methods. All fracture signs (cortical and trabecular fractures, bone bruise, joint effusion, and lipohemarthrosis) were recorded in 231 hip low-energy trauma cases with CT performed after normal or equivocal radiography in two trauma centers. Results. There were no fracture signs in 110 patients. Twelve of these had a joint effusion. In 121 patients with 46 cervical hip fractures and 75 trochanteric fractures one or more fracture signs were present. Cortical fractures were found in 115 patients. Bone bruise was found in 119 patients, joint effusion in 35, and lipohemarthrosis in 20 patients. Conclusion. Ancillary signs such as bone bruise and lipohemarthrosis can strengthen and sometimes indicate the diagnosis in CT of occult hip fractures. Joint effusion is a non-specific sign

  15. Teriparatide Treatment Following Osteoporotic Hip Fracture in a Male Patient with Multiple Sclerosis and Current Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Başaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old male patient with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS who had been operated due to a low-energy subtrochanteric femoral fracture was admitted in order to plan anti-osteoporotic treatment and rehabilitation at post-operative first week. Although the patient had a history of glucocorticoid use, he had never received any preventative treatment for osteoporosis. T-scores detected by Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA method were -4.7, -4.9 and -3.3 at femoral neck, total hip and L1-L4 vertebrae, respectively. Since the patient had severe osteoporosis, teriparatide treatment was planned. Following vitamin D supplementation, teriparatide 20 mcg/day was started. After 6 months of treatment, patient improved significantly in terms of symptoms and DXA scores. T-scores of the femoral neck, total hip and L1-L4 vertebrae improved to -3.4, -3.9 and -3.0, respectively. When teriparatide therapy was continued up to 18 months, further increase in DXA values was observed (T-scores of femoral neck, total hip and L1-L4 vertebrae were -2.9, -2.4 and -2.2, respectively. No adverse event was seen during the treatment period. Following the cessation of teriparatide therapy, alendronate and cholecalciferol combination (70 mg/2800 IU was started. Bone health and vitamin D level are affected negatively in patients with MS due to multifactorial reasons. In order to avoid serious consequences such as hip fracture, awareness about osteoporosis should be increased and preventative strategies should be tailored from the early stages of the disease

  16. Ipsilateral proximal femur and shaft fractures treated with hip screws and a reamed retrograde intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrum, Robert F; Tornetta, Paul; Watson, J Tracy; Christiano, Anthony; Vafek, Emily

    2014-09-01

    Although not common, proximal femoral fractures associated with ipsilateral shaft fractures present a difficult management problem. A variety of surgical options have been employed with varying results. We investigated the use of hip screws and a reamed retrograde intramedullary (IM) nail for the treatment of this combined fracture pattern in terms of postoperative alignment (malunion), nonunion, and complications. Between May 2002 and October 2011, a total of 95 proximal femoral fractures with associated shaft fractures were treated at three participating Level 1 trauma centers; all were treated with hip screw fixation (cannulated screws or sliding hip screws) and retrograde reamed IM nails. The medical records of these patients were reviewed retrospectively for alignment, malunion, nonunion, and complications. Followup was available on 92 of 95 (97%) of the patients treated with hip screws and a retrograde nail. Forty were treated with a sliding hip screw, and 52 were treated with cannulated screws. There were five proximal malunions in this series (5%). The union rate was 98% (90 of 92) for the femoral neck fractures and 91.3% (84 of 92) for the femoral shaft fractures after the initial surgery. There were two nonunions of comminuted femoral neck fractures after cannulated screw fixation. There was no difference in femoral neck union or alignment when comparing cannulated screws to a sliding hip screw. Four open comminuted femoral shaft fractures went on to nonunion and required secondary surgery to obtain union, and one patient developed symptomatic avascular necrosis. The treatment of ipsilateral proximal femoral neck and shaft fractures with hip screw fixation and a reamed retrograde nail demonstrated a high likelihood of union for the femoral neck fractures and a low risk of malunion. Comminution and initial displacement of the proximal femoral fracture may still lead to a small incidence of malunion or nonunion, and open comminuted femoral shaft fractures

  17. Periprosthetic femoral fracture within two years after total hip replacement:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thien, T. M.; Chatziagorou, G.; Garellick, G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We used the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association database to evaluate whether age, sex, preoperative diagnosis, fixation, and implant design influence the risk of revision arthroplasty due to periprosthetic fracture within two years from operation of a primary total hip replacement....... METHODS: Included in the study were 325,730 cemented femoral stems and 111,899 uncemented femoral stems inserted from 1995 to 2009. Seven frequently used stems (two cemented stems [Exeter and Lubinus SP II] and five uncemented stems [Bi-Metric, Corail, CLS Spotorno, ABG I, and ABG II]) were specifically...... studied. RESULTS: The incidence of revision at two years was low: 0.47% for uncemented stems and 0.07% for cemented stems. Uncemented stems were much more likely to have this complication (relative risk, 8.72 [95% confidence interval, 7.37 to 10.32]; p

  18. Audit, guidelines and standards: clinical governance for hip fracture care in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Colin T; Hutchison, James D

    To report on experience of national-level audit, guidelines and standards for hip fracture care in Scotland. Scottish Hip Fracture Audit (from 1993) documents case-mix, process and outcomes of hip fracture care in Scotland. Evidence-based national guidelines on hip fracture care are available (1997, updated 2002). Hip fracture serves as a tracer condition by the health quality assurance authority for its work on older people, which reported in 2004. Audit data are used locally to document care and support and monitor service developments. Synergy between the guidelines and the audit provides a means of improving care locally and monitoring care nationally. External review by the quality assurance body shows to what extent guideline-based standards relating to A&E care, pre-operative delay, multidisciplinary care and audit participation are met. Three national-level initiatives on hip fracture care have delivered: Reliable and large-scale comparative information on case-mix, care and outcomes; evidence-based recommendations on care; and nationally accountable standards inspected and reported by the national health quality assurance authority. These developments are linked and synergistic, and enjoy both clinical and managerial support. They provide an evolving framework for clinical governance, with casemix-adjusted outcome assessment for hip fracture care as a next step.

  19. 'Pathological' fracture of the femur -a complication of failed total hip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten patients with a major femur fracture complicating total hip arthroplasty were seen at the Princess Alice Orthopaedic Hospital between June 1986 and May 1988. Four cases were intra-operative fractures sustained at revision surgery and 6 were late postoperative fractures of the femur associated with minimal trauma, ...

  20. [Hip fracture, antiplatelet drugs treatment and postoperative complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguant, F; Martínez, E; Gil, B; Prieto, J C; del Milagro Jiménez, L; Arnau, A; Bosch, J

    2013-11-01

    To assess the incidence of postoperative complications, blood transfusions and survival at one month, in the old patients operated for hip fracture undergoing chronic treatment with antiplatelet drugs. Two hundred twenty three patients operated for hip fracture were studied retrospectively, separated into 3 groups: patients who received acetylsalicylic acid (group I), patients who were given 100mg/day of acetylsalicylic acid or 300mg/day of triflusal (group II) and patients receiving>100mg/day of acetylsalicylic acid, or>300mg/day of triflusal or thienopyridines (group III). Surgery was delayed for 4 days in patients in group III. Demographic, biological, clinical and treatment characteristics, postoperative complications and survival at one month were recorded. Patients in group III were older and sustain worse general health status. Patients with a higher transfusion requirement were those of group II (73.8%) (P=0.192), who also showed a higher percentage of anaemia on admission. Severe cardiovascular complications were experienced by 5.4% of group III patients, 4.8% of group II patients and 2.1% of group I patients. Patients from group III presented a significant amount of respiratory complications (P=0.007). Our results suggest that delaying surgery for 4 days in patients treated with clopidogrel can be associated to an increase in postoperative respiratory complications and severe adverse cardiovascular events, without increasing the tranfusional index, hospital stay, mortality, and without complications related to neuraxial anaesthesia. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. A Dual Biomechanical Failure: Exeter Stem and Pubic Rami Insufficiency Fracture, following Hybrid Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Inderpaul; Paliobeis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Incidence of Exeter stem fracture is extremely uncommon. Pubic rami insufficiency fractures following arthroplasty are also rare. To our knowledge no cases of spontaneous stem failure with previous insufficiency fractures have yet been reported. Case Presentation. This report describes a case of spontaneous fracture through a cemented Exeter stem in a 66-year-old patient who had previously undergone a hybrid total hip replacement and was found to have bifocal pubic rami insufficiency fractures. The patient presented 18-year postprimary surgery with spontaneous fracture of the middle third of the cemented femoral stem and adjacent proximal femur. Conclusion. This report demonstrates a unique case of Exeter stem fracture with previous pelvic insufficiency fractures. The case adds to the rare occurrences of Exeter stem failure in the literature and highlights the risk of potential insufficiency fractures in patients undergoing total hip replacement.

  2. Perimenopausal wrist fracture - An opportunity for prevention and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Those identified were subjected to further review to establish rates of osteoporosis and/or hip fracture. Osteoporosis and/or hip fracture rates were also determined for a control population. Main outcome measures: Osteoporosis investigation and management rates in controls v, subjects who had experienced a previous ...

  3. A comparison of bone density and bone morphology between patients presenting with hip fractures, spinal fractures or a combination of the two

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently it is uncertain how to define osteoporosis and who to treat after a hip fracture. There is little to support the universal treatment of all such patients but how to select those most in need of treatment is not clear. In this study we have compared cortical and trabecular bone status between patients with spinal fractures and those with hip fracture with or without spinal fracture with the aim to begin to identify, by a simple clinical method (spine x-ray), a group of hip fracture patients likely to be more responsive to treatment with current antiresorptive agents. Methods Comparison of convenience samples of three groups of 50 patients, one with spinal fractures, one with a hip fracture, and one with both. Measurements consist of bone mineral density at the lumbar spine, at the four standard hip sites, number, distribution and severity of spinal fractures by the method of Genant, cortical bone thickness at the infero-medial femoral neck site, femoral neck and axis length and femoral neck width. Results Patients with spinal fractures alone have the most deficient bones at both trabecular and cortical sites: those with hip fracture and no spinal fractures the best at trabecular bone and most cortical bone sites: and those with both hip and spinal fractures intermediate in most measurements. Hip axis length and neck width did not differ between groups. Conclusion The presence of the spinal fracture indicates poor trabecular bone status in hip fracture patients. Hip fracture patients without spinal fractures have a bone mass similar to the reference range for their age and gender. Poor trabecular bone in hip fracture patients may point to a category of patient more likely to benefit from therapy and may be indicated by the presence of spinal fractures. PMID:23432767

  4. Prevention of heterotopic ossification after total hip replacement with NSAIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; Koorevaar, RT; Brouwers, JRBJ

    Introduction: non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs) and prophylactic radiotherapy can prevent ectopic bone formation around the hip after total hip arthroplasty. Methods: We retrieved from Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Register ( clinical) trials and other relevant literature on the

  5. Incidence and socioeconomic burden of hip fractures in Italy: extension study 2003-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Guglielmi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: we aimed to analyze incidence and costs of hip fractures in Italy. Methods: we analyzed the Italian Ministry of Health national hospitalization and DRGs databases concerning fractures occurred in people ≥65 between 2003 and 2005. We have estimated incidence and direct costs sustained by the National Health Service for hospitalization and treatment of hip fractures on the basis of the value of the Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs referring to hip fractures. The expenses of rehabilitation and indirect costs were based on regional estimations. Results: between 2003 and 2005 we registered almost 90,000 hospital admissions per year (corresponding to 75,000 patients because of hip fractures in people aged ≥65. Women accounted for the majority of hospital admissions due to hip fractures (78.0%; n=214,519. Among women, 84.3% of fractures (n=180,861 occurred in patients ≥75, which is known to be the age group with the highest prevalence of osteoporosis. Hospitalizations of both men and women showed an increasing trend across all the examined period. Hospital costs increased up to 467 million euros in 2005, while rehabilitation costs rose up to 531 million in the same year. Conclusions: hip fractures in the Italian population are increasing and represent a major public health challenge.

  6. Development of a nomogram for individualizing hip fracture risk in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N D; Frost, S A; Center, J R; Eisman, J A; Nguyen, T V

    2007-08-01

    Until now there has been no published prognostic tool available for predicting of hip fracture to primary care settings. We have developed a nomogram for predicting the absolute risk of hip fracture for any individual by using clinical factors, including age, prior fracture and fall, in addition to BMD that was based on a 15-year follow-up cohort study. Bone mineral density or clinical risk factors alone are useful but limited tools for the identification of individuals with high-risk of hip fracture. It is hypothesized that the combination of clinical risk factors and BMD can improve the accuracy of fracture prediction. This study was aimed at developing a nomogram which combines these factors for predicting 5-year and 10-year risk of hip fracture for an individual. The study, designed as a epidemiologic, community-based prospective study, included 1,208 women and 740 men aged 60+ years with median duration of follow-up of 13 years (inter-quartile range, IQR: 6-14) for both women and men, yielding 10,523 and 7,586 person-years of observation, respectively. Main outcome measures were incidence of hip fractures and risk factors were femoral neck bone mineral density (FNBMD), prior fracture, history of fall, postural sway and quadriceps strength. Femoral neck BMD was measured by DXA (GE-LUNAR Corp, Madison, Wisconsin, USA). Cox's proportional hazards model was used to estimate the risk of fracture for individuals, and a nomogram was constructed for predicting hip fracture risk. Between 1989 and 2004, 127 individuals (96 women) sustained a hip fracture. Advancing age, low femoral neck BMD, prior fracture and history of falls were independent predictors of hip fracture. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the model was 0.85 for both sexes. A nomogram was constructed for predicting hip fracture risk for an individual. Among those aged 75 or older with BMD T-scores men was comparable to or higher than in women; however, in younger age groups

  7. Tobacco smoking and risk of hip fracture in men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høidrup, S; Prescott, E; Sørensen, T I

    2000-01-01

    on bone than women. In this study we prospectively determined the influence of current, previous, and cumulative smoking history on risk of hip fracture in men and women and addressed the issue of possible gender difference in the susceptibility to tobacco smoking. METHODS: Pooled data from three...... to tobacco smoking. CONCLUSION: Tobacco smoking is an independent risk factor for hip fracture in men and women, and there appears to be no gender differences in smoking related risk. Smoking cessation reduces the risk of hip fracture in men after 5 years, while the deleterious effect of smoking seems...

  8. Use of a long distally fixed intramedullary stem to treat a periprosthetic femoral fracture following total hip arthroplasty using a thrust plate hip prosthesis: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hatanaka, Hiroyuki; Motomura, Goro; Ikemura, Satoshi; Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Yusuke; Utsunomiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Nakashima, Yasuharu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The thrust plate hip prosthesis (TPP; Zimmer, Winterthur, Switzerland) is a hip prosthesis that is no longer in production. Few reports have focused on periprosthetic fractures following total hip arthroplasty (THA) with the use of a TPP. Presentation of case: We report a 57-year-old woman with a periprosthetic femoral fracture 13 years after THA with the use of a TPP. A plain radiograph showed a displaced subtrochanteric fracture of the right femur just below the distal tip ...

  9. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and healing of hip fracture in Alzheimer's disease patients: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eimar, H; Perez Lara, A; Tamimi, I; Márquez Sánchez, P; Gormaz Talavera, I; Rojas Tomba, F; García de la Oliva, T; Tamimi, F

    2013-12-01

    This study was designed to assess effects of cholinergic stimulation using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), a group of drugs that stimulate cholinergic receptors and are used to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD), on healing of hip fractures. A retrospective cohort study was performed using 46-female AD patients, aged above 75 years, who sustained hip fractures. Study analyses included the first 6-months after hip fracture fixation procedure. Presence of AChEIs was used as predictor variable. Other variables that could affect study outcomes: age, body mass index (BMI), mental state or type of hip fracture, were also included. Radiographic union at fracture site (Hammer index), bone quality (Singh index) and fracture healing complications were recorded as study outcomes. The collected data was analyzed by student's-t, Mann-Whitney-U and chi-square tests. No significant differences in age, BMI, mental state or type of hip fracture were observed between AChEIs-users and nonusers. However, AChEIs-users had better radiographic union at the fracture site (relative risk (RR),2.7; 95%confidence interval (CI),0.9-7.8), better bone quality (RR,2.0; 95%CI,1.2-3.3) and fewer healing complications (RR,0.8; 95%CI,0.7-1.0) than nonusers. In elderly female patients with AD, the use of AChEIs might be associated with an enhanced fracture healing and minimized complications.

  10. Radial and humeral fractures as predictors of subsequent hip, radial or humeral fractures in women, and their seasonal variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B; Schwarz, Peter; McNair, P

    1993-01-01

    with a fracture of the distal radius (n = 1162) or proximal humerus (n = 406) were followed for 0 to 9 years. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence limits (CL) of subsequent fracture among women suffering radial or humeral fractures compared with the background population were calculated. Women 60-79 years...... of age who had suffered a fracture of the distal radius or proximal humerus had relative risks of sustaining a hip fracture of 1.9 (1.3-2.6, 95% CL) and 2.5 (1.3-3.6, 95% CL) respectively. The relative risk of hip fracture was highest within the first years following a fracture of the radius...... or the humerus. Women suffering an upper extremity fracture (radius or humerus) in snowy or icy weather had a marginally increased risk (RR = 1.3, 0.4-2.3, 95% CL and RR = 1.8, 0.3-3.4, 95% CL) for a later hip fracture. A woman 50 years old with a radial or a humeral fracture had an estimated residual lifetime...

  11. Operative Trends in the Treatment of Hip Fractures and the Role of Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Luis; Summers, Spencer; Rosas, Samuel; Ong, Alvin; Hernandez, Victor Hugo

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: There is a projected exponential increase in the number of hip fractures in the United States. Trends in patient demographics and the role of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and its associated outcomes following hip fractures surgery have not been well studied. Methods: Patients with proximal femur fractures between 1990 and 2007 were identified in the National Hospital Discharge Survey database. Demographics, comorbidities, perioperative complications, and discharge status for patients undergoing THA, hemiarthroplasty, or internal fixation were examined. Multivariable regression was performed to determine independent risk factors for perioperative complications. Results: Between 1990 and 2007, there was a statistically significant increase in patient age, adverse events, medical comorbidities, surgical complications, medical complications, and nonroutine discharge across all surgical treatment modalities. In the same time period, the utilization of THA for all fracture types decreased significantly. Discussion: Total hip arthroplasty was found to be an independent risk factor for perioperative complications. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware that the hip fracture population continues to get older, with more medical comorbidities and are at higher risk for perioperative complications. Conclusion: Total hip arthroplasty is associated with a higher rate of perioperative complications in the hip fracture population. PMID:29619275

  12. Corticosteroid Is Associated with Both Hip Fracture and Fracture-Unrelated Arthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Feng-Chen; Hsu, Yao-Chun; Lin, Chien-Fu Jeff; Lo, Ying-Ying; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether and how corticosteroid use was associated with serious hip arthropathy. This population-based cohort study analyzed the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database and screened the one-million random sample from the entire population for eligibility. The steroid cohort consisted of 21,995 individuals who had used systemic corticosteroid for a minimum of 6 months between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2006. They were matched 1:1 in propensity score on the index calendar date with controls who never used steroid. All participants were followed up until occurrence of serious hip arthropathy that required arthroplasty, withdrawal from the national health insurance, or the end of 2011. Surgical indication was classified as fracture-related and -unrelated. The cumulative incidence of hip arthroplasty was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The association with steroid exposure was explored by the Cox proportional hazard model. Cumulative incidences of hip arthroplasty after 12 years of follow-up were 2.96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.73-3.2%) and 1.34% (95% CI, 1.2-1.51%) in the steroid users and non-users, respectively (Prose with steroid dosage, as the adjusted HR increased from 3.30 (95% CI, 2.44-4.46) in the low-dose subgroup, 4.54 (95% CI, 3.05-6.77) in intermediate-dose users, to 6.54 (95% CI, 4.74-9.02) in the high-dose counterpart (Ptrendhip arthroplasty, particularly for fracture-unrelated arthropathy.

  13. Type 2 diabetes mellitus severity correlates with risk of hip fracture in patients with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, J-Y; Cheng, C-Y; Hsu, C-Y

    2018-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health problem because of its associated fractures and the resulting complications. The objective of this study was to identify the association between the severity of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the risk of hip fracture in osteoporotic patients. The patients who received a diagnosis of osteoporosis between 2006 and 2010, with an adequate follow-up between 2006 and 2015, were enrolled in this study. Among patients with T2DM, the severity of the disease was evaluated using the Diabetes Complication Severity Index (DCSI). Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratios and to predict the risk of hip fracture in diabetic osteoporotic patients. A total of 1188 patients were enrolled in the final study, 87 patients had hip fractures in the follow-up period between 2006 and 2015. Among the diabetic patients, each level of the continuous DCSI was associated with a 1.56-fold greater risk of hip fracture. In further stratification, patients with a DCSI > 3 had a significantly higher risk of hip fracture in comparison with those with a DCSI ≤ 1. The categorical DCSI (DCSI > 3), HbA1c level on the diagnosis of T2DM and duration of diabetes, facilitate predicting the risk of hip fracture. The severity of T2DM reflects the risk of hip fracture in osteoporotic patients. Physicians should pay attention to osteoporotic patients presenting with a high HbA1c level on diagnosis of T2DM and a higher DCSI because of their vulnerability to hip fracture.

  14. Quality of life after hip fracture in the elderly: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Charles M M; Visser, Eva; Van de Ree, Cornelis L P; Gosens, Taco; Den Oudsten, Brenda L; De Vries, Jolanda

    2016-07-01

    With an increasing ageing population, hip fractures have become a major public health issue in the elderly. It is important to examine the health status (HS) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of the elderly faced with the epidemic of hip fractures. To provide an overview of reported HS and HRQOL in elderly patients with a hip fracture. A systematic literature search was performed in Embase, Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane, PsycINFO, Pubmed, and Google Scholar in July 2014. Studies which reported the HS or HRQOL based on standardised questionnaires in patients older than 65 years with a hip fracture were considered eligible for inclusion. After inspecting the 2725 potentially eligible studies, 49 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All included studies were randomised controlled trials or prospective cohort studies. The methodological quality of the studies was moderate. Patients' functioning on the physical, social, and emotional domains were affected after a hip fracture. The HS and HRQOL of the majority of patients recovered in the first 6 months after fracture. However, their HS did not return to prefracture level. Mental state, prefracture functioning on physical and psychosocial domains, comorbidity, female gender, nutritional status, postoperative pain, length of hospital stay, and complications were factors associated with HS or HRQOL. Treatment with total hip arthroplasty or hemi-arthroplasty provided better HS than treatment with internal fixation with displaced femoral neck fractures. Supportive psychotherapy in "low-functioning" patients, (home) rehabilitation programmes and nutritional supplementation appeared to have beneficial effects on HS. Optimizing nutrition intake, (home) rehabilitation programmes, and the possibility for psychological counselling in patients with difficulties in the psychosocial dimensions would be recommended after hip fracture surgery. Besides HS questionnaires like EQ-5D and SF-36, adequate

  15. Surgery for hip fracture yields societal benefits that exceed the direct medical costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qian; Koenig, Lane; Mather, Richard C; Tongue, John

    2014-11-01

    A hip fracture is a debilitating condition that consumes significant resources in the United States. Surgical treatment of hip fractures can achieve better survival and functional outcomes than nonoperative treatment, but less is known about its economic benefits. We asked: (1) Are the societal benefits of hip fracture surgery enough to offset the direct medical costs? (2) Nationally, what are the total lifetime benefits of hip fracture surgery for a cohort of patients and to whom do these benefits accrue? We estimated the effects of surgical treatment for displaced hip fractures through a Markov cohort analysis of patients 65 years and older. Assumptions were obtained from a systematic literature review, analysis of Medicare claims data, and clinical experts. We conducted a series sensitivity analyses to assess the effect of uncertainty in model parameters on our estimates. We compared costs for medical care, home modification, and long-term nursing home use for surgical and nonoperative treatment of hip fractures to estimate total societal savings. Estimated average lifetime societal benefits per patient exceeded the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by USD 65,000 to USD 68,000 for displaced hip fractures. With the exception of the assumption of nursing home use, the sensitivity analyses show that surgery produces positive net societal savings with significant deviations of 50% from the base model assumptions. For an 80-year-old patient, the breakeven point for the assumption on the percent of patients with hip fractures who would require long-term nursing home use with nonoperative treatment is 37% to 39%, compared with 24% for surgical patients. Nationally, we estimate that hip fracture surgery for the cohort of patients in 2009 yields lifetime societal savings of USD 16 billion in our base model, with benefits and direct costs of USD 21 billion and USD 5 billion, respectively. For an 80-year-old, societal benefits ranged from USD 2 billion to

  16. Fear of Falling and Cognitive Impairments in Elderly People with Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kasai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the estimated prevalence of dementia and the relationship between cognitive impairment and fear of falling in patients with hip fractures. Methods: Analysis 1 included 100 patients with hip fractures. Analysis 2 included a subgroup of subjects with ≥75 years of functional independence: 46 patients with hip fractures and 46 control subjects without hip fractures, and presence or absence of dementia. We used an informant-rated questionnaire including the AD8 for screening for dementia, the Barthel Index for assessing activities of daily living, and the Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I for assessing fear of falling. Results: The estimated prevalence of dementia was 66% in patients with hip fractures. There were significant fracture and dementia effects, with significant covariate effects of age and gender on the Short FES-I scores. Conclusion: Our results suggested that more than two-thirds of patients with hip fractures had dementia. Fear of falling may reflect not only physical functions but also cognitive impairments.

  17. Femoral Geometry in Male Patients with Atraumatic Hip Fracture - Original Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülten Tan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Hip fracture is the most serious complication of osteoporosis and the most disabling type of fracture. In this study, we aimed to compare femoral geometry in hip fractured male patients aged more than 65 years old with age matched controls. Patients and Methods: 20 male patients with a history of nontraumatic hip fracture and 19 age-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Bone mineral density of neck and trochanter of hip were measured by DEXA. In addition to BMD, an experienced radiologist measured proximal femur geometric parameters potentially involved in bone strength. Results: Mean BMDs of trochanteric region were not significantly different between groups, but mean BMDs of neck region were statistically significantly lower in the hip fractured group. Neck shaft angle and femur shaft width were the geometric parameters found to be significantly higher in the hip fractured group. The correlation between femur geometric and the anthropometric measurements was present only in the kontrol group. Conclusion: We concluded that besides femur geometric measurements, correlation between these measurements might be an important factors for the fracture risk. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2007;13:15-8

  18. Hip Fracture-Related Pain Strongly Influences Functional Performance of Patients With an Intertrochanteric Fracture Upon Discharge From the Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2013-01-01

    .7 seconds to perform the TUG. No significant differences were observed in baseline characteristics or pain medication given for patients with a cervical versus an intertrochanteric fracture (P ≥ .22), but patients with an intertrochanteric fracture presented more often with moderate to severe pain during...... testing (P New Mobility Score, fracture type, day of TUG performance, and pain intensity...... compromises the functional performance of patients with an intertrochanteric hip fracture upon discharge from hospital. Physical therapists should be involved in new and optimized fracture-type stratified pain management strategies....

  19. Comprehensive care of elderly patients with hip fracture: the orthogeriatric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Frondini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hip fractures in the elderly are a major source of morbidity and mortality. Interdisciplinary hospital care models proposed for the treatment of these patients include consultant teams, integrated orthopedic-geriatric care, and comprehensive geriatric-led care settings. A prospective interventional cohort study was conducted in 4 public hospitals in the Emilia-Romagna Region of Italy to compare the outcomes of these different care models. This report presents the preliminary results obtained with an orthogeriatric model in one of these centers, a large teaching hospital in Bologna. Materials and methods: Beginning in February 2008, all patients older than 75 years admitted to the University of Bologna’s Sant’Orsola-Malpighi Hospital for hip fractures were cared for in an orthogeriatric unit. The unit consisted of 10 beds in the orthopedic ward that were managed by a geriatric specialist and a multidisciplinary team, which met daily and included an orthopedic surgeon, a physiatrist, a nurse case-manager, staff nurses, a physical therapist, and a social worker. The management protocol included a thorough geriatric work-up to identify comorbidities and risk factors, systematic assessment and prevention of pain and acute disorientation, early verticalization and moblization, postacute rehabilitation therapy, family support, and regular follow-up after discharge. Preliminary results were compared with those achieved in the same orthopedic ward prior to the creation of the Orthogeriatric Unit. Results: During 2008, 226 elderly patients (mean age 86.2 + 5.5 years, 73.4% of whom were women, were admitted to the Orthogeriatric Unit for hip fractures. The mean Charlson comorbidity index of this cohort was 3.0 + 1.8. Half the patients had Activity of Daily Living scores < 4, and cognitive impairment was common (mean score on Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire: 5.9 + 3.2. Compared with figures obtained in the hospital

  20. The relevance of gender in the care of hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; Tutton, Liz; Wright, Julie

    2016-08-01

    As in many conditions, gender interplays with other social structures of inequality to impact upon women's and men's health and healthcare. This narrative review examines knowledge about sex, gender and hip fracture and suggests ways of highlighting the influence of gender in hip fracture healthcare. These will be considered in relation to two areas. Firstly the multifactorial dimension of hip fractures which identifies ethnicity, marital status, lifestyle, co-morbidities, environment in relation to falls and osteoporosis as important factors influencing the experience of hip fracture. Secondly the importance of acknowledging gender as a key element within research and management of care. Implications for practice are that we need a raised awareness of gender when we assess and care for patients, to ask critical questions about the gender bias in the evidence we use and reflect on how services and care practices may be biased towards gendered assumptions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI assessment of the posterior acetabular wall fracture in traumatic dislocation of the hip in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubel, Ivan F.; Kloen, Peter; Potter, Hollis G.; Helfet, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Traumatic hip dislocations associated with posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum in the pediatric population are in general a consequence of high-energy trauma. After expeditious reduction, instability mandates for further diagnosis and intervention. Plain radiographs or computerized tomography

  2. General Versus Spinal Anesthesia: Which is a Risk Factor for Octogenarian Hip Fracture Repair Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Shih

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion: General anesthesia increased the risk of postoperative morbidity in octogenarian patients after hip fracture repair, and patients with preexisting respiratory diseases were especially vulnerable. Spinal anesthesia is strongly recommended in such individuals.

  3. Comparison and analysis of reoperations in two different treatment protocols for trochanteric hip fractures - postoperative technical complications with dynamic hip screw, intramedullary nail and Medoff sliding plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Johnny; Stig, Josefine Corin; Olsson, Ola

    2017-08-24

    In treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures dynamic hip screw and Medoff sliding plate devices are designed to allow secondary fracture impaction, whereas intramedullary nails aim to maintain fracture alignment. Different treatment protocols are used by two similar Swedish regional emergency care hospitals. Dynamic hip screw is used for fractures considered as stable within the respective treatment protocol, whereas one treatment protocol (Medoff sliding plate/dynamic hip screw) uses biaxial Medoff sliding plate for unstable pertrochanteric fractures and uniaxial Medoff sliding plate for subtrochanteric fractures, the second (intramedullary nail/dynamic hip screw) uses intramedullary nail for subtrochanteric fractures and for pertrochanteric fractures with intertrochanteric comminution or subtrochanteric extension. All orthopedic surgeries are registered in a regional database. All consecutive trochanteric fracture operations during 2011-2012 (n = 856) and subsequent technical reoperations (n = 40) were derived from the database. Reoperations were analysed and classified into the categories adjustment (percutaneous removal of the locking screw of the Medoff sliding plate or the intramedullary nail, followed by fracture healing) or minor, intermediate (reosteosynthesis) or major (hip joint replacement, Girdlestone or persistent nonunion) technical complications. The relative risk of intermediate or major technical complications was 4.2 (1.2-14) times higher in unstable pertrochanteric fractures and 4.6 (1.1-19) times higher in subtrochanteric fractures with treatment protocol: intramedullary nail/dynamic hip screw, compared to treatment protocol: Medoff sliding plate/dynamic hip screw. Overall rates of intermediate and major technical complications in unstable pertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures were with biaxial Medoff sliding plate 0.68%, with uniaxial Medoff sliding plate 1.4%, with dynamic hip screw 3.4% and with intramedullary nail 7.2%. The

  4. Traumatic fracture-dislocation of the hip following rugby tackle: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalam Santosh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Posterior fracture-dislocation of hip is uncommonly encountered in rugby injuries. We report such a case in an adult while playing rugby. The treating orthopaedician can be caught unaware and injuries in such sports can be potentially misdiagnosed as hip sprains. Immediate reduction of the dislocation was performed in theatres. The fracture was fixed with two lag screws and a neutralization plate. This led to early rehabilitation and speedy recovery with return to sporting activities by 12 months.

  5. Risk factors and epidemiological profile of hip fractures in Indian population: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh Ahuja

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Hip fractures in the elderly population are on a rising trend especially in the Indian subcontinent due to a number of factors both hereditary and acquired. Simple measures like routine usage of bedside railing, wall-side railings at an appropriate height, high friction tiles inside rooms and washrooms, and adequate lighting indoors can play a significant role in reducing falls and hip fractures among the elderly.

  6. Value of routine blood tests for prediction of mortality risk in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosfeldt, Mathias; Pedersen, Ole Birger Vesterager; Riis, Troels

    2012-01-01

    There is a 5- to 8-fold increased risk of mortality during the first 3 months after a hip fracture. Several risk factors are known. We studied the predictive value (for mortality) of routine blood tests taken on admission.......There is a 5- to 8-fold increased risk of mortality during the first 3 months after a hip fracture. Several risk factors are known. We studied the predictive value (for mortality) of routine blood tests taken on admission....

