WorldWideScience

Sample records for prevent high-z plasma

  1. Characteristics of extreme ultraviolet emission from high-Z plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Suzuki, C.; Tomita, K.; Nishikino, M.; Fujioka, S.; Endo, A.; Li, B.; Otsuka, T.; Dunne, P.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray sources in the 2 to 7 nm spectral region related to the beyond EUV (BEUV) question at 6.x nm and the water window source based on laser-produced high-Z plasmas. Resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense unresolved transition arrays (UTAs), extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on high-Z plasma UTA source, coupled to multilayer mirror optics. (paper)

  2. Characteristics of extreme ultraviolet emission from high-Z plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Suzuki, C.; Tomita, K.; Nishikino, M.; Fujioka, S.; Endo, A.; Li, B.; Otsuka, T.; Dunne, P.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray sources in the 2 to 7 nm spectral region related to the beyond EUV (BEUV) question at 6.x nm and the water window source based on laser-produced high-Z plasmas. Resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense unresolved transition arrays (UTAs), extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on high-Z plasma UTA source, coupled to multilayer mirror optics.

  3. Statistical approach for calculating opacities of high-Z plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Takeshi; Nakamura, Shinji; Takabe, Hideaki; Mima, Kunioki

    1992-01-01

    For simulating the X-ray radiation from laser produced high-Z plasma, an appropriate atomic modeling is necessary. Based on the average ion model, we have used a rather simple atomic model for opacity calculation in a hydrodynamic code and obtained a fairly good agreement with the experiment on the X-ray spectra from the laser-produced plasmas. We have investigated the accuracy of the atomic model used in the hydrodynamic code. It is found that transition energies of 4p-4d, 4d-4f, 4p-5d, 4d-5f and 4f-5g, which are important in laser produced high-Z plasma, can be given within an error of 15 % compared to the values by the Hartree-Fock-Slater (HFS) calculation and their oscillator strengths obtained by HFS calculation vary by a factor two according to the difference of charge state. We also propose a statistical method to carry out detail configuration accounting for electronic state by use of the population of bound electrons calculated with the average ion model. The statistical method is relatively simple and provides much improvement in calculating spectral opacities of line radiation, when we use the average ion model to determine electronic state. (author)

  4. Ion emission from high-z laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohlena, K.; Kralikova, B.; Laska, L.

    1996-01-01

    The results of systematic studies of ion emission from plasmas generated in the focus of laser beams of short wavelengths, short pulse lasers (Nd:glass, 1 ns, 1060 nm; iodine, 0.5 ns, 1st harm.- 1315 nm 2nd harm.- 675 nm, 3rd harm.- 483 nm) are presented. The corpuscular diagnostics were based on (i) Thomson parabola spectrometer to display a general view of the ion spectra, (ii) cylindrical electrostatic ion energy analyzer to determine the detailed charge-energy ion spectra (iii) ion collectors to estimate the current density of the ion fluxes far from the focus. The ion current densities about 1 m from the focus are typically mA/cm 2 . Fairly high charge state (>50+) and simultaneously energetic (>8 MeV) ions were registered. The results are interpreted either in term of a two-temperature model of the expanding plasma or by an ion emission from a dual focal spot including a hot primary focus and a colder peripheral zone. (author)

  5. SCREENING OF HIGH-Z GRAINS AND RELATED PHENOMENA IN COLLOIDAL PLASMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Bystrenko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent important results are briefly presented concerning the screening of high-Z impurities in colloidal plasmas. The review focuses on the phenomenon of nonlinear screening and its effects on the structure of colloidal plasmas, the role of trapped ions in grain screening, and the effects of strong collisions in the plasma background. It is shown that the above effects may strongly modify the properties of the grain screening giving rise to considerable deviations from the conventional Debye-Huckel theory as dependent on the physical processes in the plasma background.

  6. Plasma effects in three-body recombination of high-Z bare ions with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, M.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of plasma effects on three-body recombination of bare ions with electrons in cold plasma in the electron cooler is discussed in context of recombination ''enhancement'' observed in storage ring experiments. We show that for high-Z bare ions and low electron temperatures and densities the cooler plasma becomes ''nonideal'', leading to the enhancement of the three-body recombination rates. This effect is described in terms of the Debye screening length within the ''rigid shift'' approximation. We demonstrate, that in cold (T∼1-10 K) anisotropic plasma the screening effect substantially enhances the three-body recombination rates for very high n-states. The relaxation of high Rydberg states below the field ionization cut-off, set in storage ring experiments, is discussed. The calculations are confronted with the experimental results obtained in storage ring experiments. (orig.)

  7. Self-focusing and filamentation of laser light in high Z plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. D.; Mead, W. C.; Coggeshall, S. V.; Aldrich, C. H.; Norton, J. L.; Pollak, G. D.; Wallace, J. M.

    1988-05-01

    Self-focusing and filamentation of short wavelength laser light in high Z plasmas of interest to laser fusion are discussed. It is found that self-focusing behavior is very dependent on the details of the characteristics of the laser beam, the plasma conditions, and the energy transport processes. Laser light absorption and self-focusing are strongly competitive processes. At. 0.26 μm wavelength the collisional absorption is often so great that there is no intensity amplification of the beam despite the fact that strong self-focusing is present. Wide variations are found in laser light penetration, affected by several factors. Diverging optics reduce the likelihood of self-focusing. Large scale length density gradients have little effect on focusing behavior. The self-focusing behavior is very dependent on beam shape. Large scale hot spots can have a significant effect on whole beam self-focusing early in the pulse. The behavior of small scale hot spots can be qualitatively different than the standard picture. The calculations indicate that small scale hot spots do not achieve a steady state in some cases. Sound waves cause chaotic interactions among neighboring hot spots. It is found that sub-beam size structures are also generated when nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiation and atomic physics are used in the calculations. The nature of the heat flux and thermoelectric magnetic field generation are examined with a kinetic model. Stimulated Raman backscattering levels in self-focused light are significantly reduced for short wavelengths and high Z plasmas Landau damping plays an important role in determining the Raman levels. Implications for suprathermal electron production, symmetric illumination, x-ray conversion efficiency, and laser light absorption are discussed.

  8. Microfield dynamics in dense hydrogen plasmas with high-Z impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Weisheit, Jon

    2017-01-01

    We use large-scale classical molecular dynamics to determine microfield properties for several dense plasma mixtures. By employing quantum statistical potentials (QSPs) to regularize the Coulomb interaction, our simulations follow motions of electrons as well as ions for times long enough to track relaxation phenomena involving both types of particles. Coulomb coupling, relative to temperature, of different pairs of species in the hot, dense matter being simulated ranges from weak to strong. We first study the effect of such coupling differences, along with composition and QSP differences, on the roles of electrons and various mixture components in determining probability distributions of instantaneous, total microfields experienced by the ions. Then, we address two important dynamical questions: (1) How is the quasistatic part of the total field to be extracted from the time-dependent simulation data? (2) Under what conditions does the commonly used approximation of ions with fixed Yukawa-like screening by free electrons accurately describe quasistatic fields? We identify a running, short-time average of the total field at each ion as its slowly evolving, quasistatic part. We consider several ways to specify the averaging interval, and note the influence of ion dynamics in this issue. When all species are weakly coupled, the quasistatic fields have probability distributions agreeing well with those we obtain from simulations of Yukawa-screened ions. However, agreement deteriorates as the coupling between high-Z ions increases well beyond unity, principally because the Yukawa model tends to underestimate the true screening of close high-Z pairs. Examples of this fact are given, and some consequences for the high-field portions of probability distributions are discussed.

  9. Efficient 'water window' soft x-ray high-Z plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiguchi, T; Otsuka, T; Jiang, W; Endo, A; Li, B; Dunne, P; O'Sullivan, G

    2013-01-01

    Unresolved transition array (UTA) is scalable to shorter wavelengths, and we demonstrate a table-top broadband emission 'water window' soft x-ray source based on laser-produced plasmas. Resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense UTAs in the 2 to 4 nm region, extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on a bismuth (Bi) plasma UTA source, coupled to multilayer mirror optics

  10. Control of electron beam by using high-Z gas target in the laser-plasma acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Michiaki

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the pointing stability and the divergence of a quasi-monoenergetic electron beam generated in a self-injected laser-plasma acceleration regime using high-Z gas-jet target. Gas-jet targets have been irradiated with focused 40 fs laser pulses at the 4-TW peak power. A pointing stability and a beam divergence of electron beam were improved using argon target. These values were about three times smaller than at the optimum condition using helium. This stabilization method is available for another gas material such as nitrogen. At nitrogen gas-jet target, the pointing stability is more improved to two times smaller than that in argon gas-jet target and the peak energy is increased to >30 MeV. These results prove that this method not only stabilizes the e-beam but also allows controlling the electron energy. (author)

  11. Unresolved transition array based water window soft x-ray source by laser-produced high-Z plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a table-top broadband emission water window source based on laser-produced high-Z plasmas. resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense unresolved transition arrays (UTAs) in the 2 to 4 nm region, extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). Arrays resulting from n=4-n=4 transitions are overlaid with n=4-n=5 emission and shift to shorter wavelength with increasing atomic number. An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on a bismuth plasma UTA source, coupled to multilayer mirror optics. At power densities available from 'table-top' solid-state lasers, comparison of emission from a number of targets has shown that 3d-4f UTA in zirconium plasmas have highest overall brightness and in an imaging system based on reflective multilayer mirrors, may, depending on bandwidth, have superior performance than either line or broader-band sources. (author)

  12. Non-LTE modeling of the radiative properties of high-Z plasma using linear response methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foord, Mark; Harte, Judy; Scott, Howard

    2017-10-01

    Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) atomic processes play a key role in the radiation flow and energetics in highly ionized high temperature plasma encountered in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysical applications. Modeling complex high-Z atomic systems, such as gold used in ICF hohlraums, is particularly challenging given the complexity and intractable number of atomic states involved. Practical considerations, i.e. speed and memory, in large radiation-hydrodynamic simulations further limit model complexity. We present here a methodology for utilizing tabulated NLTE radiative and EOS properties for use in our radiation-hydrodynamic codes. This approach uses tabulated data, previously calculated with complex atomic models, modified to include a general non-Planckian radiation field using a linear response methodology. This approach extends near-LTE response method to conditions far from LTE. Comparisons of this tabular method with in-line NLTE simulations of a laser heated 1-D hohlraum will be presented, which show good agreement in the time-evolution of the plasma conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Ion Heating of Plasma to Warm Dense Matter Conditions for the study of High-Z/Low-Z Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roycroft, R.; Dyer, G. M.; McCary, E.; Wagner, C.; Bernstein, A.; Ditmire, T.; Albright, B. J.; Fernandez, J. C.; Bang, W.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Hamilton, C. E.; Palaniyappan, S.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Vold, E. L.; Yin, L.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2016-10-01

    The evolution of the interface between a light and heavy material isochorically heated to warm dense matter conditions is important to the understanding of electrostatic effects on the hydrodynamic models of fluid mixing. In recent experiments at the Trident laser facility, the target, containing a high Z and a low Z material, is heated to around 1eV by laser accelerated aluminum ions. In preparation for continued mixing experiments, we have recently heated aluminum to 20eV by laser accelerated protons on the Texas Petawatt Laser. We fielded a streaked optical pyrometer to measure surface temperature. The pyrometer images the rear surface of a heated target on a sub-nanosecond timescale with 400nm blackbody emissions. This poster presents the details of the experimental setup and pyrometer design, as well as results of ion and proton heating of aluminum targets, and ion heating of high-Z/low-Z integrated targets. Supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008, the DoE through the LANL LDRD program, the DARPA PULSE program (12-63- PULSE-FP014), and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-14-1-0045).

  14. Experimental study of population inversion and spectral line broadening in a plasma containing a mixture of high Z and low Z ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, H.R.

    1988-10-01

    In our work this past year at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics we have studied laser-produced plasmas using spherical targets continuing layers of high Z and low Z materials. Our emphasis was on quantitative spectroscopy of ions in a very dense, recombining plasma. The targets used consisted of carbon-copper, carbon-gold, and aluminum-gold mixtures, instead of the originally proposed Fe or Mo mixtures with carbon. The thickness of the Cu and the Au layers were varied in order to study the effect of higher Z ions cooling the plasma. Indeed a pronounced cooling effect was observed by increasing the thickness of the Au layer in targets with Al-Au layers. Electron temperatures were studied by measuring the 1s-2p/1s 2 -1s2p line ratio of Al XIII to Al XII. Our experimental measurements, together with a collisional-radiative model and a 1-D hydrodynamic code, indicate that the electron temperature falls from 1500 eV with no gold to 950 eV with a 500 angstrom layer of gold. A detailed discussion of our results with Al-Au targets can be found in the enclosed preprint entitled Radiation Cooling in Laser-Produced Plasmas Due to High-Z Layers

  15. Ionization energy shift of characteristic K x-ray lines from high-Z materials for plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Słabkowska, K.; Szymańska, E.; Polasik, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse, Inc., 7844 Vervain Ct, Springfield, Virginia 22152 (United States); Rzadkiewicz, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Seely, J. F. [Artep, Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Ct, Ellicott, Maryland 21042 (United States); Weber, B. V.; Schumer, J. W. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The energy of the characteristic x-rays emitted by high atomic number atoms in a plasma that contains energetic electrons depends on the atom's ionization. For tungsten, the ionization energy shift of the L-lines has recently been used to diagnose the plasma's ionization; the change in energy of a K-line has been measured for iridium and observed for ytterbium. Here, we present detailed computations of the ionization energy shift to K-lines of these and an additional element, dysprosium; for these atoms, some K-lines nearly coincide in energy with K-edges of slightly lower Z atoms so that a change in transmission behind a K-edge filter betrays a change in energy. The ionization energy shift of such high-energy K-lines may enable a unique diagnostic when the plasma is inside an otherwise opaque enclosure such as hohlraums used on the National Ignition Facility.

  16. Kinetic modeling of high-Z tungsten impurity transport in ITER plasmas using the IMPGYRO code in the trace impurity limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamoto, S.; Bonnin, X.; Homma, Y.; Inoue, H.; Hoshino, K.; Hatayama, A.; Pitts, R. A.

    2017-11-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of tungsten (W) transport processes, we are developing the Monte-Carlo W transport code IMPGYRO. The code has the following characteristics which are important for calculating W transport: (1) the exact Larmor motion of W ions is computed so that the effects of drifts are automatically taken into account; (2) Coulomb collisions between W impurities and background plasma ions are modelled using the Binary Collision Model which provides more precise kinetic calculations of the friction and thermal forces. By using the IMPGYRO code, the W production/transport in the ITER geometry has been calculated under two different divertor operation modes (Case A: partially detached state and Case B: high recycling state) obtained from the SOLPS-ITER code suite calculation without the effect of drifts. The results of the W-density in the upstream SOL (scrape-off layer) strongly depend on the divertor operation mode. From the comparison of the W impurity transport between Case A and Case B, obtaining a partially detached state is shown to be effective to reduce W-impurities in the upstream SOL. The limitations of the employed model and the validity of the above results are discussed and future problems are summarized for further applications of IMPGYRO code to ITER plasmas.

  17. The effects of microstructure on propagation of laser-driven radiative heat waves in under-dense high-Z plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, J. D.; Matsukuma, H.; Brown, K. C.; Davis, J. F.; Kemp, G. E.; Koga, K.; Tanaka, N.; Yogo, A.; Zhang, Z.; Nishimura, H.; Fournier, K. B.

    2018-03-01

    This work was motivated by previous findings that the measured laser-driven heat front propagation velocity in under-dense TiO2/SiO2 foams is slower than the simulated one [Pérez et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 023102 (2014)]. In attempting to test the hypothesis that these differences result from effects of the foam microstructure, we designed and conducted an experiment on the GEKKO laser using an x-ray streak camera to compare the heat front propagation velocity in "equivalent" gas and foam targets, that is, targets that have the same initial density, atomic weight, and average ionization state. We first discuss the design and the results of this comparison experiment. To supplement the x-ray streak camera data, we designed and conducted an experiment on the Trident laser using a new high-resolution, time-integrated, spatially resolved crystal spectrometer to image the Ti K-shell spectrum along the laser-propagation axis in an under-dense TiO2/SiO2 foam cylinder. We discuss the details of the design of this experiment, and present the measured Ti K-shell spectra compared to the spectra simulated with a detailed superconfiguration non-LTE atomic model for Ti incorporated into a 2D radiation hydrodynamic code. We show that there is indeed a microstructure effect on heat front propagation in under-dense foams, and that the measured heat front velocities in the TiO2/SiO2 foams are consistent with the analytical model of Gus'kov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 18, 103114 (2011)].

  18. Hydrogen retention in lithium on metallic walls from “in vacuo” analysis in LTX and implications for high-Z plasma-facing components in NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, R., E-mail: kaita@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Lucia, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Allain, J.P.; Bedoya, F. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, & Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Bell, R.; Boyle, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Capece, A. [Department of Physics, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ (United States); Jaworski, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Koel, B.E. [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Roszell, J. [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Schmitt, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Scotti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Skinner, C.H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Soukhanovskii, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    The application of lithium to plasma-facing components (PFCs) has long been used as a technique for wall conditioning in magnetic confinement devices to improve plasma performance. Determining the characteristics of PFCs at the time of exposure to the plasma, however, is difficult because they can only be analyzed after venting the vacuum vessel and removing them at the end of an operational period. The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) addresses this problem by enabling PFC samples to be exposed to plasmas, and then withdrawn into an analysis chamber without breaking vacuum. The MAPP system was used to introduce samples that matched the metallic PFCs of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX). Lithium that was subsequently evaporated onto the walls also covered the MAPP samples, which were then subject to LTX discharges. In vacuo extraction and analysis of the samples indicated that lithium oxide formed on the PFCs, but improved plasma performance persisted in LTX. The reduced recycling this suggests is consistent with separate surface science experiments that demonstrated deuterium retention in the presence of lithium oxide films. Since oxygen decreases the thermal stability of the deuterium in the film, the release of deuterium was observed below the lithium deuteride dissociation temperature. This may explain what occurred when lithium was applied to the surface of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD). The LLD had segments with individual heaters, and the deuterium-alpha emission was clearly lower in the cooler regions. The plan for NSTX-U is to replace the graphite tiles with high-Z PFCs, and apply lithium to their surfaces with lithium evaporation. Experiments with lithium coatings on such PFCs suggest that deuterium could still be retained if lithium compounds form, but limiting their surface temperatures may be necessary.

  19. Plasma membrane disruption: repair, prevention, adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Steinhardt, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Many metazoan cells inhabit mechanically stressful environments and, consequently, their plasma membranes are frequently disrupted. Survival requires that the cell rapidly repair or reseal the disruption. Rapid resealing is an active and complex structural modification that employs endomembrane as its primary building block, and cytoskeletal and membrane fusion proteins as its catalysts. Endomembrane is delivered to the damaged plasma membrane through exocytosis, a ubiquitous Ca2+-triggered response to disruption. Tissue and cell level architecture prevent disruptions from occurring, either by shielding cells from damaging levels of force, or, when this is not possible, by promoting safe force transmission through the plasma membrane via protein-based cables and linkages. Prevention of disruption also can be a dynamic cell or tissue level adaptation triggered when a damaging level of mechanical stress is imposed. Disease results from failure of either the preventive or resealing mechanisms.

  20. The interactions of laser beam with high Z solid target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Huimin; Zhang Guoping; Sheng Jiatian

    1990-01-01

    The 1-D non-LTE radiative hydrodynamic laser irradiated code JB-19 is used to calculate the laser-produced plasma conditions of high z gold disk. Following physical processes are considered: bremsstrahlung effect, radiative ionization and recombination, collisional ionization by electrons and three-body recombination, collisional excitation and de-excitation by electrons, radiative line emission and absorption and Compton scattering. A gaussian laser pulse with wavelength 1.06 μm, FWHM 600 ps and peak intensity 3 x 10 14 W/cm 2 is used to irradiate 20 μm thick gold disk. The computational results for laser-produced plasma conditions and the absorption efficiency and laser-x-rays conversion efficiency for gold disk are shown

  1. High-Z material erosion and its control in DIII-D carbon divertor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ding

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As High-Z materials will likely be used as plasma-facing components (PFCs in future fusion devices, the erosion of high-Z materials is a key issue for high-power, long pulse operation. High-Z material erosion and redeposition have been studied using tungsten and molybdenum coated samples exposed in well-diagnosed DIII-D divertor plasma discharges. By coupling dedicated experiments and modelling using the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO, the roles of sheath potential and background carbon impurities in determining high-Z material erosion are identified. Different methods suggested by modelling have been investigated to control high-Z material erosion in DIII-D experiments. The erosion of Mo and W is found to be strongly suppressed by local injection of methane and deuterium gases. The 13C deposition resulting from local 13CH4 injection also provides information on radial transport due to E ×B drifts and cross field diffusion. Finally, D2 gas puffing is found to cause local plasma perturbation, suppressing W erosion because of the lower effective sputtering yield of W at lower plasma temperature and for higher carbon concentration in the mixed surface layer.

  2. Experimental Study of High-Z Gas Buffers in Gas-Filled ICF Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, M A; Kane, J; Loosmore, G; DeMuth, J; Latkowski, J

    2010-12-03

    ICF power plants, such as the LIFE scheme at LLNL, may employ a high-Z, target-chamber gas-fill to moderate the first-wall heat-pulse due to x-rays and energetic ions released during target detonation. To reduce the uncertainties of cooling and beam/target propagation through such gas-filled chambers, we present a pulsed plasma source producing 2-5 eV plasma comprised of high-Z gases. We use a 5-kJ, 100-ns theta discharge for high peak plasma-heating-power, an electrode-less discharge for minimizing impurities, and unobstructed axial access for diagnostics and beam (and/or target) propagation studies. We will report on the plasma source requirements, design process, and the system design.

  3. Cosmological Results from High-z Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonry, John L.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Barris, Brian; Candia, Pablo; Challis, Peter; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Coil, Alison L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Garnavich, Peter; Hogan, Craig; Holland, Stephen T.; Jha, Saurabh; Kirshner, Robert P.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Leibundgut, Bruno; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Phillips, Mark M.; Riess, Adam G.; Schommer, Robert; Smith, R. Chris; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2003-09-01

    The High-z Supernova Search Team has discovered and observed eight new supernovae in the redshift interval z=0.3-1.2. These independent observations, analyzed by similar but distinct methods, confirm the results of Riess and Perlmutter and coworkers that supernova luminosity distances imply an accelerating universe. More importantly, they extend the redshift range of consistently observed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to z~1, where the signature of cosmological effects has the opposite sign of some plausible systematic effects. Consequently, these measurements not only provide another quantitative confirmation of the importance of dark energy, but also constitute a powerful qualitative test for the cosmological origin of cosmic acceleration. We find a rate for SN Ia of (1.4+/-0.5)×10-4h3Mpc-3yr-1 at a mean redshift of 0.5. We present distances and host extinctions for 230 SN Ia. These place the following constraints on cosmological quantities: if the equation of state parameter of the dark energy is w=-1, then H0t0=0.96+/-0.04, and ΩΛ-1.4ΩM=0.35+/-0.14. Including the constraint of a flat universe, we find ΩM=0.28+/-0.05, independent of any large-scale structure measurements. Adopting a prior based on the Two Degree Field (2dF) Redshift Survey constraint on ΩM and assuming a flat universe, we find that the equation of state parameter of the dark energy lies in the range -1.48-1, we obtain wconstraints are similar in precision and in value to recent results reported using the WMAP satellite, also in combination with the 2dF Redshift Survey. Based in part on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. This research is primarily associated with proposal GO-8177, but also uses and reports results from proposals GO-7505, 7588, 8641, and 9118. Based in part on observations taken with

  4. The effect of high-Z dopant on laser-driven acceleration of a thin plastic target

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badziak, A.; Kasperczuk, A.; Parys, P.; Pisarczyk, T.; Rosinski, M.; Ryc, L.; Wolowski, J.; Suchanska, R.; Krása, Josef; Krouský, Eduard; Láska, Leoš; Mašek, Karel; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří; Dhareshwar, L.J.; Földes, I.B.; Suta, T.; Borrielli, A.; Mezzasalma, A.; Torrisi, L.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 21 (2008), 211502/1-211502/3 ISSN 0003-6951 Grant - others:EC(XE) RII3-CT-2003-506350 LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * high-Z dopant in plastics targets Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.726, year: 2008

  5. Gastric explosion induced by argon plasma coagulation and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiman, John Saul; Hampe, Toni

    2014-12-01

    We describe the occurrence of an iatrogenic explosion induced by argon plasma coagulation in a 70-year-old man undergoing gastroscopy. Combustible gases in the stomach may have been released by bacterial overgrowth as a result of partial gastric outlet obstruction (caused by a gastric tumor) and reduced acidity (from proton pump inhibitor therapy). We propose a stepwise process during upper endoscopy to prevent this devastating complication, comprising aspiration, preinsufflation with CO2, and then coagulation. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Planck List of High-z source candidates: A laboratory for high-z star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montier, L.

    The Planck satellite (Planck 2015 results. I) has provided the first FIR/submm all-sky survey with a sensitivity allowing us to identify the rarest, most luminous hig-z dusty star-forming sources on the sky. The Planck list of high-z source candidates (PHZ, PIP XXXIX subm) has been built and charcaterized over 25% of the sky by selecting the 2151 brightest red submm sources at a 5' resolution (Montier et al. 2010). Follow-up observations with Herschel/SPIRE over 228 Planck candidates have already shown that 93% of these candidates are actually overdensities of red sources (PIP XXVII 2015), while 12 Planck high-z candidates are identified as strongly lensed star-forming galaxies at redshift between 2.2 and 3.6 (Canameras et al. 2015). The first confirmed Planck proto-cluster candidate has been revealed to be a double structure at z = 1.7 and zz = 2.03 (Flores-Cacho et al. 2015). The PHZ opens a new window on these extreme star-forming systems at high-z, providing a powerful laboratory to study the mechanisms of galaxy evolution and enrichment in the frame of the large scale structure growth.

  7. The Planck Catalogue of High-z source candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montier, Ludovic

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite has provided the first FIR/submm all-sky survey with a sensitivity allowing us to identify the rarest, most luminous high-z dusty star-forming sources on the sky. It opens a new window on these extreme star-forming systems at redshift above 1.5, providing a powerful laboratory to study the mechanisms of galaxy evolution and enrichment in the frame of the large scale structure growth.I will describe how the Planck catalogue of high-z source candidates (PHz, Planck 2015 in prep.) has been built and charcaterized over 25% of the sky by selecting the brightest red submm sources at a 5' resolution. Follow-up observations with Herschel/SPIRE over 228 Planck candidates have shown that 93% of these candidates are actually overdensities of red sources with SEDs peaking at 350um (Planck Int. results. XXVII 2014). Complementarily to this population of objects, 12 Planck high-z candidates have been identified as strongly lensed star forming galaxies at redshift lying between 2.2 and 3.6 (Canameras et al 2015 subm.), with flux densities larger than 400 mJy up to 1 Jy at 350um, and strong magnification factors. These Planck lensed star-forming galaxies are the rarest brightest lensed in the submm range, providing a unique opportunity to extend the exploration of the star-forming system in this range of mass and redshift.I will detail further a specific analysis performed on a proto-cluster candidate, PHz G95.5-61.6, identified as a double structure at z=1.7 and z=2.03, using an extensive follow-up program (Flores-Cacho et al 2015 subm.). This is the first Planck proto-cluster candidate with spectroscopic confirmation, which opens a new field of statistical analysis about the evolution of dusty star-forming galaxies in such accreting structures.I will finally discuss how the PHz catalogue may help to answer some of the fundamental questions like: At what cosmic epoch did massive galaxy clusters form most of their stars? Is star formation more or less vigorous

  8. The Planck Catalogue of High-z source candidates : A laboratory for high-z star forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montier, Ludovic

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite has provided the first FIR/submm all-sky survey with a sensitivity allowing us to identify the rarest, most luminous high-z dusty star-forming sources on the sky. It opens a new window on these extreme star-forming systems at redshift above 1.5, providing a powerful laboratory to study the mechanisms of galaxy evolution and enrichment in the frame of the large scale structure growth.I will describe how the Planck catalogue of high-z source candidates (PHz, Planck 2015 in prep.) has been built and charcaterized over 25% of the sky by selecting the brightest red submm sources at a 5' resolution. Follow-up observations with Herschel/SPIRE over 228 Planck candidates have shown that 93% of these candidates are actually overdensities of red sources with SEDs peaking at 350um (Planck Int. results. XXVII 2014). Complementarily to this population of objects, 12 Planck high-z candidates have been identified as strongly lensed star forming galaxies at redshift lying between 2.2 and 3.6 (Canameras et al 2015 subm.), with flux densities larger than 400 mJy up to 1 Jy at 350um, and strong magnification factors. These Planck lensed star-forming galaxies are the rarest brightest lensed in the submm range, providing a unique opportunity to extend the exploration of the star-forming system in this range of mass and redshift.I will detail further a specific analysis performed on a proto-cluster candidate, PHz G95.5-61.6, identified as a double structure at z=1.7 and z=2.03, using an extensive follow-up program (Flores-Cacho et al 2015 subm.). This is the first Planck proto-cluster candidate with spectroscopic confirmation, which opens a new field of statistical analysis about the evolution of dusty star-forming galaxies in such accreting structures.I will finally discuss how the PHz catalogue may help to answer some of the fundamental questions like: At what cosmic epoch did massive galaxy clusters form most of their stars? Is star formation more or less vigorous

  9. High-z Universe with Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in space and trace the cosmic star formation history back to the first generations of stars. Their bright afterglows allow us to trace the abundances of heavy elements to large distances, thereby measuring cosmic chemical evolution. To date GRBs have been detected up to distances of z=8.23 and possibly even beyond z9. This makes GRBs a unique and powerful tool to probe the high-z Universe up to the re-ionization era. We discuss the current status of the field, place it in context with other probes, and also discuss new mission concepts that have been planned to utilize GRBs as probes.

  10. Evolution of internal modes, disruptions and high-Z impurities at high density in pulsator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.

    1976-04-01

    The m = 1, n = 1 internal modes, the m = 0, n = 0 internal disruption and the development of high-Z impurities in high-density Tokamak discharges were investigated in the soft X-ray region. The increased density due to the fast gas input results in an increased relaxation period of the m = 0 disruption and increased modulation coefficient. The energy consideration for the internal disruption shows that only about one quarter of the ohmic heating power is lost through the electron channel. The measurements with Si surface barrier diodes, the measurements of Zeta (factor of the amount of the impurities in a hydrogen plasma) of molybdenum and stainless steel lines seem to indicate that the impurity profile is inverted with a minimum in the center. These measurements also indicate not only that the relative impurity content goes down during the fast gas input, but also that the impurities are possibly even expelled from the center of the discharge. (orig.) [de

  11. Energy confinement in Doublet III with high-Z limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, F.B.; Adcock, S.J.; Baker, D.R.; Blau, F.P.; Brooks, N.H.; Chase, R.P.; DeBoo, J.C.; Ejima, S.; Fairbanks, E.S.; Fisher, R.K.

    1980-02-01

    This report describes the experimental measurements and data analysis techniques used to evaluate the energy confinement in noncircular plasmas produced in Doublet III. Major aspects of the confinement measurements and analysis techniques are summarized. Machine parameters, diagnostic systems and discharge parameters relavent to the confinement measurements are given. Magnetic analysis techniques used to determine the plasma shape are reviewed. Scaling of the on-axis values of electron temperature, confinement time and Z/sub eff/ with plasma density is presented. Comparison with scaling results from other circular tokamaks is discussed. Numerical and analytic techniques developed for calculating the plasma energy confinement time and self-consistent profiles of density, temperature, current, and flux in non-circular geometries are described. These techniques are applied to the data and used to determine the central and global electron energy confinement time for a typical doublet plasma. Additional aspects of the confinement such as the radial dependence of the electron thermal conductivity and the estimated ion temperature are explored with the aid of a non-circular transport simulation code. The results of the confinement measurements are summarized and discussed. A brief summary of the theoretically expected effects of noncircularity on plasma confinement is included for reference as Appendix I.

  12. K-α emission form medium and high-Z materials irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Zhavoronkov, N.; Andreev, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Fast electrons are created at the target surface during the interaction of high intensity ultra short laser pulses with solids. Fast electrons penetrate deep into the target where they generate K-α and Bremsstrahlung radiation. Generated high brightness K-α pulses offer the prospect of creating a cheap and compact X-ray source, posing a promising alternative to synchrotron radiation, e.g. in medical application and in material science. With an increase in laser intensity, efficient X-ray emission in the multi-keV range with pulse duration shorter than few picoseconds is expected. This short incoherent but monochromatic X-ray emission synchronized with laser pulses may be used for time-resolved measurements. Acceleration of fast electrons, their transport and K-α photon generation and emission from the target surface in both forward and backward directions are studied here numerically. The results are compared to recent experiments studying K-α emission from the front and rear surface of copper foil targets of various thicknesses and for various parameters of the laser plasma interaction. One-dimensional PIC simulations coupled with 3D time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations show that account of ionization processes and of density profile formed by laser ASE emission is essential for reliable explanation of experimental data. While sub-relativistic intensities are optimum for laser energy transformation into K-α emission for medium-Z targets, relativistic laser intensities have to be used for hard X-ray generation in high-Z materials. The cross-section for K-α shell ionization of high-Z elements by electrons increases or remains approximately constant within a factor of two at relativistic electron energies up to electron energies in the 100-MeV range. Moreover, the splitting ratio of K-α photon emission to Auger electron emission is favorable for high-Z materials, and thus efficient K-α emission is possible. In our

  13. Prevention of ligneous conjunctivitis by topical and subconjunctival fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F

    2004-08-01

    To present a case of ligneous conjunctivitis where the recurrence of membranous conjunctivitis was prevented by subconjunctival and topical instillation of fresh frozen plasma. Interventional case report. A case of ligneous conjunctivitis with multiple recurrences since the age of 3 years developed recurrent membranous conjunctivitis after transconjunctival levator recession. Blood plasminogen activity was determined. The membrane was excised, and the membrane reappeared 4 days later. The patient was treated with excision of the membrane and subconjunctival injection of fresh frozen plasma and topical fresh frozen plasma. Plasminogen activity of the fresh frozen plasma was normal. Plasminogen blood functional activity was 52% (normal is 80%-120%). The patient had complete remission with no recurrences of membranous conjunctivitis after topical and subconjunctival fresh frozen plasma. Prophylactic use of topical and subconjunctival fresh frozen plasma may help in the prevention of membranes in susceptible patients with plasminogen deficiency.

  14. Expanding the role of impurity spectroscopy for investigating the physics of high-Z dissipative divertors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Reinke

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available New techniques that attempt to more fully exploit spectroscopic diagnostics in the divertor and pedestal region during highly dissipative scenarios are demonstrated using experimental results from recent low-Z seeding experiments on Alcator C-Mod, JET and ASDEX Upgrade. To exhaust power at high parallel heat flux, q∥ > 1 GW/m2, while minimizing erosion, reactors with solid, high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs are expected to use extrinsic impurity seeding. Due to transport and atomic physics processes which impact impurity ionization balance, so-called ‘non-coronal’ effects, we do not accurately know and have yet to demonstrate the maximum q∥ which can be mitigated in a tokamak. Radiation enhancement for nitrogen is shown to arise primarily from changes in Li- and Be-like charge states on open field lines, but also through transport-driven enhancement of H- and He-like charge states in the pedestal region. Measurements are presented from nitrogen seeded H-mode and L-mode plasmas where emission from N1+ through N6+ are observed. Active charge exchange spectroscopy of partially ionized low-Z impurities in the plasma edge is explored to measure N5+ and N6+ within the confined plasma, while passive UV and visible spectroscopy is used to measure N1+-N4+ in the boundary. Examples from recent JET and Alcator C-Mod experiments which employ nitrogen seeding highlight how improving spectroscopic coverage can be used to gain empirical insight and provide more data to validate boundary simulations.

  15. EUV Spectra of High Z Impurities from Large Helical Device and Atomic Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, T.; Suzuki, C.; Funaba, H.; Sato, K.; Murakami, I.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H.; O’Sullivan, G.; Harte, C.; White, J.; D’Arcy, R.; Tanuma, H.; Nakamura, N.

    2017-01-01

    The results of experiments on high Z impurity injection in the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science are described. Spectra from Xe, Sn and W ions were recorded in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. Two different situations were observed in the case of Xe and Sn, depending on whether or not the plasma underwent radiative collapse. If the plasma was stable, the spectrum consisted of a number of strong lines and in both cases the strongest contribution was from 4p - 4d transitions of Cu-like ions. If the plasma underwent radiative collapse in each case it was dominated by an intense unresolved transition array with some strong lines overlapping it resulting from 4p 6 4d m - 4p 5 4d m+1 + 4p 6 4d m-1 4f transitions. For tungsten, radiative collapse was not observed though the spectrum here was dominated by the same array which lies between 4.5 and 7 nm with some additional contribution at the same wavelength from 4d 10 4f m - 4d 9 4f m+1 and 4d 10 4f m - 4d 10 4f m-1 5d transitions in lower stages also. From observation and comparison with other sources, it is shown that the spectra are dominated by resonance transitions to the ground state of the emitting ions, in marked contrast to results from charge exchange spectra that had been recorded to assist with ion stage separation. In the case of tungsten, no sharp lines are seen though the profile of the unresolved array structure changes with plasma temperature and the origin of these changes can be traced to differences in the populations of contributing ions. New assignments for lines of Xe XVIII, Sn XIX and Sn XVII of 4p - 4d transitions are listed in Tables. Strong lines of W, Xe and Sn ions in EUV range are also tabulated. (author)

  16. Effects of buried high-Z layers on fast electron propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaohu; Zhuo, Hongbin; Ma, Yanyun; Shao, Fuqiu; Xu, Han; Yin Yan; Borghesi, M.

    2014-01-01

    The transport through high density plasmas of relativistic electron beams generated by ultra-intense laser-plasma interaction has potential applications in laser-driven ion acceleration and in the fast igniter scheme for inertial confinement fusion. By extending a prior model [A.R. Bell, J.R. Davies, S.M. Guerin, Phys. Rev. E 58, 2471 (1998)], the magnetic field generated during the transport of a fast electron beam driven by an ultra-intense laser in a solid target is derived analytically and applied to estimate the effect of such field on fast electron propagation through a buried high-Z layer in a lower-Z target. It is found that the effect gets weaker with the increase of the depth of the buried layer, the divergence of the fast electrons, and the laser intensity, indicating that magnetic field effects on the fast electron divergence as measured from K a X-ray emission may need to be considered for moderate laser intensities. On the basis of the calculations, some considerations are made on how one can mitigate the effect of the magnetic field generated at the interface. (authors)

  17. Analysis of Muon Induced Neutrons in Detecting High Z Nuclear Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of Muon Induced Neutrons in Detecting High Z Nuclear Materials THESIS Logan J. Brandt, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-109...to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-109 ANALYSIS OF MUON INDUCED NEUTRONS IN DETECTING HIGH Z NUCLEAR MATERIALS THESIS...USAF March 2015 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-109 ANALYSIS OF MUON INDUCED NEUTRONS IN DETECTING HIGH Z

  18. Operation of ASDEX Upgrade with high-Z wall coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, V.; Neu, R.; Krieger, K.; Maier, H.; Geier, A.; Tabasso, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Pugno, R.; Bolshukhin, D.; Zarrabian, M.

    2001-01-01

    The material for plasma facing components of a future fusion device is still not decided. At present most experiments use graphite, because of its good thermo mechanical properties and the low radiation potential of carbon. Due to the high erosion yield and, especially, due to the codeposition with tritium, its use in a fusion reactor is still questionable. Based on the good experience using tungsten as divertor material in ASDEX Upgrade, which demonstrated that a divertor tokamak can be operated with a tungsten divertor without reduction of the performance, a step by step strategy was followed. Main sources of the carbon are predicted at the inner heat shield, which covers the central column. Tungsten test tiles confirm the erosion at this position due to charge exchange neutral, but also a non negligible ion sputtering component. A first step was done by siliconisation. In ASDEX Upgrade the maximal silicon concentration was 0.002. Consequently the performance of the experiment was not influenced by silicon radiation. A second step was done by tungsten coating of 1.2m 2 of the inner heat shield. Experiments are done without subsequent wall coating, which would cover the tungsten. Spectroscopically measured central tungsten densities are always below ∼5*10 -6 and mostly below the detection limit. Again no influence on the plasma performance parameters are found. Extrapolation to ITER conditions yields concentrations, which will not prohibit successful operation. The next step in ASDEX Upgrade will be a mostly tungsten covered inner heat shield at the next experimental campaign. (author)

  19. Studies of the disruption prevention by ECRH at plasma current rise stage in limiter discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikaev, V.V.; Borshegovskij, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of disruption prevention by means of ECRH in T-10 at the plasma current rise phase in limiter discharges with circular plasma cross-section were performed. Reliable disruption prevention by ECRH at HF power (P HF ) min level equal to 20% of ohmic heating power P OH was demonstrated. m/n=2/1 mode MHD-activity developed before disruption (with characteristic time ∼120 ms) can be considered as disruption precursor and can be used in a feedback system. (author)

  20. Probing the distance-duality relation with high- z data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, R.F.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58429-500, Campina Grande—PB (Brazil); Busti, V.C. [Departamento de Física Matemática, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo—SP (Brazil); Lima, F.S. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 58429-900, Campina Grande—PB (Brazil); Alcaniz, J.S., E-mail: holanda@uepb.edu.br, E-mail: viniciusbusti@gmail.com, E-mail: limasdl@bol.com.br, E-mail: alcaniz@on.br [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatório Nacional, 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro—RJ (Brazil)

    2017-09-01

    Measurements of strong gravitational lensing jointly with type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observations have been used to test the validity of the cosmic distance duality relation (CDDR), D{sub L}( z )/[(1+ z ){sup 2D{sub A}}( z )]=η=1, where D{sub L}(z) and D{sub A}(z) are the luminosity and the angular diameter distances to a given redshift z , respectively. However, several lensing systems lie in the interval 1.4 ≤ z ≤ 3.6 i.e., beyond the redshift range of current SNe Ia compilations ( z ≈ 1.50), which prevents this kind of test to be fully explored. In this paper, we circumvent this problem by testing the CDDR considering observations of strong gravitational lensing along with SNe Ia and (a subsample from) the latest gamma-ray burst distance modulus data, whose redshift range is 0.033 ≤ z ≤ 9.3. We parameterize their luminosity distances with a second degree polynomial function and search for possible deviations from the CDDR validity by using four different η( z ) functions: η( z )=1+η{sub 0z}, η( z )=1+η{sub 0z}/(1+ z ), η( z )=(1+ z ){sup η{sub 0}} and η( z )=1+η{sub 0ln}(1+ z ). Unlike previous tests done at redshifts lower than 1.50, the likelihood for η{sub 0} depends strongly on the η( z ) function considered, but we find no significant deviation from the CDDR validity (η{sub 0}=0). However, our analyses also point to the fact that caution is needed when one fits data in higher redshifts to test the CDDR as well as a better understanding of the mass distribution of lenses also is required for more accurate results.

  1. Effects on Implosion Characteristics of High-Z Dopant Profiles in ICF Ignition Capsule Ablators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Wang, Min; Gu, Jianfa; Zou, Shiyang; Kang, Dongguo; Ye, Wenhua; Zhang, Weiyan

    2012-10-01

    For ignition target design (ITD) of indirect drive ICF [J. Lindl, PoP 2, 3933(1995)], high-Z dopants in capsule ablators were used to prevent preheat of DTadjacentablators by Au M-band flux in laser-driven gold Hohlraums, therefore to restrain the growth of high-mode hydro-instabilities and to improve the targetrobustness.Based on NIC's Rev. 5 ITD[S. W. Haan et al., PoP 18, 051001(2011)], we investigated the effect of thickness and dopant concentration of doped layers on implosion characteristics, including the Atwood number (AWN) of fuel-ablator interface, the density gradient scale length (DGSL) of ablation front and the implosion velocity (VIM); all three variables decrease with increment of dopant dosage, and increase with dopant concentration while keeping dosage constant. Since a smaller AWN, a larger DGSL, and a faster VIM always characterize a more robust ITD, one should make tradeoff among them by adjusting the dopant profiles in ablators.A Gaussian spectrum (GS) was used to imitate the Au M-band flux [Y. S. Li et al., PoP 18, 022701(2011)], and the impact of GScenter on implosion characteristics of Rev. 5 ITD was studied while moving the GScenter towards higher energy, the ablatorpreheat got severe, AWN got larger, DGSL got larger, and VIM got faster.

  2. Measurements of the Properties of Highly-charged high-Z ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustine J. Smith, Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    We had proposed carrying out a systematic experimental investigation of the atomic physics of highly charged, high-Z ions, produced in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL electron beam ion trap (EBIT-I) in its high energy mode, superEBIT. In particular we were going to accurately measure line positions for Δn=0 transitions in few electron high-Z ions; this was meant to enable us to investigate relativistic and quantum electrodynamics QED contributions to the energy levels as well as the nuclear properties of heavy ions. We were also going to measure cross sections for various electron-ion interactions, the degree of polarization of emitted x-rays, and radiation cooling rates of various ionization stages of highly charged, high-Z ions. This would enable us to study fundamental atomic physics of high-Z ions at relativistic electron impact energies and in the intense nuclear fields of highly ionized, high-Z ions. This would extend previous measurements we have carried out to a regime where there is a paucity of good data. These measurements were expected to generate increased theoretical interest and activity in this area. The project will extend a very successful collaboration between Morehouse College (MC) and a national laboratory LLNL, Minority student training and development are major components of the proposal

  3. Plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam which is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10 17 to 10 20 electrons per cubic centimeter. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. The high-temperature plasma can be used to heat a high Z material to generate radiation. Alternatively, a tunable radiation source is produced by using a moderate Z gas or a mixture of high Z and low Z gas as the target plasma. (author)

  4. Kink structures induced in nickel-based single crystal superalloys by high-Z element migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Fei; Zhang, Jianxin [Key Laboratory for Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Mao, Shengcheng [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Jiang, Ying [Center of Electron Microscopy and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Feng, Qiang [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Shen, Zhenju; Li, Jixue; Zhang, Ze [Center of Electron Microscopy and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Han, Xiaodong [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Innovative kink structures generate at the γ/γ′ interfaces in the crept superalloy. • Clusters of heavy elements congregate at the apex of the kinks. • Dislocation core absorbs hexagonal structural high-Z elements. - Abstract: Here, we investigate a new type of kink structure that is found at γ/γ′ interfaces in nickel-based single crystal superalloys. We studied these structures at the atomic and elemental level using aberration corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The core of the dislocation absorbs high-Z elements (i.e., Co and Re) that adopt hexagonal arrangements, and it extrudes elements (i.e., Ni and Al) that adopt face centered cubic (fcc) structures. High-Z elements (i.e., Ta and W) and Cr, which is a low-Z element, are stabilized in body centered cubic (bcc) arrangements; Cr tends to behave like Re. High-Z elements, which migrate and adopt a hexagonal structure, induce kink formation at γ/γ′ interfaces. This process must be analyzed to fully understand the kinetics and dynamics of creep in nickel-based single crystal superalloys.

  5. Preliminary results of noncircular plasma experiments in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, T.

    1980-02-01

    Preliminary results of noncircular plasma experiments in Doublet III are reported. Shaping and discharge characteristics in doublet plasmas with high-Z limiters are described. Electron energy confinement and maximum plasma density are in agreement with standard circular tokamak empirical scaling laws. Chromium and molybdenum appear to be the dominant high-Z contaminants while carbon appears to dominate low-Z contaminants. High-Z impurity radiation does not appear to dominate the central power balance

  6. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma and decontamination. Can it contribute to preventing hospital-acquired infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, N; Cahill, O; Daniels, S; Galvin, S; Humphreys, H

    2014-10-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) affect ∼4.5 million patients in Europe alone annually. With the ever-increasing number of 'multi-resistant' micro-organisms, alternative and more effective methods of environmental decontamination are being sought as an important component of infection prevention and control. One of these is the use of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) systems with clinical applications in healthcare facilities. CAPPs have been shown to demonstrate antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral properties and have been adopted for other uses in clinical medicine over the past decade. CAPPs vary in their physical and chemical nature depending on the plasma-generating mechanism (e.g. plasma jet, dielectric barrier discharge, etc.). CAPP systems produce a 'cocktail' of species including positive and negative ions, reactive atoms and molecules (e.g. atomic oxygen, ozone, superoxide and oxides of nitrogen), intense electric fields, and ultraviolet radiation (UV). The effects of these ions have been studied on micro-organisms, skin, blood, and DNA; thus, a range of possible applications of CAPPs has been identified, including surface decontamination, wound healing, biofilm removal, and even cancer therapy. Here we evaluate plasma devices, their applications, mode of action and their potential role specifically in combating HCAIs on clinical surfaces. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasma carotenoids and breast cancer risk in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Furtado, Jeremy D; Campos, Hannia; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2015-09-01

    Several circulating carotenoids have been inversely associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk in large cohort studies and a pooled analysis. Whether associations differ by tumor or participant characteristics remains unclear. We investigated the associations of plasma carotenoids with postmenopausal breast cancer risk overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status, tumor stage, smoking status, and body mass index, in a case-control study nested in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. A total of 496 invasive breast cancer cases diagnosed between blood draw in 1998-2001 and June 30, 2007 and matched 1:1 with controls on race, birth date, and blood draw date were included. Multivariable-adjusted conditional and unconditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Plasma α-carotene above the lowest quartile was associated with significant 40-43% lower risk of invasive breast cancer risk (fourth vs. first quartile OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.41-0.87, P-trend = 0.037) after adjustment for multiple covariates. This inverse association was strengthened after further adjustment for other plasma carotenoids and total fruit and vegetable intake (fourth vs. first quartile OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.29-0.85, P-trend = 0.041). Other plasma carotenoids or total carotenoids were not associated with breast cancer risk. The inverse association of α-carotene with breast cancer remained for ER+, but not for ER- tumors, although test for heterogeneity was not statistically significant (P-heterogeneity = 0.49). These results suggest that higher plasma α-carotene is associated with lower risk of invasive breast cancer.

  8. Detection of High-Z Objects using Multiple Scattering of Cosmic Ray Muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, Gary E.; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Gomez, John; Morris, Christopher; Priedhorsky, William C.; Saunders, Alexander; Schultz, Larry J.; Teasdale, Margaret E.

    2004-01-01

    Detection of high-Z material hidden inside a large volume of ordinary cargo is an important and timely task given the danger associated with illegal transport of uranium and heavier elements. Existing radiography techniques are inefficient for shielded material, often expensive and involve radiation hazards, real and perceived. We recently demonstrated that radiographs can be formed using cosmic-ray muons. Here, we show that compact, high-Z objects can be detected and located in 3 dimensions with muon radiography. The natural flux of cosmic-ray muons, approximately 10,000 m-2min-1, can generate a reliable detection signal in a fraction of a minute, using large-area muon detectors as used in particle and nuclear physics

  9. High-z semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors for room-temperature gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornand, Bernard; Friant, Alain.

    1978-09-01

    A bibliographical review (182 articles of periodicals, conferences, reports, thesis and french patents) is presented, as addendum of the report CEA-BIB-210 (1974) on high-Z semiconductor compounds used as materials for the gamma and X-ray detection and spectrometry. This publication reviews issues from 1974 to 1977. References and summaries (in french) are incorporated into 182 bibliograhical notices. Index for authors, corporate authors, documents and periodicals, and subjects is included [fr

  10. Dual-energy X-ray radiography for automatic high-Z material detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Gongyin; Bennett, Gordon; Perticone, David

    2007-01-01

    There is an urgent need for high-Z material detection in cargo. Materials with Z > 74 can indicate the presence of fissile materials or radiation shielding. Dual (high) energy X-ray material discrimination is based on the fact that different materials have different energy dependence in X-ray attenuation coefficients. This paper introduces the basic physics and analyzes the factors that affect dual-energy material discrimination performance. A detection algorithm is also discussed

  11. Plasma deposition of organosilicon polymer thin films with embedded nanosilver for prevention of microbial adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saulou, Claire [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INPT, LISBP, 135 Av. de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); Despax, Bernard; Raynaud, Patrice [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); Zanna, Sandrine; Marcus, Philippe [LPCS, UMR CNRS/ENSCP 7045, 11 rue P. et M. Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Mercier-Bonin, Muriel, E-mail: muriel.mercier-bonin@insa-toulouse.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INPT, LISBP, 135 Av. de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2009-11-15

    Composite thin films ({approx}170 nm) containing silver nanoclusters embedded in an organosilicon matrix were deposited by PE-CVD onto stainless steel in order to prevent microbial adhesion. The process originality relies on a dual strategy combining silver sputtering and simultaneous plasma polymerization in argon-hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) plasma, using an asymmetrical RF glow discharge. The metal content in the film was controlled by varying the HMDSO flow rate. Investigation of the physico-chemical properties of the obtained films was conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Plasma-mediated coatings were composed of C, O, Si and Ag which was predominantly under metallic form, as indicated by XPS analysis. The presence of Si-H, Si-O-Si, Si-(CH){sub n}-Si and C-H groups was established by FTIR. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was selected as the model for eukaryotic microorganisms. The maximal anti-adhesive efficiency was achieved for the organosilicon matrix alone. When nanosilver was incorporated into the organic matrix, the efficiency was reduced, especially for high metal contents. Silver antimicrobial property was assumed to be related to Ag{sup +} progressive release from the embedded nanoparticles into the surrounding medium. This release was confirmed by ICP-MS measurements. Moreover, silver-containing film antifungal activity was observed towards sessile cells.

  12. Non-thermal plasmas: novel preventive and curative therapy against melanomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesbert, Franck; Larue, Lionel

    2014-10-01

    Malignant melanoma is a very aggressive cancer with a very poor short-term prognosis once metastatic. For years, there was no efficient adjuvant therapy after surgery. Chemotherapy and immunotherapy provided hope, but not victory. Further efforts are therefore required, to find new ways to cure this disease. Physics has, once again, opened up new possibilities for treatment, through the use of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). The curative potential of this technique was initially assessed on cancer cells, among which melanoma. In a recent issue, Yajima et al. use NEAPP on benign nevi, as a preventive treatment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Dipyridamole prevents the coconut oil-induced hypercholesterolemia. A study on lipid plasma and lipoprotein composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fuentes, Eduardo; Gil-Villarino, Almudena; Zafra, Ma Flor; García-Peregrín, Eduardo

    2002-03-01

    For a better understanding of the hypolipidemic function of dipyridamole, we have studied the comparative effects of diet supplementation with 10% coconut oil with and without dipyridamole on the lipid plasma and lipoprotein composition in chicks. This study was performed under postprandial and food-deprivation (12h) conditions. Coconut oil induced a clear hypercholesterolemia under both feeding conditions. Simultaneous administration of dipyridamole maintained total and esterified cholesterol at levels similar to those observed in control animals sacrificed under postprandial conditions. Under these conditions, our results also show that dipyridamole significantly reduced cholesterol levels in all the chick plasma lipoproteins that were increased by coconut oil administration. Nevertheless, it should be emphasised that the levels of total cholesterol found in intermediate- and very-low-density lipoproteins were lower than in control. All chemical components of these fractions were significantly decreased by dipyridamole. The effects were not significant in chicks deprived of food. In conclusion, our results show that the hypercholesterolemia induced by coconut oil was prevented by dipyridamole. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports on the antihypercholesterolemic effects of dipyridamole.

  14. High-speed readout of high-Z pixel detectors with the LAMBDA detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Xia, Q.; Rothkirch, A.; Yu, Y.; Struth, B.; Hirsemann, H.; Graafsma, H.

    2014-01-01

    High-frame-rate X-ray pixel detectors make it possible to perform time-resolved experiments at synchrotron beamlines, and to make better use of these sources by shortening experiment times. LAMBDA is a photon-counting hybrid pixel detector based on the Medipix3 chip, designed to combine a small pixel size of 55 μm, a large tileable module design, high speed, and compatibility with ''high-Z'' sensors for hard X-ray detection. This technical paper focuses on LAMBDA's high-speed-readout functionality, which allows a frame rate of 2000 frames per second with no deadtime between successive images. This takes advantage of the Medipix3 chip's ''continuous read-write'' function and highly parallelised readout. The readout electronics serialise this data and send it back to a server PC over two 10 Gigabit Ethernet links. The server PC controls the detector and receives, processes and stores the data using software designed for the Tango control system. As a demonstration of high-speed readout of a high-Z sensor, a GaAs LAMBDA detector was used to make a high-speed X-ray video of a computer fan

  15. Constraining the Epoch of Reionization from the Observed Properties of the High-z Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Solé, Eduard; Manrique, Alberto; Guzman, Rafael; Rodríguez Espinosa, José Miguel; Gallego, Jesús; Herrero, Artemio; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Marín Franch, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    We combine observational data on a dozen independent cosmic properties at high-z with the information on reionization drawn from the spectra of distant luminous sources and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to constrain the interconnected evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium since the dark ages. The only acceptable solutions are concentrated in two narrow sets. In one of them reionization proceeds in two phases: a first one driven by Population III stars, completed at z˜ 10, and after a short recombination period a second one driven by normal galaxies, completed at z˜ 6. In the other set both kinds of sources work in parallel until full reionization at z˜ 6. The best solution with double reionization gives excellent fits to all the observed cosmic histories, but the CMB optical depth is 3σ larger than the recent estimate from the Planck data. Alternatively, the best solution with single reionization gives less good fits to the observed star formation rate density and cold gas mass density histories, but the CMB optical depth is consistent with that estimate. We make several predictions, testable with future observations, that should discriminate between the two reionization scenarios. As a byproduct our models provide a natural explanation to some characteristic features of the cosmic properties at high-z, as well as to the origin of globular clusters.

  16. Platelet-rich plasma extract prevents pulmonary edema through angiopoietin-Tie2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammoto, Tadanori; Jiang, Amanda; Jiang, Elisabeth; Mammoto, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Increased vascular permeability contributes to life-threatening pathological conditions, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Current treatments for sepsis-induced pulmonary edema rely on low-tidal volume mechanical ventilation, fluid management, and pharmacological use of a single angiogenic or chemical factor with antipermeability activity. However, it is becoming clear that a combination of multiple angiogenic/chemical factors rather than a single factor is required for maintaining stable and functional blood vessels. We have demonstrated that mouse platelet-rich plasma (PRP) extract contains abundant angiopoietin (Ang) 1 and multiple other factors (e.g., platelet-derived growth factor), which potentially stabilize vascular integrity. Here, we show that PRP extract increases tyrosine phosphorylation levels of Tunica internal endothelial cell kinase (Tie2) and attenuates disruption of cell-cell junctional integrity induced by inflammatory cytokine in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Systemic injection of PRP extract also increases Tie2 phosphorylation in mouse lung and prevents endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema and the consequent decreases in lung compliance and exercise intolerance resulting from endotoxin challenge. Soluble Tie2 receptor, which inhibits Ang-Tie2 signaling, suppresses the ability of PRP extract to inhibit pulmonary edema in mouse lung. These results suggest that PRP extract prevents endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema mainly through Ang-Tie2 signaling, and PRP extract could be a potential therapeutic strategy for sepsis-induced pulmonary edema and various lung diseases caused by abnormal vascular permeability.

  17. On the Nature of Velocity Fields in High-z Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Jason X.; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Bloom, Joshua S.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the gas kinematics of damped Lyα systems (DLAs) hosting high-z gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and those toward quasars (QSO-DLAs), focusing on three statistics: (1) Δv90, the velocity interval encompassing 90% of the integrated optical depth, and (2) W1526 and (3) W1548, the rest equivalent widths of the Si II 1526 and C IV 1548 transitions, respectively. The Δv90 distributions of the GRB-DLAs and QSO-DLAs are similar; each has median Δv90 ≈ 80 km s-1 and a significant tail, extending to several hundred km s-1. This suggests comparable galaxy masses for the parent populations of GRB-DLAs and QSO-DLAs, and we infer that the average dark matter halo mass of GRB galaxies is lesssim1012 M⊙. The unique configuration of GRB-DLA sight lines and the presence (and absence) of fine-structure absorption together give special insight into the nature of high-z protogalactic velocity fields. The data support a scenario in which the Δv90 statistic reflects dynamics in the interstellar medium (ISM) and W1526 traces motions outside the ISM (e.g., halo gas and galactic-scale winds). The W1526 statistic and gas metallicity [M/H] are tightly correlated, especially for the QSO-DLAs: [M/H] = a + blog(W1526/1Å) with a = -0.92 +/- 0.05 and b = 1.41 +/- 0.10. We argue that the W1526 statistic primarily tracks dynamical motions in the halos of high-z galaxies and interpret this correlation as a mass-metallicity relation with very similar slope to the trend observed in local, low-metallicity galaxies. Finally, the GRB-DLAs exhibit systematically larger W1526 values (>0.5 Å) than the QSO-DLAs (langleW1528rangle ≈ 0.5 Å), which may suggest that galactic-scale outflows contribute to the largest observed velocity fields.

  18. Angular correlation and polarization studies for radiative electron capture into high-Z ions

    CERN Document Server

    Stöhlker, T; Fritzsche, S; Gumberidze, A; Kozhuharov, C; Ma, X; Orsic-Muthig, A; Spillmann, U; Sierpowski, D; Surzhykov, A; Tachenov, S; Warczak, A

    2004-01-01

    Recent photon correlation studies for Radiative Electron Capture into high-Z projectiles are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the investigation of polarization phenomena which are now accessible due to recent developments in position sensitive solid-states detectors. It is shown, that REC may provide a tool for the diagnostics and detection of the spinâ€"polarization of particles involved in atomic collisions. Also the impact of REC studies for atomic structure studies is outlined. Here the strong alignment of excited states induced by REC allowed us to observe an interference between competing decay branches for the case of the Lyman-α1 transition in hydrogen-like ions.

  19. Soft x ray emission spectra from laser-irradiated high-Z targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman, G.; Burkhalter, P. G.; Newman, D. A.; Ripin, B. H.

    1990-06-01

    X ray data were acquired from mass-limited targets with the Pharos III laser system. Targets, mounted at the tip of thin glass stalks, were microscopic pieces of single or multiple high-Z element composition. The laser irradiance was 4 x 10(exp 14) W/sq cm with about 300J of focused 1.05 microns wavelength laser beam. A convex KAP crystal spectrograph was used for its capability to collect high resolution spectra in the 4 to 20 A soft x ray region. The recorded spectral film densities were microdensitometered and converted by computer-processing to absolute continuum and emission line intensities. The spectral features were identified with the aid of ab-initio atomic structure calculations. The continuum background was evaluated as a source of pseudo-continua for absorption studies of soft x rays.

  20. High-Z Nanoparticle/Polymer Nanocomposites for Gamma-Ray Scintillation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao

    An affordable and reliable solution for spectroscopic gamma-ray detection has long been sought after due to the needs from research, defense, and medical applications. Scintillators resolve gamma energy by proportionally converting a single high-energy photon into a number of photomultiplier-tube-detectable low-energy photons, which is considered a more affordable solution for general purposes compared to the delicate semiconductor detectors. An ideal scintillator should simultaneously exhibit the following characteristics: 1) high atomic number (Z) for high gamma stopping power and photoelectron production; 2) high light yield since the energy resolution is inversely proportional to the square root of light yield; 3) short emission decay lifetime; and 4) low cost and scalable production. However, commercial scintillators made from either inorganic single crystals or plastics fail to satisfy all requirements due to their intrinsic material properties and fabrication limitations. The concept of adding high-Z constituents into plastic scintillators to harness high Z, low cost, and fast emission in the resulting nanocomposite scintillators is not new in and of itself. Attempts have been made by adding organometallics, quantum dots, and scintillation nanocrystals into the plastic matrix. High-Z organometallics have long been used to improve the Z of plastic scintillators; however, their strong spin-orbit coupling effect entails careful triplet energy matching using expensive triplet emitters to avoid severe quenching of the light yield. On the other hand, reported quantum dot- and nanocrystal-polymer nanocomposites suffer from moderate Z and high optical loss due to aggregation and self-absorption at loadings higher than 10 wt%, limiting their potential for practical application. This dissertation strives to improve the performance of nanoparticle-based nanocomposite scintillators. One focus is to synthesize transparent nanocomposites with higher loadings of high-Z

  1. The impact of chemistry on the structure of high-z galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallottini, A.; Ferrara, A.; Bovino, S.; Vallini, L.; Gallerani, S.; Maiolino, R.; Salvadori, S.

    2017-11-01

    To improve our understanding of high-z galaxies, we study the impact of H2 chemistry on their evolution, morphology and observed properties. We compare two zoom-in high-resolution (30 pc) simulations of prototypical M⋆ ˜ 1010 M⊙ galaxies at z = 6. The first, `Dahlia', adopts an equilibrium model for H2 formation, while the second, `Althæa', features an improved non-equilibrium chemistry network. The star formation rate (SFR) of the two galaxies is similar (within 50 per cent), and increases with time reaching values close to 100 M⊙ yr-1 at z = 6. They both have SFR-stellar mass relation consistent with observations, and a specific SFR of ≃5 Gyr-1. The main differences arise in the gas properties. The non-equilibrium chemistry determines the H → H2 transition to occur at densities >300 cm-3, I.e. about 10 times larger than predicted by the equilibrium model used for Dahlia. As a result, Althæa features a more clumpy and fragmented morphology, in turn making SN feedback more effective. Also, because of the lower density and weaker feedback, Dahlia sits 3σ away from the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation; Althæa, instead nicely agrees with observations. The different gas properties result in widely different observables. Althæa outshines Dahlia by a factor of 7 (15) in [C II]157.74 μm (H217.03 μm) line emission. Yet, Althæa is underluminous with respect to the locally observed [C II]-SFR relation. Whether this relation does not apply at high-z or the line luminosity is reduced by cosmic microwave background and metallicity effects remain as an open question.

  2. The LAMBDA photon-counting pixel detector and high-Z sensor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Struth, B.; Hirsemann, H.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Tolbanov, O.; Zarubin, A.; Tyazhev, A.; Shelkov, G.; Graafsma, H.

    2014-12-01

    Many X-ray experiments at third-generation synchrotrons benefit from using single-photon-counting detectors, due to their high signal-to-noise ratio and potential for high-speed measurements. LAMBDA (Large Area Medipix3-Based Detector Array) is a pixel detector system based on the Medipix3 readout chip. It combines the features of Medipix3, such as a small pixel size of 55 μm and flexible functionality, with a large tileable module design consisting of 12 chips (1536 × 512 pixels) and a high-speed readout system capable of running at 2000 frames per second. To enable high-speed experiments with hard X-rays, the LAMBDA system has been combined with different high-Z sensor materials. Room-temperature systems using GaAs and CdTe systems have been produced and tested with X-ray tubes and at synchrotron beamlines. Both detector materials show nonuniformities in their raw image response, but the pixel yield is high and the uniformity can be improved by flat-field correction, particularly in the case of GaAs. High-frame-rate experiments show that useful information can be gained on millisecond timescales in synchrotron experiments with these sensors.