  7. Does cognitive/physical screening in an outpatient setting predict institutionalization after hip fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongisto, Markus T; Nuotio, Maria; Luukkaala, Tiina; Väistö, Olli; Pihlajamäki, Harri K

    2016-10-22

    Institutionalization after hip fracture is a socio-economical burden. We examined the predictive value of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) for institutionalization after hip fracture to identify patients at risk for institutionalization. Fragility hip fracture patients ≥65 years of age (n = 584) were comprehensively examined at a geriatric outpatient clinic 4 to 6 months after surgery and followed 1 year postoperatively. A telephone interview with a structured inquiry was performed at 1, 4, and 12 months after hip fracture. Age-adjusted univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that IADL and MMSE scores measured at the outpatient clinic were significantly associated with living arrangements 1 year after hip fracture. Multivariate logistic regression analysis established that institutionalization 1 year after hip fracture was significantly predicted by institutionalization at 4 months (odds ratio [OR] 16.26, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 7.37-35.86), IADL institutionalization. During the time period from 4 to 12 months, 66 (11 %) patients changed living arrangements, and 36 (55 %) of these patients required more supportive accommodations. IADL and MMSE scores obtained 4 to 6 months after hospital discharge may be applicable for predicting institutionalization among fragility hip fracture patients ≥65 years of age at 1 year after hip fracture. An IADL score of ≥5 predicted the ability to remain in the community. Changes in living arrangements also often occur after 4 months.

  8. Dislocation of total hip replacement in patients with fractures of the femoral neck

    OpenAIRE

    Enocson, Anders; Hedbeck, Carl-Johan; Tidermark, Jan; Pettersson, Hans; Ponzer, Sari; Lapidus, Lasse J

    2009-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement is increasingly used in active, relatively healthy elderly patients with fractures of the femoral neck. Dislocation of the prosthesis is a severe complication, and there is still controversy regarding the optimal surgical approach and its influence on stability. We analyzed factors influencing the stability of the total hip replacement, paying special attention to the surgical approach. Patients and methods We included 713 consecutive hips in a series of 698 p...

  9. A computer-assisted systematic quality monitoring method for cervical hip fracture radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Geijer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background A thorough quality analysis of radiologic performance is cumbersome. Instead, the prevalence of missed cervical hip fractures might be used as a quality indicator. Purpose To validate a computer-based quality study of cervical hip fracture radiography. Material and Methods True and false negative and positive hip trauma radiography during 6 years was assessed manually. Patients with two or more radiologic hip examinations before surgery were selected by computer analysis of the databases. The first of two preoperative examinations might constitute a missed fracture. These cases were reviewed. Results Out of 1621 cervical hip fractures, manual perusal found 51 (3.1% false negative radiographic diagnoses. Among approximately 14,000 radiographic hip examinations, there were 27 (0.2% false positive diagnoses. Fifty-seven percent of false negative reports were occult fractures, the other diagnostic mistakes. There were no significant differences over the years. Diagnostic sensitivity was 96.9% and specificity 99.8%. Computer-assisted analysis with a time interval of at least 120 days between the first and the second radiographic examination discovered 39 of the 51 false negative reports. Conclusion Cervical hip trauma radiography has high sensitivity and specificity. With computer-assisted analysis, 76% of false negative reports were found.

  10. Comparison of fracture risk assessment tools in older men without prior hip or spine fracture: the MrOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, Margaret L; Ritter, Victor S; Fine, Jason P; Overman, Robert A; Schousboe, John T; Cawthon, Peggy M; Orwoll, Eric S; Nguyen, Tuan V; Lane, Nancy E; Cummings, Steven R; Kado, Deborah M; Lapidus, Jodi A; Diem, Susan J; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2017-10-20

    Femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD), age plus femoral neck BMD T score, and three externally generated fracture risk tools had similar accuracy to identify older men who developed osteoporotic fractures. Risk tools with femoral neck BMD performed better than those without BMD. The externally developed risk tools were poorly calibrated. We compared the performance of fracture risk assessment tools in older men, accounting for competing risks including mortality. A comparative ROC curve analysis assessed the ability of the QFracture, FRAX® and Garvan fracture risk tools, and femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) T score with or without age to identify incident fracture in community-dwelling men aged 65 years or older (N = 4994) without hip or clinical vertebral fracture or antifracture treatment at baseline. Among risk tools calculated with BMD, the discriminative ability to identify men with incident hip fracture was similar for FRAX (AUC 0.77, 95% CI 0.73, 0.81), the Garvan tool (AUC 0.78, 95% CI 0.74, 0.82), age plus femoral neck BMD T score (AUC 0.79, 95% CI 0.75, 0.83), and femoral neck BMD T score alone (AUC 0.76, 95% CI 0.72, 0.81). Among risk tools calculated without BMD, the discriminative ability to identify hip fracture was similar for QFracture (AUC 0.69, 95% CI 0.66, 0.73), FRAX (AUC 0.70, 95% CI 0.66, 0.73), and the Garvan tool (AUC 0.71, 95% CI 0.67, 0.74). Correlated ROC curve analyses revealed better diagnostic accuracy for risk scores calculated with BMD compared with QFracture (P tools. In untreated older men without fragility fractures at baseline, an age plus femoral neck BMD T score classifier identified men with incident hip fracture as accurately as more complicated fracture risk scores.

  11. Impact of bundled payments on hip fracture outcomes: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Yu-Chi; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Chang, Guann-Ming

    2018-02-01

    Establishing one price for all bundled services for a particular illness, which has become the key to healthcare reform efforts, is designed to encourage health professionals to coordinate their care for patients. Limited information is available, however, concerning whether bundled payments are associated with changes in patient outcomes. Nationwide longitudinal population-based data were used to examine the effect of bundled payments on hip fracture outcomes. An interrupted time series design with a comparison group. General acute care hospitals throughout Taiwan. A total of 178 586 hip fracture patients admitted over the period 2007-12 identified from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. Bundled payments for hip fractures were implemented in Taiwan in January 2010. The 30-day unplanned readmission and postdischarge mortality. Segmented generalized estimating equation regression models were used after adjustment for trends, patient, physician and hospital characteristics to assess the effect of bundled payments on 30-day outcomes for hip fracture compared with a reference condition. The 30-day unplanned readmission rate for hip fracture showed a relative decreasing trend after the implementation of bundled payments compared with the trend before the implementation relative to that of the reference condition. This finding might imply that the implementation of bundled payments encourages health professionals to coordinate their care, leading to reduced readmission for hip fracture. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Network Meta-Analysis of Pharmacological Agents for Osteoporosis Treatment and Fracture Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-cheng Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Osteoporosis afflicts a large number of populations in the world and is featured by systemic impairment of bone mass and strength which may further trigger an increase in the risk of fragile fractures. This network meta-analysis (NMA is designed to distinguish therapies more preferable than others with respect to efficacy and safety. Methods: We searched the medical literature for relevant studies systematically. Both direct and indirect evidence were synthesized to compare the efficacy, described by odds ratios (OR and 95% credible intervals (CrI. Moreover, the surface under cumulative ranking curve was calculated to rank probabilities with respect to clinical outcomes. The new non-vertebral fractures, hip and wrist fractures, and adverse events were evaluated in this NMA. Results: Patients treated by alendronate, denosumab, teriparatide were associated with a reduced risk of new non-vertebral fractures compared to those treated by placebo. Alendronate, denosumab and zoledronic acid had better efficacy in preventing hip fractures. With respect to wrist fractures prevention, no significant difference was observed. Zoledronic acid exhibited significantly increased risk of adverse events than placebo, alendronate, denosumab, and raloxifene. According to SUCRA, teriparatide ranked highest in new non-vertebral fractures prevention, etidronate and denosumab balanced safety and efficacy well. Conclusion: In summary, teriparatide appeared to be the most efficacious drug for preventing new non-vertebral fractures, while etidronate and denosumab were preferable for balancing safety and efficacy well.

  13. Change of residence and functional status within three months and one year following hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the recovery of patients in terms of 18 activities of daily living and change of residence within the year following a hip fracture. METHOD: This prospective cohort study was carried out in a trauma service of an acute hospital in southern Spain including 159 patients with a hip...... fracture, 65 years or older and allowed weight-bearing after surgery. Patients or their relatives were interviewed about their residential status and functional level at pre-fracture, three months and one year after surgery, using the Functional Independence Measure. RESULTS: Losses of function...... for patients who lived in their own home (73% before fracture to 58% at one year). CONCLUSIONS: The loss of independence in the first year after a hip fracture is substantial for specific activities. Recovery mainly takes place during the first three months after surgery. Change of residence mostly involved...

  14. Interrater Reliability of the 6-Minute Walk Test in Women With Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jan; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Holtze, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    -related pain was assessed with the Verbal Ranking Scale. RESULTS: Participants (all women) with a mean (standard deviation) age of 78.1 (5.9) years performed the test at a mean of 31.5 (5.8) days postsurgery. Of the participants, 10 had a cervical fracture and 10 had a trochanteric fracture. Excellent......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) is widely used as a clinical outcome measure. However, the reliability of the 6MWT is unknown in individuals who have recently experienced a hip fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative and absolute interrater reliability...... of the 6MWT in individuals with hip fracture. METHODS: Two senior physical therapy students independently examined a convenience sample of 20 participants in a randomized order. Their assessments were separated by 2 days and followed the guidelines of the American Thoracic Society. Hip fracture...

  15. Interrater Reliability of the 6-Minute Walk Test in Women With Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Overgaard, Jan; Holtze, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    -related pain was assessed with the Verbal Ranking Scale. Results: Participants (all women) with a mean (standard deviation) age of 78.1 (5.9) years performed the test at a mean of 31.5 (5.8) days postsurgery. Of the participants, 10 had a cervical fracture and 10 had a trochanteric fracture. Excellent......Background and Purpose: The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) is widely used as a clinical outcome measure. However, the reliability of the 6MWT is unknown in individuals who have recently experienced a hip fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative and absolute interrater reliability...... of the 6MWT in individuals with hip fracture. Methods: Two senior physical therapy students independently examined a convenience sample of 20 participants in a randomized order. Their assessments were separated by 2 days and followed the guidelines of the American Thoracic Society. Hip fracture...

  16. Age-specific incidence of hip fracture in the elderly: a healthy decline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Green, C

    2012-02-01

    Hip fractures in the elderly are an important source of morbidity and mortality. The predicted increase in the number of hip fractures due to the increasing elderly population has not been universally observed. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of hip fractures over a twenty year period to determine if this rise is occurring in our region. All hip fractures from the unit over 20 years were identified. Population data for those over 65 in the catchment area of our hospital was acquired. The rate of fractures occurring each year relative to the population was determined. The results were split into age groups. There was a strong correlation between the population rise and number of fractures (p = 0.77). But there was no significant difference in the rate of fracture over time (p = 0.41). However, the average age at which fracture occurred increased by two years. In addition we show the overall trend in the rate of fractures decreases in the younger age groups and increases in the older age groups. Therefore, the predicted rapid increase in rate is not occurring. This probably reflects the strengthening of the economy in Ireland from the 1930\\'s onwards, leading to a healthier population.

  17. Systematic review of the association between climate and hip fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román Ortiz, Carmen; Tenías, José María; Estarlich, Marisa; Ballester, Ferran

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to systematically review epidemiological studies that evaluate the relationship between meteorology and the incidence of hip fracture (HF). After a search in Scopus, PubMed, and Embase, two independent authors assessed the relevance of studies and extracted data for description. From each study, we extracted the geographic and temporal scope, design, study variables (meteorological and related to HF), statistical analysis, and estimated associations. Of a total of 134 works, 20 studies were selected. All use an ecological design but one case-crossover. Most studies have been conducted in northern latitudes. The analysis methodology did not take into account the temporal structure of the data in 10 studies (regression and linear correlations); the rest used Poisson regression (7) and ARIMA model (3). Most studies showed significant positive associations with rainfall, especially in the form of snow: HF relative risk (RR) on days with precipitation vs. days without precipitation that ranged from 1.14 (95 % confidence interval (CI)1.04 to 1.24) to 1.60 (95 % CI 1.06 to 2.41), the temperature, with RR by one degree Celsius decline from 1.012 (95 % CI 1.004 to 1.020) to 1.030 (95 % CI 1.023 to 1.037), and wind (3) RR FC windiest days vs. calm days: 1.32 (95 % CI 1.10 to 1.58) to 1.35 (95 % CI 0.88 to 2.08). This review shows that analytic methods are very heterogeneous and poorly adapted to the temporary nature of the data. Studies confirm a certain seasonality, with more fractures in winter and meaningful relationships with meteorological conditions typical of this season.

  18. Hip fracture risk in relation to vitamin D supplementation and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roddam Andrew W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D supplementation for fracture prevention is widespread despite conflicting interpretation of relevant randomised controlled trial (RCT evidence. This study summarises quantitatively the current evidence from RCTs and observational studies regarding vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH and hip fracture risk. Methods We undertook separate meta-analyses of RCTs examining vitamin D supplementation and hip fracture, and observational studies of serum vitamin D status (25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD level, PTH and hip fracture. Results from RCTs were combined using the reported hazard ratios/relative risks (RR. Results from case-control studies were combined using the ratio of 25(OHD and PTH measurements of hip fracture cases compared with controls. Original published studies of vitamin D, PTH and hip fracture were identified through PubMed and Web of Science databases, searches of reference lists and forward citations of key papers. Results The seven eligible RCTs identified showed no significant difference in hip fracture risk in those randomised to cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol supplementation versus placebo/control (RR = 1.13[95%CI 0.98-1.29]; 801 cases, with no significant difference between trials of 21 (heterogeneity = 51.02, p 216 (heterogeneity = 137.9, p 29 (heterogeneity = 149.68, p Conclusions Neither higher nor lower dose vitamin D supplementation prevented hip fracture. Randomised and observational data on vitamin D and hip fracture appear to differ. The reason for this is unclear; one possible explanation is uncontrolled confounding in observational studies. Post-fracture PTH levels are unrelated to hip fracture risk.

  19. Fear of falling in patients with hip fractures: prevalence and related psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visschedijk, Jan; van Balen, Romke; Hertogh, Cees; Achterberg, Wilco

    2013-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of fear of falling (FoF) in patients after a hip fracture, to investigate the relation with time after fracture, and to assess associations between FoF and other psychological factors. Cross-sectional study performed between September 2010 and March 2011 in elderly patients after a hip fracture. Ten postacute geriatric rehabilitation wards in Dutch nursing homes. A total of 100 patients aged ≥65 years with a hip fracture admitted to a geriatric rehabilitation ward. FoF and related concepts such as falls-related self-efficacy, depression, and anxiety were measured by means of self-assessment instruments. Of all patients, 36% had a little FoF and 27% had quite a bit or very much FoF. Scores on the Falls Efficacy Scale-International were 30.6 in the first 4 weeks after hip fracture, 35.6 in the second 4 weeks, and 29.4 in the period ≥8 weeks after fracture. In these 3 periods, the prevalence rates of FoF were 62%, 68%, and 59%, respectively. Significant correlations were found between FoF and anxiety (P falls-related self-efficacy. During rehabilitation, FoF is greatest in the second 4 weeks after hip fracture. More studies are needed to explore the determinants of FoF and develop interventions to reduce FoF and improve outcome after rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The use of MRI and CT in Imaging Occult Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obadă B.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of hip fractures is particularly important due to the high dependence on the integrity of this structure for people to function in their daily lives. Left unrecognized, patients face increasing morbidity and mortality as time from the original injury lengthens. A delay of just 2 days in surgical treatment for an acute hip fracture doubles mortality. In addition, an unrecognized non-displaced fracture may displace, requiring surgery of much higher risk. This may be part of the reason that the most frequent lawsuit against Emergency Physicians is for missed orthopedic injury. We reviewed the use of MRI and CT for occult hip fractures (OHF detection at a major urban trauma unit. Our study is a retrospective review. Inclusion criteria: all patients presenting to the Emergency Clinical Hospital of Constanta with a suspected, posttraumatic, occult hip fracture, over a 5 years period were included. All patients had negative initial radiographs and underwent further imaging with either CT or MRI. A total of 185 cases meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. 72 occult hip fractures were detected with both imaging modalities. Although MRI certainly enables greater image detail, in our experience both modalities are able to provide satisfactory fracture characterization. The choice of imaging should be determined by availability and indication. MRI provides superior imaging of soft tissue but is less sensitive for degenerative changes in presence of bone edema.

  1. Outcomes of dynamic hip screw augmented with trochanteric wiring for treatment of unstable type A2 intertrochanteric femur fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puram, Chetan; Pradhan, Chetan; Patil, Atul; Sodhai, Vivek; Sancheti, Parag; Shyam, Ashok

    2017-08-01

    Posteromedial and greater trochanteric fragments are a major cause of telescoping and medialization of the femoral shaft in an unstable intertrochanteric fracture. This leads to significant limb shortening, fracture collapse in varus position and implant failure, which can be prevented by trochanteric wiring in addition to dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation. The purpose of our study is to assess the outcomes of DHS augmented with trochanteric wiring in unstable type A2 intertrochanteric fractures. One hundred and two retrospective cases of unstable intertrochanteric fractures treated with DHS between January 2010 and December 2015 with a minimum follow-up period of 12 months were reviewed. Out of 102 cases, 28 were treated with DHS and derotation screw alone (Group A), while in rest 74 cases trochanteric wiring was used as an augmentation to DHS and derotation screw (Group B). Patients were evaluated clinically for range of motion, Harris hip score and Oxford hip score. Radiologically, fracture reduction, change in neck shaft angle and neck length ratio in comparison to opposite hip and union status of greater trochanter were assessed. The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 72 years (range 23-94 years) with 48 males and 54 females. The mean follow-up period was 20 months (range 12-48 months). The Harris hip score, Oxford hip score, shortening, attainment of weight bearing and change in neck shaft angle was not significantly different between the two groups (all p values >0.05). Incidence of greater trochanter nonunion was greater in group A (17.85%) as compared to group B (6.75%). We found significant association between occurrence of limp with varus change in neck shaft angle, decrease in neck length ratio and greater trochanteric non-union (all p values wiring in unstable intertrochanteric fractures gives similar result to group without no wiring, although greater trochanter non-union rate was more in the latter group. Limp can be prevented by

  2. Management of older adults with hip fractures in India: a mixed methods study of current practice, barriers and facilitators, with recommendations to improve care pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Santosh; Yadav, Lalit; Tewari, Abha; Chantler, Tracey; Woodward, Mark; Kotwal, Prakash; Jain, Anil; Dey, Aparajit; Garg, Bhavuk; Malhotra, Rajesh; Goel, Ashish; Farooque, Kamran; Sharma, Vijay; Webster, Premila; Norton, Robyn

    2017-12-01

    Evidence-based management can reduce deaths and suffering of older adults with hip fractures. This study investigates the evidence-practice gaps in hip fracture care in three major hospitals in Delhi, potential barriers and facilitators to improving care, and consequently, identifies contextually appropriate interventions for implementing best practice for management of older adults with hip fractures in India. Hip fracture in older adults is a significant public health issue in India. The current study sought to document current practices, identify barriers and facilitators to adopting best practice guidelines and recommend improvements in the management of older adults with hip fractures in Delhi, India. This mixed methods observational study collected data from healthcare providers, patients, carers and medical records from three major public tertiary care hospitals in Delhi, India. All patients aged ≥50 years with an X-ray confirmed hip fracture that were admitted to these hospitals over a 10-week period were recruited. Patients' data were collected at admission, discharge and 30 days post-injury. Eleven key informant interviews and four focus group discussions were conducted with healthcare providers. Descriptive data for key quantitative variables were computed. The qualitative data were analysed and interpreted using a behaviour change wheel framework. A total of 136 patients, 74 (54%) men and 62 women, with hip fracture were identified in the three participating hospitals during the recruitment period and only 85 (63%) were admitted for treatment with a mean age of 66.5 years (SD 11.9). Of these, 30% received surgery within 48 h of hospital admission, 95% received surgery within 39 days of hospital admission and two (3%) had died by 30 days of injury. According to the healthcare providers, inadequate resources and overcrowding prevent adequate caring of the hip fracture patients. They unanimously felt the need for protocol-based management of hip

  3. Use of anti-depressants and the risk of fracture of the hip or femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brand, M W M; Pouwels, S; Samson, M M; van Staa, T P; Thio, B; Cooper, C; Leufkens, H G M; Egberts, A C G; Verhaar, H J J; de Vries, F

    2009-10-01

    Anti-depressants are used largely, but have serious side effects. We show that both selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs) increase the risk of hip/femur fracture and that this risk is time related and depends on the degree of serotonin transporter inhibition. This should be considered when prescribing anti-depressants to patients. Anti-depressants are known to have serious side effects. We examined the association between the use of anti-depressants and the risk of hip/femur fractures with a special focus on the relation with the degree of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5-HTT) inhibition and the duration of use. A case-control study was conducted within the Dutch PHARMO-RLS database. Cases (n = 6,763) were adult patients with a first hip/femur fracture during the study period. For each case, four controls (n = 26341) were matched by age, gender and geographic region. The risk of hip/femur fracture increased with current use of SSRIs (adjusted odds ratio (OR(adj)) 2.35 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.94-2.84]) and TCAs (ORadj 1.76 [95% CI 1.45-2.15]). The risk of hip/femur fracture declined rapidly after discontinuation of use. The risk of hip/femur fracture increased as the degree of 5-HTT inhibition of all anti-depressants increased from OR(adj) 1.64 [95% CI 1.14-2.35] for drugs with low 5-HTT inhibition to OR(adj) 2.31 [95% CI 1.94-2.76] for those with high 5-HTT inhibiting properties. Current use of both SSRIs and TCAs increase hip/femur fracture risk. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanistic pathways and the relation with the underlying pathophysiology. Until then, the elevated fracture risk should be considered when prescribing anti-depressants.

  4. Occurrence of secondary fracture around intramedullary nails used for trochanteric hip fractures: a systematic review of 13,568 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Rory; Bhattacharjee, Dhritiman; Parker, Martyn J

    2012-06-01

    A sliding hip screw (SHS) is currently the treatment of choice for trochanteric hip fractures, largely due to the low incidence of complications. An alternative treatment is the use of intramedullary proximal femoral nails. Unfortunately these implants have been associated with a risk of later fracture around the implant. The aim of this study was to see if any improvements have been made to the current intramedullary nails, to reduce the incidence of secondary fracture around the distal tip of the nail. We analysed data related to 13,568 patients from 89 studies, focusing on the incidence of post operative secondary femoral shaft fracture following the use of intramedullary nails in the fixation of trochanteric hip fractures. The overall reported incidence of secondary fracture around the nail was 1.7%. The incidence of fracture has reduced in the 3rd generation Gamma nails when compared to the older Gamma nail (1.7% versus 2.6%, p value 0.03). However, the incidence of secondary fracture in the 3rd generation Gamma nails is still significantly higher than the other brands of short nail (1.7% versus 0.7%, p value 0.0005). Long nails had a slight tendency towards a lower risk of fracture although the difference was not statistically significant (1.1% versus 1.7%, p value 0.28). There was a significantly lower risk of fracture for those nails with a biaxial fixation as opposed to uniaxial fixation (0.6% versus 1.9%, p value fracture around a proximal femoral nail is one of the most significant of fracture healing complications, and this study suggests that continuing design changes to this method of fixation has reduced the risk of this complication occurring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inter-Rater Reliability and Agreement of the 6-Minute Walk Test in Women With Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Overgaard, Jan; Tange Kristensen, Morten

    MWT in individuals with hip fractures. Methods: Two senior physiotherapy students independently examined (randomized order) a convenient sample of 20 participants; their assessments were separated by two days, and testing followed instructions from the American Thoracic Society(1). Hip pain...

  6. Feasibility of progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward after hip fracture surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Kronborg

    Full Text Available Patients with a hip fracture lose more than 50% knee-extension strength in the fractured limb within one week of surgery. Hence, immediate progressive strength training following hip fracture surgery may be rational, but the feasibility unknown.To examine the feasibility of in-hospital progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward following hip fracture surgery, based on pre-specified criteria for feasibility.A prospective cohort study conducted in an acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. A consecutive sample of 36 patients, 18 with a cervical and 18 with a trochanteric hip fracture (27 women and 9 men, mean (SD age of 79.4 (8.3 years were included between June and December 2012.A daily (on weekdays program of progressive knee-extension strength training for the fractured limb, using ankle weight cuffs in 3 sets of 10 repetition maximum loadings.The primary outcome was the change in training load (kg during the knee-extension strength training. The secondary outcomes were changes in hip fracture-related pain and maximal isometric knee-extension strength.The strength training was commenced at a mean of 2.4 (0.7 days after surgery. The training loads (kilograms lifted increased from 1.6 (0.8 to 4.3 (1.7 kg over 4.3 (2.2 training sessions (P<.001. The maximal isometric knee-extension strength of the fractured limb increased from 0.37 (0.2 to 0.61 (0.3 Nm/kg (P<.001, while the average strength deficit in the fractured limb decreased from 50% to 32% (% non-fractured, P<.001. Only 3 of 212 sessions were not performed because of severe hip fracture-related pain.Progressive knee-extension strength training of the fractured limb commenced in the acute ward seems feasible, and may reduce strength asymmetry between limbs without hip pain interfering. The clinical efficacy needs confirmation in a randomized controlled design.ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01616030.

  7. "Hidden" Preoperative Blood Loss With Extracapsular Versus Intracapsular Hip Fractures: What Is the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Katharine D; Navo, Paul; Ramsey, Frederick; Jallow, Sainabou; Rehman, Saqib

    2017-12-01

    Excessive blood loss with hip fracture management has been shown to result in increased rates of complications. Our goal is to compare blood loss and transfusion rates between patients with intracapsular and extracapsular (both intertrochanteric (IT) and subtrochanteric (ST)) hip fractures. 472 patients were evaluated over a five-year period. Those who presented to the hospital with a proximal femur fracture (femoral neck, IT or ST) were considered for the study. Exclusion criteria included polytrauma, gunshot injuries, periprosthetic fractures, and non-operative management. Primary endpoint was hemoglobin (Hgb) drop from admission to day of surgery (DOS); secondary endpoint was need for pre-op transfusion and discharge location. 304 patients were analyzed who sustained a proximal femur fracture. Median IC Hgb drop was 0.6g/dL; median EC Hgb drop was 1.1g/dL from admission to DOS ( p = 0.0272). Rate of pre-operative transfusions was higher in EC (36/194 = 18.6%) than IC fractures (5/105 = 4.5%) ( p = 0.0006), and overall transfusion rates remained higher throughout hospital stay (55.7% EC vs. 32.7% IC; p = 0.0001). Breakdown of bleeding rate and tranfusion rates between IT and ST fractures were not significant ( p = 0.07; p = 0.4483). Extracapsular hip fractures were more likely to be discharged to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) (84.4% EC vs. 73.8% IC; p = 0.027). Intracapsular hip fractures have significantly less pre-operative blood loss and fewer pre-operative transfusions than their extracapsular counterparts. These findings can be used to establish appropriate pre-operative resuscitative efforts, ensuring that hip fracture protocols account for the increased likelihood of blood loss in extracapsular fractures.

  8. The association of red meat, poultry, and egg consumption with risk of hip fractures in elderly Chinese: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fang-fang; Fan, Fan; Xue, Wen-qiong; Xie, Hai-li; Wu, Bao-hua; Tu, Su-lan; Ouyang, Wei-fu; Chen, Yu-ming

    2013-10-01

    The epidemiological evidence that the consumption of red meat, poultry or eggs may be associated with the risk of hip fractures is inconsistent and no studies have differentiated between types of red meat or poultry. We evaluated the association between the consumption of red meat, poultry or eggs and the risk of hip fracture. A 1:1 age- (±3years) and gender-matched case-control study of 646 pairs (female/male: 484/162) of elderly Chinese was conducted between June 2009 and January 2013 in Guangdong, China. Information on meat and egg consumption was collected using a 79-item food frequency questionnaire administered in face-to-face interviews. Conditional logistic regression was used to test the relationship between intake of red meat, poultry, and eggs and the risk of hip fracture. Multivariate ORs and their 95% CIs were estimated. After adjusting for potential confounders, risk of hip fracture was found to be positively associated with total red meat consumption (P for trend poultry or egg consumption. The adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for hip fractures, comparing extreme quartiles, were 2.94 (1.82, 4.76) for total red meat, 1.11 (0.74, 1.66) for total poultry, and 0.99 (0.63, 1.56) for eggs. Subtype analyses indicated that the unfavorable effect of total red meat was primarily associated with the consumption of fatty pork and organ meat, whereas fatty and lean poultry had opposite effects. Men with higher fatty pork intake tended to have greater risk than women (P interaction=0.019). Our findings suggest that greater consumption of fatty, but not lean, red meat and poultry may increase the risk of hip fracture. These results provide preliminary evidence for the feasibility of a dietary program for the prevention of hip fractures, which should be confirmed by further studies. © 2013.

  9. The bridging nail in periprosthetic fractures of the hip. Incidence, biomechanics, histology and clinical outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurmond, Rutger Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are a challenging problem. Especially in geriatric, frail patients the development of complications has a large effect on health. Due to increased numbers of performed total hip arthroplasties and the longer life-expectancy, the incidence of these fractures is

  10. Fear of Falling in Patients With Hip Fractures: Prevalence and Related Psychological Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschedijk, J.; Van Balen, R.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Achterberg, W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of fear of falling (FoF) in patients after a hip fracture, to investigate the relation with time after fracture, and to assess associations between FoF and other psychological factors. Design: Cross-sectional study performed between September 2010 and March

  11. Effect of Implementing a Discharge Plan on Functional Abilities of Geriatric Patients with Hip Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL Khayya, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; Ibrahim, Hanaa; Kassem, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hip fracture is considered one of the most fatal fractures for elderly people, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality and impaired functional capacity, particularly for basic and instrumental activities of daily living. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of implementing a discharge plan on functional abilities of geriatric…

  12. Clostridium perfringens infection complicating periprosthetic fracture fixation about the hip: successful treatment with early aggressive debridement.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baker, Joseph F

    2012-07-13

    Periprosthetic fracture and infection are both challenges following hip arthroplasty. We report the case of an 87 year old female who underwent open reduction and internal fixation of a periprosthetic femoral fracture. Her post-operative course was complicated by infection with Clostridium perfringens. Early aggressive antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement were successful, and allowed retention of the original components.

  13. Impaired geometric properties of tibia in older women with hip fracture history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikkola, T.; Sipilä, S.; Portegijs, E.; Kallinen, M.; Alén, M.; Kiviranta, I.; Pekkonen, M.; Heinonen, A.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated side-to-side differences in tibial mineral mass and geometry in women with previous hip fracture sustained on average 3.5 years earlier. Both tibial mineral mass and geometry were found to be reduced in the fractured leg. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate

  14. Management of Osteonecrosis of the Hip Complicated with Fracture: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua YCJ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A 47-year-old gentleman, with underlying seborrhoeic dermatitis that was treated with steroid therapy, and hepatitis B, presented with pain in his right hip. He was diagnosed with stage 2 osteonecrosis of the right hip (Ficat and Arlet classification. Core decompression and bone grafting was performed but recovery was complicated by a surgical site infection. Wound debridement, removal of bone graft and clearance of the bone tunnel were carried out. The patient was allowed to bear weight after surgery. Twelve days later, he developed right hip pain and radiographs showed fractured femur neck; the patient then underwent a two-stage total hip replacement (THR.

  15. The second hip fracture in osteoporotic patients: not only an orthopaedic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Di Rollo, Federica; Bianchi, Maria Giulia; Dell'omo, Dario; Guido, Giulio

    2013-05-01

    The second hip fracture indicates the fracture of the osteoporotic femoral neck which occurs in patients already operated on the opposite side. It is a growing problem, especially in Italy where the ageing rate of the population is one of the highest in the world. Only in recent years this issue has been discussed in the international literature about timing and the treatment methods as a consequence linked to the social costs, mortality, disability of this pathology. The aim of our study is the evaluation of the incidence of hip fractures in a sample of patients that already substained a surgical procedure for a proximal femour fracture. The evaluation was based on the time elapsed between the two fractures, the quality of life after the second fractural episode through a telephone questionnaire (EQ-5D), the incidence of mortality, the adhesion to the antifractural therapy and the comparison of the obtained data to the international standards.

  16. Acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture: An international perspective (Part 2)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2012-10-23

    The second part of this paper provides those who care for orthopaedic patients with evidence-supported international perspectives about acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture. Developed by an international group of nurse experts and guided by a range of information from research and clinical practice, it focuses on nurse sensitive quality indicators during the acute hospitalisation for fragility hip fracture. Optimal care for the patient who has experienced such a fracture is the focus. This includes (in the first, earlier, part):\\r\

  17. Integrity of the lateral femoral wall in intertrochanteric hip fractures: an important predictor of a reoperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2007-01-01

    compression hip screw with a four-hole side-plate between 2002 and 2004. The fractures were classified on preoperative radiographs according to the AO/OTA classification system. The status of the greater and lesser trochanters, the integrity of the lateral femoral wall, and the position of the implant were...... of the lateral femoral wall are not treated adequately with a sliding compression hip-screw device, and intertrochanteric fractures should therefore be classified according to the integrity of the lateral femoral wall, especially in randomized trials comparing fracture implants....