  3. Calculations with the quasirelativistic local-spin-density-functional theory for high-Z atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Y.; Whitehead, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The generalized-exchange local-spin-density-functional theory (LSD-GX) with relativistic corrections of the mass velocity and Darwin terms has been used to calculate statistical total energies for the neutral atoms, the positive ions, and the negative ions for high-Z elements. The effect of the correlation and relaxation correction on the statistical total energy is discussed. Comparing the calculated results for the ionization potentials and electron affinities for the atoms (atomic number Z from 37 to 56 and 72 to 80) with experiment, shows that for the atoms rubidium to barium both the LSD-GX and the quasirelativistic LSD-GX, with self-interaction correction, Gopinathan, Whitehead, and Bogdanovic's Fermi-hole parameters [Phys. Rev. A 14, 1 (1976)], and Vosko, Wilk, and Nusair's correlation correction [Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)], are very good methods for calculating ionization potentials and electron affinities. For the atoms hafnium to mercury the relativistic effect has to be considered

  4. Fast Neutron Tomography of Low-Z Object in High-Z Material Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babai, Ruth Weiss; Sabo-Napadensky, Iris; Bar, Doron; Mor, Ilan; Tamim, Noam; Dangendorf, Volker; Tittelmeier, Kai; Bromberger, Benjamin; Weierganz, Mathias

    The technique and first results of Fast Neutron Tomography (FNCT) experiments are presented which are performed at the accelerator facility of PTB, Germany. A high-intensity neutron beam of broad spectral distribution with an average energy of 5.5 MeV, was produced by 11.5 MeV deuterons impinging upon a thick beryllium target. The capability of FNCT for high contrast imaging of low-Z materials embedded in thick high-Z shielding materials is demonstrated, which is superior to more conventional high-energy X-ray imaging techniques. For demonstrating the method special test objects were prepared: One consisted of an assembled polyethylene cylinder with holes of various diameters and directions drilled in its surface and inner parts. The plastic phantom was inserted into lead cylinders of different thicknesses. The detector system consisted of a plastic scintillator along with a dedicated optics, image-intensifier and a CCD camera. Two scintillator screens were compared: a bulk plastic scintillator screen and a fibres optical scintillator screen. The tomographic scans were taken in two geometrical configurations: cone beam and semi-fan beam configuration. The image quality favours the semi-fan beam configuration which on the other hand is more time consuming The obtained tomographic images and a comparison of the imaging quality between the different experimental conditions will be presented.

  5. A Software App for Radiotherapy with In-situ Dose-painting using high Z nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermoumi, M; Yucel, A; Hao, Y; Cifter, G; Sajo, E; Ngwa, W

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an user friendly and free-to-download application software that can be employed for modeling Radiotherapy with In-situ Dose-painting (RAID) using high-Z nanoparticles (HZNPs). The RAID APP is software program written in Matlab (Mathworks, Natick, MA, USA) based on deterministic code developed to simulate the space-time intra-tumor HZNPs biodistribution within the tumor, and the corresponding dose enhancement in response to low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy of I-125, Pd-102, Cs-131 and kilovoltage x-rays such as 50 keV and 100 keV. Through the GUI of RAID APP, the user will be directed to different features to compute various parameters related to the dose enhancement and the biodistribution of NPs within high risk tumor sub-volumes. The software was developed as tool for research purposes with potential for subsequent development to guide dose-painting treatment planning using radiosensitizers such as gold (Au) and platinum (Pt).

  6. Improvement on the light yield of a high-Z inorganic scintillator GSO(Ce)

    CERN Document Server

    Kamae, T; Isobe, N; Kokubun, M; Kubota, A; Osone, S; Takahashi, T; Tsuchida, N; Ishibashi, H

    2002-01-01

    Cerium-doped gadolinium silicic dioxide crystal, GSO(Ce), is a high-Z non-hydroscopic scintillator that gives higher light yield than BGO, and can potentially replace NaI(Tl), CsI(Tl) and BGO in many applications. Its production cost, however, has been substantially higher than any of them, while its energy resolution has been worse than that of NaI(Tl) or CsI(Tl). The merit did not overcome these deficiencies except in limited applications. We developed a low background phoswich counter (the well-type phoswich counter) for the Hard X-ray Detector of the Astro-E project based on GSO scintillator. In the developmental work, we have succeeded in improving the light yield of GSO(Ce) by 40-50%. For energies above 500 keV, a large GSO(Ce) crystal (4.5 cmx4.5phi cm) now gives energy resolution comparable to or better than the best NaI(Tl) when read out with a phototube. With a small GSO(Ce) crystal (5x5x5 mm sup 3) and a photodiode, an energy resolution comparable to or better than the best CsI(Tl) has been obtaine...

  7. Metal enrichment signatures of the first stars on high-z DLAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Maio, U.; Ciardi, B.; Salvaterra, R.

    2017-12-01

    We use numerical N-body hydrodynamical simulations with varying PopIII stellar models to investigate the possibility of detecting first star signatures with observations of high-redshift damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs). The simulations include atomic and molecular cooling, star formation, energy feedback and metal spreading due to the evolution of stars with a range of masses and metallicities. Different initial mass functions (IMFs) and corresponding metal-dependent yields and lifetimes are adopted to model primordial stellar populations. The DLAs in the simulations are selected according to either the local gas temperature (temperature selected) or the host mass (mass selected). We find that 3 per cent (40 per cent) of mass (temperature)-selected high-z (z ≥ 5.5) DLAs retain signatures of pollution from PopIII stars, independent of the first star model. Such DLAs have low halo mass ( Z⊙) and star formation rate ( generation and to constrain the first star mass ranges. Comparing the abundance ratios derived from our simulations to those observed in DLAs at z ≥ 5, we find that most of these DLAs are consistent within errors with PopII star dominated enrichment and strongly disfavour the pollution pattern of very massive first stars (i.e. 100-500 M⊙). However, some of them could still result from the pollution of first stars in the mass range [0.1, 100] M⊙. In particular, we find that the abundance ratios from SDSS J1202+3235 are consistent with those expected from PopIII enrichment dominated by massive (but not extreme) first stars.

  8. L-Arginine supplementation prevents allodynia and hyperalgesia in painful diabetic neuropathic rats by normalizing plasma nitric oxide concentration and increasing plasma agmatine concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón, Lusliany J; Farges, M C; Davin, N; Sion, B; Privat, A M; Vasson, M P; Eschalier, A; Courteix, C

    2017-07-19

    Neuropathic pain is a common diabetic complication. It is characterized by symptoms of spontaneous and stimulus-evoked pain including hyperalgesia and allodynia. L-Arginine is a common precursor of many metabolites of biological interest, in particular, nitric oxide (NO), ornithine, and hence polyamines. In central nervous system, NO, glutamate, and polyamines share an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated effect. We hypothesized that a variation in arginine metabolism caused by diabetes may contribute to development and maintenance of neuropathic pain and to the worsening of clinical and biological signs of diabetes. We examined whether oral L-arginine supplementation (2.58 ± 0.13 g/l in drinking water for 3 weeks) could improve the development of neuropathic pain and the clinical, biological, and metabolic complications of diabetes in streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (D) rats. STZ administration induced classical symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Diabetic rats also displayed mechanical hypersensitivity, tactile, and thermal allodynia. Plasma citrulline and NO levels were increased in diabetic hyperalgesic/allodynic rats. L-Arginine supplementation failed to reduce hyperglycaemia, polyphagia, and weight loss. Moreover, it abolished hyperalgesia and allodynia by normalizing NO plasma concentration and increasing plasma agmatine concentration. L-Arginine supplementation prevented the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, tactile, and thermal allodynia in painful diabetic neuropathy with concomitant reduction of NO and increased agmatine production, offering new therapeutic opportunities for the management of diabetic neuropathic pain.

  9. Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfill, G E; Shimizu, T; Steffes, B; Schmidt, H-U

    2009-01-01

    A new, very efficient, large area scalable and robust electrode design for plasma production in air at atmosphere pressures has been developed and tested. This has made the development of a 'plasma dispenser' for hospital disinfection possible, which has certain advantages over current fluid disinfection systems. The properties of this device are presented, in particular the bactericidal and fungicidal efficiency, and the advantages are described. Such plasma dispensers could play an important role in the future fight against the alarming and growing threat posed by nosocomial (=hospital and community associated) bacterial infections.

  10. Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfill, G E; Shimizu, T; Steffes, B; Schmidt, H-U [Max-Planck Institute for extraterrestrial physics, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hospital Munich Schwabing, Koelner Platz 1, D-80804 Muenchen (Germany)], E-mail: gem@mpe.mpg.de

    2009-11-15

    A new, very efficient, large area scalable and robust electrode design for plasma production in air at atmosphere pressures has been developed and tested. This has made the development of a 'plasma dispenser' for hospital disinfection possible, which has certain advantages over current fluid disinfection systems. The properties of this device are presented, in particular the bactericidal and fungicidal efficiency, and the advantages are described. Such plasma dispensers could play an important role in the future fight against the alarming and growing threat posed by nosocomial (=hospital and community associated) bacterial infections.

  11. Nosocomial infections—a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfill, G. E.; Shimizu, T.; Steffes, B.; Schmidt, H.-U.

    2009-11-01

    A new, very efficient, large area scalable and robust electrode design for plasma production in air at atmosphere pressures has been developed and tested. This has made the development of a 'plasma dispenser' for hospital disinfection possible, which has certain advantages over current fluid disinfection systems. The properties of this device are presented, in particular the bactericidal and fungicidal efficiency, and the advantages are described. Such plasma dispensers could play an important role in the future fight against the alarming and growing threat posed by nosocomial (=hospital and community associated) bacterial infections.

  12. Effects of buried high-Z layers on fast electron propagation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, X.; Xu, H.; Zhuo, H.; Ma, Y.; Shao, F.; Yin, Y.; Borghesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 2 (2014), s. 1-7 ISSN 1434-6060 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-plasma interactions * short-pulse * hot-electrons * solid targets * transport * field Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.228, year: 2014

  13. Yet another UFO in the X-ray spectrum of a high-z lensed QSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadina, M.; Vignali, C.; Cappi, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Ponti, G.; Torresi, E.; De Marco, B.; Chartas, G.; Giustini, M.

    2018-02-01

    Aim. Ultra-fast outflows (UFO) appear to be common in local active galactic nuclei (AGN) and may be powerful enough (Ėkin ≥ 1% of Lbol) to effectively quench the star formation in their host galaxies. To test feedback models based on AGN outflows, it is mandatory to investigate UFOs near the peak of AGN activity, that is, at high-z where only a few studies are available to date. Methods: UFOs produce Fe resonant absorption lines measured above ≈7 keV. The most critical problem in detecting such features in distant objects is the difficulty in obtaining X-ray data with sufficient signal-to-noise. We therefore selected a distant QSO that gravitational lensing made bright enough for these purposes, the z = 2.64 QSO MG J0414+0534, and observed it with XMM-Newton for ≈78 ks. Results: The X-ray spectrum of MG J0414+0534 is complex and shows signatures of cold absorption (NH ≈ 4 × 1022 cm-2) and of the presence of an iron emission line (E ≈ 6.4 keV, EW = 95 ± 53 eV) consistent with it originating in the cold absorber. Our main result, however, is the robust detection (more than 5σ) of an absorption line at Eint ≈ 9.2 keV (Eobs ≈ 2.5 keV observer frame). If interpreted as due to FeXXVI, it implies gas outflowing at vout ≈ 0.3c. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of an UFO in a radio-loud quasar at z ≥ 1.5. We estimated that the UFO mechanical output is Ėkin ≈ 2.5Lbol with ṗout/ṗrad ≈ 17 indicating that it is capable of installing significant feedback between the super-massive black hole and the bulge of the host galaxy. We argue that this also suggests a magnetic driving origin of the UFO.

  14. High Z neoclassical transport: Application and limitation of analytical formulae for modelling JET experimental parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, S.; Casson, F. J.; Bourdelle, C.; Angioni, C.; Belli, E.; Camenen, Y.; Citrin, J.; Garbet, X.; Sarazin, Y.; Sertoli, M.; JET Contributors

    2018-01-01

    Heavy impurities, such as tungsten (W), can exhibit strongly poloidally asymmetric density profiles in rotating or radio frequency heated plasmas. In the metallic environment of JET, the poloidal asymmetry of tungsten enhances its neoclassical transport up to an order of magnitude, so that neoclassical convection dominates over turbulent transport in the core. Accounting for asymmetries in neoclassical transport is hence necessary in the integrated modeling framework. The neoclassical drift kinetic code, NEO [E. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion P50, 095010 (2008)], includes the impact of poloidal asymmetries on W transport. However, the computational cost required to run NEO slows down significantly integrated modeling. A previous analytical formulation to describe heavy impurity neoclassical transport in the presence of poloidal asymmetries in specific collisional regimes [C. Angioni and P. Helander, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 56, 124001 (2014)] is compared in this work to numerical results from NEO. Within the domain of validity of the formula, the factor for reducing the temperature screening due to poloidal asymmetries had to be empirically adjusted. After adjustment, the modified formula can reproduce NEO results outside of its definition domain, with some limitations: When main ions are in the banana regime, the formula reproduces NEO results whatever the collisionality regime of impurities, provided that the poloidal asymmetry is not too large. However, for very strong poloidal asymmetries, agreement requires impurities in the Pfirsch-Schlüter regime. Within the JETTO integrated transport code, the analytical formula combined with the poloidally symmetric neoclassical code NCLASS [W. A. Houlberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 3230 (1997)] predicts the same tungsten profile as NEO in certain cases, while saving a factor of one thousand in computer time, which can be useful in scoping studies. The parametric dependencies of the temperature

  15. Swine plasma immunoglobulins for prevention and treatment of post-weaning diarrhoea: Optimizing stability towards gut conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Ballegaard, Anne-Sofie; Røjel, Nanna

    immunisation) prevent and treat post-weaning diarrhoea. Our challenge is to find a suitable method for stabilising the immunoglobulins for oral provision in order for the immunoglobulins to pass as unharmed as possible through the digestive system and still retaining their anti-pathogenic properties. What we...... immunity towards these pathogens, which include pathogen-specific immunoglobulins (antibodies). We hypothesis that by harvesting natural immunoglobulins from porcine blood plasma, a waste product from swine slaughter, and feeding these immunoglobulins to the piglets this can subsequently (by passive...

  16. Comparison of tokamak behaviour with tungsten and low-Z plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipps, V.; Neu, R.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Tokar, M.; Tanabe, T.; Rubel, M.

    2000-12-01

    Graphite wall materials are used in present day fusion devices in order to optimize plasma core performance and to enable access to a large operational space. A large physics database exists for operation with these plasma facing materials, which also indicate their use in future devices with extended burn times. The radiation from carbon impurities in the edge and divertor regions strongly helps to reduce the peak power loads on the strike areas, but carbon radiation also supports the formation of MARFE instabilities which can hinder access to high densities. The main concerns with graphite are associated with its strong chemical affinity to hydrogen, which leads to chemical erosion and to the formation of hydrogen-rich carbon layers. These layers can store a significant fraction of the total tritium fuel, which might prevent the use of these materials in future tritium devices. High-Z plasma facing materials are much more advantageous in this sense, but these advantages compete with the strong poisoning of the plasma if they enter the plasma core. New promising experiences have been obtained with high-Z wall materials in several devices, about which a survey is given in this paper and which also addresses open questions for future research and development work.

  17. Experimental investigation on the effect of high Z front layer on saturation thickness for radiation shielding materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkayastha, Biswajit

    Measurement of number and energy albedo of backscattered gamma rays has wide applications in the design of gamma ray shield involving the use of nuclear radiations. In these applications the characteristic parameter which gives an integral measurement of gamma ray scattering is the albedo of the material involved. Albedo measurements were initiated at the end of the fifth decade of the present century, just after the 2nd World War. Large number of workers worked in different fields such as (i) measurement of angular and energy distributions of backscattered in photons by applying Monte Carlo technique, (ii) experimental investigations of backscattering gamma rays by scintillation spectrometer, Uniform Sensitivity Photon Counter, Proportional Response Photon Counter etc. However, the literature on the effect of high atomic number (Z) front layer on the saturation thickness of a gamma radiation shield is almost nil. In view of the above discussions attempts have been made in the present investigation to extend the scope for optimisation of saturation thickness of a radiation shield by placing a high Z front layer material of varying thickness. Measurements of energy albedo for a homogeneous shield with and without a front layer of different high Z material of varying thickness for two energies namely 662 keV and 1250 keV have been carried out and a careful analysis is presented in the present investigation. From a detailed analysis of the present investigation the following conclusions can be drawn : (i) Anisotroplc distributions of photons as function of emerging angle. (ii) Total energy albedo values of different shielding materials decrease when high Z material is used in front of the shielding material. (iii) Saturation thickness of scattering combinations depends on Z values of the front layer. (iv) The total energy albedo values decrease exponentially as the increase in thickness of the high Z material of the front layer. (v) This experiment not only throws

  18. Thyroidectomy prevents the development of photorefractoriness and the associated rise in plasma prolactin in starlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, A.R.; Nicholls, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Intact and radiothyroidectomized male starlings were transferred from short (8-hr) to long (16-hr) day lengths and measurements made of testicular development and of plasma prolactin concentrations. In intact birds the testes reached full maturity within 3 weeks and regressed after 6 weeks of photostimulation, indicative of the development of photorefractoriness . Prolactin levels increased gradually, reaching maximal values at the time of testicular regression. Testicular growth was normal in the thyroidectomized birds. Removal of the testes from thyroidectomized birds after 1 year on long days resulted in a marked rise in plasma FSH, indicating that these birds were indeed not photorefractory ; FSH levels in the refractory-intact starlings remained low after castration. These results confirm that the presence of an intact thyroid gland is essential for the development of photorefractoriness and for the release of prolactin which normally follows photostimulation

  19. Coating of inner surface of cylindrical pipe for hydrogen entry prevention using plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Nishiguchi, Hiroshi; Furutani, Takumi; Ohshima, Tamiko; Yagyu, Yoshihito; Ihara, Takeshi; Shinohara, Masanori; Suda, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum alloy A6061, which is highly resistant to hydrogen entry, was prepared on a carbide steel cylindrical pipe using a magnetron sputtering deposition method. In this method, plasma was generated between the cylindrical pipe substrate and the cylindrical rod targets, and it moved toward the axial direction with the generation of a modulated magnetic field by a low-frequency alternating coil current. Uniform A6061 thin films were deposited inside the cylindrical pipe using the magnetron sputtering deposition method. The surface morphologies of the films were smooth, and the uniformity of the films was increased by the modulated magnetic field. Moreover, hydrogen content measurements revealed that the A6061 plasma coating is highly resistant to hydrogen entry in corrosive environments, suggesting that the coating was applicable to the elastic deformation region of the base material.

  20. Eriodictyol prevents early retinal and plasma abnormalities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucolo, Claudio; Leggio, Gian Marco; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2012-07-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a complex disease that has potential involvement of inflammatory and oxidative stress-related pathways in its pathogenesis. We hypothesized that eriodictyol, one of the most abundant dietary flavonoids, could be effective against diabetic retinopathy, which involves significant oxidative stress and inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of eriodictyol in early retinal and plasma changes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The effect of eriodictyol treatment (0.1, 1, 10 mg/kg daily for 10 days) was evaluated by TNF-α, ICAM-1, VEGF, and eNOS protein levels measurement in the retina, plasma lipid peroxidation, and blood-retinal barrier (BRB) integrity. Increased amounts of cytokines, adhesion molecule, and nitric oxide synthase were observed in retina from diabetic rats. Eriodictyol treatment significantly lowered retinal TNF-α, ICAM-1, VEGF, and eNOS in a dose-dependent manner. Further, treatment with eriodictyol significantly suppressed diabetes-related lipid peroxidation, as well as the BRB breakdown. These data demonstrated that eriodictyol attenuates the degree of retinal inflammation and plasma lipid peroxidation preserving the BRB in early diabetic rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  2. Influence of partial ionization on the energy loss of fast ions in high- Z material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, T. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, D-6500 Mainz, Germany (DE)); Kaercher, B. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-8046 Garching, Germany (DE))

    1991-04-01

    Analytical and simple numerical calculations of the stopping power of partially ionized high-{ital Z} targets are presented. Up to now such calculations are difficult, mainly because of lacking precise average ionization potentials of the target ions. The aim of this paper is both to clarify the importance of a suitable treatment of target ions in different ionization stages and to show by means of general scaling laws and explicit examples, that high-{ital Z} plasmas of high density and low ionization degree may have smaller stopping powers than cold matter. The resulting range lengthening of the projectile ions might be of crucial importance for a proper design of pellets in inertial confinement fusion.

  3. KINEMATIC CLASSIFICATIONS OF LOCAL INTERACTING GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MERGER/DISK CLASSIFICATIONS AT HIGH-z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Larson, Kirsten L.; Sanders, D. B.; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Yuan, Tiantian; Kewley, Lisa J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Smith, Howard A.; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    The classification of galaxy mergers and isolated disks is key for understanding the relative importance of galaxy interactions and secular evolution during the assembly of galaxies. Galaxy kinematics as traced by emission lines have been used to suggest the existence of a significant population of high-z star-forming galaxies consistent with isolated rotating disks. However, recent studies have cautioned that post-coalescence mergers may also display disk-like kinematics. To further investigate the robustness of merger/disk classifications based on kinematic properties, we carry out a systematic classification of 24 local (U)LIRGs spanning a range of morphologies: from isolated spiral galaxies, ongoing interacting systems, to fully merged remnants. We artificially redshift the Wide Field Spectrograph observations of these local (U)LIRGs to z = 1.5 to make a realistic comparison with observations at high-z, and also to ensure that all galaxies have the same spatial sampling of ∼900 pc. Using both kinemetry-based and visual classifications, we find that the reliability of kinematic classification shows a strong trend with the interaction stage of galaxies. Mergers with two nuclei and tidal tails have the most distinct kinematics compared to isolated disks, whereas a significant population of the interacting disks and merger remnants are indistinguishable from isolated disks. The high fraction of mergers displaying disk-like kinematics reflects the complexity of the dynamics during galaxy interactions. Additional merger indicators such as morphological properties traced by stars or molecular gas are required to further constrain the merger/disk classifications at high-z

  4. Final Report on DTRA Basic Research Project #BRCALL08-Per3-C-2-0006 'High-Z Non-Equilibrium Physics and Bright X-ray Sources with New Laser Targets'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    This project had two major goals. Final Goal: obtain spectrally resolved, absolutely calibrated x-ray emission data from uniquely uniform mm-scale near-critical-density high-Z plasmas not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) to benchmark modern detailed atomic physics models. Scientific significance: advance understanding of non-LTE atomic physics. Intermediate Goal: develop new nano-fabrication techniques to make suitable laser targets that form the required highly uniform non-LTE plasmas when illuminated by high-intensity laser light. Scientific significance: advance understanding of nano-science. The new knowledge will allow us to make x-ray sources that are bright at the photon energies of most interest for testing radiation hardening technologies, the spectral energy range where current x-ray sources are weak. All project goals were met.

  5. Final Report on DTRA Basic Research Project #BRCALL08-Per3-C-2-0006 "High-Z Non-Equilibrium Physics and Bright X-ray Sources with New Laser Targets"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This project had two major goals. Final Goal: obtain spectrally resolved, absolutely calibrated x-ray emission data from uniquely uniform mm-scale near-critical-density high-Z plasmas not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) to benchmark modern detailed atomic physics models. Scientific significance: advance understanding of non-LTE atomic physics. Intermediate Goal: develop new nano-fabrication techniques to make suitable laser targets that form the required highly uniform non-LTE plasmas when illuminated by high-intensity laser light. Scientific significance: advance understanding of nano-science. The new knowledge will allow us to make x-ray sources that are bright at the photon energies of most interest for testing radiation hardening technologies, the spectral energy range where current x-ray sources are weak. All project goals were met.

  6. Swine plasma immunoglobulins for prevention and treatment of post-weaning diarrhoea: Safety and Preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Strube, Mikael Lenz; Bendix Hansen, Marie

    and minimize the on antibiotics and zinc usage. Swine immunoglobulins were isolated directly from slaughterhouse swine plasma-waste by expanded bed chromatography. It was shown that the isolated Immunoglobulin fraction bound enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Salmonella ssp. and inhibited...... their adhesion to porcine epithelial cells in vitro. As the immunoglobulin fraction is intended for oral use as a feed supplement, we also tested the safety of feeding 4 grams of natural immunoglobulins to 4-5 week old weaner piglets for 14 days and observed no adverse effects. In an experimental model of E....... coli F4+ induced PWD, we observed that piglets given IgG as a feed supplement cleared the E coli infection significantly faster than control weaner piglets not receiving an immunoglobulin feed supplement. Furthermore, deep sequencing of the ileal microbiota showed a significantly lowered colonization...

  7. Artesunate prevents rats from the clozapine-induced hepatic steatosis and elevation in plasma triglycerides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yanmei Li,1,2 Ruibing Su,3 Shuqin Xu,2 Qingjun Huang,1 Haiyun Xu1,2 1The Mental Health Center, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Anatomy, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Forensics and Pathology, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic with therapeutic efficacy in treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients and low incidence of extrapyramidal side effects. However, the use of clozapine has been limited by its adverse effects on metabolism. Artesunate is a semisynthetic derivative of artemisinin and was shown to decrease the plasma cholesterol and triglyceride in rabbits and rats in recent studies. The aim of this study was to examine possible effects of artesunate on the clozapine-induced metabolic alterations in rats given saline, clozapine, artesunate, or clozapine plus artesunate for 6 weeks. The clozapine group showed significantly high plasma levels of triglyceride, hepatic steatosis, and fibrosis along with high levels of C-reactive protein, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase compared to the saline group. But the treatment had no effect on weight gain and caused no hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and behavioral changes in the rats. More significantly, these clozapine-induced changes were not seen in rats coadministered with clozapine plus artesunate. These results added evidence supporting psychiatrists to try add-on treatment of artesunate in schizophrenia patients to ameliorate clozapine-induced adverse metabolic effects. Keywords: artesunate, clozapine, dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis, schizophrenia 

  8. Ultra Structural Characterisation of Tetherin - a Protein Capable of Preventing Viral Release from the Plasma Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra K. Gupta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin is an antiviral restriction factor made by mammalian cells to protect them from viral infection. It prevents newly formed virus particles from leaving infected cells. Its antiviral mechanism appears to be remarkably uncomplicated. In 2 studies published in PLoS Pathogens electron microscopy is used to support the hypothesis that the tethers that link HIV-1 virions to tetherin expressing cells contain tetherin and are likely to contain tetherin alone. They also show that the HIV-1 encoded tetherin antagonist that is known to cause tetherin degradation, Vpu, serves to reduce the amount of tetherin in the particles thereby allowing their release.

  9. Plasma Metabolites From Choline Pathway and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in the PREDIMED (Prevention With Mediterranean Diet) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Hu, Frank B; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Bulló, Mònica; Toledo, Estefanía; Wang, Dong D; Corella, Dolores; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Estruch, Ramon; Lapetra, José; Fitó, Montserrat; Arós, Fernando; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Ros, Emilio; Dennis, Courtney; Liang, Liming; Clish, Clary B; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2017-10-28

    The relationship between plasma concentrations of betaine and choline metabolism and major cardiovascular disease (CVD) end points remains unclear. We have evaluated the association between metabolites from the choline pathway and risk of incident CVD and the potential modifying effect of Mediterranean diet interventions. We designed a case-cohort study nested within the PREDIMED (Prevention With Mediterranean Diet) trial, including 229 incident CVD cases and 751 randomly selected participants at baseline, followed up for 4.8 years. We used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to measure, at baseline and at 1 year of follow-up, plasma concentrations of 5 metabolites in the choline pathway: trimethylamine N-oxide, betaine, choline, phosphocholine, and α-glycerophosphocholine. We have calculated a choline metabolite score using a weighted sum of these 5 metabolites. We used weighted Cox regression models to estimate CVD risk. The multivariable hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) per 1-SD increase in choline and α-glycerophosphocholine metabolites were 1.24 (1.05-1.46) and 1.24 (1.03-1.50), respectively. The baseline betaine/choline ratio was inversely associated with CVD. The baseline choline metabolite score was associated with a 2.21-fold higher risk of CVD across extreme quartiles (95% confidence interval, 1.36-3.59; P <0.001 for trend) and a 2.27-fold higher risk of stroke (95% confidence interval, 1.24-4.16; P <0.001 for trend). Participants in the higher quartiles of the score who were randomly assigned to the control group had a higher risk of CVD compared with participants in the lower quartile and assigned to the Mediterranean diet groups ( P =0.05 for interaction). No significant associations were observed for 1-year changes in individual plasma metabolites and CVD. A metabolite score combining plasma metabolites from the choline pathway was associated with an increased risk of CVD in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk

  10. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  11. Effects of Alcohol on Plasma Glucose and Prevention of Alcohol-induced Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes - A Systematic Review with GRADE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzschner, R; Nørgaard, K; Ranjan, A

    2018-01-01

    on their suggested prevention strategies. RESULTS: We included 13 studies. Eight studies reported that ethanol, regardless of administration intravenously or orally, were associated with an increased risk of hypoglycemia due to decrease in plasma glucose, impaired counter-regulatory response, awareness...... of hypoglycemia and cognitive function. Five studies did not report an increased risk of hypoglycemia. None of the studies investigated prevention strategies for ethanol-induced hypoglycemia. Recommendations from 13 diabetes associations were included. All associations recommend combining ethanol with food intake...

  12. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  13. Plasma shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosogane, Nobuyuki; Nakayama, Takahide.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent concentration of plasma currents to the plasma center upon plasma shutdown in a torus type thermonuclear device by the injection of fuels to the plasma center thereby prevent plasma disruption at the plasma center. Constitution: The plasma shutdown device comprises a plasma current measuring device that measures the current distribution of plasmas confined within a vacuum vessel and outputs a control signal for cooling the plasma center when the plasma currents concentrate to the plasma center and a fuel supply device that supplies fuels to the plasma center for cooling the center. The fuels are injected in the form of pellets into the plasmas. The direction and the velocity of the injection are set such that the pellets are ionized at the center of the plasmas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  14. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, D. E.; Chapman, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology.

  15. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eakins, D. E.; Chapman, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology

  16. Some Notes on Neutron Up-Scattering and the Doppler-Broadening of High-Z Scattering Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, Donald Kent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    When neutrons are scattered by target nuclei at elevated temperatures, it is entirely possible that the neutron will actually gain energy (i.e., up-scatter) from the interaction. This phenomenon is in addition to the more usual case of the neutron losing energy (i.e., down-scatter). Furthermore, the motion of the target nuclei can also cause extended neutron down-scattering, i.e., the neutrons can and do scatter to energies lower than predicted by the simple asymptotic models. In recent years, more attention has been given to temperature-dependent scattering cross sections for materials in neutron multiplying systems. This has led to the inclusion of neutron up-scatter in deterministic codes like Partisn and to free gas scattering models for material temperature effects in Monte Carlo codes like MCNP and cross section processing codes like NJOY. The free gas scattering models have the effect of Doppler Broadening the scattering cross section output spectra in energy and angle. The current state of Doppler-Broadening numerical techniques used at Los Alamos for scattering resonances will be reviewed, and suggestions will be made for further developments. The focus will be on the free gas scattering models currently in use and the development of new models to include high-Z resonance scattering effects. These models change the neutron up-scattering behavior.

  17. THE ORIGIN OF COLOR GRADIENTS IN EARLY-TYPE SYSTEMS AND THEIR COMPACTNESS AT HIGH-z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Barbera, F.; De Carvalho, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    In this Letter, we present mean optical+NIR color gradient estimates for 5080 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the grizY JHK wavebands of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey plus the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey. The color gradient is estimated as the logarithmic slope of the radial color profile in ETGs. With such a large sample size, we study the variation of the mean color gradient as a function of waveband with unprecedented accuracy. We find that (1) color gradients are mainly due, on average, to a metallicity variation of about -0.4 dex per decade in galaxy radius; and (2) a small, but significant, positive age gradient is present, on average, in ETGs, with the inner stellar population being slightly younger, by ∼0.1 dex per radial decade, than the outer one. Also, we show that the presence of a positive mean age gradient in ETGs, as found in the present study, implies their effective radius to be smaller at high-z, consistent with observations.

  18. SU-F-J-74: High Z Geometric Integrity and Beam Hardening Artifact Assessment Using a Retrospective Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) Reconstruction Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K; DiCostanzo, D; Gupta, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the efficacy of a retrospective metal artifact reduction (MAR) reconstruction algorithm for a commercial computed tomography (CT) scanner for radiation therapy purposes. Methods: High Z geometric integrity and artifact reduction analysis was performed with three phantoms using General Electric’s (GE) Discovery CT. The three phantoms included: a Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS) electron density phantom (Model 062) with a 6.5 mm diameter titanium rod insert, a custom spine phantom using Synthes Spine hardware submerged in water, and a dental phantom with various high Z fillings submerged in water. Each phantom was reconstructed using MAR and compared against the original scan. Furthermore, each scenario was tested using standard and extended Hounsfield Unit (HU) ranges. High Z geometric integrity was performed using the CIRS phantom, while the artifact reduction was performed using all three phantoms. Results: Geometric integrity of the 6.5 mm diameter rod was slightly overestimated for non-MAR scans for both standard and extended HU. With MAR reconstruction, the rod was underestimated for both standard and extended HU. For artifact reduction, the mean and standard deviation was compared in a volume of interest (VOI) in the surrounding material (water and water equivalent material, ∼0HU). Overall, the mean value of the VOI was closer to 0 HU for the MAR reconstruction compared to the non-MAR scan for most phantoms. Additionally, the standard deviations for all phantoms were greatly reduced using MAR reconstruction. Conclusion: GE’s MAR reconstruction algorithm improves image quality with the presence of high Z material with minimal degradation of its geometric integrity. High Z delineation can be carried out with proper contouring techniques. The effects of beam hardening artifacts are greatly reduced with MAR reconstruction. Tissue corrections due to these artifacts can be eliminated for simple high Z geometries and greatly

  19. The Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS) in SDSS and the high-z bright-end Quasar Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Jan-Torge; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Studies of the most luminous quasars at high redshift directly probe the evolution of the most massive black holes in the early Universe and their connection to massive galaxy formation. Unfortunately, extremely luminous quasars at high redshift are very rare objects. Only wide area surveys have a chance to constrain their population. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) nd the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) have so far provided the most widely adopted measurements of the type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z>3. However, a careful re-examination of the SDSS quasar sample revealed that the SDSS quasar selection is in fact missing a significant fraction of $z~3$ quasars at the brightest end.We have identified the purely optical color selection of SDSS, where quasars at these redshifts are strongly contaminated by late-type dwarfs, and the spectroscopic incompleteness of the SDSS footprint as the main reasons. Therefore we have designed the Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS), based on a novel near-infrared JKW2 color cut using WISE AllWISE and 2MASS all-sky photometry, to yield high completeness for very bright (i footprint, to obtain a well-defined and complete quasar sample for an accurate measurement of the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 2.8<= z<=5.0. So far the ELQS has identified 75 bright new quasars in this redshift range and observations of the fall sky will continue until the end of the year. At the AAS winter meeting we will present the full spectroscopic results of the survey, including a re-estimation and extension of the high-z QLF toward higher luminosities.