  18. [Hip fracture in older adults: prevalence and costs in two hospitals. Tabasco, Mexico, 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo-Tejero, Elsy del Carmen; Zavala-González, Marco Antonio; Hernández-Gamas, Arianna del Carmen; Hernández-Ortega, Hilda María

    2011-01-01

    To determine hip fracture prevalence and direct healthcare costs in elderly users of the reference hospitals of the Mexican Institute of Social Insurance (IMSS by spanish initials) and Mexican Oils (PEMEX by spanish initials), from Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico, during 2009. This is a cross-sectional study. The information was based on the registers of surgical interventions and institutional reports of the elderly inpatients who had a registered attention in their institution. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed considering the following variables: age, gender, hip fracture type, occurrence month, direct healthcare cost. Out of 10,765 records of hospitalized elderly, 57 hip fracture cases were found (33 in the IMSS and 24 in PEMEX). Hip fracture prevalence was 0.5%, (IMSS 1.1% and PEMEX 0.3%), being more frequent in women and older than 69. The most frequent fracture type was the femur neck one (78.9%). The estimated cost of healthcare in the hospital per patient was USD 5,803 in the IMSS and USD 11,800 in PEMEX. The hip fracture prevalence was higher in the IMSS users. Estimated healthcare costs per patient were higher than the reported in other institutions of the of the mexican health national system.

  19. Ipsilateral Traumatic Posterior Hip Dislocation, Posterior Wall and Transverse Acetabular Fracture with Trochanteric Fracture in an adult: Report of First Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skand Sinha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Posterior dislocation of the hip joint with associated acetabular and intertrochanteric fracture is a complex injury. Early recognition, prompt and stable reduction is needed of successful outcome. Case Report: 45 year old male patient presented with posterior dislocation of the hip with transverse fracture with posterior wall fracture of acetabulam and intertrochanteric fracture on the ipsilateral side. The complex fracture geometry was confirmed by CT scan. The patient was successfully managed by open reduction and internal fixation of intertrochanteric fracture was achieved with dynamic hip screw (DHS plate fixation followed by fixation of acetabular fracture with reconstruction plate. Conclusion: Hip dislocation combined with acetabular fracture is an uncommon injury; this article presents a unique case of posterior wall and transverse fractures of ipsilateral acetabulum with intertrochanteric fracture in a patient who sustained traumatic posterior hip dislocation. Early surgical intervention is important for satisfactory outcomes of such complex fracture-dislocation injuries. Keywords: Hip dislocation; acetabular fractures; intertrochanteric fracture; operative treatment.

  20. Assessment of pain-related fear in patients with the thrust plate prosthesis (TPP): due to hip fracture and hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Yesim Salik; Unver, Bayram; Karatosun, Vasfi; Gunal, Izge

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the differences between hip fracture and hip arthrosis groups and to assess pain related fear of injury in patients who were operated using the TPP following hip fracture or hip arthrosis. Fifty-eight patients (mean age = 63.9 ± 10.3 years) who were operated using the TPP, following hip fracture (hip fracture group; n = 25) or coxarthrosis (coxarthrosis group; n = 33) were recruited. All of the measurements were performed after a follow-up time of at least 2 years. Functional level by Harris Hip Scoring System (HHS), pain related fear by Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and pain intensity by numerical rating scale (NRS) was evaluated. There were no significant differences between demographic and clinical characteristics of two groups. However, pain intensity was higher in coxarthrosis group than hip fracture group. There was no correlation between the TSK scores and either Harris scores or NRS scores (p > 0.05) in the hip fracture group. No correlation between NRS and TSK was found in coxarthrosis group but there was a significant correlation between TSK and HHS. TSK scores were high in both groups. High TSK scores proved us that the patients with TPP had fear of movement even they had enough physical performance. The coxarthrosis group had higher pain intensity. Rehabilitation clinicians should consider pain-related belief which is more important than pain intensity and functional level in coxarthrosis patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors that influence exercise activity among women post hip fracture participating in the Exercise Plus Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Resnick

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Resnick1, Denise Orwig2, Christopher D’Adamo2, Janet Yu-Yahiro3, William Hawkes2, Michelle Shardell2, Justine Golden2, Sheryl Zimmerman4, Jay Magaziner21University of Maryland School of Nursing, 655 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD,21201, USA; 2University of Maryland School of Medicine, Howard Hall, Redwood Street, Baltimore MD 21201, USA; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, USA; 4University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, 301 Pittsboro St., CB#3550, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3550, USAAbstract: Using a social ecological model, this paper describes selected intra- and interpersonal factors that influence exercise behavior in women post hip fracture who participated in the Exercise Plus Program. Model testing of factors that influence exercise behavior at 2, 6 and 12 months post hip fracture was done. The full model hypothesized that demographic variables; cognitive, affective, physical and functional status; pain; fear of falling; social support for exercise, and exposure to the Exercise Plus Program would influence self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and stage of change both directly and indirectly influencing total time spent exercising. Two hundred and nine female hip fracture patients (age 81.0 ± 6.9, the majority of whom were Caucasian (97%, participated in this study. The three predictive models tested across the 12 month recovery trajectory suggest that somewhat different factors may influence exercise over the recovery period and the models explained 8 to 21% of the variance in time spent exercising. To optimize exercise activity post hip fracture, older adults should be helped to realistically assess their self-efficacy and outcome expectations related to exercise, health care providers and friends/peers should be encouraged to reinforce the positive benefits of exercise post hip fracture, and fear of falling should be addressed throughout the entire hip fracture recovery trajectory

  2. Periprosthetic fractures in the resurfaced hip--A case report and review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Traumatic periprosthetic fractures adjacent a hip resurfacing prosthesis are rare. When proximal fractures are encountered the obvious surgical solution is to revise to a large head stemmed femoral component. A previously well functioning implant may however be retained as various non-operative and operative treatment options exist. This paper reports the case history of a traumatic periprosthetic fracture successfully treated with cannulated screw fixation and reviews the current literature.

  3. Dynamic Hip Screw for the Treatment of Femoral Neck Fractures: A Prospective Study with 96 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Jacobus, Lucas Senger; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Barreto, Rodrigo Py Gonçalves; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To study the correlation between avascular necrosis and the demographics, time elapsed from fracture to surgery, quality of reduction, Garden classification, and the position of the screw following use of the dynamic hip screw (DHS) in the treatment of subcapital neck fractures. Methods. A prospective study of 96 patients with subcapital neck fractures was carried out in a faculty hospital. Patients underwent surgery with closed reduction and internal fixation with DHS. Results. T...

  4. Increased risk for early periprosthetic fractures after uncemented total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Søren; Kjersgaard, Anne Grete

    2014-01-01

    in women. No correlation with diagnosis, age, body mass index, operation time, operative technique or implant position could be demonstrated, but a possible correlation with post-operative mobilisation and pain treatment was observed. Trainees had more fractures than experienced surgeons (non......-significant). CONCLUSION: We conclude that the increasing use of uncemented hip replacements implies an increasing risk of perioperative femoral fracture. The cause of the fractures remains unclear, but is probably multifactorial. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  5. OSTEOPOROTIC FRACTURES OF HIPS, WRISTS AND VERTEBRA WITH COST OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Ferk

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteoporosis becomes a serious illness when the patient breaks a bone. Osteoporotic fractures emerge in a larger number after the patients reach age 60 or above. The fracture of the wrist is the earliest osteoporotic fracture, vertebral fracture then follows and it is the most common fracture. The most serious and the most costly fracture is the hip fracture. The analysis of data on fractures of hips in General Hospital Maribor (GHM between the years 1968 and 2000 has shown that the number of fractures has been steadily increasing from 76 in the year 1968 to 258 in the year 2000. In 1968 the treatment was mainly conservative and the death rate was at 60%. With the introduction of operative treatment, which is being used on 95% of the patients nowadays, the death rate fell to 5%. The cost of acute treatment, as assessed by the Health Insurrance at the end of the year 2000, amounted to 599,360 tolars per case. The cost of the treatment of the vertebral fracture, which has been treated in outpatient’s department in 60% of the cases, amounted to 113,076 per case in the year 2000 in GHM. The cost of wrist fracture treatment, which has been handled in outpatient’s department in 90% of the cases, added up to 30,831 tolars per case.Conclusions. The osteoporotic fracture of the hip is caused by senile osteoporosis and it affects both men and women equally. That means that the menopausal osteoporosis does not have an important effect on the fracture of the hip. The number of hip fractures is increasing exponentially with the life span lengthening. With the introduction of operative treatment of hip fractures the early mortality decreased from 60% to only 5%. The cost of acute treatment of hip fracture has been three times lower in GHM compared to the same treatment in Great Britain in the year 2000. In 85% of the cases, the fracture of the wrist occurs in women shortly after the age of 60. This confirms the thesis that the menopausal

  6. Declining incidence of hip fractures and the extent of use of anti-osteoporotic therapy in Denmark 1997-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; Vestergaard, P

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of hip fractures in Denmark declined by about 20% from 1997 to 2006 in both men and women aged 60 and over. The decrease in hip fracture rates was much too large to be explained by the extent of anti-osteoporotic medication used in the country.......The incidence of hip fractures in Denmark declined by about 20% from 1997 to 2006 in both men and women aged 60 and over. The decrease in hip fracture rates was much too large to be explained by the extent of anti-osteoporotic medication used in the country....

  7. Insufficiency fracture in the medial wall of the acetabulum after total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaji, Arihiko; Ando, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Masato; Fukaya, Eiichi; Date, Hideki; Yamada, Harumoto

    2007-08-01

    Insufficiency fracture following total hip arthroplasty (THA) frequently occurs in the superior and inferior pubic ramus, the puboischial rami, or the ischium around the obturator foramen, while it rarely occurs in the medial wall of the acetabulum. Here, we report three cases showing insufficiency fracture in the medial wall of the acetabulum following THA. In our three cases, two fractures resulted from the development of bone fragility due to osteolysis at the prosthesis site, and the convergence of mechanical stress on the acetabular load bearing point due to loosening of the cup. We consider it appropriate to describe these fractures as another entity of stress fracture, namely, osteolytic fracture, rather than either pathologic fracture or insufficiency fracture.

  8. Physical activity in middle-aged women and hip fracture risk: the UFO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, U; Nordström, P; Nilsson, J; Bucht, G; Björnstig, U; Hallmans, G; Svensson, O; Pettersson, U

    2011-02-01

    In a population-based case-control study, we demonstrate that middle-aged women who were active with walking or in different physical spare time activities were at lower risk of later sustaining a hip fracture compared to more sedentary women. In middle-aged women participating in the Umeå Fracture and Osteoporosis (UFO) study, we investigated whether physical activity is associated with a subsequent decreased risk of sustaining a hip fracture. The UFO study is a nested case-control study investigating associations between bone markers, lifestyle, and osteoporotic fractures. We identified 81 female hip fracture cases that had reported lifestyle data before they sustained their fracture. Each case was compared with two female controls who were identified from the same cohort and matched for age and week of reporting data, yielding a total cohort of 237 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 57.2 ± 5.0 years, and mean age at fracture was 65.4 ± 6.4 years. Conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustments for height, weight, smoking, and menopausal status showed that subjects who were regularly active with walking or had a moderate or high frequency of physical spare time activities (i.e. berry/mushroom picking and snow shovelling) were at reduced risk of sustaining a hip fracture (OR 0.14; 95% CI; 0.05-0.53 for walking and OR 0.19; 95% CI; 0.08-0.46, OR 0.17, 95% CI; 0.05-0.64 for moderate and high frequency of spare time activities, respectively) compared to more sedentary women. An active lifestyle in middle age seems to reduce the risk of future hip fracture. Possible mechanisms may include improved muscle strength, coordination, and balance resulting in a decreased risk of falling and perhaps also direct skeletal benefits.

  9. Elderly with proximal hip fracture present significantly lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Teodoro Ezequiel Guerra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D levels, a serum marker of vitamin D3, between patients with and without proximal hip fracture. METHODS: This was a case-control study in which serum samples of 25(OHD were obtained from 110 proximal hip fracture inpatients and 231 control patients without fractures, all over 60 years of age. Levels of 25(OHD lower than or equal to 20 ng/mL were considered deficient; from 21 ng/mL to 29 ng/mL, insufficient; and above 30 ng/mL, sufficient. Sex, age, and ethnicity were considered for association with the study groups and 25(OHD levels. RESULTS: Patients with proximal hip fracture had significantly lower serum 25(OHD levels (21.07 ng/mL than controls (28.59 ng/mL; p = 0.000. Among patients with proximal hip fracture, 54.5% had deficient 25(OHD levels, 27.2% had insufficient levels, and only 18.2% had sufficient levels. In the control group, 30.3% of patients had deficient 25(OHD levels, 30.7% had insufficient levels, and 38.9% had sufficient levels. Female patients had decreased serum 25(OHD levels both in the fracture group and in the control group (19.50 ng/mL vs. 26.94 ng/mL; p = 0.000 when compared with male patients with and without fracture (25.67 ng/mL vs. 33.74 ng/mL; p = 0.017. Regarding age, there was a significant association between 25(OHD levels and risk of fracture only for the age groups 71-75 years and above 80 years. CONCLUSION: Patients with proximal hip fracture had significantly decreased serum 25(OHD levels when compared with the control group. Female patients had significantly lower serum 25(OHD levels in both groups.

  10. A protocol for staged arthroplasty to salvage infected nonunion of hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebied, Ayman M; Elseedy, Adel I; Gamal, Osama

    2017-03-01

    Nonunion of hip fractures is not uncommon. Total hip arthroplasty is used to salvage cases of non union or secondary arthritis in these fractures. However, this option may not be available or may be difficult to achieve when infection has superseded the site of nonunion. The objective of this prospective study was to assess if a staged protocol of treatment yields good results in these difficult cases. Twenty-seven consecutive patients who had deep hip infection with failed treatment of hip fractures (intracapsular in 16 cases and extracapsular in 11) were treated between June 2007 and September 2011. Twenty-six completed the planned two-stage hip arthroplasty and one case was lost after the first stage. The average age of the patients was 48.9 years (range 26-74 years) with an average follow up period of 44 months (30-72 months). Analysis was done using the paired t test where P < 0.05 was considered significant. Infection was controlled in all cases that completed the treatment protocol with no recurrence in all cases at the latest follow up. The Harris hip score of the patients improved significantly from 29 preoperatively to 85 at the latest follow up (P < 0.0001). Two patients had hip dislocation with displacement of the trochanteric fragment while three other patients had fibrous union of the trochanter. Staged Arthroplasty procedure to salvage infected non-union of hip fractures is successful in eradicating infection and regaining hip function. Level of evidence IV.

  11. Measurement of Function Post Hip Fracture: Testing a Comprehensive Measurement Model of Physical Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Hicks, Gregory; Ostir, Glen; Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Orwig, Denise; Magaziner, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of physical function post hip fracture has been conceptualized using multiple different measures. This study tested a comprehensive measurement model of physical function. This was a descriptive secondary data analysis including 168 men and 171 women post hip fracture. Using structural equation modeling, a measurement model of physical function which included grip strength, activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and performance was tested for fit at 2 and 12 months post hip fracture, and among male and female participants. Validity of the measurement model of physical function was evaluated based on how well the model explained physical activity, exercise, and social activities post hip fracture. The measurement model of physical function fit the data. The amount of variance the model or individual factors of the model explained varied depending on the activity. Decisions about the ideal way in which to measure physical function should be based on outcomes considered and participants. The measurement model of physical function is a reliable and valid method to comprehensively measure physical function across the hip fracture recovery trajectory. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  12. Dislocation of total hip replacement in patients with fractures of the femoral neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enocson, Anders; Hedbeck, Carl-Johan; Tidermark, Jan; Pettersson, Hans; Ponzer, Sari; Lapidus, Lasse J

    2009-04-01

    Total hip replacement is increasingly used in active, relatively healthy elderly patients with fractures of the femoral neck. Dislocation of the prosthesis is a severe complication, and there is still controversy regarding the optimal surgical approach and its influence on stability. We analyzed factors influencing the stability of the total hip replacement, paying special attention to the surgical approach. We included 713 consecutive hips in a series of 698 patients (573 females) who had undergone a primary total hip replacement (n = 311) for a non-pathological, displaced femoral neck fracture (Garden III or IV) or a secondary total hip replacement (n = 402) due to a fracture-healing complication after a femoral neck fracture. We used Cox regression to evaluate factors associated with prosthetic dislocation after the operation. Age, sex, indication for surgery, the surgeon's experience, femoral head size, and surgical approach were tested as independent factors in the model. The overall dislocation rate was 6%. The anterolateral surgical approach was associated with a lower risk of dislocation than the posterolateral approach with or without posterior repair (2%, 12%, and 14%, respectively (p replacement in patients with femoral neck fractures.

  13. Effect of Oral Taurine on Morbidity and Mortality in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients: A Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille F. M. Van Stijn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hip fracture patients represent a large part of the elderly surgical population and face severe postoperative morbidity and excessive mortality compared to adult surgical hip fracture patients. Low antioxidant status and taurine deficiency is common in the elderly, and may negatively affect postoperative outcome. We hypothesized that taurine, an antioxidant, could improve clinical outcome in the elderly hip fracture patient. A double blind randomized, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted on elderly hip fracture patients. Supplementation started after admission and before surgery up to the sixth postoperative day. Markers of oxidative status were measured during hospitalization, and postoperative outcome was monitored for one year after surgery. Taurine supplementation did not improve in-hospital morbidity, medical comorbidities during the first year, or mortality during the first year. Taurine supplementation lowered postoperative oxidative stress, as shown by lower urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels (Generalized estimating equations (GEE analysis average difference over time; regression coefficient (Beta: −0.54; 95% CI: −1.08–−0.01; p = 0.04, blunted plasma malondialdehyde response (Beta: 1.58; 95% CI: 0.00–3.15; p = 0.05 and a trend towards lower lactate to pyruvate ratio (Beta: −1.10; 95% CI: −2.33–0.12; p = 0.08. We concluded that peri-operative taurine supplementation attenuated postoperative oxidative stress in elderly hip fracture patients, but did not improve postoperative morbidity and mortality.

  14. Effect of oral taurine on morbidity and mortality in elderly hip fracture patients: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stijn, Mireille F M; Bruins, Arnoud A; Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Witlox, Joost; Teerlink, Tom; Schoorl, Margreet G; De Bandt, Jean Pascal; Twisk, Jos W R; Van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Houdijk, Alexander P J

    2015-05-29

    Hip fracture patients represent a large part of the elderly surgical population and face severe postoperative morbidity and excessive mortality compared to adult surgical hip fracture patients. Low antioxidant status and taurine deficiency is common in the elderly, and may negatively affect postoperative outcome. We hypothesized that taurine, an antioxidant, could improve clinical outcome in the elderly hip fracture patient. A double blind randomized, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted on elderly hip fracture patients. Supplementation started after admission and before surgery up to the sixth postoperative day. Markers of oxidative status were measured during hospitalization, and postoperative outcome was monitored for one year after surgery. Taurine supplementation did not improve in-hospital morbidity, medical comorbidities during the first year, or mortality during the first year. Taurine supplementation lowered postoperative oxidative stress, as shown by lower urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels (Generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis average difference over time; regression coefficient (Beta): -0.54; 95% CI: -1.08--0.01; p = 0.04), blunted plasma malondialdehyde response (Beta: 1.58; 95% CI: 0.00-3.15; p = 0.05) and a trend towards lower lactate to pyruvate ratio (Beta: -1.10; 95% CI: -2.33-0.12; p = 0.08). We concluded that peri-operative taurine supplementation attenuated postoperative oxidative stress in elderly hip fracture patients, but did not improve postoperative morbidity and mortality.

  15. Comprehensive care program for elderly patients over 65 years with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Moyano, A; Fernández-Ojeda, R; Ruiz-Romero, V; García-Benítez, B; Palmero-Palmero, C; Aparicio-Santos, R

    2014-01-01

    To report the health outcomes of a multidisciplinary care program for patients over 65 years with hip fracture. We have developed a care coordination model for the comprehensive care of hip fracture patients. It establishes what, who, when, how and where orthopedists, internists, family physicians, emergency, intensive care, physiotherapists, anesthetists, nurses and workers social intervene. All elderly patients over 65 years admitted with the diagnosis of hip fracture (years 2006 to 2010) were retrospectively evaluated. One thousand episodes of hip fracture, corresponding to 956 patients, were included. Mean age was 82 years and mean stay 6.7 days. This was reduced by 1.14 days during the 5 years of the program. A total of 85.1% were operated on before 72 yours, and 91.2% during the program. Incidence of surgical site infection was 1.5%. In-hospital mortality was 4.5%, (24.2% at 12 months). Readmissions at one years was 14.9%. Independence for basic activity of daily living was achieved by 40% of the patients. This multidisciplinary care program for hip fracture patients is associated with positive health outcomes, with a high percentage of patients treated early (more than 90%), reduced mean stay (less than 7 days), incidence of surgical site infections, readmissions and inpatient mortality and at one year, as well as adequate functional recovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving time to surgery for hip fracture patients. Impact of the introduction of an emergency theatre

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    French-O’Carroll, F

    2017-01-01

    Hip fractures are a major cause of morbidity and mortality1. Surgery performed on the day of or after admission is associated with improved outcome2,3. An audit cycle was performed examining time to surgery for hip fracture patients. Our initial audit identified lack of theatre space as one factor delaying surgery. A dedicated daytime emergency theatre was subsequently opened and a re-audit was performed to assess its impact on time to surgery. Following the opening of the theatre, the proportion of patients with a delay to hip fracture surgery greater than 36 hours was reduced from 49% to 26% with lack of theatre space accounting for 23% (3 of 13) of delayed cases versus 28.6% (9 of 32) previously. 44% of hip fracture surgeries were performed in the emergency theatre during daytime hours, whilst in-hospital mortality rose from 4.6% to 6%. We conclude that access to an emergency theatre during daytime hours reduced inappropriate delays to hip fracture surgery.

  17. Surgical dislocation of the hip for reduction of acetabular fracture and evaluation of chondral damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, Lalit; Batra, Sahil; Arora, Sumit; Singh, Shailendra; Kumar, Santosh; Gautam, V K

    2014-04-01

    To assess the outcome of open reduction and internal fixation combined with surgical dislocation of the hip for displaced acetabular fractures. 20 men and 2 women aged 20 to 55 (mean, 28) years underwent open reduction and internal fixation combined with surgical dislocation of the hip for displaced acetabular fracture. The most common fracture pattern was bicolumnar (n=12), followed by transverse (n=6) and T-type (n=4). Femoral head chondral lesions were classified as grade 0 (no defect) to grade 4 (osteochondral defect). Fracture fragments were fixed with titanium plates and screws, and the femoral head was redislocated to inspect for intraarticular screws. The association between functional status and acetabular fracture pattern and femoral head chondral lesions was explored. Nine patients had chondral lesions in the femoral head (mostly in the anterosuperior zone), but none in the acetabulum. All femoral heads were viable. Reduction was anatomic in 6 patients and satisfactory in 16. Functional outcome was very good in 6 patients, good in 13, medium in 2, and fair in one. No patient developed avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Four patients had iatrogenic sciatic nerve palsy. One patient developed early degenerative hip arthritis and underwent total hip arthroplasty 14 months later. Surgical dislocation of the hip facilitated anatomic reduction and inspection of any chondral lesions. It did not result in avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  18. Impact of the Holocaust on the Rehabilitation Outcome of Older Patients Sustaining a Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Eliyahu H; Lubart, Emilia; Heymann, Anthony; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Holocaust survivors report a much higher prevalence of osteoporosis and fracture in the hip joint compared to those who were not Holocaust survivors. To evaluate whether being a Holocaust survivor could affect the functional outcome of hip fracture in patients 64 years of age and older undergoing rehabilitation. A retrospective cohort study compromising 140 consecutive hip fracture patients was conducted in a geriatric and rehabilitation department of a university-affiliated hospital. Being a Holocaust survivor was based on registry data. Functional outcome was assessed by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM)TM at admission and discharge from the rehabilitation ward. Data were analyzed by t-test, chi-square test, and linear regression analysis. Total and motor FIM scores at admission (P = 0.004 and P = 0.006, respectively) and total and motor FIM gain scores at discharge (P = 0.008 and P = 0.004 respectively) were significantly higher in non-Holocaust survivors compared with Holocaust survivors. A linear regression analysis showed that being a Holocaust survivor was predictive of lower total FIM scores at discharge (β = -0.17, P = 0.004). Hip fracture in Holocaust survivors showed lower total, motor FIM and gain scores at discharge compared to non-Holocaust survivor patients. These results suggest that being a Holocaust survivor could adversely affect the rehabilitation outcome following fracture of the hip and internal fixation.

  19. The National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD) - Using a national clinical audit to raise standards of nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Antony; Boulton, Christopher; Hertz, Karen; Ellis, Michael; Burgon, Vivienne; Rai, Sunil; Wakeman, Rob

    2017-08-01

    The National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD) is a key clinical governance programme for staff working in trauma wards across England, Wales and Northern Ireland. It uses prospectively collected information about the 65,000 people who present with hip fracture each year, and links these with information about the quality of care and outcome for each individual. The NHFD can, therefore, provide a picture of the care offered to frail older people with this injury - people who, between them, occupy nearly half of inpatient trauma beds. The NHFD uses its website (www.nhfd.co.uk) to feed back live information to each of the countries' 180 trauma units - allowing them to bench mark their performance against national standards, and against that in other hospitals. This helps to develop a consensus over the best care for frail older people in areas where national guidance is not yet available. This article shows how the NHFD is contributing to four key aspects of patient safety and nursing care: the prevention of pressure ulcers and post-operative delirium, the monitoring of falls incidence across hospitals and nutritional assessment of patients with hip fracture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of nutritional supplementation on sarcopenia and recovery in hip fracture patients. A multi-centre randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malafarina, Vincenzo; Uriz-Otano, Francisco; Malafarina, Concetta; Martinez, J Alfredo; Zulet, M Angeles

    2017-07-01

    Functional deterioration and reduced mobility in elderly patients with a hip fracture are associated with a loss of both muscle mass and function (sarcopenia). The aim of this study was to assess whether oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) improves muscle mass and nutritional markers (BMI, proteins) in elderly patients with hip fracture. Patients aged 65 years and over with hip fractures admitted to either of two rehabilitation facilities were included. Patients with diabetes, with Barthel index scores patients to the intervention group (IG) or the control group (CG). Those in the IG received a standard diet plus ONS in the form of two bottles a day of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB), while those in the CG received a standard diet only. The intervention was not blinded. In order to assess changes in body mass index (BMI), anthropometric parameters were recorded at both admission and discharge. Patients' functional situation was evaluated using the Barthel index (BI) and the Functional Ambulation Categories (FAC) score. Muscle mass was assessed using bioelectrical impedance analysis, which allowed us to calculate appendicular lean mass (aLM). The outcome variable was the difference between aLM upon discharge, minus aLM upon admission (Δ-aLM). Of the 107 randomised patients (IG n55, CG n52), 49 finished the study in the IG and 43 in the CG. BMI and aLM were stable in IG patients, whilst these parametres decreased in the CG. A significant difference was observed between the two groups (pelderly patients with hip fractures. Orally administered nutritional supplements can help to prevent the onset of sarcopenic obesity. www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01404195, registered 22 July 2011, HYPERPROT-GER Study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonoperative care for hip fracture in the elderly: the influence of race, income, and comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Mark D; Fleisher, Lee A; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Mi, Lanyu; Silber, Jeffrey H

    2010-04-01

    Hip fracture occurs in 340,000 older adults each year. Operative repair is the standard of care, maximizing the chances of functional recovery. Not receiving operative care may condemn patients to a lifetime of pain and potential immobility. To measure the incidence of nonoperative treatment for first-time hip fracture in a population-based cohort and to measure the odds of nonoperative treatment of hip fracture among patients of differing race and income. Retrospective cohort study of 165,861 Medicare beneficiaries admitted for hip fracture between March 31, 2002 and December 31, 2006 to hospitals in New York, Illinois, and Texas. Odds of nonoperative management of hip fracture, adjusted for fracture characteristics, comorbidities, source of admission, age, sex, race, income, and individual hospital effects. Nonoperative management occurred in 6.2% of patients (N = 10,283). After adjustment, black patients had a 79% increase in the odds of nonoperative management as compared with whites (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.64-1.95). Low income itself was not associated with a change in the odds of nonoperative care. Among patients not receiving operative repair, blacks demonstrated lower mortality than whites at 7 days (7.96% vs. 20.17%, P < 0.0001) and 30 days (24.14% vs. 38.22%, P < 0.0001). Black race predicts an increased odds of nonoperative care for hip fracture. Among patients receiving nonoperative care, black patients demonstrated increased survival compared with whites. These results are consistent with differential selection of operative candidates by patient race.

  2. Hip fracture incidence is decreasing in the high incidence area of Oslo, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støen, R O; Nordsletten, L; Meyer, H E; Frihagen, J F; Falch, J A; Lofthus, C M

    2012-10-01

    This study reports a significant decrease in age-adjusted incidence rates of hip fracture for women in Oslo, Norway, even compared with data from 1978/1979. Use of bisphosphonate may explain up to one third of the decline in the incidence. The aims of the present study were to report the current incidence of hip fractures in Oslo and to estimate the influence of bisphosphonates on the current incidence. Using the electronic diagnosis registers and lists from the operating theaters of the hospitals of Oslo, all patients with ICD-10 codes S72.0 and S72.1 (hip fracture) in 2007 were identified. Medical records of all identified patients were reviewed to verify the diagnosis. Age- and gender-specific annual incidence rates were calculated using the population of Oslo on January 1, 2007 as the population at risk. Data on the use of bisphosphonates were obtained from official registers. A total number of 1,005 hip fractures, 712 (71%) in women, were included. The age-adjusted fracture rates per 10,000 for the age group >50 years were 82.0 for women and 39.1 for men in 2007, compared with 110.8 and 41.4 in 1996/1997, 116.5 and 42.9 in 1988/1989, and 97.5 and 34.5 in 1978/1979, respectively. It was estimated that the use of bisphosphonates may explain up to 13% of the decline in incidence in women aged 60-69 years and up to 34% in women aged 70-79 years. The incidence of hip fractures in women in Oslo has decreased significantly during the last decade and is now at a lower level than in 1978/1979. This reduction was not evident in men. The incidence of hip fractures in Oslo is, however, still the highest in the world.

  3. The Tribology of Explanted Hip Resurfacings Following Early Fracture of the Femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Lord

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this work was to determine the wear volumes and surface roughness values of a cohort of retrieved hip resurfacings which were removed due to early femoral fracture, infection and avascular necrosis (AVN. Nine resurfacing femoral heads were obtained following early fracture of the femur, a further five were retrieved due to infection and AVN. All fourteen were measured for volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Wear rates were then calculated and regions of the articulating surface were divided into “worn” and “unworn”. Roughness values in these regions were measured using a non-contacting profilometer. The mean time to fracture was 3.7 months compared with 44.4 months for retrieval due to infection and AVN. Average wear rates in the early fracture heads were 64 times greater than those in the infection and AVN retrievals. Given the high wear rates of the early fracture components, such wear may be linked to an increased risk of femoral neck fracture.

  4. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopy during fixation of hip fracture and fracture of ankle: Effect of surgical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botchu Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the years, there has been a tremendous increase in the use of fluoroscopy in orthopaedics. The risk of contracting cancer is significantly higher for an orthopedic surgeon. Hip and spine surgeries account for 99% of the total radiation dose. The amount of radiation to patients and operating surgeon depends on the position of the patient and the type of protection used during the surgery. A retrospective study to assess the influence of the radiation exposure of the operating surgeon during fluoroscopically assisted fixation of fractures of neck of femur (dynamic hip screw and ankle (Weber B was performed at a district general hospital in the United Kingdom. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with undisplaced intertrochanteric fracture were included in the hip group, and 60 patients with isolated fracture of lateral malleolus without communition were included in the ankle group. The hip and ankle groups were further divided into subgroups of 20 patients each depending on the operative experience of the operating surgeon. All patients had fluoroscopically assisted fixation of fracture by the same approach and technique. The radiation dose and screening time of each group were recorded and analyzed. Results: The radiation dose and screening time during fluoroscopically assisted fixation of fracture neck of femur were significantly high with surgeons and trainees with less than 3 years of surgical experience in comparison with surgeons with more than 10 years of experience. The radiation dose and screening time during fluoroscopically assisted fixation of Weber B fracture of ankle were relatively independent of operating surgeon′s surgical experience. Conclusion: The experience of operating surgeon is one of the important factors affecting screening time and radiation dose during fluoroscopically assisted fixation of fracture neck of femur. The use of snapshot pulsed fluoroscopy and involvement of senior surgeons could

  5. Improving older frail hip fracture patients’ experience and recovery:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Taylor Kelly, Hélène; Kjøller varmarken, Tine

    Background: An Interregional Project named Pro-hip aims at improving hip surgery patients’ outcomes based on best evidence in relation to rehabilitation; nutrition; urine retention; delirium and pressure ulcers. This presentation is an introduction to a new evidence based standard developed in th...... Reduction of workload Cost benefits...

  6. Long-Term Survival of the Native Hip After a Minimally Displaced, Nonoperatively Treated Acetabular Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke-Jenssen, John; Wikerøy, Annette K B; Røise, Olav; Øvre, Stein Arne; Madsen, Jan Erik

    2016-08-17

    Few studies have evaluated the long-term results for nonoperatively treated acetabular fractures. The purpose of this study was to describe the long-term survival of the native acetabulum as well as the clinical and radiographic outcome for patients with nonoperatively treated acetabular fractures. All patients with acetabular fractures are prospectively registered in our acetabular fracture database and followed up at regular intervals for up to 20 years. We identified 236 patients (237 fractures) who had been treated nonoperatively between 1994 and 2004; 51 patients with incomplete data were excluded. For the survival analysis, 186 fractures with an average follow-up of 9 years (range, 1 to 20 years) were included. For the long-term clinical outcome, 104 patients with an average follow-up of 12.1 years (range, 9 to 20 years) were included. The 10-year survival of the native hips was 94% (111 hips were at risk). Eighty-nine percent of the patients had a good or excellent Harris hip score, and 88% had a good or excellent Merle d'Aubigné and Postel score. The most important negative predictor for clinical outcome and survival of the hip was a fracture step-off of ≥2 mm measured in the obturator oblique radiograph. Nonoperative treatment of minimally displaced acetabular fractures yields good to excellent long-term results. For patients with a questionable indication for fracture surgery, oblique radiographs (Judet views) are a helpful tool in the decision-making process, as a fracture step-off of ≥2 mm is a strong predictor for a poor clinical and radiographic result at 10 years. Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  7. Femoral Varus Osteotomy for Hip Instability after Traumatic Fracture Dislocations of the Hip Associated with Femoral Head Fractures: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Miyamoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture of the femoral head and the acetabulum with traumatic dislocation of the hip is a severe injury representing various types and unfavorable outcome. We showed a 45-year-old man with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga. An immediate closed reduction was achieved followed by open reduction and internal fixation via a posterior approach 6 days later. However, dislocation occurred three times without traumatic events after three weeks. CT demonstrated no displacement of posterior fragments or implant failure. Femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was performed to gain concentric stability and successfully resolved recurrent dislocation. Another 45-year-old woman with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga also underwent closed reduction initially and then continued conservative treatment. After eight weeks, when she started gait training, progressive pain became symptomatic. Persistent hip pain at weight bearing was not improved in spite of arthroscopic synovectomy and osteochondroplasty. Two years after injury, femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was indicated and her refractory pain was resolved gradually. We suggest that femoral varus osteotomy should be considered for superolateral subluxation associated fracture dislocation of the hip in Pipkin type-IV and coxa valga.

  8. Hip fracture evaluation with alternatives of total hip arthroplasty versus hemiarthroplasty (HEALTH): protocol for a multicentre randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Devereaux, P J; Einhorn, Thomas A; Thabane, Lehana; Schemitsch, Emil H; Koval, Kenneth J; Frihagen, Frede; Poolman, Rudolf W; Tetsworth, Kevin; Guerra-Farfán, Ernesto; Madden, Kim; Sprague, Sheila; Guyatt, Gordon

    2015-02-13

    Hip fractures are a leading cause of mortality and disability worldwide, and the number of hip fractures is expected to rise to over 6 million per year by 2050. The optimal approach for the surgical management of displaced femoral neck fractures remains unknown. Current evidence suggests the use of arthroplasty; however, there is lack of evidence regarding whether patients with displaced femoral neck fractures experience better outcomes with total hip arthroplasty (THA) or hemiarthroplasty (HA). The HEALTH trial compares outcomes following THA versus HA in patients 50 years of age or older with displaced femoral neck fractures. HEALTH is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial where 1434 patients, 50 years of age or older, with displaced femoral neck fractures from international sites are randomised to receive either THA or HA. Exclusion criteria include associated major injuries of the lower extremity, hip infection(s) and a history of frank dementia. The primary outcome is unplanned secondary procedures and the secondary outcomes include functional outcomes, patient quality of life, mortality and hip-related complications-both within 2 years of the initial surgery. We are using minimisation to ensure balance between intervention groups for the following factors: age, prefracture living, prefracture functional status, American Society for Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class and centre number. Data analysts and the HEALTH Steering Committee are blinded to the surgical allocation throughout the trial. Outcome analysis will be performed using a χ(2) test (or Fisher's exact test) and Cox proportional hazards modelling estimate. All results will be presented with 95% CIs. The HEALTH trial has received local and McMaster University Research Ethics Board (REB) approval (REB#: 06-151). Outcomes from the primary manuscript will be disseminated through publications in academic journals and presentations at relevant orthopaedic conferences. We will communicate trial

  9. Post-operative rounds by anaesthesiologists after hip fracture surgery: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Christensen, Dorte Stig; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efforts to optimize the peri-operative care of hip fracture patients through multidisciplinary intervention have focused on orthopaedic-geriatric liaisons, which have not resulted in significant outcome changes. The early phase of rehabilitation could potentially be optimized through...... conditions. CONCLUSION: This pilot study, with insufficient power to show significant differences in outcome, supports further evaluation of the concept of intensified orthopaedic-anaesthesiological co-operation after hip fracture surgery. Such a randomized trial should evaluate economic and clinical outcome...... a multidisciplinary effort between anaesthesiologists and orthopaedic surgeons. METHODS: During the first 25 weeks of 2004, 98 consecutive community-residing patients admitted to a hip fracture unit received daily rounds by anaesthesiologists during the first four post-operative days, on weekdays only, focusing...

  10. High perceived caregiver burden for relatives of patients following hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Ortiz-Piña, Mariana; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2018-01-01

    woman and 94 (55%) were daughters of the patient. Seventy-nine of the 172 (46%) caregivers perceived a high level of burden (≥ 7 points on the Caregiver Strain Index) at the hospital. The corresponding numbers with perceived high level of burden at 1-month, 3-months, and 1-year were 87 (50%), 61 (36...... at four points during 1 year following hip fracture surgery in a regional hospital in southern Spain. The perceived caregiver burden was assessed using the Caregiver Strain Index (0-13 points). RESULTS: The mean (Standard Deviation) age of the 172 caregivers was 56 (13) years, of which 133 (77%) were...... her burden of care should be included as one of the objectives of rehabilitation treatment. The caregivers of hip fracture patients must be considered as part of the treatment during the patient's recovery period, and patient handling training should be provided to the caregivers of hip fracture...

  11. The effects of liberal versus restrictive transfusion thresholds on ambulation after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai B; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Jensen, Pia Søe

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perioperative anemia leads to increased morbidity and mortality and potentially inhibits rehabilitation after hip fracture surgery. As such, the optimum transfusion threshold after hip fracture surgery is unknown. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 120 elderly, cognitively intact hip...... fracture patients admitted from their own home were randomly assigned to receive transfusion at a hemoglobin threshold of 10.0 g per dL (liberal) versus 8.0 g per dL (restrictive) in the entire perioperative period. Patients were treated according to a well-defined multimodal rehabilitation program....... Primary outcome was postoperative functional mobility measured with the cumulated ambulation score (CAS). RESULTS: Patients in the liberal group received transfusions more frequently than those in the restrictive group (44 patients vs. 22 patients; p transfusions during...

  12. Cost-effectiveness of nutritional intervention in elderly subjects after hip fracture. A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wyers, C. E.; Reijven, P. L. M.; Evers, S. M. A. A.; Willems, P. C.; Heyligers, I. C.; Verburg, A. D.; van Helden, S.; Dagnelie, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hip fracture patients can benefit from nutritional supplementation during their recovery. Up to now, cost-effectiveness evaluation of nutritional intervention in these patients has not been performed. Costs of nutritional intervention are relatively low as compared with medical costs. Cost-effectiveness evaluation shows that nutritional intervention is likely to be cost-effective. Introduction Previous research on the effect of nutritional intervention on clinical outcome in hip fract...

  13. Simultaneous Periprosthetic Fractures of the Femur and the Acetabulum After Bipolar Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia-Paraskevi; Drosos, Georgios; Vogiatzaki, Theodosia; Tilkeridis, Konstantinos; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-12-22

    BACKGROUND Although periprosthetic fractures of the femur are a recognized complication of total hip arthroplasty, periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are rare. Simultaneous periprosthetic fractures of both the acetabulum and the femur have not been reported, to our knowledge. CASE REPORT We report a simultaneous fracture of the acetabulum and the femur in a 68-year-old female patient who had previously sustained a subcapital fracture of the femur, treated with a bipolar uncemented prosthesis. We discuss the possible mechanism of this combination of fractures. CONCLUSIONS Simultaneous periprosthetic fractures of the femur and the acetabulum can occur if, in the presence of osteoporotic bone, the metallic femoral head has migrated medially in the acetabulum while the femoral stem is not loose.

  14. Use of proton pump inhibitors and risk of fragility hip fracture in a Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Carlen; Formiga, Francesc; Coderch, Marta; Hoyo, Jordi; Ferriz, Gemma; Casanovas, Jordi; Monteserín, Rosa; Brotons, Carlos; Rojas, Marta; Moral, Irene

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether there is an increased risk of hip fracture associated with the use of proton pump inhibitors in a Mediterranean area after adjusting for other potential risk factors. Retrospective multicenter case-control study carried out in 6 primary health care centers in Catalonia, Spain. Cases were patients aged 50years and over with a fragility hip fracture registered between January 2007 and December 2010, matched with 2 controls by sex and age. use of proton pump inhibitors (type, dosage) in the 5years previous to the hip fracture, socio-demographic data, body mass index, alcohol and tobacco consumption as well as health conditions and drugs associated with an increase risk of fragility hip fracture. 358 cases were matched with 698 controls. The mean age was 82years old in both groups. Women represented 77.1% in the case group and 76.9% in the control group. Crude association between proton pump inhibitors and hip fracture was 1.44 (95% CI, 1.09-1.89) and adjusted OR was 1.24 (95% CI, 0.93-1.65). No association was found with the continuous or discontinuous use of proton pump inhibitors, OR 1.17 (95% CI, 0.77-1.79), and OR of 1.16 (95% CI, 0.85-1.60) respectively. No association was found when restricting the analysis by sex, OR of 1.19 (95% CI, 0.27-5.14) or by age, younger or older than 80years, OR of 0.72 (95% CI, 0.24-2.15). The use of proton pump inhibitors was not associated with an increased risk of hip fracture after adjusting for other risk factors in a Mediterranean area. This result suggests the existence of protective environmental factors linked to this southern area of Europe that eventually could compensate for the potential harm produced by proton pump inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Does lesser trochanter implication affect hip flexion strength in proximal femur fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprato, A; Lo Baido, R; Crosio, A; Matteotti, R; Grosso, E; Massè, A

    2015-10-01

    In pertrochanteric and intertrochanteric femoral fractures, the avulsion of the lesser trochanter by the pull of the iliopsoas muscle is not uncommon. This fragment is not commonly fixed because the avulsion of the lesser is tough to not influence the clinical outcome but up to date there is no evidence to support this statement. The aim of this study is to evaluate if lesser trochanter implication affects psoas muscle strength in proximal femur fracture. Patients with a consolidated intertrochanteric or pertrochanteric fracture associated or not with lesser trochanter fracture were enrolled, respectively, in group A and group B. Criteria of inclusion were the achievement of an anatomic reduction with gamma nail and a complete consolidation of the fracture. Criteria of exclusion were a follow-up shorter than 6 months and age over 65 years old at surgery. Patients were retrospectively reviewed for the purpose of this study. Range of motion, modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), flexion strength with hip in neutral position, at 90° of flexion and in "figure four" position were evaluated on injured and healthy side. On the pre-operative X-rays, the vertical displacement of the lesser trochanter was calculated. Groups A and B showed no significant difference in age and follow-up. No statistical difference between the two groups was found in range of motion, mean mHHS, hip flexion strength at 90° of hip flexion. Lesser trochanter fracture group showed a significantly reduced strength in flexion with hip in neutral flexion (mean difference between two groups was 18.5 kgf). Lesser trochanter displacement showed a significant correlation with strength at 90° of flexion. Our results showed that lesser trochanter implication may result in decreased hip flexion strength. Lesser trochanter displacement is directly correlated with flexion strength. Further studies will be necessary to understand if lesser trochanter fixation may be a good solution for those patients.

  16. Hip fracture risk and different gene polymorphisms in the turkish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan Dinçel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to discuss the risk assessments for both patients with hip fractures due to fall-related, low energy traumas and non-fractured control patients by examining bone mineral density and genetic data, two features associated with femoral strength and hip fracture risk. METHODS: Twenty-one osteoporotic patients with proximal femur fractures and non-fractured, osteoporotic, age- and gender-matched controls were included in the study. Bone mineral density measurements were performed with a Lunar DXA. The COL1A1, ESR, VDR, IL-6, and OPG genes were amplified, and labeling of specific gene sequences was performed in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction using the osteo/check PCR kit from the whole blood of all subjects. RESULTS: The bone mineral density (trochanteric and total bone mineral density values of the fracture group was significantly decreased relative to the control group. We were not able to conduct statistical tests for the polymorphisms of the COL1A1, ESR, and VDR genes because our results were expressed in terms of frequency. Although they were not significant, we did examine differences in the IL-6 and OPG genes polymorphisms between the two groups. We concluded that increasing the number of cases will allow us to evaluate racial differences in femoral hip fracture risk by genotypes.

  17. Risk of hip fractures associated with benzodiazepines: Applying common protocol to a multi-database nested case-control study. The protect project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Requena, Gema; Logie, John; González-González, Rocío; Gardarsdottir, Helga|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/321858131; Afonso, Ana; Souverein, Patrick C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243074948; Merino, Elisa Martin; Boudiaf, Nada; Huerta, Consuelo; Bate, Andrew; Alvarez, Yolanda; García-Rodríguez, Luis A.; Reynolds, Robert; Schlienger, Raymond G.; De Groot, Mark C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313936455; Klungel, Olaf H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181447649; De Abajo, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between benzodiazepines (BZD) and hip fractures has been estimated in several observational studies although diverse methodologies and definitions have hampered comparability. Objectives: To evaluate the discrepancies in the risk estimates of hip/femur fractures

  18. Risk factors and clinical outcomes of delirium in osteoporotic hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon Yub; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Eugene; Kwon, Ki Bum; Han, Byeong-Ryong; Cho, Yongun; Park, Jai Hyung

    2017-01-01

    This study is performed to identify risk factors for delirium in osteoporotic hip fractures and to evaluate the hospitalization cost and clinical outcomes of delirium in osteoporotic hip. A total of 221 patients with osteoporotic hip fractures were assessed for eligibility between 2010 and 2014. Among them, 37 patients with delirium were allocated into the delirium group (group D) and 37 patients without delirium were allocated into the non-delirium group (group ND) by matching demographic factors. Risk factors such as time between admission and operation, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, cognitive impairment, preoperative urinary catheter, electrolyte imbalance, preoperative hemoglobin, polymedication (medications > 5), pneumonia, anesthesia time, operation time, estimated blood loss, and total amount of transfusion were evaluated for correlation with incidence of delirium. The hospitalization cost was evaluated, and clinical outcomes such as readmission, mortality, and activity level at 1-year follow-up were evaluated. In multivariate analysis, polymedication ( p = 0.028) and preoperative indwelling urinary catheter insertion status ( p = 0.007) were related to the incidence of delirium in patients with osteoporotic hip fractures. Group D showed a significantly higher hospitalization cost compared to group ND. However, delirium did not have a significant effect on length of hospital stay, readmission rate, postoperative 1-year mortality, and activity level. Polymedication and preoperative urinary catheter were related to perioperative delirium. In addition, delirium in osteoporotic hip fractures may not have a detrimental effect on clinical outcomes; however, hospitalization cost seemed to be increased due to delirium.

  19. Geriatric Traumatology : The effectiviness of integrated orthogeriatric treatment on 1-year outcome in frail elderly with hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folbert, Ellis

    2017-01-01

    In an elderly person, a hip fracture can have severe consequences for the patient due to the risk of loss of mobility and early death. As the population ages, the number of patients with hip fractures will increase. The treatment is complex due to the occurrence of several disorders, malnutrition,

  20. Correlation of Functional and Nutritional Status in Elderly Hip Fracture in a Hospital of High Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Chavarro, Diego Andrés; Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; Gutiérrez, William Arbey; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Cañón, Arleth Patricia; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2014-01-01

    The importance of hip fractures is given not only by their high frequency, but also the associated mortality, morbidity and high economic and social cost.Aim: To determine the functionality of the individual after suffering a fall and consequently a hip fracture.Methods: Prospective observational study analytical. Results: 44 patients who met the inclusion criteria were included. The average age was 81.8 SD ± 8; 59 % were women. Of the total of 44 patients revealed that 13 patients were indep...

  1. From Complication to Diagnosis: Prostate Cancer in an Acetabular Fracture Patient Presenting with Hip Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Terlemez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available According to the Turkish Public Health Institution data, prostate cancer is the 2nd most common cancer in men. Advanced stage patients may apply with pain in the lower back, hips, or upper thighs. In this case report, a 66 year-old man who has hip pain referred to our rheumatology department with sacroiliitis is presented. Further investigations revealed that hip pain was the result of acetabular fracture due to osteoblastic bone metastases. Significant pain palliation was achieved in the patient who is diagnosed with primer prostate carcinoma after radiation therapy.

  2. Type II Intertrochanteric Fractures: Proximal Femoral Nailing (PFN Versus Dynamic Hip Screw(DHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Jonnes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intertrochanteric fracture is one of the most common fractures of the hip especially in the elderly with osteoporotic bones, usually due to low-energy trauma like simple falls. Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS is still considered the gold standard for treating intertrochanteric fractures by many. Not many studies compare the DHS with Proximal femoral nail (PFN, in Type II intertrochanteric fractures (Boyd and Griffin classification. This study was done to compare the functional and radiological outcome of PFN with DHS in treatment of Type II intertrochanteric fractures.   Methods: From October 2012 to March 2015, a prospective comparative study was done where 30 alternative cases of type II intertrochanteric fractures of hip were operated using PFN or DHS. Intraoperative complications were noted. Functional outcome was assessed using Harris Hip Score and radiological findings were compared at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results: The average age of the patients was 60 years. In our series we found that patients with DHS had increased intraoperative blood loss (159ml, longer duration of surgery (105min, and required longer time for mobilization while patients who underwent PFN had lower intraoperative blood loss (73ml, shorter duration of surgery (91min, and allowed early mobilization. The average limb shortening in DHS group was 9.33 mm as compared with PFN group which was only 4.72 mm. The patients treated with PFN started early ambulation as they had better Harris Hip Score in the early post-op period. At the end of 12th month, there was not much difference in the functional outcome between the two groups. Conclusion: PFN is better than DHS in type II inter-trochanteric fractures in terms of decreased blood loss, reduced duration of surgery, early weight bearing and mobilization, reduced hospital stay, decreased risk of infection and decreased complications.

  3. The effects of different nutritional measurements on delayed wound healing after hip fracture in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiong Jiong; Yang, Huilin; Qian, Haixin; Huang, Lixin; Guo, Zhongxing; Tang, Tiansi

    2010-03-01

    It has been well recognized that malnutrition causes wounds to heal inadequately and incompletely. Malnutrition is often observed in the elderly, and it appears to be more severe in patients with hip fracture than in the general aging population. Few prospective studies give a detailed account of the identification and classification of nutritional status in the elderly. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different nutritional measurements on wound healing status after hip fracture in the elderly. From September 2002 to December 2007, 207 hip fracture patients older than 60 y treated surgically were reviewed for preoperative nutritional status. There were 81 males and 126 females with an average age of 75.93 y (62-91 y); 131 cases with femoral neck fractures, 76 cases with intertrochanteric fractures. Parameters indicative of nutritional status (serum albumin, serum transferrin, serum pre-albumin, and total lymphocyte count levels) at the time of admission were assessed, along with anthropometric measurements, Rainey MacDonald nutritional index, and MNA tool. Suture removal was performed on postoperative day 14. Delayed wound healing complicated 46 (22.2%) of the 207 cases. The preoperative serum transferring total lymphocyte count levels, MNA total score, and Rainey MacDonald nutritional index were significantly lower for patients who subsequently had delayed wound healing. When all variables were subjected to multivariate analysis, only total lymphocyte count levels and MNA total score showed significant value in predicting which patients would have delayed wound healing. Through prophylactic antibiotics and adherence to strict aseptic precautions, on follow-up, wound healing was normal in all patients. Patients at risk for delayed wound healing problems after hip fracture can be identified using relatively inexpensive laboratory test such as TLC and MNA tool. The clinician must be aware of the risk values of both measurements. We believe

  4. Predicting Hip Fracture Type With Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2015-11-01

    Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual-energy X-ray (DXA)-based methods have shown limited improvement. Fracture types have distinct relationships to predictors, but few studies have subdivided fracture into types, because this necessitates regional measurements and more fracture cases. This work makes use of cortical bone mapping (CBM) to accurately assess, with no prior anatomical presumptions, the distribution of properties related to fracture type. CBM uses QCT data to measure the cortical and trabecular properties, accurate even for thin cortices below the imaging resolution. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study is a predictive case-cohort study of men over 65 years old: we analyze 99 fracture cases (44 trochanteric and 55 femoral neck) compared to a cohort of 308, randomly selected from 5994. To our knowledge, this is the largest QCT-based predictive hip fracture study to date, and the first to incorporate CBM analysis into fracture prediction. We show that both cortical mass surface density and endocortical trabecular BMD are significantly different in fracture cases versus cohort, in regions appropriate to fracture type. We incorporate these regions into predictive models using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios, and logistic regression to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Adding CBM to DXA-based BMD leads to a small but significant (p fracture, with AUC increasing from 0.78 to 0.79, assessed using leave-one-out cross-validation. For specific fracture types, the improvement is more significant (p trochanteric fractures and 0.76 to 0.82 for femoral neck fractures. In contrast, adding DXA-based BMD to a CBM-based predictive model does not result in any significant improvement. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

  5. Epidemiology of fragility fractures and fall prevention in the elderly: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Takayuki

    2017-11-01

    Fragility fractures in the elderly is an ongoing concern for orthopaedic surgeons. A 50-year-old woman has a 40% chance of having a vertebral compression fracture in her lifetime. The incidence of vertebral fractures, reported to be more than 10 times higher than that of femoral fractures, is estimated as 1-1.5 million per year in Japan. Vertebral fractures often occur without a fall, whereas the majority of nonvertebral fractures are the consequence of falls; the site of the nonvertebral fracture appears to be dictated by the type of fall. Distal radial fractures commonly occur as a consequence of hand protection during the fall. In older patients, falling load tends to directly affect shoulder and hip joints and lead to proximal humeral and femoral fractures. The incidence of vertebral fractures is increased in women over 50 yr of age, following the same trend as osteoporosis prevalence. Conversely, the mean age for proximal femoral fractures is around 80 yr, and more than 75% of femoral fractures occur in individuals over the age of 75. The prognostic risk of aging is 11-fold greater than that of reduced bone mineral density, and age is another risk factor for femoral fractures. Prophylactic therapy for osteoporosis and femoral fractures was shown to more effective in women in their 70s than in those over the age of 80. Although several approaches, including exercise therapy, vitamin D administration, and environmental adjustment at home, have been reported to be effective in fall prevention, effective fracture prevention approaches in frail elderly individuals have not yet been well established.

  6. Reflections on Hip Fracture Recovery From Older Adults Enrolled in a Clinical Trial

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    Sarah Stott-Eveneshen MA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes patients’ perspectives on recovery during participation in a randomized controlled trial that tested a postoperative hip fracture management program (B4 Clinic, compared with usual care, on mobility. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 50 older adults with hip fracture (from both groups twice over 12 months. A total of 32 women (64% and 18 men (36% participated in the study with a mean age at baseline of 82 (range = 65-98 years. A total of 40 participants reported recovery goals at some point during their recovery from hip fracture but only 18 participants realized their goals within 12 months. Recovering mobility, returning to prefracture activities, and obtaining stable health were the most commonly reported goals. Participants described good social support, access to physiotherapy, and positive perspective as most important to recovery. These factors were influenced by participants’ knowledge, resources, and monthly contact with study staff (perceived as a form of social support. The most frequently reported barriers to participants’ recovery were the onset of complications, pain, and limited access to physiotherapy. Potential implications of these findings include design and modification of new or preexisting fracture programs, prioritizing patient engagement and enhanced knowledge for future clinical research in hip fracture recovery.

  7. Pre-hospital dietary intake correlates with muscle mass at the time of fracture in older hip fractured patients

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    Riccardo eCalvani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Failure to meet an adequate dietary intake is involved in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia and osteoporosis, which in turn increase the risk for falls and fractures, respectively. Older people with hip fracture are often protein-malnourished at hospitalization. Whether low protein-energy intake is associated with muscle atrophy in hip fractured patients is presently unknown. This information is necessary for the development of novel strategies to manage this especially vulnerable patient population. The aim of this study was therefore to explore the relationship between dietary intake and muscle mass in older hip fractured patients.Methods. Analyses were conducted in hip fractured elderly admitted to an orthopedic and trauma surgery ward (University Hospital. Muscle mass was estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis within 24 h from admission. Dietary information was collected via 24-h dietary recall and nutrient intakes calculated by a nutrition software.Results. Among 62 hip fractured patients (mean age 84.6±7.6 years, 84% women, the average energy intake was 929.2±170.3 Kcal/day, with higher values reported by men (1.046.8±231.4 Kcal/day relative to women (906.5±148.3 Kcal/day; p=0.01. Absolute and normalized protein intake was 50.0±13.5 g/day and 0.88±0.27 g/kg (body weight/day, respectively, with no gender differences. A positive correlation was determined between total energy intake and muscle mass (r=0.384; p=0.003. Similarly, protein and leucine consumption was positively correlated with muscle mass (r=0.367 and 0.311, respectively; p=0.005 for both.Conclusions. A low intake of calories, protein and leucine is associated with reduced muscle mass in hip fractured elderly. Given the relevance of sarcopenia as a risk factor for adverse outcomes in this patient population, our findings highlight the importance of a comprehensive dietary assessment for the detection of nutritional deficits predisposing to or aggravating

  8. Risk estimates for hip fracture from clinical and densitometric variables and impact of database selection in Lebanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badra, Mohammad; Mehio-Sibai, Abla; Zeki Al-Hazzouri, Adina; Abou Naja, Hala; Baliki, Ghassan; Salamoun, Mariana; Afeiche, Nadim; Baddoura, Omar; Bulos, Suhayl; Haidar, Rachid; Lakkis, Suhayl; Musharrafieh, Ramzi; Nsouli, Afif; Taha, Assaad; Tayim, Ahmad; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada

    2009-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture incidence vary greatly worldwide. The data, if any, on clinical and densitometric characteristics of patients with hip fractures from the Middle East are scarce. The objective of the study was to define risk estimates from clinical and densitometric variables and the impact of database selection on such estimates. Clinical and densitometric information were obtained in 60 hip fracture patients and 90 controls. Hip fracture subjects were 74 yr (9.4) old, were significantly taller, lighter, and more likely to be taking anxiolytics and sleeping pills than controls. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) database selection resulted in a higher sensitivity and almost equal specificity in identifying patients with a hip fracture compared with the Lebanese database. The odds ratio (OR) and its confidence interval (CI) for hip fracture per standard deviation (SD) decrease in total hip BMD was 2.1 (1.45-3.05) with the NHANES database, and 2.11 (1.36-2.37) when adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI). Risk estimates were higher in male compared with female subjects. In Lebanese subjects, BMD- and BMI-derived hip fracture risk estimates are comparable to western standards. The study validates the universal use of the NHANES database, and the applicability of BMD- and BMI-derived risk fracture estimates in the World Health Organization (WHO) global fracture risk model, to the Lebanese.

  9. Ipsilateral fracture dislocations of the hip and knee joints with contralateral open fracture of the leg: a rare case and its management principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ramesh Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】This paper discussed the injury mecha- nism and management of a patient who had concomitant ipsilateral hip and knee dislocations and contralateral open leg fracture. A 32-year-old man presented with ipsilateral fracture- dislocations of the left hip (Pipkin’s type IV and knee (Moore II joints and contralateral open fracture of the leg bones after a car accident. After emergency resuscitative measures, the hip joint was reduced and Pipkin’s fracture was fixed using Ganz approach with lag screws; knee joint was reduced closely and tibial plateau fracture was stabi- lized with lateral buttress plate and a transarticular span- ning fixator. The open fracture on the other leg was de- brided and fixed with an external fixator. There was no insta- bility in both joints after fixation when he was examined under anesthesia. The fractures united after 3 months and the patient had no residual instability of hip and knee. There was no clinical or radiological evidence of osteonecrosis in the hip joint after 6 months. At one-year follow-up, he had satisfactory functional outcome with almost normal range of motion at both joints. Ipsilateral hip and knee dislocations are rare injuries and more caution is needed for early diagnosis. A timely appro- priate intervention can provide good functional outcome to the patient in this situation. Key words: Hip dislocation; Knee dislocation; Fractures, bone

  10. Declining incidence of hip fractures and the extent of use of anti-osteoporotic therapy in Denmark 1997-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; Vestergaard, P

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of hip fractures in Denmark declined by about 20% from 1997 to 2006 in both men and women aged 60 and over. The decrease in hip fracture rates was much too large to be explained by the extent of anti-osteoporotic medication used in the country. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study.......7% in women. CONCLUSIONS: The decrease in hip fractures is much too large to be explained by the extent of anti-osteoporotic medication. Interestingly, the decrease in fracture rates also applied to men, despite much lower treatment rates. Potential explanations include smoking habits, obesity, national home...... visit programmes, improved general health and vitamin D supplementation....

  11. The Radiographic Union Score for Hip (RUSH) Identifies Radiographic Nonunion of Femoral Neck Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Tym; Osterhoff, Georg; Sprague, Sheila; Garibaldi, Alisha; Bhandari, Mohit; Slobogean, Gerard P

    2016-06-01

    The Radiographic Union Score for Hip (RUSH) is a previously validated outcome instrument designed to improve intra- and interobserver reliability when describing the radiographic healing of femoral neck fractures. The ability to identify fractures that have not healed is important for defining nonunion in clinical trials and predicting patients who will likely require additional surgery to promote fracture healing. We sought to investigate the utility of the RUSH score to define femoral neck fracture nonunion. (1) What RUSH score threshold yields at least 98% specificity to diagnose nonunion at 6 months postinjury? (2) Using the threshold identified, are patients below this threshold at greater risk of reoperation for nonunion and for other indications? A representative sample of 250 out of a cohort of 725 patients with adequate 6-month hip radiographs was analyzed from a multinational elderly hip fracture trial (FAITH). All patients had a femoral neck fracture and were treated with either multiple cancellous screws or a sliding hip screw. Two reviewers independently determined the RUSH score based on the 6-month postinjury radiographs and interrater reliability was assessed with the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). There was substantial reliability between the reviewers assigning the RUSH scores (ICC, 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-0.85). The RUSH score is a checklist-based system that quantifies four measures of healing: cortical bridging, cortical fracture disappearance, trabecular consolidation, and trabecular fracture disappearance.. Fracture healing was determined by two independent methods: (1) concurrently by the treating surgeon using both clinical and radiographic assessments as per routine clinical care; and (2) retrospectively by a Central Adjudication Committee using complete obliteration of the fracture line on radiographs alone. Receiver operating characteristic tables were used to define a RUSH threshold score that was > 98

  12. A prospective study about the preoperative total blood loss in older people with hip fracture

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    Wu JZ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jie-Zhou Wu,1,2,* Peng-Cheng Liu,1,* Wei Ge,1,2 Ming Cai1 1Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2The First Clinical Medical College, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Our study is to confirm that hemoglobin (Hb level is significantly reduced before operation in elderly patients with hip fracture and to specify potential amounts of bleeding and Hb decline in different types of fractures.  Methods: A prospective analysis was made on the clinical data of 349 patients with both a diagnosis of hip fracture and an operative delay of greater than 72 hours between April 2014 and February 2016. Hb concentration was measured on a daily basis before the surgery. Patients were grouped according to the type of fracture (intracapsular and extracapsular for calculation of the total blood loss (TBL. All data analyses were done by SPSS version 21 software.  Results: There was a significant decrease preoperatively in the Hb concentration of nearly 21.55 g/L (standard error of the mean [SEM] 7.67 in patients with extracapsular hip fractures and nearly 15.63 g/L (SEM 6.01 in patients with intracapsular hip fractures. The preoperative TBL in patients with extracapsular fracture was significantly larger compared to that in patients with intracapsular fracture (790.3 mL and 581.7 mL, respectively, P<0.05 using Student’s t-test. We found no significant difference in the preoperative TBL between the male and female groups.  Conclusion: Hip fracture patients have an obvious blood loss after the injury, yet prior to the surgery the Hb levels were found to be normal. Anesthetic and orthopedic staff should pay additional attention to the problem of low preoperative Hb concentration, even if the initial Hb level was apparently normal. Keywords: hip fracture, blood loss, anemia, preoperation, hemoglobin

  13. Management of acetabular fractures with modified posterior approach to spare external hip rotators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlak, Ahmet Y; Selek, Ozgur; Inanir, Murat; Musaoglu, Resul; Baran, Tuncay

    2014-04-01

    In the present study the quality of reduction and incidence of complications in hip external rotator sparing modified posterior approach was assessed in both simple and complex acetabular fractures. This retrospective study includes 37 patients (38 hips) with a mean age of 42.1 years (range 21-60), that had been treated for displaced acetabular fractures from June 2007 through May 2011. They were reviewed at a mean of 3 years (20-67 months). The fractures were classified according to the Letournel-Judet classification. Anatomic reduction and stable fixation of the fracture with less than 2mm residual displacement was achieved in 28 of 38 hips. At the final follow up the patients were evaluated clinically according to Merle d'Aubigne and Postel scoring system which had been modified by Matta and radiologically based on the criteria described by Matta. The clinical results were excellent in 20, good in 8, fair in 8, and poor 2 hips. Complications included two superficial local wound infection and 10 heterotopic ossification with 7 of the cases having grade I heterotopic ossification. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head was not seen in any of the 38 hips. One patient with preoperative sciatic nerve palsy had complete recovery of neurologic function. There were no cases of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. The functional outcome was satisfactory in most of the cases and comparable with other larger series. Using the limited part of Henry's sciatic nerve exposure skin incision - working in the plane between gluteus maximus and the tensor fascia lata as in the classical Gibson approach and two portal external rotator hip sparing approach resulted in good fracture reduction without approach related complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Delirium is a risk factor for institutionalization and functional decline in older hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogseth, Maria; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Engedal, Knut; Juliebø, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    The risk of institutionalization and functional decline is substantial after a hip fracture. However, previous research has not established the extent to which delirium plays a contributory role. Using a prospective design, we studied 207 hip fracture patients aged 65 and older, home-dwelling before the fracture. Patients were screened daily for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method. Proxy information on pre-fracture cognitive function and function in activities of daily living (ADL) was obtained using the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly, 16-item version, and the Barthel ADL Index. After 6months, the patients' functions in ADL measured by the Barthel ADL Index and place of living were registered. Delirium was present in 80 patients (39%) during the hospital stay. After 6months, 33 (16%) were institutionalized. Delirium and lower Barthel ADL Index score were the main risk factors for institutionalization with an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 5.50 (95% CI=1.77-17.11) and 0.54 (95% CI=0.40-0.74) respectively. In patients able to return to their private home, the independent risk factors for functional decline were higher age (B=0.053, 95% CI=0.003-0.102) and delirium (B=0.768, 95% CI=0.039-1.497). At 6month follow-up, delirium constitutes an independent risk factor for institutionalization and functional decline in hip fracture patients living at home prior to the fracture. © 2013.