  20. Spotting high-z molecular absorbers using neutral carbon. Results from a complete spectroscopic survey with the VLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noterdaeme, P.; Ledoux, C.; Zou, S.; Petitjean, P.; Srianand, R.; Balashev, S.; López, S.

    2018-04-01

    While molecular quasar absorption systems provide unique probes of the physical and chemical properties of the gas as well as original constraints on fundamental physics and cosmology, their detection remains challenging. Here we present the results from a complete survey for molecular gas in thirty-nine absorption systems selected solely upon the detection of neutral carbon lines in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra, without any prior knowledge of the atomic or molecular gas content. H2 is found in all twelve systems (including seven new detections) where the corresponding lines are covered by the instrument setups and measured to have logN(H2) ≳ 18, indicating a self-shielded regime. We also report seven CO detections (7/39) down to logN(CO) 13.5, including a new one, and put stringent constraints on N(CO) for the remaining 32 systems. N(CO) and N(C I) are found to be strongly correlated with N(CO)/N(C I) 1/10. This suggests that the C I-selected absorber population is probing gas deeper than the H I–H2 transition in which a substantial fraction of the total hydrogen in the cloud is in the form of H2. We conclude that targeting C I-bearing absorbers is a very efficient way to find high-metallicity molecular absorbers. However, probing the molecular content in lower-metallicity regimes as well as high-column-density neutral gas remains to be undertaken to unravel the processes of gas conversion in normal high-z galaxies. Based on observations and archival data from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) prog. IDs 060.A-9024, 072.A-0346, 278.A-5062, 080.A-0482, 080.A-0795, 081.A-0242, 081.A-0334, 082.A-0544, 082.A-0569, 083.A-0454, 084.A-0699, 086.A-0074 and 086.A-0643 using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) and X-shooter at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), on Cerro Paranal, Chile.

  1. Association between plasma fatty acids and inflammatory markers in patients with and without insulin resistance and in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersch-Ferreira, Ângela Cristine; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Gehringer, Marcella Omena; Torres, Elizabeth Aparecida Ferraz da Silva; Ross-Fernandes, Maria Beatriz; da Silva, Jacqueline Tereza; Torreglosa, Camila Ragne; Kovacs, Cristiane; Alves, Renata; Magnoni, Carlos Daniel; Weber, Bernardete; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo

    2018-02-21

    Proinflammatory biomarkers levels are increased among patients with cardiovascular disease, and it is known that both the presence of insulin resistance and diet may influence those levels. However, these associations are not well studied among patients with established cardiovascular disease. Our objective is to compare inflammatory biomarker levels among cardiovascular disease secondary prevention patients with and without insulin resistance, and to evaluate if there is any association between plasma fatty acid levels and inflammatory biomarker levels among them. In this cross-sectional sub-study from the BALANCE Program Trial, we collected data from 359 patients with established cardiovascular disease. Plasma fatty acids and inflammatory biomarkers (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) were measured. Biomarkers and plasma fatty acid levels of subjects across insulin resistant and not insulin resistant groups were compared, and general linear models were used to examine the association between plasma fatty acids and inflammatory biomarkers. Subjects with insulin resistance had a higher concentration of hs-CRP (p = 0.002) and IL-6 (p = 0.002) than subjects without insulin resistance. Among subjects without insulin resistance there was a positive association between stearic fatty acid and IL-6 (p = 0.032), and a negative association between alpha-linolenic fatty acid and pro-inflammatory biomarkers (p fatty acids and arachidonic fatty acid and adiponectin (p fatty acids and pro-inflammatory biomarkers (p fatty acids and adiponectin (p fatty acids. Subjects in secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease with insulin resistance have a higher concentration of hs-CRP and IL-6 than individuals without insulin resistance, and these inflammatory biomarkers are positively associated with saturated fatty acids and negatively associated with

  2. Reducing the effects of X-ray pre-heat in double shell NIF capsules by over-coating the high Z shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Douglas; Milovich, J. L.; Daughton, W. S.; Loomis, E. N.; Sauppe, J. P.; Dodd, E. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Renner, D. B.; Haines, B. M.; Cardenas, T.; Desjardins, T.; Palaniyappan, S.; Batha, S. H.

    2017-10-01

    Hohlraum generated X-rays will penetrate the ablator of a double shell capsule and be absorbed in the outer surface of the inner capsule. The ablative pressure this generates drives a shock into the central fuel, and a reflected shock that reaches the inner high-Z shell surface before the main shock even enters the fuel. With a beryllium over-coat preheat X-rays deposit just inside the beryllium/high z interface. The beryllium tamps the preheat expansion, eliminating ablation, and dramatically reducing pressure. The slow shock or pressure wave it generates is then overtaken by the main shock, avoiding an early shock in the fuel and increasing capsule yield.

  3. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). II. Discovery of 32 quasars and luminous galaxies at 5.7 < z ≤ 6.8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Takuma; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Kohno, Kotaro; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Niida, Mana; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Oguri, Masamune; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Schulze, Andreas; Shirakata, Hikari; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Toba, Yoshiki; Utsumi, Yousuke; Wang, Shiang-Yu

    2018-01-01

    We present spectroscopic identification of 32 new quasars and luminous galaxies discovered at 5.7 galaxies, two [O III] emitters at z ˜ 0.8, and 15 Galactic brown dwarfs. The new quasars have considerably lower luminosity (M1450 ˜ -25 to -22 mag) than most of the previously known high-z quasars. Several of these quasars have luminous (>1043 erg s-1) and narrow (galaxies have extremely high luminosities (M1450 ˜ -24 to -22 mag) compared to other galaxies found at similar redshifts. With the discovery of these new classes of objects, we are opening up new parameter spaces in the high-z Universe. Further survey observations and follow-up studies of the identified objects, including the construction of the quasar luminosity function at z ˜ 6, are ongoing.

  4. Phenolic extract from Ocimum basilicum restores lipid metabolism in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemic mice and prevents lipoprotein-rich plasma oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilham Touiss

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the hypolipidemic and anti-lipoprotein-oxidation activities of phenolic extract from sweet basil a popular culinary herb. The hypolipidemic activity was studied in mice model injected intraperitoneally with Triton WR-1339 at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. The animals were grouped as follows: normolipidemic control group (n = 8, hyperlipidemic control group (n = 8 and phenolic extract-treated group (n = 8 at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. After 7 h and 24 h treatment, the oral administration of the phenolic extract exerts a significant reduction of plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.001. On the other hand, we demonstrated that the phenolic extract prevents plasma lipid oxidation by 16% (P < 0.001, 20% (P < 0.001, 32% (P < 0.001 and 44% (P < 0.001 at a doses of 10, 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL, respectively. The results were compared with ascorbic acid used as standard synthetic antioxidant. HPLC analysis shows that the extract contains 4 major phenolics and is especially rich in rosmarinic acid. This finding indicates that the phenolic extract might be beneficial in lowering hyperlipidemia and preventing atherosclerosis.

  5. Astaxanthin Supplementation Delays Physical Exhaustion and Prevents Redox Imbalances in Plasma and Soleus Muscles of Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana G. Polotow

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin (ASTA is a pinkish-orange carotenoid commonly found in marine organisms, especially salmon. ASTA is a powerful antioxidant and suggested to provide benefits for human health, including the inhibition of LDL oxidation, UV-photoprotection, and prophylaxis of bacterial stomach ulcers. Exercise is associated to overproduction of free radicals in muscles and plasma, with pivotal participation of iron ions and glutathione (GSH. Thus, ASTA was studied here as an auxiliary supplement to improve antioxidant defenses in soleus muscles and plasma against oxidative damage induced by exhaustive exercise. Long-term 1 mg ASTA/kg body weight (BW supplementation in Wistar rats (for 45 days significantly delayed time to exhaustion by 29% in a swimming test. ASTA supplementation increased scavenging/iron-chelating capacities (TEAC/FRAP and limited exercise-induced iron overload and its related pro-oxidant effects in plasma of exercising animals. On the other hand, ASTA induced significant mitochondrial Mn-dependent superoxide dismutase and cytosolic glutathione peroxidase antioxidant responses in soleus muscles that, in turn, increased GSH content during exercise, limited oxidative stress, and delayed exhaustion. We also provided significant discussion about a putative “mitochondrial-targeted” action of ASTA based on previous publications and on the positive results found in the highly mitochondrial populated (oxidative-type soleus muscles here.

  6. Disassembly of the actin network inhibits insulin-dependent stimulation of glucose transport and prevents recruitment of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, T; Vranic, M; Klip, A

    1994-11-25

    In muscle and fat tissues, insulin stimulates glucose transport through the translocation of glucose transporter proteins from an intracellular storage pool to the plasma membrane. The mechanism of this translocation is unknown. We have examined the possible role of the actin microfilament network in the stimulation of glucose transport by insulin and on the distribution of glucose transporters, in differentiated L6 rat skeletal muscle cells. Insulin (10(-7) M for 30 min) caused a major reorganization of the actin network of differentiated L6 myotubes. Cytochalasin D, a widely used inhibitor of actin filament formation, caused a dose- and time-dependent disassembly of the actin network, which was associated with an 80% inhibition of the insulin stimulation of glucose transport, without affecting the basal rate of glucose uptake. L6 myotubes express three glucose transporter isoforms, named GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. Disassembly of the actin network by cytochalasin D did not affect the number of basal glucose transporters in the plasma membrane but reduced the content of all three glucose transporters in intracellular membranes and prevented their appearance at the plasma membrane response to insulin. The inhibitory effect of cytochalasin D treatment on the insulin stimulation of glucose transport occurred downstream of tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 and of binding of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to the insulin receptor substrate-1. Using immunoprecipitation of intact membranes, we detected specific association of the actin-binding protein spectrin with GLUT4 glucose transporter-containing vesicles. We conclude that an intact actin network is required for the correct intracellular localization of glucose transporters, as well as for their incorporation into the plasma membrane in response to insulin. A direct interaction may exist between the actin network and the glucose transporter vesicles which may be mediated through a spectrin

  7. Increased protein damage in renal glomeruli, retina, nerve, plasma and urine and its prevention by thiamine and benfotiamine therapy in a rat model of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachalias, N; Babaei-Jadidi, R; Rabbani, N; Thornalley, P J

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify protein damage by glycation, oxidation and nitration in a rat model of diabetes at the sites of development of microvascular complications, including the effects of thiamine and benfotiamine therapy. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by 55 mg/kg streptozotocin and moderated by insulin (2 U twice daily). Diabetic and control rats were given thiamine or benfotiamine (7 or 70 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) over 24 weeks. Plasma, urine and tissues were collected and analysed for protein damage by stable isotopic dilution analysis MS. There were two- to fourfold increases in fructosyl-lysine and AGE content of glomerular, retinal, sciatic nerve and plasma protein in diabetes. Increases in AGEs were reversed by thiamine and benfotiamine therapy but increases in fructosyl-lysine were not. Methionine sulfoxide content of plasma protein and 3-nitrotyrosine content of sciatic nerve protein were increased in diabetes. Plasma glycation free adducts were increased up to twofold in diabetes; the increases were reversed by thiamine. Urinary excretion of glycation, oxidation and nitration free adducts was increased by seven- to 27-fold in diabetes. These increases were reversed by thiamine and benfotiamine therapy. AGEs, particularly arginine-derived hydroimidazolones, accumulate at sites of microvascular complication development and have markedly increased urinary excretion rates in experimental diabetes. Thiamine and benfotiamine supplementation prevented tissue accumulation and increased urinary excretion of protein glycation, oxidation and nitration adducts. Similar effects may contribute to the reversal of early-stage clinical diabetic nephropathy by thiamine.

  8. Development of long-pulse heating & current drive actuators & operational techniques compatible with a high-Z divertor & first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynan, George [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2018-01-09

    This was a collaboration between UCSD and MIT to study the effective application of ion-cyclotron heating (ICRH) on the EAST tokamak, located in China. The original goal was for UCSD to develop a diagnostic that would allow measurement of the steady state, or DC, convection pattern that develops on magnetic field lines that attach or connect to the ICRH antenna. This diagnostic would then be used to develop techniques and approaches that minimize or even eliminate such DC convection during application of strong ICRH heating. This was thought to then indicate reduction or elimination of parasitic losses of heating power, and thus be an indicator of effective RF heating. The original plan to use high speed digital gas-puff imaging (GPI) of the antenna-edge plasma region in EAST was ultimately unsuccessful due to limitations in machine and camera operations. We then decided to attempt the same experiment on the ALCATOR C-MOD tokamak at MIT which had a similar instrument already installed. This effort was ultimately successful, and demonstrated that the underlying idea of using GPI as a diagnostic for ICRH antenna physics would, in fact, work. The two-dimensional velocity fields of the turbulent structures, which are advected by RF-induced E x B flows, are obtained via the time-delay estimation (TDE) techniques. Both the magnitude and radial extension of the radial electric field E-r were observed to increase with the toroidal magnetic field strength B and the ICRF power. The TDE estimations of RF-induced plasma potentials are consistent with previous results based on the probe measurements of poloidal phase velocity. The results suggest that effective ICRH heating with reduced impurity production is possible when the antenna/box system is designed so as to reduce the RF-induced image currents that flow in the grounded conducting antenna frame elements that surround the RF antenna current straps.

  9. Impurity screening of scrape-off plasma in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Tani, Keiji; Nakamura, Hiroo

    1981-11-01

    Impurity screening effect of a scrape-off layer has been studied in a tokamak, based on a simple model of wall-released impurity behavior. Wall-sputtered impurities are stopped effectively by the scrape-off plasma for a medium-Z or high-Z wall system while major part of impurities enters the main plasma in a low-Z wall system. The screening becomes inefficient with increase of scrape-off plasma temperature. Successive multiplication of recycling impurities in the scrape-off layer is large for a high-Z wall and is enhanced by a rise of scrape-off plasma temperature. The stability of plasma-wall interaction is determined by a multiplication factor of recycling impurities. (author)

  10. Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S P; Chen, C Y; Fan, H W; Tarasenko, O; Scott, A; Lahiani, M; Alusta, P; Chang, J; Popovic, S; Drake, J D; Nikolic, M

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness and mechanism of a low temperature air plasma torch in clotting blood are explored. Both blood droplets and smeared blood samples were used in the tests. The treated droplet samples reveal how blood clotting depends on the distance at which the torch operated, and for how long the droplets have been exposed to the torch. Microscopy and cell count of smeared blood samples shed light on dependencies of erythrocyte and platelet counts on torch distance and exposure time. With an increase of torch distance, the platelet count of treated blood samples increases but is less than that of the control. The flux of reactive atomic oxygen (RAO) and the degree of blood clotting decreased. With an increase of exposure time, platelet count of treated samples decreased, while the degree of clot increased. The correlation among these dependencies and published data support a blood clotting mechanism that RAO as well as other likely reactive oxygen species generated by the plasma torch activate erythrocyte-platelets interactions and induces blood coagulation.

  11. Charge Correlations in Plasma Line Broadening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrighton, Jeffrey M.; Dufty, James W.

    2008-01-01

    The traditional theory of plasma line broadening is re-examined to correct for phenom-enological assumptions regarding charge correlations. Conditions for static ions are assumed, and the ion microfield distribution is introduced without neglecting ion-electron correlations, and with a precise definition for the ion field at the radiator. Radiator and plasma subsystems are defined so as to make a second order calculation of electron broadening valid for the case of high Z radiators. The electron broadening operator is identified in terms of the fluctuation of the electron density at the radiator, averaged over the entire plasma constrained by a given value for the ion microfield.

  12. Impact of wall materials and seeding gases on the pedestal and on core plasma performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wolfrum

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmas in machines with all metal plasma facing components have a lower Zeff, less radiation cooling in the scrape-off layer and divertor regions and are prone to impurity accumulation in the core. Higher gas puff and the seeding of low-Z impurities are applied to prevent impurity accumulation, to increase the frequency of edge localised modes and to cool the divertor. A lower power threshold for the transition from low-confinement mode to high confinement mode has been found in all metal wall machines when compared to carbon wall machines. The application of lithium before or during discharges can lead to ELM free H-modes. The seeding of high-Z impurities increases core radiation, reduces the power flux across the separatrix and, if applied in the right amount, does not lead to deterioration of the confinement. All these effects have in common that they can often be explained by the shape or position of the density profile. Not only the peakedness of the density profile in the core but also the position of the edge pressure gradient influences global confinement. It is shown how (i ionisation in the pedestal region due to higher reflection of deuterium from high-Z walls, (ii reduced recycling in consequence of lithium wall conditioning, (iii the fostering of edge modes with lithium dropping, (iv increased gas puff and (v the cooling of the scrape-off layer by medium-Z impurities such as nitrogen affect the edge density profile. The consequence is a shift in the pressure profile relative to the separatrix, leading to improved pedestal stability of H-mode plasmas when the direction is inwards.

  13. A randomized-controlled trial of high- or low-volume intravenous Plasma-Lyte(®) to prevent hypotension during sedation for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Kate; Allen, Megan; Lee, Austin; Clarke, Phillip

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of hypotension during sedation in adults presenting for elective colonoscopy and randomized to intravenous Plasma-Lyte 148(®) at either 2 mL·kg(-1) (low volume) or 20 mL·kg(-1) (high volume). Patients aged ≥ 18 yr presenting for elective colonoscopy, with or without gastroscopy, after oral bowel preparation were randomized to receive the intervention immediately before the start of the procedure. Hypotension was defined as a ≥ 25% decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP) from baseline during the procedure. Secondary outcomes included SBP hypotension, use of vasopressors, postoperative outcomes, and cost. Seventy-five patients were randomly allocated to either the low-volume or high-volume group, respectively (total n = 150). The incidence of hypotension was similar in the two groups (59% vs 56%, respectively; odds ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.47 to 1.71; P = 0.74). The incidence of SBP hypotension, the use of vasopressors, and postoperative outcomes were also similar in the two groups. This study does not support the routine use of 20 mL·kg(-1) of intravenous Plasma-Lyte 148 to prevent hypotension and other complications during sedation for elective colonoscopy in adult patients. Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR 12615001288516).

  14. Multiple charge states of titanium ions in laser produced plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the wavelength, higher is the critical density and thus increased absorption of laser radia- tion. Various types of metal targets ranging from low to high Z (Co, Ni, W, Pt, Au, Pb, Bi, ... The energy is monitored by calorimeter. Laser energy is focused onto the Ti target kept in plasma chamber evacuated at ~10- torr, using a 100% ...

  15. The precise energy spectra measurement of laser-accelerated MeV/n-class high-Z ions and protons using CR-39 detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanasaki, M.; Jinno, S.; Sakaki, H.; Kondo, K.; Oda, K.; Yamauchi, T.; Fukuda, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis method, using a combination of a permanent magnet and CR-39 track detectors, has been developed to separately measure the energy spectrum of the laser-accelerated MeV/n-class high-Z ions and that of MeV protons. The main role of magnet is separating between high-Z ions and protons, not for the usual energy spectrometer, while ion energy was precisely determined from careful analysis of the etch pit shapes and the etch pit growth behaviors in the CR-39. The method was applied to laser-driven ion acceleration experiments using CO2 clusters embedded in a background H2 gas. Ion energy spectra with uncertainty ΔE  =  0.1 MeV n-1 for protons and carbon/oxygen ions were simultaneously obtained separately. The maximum energies of carbon/oxygen ions and protons were determined as 1.1  ±  0.1 MeV and 1.6  ±  0.1 MeV n-1, respectively. The sharp decrease around 1 MeV n-1 observed in the energy spectrum of carbon/oxygen ions could be due to a trace of the ambipolar hydrodynamic expansion of CO2 clusters. Thanks to the combination of the magnet and the CR-39, the method is robust against electromagnetic pulse (EMP).

  16. Vacuum plasma sprayed coatings using ionic silver doped hydroxyapatite powder to prevent bacterial infection of bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond-Lischer, Stefanie; Ren, Qun; Braissant, Olivier; Gruner, Philipp; Wampfler, Bruno; Maniura-Weber, Katharina

    2016-03-10

    Fast and efficient osseointegration of implants into bone is of crucial importance for their clinical success; a process that can be enhanced by coating the implant surface with hydroxyapatite (HA) using the vacuum plasma spray technology (VPS). However, bacterial infections, especially the biofilm formation on implant surfaces after a surgery, represent a serious complication. With ever-increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is great interest in silver (Ag) as an alternative to classical antibiotics due to its broad activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. In the present study, silver ions were introduced into HA spray powder by ion exchange and the HA-Ag powder was applied onto titanium samples by VPS. The Ag-containing surfaces were evaluated for the kinetics of the silver release, its antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus as well as Escherichia coli, and possible cytotoxicity against human bone cells. The HA-Ag coatings with different concentrations of Ag displayed mechanical and compositional properties that fulfill the regulatory requirements. Evaluation of the Ag release kinetic showed a high release rate in the first 24 h followed by a decreasing release rate over the four subsequent days. The HA-Ag coatings showed no cytotoxicity to primary human bone cells while exhibiting antibacterial activity to E. coli and S. aureus.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of alternative thresholds of the fasting plasma glucose test to identify the target population for type 2 diabetes prevention in adults aged ≥45 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ping; Kahn, Henry S; Gregg, Edward W

    2013-12-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of alternative fasting plasma glucose (FPG) thresholds to identify adults at high risk for type 2 diabetes for diabetes preventive intervention. We used a validated simulation model to examine the change in lifetime quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and medical costs when the FPG threshold was progressively lowered in 5-mg/dL decrements from 120 to 90 mg/dL. The study sample includes nondiabetic adults aged ≥45 years in the United States using 2006-2010 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. High-risk individuals were assumed to receive a lifestyle intervention, as that used in the Diabetes Prevention Program. We calculated cost per QALY by dividing the incremental cost by incremental QALY when lowering the threshold to the next consecutive level. Medical costs were assessed from a health care system perspective. We conducted univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness of the results using different simulation scenarios and parameters. Progressively lowering the FPG threshold would monotonically increase QALYs, cost, and cost per QALY. Reducing (in 5-mg/dL decrements) the threshold from 120 to 90 mg/dL cost $30,100, $32,900, $42,300, $60,700, $81,800, and $115,800 per QALY gained, respectively. The costs per QALY gained were lower for all thresholds under a lower-cost and less-effective intervention scenario. Lowering the FPG threshold leads to a greater health benefit of diabetes prevention but reduces the cost-effectiveness. Using the conventional benchmark of $50,000 per QALY, a threshold of 105 mg/dL or higher would be cost effective. A lower threshold could be selected if the intervention cost could be lowered.

  18. Ablation of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 4 prevents development of hypertrophy in a model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N; Lasko, Valerie M; Nieman, Michelle L; Jiang, Min; Gao, Xu; Rubinstein, Jack; Wieczorek, David F; Shull, Gary E

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms linking the expression of sarcomeric mutant proteins to the development of pathological hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase PMCA4 in the HCM phenotype using a transgenic model that expresses mutant (Glu180Gly) α-tropomyosin (Tm180) in heart. Immunoblot analysis revealed that cardiac PMCA4 expression was upregulated early in Tm180 disease pathogenesis. This was accompanied by an increase in levels of the L-type Ca(2+)-channel, which is implicated in pathological hypertrophy. When Tm180 mice were crossed with a PMCA4-null line, loss of PMCA4 caused the abrogation of hypertrophy in Tm180/PMCA4-null double mutant mice. RT-PCR analysis of Tm180/PMCA4-null hearts revealed blunting of the fetal program and reversion of pro-fibrotic Col1a1 and Col3a1 gene expression to wild-type levels. This was accompanied by evidence of reduced L-type Ca(2+)-channel expression, and diminished calcineurin activity. Expression of the metabolic substrate transporters glucose transporter 4 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b was preserved and Tm180-related changes in mRNA levels of various contractile stress-related proteins including the cardiac ankyrin protein CARP and the N2B isoform of titin were reversed in Tm180/PMCA4-null hearts. cGMP levels were increased and phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein was elevated in Tm180/PMCA4-null hearts. These changes were associated with a sharp reduction in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in Tm180/PMCA4-null hearts, which occurred despite persistence of Tm180-related impairment of relaxation dynamics. These results reveal a novel and specific role for PMCA4 in the Tm180 hypertrophic phenotype, with the "protective" effects of PMCA4 deficiency encompassing multiple determinants of HCM-related hypertrophy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields and platelet rich plasma in preventing osteoclastogenesis in an in vitro model of osteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschon, Matilde; Veronesi, Francesca; Contartese, Deyanira; Sartori, Maria; Martini, Lucia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Ravani, Annalisa; Varani, Katia; Fini, Milena

    2018-03-01

    Osteolysis is the main limiting cause for the survival of an orthopedic prosthesis and is accompanied by an enhancement in osteoclastogenesis and inflammation, due by wear debris formation. Unfortunately therapeutic treatments, besides revision surgery, are not available. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Pulsed Electro Magnetic Fields (PEMFs) and platelet rich plasma (PRP), alone or in combination, in an in vitro model of osteolysis. Rats peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured on Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene particles and divided into four groups of treatments: (1) PEMF stimulation (12 hr/day, 2.5 mT, 75 Hz, 1.3 ms pulse duration); (2) 10% PRP; (3) combination of PEMFs, and PRP; (4) no treatment. Treatments were performed for 3 days and cell viability, osteoclast number, expression of genes related to osteoclastogenesis and inflammation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines were assessed up to 14 days. PEMF stimulation exerted best results because it increased cell viability at early time points and counteracted osteoclastogenesis at 14 days. On the contrary, PRP increased osteoclastogenesis and reduced cell viability in comparison to PEMFs alone. The combination of PEMFs and PRP increased cell viability over time and reduced osteoclastogenesis in comparison to PRP alone. However, these positive results did not exceed the level achieved by PEMF alone. At longer time points PEMF could not counteract osteoclastogenesis increased by PRP. Regarding inflammation, all treatments maintained the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines at low level, although PRP increased the level of interleukin 1 beta. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Antihemophilic factor (recombinant plasma/albumin-free method for the management and prevention of bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Pipe

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Steven PipeDepartment of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Hemophilia is a rare genetic bleeding disorder that, if not adequately controlled, is associated with life-threatening bleeding events and serious and costly complications, primarily from joint damage. The advent of effective clotting factor replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia is considered one of the foremost medical advances of the 20th century. The last 3 decades of experience in hemophilia care have witnessed the effectiveness of the care of patients with hemophilia within specialized comprehensive care centers, advances in factor replacement therapies, the benefits of prophylaxis over on-demand replacement therapy, and the role of aggressive management of joint disease to prevent dysfunction. Ongoing challenges, including the management of inhibitors to factor therapies and the consequences of thousands of patients with hemophilia becoming infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus in the 1980s from contaminated plasma-derived factor concentrates, have highlighted the need for vigilance with respect to clotting factor product safety, access to care, and a full complement of choice of factor replacement therapies. Advate® (antihemophilic factor [recombinant] plasma/albumin-free method [rAHF-PFM] is the first recombinant factor VIII therapy manufactured without human or animal protein additives to eliminate the risk of pathogen transmission that could be carried by these additives. Preclinical studies established bioequivalence with recombinant antihemophilic factor (Recombinate®, a product with 16 years of clinical experience. Currently licensed in 44 countries worldwide, rAHF-PFM has over 7 years of clinical research within 5 global studies supporting its safety and efficacy in the treatment of patients with hemophilia A.Keywords: factor VIII, hemophilia A, recombinant proteins, clinical

  1. Simulation Study of Using High-Z EMA to Suppress Recoil Protons Crosstalk in Scintillating Fiber Array for 14.1 MeV Neutron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qinggang; Hu, Huasi; Zhang, Fengna; Zhang, Tiankui; Lv, Wei; Zhan, Yuanpin; Liu, Zhihua

    2013-12-01

    This paper studies the effect of a high-Z extra mural absorber (EMA) to improve the spatial resolution of a plastic (polystyrene) scintillating fiber array for 14.1 MeV fusion neutron imaging. Crosstalk induced by recoil protons was studied, and platinum (Pt) was selected as EMA material, because of its excellent ability to suppress the recoil protons penetrating the fibers. Three common fiber arrays (cylindrical scintillating fibers in square and hexagonal packing arrangements and square scintillating fibers) were simulated using the Monte Carlo method for evaluating the effect of Pt-EMA in improving spatial resolution. It is found that the resolution of the 100 μm square fiber array can be improved from 1.7 to 3.4 lp/mm by using 10- μm-thick Pt-EMA; comparatively, using an array with thinner square fibers (50 μm) only obtains a resolution of 2.1 lp/mm. The packing fraction decreases with the increase of EMA thickness. Our results recommend the use of 10 μm Pt-EMA for the square and the cylindrical (hexagonal packing) scintillating fiber arrays with fibers of 50-200 μm in the cross-sectional dimension. Besides, the dead-zone material should be replaced by high-Z material for the hexagonal packing cylindrical fiber array with fibers of 50-200 μm in diameter. Tungsten (W) and gold (Au) are also used as EMA in the three fiber arrays as a comparison. The simulation results show that W can be used at a lower cost, and Au does not have any advantages in cost and resolution improvement.

  2. SUBARU HIGH- z EXPLORATION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY QUASARS (SHELLQs). I. DISCOVERY OF 15 QUASARS AND BRIGHT GALAXIES AT 5.7 < z < 6.9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Furusawa, Hisanori; Ikeda, Hiroyuki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Onoue, Masafusa; Kikuta, Satoshi [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Iwasawa, Kazushi [ICREA and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, IEEC-UB, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Strauss, Michael A.; Bosch, James; Gunn, James E. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Nagao, Tohru; Toba, Yoshiki [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Niida, Mana [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Akiyama, Masayuki [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, 980-8578 (Japan); Asami, Naoko [Japan Professional School of Education, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-0041 (Japan); Foucaud, Sébastien [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Goto, Tomotsugu [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Harikane, Yuichi [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kawaguchi, Toshihiro, E-mail: yk.matsuoka@nao.ac.jp [Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Sapporo Medical University, Chuo, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); and others

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High- z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg{sup 2} of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z {sub AB} < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high- z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Ly α lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M {sub 1450} ∼ −22 mag or z {sub AB} ∼ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  3. Dose-current discharge correlation analysis in a Mather type Plasma Focus device for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumini, M.; Mostacci, D.; Tartari, A.; Mazza, A.; Cucchi, G.; Isolan, L.; Buontempo, F.; Zironi, I.; Castellani, G.

    2017-11-01

    In a Plasma Focus device the plasma collapses into the pinch where it reaches thermonuclear conditions for a few tens of nanoseconds, becoming a multi-radiation source. The nature of the radiation generated depends on the gas filling the chamber and the device working parameters. The self-collimated electron beam generated in the backward direction with respect to the plasma motion is one of the main radiation sources of interest also for medical applications. The electron beam may be guided against a high Z material target to produce an X-ray beam. This technique offers an ultra-high dose rate source of X-rays, able to deliver during the pinch a massive dose (up to 1 Gy per discharge for the PFMA-3 test device), as measured with EBT3 GafchromicⒸfilm tissue equivalent dosimeters. Given the stochastic behavior of the discharge process, a reliable on-line estimate of the dose-delivered is a very challenging task, in some way preventing a systematic application as a potentially interesting therapy device. This work presents an approach to linking the dose registered by the EBT3 GafchromicⒸfilms with the information contained in the signal recorded during the current discharge process. Processing the signal with the Wigner-Ville distribution, a spectrogram was obtained, displaying the information on intensity at various frequency scales, identifying the band of frequencies representative of the pinch events and define some patterns correlated with the dose.

  4. Mirror plasma apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A mirror plasma apparatus which utilizes shielding by arc discharge to form a blanket plasma and lithium walls to reduce neutron damage to the wall of the apparatus. An embodiment involves a rotating liquid lithium blanket for a tandem mirror plasma apparatus wherein the first wall of the central mirror cell is made of liquid lithium which is spun with angular velocity great enough to keep the liquid lithium against the first material wall, a blanket plasma preventing the lithium vapor from contaminating the plasma

  5. 2D simulations of hohlraum targets for laser-plasma experiments and ion stopping measurement in hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basko, M.M.; Novikov, V.G.; Grushin, A.S.