  15. Cranberry juice concentrate does not significantly decrease the incidence of acquired bacteriuria in female hip fracture patients receiving urine catheter: a double-blind randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnarsson AK

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anna-Karin Gunnarsson,1 Lena Gunningberg,2 Sune Larsson,1 Kenneth B Jonsson1 1Institution of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; 2Institution of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI is a common complication among patients with hip fractures. Receiving an indwelling urinary catheter is a risk factor for developing UTIs. Treatment of symptomatic UTIs with antibiotics is expensive and can result in the development of antimicrobial resistance. Cranberries are thought to prevent UTI. There is no previous research on this potential effect in patients with hip fracture who receive urinary catheters. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate whether intake of cranberry juice concentrate preoperatively decreases the incidence of postoperative UTIs in hip fracture patients that received a urinary catheter. Design: This study employed a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind trial. Method: Female patients, aged 60 years and older, with hip fracture (n=227 were randomized to receive cranberry or placebo capsules daily, from admission, until 5 days postoperatively. Urine cultures were obtained at admission, 5 and 14 days postoperatively. In addition, Euro Qual five Dimensions assessments were performed and patients were screened for UTI symptoms. Result: In the intention-to-treat analysis, there was no difference between the groups in the proportion of patients with hospital-acquired postoperative positive urine cultures at any time point. When limiting the analysis to patients that ingested at least 80% of the prescribed capsules, 13 of 33 (39% in the placebo group and 13 of 47 (28% in the cranberry group (P=0.270 had a positive urine culture at 5 days postoperatively. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.270. Conclusion: Cranberry concentrate does not seem to effectively prevent UTIs in female patients with hip fracture and

  16. New-Onset Depression Following Hip Fracture Is Associated With Increased Length of Stay in Hospital and Rehabilitation Centers

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    Anna C. Phillips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the coincident effects of new-onset depression post hip fracture on length of hospital stay, readmission rates, and incidence of infections in older adults. Participants were 101 hip fracture patients aged 60+ years; 38 developed depressive symptoms following their fracture. Infection rates, readmissions to hospital and rehabilitation units, and length of hospital stay were assessed over the 6 months post hip fracture from hospital and general practitioner notes. Patients who developed depression by Week 6 post fracture were likely to spend more time in hospital/rehabilitation wards (p = .02 and more likely to be discharged to a rehabilitation unit (p < .05. There were no group differences in readmissions or infection rates. New-onset depression coincident with hip fracture in older adults is associated with longer hospital ward stays and greater need for rehabilitation.

  17. Quality of life and psychological consequences in elderly patients after a hip fracture: a review

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    Alexiou KI

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Konstantinos I Alexiou,1 Andreas Roushias,2 Sokratis E Varitimidis,1 Konstantinos N Malizos1 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Trauma, Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece; 2Orthopaedic Department, Apollonion Private Hospital, Nicosia, Cyprus Abstract: Fractures due to fragility of the bone around the hip joint have become a major public health issue, presenting with an increasing incidence due to the growth of the elderly population. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the impact of hip fractures on the quality of life (QoL, health status (HS, functioning, and psychological parameters, and factors influencing the outcome and the appropriate interventions for improvement of elderly patients. A systematic electronic search of the relevant literature was carried out using the CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, Medline (OvidSP, and PubMed databases spanning the time period from their establishment up to January 2017. Forty-nine randomized controlled trials or prospective cohort studies reporting the QoL and psychological outcomes were assessed by using standardized questionnaires. Patients with a hip fracture who were older than 65 years, were included in the analysis. In the majority of elderly patients, the hip fracture seriously affected physical and mental functioning and exerted a severe impact on their HS and health-related QoL (HRQoL. Moreover, most of the patients did not return to prefracture levels of performance regarding both the parameters. The levels of mental, physical, and nutritional status, prior to the fracture, comorbidity, and female gender, in addition to the postoperative pain, complications, and the length of hospital stay, were the factors associated with the outcome. Psychosocial factors and symptoms of depression could increase pain severity and emotional distress. For the displaced femoral neck fractures, the treatment with total hip arthroplasty or hemiarthroplasty, when compared to

  18. Hip fracture history and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer: a Danish population-based study

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    Lamberg AL

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Anna Lei Lamberg1,2, Anne Braae Olesen1,2, Annette Østergaard Jensen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, DenmarkBackground: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with osteoporotic fractures, such as hip fracture. Sun exposure, the natural source of vitamin D, is the main risk factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. In this study, we examined the association between a history of hip fracture and risk of BCC and SCC.Methods: We conducted a population-based case-controlled study using data on BCC and SCC cases registered in the Danish Cancer Registry from 1990–2005. For each case, we selected five population controls matched by age and gender. We used conditional logistic regression to compute odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, while adjusting for chronic diseases and socioeconomic status.Results: A history of hip fracture was associated with a decreased risk of BCC (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.85–0.94, which was most pronounced in cases of tumors on the trunk, extremities, or at multiple sites. We found no association for SCC (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.98–1.17.Conclusion: Our study showed an inverse association between history of hip fracture and risk of BCC, but not of SCC. Sun exposure, resulting in vitamin D synthesis, may explain the link between the two diseases.Keywords: hip fracture, vitamin D, sunlight, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  19. Prediction of Incident Major Osteoporotic and Hip Fractures by Trabecular Bone Score (TBS) and Prevalent Radiographic Vertebral Fracture in Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, John T; Vo, Tien; Taylor, Brent C; Cawthon, Peggy M; Schwartz, Ann V; Bauer, Douglas C; Orwoll, Eric S; Lane, Nancy E; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2016-03-01

    Trabecular bone score (TBS) has been shown to predict major osteoporotic (clinical vertebral, hip, humerus, and wrist) and hip fractures in postmenopausal women and older men, but the association of TBS with these incident fractures in men independent of prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture is unknown. TBS was estimated on anteroposterior (AP) spine dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans obtained at the baseline visit for 5979 men aged ≥65 years enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study and its association with incident major osteoporotic and hip fractures estimated with proportional hazards models. Model discrimination was tested with Harrell's C-statistic and with a categorical net reclassification improvement index, using 10-year risk cutpoints of 20% for major osteoporotic and 3% for hip fractures. For each standard deviation decrease in TBS, there were hazard ratios of 1.27 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17 to 1.39) for major osteoporotic fracture, and 1.20 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.39) for hip fracture, adjusted for FRAX with bone mineral density (BMD) 10-year fracture risks and prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture. In the same model, those with prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture compared with those without prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture had hazard ratios of 1.92 (95% CI 1.49 to 2.48) for major osteoporotic fracture and 1.86 (95% CI 1.26 to 2.74) for hip fracture. There were improvements of 3.3%, 5.2%, and 6.2%, respectively, of classification of major osteoporotic fracture cases when TBS, prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture status, or both were added to FRAX with BMD and age, with minimal loss of correct classification of non-cases. Neither TBS nor prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture improved discrimination of hip fracture cases or non-cases. In conclusion, TBS and prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture are associated with incident major osteoporotic fractures in older men independent of each other

  20. Effects of progressive resistance training on physical disability among older community-dwelling people with history of hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, Johanna; Rantanen, Taina; Heinonen, Ari; Portegijs, Erja; Alén, Markku; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Kallinen, Mauri; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2012-04-01

    Hip fracture is a common trauma in older people, and often leads to decreased muscle strength and increased physical disability. This randomized controlled trial examined whether three months of progressive resistance training (PRT) can reduce physical disability among older people with a history of hip fracture. A population-based sample of 60-85-year-old community- dwelling persons, with hip fractures sustained on average three years earlier, were enrolled in the study. Of 78 people participating in laboratory assessments, those without contraindications for participation in resistance training were randomly assigned to a training group (TG, n=22) or a control group (CG, n=21). TG took part in resistance training for three months twice a week. Training focused on lower limb muscles. Disability was assessed by a validated questionnaire containing six questions on activities of daily living (ADL) and nine on instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). A sum score was calculated separately for both items. High scores indicated more difficulties. Group differences were analysed with the Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests. The effects of PRT on disability were tested with the McNemar test and by covariance analysis (ANCOVA). TG and CG were comparable with respect to gender, age, chronic diseases, BMI, time since fracture, self-reported health, and level of physical activity at baseline. The ADL sum score in TG was 1.8 (2.0) at baseline and 1.1 (1.3) after follow-up; in CG values were 1.7 (1.8) and 1.5 (1.8) (ANCOVA p=0.034). IADL sum scores in TG were 3.9 (4.6) at baseline and 2.2 (3.8) after follow-up, and in CG 3.4 (3.6) and 2.4 (2.3) (ANCOVA p=0.529). Progressive resistance training reduced self-reported difficulties in ADL, even several years after fracture. More research is still needed on how to prevent physical disability among community-dwelling older people, especially after hip fracture.

  1. Short-Term Relationship between Hip Fracture and Weather Conditions in Two Spanish Health Areas with Different Climates

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    José María Tenías

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate differences in the short-term relationship between weather conditions and the incidence of hip fracture in people aged 65 and over among two regions of Spain. Methods. Hip fracture incidence was calculated for the years 2000–2008 for residents of Health Area 14 in Valencian Community (Mediterranean climate and the “Mancha Centro” Health Area in Castilla-La Mancha (inland climate, Spain. The relationship between hip fracture incidence and weather was analyzed with a case-crossover design and explored in subgroups defined by sex, age, and fracture type. Results. In the inland area, a positive and significant tendency for hip fracture incidence was observed (annual increase: 1.5% whereas in the Mediterranean area a seasonal increase of 9% was noted in autumn and winter with respect to spring. Weather conditions, especially wind, were significantly associated with hip fracture incidence: days with more frequent windy periods and/or a greater wind velocity were associated with an increase in hip fracture incidence of 51% in the Mediterranean area and 44% in the inland area. Conclusions. Hip fracture incidence exhibits seasonal changes that differ between the Mediterranean and inland areas. The short-term relationship with climate, although similar in both areas, may partly explain these seasonal changes.

  2. Anatomical Variance in Acetabular Anteversion Does Not Predict Hip Fracture Patterns in the Elderly: A Retrospective Study in 135 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kamath, Megan Y.; Coleman, Nathan W.; Belkoff, Stephen M.; Mears, Simon C.

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that variances in the anatomy of the acetabulum determine the type of hip fracture in elderly patients. Based on this concept, an overly anteverted acetabulum would lead to impingement of the femoral neck against the posterior rim of the acetabulum, causing a femoral neck fracture, whereas with a retroverted acetabulum, external rotation of the hip would be limited by the capsular tissues attached to the trochanteric region, causing a trochanteric fracture. To test the h...

  3. Low Levels of Hemoglobin at Admission Are Associated With Increased 30-Day Mortality in Patients With Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praetorius, Katrine; Madsen, Christian M; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    in patients with anemia (type of fracture, gender, and comorbidities (Charlson score) slightly attenuated the risk estimate (HR: 1.21, CI: 1.03-1.41, P = .02). CONCLUSION: This study......INTRODUCTION: Previous smaller studies suggest that anemia is a risk factor for mortality in patients with hip fracture. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the correlation between hemoglobin at admission with 30-day mortality following a hip fracture in a large-scale study. PATIENTS...

  4. Epidemiology of hip fracture and the development of FRAX in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povoroznyuk, V V; Grygorieva, N V; Kanis, J A; Ev, McCloskey; Johansson, H; Harvey, N C; Korzh, M O; Strafun, S S; Vaida, V M; Klymovytsky, F V; Vlasenko, R O; Forosenko, V S

    2017-12-01

    A country-specific FRAX model has been developed for the Ukraine to replace the Austrian model hitherto used. Comparison of the Austrian and Ukrainian models indicated that the former markedly overestimated fracture probability whilst correctly stratifying risk. FRAX has been used to estimate osteoporotic fracture risk since 2009. Rather than using a surrogate model, the Austrian version of FRAX was adopted for clinical practice. Since then, data have become available on hip fracture incidence in the Ukraine. The incidence of hip fracture was computed from three regional estimates and used to construct a country-specific FRAX model for the Ukraine. The model characteristics were compared with those of the Austrian FRAX model, previously used in Ukraine by using all combinations of six risk factors and eight values of BMD (total number of combinations =512). The relationship between the probabilities of a major fracture derived from the two versions of FRAX indicated a close correlation between the two estimates (r > 0.95). The Ukrainian version, however, gave markedly lower probabilities than the Austrian model at all ages. For a major osteoporotic fracture, the median probability was lower by 25% at age 50 years and the difference increased with age. At the age of 60, 70 and 80 years, the median value was lower by 30, 53 and 65%, respectively. Similar findings were observed for men and for hip fracture. The Ukrainian FRAX model should enhance accuracy of determining fracture probability among the Ukrainian population and help to guide decisions about treatment. The study also indicates that the use of surrogate FRAX models or models from other countries, whilst correctly stratifying risk, may markedly over or underestimate the absolute fracture probability.

  5. Geriatric Intervention in Elderly Patients with Hip Fracture in an Orthopaedic Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Merete; Damsgaard, Else Marie Skjøde; Hougaard, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fracture is a common cause of long hospital stay in the elderly. Approximately one third of these patients die within the first year. As a consequence geriatric and orthopedic col-laboration (orthogeriatrics) has been organized in different ways. The aim of this study is to eva-...... patient outcomes. The concept should be further developed particularly among the frail elderly....

  6. Factors with independent influence on the 'timed up and go' test in patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Foss, Nicolai Bang; Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    values of TUG performances and determine the influence of individual and clinical factors on TUG-test scores in patients with hip fracture. METHOD: In this prospective, descriptive study, a total of 196 consecutive patients over the age of 60, and able to perform the TUG when discharged directly...

  7. Effects of a geriatrician-led hip fracture program: improvements in clinical and economic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Lisa N; DiPiero, Albert R; Homer, Louis D

    2009-01-01

    The hip fracture service (HFS) is an interdisciplinary, geriatrician-led program instituted to improve the care of frail elderly people who present to the hospital with acute hip fracture. The HFS pilot project used existing hospital personnel and facilities and initiated new practices, including set protocols, preprinted orders, and standardized assessments, to achieve and evaluate patient triage and care and hospital cost savings. Outcome measures for 91 patients with acute hip fracture consecutively admitted to the HFS were compared with those of 72 historical controls managed under standard care in the prior year. Analysis demonstrated better outcomes in terms of length of stay (6.1+/-2.4 days for standard care, 4.6+/-1.1 days for the HFS; Pvs 50.5% of HFS patients; Pmodel showed a reduction in total costs, resulting in a gain in net income, from a deficit of $908+/-4,977 (95% confidence interval (CI)=-$2,078-261) per patient in the standard group to a gain of $1,047+/-2,718 (95% CI=$481-1,613) per patient in the HFS group (Pcost effectiveness of managing elderly patients with hip fracture. Although the results must be interpreted with caution because of the pre-post design, this pilot study provides a model of care for further hypothesis generation and more rigorous testing into the quality and financial benefits of a geriatrics-led care process.

  8. Bias towards dementia: are hip fracture trials excluding too many patients? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hebert-Davies, Jonah; Laflamme, G.-Yves; Rouleau, Dominique; Bhandari, Mohit; Devereaux, Philip J.; Guyatt, Gordon; Heetveld, Martin J.; Jeray, Kyle; Liew, Susan; Richardson, Martin J.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen; Mohit, Bhandari; Sprague, Sheila; Viveiros, Helena; Simunovic, Nicole; Swinton, Marilyn; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Buckingham, Lisa; Duraikannan, Aravin; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Agel, Julie; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; Zielinski, Stephanie M.; Goslings, J. Carel; Haverlag, Robert; Ponsen, M. J.; de Rijcke, P. A. R.; Koppert, C. L.; Buijk, Steven E.; Groenendijk, Richard P. R.; Dawson, I.; de Rycke, P. A. R.; Tetteroo, G. W. M.; Bruijninckx, M. M. M.; Doornebosch, P.; deGraaf, E. J. R.; Patka, Peter; Eversdijk, Martin; Peters, Rolf; van Waes, Oscar; den Hartog, Dennis; van Waes, O.; Oprel, P.; Gasthuis, Kennemer; Visser, Gijs A.; Stockmann, Heyn; Silvis, Rob; Snellen, J. P.; Rybroek, A.; Scheepers, J. J. G.; Vermeulen, Erik G. J.; Siroen, M. P. C.; Vuylsteke, Ronald; Brom, H. L. F.; Ryna, H.; van Laarhoven, H. A. J.; Haag, Den; Rhemrev, S.; Bosman, C. H. R.; van Otterloo, Alexander Mol; Hoogendoorn, Jochem; Idenburg, Floris; de Vries, A. C.; Meylaerts, S. A. G.; Roukema, Gert R.; Josaputra, H.; Keller, Paul; de Rooij, P. P.; Kuiken, H.; Boxma, H.; Cleffken, B. I.; Liem, Ronald; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Simons, Maarten P.; van der Heijden, F. H. W. M.; Willems, W. J.; de Meulemeester, Frank R. A. J.; van der Hart, Cor; Tarkan, K.; Festen, S.; de Nies, F.; Out, N. J. M.; Bosma, J.; de Graaf Gasthuis, Reinier; van der Elst, Maarten; van der Pol, Carmen C.; van't Reit, Martyne; Karsten, T. M.; de Vries, M. R.; Stassen, P. S.; Schep, N.; Schmidt, Ben; Hoffman, W. H.; Segers, J. M.; Zijl, Jacco; Verhoeven, Bart; Smits, Anke; Theunissen, Evert B. M.; Wille, J.; Govaert, Lonnek; Wittich, Phillippe; Brauw, Maurits; Wille, Jan; Ritchie, Ewan D.; Wittish, H.; Wessel, R. N.; Hammacher, E. R.; Ziekenhuis, Elisabeth; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; Meijer, Joast M. R.; van Egmond, Teun; van den Heijden, F. H. W. M.; Campo, Martin; Verhagen, Ronald; van Kampen, A.; Biert, J.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Edwards, Michael; Blokhuis, Taco; Frolke, Jan Paul M.; Geeraidts, L.; de Waal Malefyt, M. C.; Schreurs, B.; Simmermacher, Roger K. J.; van Mulken, Jeroen; van Gaalen, Steven M.; Bronovo, Ziekenhuis; Bronkhorst, Maarten W. G. A.; Guicherit, O. R.; Frihagen, Frede; Nordsletten, Lars; Kibsgaard, Thomas; Haug, Knut Jorgen; Lona, Tariei; Ugland, Stein; Nilsen, Kenneth; Brekke, Anne Christin; Vesterhus, Elise Berg; Tetsworth, Kevin; Weinrauch, Patrick; Pincus, Paul; Donald, Geoff; yang, Steven; Halliday, Brett; Gervais, Trevor; Holt, Michael; Flynn, Annette; Pirpiris, Marinis; Love, David; Bucknill, Andrew; Farrugia, Richard J.; Dowrick, Adam; Donohue, Craig; Bedi, Harvinder; Li, Doug; Edwards, Elton; Csonguray, Steven; Miller, Russell; Wang, Otis; Chia, Andrew; Jain, Arvind; Mammen, Mathan; Moaveni, Ash; Murdock, Zoe; Sage, Claire; Bahadur, Tegh; Jain, Anil Kumar; Pankaj, Amite; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Martinez, Adriana; Novoa, Catherine; Buckley, Richard E.; Duffy, Paul; Korley, Robert; Johnston, Kelly; Puloski, Shannon; Carcary, Kimberly; Avram, Victoria; Bicknell, Ryan; Yach, Jeff; Bardana, Davide; Wood, Gavin; Lambert, Sue; Sanders, David W.; Howard, Jamie; Macleod, Mark; Lawendy, Abdel; Bartley, Debra; Laney, Tim; Tieszer, Christina; Peterson, Devin; Zalzal, Paul; Naumetz, Victor; Brien, Heather; Weening, Brad; Wai, Eugene K.; Papp, Steven; Roffey, Darren; McCormack, Robert; Stone, Trevor; Perey, Bertrand; Viskontas, Darius; Boyer, Dory; Moola, Farhad; Zomar, Mauri; Moon, Karyn; McKee, Michael; Hall, Jeremy; Ahn, Henry; Vicente, Milena R.; Wild, Lisa M.; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Nousianinen, Markku; Kunz, Monica; Syed, Khalid; Azad, Tania; Coles, Chad; Leighton, Ross; Johnstone, David; Glazebrook, Mark; Alexander, David; Coady, Cathy; Trask, Kelly; Dobbin, Gwendolyn; Oliver, Todd M.; Jones, Vicky; Ronan, James; Brown, Desmond T.; Carlilse, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Schwappach, John; Davis, Craig A.; Weingarten, Peter; Weinerman, Stewart; Newman, Heike; Baker, Janell; Browner, Kieran; Hurley, Meghan; Payton, Krystal; Zura, Robert; Manson, Maria J.; Goetz, David; Broderick, Scott J.; Porter, Scott; Pace, Thomas; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Snider, Becky; Schmidt, Andrew H.; Haas, Jonathan; Templeman, David; Westberg, Jerald R.; Mullis, Brian; Ertl, J. P.; Shively, Karl; Frizzel, Valda; Moore, Molly M.; Marcantonio, Andrew J.; Iorio, Richard; Lobo, Margaret; Kain, Michael; Specht, Lawrence; Tilzey, John; Garfi, John; Prayson, Michael J.; Laughlin, Richard; Rubino, Joe; Lawless, Mathew; DiPaola, Matt; Gayton, Chris; Dulaney-Cripe, Liz; Vallier, Heather A.; Wilber, John; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John H.; Patterson, Brendan; Dolenc, Andrea; Robinson, Chalitha; DePaolo, Charles J.; Alosky, Rachel; Shell, E.; Keeve, Jonathan P.; Anderson, Chris; McDonald, Michael; Hoffman, Jodi; Baele, Joseph; Weber, Tim; Edison, Matt; Musapatika, Dana; Jones, Clifford; Ringler, James; Endres, Terrance; Gelbke, Martin; Jabara, Michael; Sietsema, Debra L.; Engerman, Susan M.; Switzer, Julie A.; Li, Mangnai; Marston, Scott; Cole, Peter; Vang, Sandy X.; Ly, Thuan; Anderson, Sarah; Foley, Amy; McBeth, Jessica; Comstock, Curt; Ziran, Navid; Shaer, James; Hileman, Barbara; Karges, David; Cannada, Lisa; Kuldjanov, Djoldas; Watson, John Tracy; Mills, James Jackman Emily; Hill, Leslie; Simon, Tiffanya; Abdelgawad, Amr; Shunia, Juan; Jenkins, Mark; Zumwalt, Mimi; Romero, Amanda West; Lowe, Jason; Goldstein, Jessica; Zamorano, David P.; Lawson, Deanna; Archdeacon, Michael; Wyrick, John; Hampton, Shelley; Lewis, Courtland G.; Ademi, Arben; Sullivan, Raymond; Caminiti, Stephanie; Graves, Matthew; Smith, Lori; Della Rocca, Gregory J.; Crist, Brett D.; Murtha, Yvonne; Anderson, Linda K.; Kliewer, Toni K.; McPherson, Melinda K.; Sullivan, Kelly M.; Jarrett, Sharon L.; Sagebien, Carlos; Seuffert, Patricia; Mehta, Samir; Esterhai, John; Ahn, Jaimo; Tjoumakaris, Fotios; Horan, Annamarie D.; Kaminski, Christine; Tarkin, Ivan; Siska, Peter; Luther, Arlene; Irrgang, James; Farrell, Dana J.; Gorczyca, John T.; Gross, Jonathan M.; Kates, Stephen Lloyd; Colosi, Jen; Hibsch, Nancy; Noble, Krista; Neu, Sarah; Agarwal, Animesh; Wright, Rebecca; Hsu, Joseph R.; Randall, Gayle M.; Ficke, James R.; Charlton, Michael; Fan, Mary; Garcia, Socorro H.; Obremskey, William T.; Richards, Justin Edward; Robinson, Kenya; Carroll, Eben; Kulp, Brenda; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Devereaux, Philip James; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Koval, Ken J.; Tetsworth, Kevin D.; Culgin, Sarah; Desjardin, Heather; Beimers, Lijkele; de Vries, Jasper; Zurcher, Arthur W.; Albers, G. H. Rob; Rademakers, Maarten; Breugem, Stefan; van der Haven, Ibo; Damen, Peter Jan; Bulstra, Gythe H.; Somford, P.; Haverkamp, Daniël; Gasthuis, Onze Lieve Vrouwe; Molekamp, Willem Jan Kleyn; Kleipool, E. B.; Keizer, Stefan B.; Swen, Jan-Willem A.; Nelissen, Eelco M.; Hollander, Peter H. C. den; Metsaars, Weineke; Thomassen, J. W.; Fontijne, W. Peter J.; Wiersma, Saskia C.; Boetes, Bastiaan; JT, Edgar; Ziekenhuis, Spaarne; Nolte, Peter A.; de Jong, Tjitte; van Noort, Arthur; Vergroesen, Diederik A.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Schutte, Bernard G.; Schuman, Lein; Hillen, Robert Jan; Cheung, John; van der Heide, Huub J. L.; Nagels, Jochem; Krips, Rover; Mullers, J. Bernard; Schüller, Hans; Ziekenhuis, Amphia; van den Hout, Joost A. A. M.; Joosten, Adrianus J. P.; van der Broek, Chris M.; Bolder, Stefan B. T.; Eygendaal, Denise; Moonen, Adrianus F. C. M.; van Geenen, Rutger C. I.; Hoebink, Eric A.; Wagenmakers, Robert; van Helden, Wouter; Kooijman, Rob; Postema, Roelf R.; Lampe, Harald I. H.; Ziekenhuizen, Gelre; Bolhuis, Hugo W.; Bullens, Pieter H. J.; Hogervorst, Mike; de Kroon, Karin E.; Jansen, Rob H.; Raven, Eric E. J.; van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W.; Reuver, Joost M.; Barnaart, Alexander F. W.; Roerdink, W. Herbert; van Erve, Ruud H. G. P.; Koorevaar, Rinco; Frima, Anthony Hans; Flikweert, Elvira R.; Falke, Mark L. M.; Kurek, Frans J.; Slingerland, Adrianus C. H.; Vallei, Gelderse; van Dijk, Jan P.; van Helden, Wouter H.; Mauer-Hansen, Espen; Boee, Berte; Clarke-Jensen, Jon; Brekke, Anne Christine; Vestergaard, Elise Berg; Carr, Ashley; Russ, Matthias; Li, Douglas; Doig, Stephen; Laflamme, Yves; Fernandes, Julio C.; Poirier, Marie-France; Bogoch, Earl; Kreder, Hans; Axelrod, Terry; Jenkinson, Richard; Wadey, Veronica; Nousiainen, Markku; Stephen, David; Macnevin, Melanie; Richardson, Glen C.; Biddulph, Michael; Gross, Michael; Dunbar, Michael; Dobbin, Gwen; Zarin, Jeffrey; Parvataneni, Hari; Baker, Janell K.; Roberson, James R.; Erens, Greg; Montelione, Anita; Woodard, Shawndra; Ertl, Janos; Cummings, Judd; Worman, Ripley; Webster, Mark; Parr, Andrew; Frizzell, Valda; Moore, Molly; Wilk, Richard; Torchia, Michael; Cross, William; Sems, Andrew; Taunton, Michael; Sanchez-Satelo, Joaquin; Sierrz, Rafsel; Timm, Kimberly; Foreman, Barbara; DePaolo, Charles; Hill, Rocky; Lewis, Coutland; Srivastava, Ajay; Bakeman, James; Sietsema, Deb; Strathy, Gregg; Johnson, Paul; Peter, Kathleen; Morton, Maeghan E.; Parvizi, Javad; Austin, Matthew; Morrison, Tiffany; Mont, Michael; Copeland, Carol; Delanois, Ronald; Khanuja, Harpal; Weddington, Shaquita; Bacon, Madeline; Mullen, Marylou; Kanlic, Enes; Abdelgawad, Amr Atef; Shunia, Juan Gerardo; Horan, Annamarie

    2012-01-01

    Patients with hip fractures are older and often present many co-morbidities, including dementia. These patients cannot answer quality of life questionnaires and are generally excluded from trials. We hypothesized that a significant number of patients are being excluded from these studies and this

  9. Fear of falling and changed functional ability following hip fracture among community-dwelling elderly people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesmark, Annette; Herling, Suzanne Forsyth; Egerod, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the study were to assess self-reported fear of falling (FOF) and functional ability among community-dwelling elderly people 3-6 months post hospital discharge after a hip fracture, to investigate the association between FOF and functional ability, and to explore the lived experience...

  10. Incidence of and risk factors for falls following hip fracture in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway-Cook, Anne; Ciol, Marcia A; Gruber, William; Robinson, Cynthia

    2005-07-01

    Hip fracture is a major medical problem among older adults, leading to impaired balance and gait and loss of functional independence. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of and risk factors for falls 6 months following hospital discharge for a fall-related hip fracture in older adults. Ninety of 100 community-dwelling older adults (> or =65 years of age) hospitalized for a fall-related hip fracture provided data for this study. An observational cohort study used interviews and medical records to obtain information on demographics, prefracture health, falls, and functional status. Self-report of falls and performance-based measures of balance and mobility were completed 6 months after discharge. A total of 53.3% of patients (48/90) reported 1 or more falls in the 6 months after hospitalization. Older adults who fell following discharge had greater declines in independence in activities of daily living and lower performance on balance and mobility measures. Prefracture fall history and use of a gait device predicted postdischarge falls. Falls following hip fracture can be predicted by premorbid functional status.

  11. Physical inactivity and pain in older men and women with hip fracture history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salpakoski, Anu; Portegijs, Erja; Kallinen, Mauri; Sihvonen, Sanna; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Alen, Markku; Rantanen, Taina; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2011-01-01

    Hip fracture patients often suffer from pain for several months after surgery. This may lead to physical inactivity and subsequent mobility limitation and disability. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between severe musculoskeletal pain and the level of physical activity

  12. Effectiveness of preoperative physical therapy for older patients with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaguchi, Akira; Momosaki, Ryo; Hasebe, Kiyotaka; Chono, Masayuki; Kasuga, Seiji; Abo, Masahiro

    2018-03-02

    To clarify the effectiveness of preoperative physical therapy for older patients after hip fracture in an acute care hospital. In the present retrospective observational study, data from the Japan Rehabilitation Database were analyzed for patients admitted to an acute care hospital with hip fracture between 2005 and 2015. In this study, all eligible patients received surgery within 10 days of admission. Propensity score analysis was used to compare outcomes between patients who underwent preoperative rehabilitation and those who did not. The primary outcome was motor Functional Independence Measure (FIM) gain. Of the 681 patients eligible after applying exclusion criteria, 50% underwent preoperative rehabilitation after hip fracture. Both before and after adjustment by inverse probability weighting, motor FIM gain was significantly higher in patients who underwent preoperative rehabilitation (motor FIM gain 31.1 ± 18.2 before weighting, 31.1 ± 18.2 after weighting) than in those who did not (motor FIM gain 24.6 ± 18.1 before weighting, P preoperative rehabilitation. Our data suggest that preoperative rehabilitation after hip fracture is associated with better rehabilitation outcomes than no preoperative rehabilitation. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Short-term mortality in hip fracture patients admitted during weekends and holidays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, N B; Kehlet, H

    2006-01-01

    Acute surgical admission during weekends, with reduced staffing levels, has been associated with increased risk of mortality, but the effect of longer vacation/holiday periods has not been studied. We therefore examined early postoperative mortality in hip fracture patients admitted during weekends...

  14. Secondary hyperparathyroidism and mortality in hip fracture patients compared to a control group from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Medom; Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl; Lind, Bent

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previously, little attention has been paid as to how disturbances in the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-calcium-vitamin D-axis, such as secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), relate to mortality amongst hip fracture patients. This study aimed to (1) determine if SHPT is associated...

  15. Integrated nutritional intervention in the elderly after hip fracture. A process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedveld-Peters, José J L; Reijven, Petronella L M; Wyers, Caroline E; van Helden, Svenhjalmar; Arts, J J Chris; Meesters, Berry; Prins, Martin H; van der Weijden, Trudy; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2012-04-01

    Within a multicentre randomized controlled trial aimed at improving the nutritional status and increase the speed of recovery of elderly hip fracture patients, we performed a process evaluation to investigate the feasibility of the intervention within the present Dutch health care system. Patients in the intervention group received nutritional counseling during 10 contacts. Oral nutritional supplements were advised as needed until three months after hip fracture surgery. The intervention was evaluated with respect to dieticians' adherence to the study protocol, content of nutritional counseling, and patients' adherence to recommendations given. We included 66 patients (mean age of 76, range 55-92 years); 74% women. Eighty-three percent of patients received all 10 contacts as planned, but in 62% of the patients one or more telephone calls had to be replaced by face to face contacts. Nutritional counseling was complete in 91% of contacts. Oral nutritional supplementation was needed for a median period of 76 days; 75% of the patients took the oral nutritional supplements as recommended. Nutritional counseling in elderly hip fracture patients through face to face contacts and telephone calls is feasible. However, individual tailoring of the intervention is recommended. The majority of hip fracture patients needed >2 months oral nutritional supplements to meet their nutritional requirements. The trial was registered at clincialtrails.gov as NCT00523575. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  16. The changing face of fractures of the hip in Northern Ireland: a 15-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, A; Donnelly, K J; McDonald, S; Craig, J; Foster, A P; Acton, J D

    2017-09-01

    We reviewed all patients who sustained a fracture of the hip and were treated in Northern Ireland over a period of 15 years to identify trends in incidence, the demographics of the patients, the rates of mortality, the configuration of the fracture and the choice of implant. Since 01 January 2001 data about every fracture of the hip sustained in an adult have been collected centrally in Northern Ireland. All adults with such a fracture between 2000 and 2015 were included in the study. Temporal changes in their demographics, the mode of treatment, and outcomes including mortality were analysed. The incidence of fractures of the hip, in Northern Ireland, rose from 54 in 100 000 in 2000 to 86 in 100 000 in 2015. If these trends continue, we predict this rising to 128 in 100 000 in 2030. We found that these patients are becoming older and increasingly frail, as assessed by the American Association of Anesthesiology grade. Complex extracapsular fractures have become more common since 2009, which may explain the increased use of cephalomedullary nails. Despite increasing frailty, the 30-day and 12-month rates of mortality fell significantly (p = 0.002 and 0.001, respectively). Fractures of the hip are becoming more common and more complex in an aging, increasingly frail population. We expect these trends to continue. This will place an increasing economic and clinical strain on healthcare systems. Forward planning is essential to put systems in place that can deal with the increasing demand. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1223-31. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  17. Primary total hip replacement for displaced subcapital fractures of the femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taine, W H; Armour, P C

    1985-03-01

    The management of displaced subcapital fracture of the hip is still controversial because of the high incidence of complications after internal fixation or hemiarthroplasty. To avoid some of these complications we have used primary total hip replacement for independently mobile patients over 65 years of age. A total of 163 cases, operated on over four years, have been reviewed. There were relatively more dislocations after operation for fracture than after total replacement for arthritis, and these were associated with a posterior approach to the hip. Only seven revision operations have been required. Of 57 patients who were interviewed an average of 42 months after replacement, 62% had excellent or good results as assessed by the Harris hip score. All the others had major systemic disease which affected their assessment. This inadequacy of current systems of hip assessment is discussed. It is concluded that total hip replacement is the best management for a selected group of patients with this injury, and that further prospective studies are indicated.

  18. A very rare case with neglected hip dislocation coexisted with posterior acetabular lip fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samet Karabulut

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neglected hip dislocation is a rare situation among children. The coexistence of acetabulum fracture is less common. The result of treatment depends on the time of diagnosis. Early treatment is mandatory in such cases. Seven years old female brought to our outpatient clinic with the complaints of right hip pain and walking difficulty. Her parents said that she had fallen from a horse one month ago. X-ray and CT showed a posterior dislocation of her right hip and a fracture on her right posterior acetabular lip. We performed an open reduction via posterior approach. Because the hip was unstable we fixed the femoral head to the acetabulum by a Kirshner wire. Pelvipedal cast was applied after the operation for 6 weeks. After 6 months avascular necrosis (AVN developed on her right femoral head, the range of motion (ROM of the hip was restricted and she had minimal pain on her right hip. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:228-31

  19. MRI assessment of the posterior acetabular wall fracture in traumatic dislocation of the hip in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Ivan F.; Kloen, Peter; Helfet, David L. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY (United States); Potter, Hollis G. [MRI Department, Diagnostic Radiology, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Traumatic hip dislocations associated with posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum in the pediatric population are in general a consequence of high-energy trauma. After expeditious reduction, instability mandates for further diagnosis and intervention. Plain radiographs or computerized tomography (CT) scans can misjudge the involvement of the posterior wall of the acetabulum due to the partially calcified nature of the pediatric bone. We present two cases of pediatric traumatic hip dislocation associated with posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum. In both cases, obvious postreduction instability was noted without conclusive findings of etiology on plain X-rays or CT scans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed an extensive posterior wall traumatic involvement in both cases and helped to decide in favor of open reduction of the hip and internal fixation of the posterior wall fragment. (orig.)

  20. Age and Sex Features of Proximal Hip Geometry in Patients with its Intraarticular Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Grygorieva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the literature data, some parameters of the femoral bone (FB, namely the length of its axis, head-collum-diaphyseal angle, etc., are independent predictors of proximal femoral (PF fractures, but such studies among Ukrainian patients are absent. This article presents the literature data and the results of own research on the geometrical features of the FB in patients with intra-articular PF fractures. We have analyzed 100 survey (anteroposterior radiographs of the hip joint in patients aged 50–89 years (median age 70.98 ± 0.99 years. We observed 31 women and 39 men, who were hospitalized with intra-articular FB fractures, and 30 persons (16 women and 14 men without fractures. Assessment of hip geometry parameters was performed on the contralateral limb in relation to fracture. For the analysis, patients were divided into subgroups by gender and age. It was established the significant effect of the age on the parameters of PF geometry in men and women with intra-articular fractures, but not in patients without fractures. Also, we have found the significantly lower indices of the length of femoral axis, the base and the diameter of the head, «head — acetabulum» distance in men with intra-articular PF fractures compared to the parameters in persons without fractures, in the absence of significant differences in indices of women. Identified differences should be considered for both planning surgery after PF fracture and for predicting the risk of PF fractures in older age patients.

  1. Cervical spine fractures in elderly patients with hip fracture after low-level fall: an opportunity to refine prehospital spinal immobilization guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Lori L; Satterlee, Paul A; Jansen, Paul R

    2014-02-01

    Conventional prehospital spine-assessment approaches based on low index of suspicion and mechanism of injury (MOI) result in the liberal application of spinal immobilization in trauma patients. A painful distracting injury (DI), such as a suspected hip fracture, historically has been a sufficient condition for immobilization, even in an elderly patient who suffers a simple fall from standing and exhibits no other risk factors for spinal injury. Because the elderly are at increased risk of hip fracture from low-level falls, and are also particularly susceptible to the discomfort and morbidity associated with immobilization, the prevalence of cervical spine (c-spine) fracture in this patient population was examined. Hospital billing records were used to identify all cases of traumatic femur fracture in Minnesota (USA) in 2010-2011. Concurrent diagnosis and external cause codes were used to estimate the prevalence of c-spine fracture by age and MOI. Among 1,394 patients with femur fracture, 23 (1.7%) had a c-spine fracture. When the MOI was a fall from standing or sitting height and the patient age was ≥ 65, the prevalence dropped to 0.4% (2/565). The prevalence was similar when the definition of hip fracture additionally included pelvis fractures (0.5%; 11/2,441). Eight of the 11 patients with c-spine fracture had diagnosis codes indicative of criteria other than the DI that likely would have resulted in immobilization (eg, head injury and compromised mental status). C-spine fracture is extremely rare in elderly patients who sustain hip fracture as a result of a low-level fall, and appears to be accompanied frequently by other known predictors of spinal injury besides DI. More research is needed to determine whether conservative use of spinal immobilization may be warranted in elderly patients with hip fracture after low-level falls when the only criteria for immobilization is the distracting hip injury.

  2. Effects of illness and hip fracture perceptions on coping strategies of elderly rehabilitation clients

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    Tone Brejc

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate, using Leventhal's self-regulatory model of illness perceptions, the effects of subjective representations of health and hip fracture on coping strategies in a sample of 52 clients more than 65 years old at the beginning of intensive hospital rehabilitation programme. The results revealed that rehabilitation clients suffering from hip fracture preserved their sense of good general and mental health. Negative representation of hip fracture was related only to perception of temporary decline in physical activity and not to perception of other personal, social and economic consequences neither to perception of their controllability. Perception of poor physical competence influenced the use of less preferred coping strategies of behavioural, mental and alcohol/drug based disengagement, and denial. Rehabilitation clients preferred those cognitive-behavioural and emotional strategies which confirmed their perception of self-efficiency and confidence in therapeutic assistance.Strategies were thus selected according to active and planned endeavour to cope, and were based on acceptance, turning to religion, focusing and venting emotions, and seeking instrumental and social support. The study confirmed the hypothesis that negative representation of hip fracture and poor sense of physical competence had a restraining effect on the use of coping strategies. There was no evidence that coping strategies of hip fracture in elderly rehabilitation clients created a specific pattern, depending on the perception of its consequences and the appraisal of possibility to regain health control. The validity of the findings is limited by a relatively small and selected sample of cognitive intact and motivated older rehabilitation clients, use of specific, non-standardised instruments, and a cross-sectional approach.

  3. Serum albumin and total lymphocyte count as predictors of outcome in hip fractures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Daly, Brendan J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hip fractures are a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in the elderly. Malnutrition is a significant contributor to this, however no consensus exists as to the detection or management of this condition. We hypothesise that results of admission serum albumin and total lymphocyte count (TLC), as markers of Protein Energy Malnutrition (PEM) can help predict clinical outcome in hip fracture patients aged over 60 years. METHODS: This retrospective study evaluated the nutritional status of patients with hip fractures using albumin and TLC assays and analysed their prognostic relevance. Clinical outcome parameters studied were delay to operation, duration of in-patient stay, re-admission and in-patient, 3- and 12-month mortality. RESULTS: Four hundred and fifteen hip fracture patients were evaluated. Survival data were available for 377 patients at 12 months. In-hospital mortality for PEM patients was 9.8%, compared with 0% for patients without. Patients with PEM had a higher 12-month mortality compared to patients who had normal values of both laboratory parameters (Odds Ratio 4.6; 95% CI: 1.0-21.3). Serum albumin (Hazard Ratio 0.932, 95% CI: 0.9-1.0) and age (Hazard Ratio 1.04, 95% CI: 1.0-1.1) were found to be significant independent prognostic factors of mortality by Cox regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: These results highlight the relevance of assessing the nutritional status of patients with hip fractures at the time of admission and emphasises the correlation between PEM and outcome in these patients.

  4. Epidemiology of hip fractures in Ecuador Epidemiología de las fracturas de cadera en Ecuador

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    Carlos H. Orces

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To report the age-, sex-, and type-specific hip fracture incidence rates in Ecuador. A secondary objective was to examine hip fracture geographic variations in Latin America. METHODS: The Anuario de Egresos Hospitalarios was analyzed to determine the number of persons aged 50 years or older hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of hip fracture (ICD-10 S72 in 2005. Census estimates of the population were used as the denominator to calculate hip fracture incidence rates per 100 000 inhabitants. Age-adjusted rates were calculated by the direct method using the 2000 U.S. population as the standard to examine hip fracture geographic variations. RESULTS: A total of 1 005 persons were hospitalized with a diagnosis of hip fracture (664 women and 341 men during the study period. The crude annual incidence rate of hip fractures was 49.5 per 100 000 (34.8 per 100 000 men and 63.2 per 100 000 women. In general, the number and incidence of hip fractures increased exponentially with age in both sexes. However, the increase was more relevant in women. Age-adjusted rates in Latin America ranged from a low of 15.1 per 100 000 in women and 6.7 per 100 000 in men for Sobral, Brazil, to a high of 499.0 per 100 000 in women for La Plata, Argentina. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study indicate a low incidence of hip fractures in Ecuador and geographic differences of hip fracture rates in Latin America. Because the population of Ecuador is aging, this study provides valuable information for public health authorities to start planning and implementing prevention strategies aimed at reducing the burden of hip fractures in the near future.OBJETIVOS: Determinar la incidencia de fracturas de cadera por edad, sexo y tipo en Ecuador. Como objetivo secundario se analizaron las variaciones geográficas de las fracturas de cadera en América Latina. MÉTODOS: Se analizó el Anuario de Egresos Hospitalarios para determinar el número de personas de 50 años o m

  5. Preventive analgesia in hip or knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

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    Díaz-Heredia, J; Loza, E; Cebreiro, I; Ruiz Iban, M Á

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the efficacy and safety of preventive analgesia in patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty due to osteoarthritis. A systematic literature review was performed, using a defined a sensitive strategy on Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library up to May 2013. The inclusion criteria were: patients undergoing knee and/or hip arthroplasty, adults with moderate or severe pain (≥4 on a Visual Analog Scale). The intervention, the use (efficacy and safety) of pharmacological treatment (preventive) close to surgery was recorded. Oral, topical and skin patch drugs were included. Systematic reviews, meta-analysis, controlled trials and observational studies were selected. A total of 36 articles, of moderate quality, were selected. The patients included were representative of those undergoing knee and/or hip arthroplasty in Spain. They had a mean age >50 years, higher number of women, and reporting moderate to severe pain (≥4 on a Visual Analog Scale). Possurgical pain was mainly evaluated with a Visual Analog Scale. A wide variation was found as regards the drugs used in the preventive protocols, including acetaminophen, classic NSAID, Cox-2, opioids, corticosteroids, antidepressants, analgesics for neuropathic pain, as well as others, such as magnesium, ketamine, nimodipine or clonidine. In general, all of them decreased post-surgical pain without severe adverse events. The use or one or more pre-surgical analgesics decreases the use of post-surgical drugs, at least for short term pain. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Intertrochanteric Fracture Fixation with Dynamic Hip Screw and Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty Techniques

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    Mohammad Emami

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: At present, there is no consensus on an appropriate treatment modality for intertrochanteric fractures in the elderly with background diseases. The aim of the present study was to compare treatment outcomes of intertrochanteric fractures reduced with dynamic hip screws (DHS and bipolar hemiarthroplasty in elderly patients with background medical conditions. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 60 patients with intertrochanteric fractures, who were 45-60 years old, were randomly divided into DHS and bipolar groups. After treatment, the two groups were compared in relation to complications and mortality rates, functional status using the Harris Hip Score (HHS, range of movement and severity of pain using the visual analogue score (VAS. Results: HHS (86±9 vs. 75±7.6, range of flexion (105±11 degrees vs. 90±17 degrees and external rotation (35±7 degrees vs. 20±7 degrees were significantly higher in the bipolar group compared to the DHS group (P

  7. Do we need orthogeriatrics in Poland? Changes in the age structure and location of hip fractures.

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    Wilk, Robert; Skrzypek, Michał; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Kusz, Damian; Koczy, Bogdan; Zagórski, Piotr; Pluskiewicz, Wojciech

    2017-08-01

    Patients with hip fractures present a great challenge for surgeons due to multimorbidity, polypharmacy as well as difficulty in communicating. These could be attributed to a recent trend in the aging patient population (80 years and older) as compared to the past. The aim of this study is to analyze age structure and location in male and female patients' population with hip fracture over 50. Hospital records between 2005 and 2014 with ICD-10 codes S72,0, S72,1 and S72,2 were included in the analysis. All fractures occurred in citizen aged 50 years and over living in the district of Tarnowskie Góry and the city of Piekary Śląskie in Poland. Within the study period, 1258 hip fractures were registered. The mean age of the patients was higher every year, starting from 77.27 ± 9.52 in 2005 to 80.80 ± 9.65 years in 2014 (p < 0.01). The average age also increased in both gender groups from 73.85 ± 8.30 to 77.89 ± 9.52 years in male and from 78.14 ± 9.66 to 81.98 ± 9.49 years in female, respectively. The median age value was changed from 78.00 to 83.00 years in the total population. We noted a significant increase in female with trochanteric fracture; however, the level of neck fracture was almost the same. In men, crude rates for both trochanteric and cervical fractures slightly increased. As the age of patients increases, fractures were shown to be more complicated. Given the scale of the phenomenon and its determinants, we emphatically conclude orthogeriatrics is needed in Poland.

  8. Burden of hip fracture using disability-adjusted life-years: a pooled analysis of prospective cohorts in the CHANCES consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Nikos; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Orfanos, Philippos; Benetou, Vassiliki; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Künn-Nelen, Annemarie; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Eriksson, Sture; Brenner, Hermann; Schöttker, Ben; Saum, Kai-Uwe; Holleczek, Bernd; Grodstein, Francine D; Feskanich, Diane; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja; Bellavia, Andrea; Wilsgaard, Tom; Jørgensen, Lone; Boffetta, Paolo; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Trichopoulou, Antonia

    2017-05-01

    No studies have estimated disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost due to hip fractures using real-life follow-up cohort data. We aimed to quantify the burden of disease due to incident hip fracture using DALYs in prospective cohorts in the CHANCES consortium, and to calculate population attributable fractions based on DALYs for specific risk factors. We used data from six cohorts of participants aged 50 years or older at recruitment to calculate DALYs. We applied disability weights proposed by the National Osteoporosis Foundation and did a series of sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of DALY estimates. We calculated population attributable fractions for smoking, body-mass index (BMI), physical activity, alcohol intake, type 2 diabetes and parity, use of hormone replacement therapy, and oral contraceptives in women. We calculated summary risk estimates across cohorts with pooled analysis and random-effects meta-analysis methods. 223 880 men and women were followed up for a mean of 13 years (SD 6). 7724 (3·5%) participants developed an incident hip fracture, of whom 413 (5·3%) died as a result. 5964 DALYs (27 per 1000 individuals) were lost due to hip fractures, 1230 (20·6%) of which were in the group aged 75-79 years. 4150 (69·6%) DALYs were attributed to disability. Current smoking was the risk factor responsible for the greatest hip fracture burden (7·5%, 95% CI 5·2-9·7) followed by physical inactivity (5·5%, 2·1-8·5), history of diabetes (2·8%, 2·1-4·0), and low to average BMI (2·0%, 1·4-2·7), whereas low alcohol consumption (0·01-2·5 g per day) and high BMI had a protective effect. Hip fracture can lead to a substantial loss of healthy life-years in elderly people. National public health policies should be strengthened to reduce hip fracture incidence and mortality. Primary prevention measures should be strengthened to prevent falls, and reduce smoking and a sedentary lifestyle. European Community's Seventh Framework Programme

  9. Cost-effectiveness of a multifactorial fracture prevention program for elderly people admitted to nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dirk; Borsi, Lisa; Stracke, Claudia; Stock, Stephanie; Stollenwerk, Björn

    2015-06-01

    Fractures are one of the most costly consequences of falls in elderly patients in nursing homes. To compare the cost-effectiveness of a 'multifactorial fracture prevention program' provided by a multidisciplinary team with 'no prevention' in newly admitted nursing home residents. We performed a cost-utility analysis using a Markov-based simulation model to establish the effectiveness of a multifaceted fall prevention program from the perspective of statutory health insurance (SHI) and long-term care insurance (LCI). The rate of falls was used to estimate the clinical and economic consequences resulting from hip and upper limb fractures. Robustness of the results was assessed using deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Compared to no prevention a multifactorial prevention program for nursing home residents resulted in a cost-effectiveness ratio of 21,353 euro per quality-adjusted life-year. The total costs for SHI/LCI would result in 1.7 euro million per year. Results proved to be robust following deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Multifactorial fracture prevention appears to be cost-effective in preventing fractures in nursing home residents. Since the results were based on the number of falls further research is required to confirm the results.

  10. Morbidity and mortality among patients with hip fractures surgically repaired within and after 48 hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Padmini; Godkar, Darshan; Mahgerefteh, Shmuel; Chambers, Karinn; Niranjan, Selva; Cucco, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The objectives were (1) to compare the morbidity and mortality of patients with hip fractures surgically repaired within and after 48 hours of the occurrence of fracture and (2) to establish whether timing of repair alone had a major role in determining how the patients fared after the surgical repair or whether comorbidities also affected outcomes. The study involved the medical records of 49 patients (aged 51 to 99 years) admitted to Coney Island Hospital between January 2003 and January 2004 with a primary diagnosis of hip fracture who underwent surgical repair. Analysis of data was done by retrospective chart review of patients admitted with the diagnosis of hip fracture to an acute care hospital setting. Follow-up continued until the patients were transferred to a rehabilitation facility for physical or occupational therapy after surgery. The preoperative health status of each patient was assessed by cardiopulmonary risk index score, based on comorbid conditions, and postoperative outcome was determined by complications (such as bed sores, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, deep vein thrombosis, or pulmonary embolism) or death. Patients who underwent early surgical repair (within 48 hours) had fewer postoperative complications (14.7%, as compared with 33.3% in the group undergoing surgery >48 hours after fracture). CPRI scores in the early and delayed surgery groups were also compared with regard to postoperative mortality and morbidity. It appeared that there was a higher statistical correlation between CPRI scores and complications among patients in the early surgery group (P=0.39) and an insignificant correlation among patients in the delayed surgery group (P=0.07). Surgical repair of hip fractures within the first 48 hours was associated with better health outcomes in a nationally representative sample, as observed in an acute care facility, irrespective of comorbid conditions.

  11. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of canine hip dysplasia: a review

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    Schachner ER

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Emma R Schachner, Mandi J Lopez Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: Canine hip dysplasia (CHD is a polygenic and multifactorial developmental disorder characterized by coxofemoral (hip joint laxity, degeneration, and osteoarthritis (OA. Current diagnostic techniques are largely subjective measures of joint conformation performed at different stages of development. Recently, measures on three-dimensional images generated from computed tomography scans predicted the development of OA associated with CHD. Continued refinement of similar imaging methods may improve diagnostic imaging techniques to identify dogs predisposed to degenerative hip joint changes. By current consensus, joint changes consistent with CHD are influenced by genetic predisposition as well as environmental and biomechanical factors; however, despite decades of work, the relative contributions of each to the development and extent of CHD signs remain elusive. Similarly, despite considerable effort to decipher the genetic underpinnings of CHD for selective breeding programs, relevant genetic loci remain equivocal. As such, prevention of CHD within domestic canine populations is marginally successful. Conservative management is often employed to manage signs of CHD, with lifelong maintenance of body mass as one of the most promising methods. Surgical intervention is often employed to prevent joint changes or restore joint function, but there are no gold standards for either goal. To date, all CHD phenotypes are considered as a single entity in spite of recognized differences in expression and response to environmental conditions and treatment. Identification of distinct CHD phenotypes and targeting evidence-based conservative and invasive treatments for each may significantly advance prevention and management of a prevalent, debilitating condition in canine companions. Keywords: canine

  12. Quality of life and psychological consequences in elderly patients after a hip fracture: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Konstantinos I; Roushias, Andreas; Varitimidis, Sokratis E; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2018-01-01

    Fractures due to fragility of the bone around the hip joint have become a major public health issue, presenting with an increasing incidence due to the growth of the elderly population. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the impact of hip fractures on the quality of life (QoL), health status (HS), functioning, and psychological parameters, and factors influencing the outcome and the appropriate interventions for improvement of elderly patients. A systematic electronic search of the relevant literature was carried out using the CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, Medline (OvidSP), and PubMed databases spanning the time period from their establishment up to January 2017. Forty-nine randomized controlled trials or prospective cohort studies reporting the QoL and psychological outcomes were assessed by using standardized questionnaires. Patients with a hip fracture who were older than 65 years, were included in the analysis. In the majority of elderly patients, the hip fracture seriously affected physical and mental functioning and exerted a severe impact on their HS and health-related QoL (HRQoL). Moreover, most of the patients did not return to prefracture levels of performance regarding both the parameters. The levels of mental, physical, and nutritional status, prior to the fracture, comorbidity, and female gender, in addition to the postoperative pain, complications, and the length of hospital stay, were the factors associated with the outcome. Psychosocial factors and symptoms of depression could increase pain severity and emotional distress. For the displaced femoral neck fractures, the treatment with total hip arthroplasty or hemiarthroplasty, when compared to the treatment with internal fixation, provided a better functional outcome. Supportive rehabilitation programs, complemented by psychotherapy and nutritional supplementation prior to and after surgery, provided beneficial effects on the HS and the psychosocial dimension of the more debilitated patients

  13. Post-discharge management following hip fracture - get you back to B4: A parallel group, randomized controlled trial study protocol

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    Brown Roy A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fall-related hip fractures result in significant personal and societal consequences; importantly, up to half of older adults with hip fracture never regain their previous level of mobility. Strategies of follow-up care for older adults after fracture have improved investigation for osteoporosis; but managing bone health alone is not enough. Prevention of fractures requires management of both bone health and falls risk factors (including the contributing role of cognition, balance and continence to improve outcomes. Methods/Design This is a parallel group, pragmatic randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a post-fracture clinic compared with usual care on mobility for older adults following their hospitalization for hip fracture. Participants randomized to the intervention will attend a fracture follow-up clinic where a geriatrician and physiotherapist will assess and manage their mobility and other health issues. Depending on needs identified at the clinical assessment, participants may receive individualized and group-based outpatient physiotherapy, and a home exercise program. Our primary objective is to assess the effectiveness of a novel post-discharge fracture management strategy on the mobility of older adults after hip fracture. We will enrol 130 older adults (65 years+ who have sustained a hip fracture in the previous three months, and were admitted to hospital from home and are expected to be discharged home. We will exclude older adults who prior to the fracture were: unable to walk 10 meters; diagnosed with dementia and/or significant comorbidities that would preclude their participation in the clinical service. Eligible participants will be randomly assigned to the Intervention or Usual Care groups by remote allocation. Treatment allocation will be concealed; investigators, measurement team and primary data analysts will be blinded to group allocation. Our primary outcome is mobility

  14. Patients with prior vertebral or hip fractures treated with teriparatide in the Direct Assessment of Nonvertebral Fractures in Community Experience (DANCE) observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, D P; Feldman, R G; Gordon, M L; Gruber, B L; Lane, J M; Valenzuela, G; Yim, D; Alam, J; Krege, J H; Krohn, K

    2016-03-01

    In patients in the Direct Assessment of Nonvertebral Fractures in Community Experience (DANCE) observational study with and without a prior vertebral or hip fracture, the incidence of nonvertebral fractures was lower with >6 months of teriparatide treatment than during the first 6 months. Clinical evidence on the effect of teriparatide in patients with prior fracture is limited. In the DANCE observational study, the incidence of nonvertebral fragility fractures (NVFX) decreased significantly in patients receiving teriparatide for >6 months (6-24 months) versus >0 to ≤6 months (reference period). We performed a post hoc analysis to assess the effect of teriparatide 20 μg/day in patients who entered DANCE with prior vertebral or hip fractures. The incidence of patients experiencing a NVFX for four 6-month intervals during and after treatment was compared with the reference period. Overall, 4085 patients received ≥1 dose of teriparatide. Of 3720 with sufficient data for efficacy analysis, 692 had prior vertebral fracture, including 179 with previous kyphoplasty/vertebroplasty; 290 had prior hip fracture. These patients were older, and those with prior vertebral fractures had more comorbid conditions at baseline than those without prior vertebral fractures. The incidence of patients experiencing NVFX declined over time in all patient groups. The fracture incidence rate declined 49 and 46%, respectively, in patients with and without prior vertebral fracture and was 63 and 46% lower in patients with previous kyphoplasty/vertebroplasty and without prior vertebral fracture. NVFX declined 43 and 48% in patients with and without prior hip fracture. The reduced incidence over time was consistent in the subgroups (all interaction p values >0.05). Patients with prior fracture were more likely to experience serious adverse events. The incidence of NVFX decreased over time in patients receiving teriparatide in DANCE regardless of prior fracture status.

  15. Bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint resulting from subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis

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    Yamamoto, Takuaki; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka (Japan); Schneider, Robert [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Bullough, Peter G. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Laboratory Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A 57-year-old woman suffered rapid destruction of both hip joints over a 10 months period. At the first visit, her radiographs demonstrated slight joint space narrowing and acetabular cyst formation in both hips. Five months later, joint space narrowing had further progressed, and intra-articular injection of steroid was given in both hips. However, the hip pain gradually became worse. Five months later, both joint spaces had totally disappeared and both femoral heads had undergone massive collapse. At gross examination, both resected femoral heads showed extensive opaque yellow areas consistent with osteonecrosis. Microscopic examination of these areas revealed evidence of both extensive fracture and callus formation, as well as necrosis throughout, indicating that the osteonecrosis observed in this case was a secondary phenomenon superimposed on pre-existing osteoarthritis and subchondral fracture. There were many pseudogranulomatous lesions in the marrow space and necrotic area, where tiny fragments of bone and articular cartilage, surrounded by histiocytes and giant cells, were embedded, such as are typically seen in rapidly destructive arthrosis. No radiologic or morphologic evidence of primary osteonecrosis was noted. This case indicates that at least some cases of rapidly destructive arthritis are the result of subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  16. Bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint resulting from subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takuaki; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Schneider, Robert; Bullough, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman suffered rapid destruction of both hip joints over a 10 months period. At the first visit, her radiographs demonstrated slight joint space narrowing and acetabular cyst formation in both hips. Five months later, joint space narrowing had further progressed, and intra-articular injection of steroid was given in both hips. However, the hip pain gradually became worse. Five months later, both joint spaces had totally disappeared and both femoral heads had undergone massive collapse. At gross examination, both resected femoral heads showed extensive opaque yellow areas consistent with osteonecrosis. Microscopic examination of these areas revealed evidence of both extensive fracture and callus formation, as well as necrosis throughout, indicating that the osteonecrosis observed in this case was a secondary phenomenon superimposed on pre-existing osteoarthritis and subchondral fracture. There were many pseudogranulomatous lesions in the marrow space and necrotic area, where tiny fragments of bone and articular cartilage, surrounded by histiocytes and giant cells, were embedded, such as are typically seen in rapidly destructive arthrosis. No radiologic or morphologic evidence of primary osteonecrosis was noted. This case indicates that at least some cases of rapidly destructive arthritis are the result of subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  17. The SCHHS hip fracture clinical network experience-Improving care and outcomes through an interprofessional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckeridge, Gillian; Terblanche, Morné; Massey, Debbie

    2017-08-01

    Hip fractures are a major global health care issue, with the 1.26 million estimated cases in 1990 predicted to increase to 4.5 million by 2050. Varying models of care have been developed to improve outcomes following fragility hip fractures. Most of these care models embrace an interprofessional approach to care. Specialist orthopedic nurses play an important role in the management of fragility hip fracture patients and their contribution to the interprofessional health care team is an important predictor of patient outcomes. The Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service (SCHHS) is compromised of four hospitals in South East Queensland, Australia however only one large regional hospital provides specialist hip fracture services. Approximately, 350 older hip fracture patients present to the Sunshine Coast Hospital & Health Service (SCHHS) each year. We used Hospital Health round table (HHRT) data to identify and assess key performance care and management of hip fracture patient and outcomes at SCHHS. The HHRT is a nonprofit membership organisation of health services across Australia and New Zealand that aims to provide opportunity for Health Services to achieve best practice, collect analyse and publish information, identify ways to improve and promote collaboration and networking. Exemplars of best practice are also identified in the data so that organizations can adopt similar models of care. HHRT data identified underperformance in management of hip fracture patients in a number of quality indicators at the study site, including length of stay (LOS), time to surgery and relative stay index (RSI). Following review of HHRT data key stakeholders undertook a quality improvement project and formed the Hip Fracture Clinical Network Group (HFCNG). This was established in 2013 with the aim of improving outcomes and achieving key performance indicators for all elderly patients who sustain a hip fracture through active collaboration and regular communication between a

  18. Cancer therapy associated bone loss: Implications for hip fractures in mid-life women with breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Beatrice J.; Raisch, Dennis W.; Shankaran, Veena; McKoy, June M.; Gradishar, William; Bunta, Andrew D.; Samaras, Athena T.; Boyle, Simone N.; West, Dennis P.; Guise, Theresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have been recently associated with hip fractures. We present a case series of breast cancer survivors and a systematic review of bone health care in breast cancer. Experimental Design We completed clinical assessments and bone density testing (BMD) of hip fractures from January 2005–December 2008. Pre-fracture and 12-month functional status was obtained. Systematic review included case reports and review of MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FDA AERS) from January 1998–December 2008 (search terms: breast cancer, bone loss, osteopenia, osteoporosis, malignancy, cancer treatment, menopause, adriamycin, cytoxan, tamoxifen, and AIs). Results Median age was 53.5 years; five women had osteopenia, one osteoporosis. Five cases were ER (+), and received surgery, XRT chemotherapy, and anastrozole. Functional decline was noted at 12 months, with difficulty in performing heavy housekeeping, climbing stairs and shopping. The FDA AERS database included 228 cases of fractures associated with breast cancer therapy; 77/228 (29.4%) were hip or femur fractures. Among mid-life women under the age of 64 years there were 78 fractures; 15/228 (19%) were hip and femur fractures. AIs were the most common drug class associated with fractures (n=149, 65%). Conclusions CTIBL results in hip fractures among mid-life women with breast cancer. Hip fractures occur at younger ages and higher BMD than expected for patients in this age group without breast cancer. Hip fractures result in considerable functional decline. Greater awareness of this adverse drug effect is needed. PMID:21288927

  19. Minimally invasive percutaneous compression plating versus dynamic hip screw for intertrochanteric fractures: a randomized control trial

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    HU Ning

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Intertrochanteric femur fracture is a common injury in elderly patients. The dynamic hip screw (DHS has served as the standard choice for fixation; however it has several drawbacks. Studies of the percutaneous compression plate (PCCP are still inconclusive in regards to its effi cacy and safety. By comparing the two methods, we assessed their clinical therapeutic outcome. Methods: A total of 121 elderly patients with intertrochanteric femur fractures (type AO/OTA 31.A1- A2, Evans type 1 were divided randomly into two groups undergoing either a minimally invasive PCCP procedure or a conventional DHS fi xation. Results: The mean operation duration was signifi cantly shorter in the PCCP group (55.2 min versus 88.5 min, P<0.01. The blood loss was 156.5 ml±18.3 ml in the PCCP group and 513.2 ml±66.2 ml in the DHSgroup (P<0.01. Among the patients treated with PCCP, 3.1% needed blood transfusions, compared with 44.6% of those that had DHS surgery (P<0.01. The PCCP group displayed less postoperative complications (P<0.05. The mean American Society of Anesthesiologists score and Harris hip score in the PCCP group were better than those in the DHS group. There were no signifi cant differences in the mean hospital stay, mortality rates, or fracture healing. Conclusion: Due to several advantages, PCCP has the potential to become the ideal choice for treating intertrochanteric fractures (type AO/OTA 31.A1-A2, Evans type 1, particularly in the elderly. Key words: Hip fractures; Osteoporotic fractures; Surgical procedures, minimally invasive; Fracture fixation, internal

  20. Evaluation of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme for elderly patients with hip fracture: A prospective cohort study

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    Wing-Hoi Cheung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effectiveness and cost of an 18-month multi-disciplinary Comprehensive Fragility Fracture Management Program (CFFMP for fragility hip fracture patients. Design: Prospective cohort study. Patients: Elderly patients with hip fracture were recruited at their first postoperative follow-up in 2 district hospitals. The intervention group comprised patients from the hospital undergoing CFFMP, and the control group comprised patients from another hospital undergoing conventional care. CFFMP provided geri-orthopaedic co-management, physician consultations, group-exercise and vibration-therapy. Timed-up-and-go test (TUG, Elderly Mobility Scale (EMS, Berg Balance Scale (BBS and fall risk screening (FS were used to assess functional performance. Incidences of falls and secondary fractures, the cost of the programme and related healthcare resources were recorded. Results: A total of 76 patients were included in the intervention group (mean age 77.9 years ((standard deviation; SD 6.1 and 77 in the control group (79.9 (SD 7.2, respectively. The re-fracture rate in the control group (10.39% was significantly higher than in the intervention group (1.32% (p = 0.034. The intervention group improved significantly in TUG, EMS and FS after a 1-year programme. The overall healthcare costs per patient in the intervention and control groups were US$22,450 and US$25,313, respectively. Conclusion: Multi-disciplinary CFFMP is effective, with reduced overall cost, reduced length of hospital stay and reduced secondary fracture rate. The rehabilitation community service favours rehabilitation and improved quality of life of hip fracture patients.