    2011-12-01

    An attractive way to create uniform plasma states at high temperatures and densities is by using hohlraums - cavities with heavy-metal walls that are either directly or indirectly heated by intense laser pulses to x-ray temperatures of tens and hundreds electron volts. A sample material, whose plasma state is to be studied, can be placed inside such a hohlraum (usually in the form of a low-density foam) and uniformly heated to a high temperature. In this case a high-Z hohlraum enclosure serves a double purpose: it prevents the hot plasma from rapid disassembly due to hydrodynamic expansion and, at the same time, suppresses its rapid radiative cooling by providing high diffusive resistivity for X-rays. Of course, both the inertial and the thermal confinement of high-temperature plasmas can be achieved only for a limited period of time - on the order of nanoseconds for millimeter-scale hohlraums. Some time ago such hohlraum targets were proposed for measurements of the stopping power of hot dense plasmas for fast ions at GSI (Darmstadt). Theoretical modeling of hohlraum targets has always been a challenging task for computational physics because it should combine multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations with the solution of the spectral transfer equation for thermal radiation. In this work we report on our latest progress in this direction, namely, we present the results of 2D (two-dimensional) simulations with a newly developed radiation-hydrodynamics code RALEF-2D of two types of the hohlraum targets proposed for experiments on the PHELIX laser at GSI. The first configuration is a simple spherical hohlraum with gold walls and empty interior, which has two holes - one for laser beam entrance, and the other for diagnostics. The hohlraums of this type have already been used in several experimental sessions with the NHELIX and PHELIX lasers at GSI. The second type is a two-chamber cylindrical hohlraum with a characteristic Ω-shaped cross-section of the enclosure

  6. A randomized controlled experimental study of the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma and hyaluronic acid for the prevention of adhesion formation in a rat uterine horn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Murat; Cetinkaya, Nilufer; Bas, Sevda; Korkmaz, Elmas; Ozgu, Emre; Terzioglu, Gokay Serdar; Buyukkagnici, Umran; Akbay, Serap; Caydere, Muzaffer; Gungor, Tayfun

    2016-09-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been known to possess an efficacy in tissue regeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PRP on post-operative adhesion formation in an experimental rat study. Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control, hyaluronic acid, and PRP treatment groups and operated on for uterine horn adhesion modeling. Blood was collected to produce a PRP with platelet counts of 688 × 10(3)/μL, and 1 ml of either hyaluronic acid gel or PRP was administered over the standard lesions, while the control group received no medication. The evaluation of post-operative adhesions was done on the 30th post-operative day. The location, extent, type, and tenacity of adhesions as well as total adhesion scores, tissue inflammation, fibrosis and transforming growth factor-1beta (TGF-1β) expressions were evaluated. The total adhesion score was significantly lower in the PRP group (3.2 ± 1.5) compared with the hyaluronic acid (5.0 ± 1.3) and control (8.1 ± 1.7) groups. The extent of the adhesions was significantly lower in the PRP group. There was no significant difference in the type and tenacity of adhesions between the hyaluronic acid and the PRP group. The level of inflammation was significantly higher in the control group than the others, while there was no difference between the PRP and hyaluronic acid groups. TGF-1β expression was significantly lesser in the PRP group than the control and hyaluronic acid groups. PRP is more effective than hyaluronic acid treatment in preventing post-operative adhesion formation in an experimental rat uterine horn adhesion model.

  7. Cosmic Microwave Background as a Thermal Gas of SU(2 Photons: Implications for the High-z Cosmological Model and the Value of H0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Hahn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Presently, we are facing a 3σ tension in the most basic cosmological parameter, the Hubble constant H0. This tension arises when fitting the Lambda-cold-dark-matter model (ΛCDM to the high-precision temperature-temperature (TT power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB and to local cosmological observations. We propose a resolution of this problem by postulating that the thermal photon gas of the CMB obeys an SU(2 rather than U(1 gauge principle, suggesting a high-z cosmological model which is void of dark-matter. Observationally, we rely on precise low-frequency intensity measurements in the CMB spectrum and on a recent model independent (low-z extraction of the relation between the comoving sound horizon rs at the end of the baryon drag epoch and H0 (rsH0=const. We point out that the commonly employed condition for baryon-velocity freeze-out is imprecise, judged by a careful inspection of the formal solution to the associated Euler equation. As a consequence, the above-mentioned 3σ tension actually transforms into a 5σ discrepancy. To make contact with successful low-z  ΛCDM cosmology we propose an interpolation based on percolated/depercolated vortices of a Planck-scale axion condensate. For a first consistency test of such an all-z model we compute the angular scale of the sound horizon at photon decoupling.

  8. Cerium oxide nanoparticles: influence of the high-Z component revealed on radioresistant 9L cell survival under X-ray irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Adam; Corde, Stéphanie; Oktaria, Sianne; Brown, Ryan; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Lerch, Michael; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Tehei, Moeava

    2013-10-01

    This article pioneers a study into the influence of the high-Z component of nanoparticles on the efficacy of radioprotection some nanoparticles offer to exposed cells irradiated with X-rays. We reveal a significant decrease in the radioprotection efficacy for cells exposed to CeO2 nanoparticles and irradiated with 10 MV and 150 kVp X-rays. In addition, analysis of the 150 kVp survival curve data indicates a change in radiation quality, becoming more lethal for irradiated cells exposed to CeO2 nanoparticles. We attribute the change in efficacy to an increase in high linear energy transfer Auger electron production at 150 kVp which counterbalances the CeO2 nanoparticle radioprotection capability and locally changes the radiation quality. This study highlights an interesting phenomenon that must be considered if radiation protection drugs for use in radiotherapy are developed based on CeO2 nanoparticles. CeO2 nanoparticles are thought to offer radioprotection; however, this study reveals significant decrease in the radioprotection efficacy for cells exposed to CeO2 nanoparticles and irradiated with 10 MV and 150 kVp X-rays. This phenomenon must be considered when developing radiation protection drugs based on CeO2 nanoparticles. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Improvement of high T{sub c} superconductor by near-optimum pinning centers created by high Z, high-energy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Roy, E-mail: Weinstein@uh.edu [Texas Center for Superconductivity, Physics Department, 632 Science and Research Bldg. 1, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Parks, Drew; Mayes, Billy [Texas Center for Superconductivity, Physics Department, 632 Science and Research Bldg. 1, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Damage tracks left by high Z, high-energy ions in high temperature superconductor (HTS) can serve the need to pin in place the magnetic field quanta. Such pinning centers (PCs) can serve to dramatically increase the critical current density, J{sub c}. Specific energy loss, S{sub e}, which is effective in the YBCO superconductor (YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}) lies in the range 0.7 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To S{sub e} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 3.5 keV/A. At 77 K, a sharp peak in J{sub c} occurs at S{sub e} {approx} 2.1 keV/A, for fluences of 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}, where record in-field J{sub c} is achieved in large-grain YBCO. For example, J{sub c} = 340 kA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K, applied field of 1 T. At closely similar conditions record in-field J{sub c} is achieved in thick coated conductor, e.g., J{sub c} = 543 kA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K, 1 T. When corrected to the optimum S{sub e}, this J{sub c} increases to 770 kA/cm{sup 2}. These near-optimum PCs have very small diameter of damage (d{sub d} {approx} 6.6 nm) close to the value, predicted theoretically. However, they are very discontinuous, whereas theory predicts that continuous columnar PCs are the best to obtain high J{sub c}. We find that the advantages of discontinuous PCs at S{sub e} = 2.1 keV/A, are (a) a factor of 12 less damage to the HTS (resulting in improved percolation and T{sub c}) and (b) entanglement of fluxoids (even for parallel PCs). This results in five times higher J{sub c} than can be achieved with continuous columnar PCs. In large-grain HTS, these pinning centers increase J{sub c} by a factor of 17, indicating that the dominant reduction of J{sub c} in large-grain HTS is due not to weak links, voids, non-optimum oxygenation, etc., but to a dearth of pinning centers.

  10. 1D multi-fluid plasma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, P.; Suender, D.

    1998-01-01

    1D and time-dependent multi-fluid plasma models are derived from multi-fluid MHD equations. Including neutral particles and their ionization stages as fluids increases the number of equations to be solved and the indeterminacy of the results considerably. For this reason, especially for the case of high-Z materials, the impurities are described by distinct approaches without restricting the impurity densities to be small compared with the hydrogen plasma density. Using the approach of the average ion model, neglecting the effect of the neutral particles, equalizing the plasma temperatures and adopting the condition of quasi-neutrality, we arrive at a three-fluid description and analyze wave front solution of the self-consistent system of equations obtained. This system is reduced to a two-fluid description assuming the flow velocities of the electrons and ions to be equal. This model can be reduced further to a currentless, modified one-fluid approach if the impurity density in dependence on the model functions is known. Introducing Lagrangian coordinates and assuming a constant total pressure a single reaction-diffusion equation for the temperature is obtained. A differential equation for the impurity density in dependence of the temperature has to be included. It determines the influence of the impurities on the reaction-diffusion process which affect not only the radiation loss but also the heat conduction. This is demonstrated for carbon, beryllium and high-Z impurities. (orig.)

  11. Arabidopsis protein kinase PKS5 inhibits the plasma membrane H+ -ATPase by preventing interaction with 14-3-3 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Guo, Yan; Cuin, Tracey A.

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of the trans-plasma membrane pH gradient is an important part of plant responses to several hormonal and environmental cues, including auxin, blue light, and fungal elicitors. However, little is known about the signaling components that mediate this regulation. Here, we report that an ......Regulation of the trans-plasma membrane pH gradient is an important part of plant responses to several hormonal and environmental cues, including auxin, blue light, and fungal elicitors. However, little is known about the signaling components that mediate this regulation. Here, we report...

  12. Sex differences in the association between plasma copeptin and incident type 2 diabetes : the Prevention of Renal and Vascular Endstage Disease (PREVEND) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, A.; Corpeleijn, E.; Meijer, E.; Postmus, D.; Gansevoort, R. T.; Gans, R. O. B.; Struck, J.; Hillege, H. L.; Stolk, R. P.; Navis, G.; Bakker, S. J. L.

    Vasopressin plays a role in osmoregulation, glucose homeostasis and inflammation. Therefore, plasma copeptin, the stable C-terminal portion of the precursor of vasopressin, has strong potential as a biomarker for the cardiometabolic syndrome and diabetes. Previous results were contradictory, which

  13. Low muscle glycogen and elevated plasma free fatty acid modify but do not prevent exercise-induced PDH activation in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian; Gudmundsson, Mikkel; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2010-01-01

    to the contra-lateral leg (CON) the day before the experiment day. On the experimental days, plasma FFA was ensured normal or remained elevated by consuming breakfast rich (low FFA) or poor (high FFA) in carbohydrate, 2 hours before performing 20 min of two-legged knee extensor exercise. Vastus lateralis...

  14. Plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates

  15. ''Flicker'' in small scale laser--plasma self-focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggeshall, S.V.; Mead, W.C.; Jones, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Small amplitude, short wavelength ion acoustic waves in laser-produced plasmas cause fluctuations in the trajectories of light rays that can lead to time-dependent, self-sustaining shifting of focal spots and a somewhat random redistribution of the light near the critical surface. This flickering is seen in simulations involving small scale beam inhomogeneities over a uniform background laser profile, which model the center of a realistic laser beam. The effect can cause significant intensity multiplication in long scale length high-Z plasmas with only modest beam imperfections

  16. Plasma properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzner, H.

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: MHD plasma activity: equilibrium, stability and transport; statistical analysis; transport studies; edge physics studies; wave propagation analysis; basic plasma physics and fluid dynamics; space plasma; and numerical methods

  17. Plasma position control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahama, Hidefumi; Sakurai, Yoshimi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the non-linear relationship between the horizontal position of plasmas and the intensity of the vertical magnetic fields, thereby control the horizontal position of the plasmas stably and at a high speed in a closed loop in a tokamak type thermonuclear device. Method: In a control method for approaching the plasma position to a target position in the tokamak type thermonuclear device, a function circuit having two inputs and one output is disposed in a loop constituting the plasma position control system. The characteristics of the function circuit are so designed as to provide a proportional relationship between the first input and the output, while an inverse proportional relationship between the second input and the output. A detected value for the plasma current is used as a signal for the first input, while the detected value for the plasma position or a operation amount based on the difference with the detected value is used as a signal for the second input. By using the function circuit, it is possible to suppress the non-linear characteristics in the dynamic properties of the plasmas, by which the remarkable change of gains in the plasma position control circuit due to the fluctuations of the plasma current and the position can be prevented. (Ikeda, J.)

  18. Randomised clinical trial of an intensive intervention in the primary care setting of patients with high plasma fibrinogen in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodríguez Cristóbal Juan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have studied the possible effects of an intensive lifestyle change program on plasma fibrinogen levels, in patients with no cardiovascular disease, with elevated levels of fibrinogen, normal cholesterol levels, and a moderate estimated risk of coronary heart disease (CHD and we have also analysed whether the effect on fibrinogen is independent of the effect on lipids. Results This clinical trial was controlled, unblinded and randomized, with parallel groups, done in 13 Basic Health Areas (BHA in l'Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona and Barcelona city. The study included 436 patients, aged between 35 and 75 years, with no cardiovascular disease, elevated levels of fibrinogen (> 300 mg/dl, cholesterol The evaluation of the baseline characteristics of the patients showed that both groups were homogenous. Obesity and hypertension were the most prevalent risk factors. After 24 months of the study, statistically significant changes were seen between the adjusted means of the two groups, for the following parameters: fibrinogen, plasma cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and body mass index. Conclusion Intensive intervention to achieve lifestyle changes has shown to be effective in reducing some of the estimated CHD factors. However, the effect of intensive intervention on plasma fibrinogen levels did not correlate with the variations in cholesterol. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01089530

  19. Development of Long-Pulse Heating and Current Drive Actuators and Operational Techniques Compatible with a High-Z Divertor and First Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guiding [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Accurate measurement of the edge electron density profile is essential to optimizing antenna coupling and assessment of impurity contamination in studying long-pulse plasma heating and current drive in fusion devices. Measurement of the edge density profile has been demonstrated on the US fusion devices such as C-Mod, DIII-D, and TFTR amongst many devices, and has been used for RF loading and impurity modeling calculations for many years. University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) has recently installed a density profile reflectometer system on the EAST fusion device at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in China based on the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)-designed reflectometer system on the DIII-D fusion device at General Atomics Company in San Diego, California. UCLA has been working with USTC to optimize the existing microwave antenna, waveguide system, microwave electronics, and data analysis to produce reliable edge density profiles. During the past budget year, progress has been made in all three major areas: effort to achieve reliable system operations under various EAST operational conditions, effort to optimize system performance, and effort to provide quality density profiles into EAST’s database routinely.

  20. Plasma harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    Preface; Why plasma harmonics? A very brief introduction Early stage of plasma harmonic studies - hopes and frustrations New developments in plasma harmonics studies: first successes Improvements of plasma harmonics; Theoretical basics of plasma harmonics; Basics of HHG Harmonic generation in fullerenes using few-cycle pulsesVarious approaches for description of observed peculiarities of resonant enhancement of a single harmonic in laser plasmaTwo-colour pump resonance-induced enhancement of odd and even harmonics from a tin plasmaCalculations of single harmonic generation from Mn plasma;Low-o

  1. Measurement of runaway electron energy distribution function during high-Z gas injection into runaway electron plateaus in DIII-Da)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmann, E. M. [University of California—San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093, USA; Parks, P. B. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Commaux, N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA; Eidietis, N. W. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Moyer, R. A. [University of California—San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093, USA; Shiraki, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA; Austin, M. E. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas—Austin, 2100 San Jacinto Blvd, Austin, Texas 78712, USA; Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Rudakov, D. L. [University of California—San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093, USA

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of the runaway electron (RE) energy distribution function fεfε during massive gas injection into centered post-disruption runaway electron plateaus has been reconstructed. Overall, fεfε is found to be much more skewed toward low energy than predicted by avalanche theory. The reconstructions also indicate that the RE pitch angle θ is not uniform, but tends to be large at low energies and small θ ~0.1–0.2 at high energies. Overall power loss from the RE plateau appears to be dominated by collisions with background free and bound electrons, leading to line radiation. However, the drag on the plasma current appears to be dominated by collisions with impurity ions in most cases. Synchrotron emission appears not to be significant for overall RE energy dissipation but may be important for limiting the peak RE energy.

  2. Low muscle glycogen and elevated plasma free fatty acid modify but do not prevent exercise-induced PDH activation in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilerich, Kristian; Gudmundsson, Mikkel; Birk, Jesper B; Lundby, Carsten; Taudorf, Sarah; Plomgaard, Peter; Saltin, Bengt; Pedersen, Per A; Wojtaszewski, Jorgen F P; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that free fatty acid (FFA) and muscle glycogen modify exercise-induced regulation of PDH (pyruvate dehydrogenase) in human skeletal muscle through regulation of PDK4 expression. On two occasions, healthy male subjects lowered (by exercise) muscle glycogen in one leg (LOW) relative to the contra-lateral leg (CON) the day before the experimental day. On the experimental days, plasma FFA was ensured normal or remained elevated by consuming breakfast rich (low FFA) or poor (high FFA) in carbohydrate, 2 h before performing 20 min of two-legged knee extensor exercise. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained before and after exercise. PDK4 protein content was approximately 2.2- and approximately 1.5-fold higher in LOW than CON leg in high FFA and low FFA, respectively, and the PDK4 protein content in the CON leg was approximately twofold higher in high FFA than in low FFA. In all conditions, exercise increased PDHa (PDH in the active form) activity, resulting in similar levels in LOW leg in both trials and CON leg in high FFA, but higher level in CON leg in low FFA. PDHa activity was closely associated with the PDH-E1alpha phosphorylation level. Muscle glycogen and plasma FFA attenuate exercise-induced PDH regulation in human skeletal muscle in a nonadditive manner. This might be through regulation of PDK4 expression. The activation of PDH by exercise independent of changes in muscle glycogen or plasma FFA suggests that exercise overrules FFA-mediated inhibition of PDH (i.e., carbohydrate oxidation), and this may thus be one mechanism behind the health-promoting effects of exercise.

  3. Plasma DCLK1 is a marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): Targeting DCLK1 prevents HCC tumor xenograft growth via a microRNA-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureban, Sripathi M; Madhoun, Mohammad F; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Ali, Naushad; Fazili, Javid; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ding, Kai; Lightfoot, Stanley A; Houchen, Courtney W

    2015-11-10

    Tumor stem cell marker Doublecortin-like kinase1 (DCLK1) is upregulated in several solid tumors. The role of DCLK1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. We immunostained tissues from human livers with HCC, cirrhosis controls (CC), and non-cirrhosis controls (NCC) for DCLK1. Western blot and ELISA analyses for DCLK1 were performed with stored plasma samples. We observed increased immunoreactive DCLK1 in epithelia and stroma in HCC and CCs compared with NCCs, and observed a marked increase in plasma DCLK1 from patients with HCC compared with CC and NCC. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas' HCC dataset revealed that DCLK1 is overexpressed in HCC tumors relative to adjacent normal tissues. High DCLK1-expressing cells had more epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Various tumor suppressor miRNAs were also downregulated in HCC tumors. We evaluated the effects of DCLK1 knockdown on Huh7.5-derived tumor xenograft growth. This was associated with growth arrest and a marked downregulation of cMYC, and EMT transcription factors ZEB1, ZEB2, SNAIL, and SLUG via let-7a and miR-200 miRNA-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, upregulation of miR-143/145, a corresponding decrease in pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG, KLF4, and LIN28, and a reduction of let-7a, miR-143/145, and miR-200-specific luciferase activity was observed. These findings suggest that the detection of elevated plasma DCLK1 may provide a cost-effective, less invasive tool for confirmation of clinical signs of cirrhosis, and a potential companion diagnostic marker for patients with cirrhosis and HCC. Our results support evaluating DCLK1 as a biomarker for detection and as a therapeutic target for eradicating HCC.

  4. Plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive a fast liner. An annular or solid relativistic electron beam is used to heat a plasma to kilovolt temperatures through streaming instabilities in the plasma. Energy deposited in the plasma then converges on a fast liner to explosively or ablatively drive the liner to implosion. (U.K.)

  5. The use of autologous platelet-leukocyte-enriched plasma to minimize drain burden and prevent seroma formation in latissimus dorsi breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, J Garrett; Elliott, L Franklyn; Bergey, Patti

    2012-05-01

    Seromas and drains are major sources of morbidity associated with latissimus dorsi breast reconstruction. Our goal was to look at an autologous platelet-leukocyte-enriched plasma spray and to assess its efficacy in reducing drain burden and seroma formation. We performed a single surgeon, patient-controlled, blinded study on bilateral latissimus dorsi breast reconstruction patients in which we applied autologous platelet-leukocyte-enriched plasma to one side and measured drain amounts, time to drain removal, and seroma rate. Twelve patients were included in this study. The average age was 41.1 years, and the average body mass index was 21.6 kg/m. Average volume of drain output showed neither difference (789 mL spray side vs. 790 mL control side) nor average time to drain removal (11.83 days spray side vs. 11.5 days control side). There were 2 complications reported: 1 hematoma (8.33%) and 1 seroma (8.33%) that required aspiration in a postoperative visit. It appears after 12 patients that there is no demonstrable difference regarding drain output, time to drain removal, or seroma incidence between the study and the control group. We feel a larger study population would add power and confirm these findings.

  6. Increased plasma homocyst(e)ine after withdrawal of ready-to-eat breakfast cereal from the diet: prevention by breakfast cereal providing 200 microg folic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinow, M R; Duell, P B; Irvin-Jones, A; Upson, B M; Graf, E E

    2000-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that cessation of habitual ingestion of breakfast cereals would be associated with elevated plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations. We anticipated that those subjects who reported consuming breakfast cereals containing 100 to 400 ,microg of folic acid per serving before entering the study would achieve higher plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations if, in addition to their regular diet, they began ingesting a daily serving of breakfast cereal that contained less than 10 microg of folic acid per serving. Seventy-nine subjects consumed a daily serving of breakfast cereal containing either ine elevation. Breakfast cereal containing 200 microg folic acid per day was sufficient to maintain the homocyst(e)ine lowering effects of commercial cereals. Habitual consumption of commercially available fortified breakfast cereals, usually containing 100 to 400 microg folic acid per serving, had significant homocyst(e)ine lowering effects as shown by the homocyst(e)ine increase after cessation of habitual intake of commercial breakfast cereal. Substitution of breakfast cereal containing only 200 microg folic acid per day was sufficient to maintain the homocyst(e)inelowering effects of commercial cereals.

  7. Intermittent preventive sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine treatment of primigravidae reduces levels of plasma immunoglobulin G, which protects against pregnancy-associated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, Trine; Shulman, Caroline E; Dorman, Edgar K

    2004-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is an important cause of maternal and neonatal suffering. It is caused by Plasmodium falciparum capable of inhabiting the placenta through expression of particular variant surface antigens (VSA) with affinity for proteoglycans such as chondroitin sulfate A....... Protective immunity to PAM develops following exposure to parasites inhabiting the placenta, and primigravidae are therefore particularly susceptible to PAM. The adverse consequences of PAM in primigravidae are preventable by intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp), where women are given antimalarials...... at specified intervals during pregnancy, but this may interfere with acquisition of protective PAM immunity. We found that Kenyan primigravidae receiving sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine IPTp had significantly lower levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) with specificity for the type of parasite-encoded VSA-called VSA(PAM...

  8. A measuring method of photo-electric cross section. Application to high-Z elements between 40 keV and 220 keV. Measurement of K absorption edge energy of Au, Th, U, Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, J.-L.

    1977-09-01

    This study first describes a bent crystal monochromator developed for the production of monochromatic beams in a continuous energy range from 30 to 250 keV; it is completed by a metrological application of the device (determination of K absorption edge energy of Au, Th, U, Pu). A method and the associated experimental procedure were developed to measure the photo-electric cross section for high-Z elements; the results are presented with a relative uncertainty ranging between 3 and 6%. Finally, the experimental values are compared with values calculated from theories using self-consistent potential models [fr

  9. Plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, S A; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Plasma Astrophysics is a translation from the Russian language; the topics discussed are based on lectures given by V.N. Tsytovich at several universities. The book describes the physics of the various phenomena and their mathematical formulation connected with plasma astrophysics. This book also explains the theory of the interaction of fast particles plasma, their radiation activities, as well as the plasma behavior when exposed to a very strong magnetic field. The text describes the nature of collective plasma processes and of plasma turbulence. One author explains the method of elementary

  10. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  11. Plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described of providing electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive a fast liner to implode a structured microsphere. An annular relativistic electron beam is used to heat an annular plasma to kilovolt temperatures through streaming instabilities in the plasma. Energy deposited in the annular plasma then converges on a fast liner to explosively or ablatively drive the liner to convergence to implode the structured microsphere. (U.K.)

  12. Predicting HCN, HCO+, multi-transition CO, and dust emission of star-forming galaxies. From local spiral and ultraluminous infrared galaxies to high-z star-forming and submillimeter galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, B.; Gratier, P.; Braine, J.; Bot, C.

    2017-06-01

    High-z star-forming galaxies have significantly higher gas fractions and star-formation efficiencies per molecular gas mass than local star-forming galaxies. In this work, we take a closer look at the gas content or fraction and the associated star-formation rate in main sequence and starburst galaxies at z = 0 and z 1-2 by applying an analytical model of galactic clumpy gas disks to samples of local spiral galaxies, ULIRGs, submillimeter (smm), and high-z star-forming galaxies. The model simultaneously calculates the total gas mass, Hi/H2 mass, the gas velocity dispersion, IR luminosity, IR spectral energy distribution, CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED), HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) emission of a galaxy given its size, integrated star formation rate, stellar mass radial profile, rotation curve, and Toomre Q parameter. The model reproduces the observed CO luminosities and SLEDs of all sample galaxies within the model uncertainties ( 0.3 dex). Whereas the CO emission is robust against the variation of model parameters, the HCN and HCO+ emissions are sensitive to the chemistry of the interstellar medium. The CO and HCN mass-to-light conversion factors, including CO-dark H2, are given and compared to the values found in the literature. All model conversion factors have uncertainties of a factor of two. Both the HCN and HCO+ emissions trace the dense molecular gas to a factor of approximately two for the local spiral galaxies, ULIRGs and smm-galaxies. Approximately 80% of the molecular line emission of compact starburst galaxies originates in non-self-gravitating gas clouds. The effect of HCN infrared pumping is small but measurable (10-20%). The gas velocity dispersion varies significantly with the Toomre Q parameter. The Q = 1.5 model yields high-velocity dispersions (vdisp ≫ 10 km s-1) consistent with available observations of high-z star-forming galaxies and ULIRGs. However, we note that these high-velocity dispersions are not mandatory for starburst galaxies

  13. Enhancement of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV Infection by Seminal Plasma and Semen Amyloids Implicates a New Target for the Prevention of HSV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilith Torres

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesviruses cause different infectious diseases, resulting in world-wide health problems. Sexual transmission is a major route for the spread of both herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 and -2. Semen plays an important role in carrying the viral particle that invades the vaginal or rectal mucosa and, thereby, initiates viral replication. Previously, we demonstrated that the amyloid fibrils semenogelin (SEM and semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI, and seminal plasma (SP augment cytomegalovirus infection (Tang et al., J. Virol 2013. Whether SEM or SEVI amyloids or SP could also enhance other herpesvirus infections has not been examined. In this study, we found that the two amyloids as well as SP strongly enhance both HSV-1 and -2 infections in cell culture. Along with SP, SEM and SEVI amyloids enhanced viral entry and increased infection rates by more than 10-fold, as assessed by flow cytometry assay and fluorescence microscopy. Viral replication was increased by about 50- to 100-fold. Moreover, viral growth curve assays showed that SEM and SEVI amyloids, as well as SP, sped up the kinetics of HSV replication such that the virus reached its replicative peak more quickly. The interactions of SEM, SEVI, and SP with HSVs are direct. Furthermore, we discovered that the enhancing effects of SP, SEM, and SEVI can be significantly reduced by heparin, a sulfated polysaccharide with an anionic charge. It is probable that heparin abrogates said enhancing effects by interfering with the interaction of the viral particle and the amyloids, which interaction results in the binding of the viral particles and both SEM and SEVI.

  14. Dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.E.; Winske, D.; Keinigs, R.; Lemons, D.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of dusty plasmas at the Laboratory. While dusty plasmas are found in space in galactic clouds, planetary rings, and cometary tails, and as contaminants in plasma enhanced fabrication of microelectronics, many of their properties are only partially understood. Our work has involved both theoretical analysis and self-consistent plasma simulations to understand basic properties of dusty plasmas related to equilibrium, stability, and transport. Such an understanding can improve the control and elimination of plasma dust in industrial applications and may be important in the study of planetary rings and comet dust tails. We have applied our techniques to the study of charging, dynamics, and coagulation of contaminants in plasma processing reactors for industrial etching and deposition processes and to instabilities in planetary rings and other space plasma environments. The work performed in this project has application to plasma kinetics, transport, and other classical elementary processes in plasmas as well as to plasma waves, oscillations, and instabilities

  15. Plasma chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the fundamental theory and various applications of ion mobility spectroscopy. Plasma chromatography developed from research on the diffusion and mobility of ions. Topics considered include instrument design and description (e.g., performance, spectral interpretation, sample handling, mass spectrometry), the role of ion mobility in plasma chromatography (e.g., kinetic theory of ion transport), atmospheric pressure ionization (e.g., rate equations), the characterization of isomers by plasma chromatography (e.g., molecular ion characteristics, polynuclear aromatics), plasma chromatography as a gas chromatographic detection method (e.g., qualitative analysis, continuous mobility monitoring, quantitative analysis), the analysis of toxic vapors by plasma chromatography (e.g., plasma chromatograph calibration, instrument control and data processing), the analysis of semiconductor devices and microelectronic packages by plasma chromatography/mass spectroscopy (e.g., analysis of organic surface contaminants, analysis of water in sealed electronic packages), and instrument design and automation (hardware, software)

  16. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Volume 5 of the supplements on ''atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion'' to the journal ''Nuclear Fusion'' is devoted to a critical assessment of the physical and thermo-mechanical properties of presently considered candidate plasma-facing and structural materials for next-generation thermonuclear fusion devices. It contains 9 papers. The subjects are: (i) requirements and selection criteria for plasma-facing materials and components in the ITER EDA (Engineering Design Activities) design; (ii) thermomechanical properties of Beryllium; (iii) material properties data for fusion reactor plasma-facing carbon-carbon composites; (iv) high-Z candidate plasma facing materials; (v) recommended property data for Molybdenum, Niobium and Vanadium alloys; (vi) copper alloys for high heat flux structure applications; (vii) erosion of plasma-facing materials during a tokamak disruption; (viii) runaway electron effects; and (ix) data bases for thermo-hydrodynamic coupling with coolants. Refs, figs, tabs

  17. Development of a Plasma Streaming System for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdsworth, T.; Clark, R.N.; McCotter, R.E.; Rossow, T.L.; Cruz, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    The Plasma Streaming System (PSS) is an essential portion of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), scheduled for completion in October 1981. The PSS will develop a plasma density of at least 2 x 10 12 particles/cm 3 at the MFTF magnet centerline by injecting particles along the field lines. The plasma will have a midplane plasma radius as large as 40 cm with variable plasma particle energy and beam geometry. Minimum amounts of impurities will be injected, with emphasis on minimizing high Z materials. Each of the 60 PSS units will consist of a gun magnet assembly (GMA) and a power supply. Each GMA consists of a plasma streaming gun, a pulse magnet that provides variable beam shaping, and a fast reaction pulse gas valve

  18. Development of a plasma pinch photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, John F.

    The need in advanced Linacs is for a high-performance (emittance, current, and life) cathode that will not poison in the only moderately good vacuums of such systems. Our approach embodies the durability of an unsensitized metal photocathode that is illuminated by a high-Z, high-density plasma pinch formed from a liquid-jet source in vacuum. The principal advantage of this pinch over a laser is both its simplicity and its ability to efficiently produce high-power vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The laser-guided gas-embedded pinch vacuum-ultraviolet source has been converted to a liquid-jet configuration in vacuum. This was undertaken for several reasons. First, the necessity of interposed high-density background gas is avoided. Second, a channel-forming guide laser beam is no longer needed. Finally, a wide variety of high-Z low cost substances are available in liquid form. For these reasons the liquid-jet approach makes sense for a rep-rate version of the pinch illuminator. Background gas absorption of hard UV is lessened. A large gas-transport system is not needed. Radiation output may be optimized through selection of the liquid's vapor pressure, surface tension, density, and composition.

  19. Highly ionized plasma plume generation by long-pulse CO2 laser irradiation of solid targets in strong axial magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.L.; Crawford, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present work utilizes high f number optics and is directed primarily at controlling the conditions in the magnetically confined plume. Typically, fully ionized carbon plasmas have been produced with 10 18 cm -3 electron densities and 100 to 150 eV electron temperatures. These carbon plasmas have been doped with high Z atoms in order to study ionization and emission rates at the above conditions

  20. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, James E

    1961-01-01

    A historic snapshot of the field of plasma physics, this fifty-year-old volume offers an edited collection of papers by pioneering experts in the field. In addition to assisting students in their understanding of the foundations of classical plasma physics, it provides a source of historic context for modern physicists. Highly successful upon its initial publication, this book was the standard text on plasma physics throughout the 1960s and 70s.Hailed by Science magazine as a ""well executed venture,"" the three-part treatment ranges from basic plasma theory to magnetohydrodynamics and microwa

  1. Plasma generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omichi, Takeo; Yamanaka, Toshiyuki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To recycle a coolant in a sealed hollow portion formed interiorly of a plasma limiter itself to thereby to cause direct contact between the coolant and the plasma limiter and increase of contact area therebetween to cool the plasma limiter. Structure: The heat resulting from plasma generated during operation and applied to the body of the plasma limiter is transmitted to the coolant, which recycles through an inlet and outlet pipe, an inlet and outlet nozzle and a hollow portion to hold the plasma limiter at a level less than a predetermined temperature. On the other hand, the heater wire is, at the time of emergency operation, energized to heat the plasma limiter, but this heat is transmitted to the limiter body to increase the temperature thereof. However, the coolant recycling the hollow portion comes into direct contact with the limiter body, and since the plasma limiter surround the hollow portion, the heat amount transmitted from the limiter body to the coolant increases to sufficiently cool the plasma limiter. (Yoshihara, H.)

  2. Bridge between fusion plasma and plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Noriyasu; Takamura, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    In the present review, relationship between fusion plasma and processing plasma is discussed. From boundary-plasma studies in fusion devices new applications such as high-density plasma sources, erosion of graphite in a hydrogen plasma, formation of helium bubbles in high-melting-point metals and the use of toroidal plasmas for plasma processing are emerging. The authors would like to discuss a possibility of knowledge transfer from fusion plasmas to processing plasmas. (T. Ikehata)

  3. Isotopic anomalies in high Z elements: Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G.W. Jr.; Essling, A.M.; Rauh, E.G.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1989-03-01

    Uranium in terrestrial volcanic ejecta from mantle-related sources has been analyzed mass spectrometrically. The objective was to seek supporting evidence for or refutation isotopic variations reported by Fried et al. (1985) for some such samples. The possibility that terrestrial U is not of constant isotopic composition is extraordinary. If true, mechanisms for creating the variation must be sought and the lack of homogenization within the earth addressed. Samples of 100 grams or more were processed in order to minimize reagent and environmental (laboratory) blank interference and to permit isolation of large amounts (several to tens of ..mu..g) of U for the mass spectrometer (MS) measurements, which utilizes aliquots of /approximately/1 ..mu..g. Aliquants from four volcanic samples gave data which indicate enrichments of /sub 235/U ranging from 0.2% to 5.9% in the 235/238 ratio relative normal uranium ratios. These relative enrichments are consistent with, and in some cases, higher than the 0.18% enrichment reported by Fried et al. (1985) for two volcanic lava samples. However, we were not able to reproduce their results on the Kilauea lava for which they report 0.18% /sup 235/U enrichment. The relative error in our MS ratios is 0.05% -- 0.07%. 1 tab.

  4. Isotopic anomalies in high Z elements: Uranium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G.W. Jr.; Essling, A.M.; Rauh, E.G.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1989-03-01

    Uranium in terrestrial volcanic ejecta from mantle-related sources has been analyzed mass spectrometrically. The objective was to seek supporting evidence for or refutation isotopic variations reported by Fried et al. (1985) for some such samples. The possibility that terrestrial U is not of constant isotopic composition is extraordinary. If true, mechanisms for creating the variation must be sought and the lack of homogenization within the earth addressed. Samples of 100 grams or more were processed in order to minimize reagent and environmental (laboratory) blank interference and to permit isolation of large amounts (several to tens of μg) of U for the mass spectrometer (MS) measurements, which utilizes aliquots of /approximately/1 μg. Aliquants from four volcanic samples gave data which indicate enrichments of 235 U ranging from 0.2% to 5.9% in the 235/238 ratio relative normal uranium ratios. These relative enrichments are consistent with, and in some cases, higher than the 0.18% enrichment reported by Fried et al. (1985) for two volcanic lava samples. However, we were not able to reproduce their results on the Kilauea lava for which they report 0.18% 235 U enrichment. The relative error in our MS ratios is 0.05% -- 0.07%. 1 tab

  5. Plasma properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzner, H.

    1991-06-01

    The Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division continues to study a broad range of problems originating in plasma physics. Its principal focus is fusion plasma physics, and most particularly topics of particular significance for the world magnetic fusion program. During the calendar year 1990 we explored a wide range of topics including RF-induced transport as a plasma control mechanism, edge plasma modelling, further statistical analysis of L and H mode tokamak plasmas, antenna design, simulation of the edge of a tokamak plasma and the L-H transition, interpretation of the CCT experimental results at UCLA, turbulent transport, studies in chaos, the validity of moment approximations to kinetic equations and improved neoclassical modelling. In more basic studies we examined the statistical mechanisms of Coulomb systems and applied plasma ballooning mode theory to conventional fluids in order to obtain novel fluid dynamics stability results. In space plasma physics we examined the problem of reconnection, the effect of Alfven waves in space environments, and correct formulation of boundary conditions of the Earth for waves in the ionosphere

  6. Plasma container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Katsuyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to easily detect that the thickness of material to be abraded is reduced to an allowable limit from the outerside of the plasma container even during usual operation in a plasma vessel for a thermonuclear device. Constitution: A labelled material is disposed to the inside or rear face of constituent members of a plasma container undergoing the irradiation of plasma particles. A limiter plate to be abraded in the plasma container is composed of an armour member and heat removing plate, in which the armour member is made of graphite and heat-removing plate is made of copper. If the armour member is continuously abraded under the effect of sputtering due to plasma particles, silicon nitride embedded so far in the graphite at last appears on the surface of the limiter plate to undergo the impact shocks of the plasma particles. Accordingly, abrasion of the limiter material can be detected by a detector comprising gas chromatography and it can easily be detected from the outside of the plasma content even during normal operation. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. The diverse applications of plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukul; Dubey, Shivani; Darwhekar, Gajanan; Jain, Sudhir Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Plasma being the fourth state of matter has always been an attraction for Physicists and Chemists. With the advent of time, plasma energy has been recognized in having widening horizons in the field of Biomedical Sciences. Plasma medicine can be subdivided into three main fields; Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure direct plasma for medical therapy; Plasma-assisted modification of bio-relevant surfaces and Plasma-based bio-decontamination and sterilization. The basis of the research is that as it has free carrier molecules, it has the ability to target specific cells and regulate functions like wound healing. Plasma does not harm healthy human cells but can kill bacteria and possibly even cancer cells to help treat various diseases. Nosocomial infection control, prevention and containment of contagious diseases, disinfection of medical devices, surface treatment (heat and UV sensitive surfaces) are research of interest. Recent success in generating plasma at very low temperature ie. Cold plasma makes the therapy painless. It has the ability to activate cellular responses and important mechanisms in the body. They target specific molecules such as prothrombin for blood coagulation, cytokines for killing bacteria, and angiogenesis for tissue regeneration. Plasma has bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal properties. Plasma technology has flourishing future in diverse fields like Textiles, Nanofabrication, Automotives, Waste management, Microbiology, Food Hygiene, Medical Science like Skin treatments, sterilisation of wounds, Hand disinfection, Dental treatments etc. Food hygiene using plasma can be achieved in disinfection of food containers, food surface disinfection, hygiene in food handling, preparation and packaging. Therefore Plasma is most promising field for budding Scientist for fluorishing research in Biological Sciences.

  8. The diverse applications of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mukul; Darwhekar, Gajanan; Dubey, Shivani; Jain, Sudhir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Plasma being the fourth state of matter has always been an attraction for Physicists and Chemists. With the advent of time, plasma energy has been recognized in having widening horizons in the field of Biomedical Sciences. Plasma medicine can be subdivided into three main fields; Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure direct plasma for medical therapy; Plasma-assisted modification of bio-relevant surfaces and Plasma-based bio-decontamination and sterilization. The basis of the research is that as it has free carrier molecules, it has the ability to target specific cells and regulate functions like wound healing. Plasma does not harm healthy human cells but can kill bacteria and possibly even cancer cells to help treat various diseases. Nosocomial infection control, prevention and containment of contagious diseases, disinfection of medical devices, surface treatment (heat and UV sensitive surfaces) are research of interest. Recent success in generating plasma at very low temperature ie. Cold plasma makes the therapy painless. It has the ability to activate cellular responses and important mechanisms in the body. They target specific molecules such as prothrombin for blood coagulation, cytokines for killing bacteria, and angiogenesis for tissue regeneration. Plasma has bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal properties. Plasma technology has flourishing future in diverse fields like Textiles, Nanofabrication, Automotives, Waste management, Microbiology, Food Hygiene, Medical Science like Skin treatments, sterilisation of wounds, Hand disinfection, Dental treatments etc. Food hygiene using plasma can be achieved in disinfection of food containers, food surface disinfection, hygiene in food handling, preparation and packaging. Therefore Plasma is most promising field for budding Scientist for fluorishing research in Biological Sciences

  9. The diverse applications of plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Mukul, E-mail: mukulsharma@acropolis.edu.in; Darwhekar, Gajanan, E-mail: gdarwhekar@acropolis.edu.in [Acropolis Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research, Indore MP India (India); Dubey, Shivani, E-mail: dubeyshivani08@rediffmail.com [Mata Gujri College of Professional Studies, Indore MP India (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar, E-mail: sudhirkjain1@rediffmail.com [School of Studies in Microbiology, Vikram University, Ujjain MP India (India)

    2015-07-31

    Plasma being the fourth state of matter has always been an attraction for Physicists and Chemists. With the advent of time, plasma energy has been recognized in having widening horizons in the field of Biomedical Sciences. Plasma medicine can be subdivided into three main fields; Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure direct plasma for medical therapy; Plasma-assisted modification of bio-relevant surfaces and Plasma-based bio-decontamination and sterilization. The basis of the research is that as it has free carrier molecules, it has the ability to target specific cells and regulate functions like wound healing. Plasma does not harm healthy human cells but can kill bacteria and possibly even cancer cells to help treat various diseases. Nosocomial infection control, prevention and containment of contagious diseases, disinfection of medical devices, surface treatment (heat and UV sensitive surfaces) are research of interest. Recent success in generating plasma at very low temperature ie. Cold plasma makes the therapy painless. It has the ability to activate cellular responses and important mechanisms in the body. They target specific molecules such as prothrombin for blood coagulation, cytokines for killing bacteria, and angiogenesis for tissue regeneration. Plasma has bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal properties. Plasma technology has flourishing future in diverse fields like Textiles, Nanofabrication, Automotives, Waste management, Microbiology, Food Hygiene, Medical Science like Skin treatments, sterilisation of wounds, Hand disinfection, Dental treatments etc. Food hygiene using plasma can be achieved in disinfection of food containers, food surface disinfection, hygiene in food handling, preparation and packaging. Therefore Plasma is most promising field for budding Scientist for fluorishing research in Biological Sciences.

  10. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, F Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael W; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond

    2009-08-01

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 microg of plasma with density above 10(17) cm(-3) to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 microg has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.

  11. PLASMA ENERGIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

    1962-03-01

    BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

  12. Superconducting plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro; Ohno, J.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) plasmas are proposed and investigated. The SC plasmas are not yet familiar and have not yet been studied. However, the existence and the importance of SC plasmas are stressed in this report. The existence of SC plasmas are found as follows. There is a fundamental property of Meissner effect in superconductors, which shows a repulsive effect of magnetic fields. Even in that case, in a microscopic view, there is a region of magnetic penetration. The penetration length λ is well-known as London's penetration depth, which is expressed as δ = (m s /μ 0 n s q s 2 ) 1/2 where m s , n s , q s and μ o show the mass, the density, the charge of SC electron and the permeability in free space, respectively. Because this expression is very simple, no one had tried it into more simple and meaningful form. Recently, one of the authors (T.O.) has found that the length can be expressed into more simple and understandable fundamental form as λ = c/ω ps where c = (ε 0 μ 0 ) -1/2 and ω ps = (n s q s 2 /m s ε 0 ) 1/2 are the light velocity and the superconducting plasma frequency. From this simple expression, the penetration depth of the magnetic field to SC is found as a SC plasma skin depth, that is, the fundamental property of SC can be expressed by the SC plasmas. This discovery indicates an importance of the studies of superconducting plasmas. From these points, several properties (propagating modes et al) of SC plasmas, which consist of SC electrons, normal electrons and lattice ions, are investigated in this report. Observations of SC plasma frequency is also reported with a use of Terahertz electromagnet-optical waves

  13. Choking Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  14. Kinetics of ion and prompt electron emission from laser-produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Ding, H. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2013-07-15

    We investigated ion emission dynamics of laser-produced plasma from several elements, comprised of metals and non-metals (C, Al, Si, Cu, Mo, Ta, W), under vacuum conditions using a Faraday cup. The estimated ion flux for various targets studied showed a decreasing tendency with increasing atomic mass. For metals, the ion flux is found to be a function of sublimation energy. A comparison of temporal ion profiles of various materials showed only high-Z elements exhibited multiple structures in the ion time of flight profile indicated by the observation of higher peak kinetic energies, which were absent for low-Z element targets. The slower ions were seen regardless of the atomic number of target material propagated with a kinetic energy of 1–5 keV, while the fast ions observed in high-Z materials possessed significantly higher energies. A systematic study of plasma properties employing fast photography, time, and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and electron analysis showed that there existed different mechanisms for generating ions in laser ablation plumes. The origin of high kinetic energy ions is related to prompt electron emission from high-Z targets.

  15. Plasma Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  16. Plasma will…

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 174, č. 3 (2016), s. 486-487 ISSN 0007-0963 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : plasma * ionized gas Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.706, year: 2016

  17. Plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouet, M.G.

    1984-03-01

    IREQ was contracted by the Canadian Electrical Association to review plasma technology and assess the potential for application of this technology in Canada. A team of experts in the various aspects of this technology was assembled and each team member was asked to contribute to this report on the applications of plasma pertinent to his or her particular field of expertise. The following areas were examined in detail: iron, steel and strategic-metals production; surface treatment by spraying; welding and cutting; chemical processing; drying; and low-temperature treatment. A large market for the penetration of electricity has been identified. To build up confidence in the technology, support should be provided for selected R and D projects, plasma torch demonstrations at full power, and large-scale plasma process testing

  18. Plasma chromograninx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Hilsted, Linda M; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk assessment remains difficult in elderly patients. We examined whether chromogranin A (CgA) measurement in plasma may be valuable in assessing risk of death in elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure in a primary care setting. A total of 470 patients (mean age 73 years......) were followed for 10 years. For CgA plasma measurement, we used a two-step method including a screening test and a confirmative test with plasma pre-treatment with trypsin. Cox multivariable proportional regression and receiver-operating curve (ROC) analyses were used to assess mortality risk...... of follow-up showed significant additive value of CgA confirm measurements compared with NT-proBNP and clinical variables. CgA measurement in the plasma of elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure can identify those at increased risk of short- and long-term mortality....

  19. Plasma confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Hazeltine, R D

    2003-01-01

    Detailed and authoritative, this volume examines the essential physics underlying international research in magnetic confinement fusion. It offers readable, thorough accounts of the fundamental concepts behind methods of confining plasma at or near thermonuclear conditions. Designed for a one- or two-semester graduate-level course in plasma physics, it also represents a valuable reference for professional physicists in controlled fusion and related disciplines.

  20. Plasma metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of surface contamination of the films due to plasma treatment was observed but was easily removed by argon ion cleaning. Hydrogen plasma reduction of glass supported silver(l) nitrate and palladium(ll) acetate films reveals that this metallization technique is applicable to a wide variety of metal salts and supports, and has also shown the ability of plasma reduction to retain the complex 'fern-like' structures seen for spin coated silver(l) nitrate layers. Some metal salts are susceptible to decomposition by X-rays. The reduction of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride films by soft X-rays to produce nanoscopic gold particles has been studied. The spontaneous reduction of these X-ray irradiated support gold(lll) chloride films on exposure to the atmosphere to produce gold rich metallic films has also been reported. (author)

  1. Monte Carlo study of the influence of energy spectra, mesh size, high Z element on dose and PVDR based on 1-D and 3-D heterogeneous mouse head phantom for Microbeam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Jing, Jia; Xu, Liangfeng; Mao, Xiaoli

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of energy spectra, mesh sizes, high Z element on dose and PVDR in Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) based on 1-D analogy-mouse-head-model (1-D MHM) and 3-D voxel-mouse-head-phantom (3-D VMHP) by Monte Carlo simulation. A Microbeam-Array-Source-Model was implemented into EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc. The microbeam size is assumed to be 25μm, 50μm or 75μm in thickness and fixed 1mm in height with 200μmc-t-c. The influence of the energy spectra of ID17@ESRF and BMIT@CLS were investigated. The mesh size was optimized. PVDR in 1-D MHM and 3-D VMHP was compared with the homogeneous water phantom. The arc influence of 3-D VMHP filled with water (3-D VMHWP) was compared with the rectangle phantom. PVDR of the lower BMIT@CLS spectrum is 2.4times that of ID17@ESRF for lower valley dose. The optimized mesh is 5µm for 25µm, and 10µm for 50µm and 75µm microbeams with 200µmc-t-c. A 500μm skull layer could make PVDR difference up to 62.5% for 1-D MHM. However this influence is limited (influence is limited for the more depth (influence of 3-D heterogeneous media. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of tungsten for plasma limiters in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.; Wada, M.; Ohgo, T.; Philipps, V.; Rubel, M.; Huber, A.; Seggern, J. von; Ohya, K.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B.

    2000-01-01

    Three different types of W limiters were exposed in the TEXTOR plasma and the response of the plasma and materials performance of the limiters were investigated. - A W bulk limiter operated with preheating above 800 K withstood a plasma heat load of about ∼20 MW/m 2 for a few seconds with some slight surface melting during the highest heat load shot. However, it was severely damaged when operated at around 500 K. - A C/W twin test limiter, half made of bulk W and the other half of graphite (EK-98) gave very useful information on how low- and high-Z materials behave under conditions of simultaneous utilization as PFM such as cross-contamination and the influence of a large mass difference on hydrogen reflection and deposition. - Two sets of main poloidal W limiters made of vacuum vapor sprayed (VPS)-W deposited on graphite (IG-430U) with a Re interlayer could absorb about 60% of the total convection heat and the ohmic plasma with a density as high as 5 x 10 13 cm -3 was sustained. Most of the VPS-W coated limiters tolerated a heat load of ∼20 MW/m 2 . This series of W limiters experiments in TEXTOR has shown that W is applicable as a PFM, if its central accumulation is avoided by NBI and/or ICRH heating. Nevertheless, some concerns still remain, including difficulty of plasma start-up, W behavior in higher temperature plasmas, and materials' selection

  3. Spectral modeling of laser-produced underdense titanium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Kyung; Back, Christina A.; Scott, Howard A.; Constantin, Carmen; Lee, Richard W.

    2004-11-01

    Experiments were performed at the NIKE laser to create underdense low-Z plasmas with a small amount of high-Z dopant in order to study non-LTE population kinetics. An absolutely calibrated spectra in 470-3000 eV was measured in time-resolved and time-averaged fashion from SiO2 aerogel target with 3% Ti dopant. K-shell Ti emission was observed as well as L-shell Ti emission. Time-resolved emission show that lower energy photons peak later than higher energy photons due to plasma cooling. In this work, we compare the measured spectra with non-LTE spectral calculations of titanium emission at relatively low temperatures distributions dominated by L-shell ions will be discussed.

  4. Cold plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, G.

    1990-01-01

    This textbook discusses the following topics: Phenomenological description of a direct current glow discharge; the plasma (temperature distribution and measurement, potential variation, electron energy distribution function, charge neutralization, wall potentials, plasma oscillations); Production of charge carriers (ions, electrons, ionization in the cathode zone, negative glowing zone, Faraday dark space, positive column, anode zone, hollow cathode discharges); RF-discharges (charge carrier production, RF-Shields, scattering mechanisms); Sputtering (ion-surface interaction, kinetics, sputtering yield and energy distribution, systems and conditions, film formation and stresses, contamination, bias techniques, multicomponent film deposition, cohesion, magnetrons, triode systems, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition); Dry etching (sputter etching, reactive etching, topography, process control, quantitative investigations); Etching mechanisms (etching of Si and SiO 2 with CF 4 , of III/V-compound-semiconductors, combination of isotrope and anisotrope etching methods, surface cleaning); ion beam systems (applications, etching); Dyclotron-resonance-systems (electron cyclotron resonance systems, whistler-sources and 'resonant inductive plasma etching'); Appendix (electron energy distribution functions, Bohm's transition zone, plasma oscillations, scattering cross sections and mean free path, metastable states, Child-Langmuir-Schottky equation, loss mechanisms, charge carrier distribution in the positive column, breakdown at high frequencies, motion in a magnetic field, skin depth of an electric field for a HF-discharge, whistler waves, dispersion relations for plane wave propagation). (orig.) With 138 figs

  5. Survey and Cleaning of Metal Contamination in Graphite Plasma-Facing Tiles in DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrobak, C. P.; Chamberlain, F.; Lee, R. L.; Holtrop, K. L.; Taylor, P. L.; Jackson, G. L.; Wall, D.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Mills, B. E.

    2012-10-01

    During the DIII-D FY11 and FY12 campaigns, relatively high levels of high Z metallic core plasma impurities impeded high performance plasma operation. Observations made during a vessel entry revealed potential sources of the increased metals, including: copper and Inconel splatter from a probe head damaged by runaway electrons, partial melting of a neutral beam molybdenum shield plate, and exposed metals on the Fast Wave antenna Faraday shields. Portable beta-backscattering and x-ray fluorescence diagnostics were used to map the areal density of metals deposited on the graphite plasma-facing tiles around the vessel. Tile surfaces with deposits exceeding 7x10^16 metal atoms/cm^2 were sanded in place or grit blasted outside of the vessel to remove impurities. The distribution of metals before and after resurfacing and the effectiveness of the tile resurfacing techniques on subsequent plasmas will be presented.

  6. PLASMA DEVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  7. Plasma properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzner, H.

    1989-08-01

    A cursory examination of the research activities of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division for the calendar year 1988 shows the effects of the gradual transformation of the group. Although our principal activity, fusion plasma physics research, is unchanged, the work shows closer ties to problems relevant to present experiments than previously. Most notable is the concentrated effort on tokamak equilibrium and transport. We are exploring the implication of turbulence induced transport, resistive MHD effects, neoclassical transport, and possible interpretations of transport based on classical phenomena. In addition, one of our members has chosen to focus on problems of enhanced statistical methods for interpretation of experiments. All of this activity preceded the Tokamak Transport Initiative and reflects our active involvement and concern with the world-wide tokamak program. Since equilibrium and transport are by no means the only theoretical plasma physics problems affecting fusion devices we continue substantial efforts in wave propagation and heating, particle simulation of plasmas, stability theory, enhancement of numerical algorithms, and general plasma physics. We are attempting to develop effective numerical schemes for the Boltzmann equation, adaptive grid methods for MHD, and particle simulation of boundary and antenna effects. Many of these topics reflect our continuing concern to maintain a modest effort in the development of theoretical models and tools for problems of real significance to fusion, but not necessarily of immediate highest priority. We select problems which we expect to become extremely important in the future. Our space plasma physics activities, funded by agencies other than DOE, transfers knowledge learned in fusion plasma physics to another area and conversely stimulates work also relevant to fusion problems

  8. ''Dusty plasmas''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V.N.; Bingham, R.; Angelis, U. de

    1989-09-01

    The field of ''dusty plasmas'' promises to be a very rewarding topic of research for the next decade or so, not only from the academic point of view where the emphasis is on developing the theory of the often complex collective and non-linear processes, but also from the point of view of applications in astrophysics, space physics, environmental and energy research. In this ''comment'' we should like to sketch the current development of this fast growing and potentially very important research area. We will discuss the new features of ''dusty'' plasmas in the most general terms and then briefly mention some successful applications and effects which have already been examined. (author)

  9. Electron plasma waves and plasma resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R N; Braithwaite, N St J

    2009-01-01

    In 1929 Tonks and Langmuir predicted of the existence of electron plasma waves in an infinite, uniform plasma. The more realistic laboratory environment of non-uniform and bounded plasmas frustrated early experiments. Meanwhile Landau predicted that electron plasma waves in a uniform collisionless plasma would appear to be damped. Subsequent experimental work verified this and revealed the curious phenomenon of plasma wave echoes. Electron plasma wave theory, extended to finite plasmas, has been confirmed by various experiments. Nonlinear phenomena, such as particle trapping, emerge at large amplitude. The use of electron plasma waves to determine electron density and electron temperature has not proved as convenient as other methods.

  10. Rape prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date rape - prevention; Sexual assault - prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Sexual assault and abuse and STDs. In: 2015 sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2015. www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/sexual- ...

  11. Dengue Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This photograph ... medications to treat a dengue infection. This makes prevention the most important step, and prevention means avoiding ...

  12. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wobrauschek, P., E-mail: wobi@ati.ac.at; Prost, J.; Ingerle, D.; Kregsamer, P.; Streli, C. [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Misra, N. L. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-08-15

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm{sup 2} active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  13. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobrauschek, P.; Prost, J.; Ingerle, D.; Kregsamer, P.; Misra, N. L.; Streli, C.

    2015-08-01

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm2 active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  14. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobrauschek, P; Prost, J; Ingerle, D; Kregsamer, P; Misra, N L; Streli, C

    2015-08-01

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm(2) active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  15. Plague Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Clinicians Public Health Officials Veterinarians Prevention History of Plague Resources FAQ Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Reduce rodent habitat around your ...

  16. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  17. Burning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J.

    1990-10-01

    The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R ampersand D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration

  18. Burning plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

  19. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  20. Plasma medicine: an introductory review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, M. G.; Kroesen, G.; Morfill, G.; Nosenko, T.; Shimizu, T.; van Dijk, J.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    This introductory review on plasma health care is intended to provide the interested reader with a summary of the current status of this emerging field, its scope, and its broad interdisciplinary approach, ranging from plasma physics, chemistry and technology, to microbiology, biochemistry, biophysics, medicine and hygiene. Apart from the basic plasma processes and the restrictions and requirements set by international health standards, the review focuses on plasma interaction with prokaryotic cells (bacteria), eukaryotic cells (mammalian cells), cell membranes, DNA etc. In so doing, some of the unfamiliar terminology—an unavoidable by-product of interdisciplinary research—is covered and explained. Plasma health care may provide a fast and efficient new path for effective hospital (and other public buildings) hygiene—helping to prevent and contain diseases that are continuously gaining ground as resistance of pathogens to antibiotics grows. The delivery of medically active 'substances' at the molecular or ionic level is another exciting topic of research through effects on cell walls (permeabilization), cell excitation (paracrine action) and the introduction of reactive species into cell cytoplasm. Electric fields, charging of surfaces, current flows etc can also affect tissue in a controlled way. The field is young and hopes are high. It is fitting to cover the beginnings in New Journal of Physics, since it is the physics (and non-equilibrium chemistry) of room temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas that have made this development of plasma health care possible.

  1. Plasma characteristics in FTU with different limiter materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apicella, M.; Apruzzese, G.; Bracco, G.; Ciotti, M.; Crisanti, F.; De Angelis, R.; Ferro, C.; Gabellieri, L.; Gatti, G.; Kroegler, H.

    1995-12-01

    Over the last several years, a great deal of effort has been devoted to solve the problem of power and particle handling in divertors, which has been recognised as a critical issue for the operation of a magnetic fusion reactor. In particular the choice of materials for plasma facing components has been examined in view of developing heat and erosion resistant materials for divertor target plates. A large data base on the behaviour of low materials in Tokamak is available, while for high Z materials there is little experience in present generation of magnetic fusion devices. FTU, a high field compact Tokamak, has devoted part of its experimental campaign to study the plasma characteristics when its limiter material is changed from the usual Inconel to molybdenum and tungsten. In this work results are reported concerning the plasma operation, the difference in plasma characteristics and radiation losses, the impurity generation mechanisms and their relative concentrations in the core plasma. A simulation of the experimental results, made with a self-consistent edge-core coupled model is presented, in order to put in evidence the main physics mechanisms responsible for the observed behaviour

  2. Electrosurgical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalder, Kenneth R; McMillen, Donald F; Woloszko, Jean [ArthroCare Corp., Sunnyvale, CA 94085-3523 (United States)

    2005-06-07

    Electrosurgical medical devices based on repetitively pulsed nonequilibrium micron-scale to millimetre-scale plasma discharges in saline solutions are described. The formation of vapour layers (bubbles) around active electrodes appears to be a common feature at moderate (<300 V rms) voltages, and dissociation, excitation and ionization of the vapour in these bubbles produces chemical conditions that are thought to be the source of beneficial tissue removal and treatment. Experimental data are discussed, as are the results of modelling efforts of the plasma chemistry. Hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen atoms and other species are observed spectroscopically and their interactions with collagen, a common component of tissue encountered in surgical situations, are considered. Several pathways by which hydroxyl radicals interacting with collagen can lead to tissue removal are discussed.

  3. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A

    1985-01-01

    This book is intended as an introduction to plasma physics at a level suitable for advanced undergraduates or beginning postgraduate students in physics, applied mathematics or astrophysics. The main prerequisite is a knowledge of electromagnetism and of the associated mathematics of vector calculus. SI units are used throughout. There is still a tendency amongst some plasma physics researchers to· cling to C.g.S. units, but it is the author's view that universal adoption of SI units, which have been the internationally agreed standard since 1960, is to be encouraged. After a short introductory chapter, the basic properties of a plasma con­ cerning particle orbits, fluid theory, Coulomb collisions and waves are set out in Chapters 2-5, with illustrations drawn from problems in nuclear fusion research and space physics. The emphasis is on the essential physics involved and (he theoretical and mathematical approach has been kept as simple and intuitive as possible. An attempt has been made to draw attention t...

  4. Surface heat flux feedback controlled impurity seeding experiments with Alcator C-Mod’s high-Z vertical target plate divertor: performance, limitations and implications for fusion power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, D.; Wolfe, S. M.; LaBombard, B.; Kuang, A. Q.; Lipschultz, B.; Reinke, M. L.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Terry, J. L.; Umansky, M. V.; The Alcator C-Mod Team

    2017-08-01

    The Alcator C-Mod team has recently developed a feedback system to measure and control surface heat flux in real-time. The system uses real-time measurements of surface heat flux from surface thermocouples and a pulse-width modulated piezo valve to inject low-Z impurities (typically N2) into the private flux region. It has been used in C-Mod to mitigate peak surface heat fluxes  >40 MW m-2 down to    1. While the system works quite well under relatively steady conditions, use of it during transients has revealed important limitations on feedback control of impurity seeding in conventional vertical target plate divertors. In some cases, the system is unable to avoid plasma reattachment to the divertor plate or the formation of a confinement-damaging x-point MARFE. This is due to the small operational window for mitigated heat flux in the parameters of incident plasma heat flux, plasma density, and impurity density as well as the relatively slow response of the impurity gas injection system compared to plasma transients. Given the severe consequences for failure of such a system to operate reliably in a reactor, there is substantial risk that the conventional vertical target plate divertor will not provide an adequately controllable system in reactor-class devices. These considerations motivate the need to develop passively stable, highly compliant divertor configurations and experimental facilities that can test such possible solutions.

  5. Scallop protein with endogenous high taurine and glycine content prevents high-fat, high-sucrose-induced obesity and improves plasma lipid profile in male C57BL/6J mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Keenan, Alison H.; Madsen, Lise

    2014-01-01

    -sucrose diets with protein sources of increasing endogenous taurine content, i.e., chicken, cod, crab and scallop, for 6 weeks. The energy intake was lower in crab and scallop-fed mice than in chicken and cod-fed mice, but only scallop-fed mice gained less body and fat mass. Liver mass was reduced in scallop......-fasted states. Dietary intake of taurine and glycine correlated negatively with body mass gain and total fat mass, while intake of all other amino acids correlated positively. Furthermore taurine and glycine intake correlated positively with improved plasma lipid profile, i.e., lower levels of plasma lipids...

  6. Importance of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) for preventing single chain urokinase plasminogen activator (scu-PA) conversion into two chain urokinase plasminogen activator (tcu-PA) in plasma in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosne, A M; Dubor, F; Samama, M

    1991-09-01

    We have studied the effects of PAI-1 on the conversion of scu-PA into tcu-PA in vitro in plasma containing or not a 125I-fibrin clot by determining tcu-PA activity on S2444. Two preparations of PAI-1 have been used, a fraction of medium conditioned with the monkey Vero cells (Vero-Prep), the antiurokinase activity of which is inhibited at 83% by anti PAI-1 IgG, or purified human PAI-1 from HT 1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Scu-PA purified from human kidney cells has been treated with diisopropylfluorophosphate before use. In plasma, conversion of scu-PA into the tc form is accelerated by addition of anti PAI-1 IgG. In plasma containing a clot, generation of tcu-PA, is considerably delayed after addition of the Vero-Prep or human PAI-1. Clot lysis is also decreased but to a lesser extent than it would be expected from the level of tcu-PA activity. Addition of anti PAI-1 antibodies shortens the lag phase before tcu-PA appears and moderatly accelerates clot lysis. These results demonstrate the importance of PAI-1 for the stability of scu-PA in plasma in vitro by delaying its conversion into tcu-PA.

  7. Preventing Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Susan Fordney

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the beginning counselor with an overview of prevention concepts. Prevention is a relatively new emphasis in community efforts to stem the rising costs of substance abuse and other high-risk behaviors. The paper discusses agent, host, and environmental prevention models and how they relate to causal theories…

  8. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  9. Plasma dynamics in a staged pinch device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, N.A.D.; Ahmed, Z.; Mirza, A.M.; Murtaza, G.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma parameters in fiber initiated fast and dense theta-pinch plasma driven by an annular finite-thickness gas-puff Z-pinch are studied. The imploding gas-puff Z-pinch plasma traps an axial magnetic field B/sub z/, compressing it to large values (of the order of several megagauss) in an extremely short time. The rapidly changing magnetic flux of this field induces an azimuthal current on the surface of the coaxially placed fiber, with a rise time an order of magnitude shorter than the applied Z-pinch current. The shorter rise time of the current stabilizes the pinch against sausage mode of MHD instabilities. Our numerical results demonstrate that for a relatively thick gas-puff layer, the compression occurs before the current saturates. At the peak compression the fuel densities of the order of 10/sup 25/ cm/sup -3/ and temperature above 10 keV can be achieved on a time scale of 0.1 nanoseconds, yielding the Lawson Criterion parameters n tau is approximately equal to 10/sup 14/ sec cm/sup -3/ for D-T fuel. The snow-plow effect incorporated in our model exercise a strong influence on the onset and growth rate of sausage and Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) modes of instabilities. Imposing a rotational velocity on the outer thin gas-puff plasma can control the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Numerical results indicate that the choice of the spin velocity is critical. Large values of the spin velocity, though provide stabilization against the R-T instability at the final stage of compression, however, it adversely reduce the plasma parameters so essential to achieve controlled fusion. Our analysis, therefore, suggests that a judicious choice of the spin velocity is necessary to obtain the desired temperature and density, especially when we seed D-T fiber plasma with a small fraction of high-Z Kr impurity to initiate the radiative collapse. (author)

  10. Study of single and binary ion plasma expansion into laboratory-generated plasma wakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, K.H. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    Plasma expansion into the wake of a large rectangular plate immersed in a collisionless, supersonic plasma was investigated in laboratory experiments. The experimental conditions address both single ion and binary ion plasma flows for the case of a body whose size is large in comparison with the Debye length, when the potential difference between the body and the plasma is relatively small. A new plasma source was developed to generate equi-velocity, binary ion plasma flows, which allows access to new parameter space that have previously been unavailable for laboratory studies. Specifically, the new parameters are the ionic mass ratio and the ionic component density ratio. In a series of experiments, a krypton-neon plasma is employed where the ambient density ratio of neon to krypton is varied more than an order of magnitude. The expansion in both the single ion and binary ion plasma cases is limited to early times, i.e., a few ion plasma periods, by the combination of plasma density, plasma drift speed, and vacuum chamber size, which prevented detailed comparison with self-similar theory

  11. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    -pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two

  12. Improved plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  13. Plasma protein haptoglobin modulates renal iron loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagoonee, Sharmila; Gburek, Jakub; Hirsch, Emilio

    2005-01-01

    distribution of hemoglobin in haptoglobin-deficient mice resulted in abnormal iron deposits in proximal tubules during aging. Moreover, iron also accumulated in proximal tubules after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury or after an acute plasma heme-protein overload caused by muscle injury, without affecting...... morphological and functional parameters of renal damage. These data demonstrate that haptoglobin crucially prevents glomerular filtration of hemoglobin and, consequently, renal iron loading during aging and following acute plasma heme-protein overload....