  1. Bearing Change to Metal-On-Polyethylene for Ceramic Bearing Fracture in Total Hip Arthroplasty; Does It Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soong Joon; Kwak, Hong Suk; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Kim, Hee Joong

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the short-term to midterm results of reoperation with bearing change to metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) after ceramic bearing fracture in ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty. Nine third-generation ceramic bearing fractures (6 heads and 3 liners) were treated with bearing change to MoP. Mean age at reoperation was 52.7 years. Mean follow-up was 4.3 years. During follow-up, 2 of 3 liner-fractured hips and 1 of 6 head-fractured hips showed radiologic signs of metallosis and elevated serum chromium levels. Re-reoperation with bearing rechange to a ceramic head was performed for the hips with metallosis. One liner-fractured hip had periprosthetic joint infection. Dislocation occurred in 3 hips. From our experience, bearing change to MoP is not a recommended treatment option for ceramic bearing fracture in total hip arthroplasty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional and nutritional status correlation in elderly patients with hip fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Ramón González González

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hip fractures in elderly patients are related to several factors, among which nutrition and functionality stand out. The presence of alterations in the nutritional state has been related directly with the functional state. Objective: To determine the previous functional state of the patient with a hip fracture, the nutritional state at the moment of admittance and the correlation between both parameters as risk factors for the fracture. Materials and methods: 78 elderly patients with a hip fractured were studied from February 1st, 2009 to December 31st of 2009. The functional and nutritional stated were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and inferential analysis were used with contingency tables to test association with c2. Results: 46.1% were functionally independent and 53.9% had functional impairment. 14.1% presented malnourishment, 48.7% were at risk of malnutrition and 37.2% had normal nutrition. Only the 36.7% with the “nutritional problem” (MNA24 who were independent.

  3. Counseling, quality of life, and acute postoperative pain in elderly patients with hip fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambatesa M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Maria Gambatesa,1 Alessandro D'Ambrosio,1 Davide D'Antini,1 Lucia Mirabella,1 Antonella De Capraris,1 Salvatore Iuso,2 Antonello Bellomo,2 Antonio Macchiarola,3 Michele Dambrosio,1 Gilda Cinnella1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, 2Department of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy; 3Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Riuniti Hospital, Foggia, Italy Introduction: Hip fractures represent one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly people. Anxiety and depression affect their quality of life and increase pain severity, and have adverse effects on functional recovery. Recent World Health Organization guidelines emphasize that therapeutic regimes need to be individualized and combined with psychological support. This study was launched with the primary endpoint of assessing if and to what extent client-centered therapy affects the perception of pain, reduces anxiety and depression, and increases the quality of life of elderly patients with hip fracture. Materials and methods: Forty patients were admitted to the Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery ward for hip fracture. Patients were randomly divided into two subgroups: (1 case (group C, had to receive patient-centered counseling throughout the hospitalization; and (2 control (group NC, receiving the analgesic treatment without receiving counseling. Short Form-36-item Health Survey Questionnaire, State–Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores were recorded before any treatment, at discharge, and after 30 days. Pain levels were evaluated by means of Visual Analog Scale every 12 hours during the hospitalization from the day of surgery until day 5. Results: The hierarchical clustering analysis identified before any treatment were two clusters based on different physical functioning perceptions and role limitations, which were due to physical and emotional problems. Counseling did have a positive

  4. Anti-osteoporosis drug prescribing after hip fracture in the UK: 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klop, C; Gibson-Smith, D; Elders, P J M; Welsing, P M J; Leufkens, H G M; Harvey, N C; Bijlsma, J W J; van Staa, T-P; de Vries, F

    2015-07-01

    The probability of initiating with anti-osteoporosis therapy increased from 7 % in 2000 to 46 % in 2010. This improvement was greater for patients over the age of 75 years. Men, those overweight, having dementia or exposed to antipsychotics, sedatives/hypnotics or opioid analgesics were significantly less likely to receive anti-osteoporosis drugs. The objective of this study was to examine trends and determinants of anti-osteoporosis drug prescribing after hip fracture in the UK between 2000 and 2010. Data were extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink for patients ≥50 years who had a first hip fracture between 2000 and 2010 and who did not currently (≤6 months prior) receive anti-osteoporosis drugs (bisphosphonates, strontium ranelate, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin and raloxifene) (n = 27,542). The cumulative incidence probability of being prescribed anti-osteoporosis drugs within 1 year after hip fracture was estimated by Kaplan-Meier life-table analyses. Determinants for treatment initiation were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. The probability of being prescribed any anti-osteoporosis drug after hip fracture increased from 7 % in 2000 to 46 % in 2010. This trend was more marked in patients ≥75 years. The increase in prescribing of anti-osteoporosis drugs was complemented by a similar increase in vitamin D/calcium provision. Cumulative incidence of receiving anti-osteoporosis therapy was greater at any given point in time in women (8 % in 2000, 51 % in 2010) compared to men (4 % in 2000, 34 % in 2010). In addition to male gender, multivariable Cox regression identified reduced likelihood of receiving anti-osteoporosis drugs for those being overweight, having dementia and exposed to psychotropic drugs (antipsychotics, sedatives/hypnotics) or opioid analgesics. Although the prescribing of anti-osteoporosis drugs after hip fracture has increased substantially since 2000, the overall rate remained inadequate, particularly in

  5. Sex effects on short-term complications after hip fracture: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekström W

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wilhelmina Ekström,1 Bodil Samuelsson,2 Sari Ponzer,3 Tommy Cederholm,4,5 Karl-Göran Thorngren,6 Margareta Hedström7 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, 3Department of Clinical Science and Education, Section of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, 4Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, 5Department of Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, 6Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Orthopaedics, Lund University, Lund, 7Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden Objectives: To evaluate potential sex differences and other factors associated with complications within 4 months after a hip fracture.Methods: A total of 1,915 patients ≥65 years (480 men with hip fracture were consecutively included in a prospective multicenter cohort study. A review of medical records and patient interviews according to a study protocol based on the Standardized Audit of Hip Fractures in Europe (SAHFE, RIKSHÖFT was performed. Sex differences in comorbidity according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists score and complications 4 months after a hip fracture were registered. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors related to complications.Results: Male sex was associated with worse general health according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists classification (P=0.005 and with more comorbidities (P<0.001. Male sex emerged as a risk factor for developing pneumonia (P<0.001, and additionally, 18% of the men suffered from cardiac complications compared with 13% of the females (P=0.018. Female sex was predisposed for urinary tract infections, 30% vs 23

  6. Fall Risk Assessment Predicts Fall-Related Injury, Hip Fracture, and Head Injury in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Martin; Eriksson, Joel; Larsson, Berit; Odén, Anders; Johansson, Helena; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the role of a fall risk assessment, using the Downton Fall Risk Index (DFRI), in predicting fall-related injury, fall-related head injury and hip fracture, and death, in a large cohort of older women and men residing in Sweden. Cross sectional observational study. Sweden. Older adults (mean age 82.4 ± 7.8) who had a fall risk assessment using the DFRI at baseline (N = 128,596). Information on all fall-related injuries, all fall-related head injuries and hip fractures, and all-cause mortality was collected from the Swedish Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. The predictive role of DFRI was calculated using Poisson regression models with age, sex, height, weight, and comorbidities as covariates, taking time to outcome or end of study into account. During a median follow-up of 253 days (interquartile range 90-402 days) (>80,000 patient-years), 15,299 participants had a fall-related injury, 2,864 a head injury, and 2,557 a hip fracture, and 23,307 died. High fall risk (DFRI ≥3) independently predicted fall-related injury (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.39-1.49), hip fracture (HR = 1.51, 95% CI =1.38-1.66), head injury (HR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03-1.22), and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.35-1.43). DFRI more strongly predicted head injury (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21-1.36 vs HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04-1.11) and hip fracture (HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.30-1.53 vs HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.05-1.11) in 70-year old men than in 90-year old women (P Fall risk assessment using DFRI independently predicts fall-related injury, fall-related head injury and hip fracture, and all-cause mortality in older men and women, indicating its clinical usefulness to identify individuals who would benefit from interventions. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. The role of adipokines as prognostic factors of one-year mortality in hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, T; Kruljac, I; Kirigin Biloš, L S; Gulin, M; Grgurević, M; Borojević, M

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the impact of anthropometric parameters, adiponectin, leptin, homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), beta-isomerised C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (β-CTX), and routine biochemical tests on one-year mortality in hip fracture patients. We found that male patients with high adiponectin, leptin, and β-CTX levels had a 5-fold increase in all-cause one-year mortality. Several predictors of one-year hip fracture mortality have been identified including advanced age, male sex, low bone mineral density, and preexisting comorbidities. However, the impact of metabolic parameters on hip fracture mortality remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of serum leptin and adiponectin levels, as well as other metabolic parameters on all-cause one-year hip fracture mortality. This prospective study included 236 patients of all ages with non-traumatic hip fractures. Anthropometric parameters, adiponectin, leptin, HOMA-IR, β-CTX, and routine biochemical tests were recorded at admission and correlated with one-year mortality by using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. The median patient age was 82 (75-87) years, and one-year mortality rate was 28.4%. In univariate analysis, adiponectin, age, β-CTX, and renal function were associated with mortality. However, in a multivariate model, male gender, high β-CTX, adiponectin, and leptin were independently associated with increased mortality. Thus, we constructed a nomogram that included all the latter variables in addition to age. The nomogram predicted mortality with a sensitivity of 74.8% (66.0-82.3) and specificity of 74.4% (57.9-87.0), and had an area under the curve of 0.784. Patients that scored 9.2 had a mortality of 49.2% (relative risk 5.4, 95% CI 2.8-10.2, P < 0.001). Male patients with high adiponectin, leptin, and β-CTX levels have a 5-fold increase in all-cause one-year mortality after hip fracture.

  8. Reliability of hip range of motion using goniometry in pediatric femur shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Janice; Stephens, Derek; Wright, James G

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the interrater reliability of the assessment of range of motion of the hip joint through goniometry. We included children aged 4 to 10 years with a femoral shaft fracture, from 4 study sites, who had had either an early hip spica cast or an external fixator. An assessor blind to treatment received at each site measured range of hip joints motion, using a standardized goniometric technique at 15 and 24 months postfracture. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to quantify concordance or agreement. Most ICCs for the different aspects of hip range were between 0.2 and 0.5, indicating only slight agreement. The most reliable measure was hip flexion, with an ICC of 0.48 (95% confidence interval 0.29-0.63). Goniometric measurement, using standardized protocols for the hip, has low reliability. Only when differences in rotation exceed at least 30 degrees and in flexion-extension exceed 50 degrees should clinicians conclude that true change has occurred.

  9. Sliding hip screw versus IM nail in reverse oblique trochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures. A study of 2716 patients in the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matre, Kjell; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Gjertsen, Jan-Erik; Vinje, Tarjei; Espehaug, Birgitte; Fevang, Jonas Meling

    2013-06-01

    Intramedullary nailing is commonly recommended as the treatment of choice for transverse/reverse oblique trochanteric (AO/OTA type A3=intertrochanteric) and subtrochanteric fractures. However, only to a limited extent is this approach supported by superior results in well designed clinical trials, and the sliding hip screw (SHS) is still a frequently used implant for these fractures. The aim of the present study was to compare IM nails and SHS in the treatment of transverse/reverse oblique trochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures using data from the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register (NHFR). Data on 2716 operations for acute transverse/reverse oblique trochanteric or subtrochanteric fractures were collected from the NHFR from 2005 to 2010. Surgeons reported patient characteristics and details from initial surgery and reoperations, and patients answered questionnaires about pain, satisfaction, and quality of life (EQ-5D) 4, 12, and 36 months postoperatively. Reoperation rates were calculated using Kaplan-Meier analyses. Primary outcome measures were pain (Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)), satisfaction (VAS), quality of life (EQ-5D), and reoperation rates at one year. The treatment groups were similar regarding age, gender, ASA-class, cognitive impairment, and preoperative EQ-5Dindex score. At one year reoperation rates were 6.4% and 3.8% for SHS and IM nails, respectively (p=0.011). Patients treated with SHS also had slightly more pain (VAS 30 vs. 27, p=0.037) and were less satisfied (VAS 31 vs. 36, p=0.003) compared to patients treated with IM nail. There was no statistically significant difference in the EQ-5Dindex score, but the mobility was significantly better for the IM nail group. 12 months postoperatively patients with transverse/reverse oblique trochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures operated with a SHS had a higher reoperation rate compared to those operated with an IM nail. Small differences regarding pain, satisfaction, quality of life, and mobility were

  10. Timed up & go test score in patients with hip fracture is related to the type of walking aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Bandholm, Thomas; Holm, Bente

    2009-01-01

    Kristensen MT, Bandholm T, Holm B, Ekdahl C, Kehlet H. Timed Up & Go test score in patients with hip fracture is related to the type of walking aid. OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between Timed Up & Go (TUG) test scores and type of walking aid used during the test, and to determine...... the feasibility of using the rollator as a standardized walking aid during the TUG in patients with hip fracture who were allowed full weight-bearing (FWB). DESIGN: Prospective methodological study. SETTING: An acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Patients (N=126; 90 women......, 36 men) with hip fracture with a mean age +/- SD of 74.8+/-12.7 years performed the TUG the day before discharge from the orthopedic ward. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The TUG was performed with the walking aid the patient was to be discharged with: a walker (n=88) or elbow...

  11. Preoperative CSF Melatonin Concentrations and the Occurrence of Delirium in Older Hip Fracture Patients : A Preliminary Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, Rikie M; de Rooij, Sophia E J A; Vellekoop, Annelies E; Vrouenraets, Bart C; van Munster, Barbara C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delirium is characterized by disturbances in circadian rhythm. Melatonin regulates our circadian rhythm. Our aim was to compare preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) melatonin levels in patients with and without postoperative delirium. METHODS: Prospective cohort study with hip fracture

  12. Total Hip Arthroplasty after Treatment of an Atypical Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture in a Patient with Pycnodysostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Yuasa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with an osteonecrosis of her right femoral head after treatment of an atypical subtrochanteric fracture caused by pycnodysostosis. She had this fracture after a low-trauma fall. She was of short stature with typical facial features, short stubby hands, and radiological features including open cranial sutures, obtuse mandible, and generalized skeletal sclerosis. The majority of cases of atypical subtrochanteric fractures are associated with long-term use of bisphosphonates; some occur in bisphosphonate-free patients. We report a rare case of total hip arthroplasty (THA in a patient with pycnodysostosis who developed an osteonecrosis of the femoral head after treatment of an atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture. We performed cementless THA in combination with a plate and cables. Cementless THA is a potential intervention in a patient with pycnodysostosis; although the bone quality may have been sclerotic, healing is not a problem in this condition.

  13. A comprehensive fracture prevention strategy in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blain, H.; Masud, T.; Dargent-Molina, P.

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest group on falls and fracture prevention of the European union geriatric medicine society (EUGMS...... of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis (ECCEO), outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people....

  14. 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fractures and hip fractures according to Ukrainian model of FRAX® in women with vertebral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Grygorieva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vertebral fractures are one of the severe complications of systemic osteoporosis, which lead to the low-back pain, decrease or loss of efficiency and increase of mortality in older people. FRAX and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA are important methods in determining major osteoporotic fractures risk, including vertebral fractures. Materials and methods. We studied the parameters of Ukrainian model of FRAX in women depending on the presence of vertebral fractures. 652 patients aged 40–89 years examined at the Ukrainian Scientific Medical Center of Osteoporosis were divided into two groups: the first one — 523 women without any previous fractures, the second one — 129 patients with previous vertebral fractures. The assessment of bone mineral density (BMD was performed using DXA (Prodigy, General Electric. The 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fractures (FRAX-MOF and hip fractures (FRAX-HF has been determined using Ukrainian model of FRAX according to two methods — with body mass index (FRAXBMI and BMD. Results. According the distribution of FRAXBMI-MOF parameters in women depending on the presence of vertebral fractures, it was found that index of FRAXBMI-MOF was less than 20 % (the limit indicated as the criterion for treatment initiation in US guidelines in 100 and 100 % of subjects, respectively. The indices of FRAX BMD-HF were less than 3 % (the limit for starting treatment in US guidelines in 95 and 55 % of women, respectively. It was shown the significant moderate correlation between the indices of two methods in all groups for both parameters of the algorithm — FRAX-MOF and FRAX-HF. Conclusions. The study of the age-specific features of FRAX in women depending on the presence of vertebral fractures showed a significant increase in the risks for both major osteoporotic and hip fractures, regardless of the used technique (with BMI or BMD in women with vertebral fractures or without any fractures. Our

  15. Sliding hip screw versus the Targon PFT nail for trochanteric hip fractures: a randomised trial of 400 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M J; Cawley, S

    2017-09-01

    To compare the outcomes for trochanteric fractures treated with a sliding hip screw (SHS) or a cephalomedullary nail. A total of 400 patients with a trochanteric hip fracture were randomised to receive a SHS or a cephalomedullary nail (Targon PFT). All surviving patients were followed up to one year from injury. Functional outcome was assessed by a research nurse blinded to the implant used. Recovery of mobility, as assessed by a mobility scale, was superior for those treated with the intramedullary nail compared with the SHS at eight weeks, three and nine months (p-values between 0.01 and 0.04), the difference at six and 12 months was not statistically significant (p = 0.15 and p = 0.18 respectively). The mean difference was around 0.4 points (0.3 to 0.5) on a nine point scale. Surgical time for the nail was four minutes less than that for the SHS (p Fracture healing complications were similar for the two groups. There were no statistically significant differences between implants for any other recorded outcomes including the need for post-operative blood transfusion, wound healing complications, general medical complications, hospital stay or mortality. This study confirms the findings of a previous study that both methods of treatment produce similar results, although intramedullary fixation does result in marginally improved regain of mobility in comparison with the SHS. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1210-15. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  16. Can we predict postoperative complications in elderly Chinese patients with hip fractures using the surgical risk calculator?

    OpenAIRE

    Wang X; Zhao BJ; Su Y

    2017-01-01

    Xiao Wang, Bin Jiang Zhao, Yue Su Department of Anesthesiology, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China Purpose: Hip fractures are associated with poor prognosis in elderly patients partly due to the high rate of postoperative complications. This study was aimed to investigate whether the surgical risk calculator is suitable for predicting postoperative complications in elderly Chinese patients with hip fractures.Methods: The incidence of postoperative complica...

  17. How many trials are needed to achieve performance stability of the Timed Up & Go test in patients with hip fracture?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Ekdahl, Charlotte; Kehlet, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    To examine the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability of the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test using a standardized walking aid in patients with hip fracture who are allowed full weight bearing (FWB).......To examine the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability of the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test using a standardized walking aid in patients with hip fracture who are allowed full weight bearing (FWB)....

  18. Reduced Sirtuin1 expression at the femoral neck in women who sustained an osteoporotic hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Haj, M; Gurt, I; Cohen-Kfir, E; Dixit, V; Artsi, H; Kandel, L; Yakubovsky, O; Safran, O; Dresner-Pollak, R

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the role of Sirtuin1 in osteoporosis, Sirtuin1 was determined at the femoral neck in female patients undergoing hip operation for fractured hip or osteoarthritis. Reduced Sirtuin1 was found in osteoporotic patients. Pharmacologic activation of Sirtuin1 reduced sclerostin, an inhibitor of bone formation. Activation of Sirtuin1 may be a new direction to generate therapies for osteoporosis. The aim of the study are to investigate the role of Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), an anti-aging factor and a player in age-associated diseases, in osteoporotic hip fractures, and test the hypothesis that Sirt1 is a negative regulator of sclerostin, a bone formation inhibitor, in human femoral bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs). Sirt1 and sclerostin were determined by western blot in bone samples obtained intra-operatively from the inferior medial cortex of the femoral neck (calcar region) in female patients undergoing partial hip replacement for fractured neck of femur (N = 10) or hip replacement for osteoarthritis (N = 8) (mean ± SD age 81 ± 8.1 vs. 68 ± 9.3 years; BMI 26.2 ± 3.6 vs. 25.9 ± 7.1 kg/m(2) in osteoporotic and osteoarthritis patients). Calcar thickness and femoral bone mineral density (BMD) were determined preoperatively by X-ray using a digital TraumaCad(™) software and DEXA. Femoral BM-MSCs were collected intra-operatively and treated with SRT3025, a Sirt1 activator. Sclerostin and dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein (DMP1) were determined by western blot and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of Lef1 and DMP1 was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Osteoporotic (OP) patients had reduced cortical thickness, femoral neck, and total hip BMD compared to osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Calcar Sirt1 expression was significantly reduced, while sclerostin was markedly increased in OP compared to OA patients. Sirt1 and sclersotin expressions were inversely correlated (r = -0.49, P = 0.047). SRT3025 administration down

  19. Municipality-based physical rehabilitation after acute hip fracture surgery in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Lise; Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    , the aim of the present paper was to describe the specifics of PR provided to patients following discharge after hip fracture (HF) surgery in Denmark to evaluate the need for future interventions or guidelines. METHODS: This was a national, cross-sectional questionnaire survey including 56 randomly...... of which only 14% provided specific information regarding the intensity and the progression of training. CONCLUSION: PR after hip fracture in Denmark is initiated shortly after referral, for a variable duration of time and with poorly described exercise intensity and progression. This calls for a national...... selected municipalities out of 98. Information was gathered on PR and categorised into outpatient PR (including one-to-one and group), home-based PR, 24-hour in-patient PR units and nursing homes. RESULTS: Sixty PR centres (97%) within 51 municipalities (91%) participated. The PR was initiated within 1...

  20. Estrogen receptor alpha polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Alisa D; Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2007-01-01

    thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism), cancer of reproductive organs (breasts, ovaries, uterus, and prostate), and hip fracture. We also studied patients with ischemic heart disease (n=2495), ischemic cerebrovascular disease (n=856), and breast cancer (n=1256) versus general population......Background- We hypothesized that the estrogen receptor (ESR1) IVS1-397T/C polymorphism affects high-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to hormone replacement therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer of reproductive organs, and hip fracture. Methods and Results- We studied...... controls. The CC, CT, and TT genotypes had general population frequencies of 21%, 50%, and 29%, respectively. Cross-sectionally, genotype did not influence high-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to hormone replacement therapy. In the cohort study, there were no differences in risks of CVD, cancer...

  1. Impact of surgical complications on length of stay after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Palm, Henrik; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rehabilitation after hip fracture may be lengthy, with bed-day consumption accounting for up to 85% of the total cost of admission to hospital. Data suggest that surgical complications requiring reoperation may lead to an excessively long in-patient stays. However, the overall impact...... of surgical complications has not been examined in detail. METHODS: All 600 consecutive patients included were admitted with primary hip fracture and received primary surgical intervention with multimodal rehabilitation. Surgical complications were audited and classified as being due to a patient fall......, infection or suboptimal surgery, stratified into either requiring reoperation or not allowing mobilisation because of instability. RESULTS: Of the 600, 116 (19.3, 95% CI 16-22%) patients underwent reoperation or immobilisation; 27.1% of bed-day consumption resulted from surgical complications. The audit...

  2. O-POSSUM score predicts morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay-Domínguez, Elena; Lajara-Marco, Francisco; Bernáldez-Silvetti, Pablo Federico; Veracruz-Gálvez, Eva María; Muela-Pérez, Beatriz; Palazón-Banegas, Miguel Ángel; Salinas-Gilabert, José Eduardo; Lozano-Requena, Juan Antonio

    2017-11-27

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the O-POSSUM score capacity to predict the morbidity and mortality of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of patients older than 65years old, operated on for hip fractures between January 2012 and December 2013. Of 229 patients, the mean age was 82.3years and 170 were women. We collected comorbidities, type of surgery, and expected morbidity and mortality O-POSSUM values. After a minimum follow up of one year, 38 deaths were reported and 77 patients had complications. The expected mortality according to the O-POSSUM was 35 patients and expected morbidity 132. By comparing the observed results with those predicted, the O-POSSUM scale is reliable in predicting mortality and overestimates morbidity. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Post-operative rounds by anaesthesiologists after hip fracture surgery: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Christensen, Dorte Stig; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    a multidisciplinary effort between anaesthesiologists and orthopaedic surgeons. METHODS: During the first 25 weeks of 2004, 98 consecutive community-residing patients admitted to a hip fracture unit received daily rounds by anaesthesiologists during the first four post-operative days, on weekdays only, focusing...... in the intervention group (P = 0.02). There was no significant difference between post-operative morbidity and hospital stay in the control and intervention groups; in-hospital mortality was 12% in the control group and 7% in the intervention group (P = 0.24). The rounds by anaesthesiologists improved nursing care......BACKGROUND: Efforts to optimize the peri-operative care of hip fracture patients through multidisciplinary intervention have focused on orthopaedic-geriatric liaisons, which have not resulted in significant outcome changes. The early phase of rehabilitation could potentially be optimized through...

  4. Outcomes and weight-bearing status during rehabilitation after arthroplasty for hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebens, Hilary C; Sharkey, Phoebe; Aronow, Harriet U; Horn, Susan D; Munin, Michael C; DeJong, Gerben; Smout, Randall J; Radnay, Craig S

    2012-08-01

    To examine the association of weight-bearing status with patient-related variables and outcomes of inpatient rehabilitation after hip arthroplasty for acute hip fracture. A multi-site prospective observational cohort study. Eighteen skilled nursing and inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Patients with hip fractures (N = 224) treated with hip arthroplasty and admitted to either skilled nursing or inpatient rehabilitation facilities; a subset (N = 84) with telephone follow-up outcomes 8 months after rehabilitation discharge. Measurements included demographic variables, medical severity using the Comprehensive Severity Index, and functional levels using the Functional Independence Measure. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASUREMENT: Cognitive, motor, and total Functional Independence Measure scores at rehabilitation discharge and at 8-month follow-up; living location at discharge and follow-up. Patients on average (standard deviation) were 76.8 ± 11.4 years old, mainly women (78%), and mainly white (87%). In unadjusted analysis, weight bearing as tolerated (WBAT) was associated with less osteoarthritis (P = .025) and lower admission medical severity (ACSI) (P = .014). One participating facility had a significant preponderance of restricted weight-bearing cases. WBAT had no bivariate association with cognitive or motor function at discharge. Therapists cited restricted weight bearing as a barrier to therapy in 11% of cases. In logistic regressions, lower medical admission severity, older age, and one specified site significantly predicted WBAT (c statistic = 0.714). Significant predictors for home discharge included lower maximum severity (P < .001), younger age (P < .001), higher cognition (P = .037), and WBAT (P = .051) (c statistic = 0.863). WBAT is associated with a greater likelihood of home discharge and had similar functional outcomes compared with restricted weight bearing. These findings add support for allowing WBAT after arthroplasty for hip fracture. Copyright © 2012

  5. [Effects of long-term fluoride in drinking water on risks of hip fracture of the elderly: an ecologic study based on database of hospitalization episodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Young; Hwang, Seung Sik; Kim, Jai Yong; Cho, Soo Hun

    2008-05-01

    Fluoridation of drinking water is known to decrease dental caries, particularly in children. However, the effects of fluoridated water on bone over several decades are still in controversy. To assess the risk of hip fracture related to water fluoridation, we evaluated the hip fracture-related hospitalizations of the elderly between a fluoridated city and non-fluoridated cities in Korea. Cheongju as a fluoridated area and Chungju, Chuncheon, Suwon, Wonju as non-fluoridated areas were chosen for the study. We established a database of hip fracture hospitalization episode based on the claims data submitted to the Health Insurance Review Agency from January 1995 to December 2002. The hip fracture hospitalization episodes that satisfied the conditions were those that occurred in patients over 65 years old, the injuries had a hip fracture code (ICD-9 820, ICD-10 S72) and the patients were hospitalized for at least 7days. A total of 80,558 cases of hip fracture hospitalization episodes were analyzed. The admission rates for hip fracture increased with the age of the men and women in both a fluoridated city and the non-fluoridated cities (p<0.01). The relative risk of hip fracture increased significantly both for men and women as their age increased. However, any difference in the hip fracture admission rates was not consistently observed between the fluoridated city and the nonfluoridated cities. We cannot conclude that fluoridation of drinking water increases the risk of hip fracture in the elderly.

  6. Body weight-supported treadmill training for patients with hip fracture: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangregorio, Lora M; Thabane, Lehana; Debeer, Justin; Farrauto, Leonardo; McCartney, Neil; Adachi, Jonathan D; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2009-12-01

    Giangregorio LM, Thabane L, deBeer J, Farrauto L, McCartney N, Adachi JD, Papaioannou A. Body weight-supported treadmill training for patients with hip fracture: a feasibility study. To determine the feasibility of body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) as a strategy for improving independent ambulation among patients who had sustained a hip fracture. Nonrandomized controlled trial. Inpatient rehabilitation. Patients with a stable hip fracture and at least 50% weight-bearing. BWSTT in lieu of standard walking exercises throughout stay in rehabilitation. Feasibility outcomes included the number of patients agreeing to participate in treadmill walking, the number who returned for follow-up assessments, compliance, and the number of adverse events. Secondary outcomes included the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, the Timed Up & Go test, a 2-minute walk test, and the Falls Self-Efficacy Scale. Univariate regression was used to assess the group effect on score changes from baseline to discharge and from baseline to follow-up. Among 41 potentially eligible patients, 21 (51%) agreed to participate and 14 returned for follow-up assessments. The recruitment goal of 12 patients agreeing to BWSTT was achieved; however, retention by 3-month follow-up was 67%. The average compliance was 3 sessions a week; however, several patients were below average. No adverse events of BWSTT were reported. There were no significant differences between groups with respect to secondary outcomes. BWSTT may be a feasible method for retraining gait among patients with hip fracture. However, future studies evaluating its efficacy need rigorous methods for ensuring compliance and retention.

  7. Use of anti-depressants and the risk of fracture of the hip or femur

    OpenAIRE

    van den Brand, M. W. M.; Samson, M. M.; Pouwels, S.; van Staa, T. P.; Thio, B.; Cooper, C.; Leufkens, H. G. M.; Egberts, A. C. G.; Verhaar, H. J. J.; de Vries, F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Anti-depressants are used largely, but have serious side effects. We show that both selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs) increase the risk of hip/femur fracture and that this risk is time related and depends on the degree of serotonin transporter inhibition. This should be considered when prescribing anti-depressants to patients. Introduction Anti-depressants are known to have serious side effects. We examined the association between t...

  8. Effect of Teriparatide or Risedronate in Elderly Patients With a Recent Pertrochanteric Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malouf-Sierra, Jorge; Tarantino, Umberto; Garcia-Hernandez, Pedro A.

    2017-01-01

    We present final results of a study comparing teriparatide 20 μg every day (QD) with risedronate 35 mg once per week (QW) started within 2 weeks after surgery for a pertrochanteric hip fracture. Patients with BMD T-score ≤ -2.0 and 25OHD ≥9.2 ng/mL were randomized to receive 26-week double-dummy ...