  14. Plasma physics and fusion plasma electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bers, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is a ubiquitous state of matter at high temperatures. The electrodynamics of plasmas encompasses a large number of applications, from understanding plasmas in space and the stars, to their use in processing semiconductors, and their role in controlled energy generation by nuclear fusion. This book covers collective and single particle dynamics of plasmas for fully ionized as well as partially ionized plasmas. Many aspects of plasma physics in current fusion energy generation research are addressed both in magnetic and inertial confinement plasmas. Linear and nonlinear dynamics in hydrodynamic and kinetic descriptions are offered, making both simple and complex aspects of the subject available in nearly every chapter. The approach of dividing the basic aspects of plasma physics as "linear, hydrodynamic descriptions" to be covered first because they are "easier", and postponing the "nonlinear and kinetic descriptions" for later because they are "difficult" is abandoned in this book. For teaching purpose...

  15. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen ...

  16. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise ...

  17. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watchful Waiting and Education Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 ...

  18. Algebraic motion of vertically displacing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2018-02-01

    The vertical motion of a tokamak plasma is analytically modelled during its non-linear phase by a free-moving current-carrying rod inductively coupled to a set of fixed conducting wires or a cylindrical conducting shell. The solutions capture the leading term in a Taylor expansion of the Green's function for the interaction between the plasma column and the surrounding vacuum vessel. The plasma shape and profiles are assumed not to vary during the vertical drifting phase such that the plasma column behaves as a rigid body. In the limit of perfectly conducting structures, the plasma is prevented to come in contact with the wall due to steep effective potential barriers created by the induced Eddy currents. Resistivity in the wall allows the equilibrium point to drift towards the vessel on the slow timescale of flux penetration. The initial exponential motion of the plasma, understood as a resistive vertical instability, is succeeded by a non-linear "sinking" behaviour shown to be algebraic and decelerating. The acceleration of the plasma column often observed in experiments is thus concluded to originate from an early sharing of toroidal current between the core, the halo plasma, and the wall or from the thermal quench dynamics precipitating loss of plasma current.

  19. Quiescent plasma machine for plasma investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    A large volume quiescent plasma device is being developed at INPE to study Langmuir waves and turbulence generated by electron beams (E b ≤ 500 e V) interacting with plasma. This new quiescent plasma machine was designed to allow the performance of several experiments specially those related with laboratory space plasma simulation experiments. Current-driven instabilities and related phenomena such as double-layers along magnetic field lines are some of the many experiments planned for this machine. (author)

  20. Plasma-wall interaction; Interaction plasma paroi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichle, R

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the 43 slides presented in the framework of the week long lecture 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. This document is divided into 4 parts: 1) thermal load on the wall, power extraction and particle recovery, 2) basic edge plasma physics, 3) processes that drive the plasma-solid interaction, and 4) material conditioning (surface treatment...) for ITER.

  1. The Prevention of Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Antonio; Kan, Yuet Wai

    2013-01-01

    The thalassemias are among the most common inherited diseases worldwide, affecting individuals originating from the Mediterranean area, Middle East, Transcaucasia, Central Asia, Indian subcontinent, and Southeast Asia. As the diseases require long-term care, prevention of the homozygous state constitutes a major armament in the management. This article discusses the major prevention programs that are set up in many countries in Europe, Asia, and Australia, often drawing from the experience in Sardinia. These comprehensive programs involve carrier detections, molecular diagnostics, genetic counseling, and prenatal diagnosis. Variability of clinical severity can be attributable to interactions with α-thalassemia and mutations that increase fetal productions. Special methods taht are currently quite expensive and not widely applicable are preimplantation and preconception diagnosis. The recent successful studies of fetal DNA in maternal plasma may allow future prenatal diagnosis that is noninvasive for the fetus. PMID:23378598

  2. Poison Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Poison Prevention Page Content Article Body Post the Poison Help number 1-800-222-1222 on the ... or empty container of a toxic substance, call Poison Help immediately. More than a million American children ...

  3. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  4. Dense plasma. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulik, P.P.

    1977-01-01

    The known data on dense plasma investigation are summarized and systemized. The dense plasma is created by joint effect of high temperatures, resulting in thermal substance ionization, and high densities, resulting in ionization by pressure. The state of investigations of plasma properties has been analysed and a contribution of static and kinetic theories to equilibrium plasma investigation has been shown

  5. Preventive analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper will discuss the concepts of pre-emptive and preventive analgesia in acute and persistent postsurgical pain, based on the most recent experimental and clinical literature, with a special focus on injury-induced central sensitization and the development from acute to chronic pain. Recent...... of preventive analgesia for persistent postoperative pain are promising. However, clinicians must be aware of the demands for improved design of their clinical studies in order to get more conclusive answers regarding the different avenues for intervention. Summary: The concept of preventive analgesia is still...

  6. Mesoscopic plasma modes producing magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppi, B.; Detragiache, P. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection processes in collisionless regimes are shown to be difficult to excite in well confined plasma and, when excited, they possess rather weak characteristics in that they depend on the physics of [open quotes]transition layers[close quotes] that have microscopic dimensions. When considering the effects of the so-called drift frequencies that depend on the pressure gradients of both the electron and the ion populations, modes with azimuthal or poloidal mode number M[sup 0] = 1 can be driven unstable only in a limited range of parameters. The relevance of this theory is pointed out to explain the experimentally observed crash events of the plasma temperature in regimes where the electron collision frequency is smaller then the mode growth rate. Given the mode weakness it is suggested that the onset of reconnection should be triggered or prevented by controlling factors, such as the gradients of the plasma density or the creation of a significant high energy particle population in the center of the plasma column. It is pointed out that the plasma pressure gradient in the affected region of the plasma column is the driving factor of the considered instability in a well-confined plasma and, on this basis, the associated process of magnetic reconnection can be expected to proceed only up to the stage where the instability will have adequately depressed the relevant pressure gradient. The applicability of this analysis to space plasmas is discussed. 26 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Seminal plasma hypersensitivity reactions: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublett, J Wesley; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2011-01-01

    Seminal plasma hypersensitivity manifests as a spectrum of systemic and/or localized clinical symptoms after exposure to specific protein components in seminal fluid. The prevalence of this disease is largely unknown, but it is believed to affect up to 40,000 women in the United States. Although no definitive risk factors have been confirmed, women with systemic reactions are frequently atopic. Prostate-specific antigen is believed to be the major allergen involved in the disorder, but other proteins are likely involved. Interestingly, up to 40%-50% of both systemic and localized seminal plasma hypersensitivity cases can occur after first-time intercourse. Diagnosis is based on clinical history. The gold standard for diagnosing seminal plasma hypersensitivity is prevention of symptoms with the use of a condom. Patients with seminal plasma hypersensitivity demonstrate positive prick skin test and/or serum-specific immunoglobulin E to whole seminal fluid or fractionated seminal plasma proteins. Treatment of seminal plasma hypersensitivity involves either avoidance with the use of condoms, intravaginal graded challenge using dilutions of whole seminal fluid, or subcutaneous desensitization to relevant fractionated seminal plasma proteins obtained from the woman's sexual partner. In most cases, treatment using one or more of the above approaches has been very successful. Infertility has not been demonstrated to be directly related to seminal plasma hypersensitivity, although women with the condition frequently have difficulty conceiving due to their inability to have unprotected sexual intercourse. © 2011 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  8. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back ... in very slightly. Hold a ball directly in front of you. Keep your abdominal muscles tight and ...

  9. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic ... Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain ...

  10. Prevent Shingles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Prevent Shingles Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... that can result in vision loss. Older Adults & Shingles As you get older, you are more likely ...

  11. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! ...

  12. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Education Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle ... Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 for Spine Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis ...

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A SPECIALIST Prevention Strengthening Exercise Committee Exercise Committee Core Strengthening Many popular forms of exercise focus on ... acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from ...

  14. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient ... the floor; rotate from side to side. Repeat 10 times. Check with your physician; if you are ...

  15. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES Patient ... popular forms of exercise focus on core strengthening, or building the muscles that provide support for your body. Pilates, yoga and martial arts ...

  16. Collisionless plasmas in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Belmont, Gerard; Mottez, Fabrice; Pantellini, Filippo; Pelletier, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics examines the unique properties of media without collisions in plasma physics. Experts in this field, the authors present the first book to concentrate on collisionless conditions in plasmas, whether close or not to thermal equilibrium. Filling a void in scientific literature, Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics explains the possibilities of modeling such plasmas, using a fluid or a kinetic framework. It also addresses common misconceptions that even professionals may possess, on phenomena such as "collisionless (Landau) damping". Abundant illustrations

  17. Examples of plasma horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanni, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of the plasma horizon, defined as the boundary of the region in which an infinitely thin plasma can be supported against Coulomb attraction by a magnetic field, shows that the argument of selective accretion does not rule out the existence of charged black holes embedded in a conducting plasma. A detailed account of the covariant definition of plasma horizon is given and some examples of plasma horizons are presented. 7 references

  18. HIV Prevention

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about steps people can take to protect their health from HIV.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  19. Effect of serotonin infusions on the mean plasma concentrations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    concentrations of growth hormone, thyroid hormones and the amount and constituents of ... thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), growth hormone (GH), milk amount and constituents in the Sanan goats. Nine Sanan goats were ... samples before centrifugation to prevent clotting of plasma during storage. Plasma was stored at ...

  20. Extended application of Kohn-Sham first-principles molecular dynamics method with plane wave approximation at high energy—From cold materials to hot dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei, E-mail: weikang@pku.edu.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Hongwei [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zhang-ping@iapcm.ac.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); He, X. T., E-mail: xthe@iapcm.ac.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2016-04-15

    An extended first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method based on Kohn-Sham scheme is proposed to elevate the temperature limit of the FPMD method in the calculation of dense plasmas. The extended method treats the wave functions of high energy electrons as plane waves analytically and thus expands the application of the FPMD method to the region of hot dense plasmas without suffering from the formidable computational costs. In addition, the extended method inherits the high accuracy of the Kohn-Sham scheme and keeps the information of electronic structures. This gives an edge to the extended method in the calculation of mixtures of plasmas composed of heterogeneous ions, high-Z dense plasmas, lowering of ionization potentials, X-ray absorption/emission spectra, and opacities, which are of particular interest to astrophysics, inertial confinement fusion engineering, and laboratory astrophysics.

  1. Statistical Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ichimaru, Setsuo

    2004-01-01

    Plasma physics is an integral part of statistical physics, complete with its own basic theories. Designed as a two-volume set, Statistical Plasma Physics is intended for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate courses on plasma and statistical physics, and as such, its presentation is self-contained and should be read without difficulty by those with backgrounds in classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, and statistics. Major topics include: plasma phenomena in nature, kinetic equations, plasmas and dielectric media, electromagnetic properties of Vlasov plasmas in thermodynamic equilibria, transient processes, and instabilities. Statistical Plasma Physics, Volume II, treats subjects in the field of condensed plasma physics, with applications to condensed matter physics, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. The aim of this book is to elucidate a number of basic topics in physics of dense plasmas that interface with condensed matter physics, atomic physics, nuclear...

  2. Theoretical Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, George M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Lattice Boltzmann algorithms are a mesoscopic method to solve problems in nonlinear physics which are highly parallelized – unlike the direction solution of the original problem. These methods are applied to both fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. By introducing entropic constraints one can enforce the positive definiteness of the distribution functions and so be able to simulate fluids at high Reynolds numbers without numerical instabilities. By introducing a vector distribution function for the magnetic field one can enforce the divergence free condition on the magnetic field automatically, without the need of divergence cleaning as needed in most direct numerical solutions of the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations. The principal reason for the high parallelization of lattice Boltzmann codes is that they consist of a kinetic collisional relaxation step (which is purely local) followed by a simple shift of the relaxed data to neighboring lattice sites. In large eddy simulations, the closure schemes are highly nonlocal – the most famous of these schemes is that due to Smagorinsky. Under a lattice Boltzmann representation the Smagorinsky closure is purely local – being simply a particular moment on the perturbed distribution fucntions. After nonlocal fluid moment models were discovered to represent Landau damping, it was found possible to model these fluid models using an appropriate lattice Boltzmann algorithm. The close to ideal parallelization of the lattice Boltzmann codes permitted us to be Gordon Bell finalists on using the Earth Simulation in Japan. We have also been involved in the radio frequency propagation of waves into a tokamak and into a spherical overdense tokamak plasma. Initially we investigated the use of a quasi-optical grill for the launching of lower hybrid waves into a tokamak. It was found that the conducting walls do not prevent the rods from being properly irradiated, the overloading of the quasi-optical grill is not severe

  3. Plasmas and fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma and fluid physics includes the fields of fusion research and space investigation. This book discusses the most important advances in these areas over the past decade and recommends a stronger commitment to basic research in plasma and fluid physics. The book recommends that plasma and fluid physics be included in physics curriculums because of their increasing importance in energy and defense. The book also lists recent accomplishments in the fields of general plasma physics, fusion plasma confinement and heating, space and astrophysical plasmas, and fluid physics and lists research opportunities in these areas. A funding summary explains how research monies are allocated and suggests ways to improve their effectiveness

  4. Reviews of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    "Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24," edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence

  5. Optical properties of relativistic plasma mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenti, H; Monchocé, S; Kahaly, S; Bonnaud, G; Martin, Ph; Quéré, F

    2014-03-11

    The advent of ultrahigh-power femtosecond lasers creates a need for an entirely new class of optical components based on plasmas. The most promising of these are known as plasma mirrors, formed when an intense femtosecond laser ionizes a solid surface. These mirrors specularly reflect the main part of a laser pulse and can be used as active optical elements to manipulate its temporal and spatial properties. Unfortunately, the considerable pressures exerted by the laser can deform the mirror surface, unfavourably affecting the reflected beam and complicating, or even preventing, the use of plasma mirrors at ultrahigh intensities. Here we derive a simple analytical model of the basic physics involved in laser-induced deformation of a plasma mirror. We validate this model numerically and experimentally, and use it to show how such deformation might be mitigated by appropriate control of the laser phase.

  6. Plasma health care - Aims, constraints and progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfill, G.E.; Zimmerman, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Health Care covers three areas of interest for cold atmospheric pressure plasmas: Cosmetics, Hygiene and Medicine. These areas can be subdivided into personal and professional care. In this review will concentrate on Hygiene and Medicine. In professional hygiene the most important plasma contribution is sterilization, decontamination and disinfection. The main aim is the prevention of diseases or their containment. Progress in the development of efficient bactericidal plasma sources has been rapid, so that it appears realistic to use plasmas to combat nosocomial infections as well as community associated infections in the not too distant future. The advantages of plasma devices – they use air and electricity only, there are no waste products, they are inexpensive to manufacture and operate, easy to transport and install, and bactericidal effects are fast (seconds). Plasmas can efficiently kill resistant bacteria (e.g. MRSA) and tests have shown no resistance build-up so far. With an estimated 2 Million hospital induced infections each year in the US alone, and about 100.000 resulting deaths, very efficient, safe and fast hospital plasma hygiene devices would appear to be a very important weapon to help contain the spread of infectious diseases. In Medicine there are a number of ambitious ideas and aims. Plasmas can be “designed” to some extent. They can include different active species that can have an effect at the cellular level. There are ionic atoms and molecules, whose medical use need to be evaluated – the vision is that a new area of “plasma pharmacy” could develop. First steps are currently being taken in biological studies. Also the excited atoms in cold atmospheric plasmas may make cell walls more permeable for such species. (author)

  7. Formation of Imploding Plasma Liners for HEDP and MIF Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Case, Andrew [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Brockington, Samuel [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Messer, Sarah [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Bomgardner, Richard [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Phillips, Mike [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Wu, Linchun [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Elton, Ray [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-11-11

    Plasma jets with high density and velocity have a number of important applications in fusion energy and elsewhere, including plasma refueling, disruption mitigation in tokamaks, magnetized target fusion, injection of momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, plasma thrusters, and high energy density plasmas (HEDP). In Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF), for example, an imploding material liner is used to compress a magnetized plasma to fusion conditions and to confine the resulting burning plasma inertially to obtain the necessary energy gain. The imploding shell may be solid, liquid, gaseous, or a combination of these states. The presence of the magnetic field in the target plasma suppresses thermal transport to the plasma shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target to fusion conditions. This allows the required imploding momentum flux to be generated electromagnetically using off-the-shelf pulsed power technology. Practical schemes for standoff delivery of the imploding momentum flux are required and are open topics for research. One approach for accomplishing this, called plasma jet driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF), uses a spherical array of pulsed plasma guns to create a spherically imploding shell of very high velocity, high momentum flux plasma. This approach requires development of plasma jet accelerators capable of achieving velocities of 50-200 km/s with very precise timing and density profiles, and with high total mass and density. Low-Z plasma jets would require the higher velocities, whereas very dense high-Z plasma shells could achieve the goal at velocities of only 50-100 km/s. In this report, we describe our work to develop the pulsed plasma gun technology needed for an experimental scientific exploration of the PJMIF concept, and also for the other applications mentioned earlier. The initial goal of a few hundred of hydrogen at 200 km/s was eventually replaced with accelerating 8000 μg of argon or xenon to 50 km

  8. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Babayan, Steve E.; Hicks, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  9. Aerospace Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma/non-thermal plasma/cold plasmas are being used in a wide range of new applications in aeronautics, active flow control, heat transfer reduction, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, noise suppression, and power generation. Industrial applications may be found in pollution control, materials surface treatment, and water purification. In order for these plasma processes to become practical, efficient means of ionization are necessary. A primary challenge for these applications is to create a desired non-equilibrium plasma in air by preventing the discharge from transitioning into an arc. Of particular interest is the impact on simulations and experimental data with and without detailed consideration of non-equilibrium effects, and the consequences of neglecting non-equilibrium. This presentation will provide an assessment of the presence and influence of non-equilibrium phenomena for various aerospace needs and applications. Specific examples to be considered will include the forward energy deposition of laser-induced non-equilibrium plasmoids for sonic boom mitigation, weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges for an annular Hall type MHD generator duct for turbojet energy bypass, and fundamental mechanisms affecting the design and operation of novel plasma-assisted reactive systems in dielectric liquids (water purification, in-pipe modification of fuels, etc.).

  10. Plasma temperature measurements in disruption simulated experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.I. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Bakhtin, V.P. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Toporkov, D.A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Vasenin, S.G. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Wurz, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INR (Germany); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Results are reported of experiments to measure the temporal and spatial distributions of a temperature and radiation of a near surface plasma cloud appearing in the disruption simulated experiments. These measurements are needed to verificate the different numerical models of vapor shielding layer which appears to arise near the divertor plates surface and prevents them from the bulk of the incoming energy. Experiments with graphite and tungsten samples were carried out at the 2MK-200 plasma facility. Long CUSP trap was used as a source of high temperature deuterium plasma with a power density W = 10 MW/cm{sup 2} and time duration t = 20 mcs. Laser scattering, space and time resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy was employed to measure the plasma cloud temperature and radiation. The different behaviour of shielding layer parameters was shown for a graphite and tungsten samples. For a tungsten the sharp boundary existed between the incoming deuterium plasma and the thin layer of ablated material plasma and the strong gradient of electron temperature took place in this zone. For a graphite this boundary was broadened at the distance and the main part of the screening layer consisted of the mixture of the incoming deuterium and ablated carbon plasma. (orig.).

  11. Bullying Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the milestone project is to focus on bridging the gap of bullying and classroom instruction methods. There has to be a defined expectations and level of accountability that has to be defined when supporting and implementing a plan linked to bullying prevention. All individuals involved in the student's learning have to be aware of…

  12. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES ... The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND ...

  13. Prevent Pneumonia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-06

    CDC’s Matthew Westercamp explains what pneumonia is, its symptoms, and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/6/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Respiratory Diseases Branch (RDB).   Date Released: 8/6/2015.

  14. HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Collapse All Is abstinence the only 100% effective HIV prevention option? Yes. Abstinence means not having oral, ...

  15. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Feature Articles Patient Q&A Success Stories Definitions Anatomy of the Spine Definitions A-Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 for Spine Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Prevention ...

  16. Special issue: Plasma Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Tu, X.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    With growing concern of energy and environmental issues, the combination of plasma and heterogeneous catalysts receives special attention in greenhouse gas conversion, nitrogen fixation and hydrocarbon chemistry. Plasma gas conversion driven by renewable electricity is particularly important for the

  17. Nonequilibrium Air Plasma Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kruger, Charles

    2002-01-01

    .... The goal of the Air Plasma Ramparts program is to investigate energy efficient methods for creating and sustaining large volume atmospheric air plasmas with electron number densities greater than 10(exp 13...

  18. Perspective plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakicevic, I. S.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental results of the plasma focus have been analyzed and compared with theoretical regularities of the plasma force-free state. It has been shown that the plasma focus vortex filaments structures, which are closing in itself forming hot spots, have to be unstable, and so they are quickly destroying. That is the reason why in the plasma focus the controlled thermonuclear fusion can not be realized. (author)

  19. Plasma-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichle, R.

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the 43 slides presented in the framework of the week long lecture 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. This document is divided into 4 parts: 1) thermal load on the wall, power extraction and particle recovery, 2) basic edge plasma physics, 3) processes that drive the plasma-solid interaction, and 4) material conditioning (surface treatment...) for ITER

  20. Study of shear viscosity for dense plasmas by equilibrium molecular dynamics in asymmetric Yukawa ionic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Rudd, Robert; Cabot, William; Graziani, Frank

    2015-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of shear viscosity for asymmetric mixed plasma for thermodynamic conditions relevant to astrophysical and Inertial Confinement Fusion plasmas. Specifically, we consider mixtures of deuterium and argon at temperatures of 100-500 eV and a number density of 1025 ions/cc. The motion of 30000-120000 ions is simulated in which the ions interact via the Yukawa (screened Coulomb) potential. The electric field of the electrons is included in this effective interaction. Shear viscosity is calculated using the Green-Kubo approach with an integral of the shear stress autocorrelation function, a quantity calculated in the equilibrium MD simulations. We study different mixtures with increasing fraction of the minority high-Z element (Ar) in the D-Ar plasma mixture. In the more weakly coupled plasmas, at 500 eV and low Ar fractions, results from MD compare very well with Chapman-Enskog kinetic results. We introduce a model that interpolates between a screened-plasma kinetic theory at weak coupling and the Murillo Yukawa viscosity model at higher coupling. This hybrid kinetics-MD viscosity model agrees well with the MD results over the conditions simulated. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Absorption Spectra of BaF2 Sm2O3, Sm, Gd, and Ho Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael; Bastiani-Ceccotti, Serena

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge of the opacities of high Z element plasmas is important in indirect drive ICF and the study of stellar evolution. There are few experimental measurements of this quantity, and its theoretical determination is difficult due to the number of possible bound electron configurations. This study aims to better the theoretical understanding of this parameter by looking at the 3d-4f transitions of BaF2, Sm2O3, Sm, Gd, and Ho plasmas at the LULI2000 facility. The plasmas are produced by radiative heating and are cold, 15 -- 40 eV, and relatively dense, ˜ .01gm/cm^3 A plasma is produced by a .5 ns laser pulse irradiating a gold hohlraum and then probed by an x-ray source created by a gold foil irradiated by a 10 ps laser pulse. The transmission is found with simultaneous source and absorption measurements by an x-ray spectrometer in the 8 - 20 å range We will compare the results with statistical atomic structure codes. From this experiment we will gain further insight into the spectral broadening of neighboring Z elements due to changing plasma temperature and into mixture thermodynamics. This is a first step towards an experimental study of astrophysical domains.

  2. The effect of ICRF on the Alcator C Scrape-Off Layer plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, A.S.; Lipschultz, B.; McDermott, F.S.; Terry, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    This paper presents a characterization of the Alcator C Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) plasma during ICRF hydrogen-minority fast wave heating experiments. The SOL plasma parameters were measured using a multifunctional probe, JANUS, which is capable of simultaneously measuring the ion and electron parameters both parallel and antiparallel with respect to the toroidal magnetic field. The probe data indicate, at low value of injected rf power, there is direct edge heating and density increases at radii greater than that of the antenna Faraday shield. Increasing the injected rf power spreads both the temperature and density increases throughout the edge region, flattening the radial profiles. Varying the position of the resonance layer in the main plasma does not significantly change the effect of ICRF on the SOL parameters. Given this single spatial point characterization of the SOL, a crude estimate of power flow into and through the edge plasma indicate that /approximately/20% of the ICRF power launched from the antenna is absorbed /und directly/ in the SOL plasma. Additional observation of the impurity source rates confirms the conclusions of an earlier paper, which attributed increasing central densities of high-Z impurities to the increase in physical sputtering rate at both the ICRF antenna's Faraday shield and the limiter surface

  3. Observation of hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated plasma in a small hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hang; Kuang, Longyu; Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: jiangshn@vip.sina.com; Ding, Yongkun, E-mail: ding-yk@vip.sina.com [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin, E-mail: yjm70018@sina.cn; Zhu, Tuo; Lin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Haiying; Yu, Ruizhen; Liu, Shenye [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In the hohlraum used in laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated high-Z plasma have a great effect on laser injection efficiency, radiation uniformity, and diagnosis of hohlraum radiation field from diagnostic windows (DW). To study plasma filling in the DWs, a laser-irradiated Ti disk was used to generate 2–5 keV narrow energy band X-ray as the intense backlighter source, and laser-produced X-ray in a hohlraum with low-Z foam tamper was used to heat a small hole surrounded by gold wall with 150 μm in diameter and 100 μm deep. The hydrodynamic movement of the gold plasma in the small hole was measured by an X-ray framing camera and the results are analyzed. Quantitative measurement of the plasma areal density distribution and evolution in the small hole can be used to assess the effect of plasma filling on the diagnosis from the DWs.

  4. Application of plasma focus device to compression of toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari

    1980-01-01

    A new concept of compressing a toroidal plasma using a plasma focus device is considered. Maximum compression ratio of toroidal plasma is determined merely by the initial density ratio of the toroidal plasma to a sheet plasma in a focus device because of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. An initiation senario of plasma-linear is also proposed with a possible application of this concepts to the creation of a burning plasma in reversed field configurations, i.e., burning plasma vortex. (author)

  5. Divertor, thermonuclear device and method of neutralizing high temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegami, Hideo.

    1995-01-01

    The thermonuclear device comprises a thermonuclear reactor for taking place fusion reactions to emit fusion plasmas, and a divertor made of a hydrogen occluding material, and the divertor is disposed at a position being in contact with the fusion plasmas after nuclear fusion reaction. The divertor is heated by fusion plasmas after nuclear fusion reaction, and hydrogen is released from the hydrogen occluding material as a constituent material. A gas blanket is formed by the released hydrogen to cool and neutralize the supplied high temperature nuclear fusion plasmas. This prevents the high temperature plasmas from hitting against the divertor, elimination of the divertor by melting and evaporation, and solve a problem of processing a divertor activated by neutrons. In addition, it is possible to utilize hydrogen isotopes of fuels effectively and remove unnecessary helium. Inflow of impurities from out of the system can also be prevented. (N.H.)

  6. Some aspects of plasma thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorgoraki, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    The objective reasons which have inhibited the development of a plasma-thermodynamics theory are discussed and the authors formulate the fundamental principles which can be the basis of a common plasma-thermodynamics theory. Two kinds of thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas are discussed, an isothermal plasma and a nonisothermal plasma. An isothermal plasma is a high-temperature plasma; the Saha-Eggert equation describes its behavior. A nonisothermal plasma is a low-temperature plasma, and the reactions taking place therein are purely plasma-chemical. The ionization equilibrium and the composition of such a plasma can be found with the aid of the equations presented in this paper

  7. Contemporary plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodha, M.S.; Tewari, D.P.; Subbarao, D.

    1983-01-01

    The book consists of review articles on some selected contemporary aspects of plasma physics. The selected topics present a panoramic view of contemporary plasma physics and applications to fusion, space and MHD power generation. Basic non-linear plasma theory is also covered. The book is supposed to be useful for M.S./M.Sc. students specialising in plasma physics and for those beginning research work in plasma physics. It will also serve as a valuable reference book for more advanced research workers. (M.G.B.)

  8. Space plasma simulation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Scientific results of experiments and tests of instruments performed with the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber and its facility are reviewed in the following six categories. 1. Tests of instruments on board rockets, satellites and balloons. 2. Plasma wave experiments. 3. Measurements of plasma particles. 4. Optical measurements. 5. Plasma production. 6. Space plasms simulations. This facility has been managed under Laboratory Space Plasma Comittee since 1969 and used by scientists in cooperative programs with universities and institutes all over country. A list of publications is attached. (author)

  9. Cyclotron waves in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lominadze, D G

    2013-01-01

    Cyclotron Waves in Plasma is a four-chapter text that covers the basic physical concepts of the theory of cyclotron waves and cyclotron instabilities, brought about by the existence of steady or alternating plasma currents flowing perpendicular to the magnetic field.This book considers first a wide range of questions associated with the linear theory of cyclotron oscillations in equilibrium plasmas and in electron plasmas in metals and semiconductors. The next chapter deals with the parametric excitation of electron cyclotron oscillations in plasma in an alternating electric field. A chapter f

  10. Applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Applied Plasma Physics is a major sub-organizational unit of the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Program. It includes Fusion Plasma Theory and Experimental Plasma Research. The Fusion Plasma Theory group has the responsibility for developing theoretical-computational models in the general areas of plasma properties, equilibrium, stability, transport, and atomic physics. This group has responsibility for giving guidance to the mirror experimental program. There is a formal division of the group into theory and computational; however, in this report the efforts of the two areas are not separated since many projects have contributions from members of both. Under the Experimental Plasma Research Program we are developing a neutral-beam source, the intense, pulsed ion-neutral source (IPINS), for the generation of a reversed-field configuration on 2XIIB. We are also studying the feasibility of using certain neutron-detection techniques as plasma diagnostics in the next generation of thermonuclear experiments

  11. Metallurgical plasma torches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalov, V.A.; Latash, Yu.V.

    2000-01-01

    The technological equipment for the plasma heating of metals, plasma melting and plasma treatment of the surface is usually developed on the basis of are plasma torches using direct or alternating current. The reasons which partly restrict the industrial application of the plasma torches are the relatively short service life of the electrode (cathode) on which the arc is supported, and the contamination of the treated metal with the products of failure of the electrode. The aim of this work was to determine the reasons for the occurrence of negative phenomena observed in the process of service of plasma torches, and propose suitable approaches to the design of metallurgical plasma torches characterised by a long service life

  12. Plasma polymerization by Softplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, J.; Wu, Zhenning; Benter, Maike

    2008-01-01

    In the late 19th century, the first depositions - known today as plasma polymers, were reported. In the last century, more and more research has been put into plasma polymers. Many different deposition systems have been developed. [1, 2] Shi F. F. broadly classified them into internal electrode......, external electrode, and electrodeless microwave or high frequency reactors. [3] Softplasma™ is an internal electrode plasma setup powered by low frequenc~ gower supply. It was developed in late 90s for surface treatment of silicone rubber. [ ]- 5] It is a low pressure, low electron density, 3D homogenous...... plasma. In this study, we are presenting the surface modification"pf polymers by plasma polymerization using Softplasma™. Softplasma™ can be used for two major types of polymerization: polymerization of vinyl monomers, where plasma acts as initiator; chemical vapour deposition, where plasma acts...