  9. Is body temperature an independent predictor of mortality in hip fracture patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizi, Murtuza; Farrier, Adam J; Venkatesan, Murali; Thomas, Christopher; Uzoigwe, Chika Edward; Balasubramanian, Siva; Smith, Robert P

    2014-12-01

    Admission body temperature is a critical parameter in all trauma patients. Low admission temperature is strongly associated with adverse outcomes. We have previously shown, in a prospective study that low admission body temperature is common and associated with high mortality in hip fracture patients (Uzoigwe et al., 2014). However, no previous studies have evaluated whether admission temperature is an independent predictor of mortality in hip fracture patients after adjustment for the 7 recognised independent prognostic indicators (Maxwell et al., 2008). We retrospectively collated data on all patients presenting to our institution between June 2011 and February 2013 with a hip fracture. This included patients involved in the original prospective study (Uzoigwe et al., 2014). Admission tympanic temperature, measured on initial presentation at triage, was recorded. The prognosticators of age, gender, source of admission, abbreviated mental test score, haemoglobin, co-morbid disease and the presence or absence of malignancy were also recorded. Using multiple logistic regression, adjustment was made for these potentially confounding prognostic indicators of 30-day mortality, to determine if admission low body temperature were independently linked to mortality. 1066 patients were included. 781 patients, involved in the original prospective study (Uzoigwe et al., 2014), presented in the relevant time frame and were included in the retrospective study. The mean age was 81. There were 273 (26%) men and 793 (74%) women. 407 (38%) had low body temperature (temperature had an adjusted odds ratio of 30-day mortality that was 2.1 times that of the euthermic (36.5–37.5 °C). Low body temperature is strongly and independently associated with 30-day mortality in hip fracture patients.

  10. Hip fracture in older adults: prevalence and costs in two hospitals. Tabasco. México. 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Quevedo-Tejero, Elsy del Carmen; División Académica de Ciencias de la Salud de la Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco. México. Médico, Maestra en Geriatría.; Zavala-González, Marco Antonio; División Académica de Ciencias de la Salud de la Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco. México. Médico, Maestro en Educación.; Hernández-Gamas, Arianna del Carmen; División Académica de Ciencias de la Salud de la Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco. México. Estudiante de Medicina Humana.; Hernández-Ortega, Hilda María; División Académica de Ciencias de la Salud de la Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco. México. Estudiante de Medicina Humana.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To determine hip fracture prevalence and direct healthcare costs in elderly users of the reference hospitals of the Mexican Institute of Social Insurance (IMSS by spanish initials) and Mexican Oils (PEMEX by spanish initials), from Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico, during 2009. Materials and methods. This is a cross-sectional study. The information was based on the registers of surgical interventions and institutional reports of the elderly inpatients who had a registered attention i...

  11. Early interdisciplinary hospital intervention for elderly patients with hip fractures : functional outcome and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Tarazona-Santabalbina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hip fractures are associated with high levels of co-morbidity and mortality. Orthogeriatric units have been shown to be effective with respect to functional recovery and mortality reduction. The aim of this study is to document the natural history of early multidisciplinary intervention in elderly patients with hip fractures and to establish the prognostic factors of mortality and walking ability after discharge. METHODS: This observational, retrospective study was performed in an orthogeriatric care unit on patients aged >70 years with a diagnosis of hip fracture between 2004 and 2008. This study included 1363 patients with a mean age of 82.7 + 6.4 years. RESULTS: On admission to the unit, the average Barthel score of these patients was 77.2 + 27.8 points, and the average Charlson index score was 2.14 + 2.05. The mean length of stay was 8.9 + 4.26 days, and the readmission rate was 2.3%. The in-hospital mortality rate was 4.7%, and the mortality rates at one, six, and 12 months after discharge were 8.7%, 16.9%, and 25.9%, respectively. The Cox proportional hazards model estimated that male sex, Barthel scale, heart failure, and cognitive impairment were associated with an increased risk of death. With regard to functionality, 63.7% of the patients were able to walk at the time of discharge, whereas 77.4% and 80.1% were able to walk at one month and six months post-discharge, respectively. The factors associated with a worse functional recovery included cognitive impairment, performance status, age, stroke, Charlson score, and delirium during the hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: Early multidisciplinary intervention appears to be effective for the management of hip fracture. Age, male sex, baseline function, cognitive impairment and previous comorbidities are associated with a higher mortality rate and worse functional recovery.

  12. Improving community ambulation after hip fracture: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Orwig

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: This multicentre randomised study will be the first to test whether a home-based multi-component physiotherapy intervention targeting specific precursors of community ambulation (PUSH is more likely to lead to community ambulation than a home-based non-specific multi-component physiotherapy intervention (PULSE in older adults after hip fracture. The study will also estimate the potential economic value of the interventions.

  13. Effect of Birth Cohort on Risk of Hip Fracture: Age-Specific Incidence Rates in the Framingham Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelson, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yuqing; Kiel, Douglas P.; Hannan, Marian T.; Felson, David T.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined the effect of birth cohort on incidence rates of hip fracture among women and men in the Framingham Study. Methods. Age-specific incidence rates of first hip fracture were presented according to tertile of year of birth for 5209 participants of the Framingham Study, a population-based cohort followed since 1948. Sex-specific incidence rate ratios were calculated by Cox regression to assess the relation between birth cohort and hip fracture incidence. Results. An increasing trend in hip fracture incidence rates was observed with year of birth for women (trend, P = .05) and men (trend, P = .03). Relative to those born from 1887 to 1900 (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.0), age-specific incidence rates were greatest in the most recent birth cohort, born from 1911 to 1921 (IRR = 1.4 for women, IRR = 2.0 for men), and intermediate in those born from 1901 to 1910 (IRR = 1.2 for women, IRR = 1.5 for men). Conclusions. Results suggest risk of hip fracture is increasing for successive birth cohorts. Projections that fail to account for the increase in rates associated with birth cohort underestimate the future public health impact of hip fracture in the United States. PMID:11988460

  14. A locked hip screw-intramedullary nail (cephalomedullary nail) for the treatment of fractures of the proximal part of the femur combined with fractures of the femoral shaft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A; Ekeland, A; Grøgaard, B; Dokke, J R

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with complex femoral fractures (combined shaft and proximal femoral fractures) were treated with a modified Grosse-Kempf slotted locking nail (cephalomedullary nail), wherein two screws were inserted in the hip. Four types of complex, multifocal femoral fractures were represented in the series. Eleven of the femoral shaft fractures were secondary to a previous, internally fixed, not yet united hip fracture (type I). Ten comminuted peritrochanteric fractures occurred in normal bone (type II). Three similar fractures were pathologic because of metastasis. Two patients had an ipsilateral fracture of the femoral shaft and the trochanteric area (type III), and one of the shaft and the femoral neck (type IV). Locking was made static in 24 cases. Additional cerclage wiring was used in three type II fractures. Five complications were as follows: one cutting out of a screw in the femoral head, two fractures of the nail, one deep venous thrombosis, and one wound hematoma. Reoperations were two salvage operations using a new nail and one evacuation of hematoma. One patient with multiple injuries and four elderly patients died within 2 months. Eighteen patients with fractures in normal bone were followed for a median of 20 (6 to 37) months. All fractures united. Two nails were removed. The end result was excellent in ten patients, good in seven, and fair in one (2-cm shortening and 20-degree external rotation). We conclude that a locked intramedullary construct with locking screws in femoral neck and distal femur controls a complex fracture situation well.

  15. Body Weight–Supported Treadmill Training for Patients With Hip Fracture: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangregorio, Lora M.; Thabane, Lehana; deBeer, Justin; Farrauto, Leonardo; McCartney, Neil; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT) as a strategy for improving independent ambulation among patients who had sustained a hip fracture. Design Nonrandomized controlled trial. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants Patients with a stable hip fracture and at least 50% weight-bearing. Intervention BWSTT in lieu of standard walking exercises throughout stay in rehabilitation. Main Outcomes Measures Feasibility outcomes included the number of patients agreeing to participate in treadmill walking, the number who returned for follow-up assessments, compliance, and the number of adverse events. Secondary outcomes included the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, the Timed Up & Go test, a 2-minute walk test, and the Falls Self-Efficacy Scale. Univariate regression was used to assess the group effect on score changes from baseline to discharge and from baseline to follow-up. Results Among 41 potentially eligible patients, 21 (51%) agreed to participate and 14 returned for follow-up assessments. The recruitment goal of 12 patients agreeing to BWSTT was achieved; however, retention by 3-month follow-up was 67%. The average compliance was 3 sessions a week; however, several patients were below average. No adverse events of BWSTT were reported. There were no significant differences between groups with respect to secondary outcomes. Conclusions BWSTT may be a feasible method for retraining gait among patients with hip fracture. However, future studies evaluating its efficacy need rigorous methods for ensuring compliance and retention. PMID:19969179

  16. [Preoperative intravenous iron as a strategy for blood saving in surgery for hip fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco Rubio, Nieves; Llorens Eizaguerri, María; Seral García, Belén; Burillo Fuertes, Pilar; Ranera García, Miguel; Albareda Albareda, Jorge

    2013-11-02

    To determine whether administration of intravenous iron in a patient diagnosed with hip fracture reduces the need for blood transfusion. A retrospective observational case-control study was performed comparing a control group of 63 patients diagnosed with hip fracture with another group of 57 patients treated with parenteral iron. Demographic, clinical condition/clinical record and hematometric differences of the case-control patients were described. We analyzed the morbidity (post-surgical infection) and mortality rate. SPSS(®) was used for statistical studies. Being statistically significant, after the administration of intravenous iron sucrose, the need of blood transfusion was reduced in the case group, as well as the quantity of concentrates required (1.37 vs 0.6). In the case group, there was a statistically significant decreasing trend in hospital mortality rate (case group: 0.8%/control group: 8.3%). It was not been proven the relation between the decrease in nosocomial infection and the administration of intravenous iron The administration of intravenous iron sucrose in patients diagnosed with hip fracture before surgery could be effective blood saving measure in this type of trauma surgery. Furthermore, its use has been reliable without causing any side effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Retrospective Evaluation of a Restrictive Transfusion Strategy in Older Adults with Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerah, Lorene; Dourthe, Lucile; Cohen-Bittan, Judith; Verny, Marc; Raux, Mathieu; Mézière, Anthony; Khiami, Frédéric; Tourette, Cendrine; Neri, Christian; Le Manach, Yannick; Riou, Bruno; Vallet, Hélène; Boddaert, Jacques

    2018-04-20

    To compare the association between a restrictive transfusion strategy and cardiovascular complications during hospitalization for hip fracture with the association between a liberal transfusion strategy and cardiovascular complications, accounting for all transfusions from the emergency department to postacute rehabilitation settings. Retrospective study. Perioperative geriatric care unit. All individuals aged 70 and older admitted to the emergency department for hip fracture and hospitalized in our perioperative geriatric care unit (N=667; n=193 in the liberal transfusion group, n=474 in the restrictive transfusion group) from July 2009 to April 2016. A restrictive transfusion strategy (hemoglobin level threshold ≥8 g/dL or symptoms) used from January 2012 to April 2016 was compared with the liberal transfusion strategy (hemoglobin level threshold ≥10 g/dL) used from July 2009 to December 2011. Primary endpoint was in-hospital acute cardiovascular complications (heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation or stroke). The change to a restrictive transfusion strategy was associated with fewer acute cardiovascular complications (odds ratio=0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.31-0.67, pstrategy, Pstrategy than the liberal transfusion strategy (18% vs 9%, Pstrategy in older adults with hip fracture was found to be safe and was associated with fewer cardiovascular complications but more transfusions in rehabilitation settings. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. © 2018, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2018, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. The Doppler renal resistive index for early detection of acute kidney injury after hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Philippe; Ferre, Fabrice; Labaste, François; Jacques, Loriane; Luzi, Aymeric; Conil, Jean-Marie; Silva, Stein; Minville, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is linked to an increase in morbidity and mortality, particularly in elderly populations. This study's aim was to assess the accuracy of the Doppler renal resistive index (RI) in detecting AKI at an early stage after hip fracture surgery. This prospective single-centre study included 48 patients suffering hip fractures requiring surgery and who presented risk factors for the development of AKI. The RI was calculated preoperatively and postoperatively in patients without pain and with haemodynamic and respiratory stability. The occurrence of AKI was determined by measurements of serum creatinine according to AKIN criteria. Twenty-nine patients (60%) developed AKI during the first five postoperative days, without need for dialysis. The RI was increased in patients who developed postoperative AKI 0.68 (0.67-0.71) vs. 0.72 (0.7-0.73); P=0.014 for the preoperative index; and 0.6 (0.58-0.68) vs. 0.74 (0.71-0.76); Pcalculation of the RI during the perioperative periods of hip fracture surgery predicts early and effectively the postoperative occurrence of AKI, thus allowing treatment to be anticipated so as to improve patient prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The Clinical and Economic Impact of Preoperative Transthoracic Echocardiography in Elderly Patients with Hip Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcantonio, Andrew; Steen, Brandon; Kain, Michael; Bramlett, Kasey-Jean; Tilzey, John F; Iorio, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate preoperative transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) on cardiac intervention, length of stay (LOS), inpatient mortality, and costs. A retrospective series of 43 preoperative TTE and 161 non-TTE (control) hip fracture patients (> 65 years) was reviewed. The data collected included ASA score, comorbidities, indication for TTE, perioperative cardiac intervention, LOS, inpatient mortality, and cost. One of 43 (2.4%) (TTE) had a cardiac intervention (PTCA/CABG). Zero interventions occurred in the control group. The average time to operation was 1.5 days (TTE) and 0.93 days (control) (p TTE) and 6.0 days (control), (p = 0.04). Patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification 3 and 4 patients), LOS was 7.3 days (TTE) and 6.3 days (control) (p = 0.18). Inpatient mortality was 2.3% (TTE) and 3% (control) (p = 0.493). There was no correlation between TTE and anesthesia. Hospital costs were different between groups (TTE $24,445 and control $18,429, p = 0.02). Preoperative TTE in elderly patients with hip fractures resulted in a low cardiac intervention rate. Patients undergoing preoperative TTE prior to surgery had longer times to operation, LOS, and higher hospital costs. The utility of TTE as a preoperative screening tool is limited in the geriatric hip fracture population and does not appear to effect perioperative mortality rates.

  20. Albuminuria and Rapid Loss of GFR and Risk of New Hip and Pelvic Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peggy; Clase, Catherine M.; Mente, Andrew; Mann, Johannes F.E.; Sleight, Peter; Yusuf, Salim; Teo, Koon K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives The microvascular circulation plays an important role in bone health. This study examines whether albuminuria, a marker of renal microvascular disease, is associated with incident hip and pelvic fractures. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study reanalyzed data from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global End Point Trial/Telmisartan Randomized Assessment Study in Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Intolerant Subjects with Cardiovascular Disease trials, which examined the impact of renin angiotensin system blockade on cardiovascular outcomes (n=28,601). Albuminuria was defined as an albumin-to-creatinine ratio≥30 mg/g (n=4597). Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the association of albuminuria with fracture risk adjusted for known risk factors for fractures, estimated GFR, and rapid decline in estimated GFR (≥5%/yr). Results There were 276 hip and pelvic fractures during a mean of 4.6 years of follow-up. Participants with baseline albuminuria had a significantly increased risk of fracture compared with participants without albuminuria (unadjusted hazard ratio=1.62 [1.22, 2.15], P<0.001; adjusted hazard ratio=1.36 [1.01, 1.84], P=0.05). A dose-dependent relationship was observed, with macroalbuminuria having a large fracture risk (unadjusted hazard ratio=2.01 [1.21, 3.35], P=0.007; adjusted hazard ratio=1.71 [1.007, 2.91], P=0.05) and microalbuminuria associating with borderline or no statistical significance (unadjusted hazard ratio=1.52 [1.10, 2.09], P=0.01; adjusted hazard ratio=1.28 [0.92, 1.78], P=0.15). Estimated GFR was not a predictor of fracture in any model, but rapid loss of estimated GFR over the first 2 years of follow-up predicted subsequent fracture (adjusted hazard ratio=1.47 [1.05, 2.04], P=0.02). Conclusions Albuminuria, especially macroalbuminuria, and rapid decline of estimated GFR predict hip and pelvic fractures. These findings support a

  1. Is a lateral view essential in management of hip fracture?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, Syed G.A., E-mail: docnaqvi@gmail.com [SpR Trauma and Orthopaedics, Countess of Chester Hospital, 15-Mulberryr Walk, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham B74 3TE (United Kingdom); Iqbal, Shoaib, E-mail: drshoaibiqbal@gmail.com [SHO Plastic Surgery, Countess of Chester Hospital (United Kingdom); Reynolds, T., E-mail: Tim.Reynolds@burtonh-tr.wmids.nhs.uk [Queens Hospital, Burton on Trent, DE13 0RB (United Kingdom); Braithwaite, I., E-mail: Ian.Braithwaite@nhs.net [Countess of Chester Hospital, Chester, CH2 1UL (United Kingdom); Banim, R., E-mail: Ronan.Banim@nhs.net [Countess of Chester Hospital, Chester, CH2 1UL (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    Introduction: Neck of femur accounts to about 86,000 cases per annum in UK. AP and lateral radiographs form an essential investigation in planning the management of these fractures. Recently it has been suggested that lateral view does not provide any additional information in majority of the cases. Materials and methods: We looked retrospectively at 25 consecutive radiographs with intracapsular and extracapsular fracture neck of femur each presenting to our department between May 2010 and January 2011. These radiographs were put on the CD in 2 folders as AP and lateral. It was reviewed by 2 observers who suggested their preferred treatment. The results were compared for the intra observer agreement to assess the necessity of the lateral view of the radiographs. We also compared the treatment options with the gold standard. Results: Our results showed that lateral view did not make any difference in the management in majority of the cases with excellent agreement based on kappa statistics. Conclusion: We feel that the lateral view does not make any difference in most of the cases as shown by a good intraobserver agreement.

  2. Sarcopenia in patients with hip fracture: A multicenter cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steihaug, Ole Martin; Gjesdal, Clara Gram; Bogen, Bård; Kristoffersen, Målfrid Holen; Lien, Gunhild; Ranhoff, Anette Hylen

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is prevalent in older persons and is a risk factor for falls, fractures, and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine a) the feasibility of determining sarcopenia in patients with acute hip fracture, b) the prevalence of sarcopenia and c) associations of sarcopenia with nutritional status and comorbidities. A multicenter cross-sectional study on sarcopenia in male and female patients with acute hip fracture. Participants were previously ambulatory and living in the community. Sarcopenia was assessed postoperatively with muscle mass estimated by anthropometry using triceps skinfold, arm circumference, height, weight and sex. Grip strength was measured by Jamar dynamometer and pre-fracture mobility was by self-report using the New Mobility Score. Out of 282 patients, 202 were assessed for sarcopenia of whom 74 (37%) were diagnosed as sarcopenic. Sarcopenia was associated with age, odds ratio (OR) 1.4 per 5 years, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.1, 1.8], ASA Physical Status Classification System score, OR 2.3 per point, 95% CI [1.3, 4.3] and number of medications at discharge, OR 1.2 per medication, 95% CI [1.0, 1.3] and inversely associated with BMI, OR 0.8, 95% CI [0.7, 0.9] and serum albumin, OR 0.9, 95% CI [0.8,1.0]. Thirty-seven percent of assessed subjects were diagnosed with sarcopenia. Our data demonstrates that the prevalence of sarcopenia is associated with older age, malnutrition and comorbidities. Determining sarcopenia at the bedside was feasible in postoperative hip fracture patients by using grip strength, estimation of muscle mass by anthropometry and self-reported mobility.

  3. Assessment of femoral neck fracture risk for a novel proximal epiphyseal hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofolini, Luca; Juszczyk, Mateusz; Taddei, Fulvia; Field, Richard E; Rushton, Neil; Viceconti, Marco

    2011-07-01

    This study addresses the risk of femoral neck fracture associated with resurfacing hip prostheses. A novel cemented Proximal Epiphyseal Replacement (PER) featuring a short curved stem was investigated. Seven pairs of femurs were in vitro tested. One femur of each pair was randomly assigned for PER implantation. The contralateral femur was tested intact. All femurs were loaded to failure in a validated, physiological configuration. High-speed videos (10,000-12,000 frames/s) were acquired to identify the location of fracture initiation. For comparison, data were included from Birmingham Hip Resurfacing previously tested in an identical fashion (N=3). Relative to the contralateral intact femurs, the failure load of the PER and Birmingham implants was 15.4% higher and 10.0% lower, respectively. In six of the seven PER implants, fracture initiation (neck or inter-trochanteric) was similar to the contralateral intact femurs, suggesting comparable stress distribution. Conversely, fracture initiation in the Birmingham implants occurred at the lateral prosthesis rim, which differed substantially from the intact femurs. No correlation existed between bone quality and strengthening/weakening effect of the PER (failure load of implant as a percentage of intact: R^2=0.067). Conversely, Birmingham implantation weakened the femurs with lower density (R^2=0.92). Therefore, unlike most resurfacing prostheses, the PER seems suitable also for osteoporotic subjects. This study seems to confirm that resurfacing with a Birmingham Hip tends to reduce the strength of the proximal femur. The opposite seemed to happen with the PER, which slightly reduced the risk of neck fracture, also in low-quality bones. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Methodological challenges in the use of hip-specific composite outcomes: linking measurements from hip fracture trials to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang-Kim, Amy; Schemitsch, Emil; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Beaton, Dorcas

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of hip-specific outcome measures in randomized trials reflects what directs our outcome assessment following a hip fracture. The present study provides an overview on the most commonly-used hip-specific outcome instruments used for postoperative assessment of hip fracture with respect to their covered contents. This can facilitate the selection of appropriate items for specific purposes in clinical as well as research settings. We used the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) model to distinguish concepts within the instrument. All items from the questionnaires were categorized into one of three categories using the ICF linking rules for a standardized approach. The hip-specific composites measures were also compared to other types of prevalent measures: generic and patient-based instruments. All of the items in the instruments could be mapped to the ICF. We report the highest frequency of ICF activity and participation (71%) within the Harris hip score (HHS) which is similar to the frequency of ICF content found in the generic measures (82%). Hip-specific composites focused mostly on walking and moving long and short distances, while in patient-reported measures there was a concentration on the concept of sensation of pain and pain in body parts. The prevalent use of the HHS, over the other hip-specific instruments, could be attributed to its likeness in concept to other generic measures. The dominance of the ICF category of activity and participation reflects what is important to clinicians treating a hip fracture. Composite scores remain problematic as they cut across different ICF concepts. As long as the popularity of composite scoring systems continues, an overall score may not represent the true patient preferences and concerns in clinical trials. Future studies could apply the results from this study for the creation of an ICF category-based item banking or investigators could operationalize the ICF

  5. Effect of extended physiotherapy and high-dose vitamin D on rate of falls and hospital re-admission after acute hip fracture: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelines for post-fracture care of elderly hip fracture patients are not established despite the significant socio-economic burden of post hip fracture morbidity and mortality. Using a factorial design, we studied the effects of extended physiotherapy (supervised 1 hour per day during acute care p...

  6. Asymmetries Identified in Sit-to-Stand Task Explain Physical Function After Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Robert A; Houck, Jeff R; Drummond, Micah J; Fritz, Julie M; LaStayo, Paul C; Marcus, Robin L

    2017-03-01

    Several known demographic and functional characteristics combine to predict physical function after hip fracture. Long-term weight-bearing asymmetries, evident during functional movements after hip fracture, contribute to limited mobility and large asymmetries in muscle function are linked to a high rate of injurious falls. Although postfracture mobility is commonly measured as whole body movement, a force-plate imbedded chair can identify individual limb contributions to an important task like moving from a sitting to standing position. The modified Physical Performance Test (mPPT) and stair climb test (SCT) are reliable, valid measures of function that predict independence after hip fracture. The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent asymmetry during a sit-to-stand task (STST) predicts function (mPPT, 12-step SCT), above and beyond other known predictors. Thirty-one independent community-dwelling older adults, recently discharged from usual care physical therapy (mean [standard deviation], 77.7 [10.5] years, 10 male), within 2 to 8 months postfracture, volunteered for this study.Participants performed an STST on a force-plate-imbedded chair designed to identify individual limb contributions during an STST. Asymmetry magnitude during the STST was determined for each individual. In addition, mPPT and SCT were assessed and regression analyses were performed to determine the contribution of asymmetry to the variance in these physical function scores beyond other factors predicting function. Demographic factors (sex, time since fracture, repair type, and body mass index) were not significantly related to function in this sample. Age, gait speed, knee extension strength, balance confidence, and functional self-report were each significantly related to both mPPT (r = 0.43-0.86) and SCT (r = 0.40-0.83), and were retained in the regression model. Included variables accounted for 83.4% of the variance in mPPT score, and asymmetry during the STST did not

  7. What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feet. Repeat five times. How Can I Prevent Broken Bones if I Fall? Sometimes you cannot prevent ... Falls and Fractures (NIA) Caídas y fracturas (NIA) Home Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget’s Disease of ...

  8. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine W Chong

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49. Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02. The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured

  9. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  10. Delivering high quality hip fracture rehabilitation: the perspective of occupational and physical therapy practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Natalie E; Lepore, Michael; Wong, Carin; Chang, Sun Hwa; Freeman, Lynn; Crum, Karen; Gillies, Heather; Nash, Paul

    2018-03-01

    The majority of post-acute hip fracture rehabilitation in the US is delivered in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). Currently, there are limited guidelines that equip occupational and physical therapy practitioners with a summary of what constitutes evidence-based high quality rehabilitation. Thus, this study aimed to identify rehabilitation practitioners' perspectives on the practices that constitute high quality hip fracture rehabilitation. Focus groups were conducted with 99 occupational and physical therapy practitioners working in SNFs in southern California. Purposive sampling of facilities was conducted to capture variation in key characteristics known to impact care delivery for this patient population (e.g., financial resources, staffing, and patient case-mix). Questions aimed to elicit practitioners' perspectives on high quality hip fracture rehabilitation practices. Each session was audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were systematically analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. Seven themes emerged: objectives of care; first 72 h; positioning, pain, and precautions; use of standardized assessments; episode of care practices; facilitating insight into progress; and interdisciplinary collaboration. Clinical guidelines are critical tools to facilitate clinical decision-making and achieve desired patient outcomes. The findings of this study highlight the practitioners' perspective on what constitutes high quality hip fracture rehabilitation. This work provides critical information to advance the development of stakeholder-driven rehabilitation clinical guidelines. Future research is needed to verify the findings from other stakeholders (e.g., patients), ensure the alignment of our findings with current evidence, and develop measures for evaluating their delivery and relationship to desired outcomes. Implications for Rehabilitation This study highlights occupational and physiotherapy therapy practitioners' perspectives on the cumulative best

  11. Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty for Fractured Ceramic Bearings: A Review of Best Practices for Revision Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambani, Rohit; Kepecs, David M; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Safir, Oleg A; Gross, Allan E; Kuzyk, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Total hip arthroplasty revision for a fractured ceramic bearing is rare but offers unique challenges. The purpose of this review was to provide a summary of existing literature on fractured ceramic bearings. Two authors performed a literature search of the MEDLINE OVID and PubMed databases with the following search terms: ceramic, fracture, total hip arthroplasty, and revision. The search identified 228 articles of which 199 were selected for review. It is mandatory to perform a complete synovectomy and thorough debridement of the fractured ceramic fragments. A well-fixed acetabular component should be removed if either the locking mechanism is damaged or the component is malpositioned. If the femoral stem taper is damaged, the femoral stem should be removed. However, if minimal damage is present, the femoral stem may be retained and revised using a fourth generation ceramic head with a titanium sleeve. Metal bearings should be avoided and revision with ceramic bearings should be performed whenever possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reasons for discrepancies in hip fracture risk estimates using FRAX and Garvan calculators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, Emma O; Gamble, Greg D; Reid, Ian R

    2016-03-01

    Both the FRAX and Garvan calculators are used to estimate absolute risk of fracture, but they sometimes produce different estimates. We sought to determine which patient characteristics contribute to these discrepancies. Ten-year hip fracture risk was estimated for 122 women, using both FRAX and Garvan with bone mineral density (BMD). Differences in estimates of hip fracture were assessed, both in absolute terms and with respect to a treatment threshold of 3%. Garvan estimates were higher than FRAX estimates across the range of ages and BMDs studied. A history of falls or of multiple fractures increased risk calculated by Garvan 3-6-fold, but did not account for all differences between calculators. Discrepancies around a 3% treatment threshold occurred in 31/122 (25%). Women aged 70-74 years, and women with osteopenia were most likely to have discordant estimates. Most discordant estimates (29/31) had a Garvan estimate ≥ 3% and FRAX calculator, use of the other calculator should be considered to help guide treatment decisions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of the Cause of the Stem Neck Fracture in the Hip Joint Endoprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryniewicz A.M.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Endoprosthesis stem fractures are among the rarest complications that occur after hip joint arthroplasty. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the causes of the fractures of the Aura II stem neck, which is an element of an endoprosthesis implanted in a patient. In order to achieve it, a radiogram was evaluated, the FEM analysis was carried out for the hip joint replaced using the Aura II prosthesis and scanning tests as well as a chemical analysis were performed for the focus of fatigue. The tests performed indicate that the most probable causes leading to the fatigue fracture of the Aura II stem under examination were material defects in the process of casting and forging (forging the material with delamination and the presence of brittle oxides and carbides that resulted in a significant reduction of strength and resistance to corrosion. In the light of an unprecedented stem neck fracture, this information should be an indication for non-destructive tests of ready-made stems aiming to discover the material and technological defects that may arise in the process of casting and drop forging.

  14. Calcaneal stress fracture: an adverse event following total hip and total knee arthroplasty: a report of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Takaaki; Miki, Takahito; Nishiyama, Akihiro

    2014-01-15

    Stress fractures have been reported to occur in the pubis, femoral neck, proximal part of the tibia, and fabella during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty. However, to our knowledge, calcaneal stress fractures after total hip or total knee arthroplasty have not been reported in the English-language literature. Most orthopaedic surgeons are not familiar with calcaneal stress fractures that may occur in elderly patients after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features, imaging findings, and bone mineral content of the proximal part of the femur and the distal end of the radius in five patients who had a calcaneal stress fracture after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty. All patients were women with a mean age of 76.8 years. All fractures occurred in the calcaneus on the same side as the arthroplasty. The fracture appeared at a mean of 10.2 weeks postoperatively. All patients reported heel pain on walking. Swelling and local heat were found in four and three patients, respectively. Pain was elicited by squeezing the calcaneus in all patients. Early radiographs had normal findings in two patients, and an irregular sclerotic line appeared later in the radiographs of all patients. All fractures were treated conservatively. Four fractures healed uneventfully, but one fracture displaced. All patients had osteoporosis. Calcaneal stress fractures during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty may not be as rare as previously thought. Because clinical symptoms of the fracture appear insidiously and radiographic findings are absent or subtle in the early stage, a high index of suspicion is needed for orthopaedic surgeons to make the correct diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging or repeated radiographs may be necessary to make the correct diagnosis when no abnormality is apparent on the initial radiograph.

  15. Antifracture efficacy and reduction of mortality in relation to timing of the first dose of zoledronic acid after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Erik Fink; Lyles, Kenneth W; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S

    2009-01-01

    Annual infusions of zoledronic acid (5 mg) significantly reduced the risk of vertebral, hip, and nonvertebral fractures in a study of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and significantly reduced clinical fractures and all-cause mortality in another study of women and men who had recently unde...

  16. Lower-limb pain, disease, and injury burden as determinants of muscle strength deficit after hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portegijs, Erja; Rantanen, Taina; Kallinen, Mauri; Heinonen, Ari; Alen, Markku; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip fracture may result in an asymmetrical lower-limb strength deficit. The deficit may be related to the trauma, surgical treatment, pain, or disuse of the fractured limb. However, disease and injury burden or musculoskeletal pain in the other limb may reduce muscle strength on that

  17. Plasma B vitamins, homocysteine and their relation with bone loss and hip fracture in elderly men and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated homocysteine is a strong risk factor for osteoporotic fractures among elders, yet it may be a marker for low B vitamin status. Objective: To examine the associations of plasma concentrations of folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6 and homocysteine with bone loss and hip fracture risk in elderly...

  18. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of nutritional intervention in elderly after hip fracture : Design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyers, C.E.; Breedveld-Peters, J.J.L.; Reijven, P.L.M.; Van Helden, S.; Guldemond, N.A.; Severens, J.L.; Verburg, A.D.; Meesters, B.; Van Rhijn, L.; Dagnelie, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hip fracture patients often have an impaired nutritional status at the time of fracture, which can result in a higher complication rate, prolonged rehabilitation time and increased mortality. A study was designed to evaluate the effect of nutritional intervention on nutritional status,

  19. Subtrochanteric hip fractures treated with cerclage cables and long cephalomedullary nails: a review of 17 consecutive cases over 2 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Muiris T

    2011-11-01

    The conflict between the anatomist and biologist surgeons is exemplified by the debate about subtrochanteric hip fractures. Closed intramedullary nailing is biologically friendly but may result in prolonged procedures and malunion. By contrast, accurate anatomical open reduction may disturb the biological composition of the fracture environment.

  20. Computed tomography compared to magnetic resonance imaging in occult or suspect hip fractures. A retrospective study in 44 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, David; Goethlin, Jan H. [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Moelndal (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skaane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    2016-11-15

    Computed tomography (CT) for evaluation of occult and suspect hip fractures has been proposed as a good second-line investigation. The diagnostic precision compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is unclear. To compare the diagnostic performance of CT and MRI in a retrospective study on patients with suspect and occult hip fractures