  13. Plasma engineering: a perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralnick, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    This review paper will present the authors perspective of the field of Plasma Engineering as it has evolved over the preceding five years. This embrionic discipline has grown in that period of time to the point where it is sufficiently mature to become part of the curriculum, and a speciality within, the discipline of Nuclear Engineering. Plasma Engineering can be distinguished from the underlying science of plasma physics in that in the pursuit of the latter, our goal is the understanding of the fundamental processes governing the behavior of plasmas while the former discipline seeks the embodiment of these concepts in useful devices. Consequent to this goal, the plasma engineer, of necessity, is concerned with the interfaces between a plasma configuration and the device by which it is produced and maintained. These interface problems, often referred to as kitchen physics are multidisciplinary in nature, and their solution requires careful attention to both plasma physics and machine engineering detail

  14. Plasmas for medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.; Masur, K.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2013-09-01

    Plasma medicine is an innovative and emerging field combining plasma physics, life science and clinical medicine. In a more general perspective, medical application of physical plasma can be subdivided into two principal approaches. (i) “Indirect” use of plasma-based or plasma-supplemented techniques to treat surfaces, materials or devices to realize specific qualities for subsequent special medical applications, and (ii) application of physical plasma on or in the human (or animal) body to realize therapeutic effects based on direct interaction of plasma with living tissue. The field of plasma applications for the treatment of medical materials or devices is intensively researched and partially well established for several years. However, plasma medicine in the sense of its actual definition as a new field of research focuses on the use of plasma technology in the treatment of living cells, tissues, and organs. Therefore, the aim of the new research field of plasma medicine is the exploitation of a much more differentiated interaction of specific plasma components with specific structural as well as functional elements or functionalities of living cells. This interaction can possibly lead either to stimulation or inhibition of cellular function and be finally used for therapeutic purposes. During recent years a broad spectrum of different plasma sources with various names dedicated for biomedical applications has been reported. So far, research activities were mainly focused on barrier discharges and plasma jets working at atmospheric pressure. Most efforts to realize plasma application directly on or in the human (or animal) body for medical purposes is concentrated on the broad field of dermatology including wound healing, but also includes cancer treatment, endoscopy, or dentistry. Despite the fact that the field of plasma medicine is very young and until now mostly in an empirical stage of development yet, there are first indicators of its enormous

  15. Allergy prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muche-Borowski, Cathleen; Kopp, Matthias; Reese, Imke; Sitter, Helmut; Werfel, Thomas; Schäfer, Torsten

    2010-09-01

    The further increase of allergies in industrialized countries demands evidence-based measures of primary prevention. The recommendations as published in the guideline of 2004 were updated and consented on the basis of a systematic literature search. Evidence from the period February 2003-May 2008 was searched in the electronic databases Cochrane and MEDLINE as well as in reference lists of recent reviews and by contacting experts. The retrieved citations were screened for relevance first by title and abstract and in a second step as full paper. Levels of evidence were assigned to each included study and the methodological quality of the studies was assessed as high or low. Finally the revised recommendations were formally consented (nominal group process) by representatives of relevant societies and organizations including a self-help group. Of originally 4556 hits, 217 studies (4 Cochrane Reviews, 14 meta-analyses, 19 randomized controlled trials, 135 cohort and 45 case-control studies) were included and critically appraised. Grossly unchanged remained the recommendations on avoiding environmental tobacco smoke, breast-feeding over 4 months (alternatively hypoallergenic formulas for children at risk), avoiding a mold-promoting indoor climate, vaccination according to current recommendations, and avoidance of furry pets (especially cats) in children at risk. The recommendation on reducing the house dust mite allergen exposure as a measure of primary prevention was omitted and the impact of a delayed introduction of supplementary food was reduced. New recommendations were adopted concerning fish consumption (during pregnancy / breast-feeding and as supplementary food in the first year), avoidance of overweight, and reducing the exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollutants. The revision of this guideline on a profound evidence basis led to (1) a confirmation of existing recommendations, (2) substantial revisions, and (3) new recommendations. Thereby it is possible

  16. Plasma Sterilization: New Epoch in Medical Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, P.; Arun, N.; Vigneswaran, C.

    2015-04-01

    Clothing is perceived to be second skin to the human body since it is in close contact with the human skin most of the times. In hospitals, use of textile materials in different forms and sterilization of these materials is an essential requirement for preventing spread of germs. The need for appropriate disinfection and sterilization techniques is of paramount importance. There has been a continuous demand for novel sterilization techniques appropriate for use on various textile materials as the existing sterilization techniques suffer from various technical and economical drawbacks. Plasma sterilization is the alternative method, which is friendlier and more effective on the wide spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Basically, the main inactivation factors for cells exposed to plasma are heat, UV radiation and various reactive species. Plasma exposure can kill micro-organisms on a surface in addition to removing adsorbed monolayer of surface contaminants. Advantages of plasma surface treatment are removal of contaminants from the surface, change in the surface energy and sterilization of the surface. Plasma sterilization aims to kill and/or remove all micro-organisms which may cause infection of humans or animals, or which can cause spoilage of foods or other goods. This review paper emphasizes necessity for sterilization, essentials of sterilization, mechanism of plasma sterilization and the parameters influencing it.

  17. Surface cleaning of metal wire by atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, T.; Buttapeng, C.; Furuya, S.; Harada, N.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the possible application of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma for the annealing of metallic wire is examined and presented. The main purpose of the current study is to examine the surface cleaning effect for a cylindrical object by atmospheric pressure plasma. The experimental setup consists of a gas tank, plasma reactor, and power supply with control panel. The gas assists in the generation of plasma. Copper wire was used as an experimental cylindrical object. This copper wire was irradiated with the plasma, and the cleaning effect was confirmed. The result showed that it is possible to remove the tarnish which exists on the copper wire surface. The experiment reveals that atmospheric pressure plasma is usable for the surface cleaning of metal wire. However, it is necessary to examine the method for preventing oxidization of the copper wire.

  18. Magnetospheric plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawhan, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    A brief history of plasma wave observations in the Earth's magnetosphere is recounted and a classification of the identified plasma wave phenomena is presented. The existence of plasma waves is discussed in terms of the characteristic frequencies of the plasma, the energetic particle populations and the proposed generation mechanisms. Examples are given for which plasmas waves have provided information about the plasma parameters and particle characteristics once a reasonable theory has been developed. Observational evidence and arguments by analogy to the observed Earth plasma wave processes are used to identify plasma waves that may be significant in other planetary magnetospheres. The similarities between the observed characteristics of the terrestrial kilometric radiation and radio bursts from Jupiter, Saturn and possibly Uranus are stressed. Important scientific problems concerning plasma wave processes in the solar system and beyond are identified and discussed. Models for solar flares, flare star radio outbursts and pulsars include elements which are also common to the models for magnetospheric radio bursts. Finally, a listing of the research and development in terms of instruments, missions, laboratory experiments, theory and computer simulations needed to make meaningful progress on the outstanding scientific problems of plasma wave research is given. (Auth.)

  19. Plasma Biomedicine in Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Satsohi

    2012-10-01

    Various effects of plasmas irradiation on cells, tissues, and biomaterials relevant for orthopedic applications have been examined. For direct application of plasmas to living cells or tissues, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with helium flows into ambient air were used. For biomaterial processing, on the other hand, either helium DBDs mentioned above or low-pressure discharges generated in a chamber were used. In this presentation, plasma effects on cell proliferation and plasma treatment for artificial bones will be discussed. First, the conditions for enhanced cell proliferation in vitro by plasma applications have been examined. The discharge conditions for cell proliferation depend sensitively on cell types. Since cell proliferation can be enhanced even when the cells are cultured in a plasma pre-treated medium, long-life reactive species generated in the medium by plasma application or large molecules (such as proteins) in the medium modified by the plasma are likely to be the cause of cell proliferation. It has been found that there is strong correlation between (organic) hydroperoxide generation and cell proliferation. Second, effects of plasma-treated artificial bones made of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) have been examined in vitro and vivo. It has been found that plasma treatment increases hydrophilicity of the surfaces of microscopic inner pores, which directly or indirectly promotes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells introduced into the pores and therefore causes faster bone growth. The work has been performed in collaboration with Prof. H. Yoshikawa and his group members at the School of Medicine, Osaka University.

  20. Particle beams and plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; Messerschmid, E.; Lawson, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    These lectures present a survey of some of the concepts of plasma physics and look at some situations familiar to particle-accelerator physicists from the point of view of a plasma physicist, with the intention of helping to link together the two fields. At the outset, basic plasma concepts are presented, including definitions of a plasma, characteristic parameters, magnetic pressure and confinement. This is followed by a brief discussion on plasma kinetic theory, non-equilibrium plasma, and the temperature of moving plasmas. Examples deal with beams in the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings as well as with non-steady beams in cyclic accelerators and microwave tubes. In the final chapters, time-varying systems are considered: waves in free space and the effect of cylinder bounds, wave motion in cold stationary plasmas, and waves in plasmas with well-defined streams. The treatment throughout is informal, with emphasis on the essential physical properties of continuous beams in accelerators and storage rings in relation to the corresponding problems in plasma physics and microwave tubes. (Author)

  1. Parallel processing for a 1-D time-dependent solution to impurity rate equations for fusion plasma simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasingam, R.

    1990-01-01

    In fusion plasmas impurities such as carbon, oxygen or nickel can contaminate the plasma and cause degradation of the performance of a fusion device through radiation. However, impurities can also be used as diagnostics to obtain information about a plasma through spectroscopic experiments which can then be used in plasma modeling and simulations. In the past, serial algorithms have been described for either the time dependent or steady state problem. In this paper, we describe a parallel procedure adopted to solve the time-dependent problem. It can be shown that for the steady state problem a parallel procedure would not be a useful application of parallelization because a few seconds of the Central Processing Unit time on a CRAY-XMP or IBM 3090/600S would suffice to obtain the solution, while this is not the case for the time-dependent problem. In order to study the effects of low Z and high Z impurities on the final state of a plasma, time-dependent solutions are necessary. For purposes of diagnostics and comparisons with experiments, a fast turn around time of the simulations would be advantageous. We have implemented a parallel algorithm on and IBM 3090/600S and tested its performance for a typical set of fusion plasma parameters. 4 refs., 1 tab

  2. Development and Benchmarking of a Hybrid PIC Code For Dense Plasmas and Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Welch, Dale R. [Voss Scientific, LLC; Thompson, John R. [FAR-TECH, Inc.; MacFarlane, Joeseph J. [Prism Computational Sciences Inc.; Phillips, Michael W. [Advanced Energy Systems, Inc.; Bruner, Nicki [Voss Scientific, LLC; Mostrom, Chris [Voss Scientific, LLC; Thoma, Carsten [Voss Scientific, LLC; Clark, R. E. [Voss Scientific, LLC; Bogatu, Nick [FAR-TECH, Inc.; Kim, Jin-Soo [FAR-TECH, Inc.; Galkin, Sergei [FAR-TECH, Inc.; Golovkin, Igor E. [Prism Computational Sciences, Inc.; Woodruff, P. R. [Prism Computational Sciences, Inc.; Wu, Linchun [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Messer, Sarah J. [HyperV Technologies Corp.

    2014-05-20

    , restrike and advanced jet accelerator design. In addition, a strong linkage to diagnostic measurements was made by modeling plasma jet experiments on PLX to support benchmarking of the code. A large number of upgrades and improvements advancing hybrid PIC algorithms were implemented in LSP during the second funding cycle. These include development of fully 3D radiation transport algorithms, new boundary conditions for plasma-electrode interactions, and a charge conserving equation of state that permits multiply ionized high-Z ions. The final funding cycle focused on 1) mitigating the effects of a slow-growing grid instability which is most pronounced in plasma jet frame expansion problems using the two-fluid Eulerian remap algorithm, 2) extension of the Eulerian Smoothing Algorithm to allow EOS/Radiation modeling, 3) simulations of collisionless shocks formed by jet merging, 4) simulations of merging jets using high-Z gases, 5) generation of PROPACEOS EOS/Opacity databases, 6) simulations of plasma jet transport experiments, 7) simulations of plasma jet penetration through transverse magnetic fields, and 8) GPU PIC code development The tools developed during this project are applicable not only to the study of plasma jets, but also to a wide variety of HEDP plasmas of interest to DOE, including plasmas created in short-pulse laser experiments performed to study fast ignition concepts for inertial confinement fusion.

  3. Experimental and numerical investigations on the density profile of CO2 laser-produced Sn plasma for an EUVL source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y.; Ueno, Y.; Yuspeh, S.; Burdt, R. A.; Amin, N.; Shaikh, N. M.; Tillack, M. S.; Najmabadi, F.

    2010-04-01

    Experimentally observed density profile of CO2 laser-produced Sn plasma was compared with that predicted by one dimensional hydrodynamic radiation numerical code. Experimental data showed a much smaller corona and a much shorter shift distance of the critical density from the initial target surface as compared with those predicted by an isothermal model and the numerical simulation. The possible reason may come from thin localized laser deposition region, less energy transport into the corona and into the dense region beyond the critical density. This research suggests that more efforts to understand the fundamental dominating the interaction of CO2 laser with high Z plasma are necessary to form a more solid foundation for the application of numerical method to the development of the EUVL source.

  4. Ion beam generated plasmas described from the view of atomic physics. Atomphysikalische Beschreibung ionenstrahl-erzeugter Plasmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.

    1991-06-01

    The aim of this thesis is the description of ion-beam-driven plasmas by means of rate equations. Emphasis is put on the numerical and analytical study of the state and radiation emission of these non-equilibrium systems and on their stopping power for swift projectile ions. Important features of the quasi-stationary non-equilibrium states of ion-beam-generated plasmas are discussed by describing the degree of ionization as well as the distribution of ionization stages and the excited level populations of the plasma ions. The investigation of the energy balance of ion-beam-driven plasmas illustrates that the specific deposition power is only a weak function of the plasma temperature and density. On the contrary, the radiation emission shows significant structure, leading to the possibility of several equilibrium points which may be reached by the beam-plasma-system depending on its initial state. The time needed to build up an equilibrium temperature is long compared to both the time after which a temperature for the free electrons can be defined and the typical time scale of relaxation of the level populations. Furthermore this work presents an analytical discussion of the conversion of ion beam energy into radiation emission from the K-band of the plasma target for all elements. Finally, the energy loss of fast projectile ions in partially ionized, dense plasmas is investigated with emphasis on the changes of the average ionization potentials compared to cold matter. It is shown that the influence of excited state populations in the plasma ions may enhance the energy loss up to 13% in the case of a hydrogen plasma. As far as weakly ionized high-Z matter is concerned, a known reduction of the energy loss of about 10% is confirmed and systematically studied for the elements of the periodic table. (orig./AH).

  5. Thermal plasma waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heberlein, Joachim; Murphy, Anthony B

    2008-01-01

    Plasma waste treatment has over the past decade become a more prominent technology because of the increasing problems with waste disposal and because of the realization of opportunities to generate valuable co-products. Plasma vitrification of hazardous slags has been a commercial technology for several years, and volume reduction of hazardous wastes using plasma processes is increasingly being used. Plasma gasification of wastes with low negative values has attracted interest as a source of energy and spawned process developments for treatment of even municipal solid wastes. Numerous technologies and approaches exist for plasma treatment of wastes. This review summarizes the approaches that have been developed, presents some of the basic physical principles, provides details of some specific processes and considers the advantages and disadvantages of thermal plasmas in waste treatment applications. (topical review)

  6. What is a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierdel, G.

    1974-01-01

    To study this book, written in an intuitive and easily comprehensive manner including many illustrations, presumes the knowledge of highschool level. Beginning with the plasma as the 4. physical condition a review of the three classical physical conditions is given and the following topics are discussed: a) structure of gases kinetic theory, b) foundations of plasma-physics, c) production of a plasma, d) behaviour of a plasma in a magnetic field, c) oscillations and plasma-waves, f) plasma-diagnostics. Finally technical applications in light-technology, for the development of high temperature heat-sources and in energy-technology (transformation and control of electric power, MHD-generator, thermonuclear reactor) are discussed and literature is given for completion and further studies. (GG) [de

  7. What is a plasma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    This introduction will define the plasma fourth state of matter, where we find plasmas on earth and beyond, and why they are useful. There are applications to many consumer items, fusion energy, scientific devices, satellite communications, semiconductor processing, spacecraft propulsion, and more. Since 99% of our observable universe is ionized gas, plasma physics determines many important features of astrophysics, space physics, and magnetosphere physics in our solar system. We describe some plasma characteristics, examples in nature, some useful applications, how to create plasmas. A brief introduction to the theoretical framework includes the connection between kinetic and fluid descriptions, quasi neutrality, Debye shielding, ambipolar electric fields, some plasma waves. Hands-on demonstrations follow. More complete explanations will follow next week.

  8. Introduction to Complex Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bonitz, Michael; Ludwig, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Complex plasmas differ from traditional plasmas in many ways: these are low-temperature high pressure systems containing nanometer to micrometer size particles which may be highly charged and strongly interacting. The particles may be chemically reacting or be in contact with solid surfaces, and the electrons may show quantum behaviour. These interesting properties have led to many applications of complex plasmas in technology, medicine and science. Yet complex plasmas are extremely complicated, both experimentally and theoretically, and require a variety of new approaches which go beyond standard plasma physics courses. This book fills this gap presenting an introduction to theory, experiment and computer simulation in this field. Based on tutorial lectures at a very successful recent Summer Institute, the presentation is ideally suited for graduate students, plasma physicists and experienced undergraduates.

  9. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Horimoto, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Sukegawa, Kouta; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasma can be anisotropic in laser-produced plasmas. We have developed a new technique to evaluate the polarization degree of the emission lines in the extreme vacuum ultra violet wavelength region. The polarization of the emission lines and the continuums from the lithium-like nitrogen and from helium- and hydrogen-like carbon in recombining plasma is evaluated. Particle simulation in the velocity space gives the time scale for relaxation of anisotropic EVDFs. (author)

  10. Space plasma physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1993-01-01

    During the course of this grant, work was performed on a variety of topics and there were a number of significant accomplishments. A summary of these accomplishments is included. The topics studied include empirical model data base, data reduction for archiving, semikinetic modeling of low energy plasma in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere, O(+) outflows, equatorial plasma trough, and plasma wave ray-tracing studies. A list of publications and presentations which have resulted from this research is also included.

  11. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  12. Compression of toroidal plasma by imploding plasma-liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1979-07-01

    A new concept of compressing a plasma in a closed magnetic configuration by a version of liner implosion flux compression technique is considered. The liner consists of a dense plasma cylinder, i.e. the plasma-liner. Maximum compression ratio of toroidal plasma is determined just by the initial density ratio of the toroidal plasma to the liner plasma because of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A start-up senario of plasma-liner is also proposed with a possible application of this concept to the creation of a burning plasma in reversed field configurations, i.e. burning plasma vortex. (author)

  13. Rotating preventers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangedahl, M.J.; Stone, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that recent changes in the oil and gas industry and ongoing developments in horizontal and underbalanced drilling necessitated development of a better rotating head. A new device called the rotating blowout preventer (RBOP) was developed by Seal-Tech. It is designed to replace the conventional rotating control head on top of BOP stacks and allows drilling operations to continue even on live (underbalanced) wells. Its low wear characteristics and high working pressure (1,500 psi) allow drilling rig crews to drill safely in slightly underbalanced conditions or handle severe well control problems during the time required to actuate other BOPs in the stack. Drilling with a RBOP allows wellbores to be completely closed in tat the drill floor rather than open as with conventional BOPs

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990

  15. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  16. Plasma globe revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2018-01-01

    The plasma globe or plasma ball is an underutilized resource for teaching the physics of electricity. It also offers a convenient source of electric field that can be used for demonstrations and experiments. Unlike the Van de Graaff generator, the plasma globe does not shock you and is essentially silent. Other authors have written up some of these activities, but the full potential of the plasma globe is generally not taken advantage of by most teachers. I hope that this article can bring more awareness to how this ubiquitous piece of novelty lighting can be an essential physics teaching apparatus.

  17. Plasma processing for VLSI

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1984-01-01

    VLSI Electronics: Microstructure Science, Volume 8: Plasma Processing for VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) discusses the utilization of plasmas for general semiconductor processing. It also includes expositions on advanced deposition of materials for metallization, lithographic methods that use plasmas as exposure sources and for multiple resist patterning, and device structures made possible by anisotropic etching.This volume is divided into four sections. It begins with the history of plasma processing, a discussion of some of the early developments and trends for VLSI. The second section

  18. Nonlinear Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kono, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    A nonlinearity is one of the most important notions in modern physics. A plasma is rich in nonlinearities and provides a variety of behaviors inherent to instabilities, coherent wave structures and turbulence. The book covers the basic concepts and mathematical methods, necessary to comprehend nonlinear problems widely encountered in contemporary plasmas, but also in other fields of physics and current research on self-organized structures and magnetized plasma turbulence. The analyses make use of strongly nonlinear models solved by analytical techniques backed by extensive simulations and available experiments. The text is written for senior undergraduates, graduate students, lecturers and researchers in laboratory, space and fusion plasmas.

  19. Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Leslie Colin

    2003-01-01

    A short, self-sufficient introduction to the physics of plasma for beginners as well as researchers in a number of fields. The author looks at the dynamics and stability of magnetoplasma and discusses wave and transport in this medium. He also looks at such applications as fusion research using magnetic confinement of Deuterium plasma, solar physics with its plasma loops reaching high into the corona, sunspots and solar wind, engineering applications to metallurgy, MHD direct generation of electricity, and railguns, finally touching on the relatively new and difficult subject of dusty plasmas.

  20. Platelet Rich Plasma and Knee Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, the knee joint has traditionally been considered the workhorse. The reconstruction of every damaged element in this joint is crucial in achieving the surgeon’s goal to restore the knee function and prevent degeneration towards osteoarthritis. In the last fifteen years, the field of regenerative medicine is witnessing a boost of autologous blood-derived platelet rich plasma products (PRPs application to effectively mimic and accelerate the tissue healing process. The scientific rationale behind PRPs is the delivery of growth factors, cytokines, and adhesive proteins present in platelets and plasma, as well as other biologically active proteins conveyed by the plasma such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, and fibronectin; with this biological engineering approach, new perspectives in knee surgery were opened. This work describes the use of PRP to construct and repair every single anatomical structure involved in knee surgery, detailing the process conducted in ligament, meniscal, and chondral surgery.

  1. Atomic physics for simulations and diagnostics of plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapisch, Marcel

    2000-10-01

    Recent progress in target design for laser induced ICF[1]has shown the importance of reliable atomic physics for simulating radiation of heavy elements. As for diagnostic purposes, one can usually choose elements to generate simple spectra from which temperature and densities can be deduced. I will describe atomic physics methods addressing both needs of plasma physics. Low density (e.g. Tokamaks) and high density (e.g. laser-produced) plasmas can be described in a unified manner within the collisional radiative model (CRM), bridging between the corona equilibrium and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The domain of validity of theses two limits will be discussed. The importance of self-generated or external radiation fields raises the dilemma of including atomic models on-line with the hydrodynamics (atomic description approximated) or off-line (radiation approximated). For simple spectra (low Z elements, H and He-like heavier ions) available methods and databases for rates of the various processes involved will be described. However, for complex spectra (medium to high Z atoms not fully ionized), detailed application of the CRM is usually not possible due to the number of energy levels and/or processes. The approach of ``unresolved transition arrays" (UTA)[2] and ``super transition arrays" (STA)[3], for LTE and non-LTE [4] will be presented in some details. [1]D. G. Colombant, S. E. Bodner, A. J. Schmitt, et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2046 (2000); 7, 2298 (2000). [2]J. Bauche, C. Bauche-Arnoult and M. Klapisch, Advance At. Mol. Phys. 23, 131(1987). [3]A. Bar-Shalom, J. Oreg, W. H. Goldstein, et al., Phys. Rev. A 40, 3183 (1989). [4]A. Bar-Shalom, J. Oreg and M. Klapisch, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 58, 427 (1997).

  2. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Hoan; Park, Hyung Jun; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-response genes. We found that liquid plasma markedly increased the concentration of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), reflecting an influx from the extracellular milieu. Liquid plasma contributed to mitochondrial accumulation of ROS and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential with consequent cell death. Healthy normal cells, however, were hardly affected by the liquid-plasma treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blocked liquid-plasma-induced cell death. A knockdown of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or Mn-SOD enhanced the plasma-induced cell death, whereas expression of exogenous CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, or catalase blocked the cell death. These results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by ROS production is a key contributor to liquid-plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, regardless of genetic variation. Thus, liquid plasma may have clinical applications, e.g., the development of therapeutic strategies and prevention of disease progression despite tumor heterogeneity.

  3. Treating and Preventing Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  4. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    By photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms with laser light tuned just above the ionization limit, plasmas can be created with electron and ion temperatures below 10 K. These ultracold neutral plasmas have extended the temperature bounds of plasma physics by two orders of magnitude. Table-top experiments, using many of the tools from atomic physics, allow for the study of plasma phenomena in this new regime with independent control over the density and temperature of the plasma through the excitation process. Characteristic of these systems is an inhomogeneous density profile, inherited from the density distribution of the laser-cooled neutral atom sample. Most work has dealt with unconfined plasmas in vacuum, which expand outward at velocities of order 100 m/s, governed by electron pressure, and with lifetimes of order 100 μs, limited by stray electric fields. Using detection of charged particles and optical detection techniques, a wide variety of properties and phenomena have been observed, including expansion dynamics, collective excitations in both the electrons and ions, and collisional properties. Through three-body recombination collisions, the plasmas rapidly form Rydberg atoms, and clouds of cold Rydberg atoms have been observed to spontaneously avalanche ionize to form plasmas. Of particular interest is the possibility of the formation of strongly coupled plasmas, where Coulomb forces dominate thermal motion and correlations become important. The strongest impediment to strong coupling is disorder-induced heating, a process in which Coulomb energy from an initially disordered sample is converted into thermal energy. This restricts electrons to a weakly coupled regime and leaves the ions barely within the strongly coupled regime. This review will give an overview of the field of ultracold neutral plasmas, from its inception in 1999 to current work, including efforts to increase strong coupling and effects on plasma properties due to strong coupling.

  5. Velocity-metallicity correlation for high-z DLA galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledoux, C.; Petitjean, P.; Fynbo, J.P.U.

    2006-01-01

    Galaxies: halos, galaxies: high-redshift, galaxies: ISM, quasars: absorption lines, cosmology: observations Udgivelsesdato: Oct.......Galaxies: halos, galaxies: high-redshift, galaxies: ISM, quasars: absorption lines, cosmology: observations Udgivelsesdato: Oct....

  6. First systematic deep search for high-z CO absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, Elizabeth; Sadler, Elaine; Morganti, Raffaella; Ekers, Ron; Curran, Steve; Allison, James Richard; Chow, Kate; Emonts, Bjorn

    2012-04-01

    Molecular gas plays an important role in the formation and evolution of galaxies and is thought to be a crucial link between the central Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and the host galaxy. The most common way to study the properties of this cool, molecular gas is to look for Carbon monoxide (CO) emission. However, these studies are extremely expensive in telescope time. We propose to look for CO absorption against high redshift, bright millimetre sources selected from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey. This will be the first systematic study of CO absorption properties of a large sample (20 objects) of galaxies providing insight into the molecular gas properties of the host galaxy without the time-consuming nature of CO emission line searches.

  7. Relapse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S M; Wasserman, D A; Havassy, B E

    1991-01-01

    Although knowledge about relapse prevention is still at an early stage, the extant data highlight the importance of several constructs. 1. Motivation for abstinence remains central. The construct itself is often clouded because of its association with mystical notions such as willpower and self-control. We know that manipulation of environmental events can increase motivation. These interventions are effective, however, only as long as the contingencies are in effect. We need to develop and evaluate strategies for transferring contingency management to the natural environment, that is, to institutions and groups that can perpetuate them for the long term. Also, clarification of the kinds of abstinence goals needed to prevent relapse is important. 2. Coping skills have been studied by several investigators, but research on these, except for job-finding skills, is not encouraging. The skills usually taught may be too basic. Skills training oriented to complex targets, such as building nondrug-using networks, may be useful and should be further explored. 3. Social support is clearly important, yet we do not know how best to use it to promote abstinence. The little research available suggests that both familial and nonfamilial systems should be mobilized. We need to define abstinence-promoting supportive behaviors, identify and engage important support systems in treatment, and help patients expand their nondrug-using contacts. 4. Negative affect may be causally related to relapse. We need to continue efforts to identify dysphoric patients and develop interventions to ameliorate dysphoria concurrent with drug abuse treatment (cf. Zweben and Smith 1989). 5. Drug cue reactivity and extinction to drug cues have been demonstrated in the laboratory. What is needed in this promising line of research are (1) investigation of cues and cue-reactivity phenomena in the natural environment or in conditions closely mimicking that environment and (2) extinction methods that transfer

  8. Plasma Physics An Introduction to Laboratory, Space, and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Plasma Physics gives a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The new fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a brief introduction to plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple and emphasizes the underlying concepts. T...

  9. EDITORIAL: Plasma jets and plasma bullets Plasma jets and plasma bullets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, M. G.; Ganguly, B. N.; Hicks, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    Plasma plumes, or plasma jets, belong to a large family of gas discharges whereby the discharge plasma is extended beyond the plasma generation region into the surrounding ambience, either by a field (e.g. electromagnetic, convective gas flow, or shock wave) or a gradient of a directionless physical quantity (e.g. particle density, pressure, or temperature). This physical extension of a plasma plume gives rise to a strong interaction with its surrounding environment, and the interaction alters the properties of both the plasma and the environment, often in a nonlinear and dynamic fashion. The plasma is therefore not confined by defined physical walls, thus extending opportunities for material treatment applications as well as bringing in new challenges in science and technology associated with complex open-boundary problems. Some of the most common examples may be found in dense plasmas with very high dissipation of externally supplied energy (e.g. in electrical, optical or thermal forms) and often in or close to thermal equilibrium. For these dense plasmas, their characteristics are determined predominantly by strong physical forces of different fields, such as electrical, magnetic, thermal, shock wave, and their nonlinear interactions [1]. Common to these dense plasma plumes are significant macroscopic plasma movement and considerable decomposition of solid materials (e.g. vaporization). Their applications are numerous and include detection of elemental traces, synthesis of high-temperature materials and welding, laser--plasma interactions, and relativistic jets in particle accelerators and in space [2]-[4]. Scientific challenges in the understanding of plasma jets are exciting and multidisciplinary, involving interweaving transitions of all four states of matter, and their technological applications are wide-ranging and growing rapidly. Using the Web of Science database, a search for journal papers on non-fusion plasma jets reveals that a long initial phase up

  10. Waves in unmagnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, A.J.D.

    1979-01-01

    A review of linear and weakly non-linear theory of electron waves, ion waves and electromagnetic waves in plasmas is presented. The author restricts the discussion to an infinitely extended, homogeneous and isotropic plasma, not affected by external fields and described by Vlasov's and Maxwell's equations. (Auth.)

  11. Plasma etching an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Manos, Dennis M

    1989-01-01

    Plasma etching plays an essential role in microelectronic circuit manufacturing. Suitable for researchers, process engineers, and graduate students, this book introduces the basic physics and chemistry of electrical discharges and relates them to plasma etching mechanisms. Throughout the volume the authors offer practical examples of process chemistry, equipment design, and production methods.

  12. Introduction to Plasma Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, H-J

    2009-01-01

    Based on lectures given at the Ruhr-University of Bochum for graduate students and postgraduates starting in plasma physics as well as from low- to high-density hot plasmas, this book introduces basic ideas and fundamental concepts and typical instrumentation from the X-ray to the infrared spectral regions

  13. General Relativistic Plasma Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moortgat, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis I discuss the importance of general relativity on plasma physics in several astrophysical and cosmological contexts. The first chapters show how gravitational waves can excite all three fundamental low frequency magnetohydrodynamic plasma modes, the Alfven, slow and fast

  14. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamsstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Atoms in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  16. General relativistic plasma dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moortgat, Joachim Benedictus

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis I discuss the importance of general relativity on plasma physics in several astrophysical and cosmological contexts. The first chapters show how gravitational waves can excite all three fundamental low frequency magnetohydrodynamic plasma modes, the Alfven, slow and fast

  17. Plasma technology directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling

  18. Atoms in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs

  19. Helical plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beklemishev, A. D., E-mail: bekl@bk.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  20. Plasma-material interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma-interactive components must be resistant to erosion processes, efficient in heat removal, and effective in minimizing tritium inventory and permeation. As long as plasma edge temperatures are 50 eV, no one material can satisfy the diverse requirements imposed by these plasma materials interactions. The only solution is the design of duplex, or even more complicated, structures. The material that faces the plasma should be low atomic number, with acceptable erosion and evaporation characteristics. The substrate material must have high thermal conductivity for heat removal. Finally, materials must be selected judiciously for tritium compatibility. In conclusion, materials play a critical role in the achievement of safe and economical magnetic fusion energy. Improvements in materials have already led to many advances in present day device operation, but additional innovative materials solutions are required for the critical plasma materials interaction issues in future power reactors

  1. Microphysics of cosmic plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, Andrei; Cargill, Peter; Dendy, Richard; Wit, Thierry; Raymond, John

    2014-01-01

    This title presents a review of the detailed aspects of the physical processes that underlie the observed properties, structures and dynamics of cosmic plasmas. An assessment of the status of understanding of microscale processes in all astrophysical collisionless plasmas is provided. The topics discussed include  turbulence in astrophysical and solar system plasmas as a phenomenological description of their dynamic properties on all scales; observational, theoretical and modelling aspects of collisionless magnetic reconnection; the formation and dynamics of shock waves; and a review and assessment of microprocesses, such as the hierarchy of plasma instabilities, non-local and non-diffusive transport processes and ionisation and radiation processes.  In addition, some of the lessons that have been learned from the extensive existing knowledge of laboratory plasmas as applied to astrophysical problems are also covered.   This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in the areas of cosmi...

  2. Solar system plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of spacecraft observations of plasma waves in the solar system. In situ measurements of plasma phenomena have now been obtained at all of the planets except Mercury and Pluto, and in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 0.29 to 58 AU. To illustrate the range of phenomena involved, we discuss plasma waves in three regions of physical interest: (1) planetary radiation belts, (2) planetary auroral acceleration regions and (3) the solar wind. In each region we describe examples of plasma waves that are of some importance, either due to the role they play in determining the physical properties of the plasma, or to the unique mechanism involved in their generation.

  3. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fermous, Rachid, E-mail: rfermous@usthb.dz; Djebli, Mourad, E-mail: mdjebli@usthb.dz [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, USTHB, B.P. 32 Bab-Ezzouar, 16079 Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  4. Polio and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Photo Collections Videos Polio Today → Polio + Prevention Polio + Prevention Polio and prevention Polio is a crippling and ... a child for life. Learn more about polio + prevention The Virus The Vaccines The Communities Related resources ...

  5. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recruiting Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) The NIDDK-sponsored Diabetes Prevention ... Diabetes Prevention Program for those who are eligible. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) DPP Goal The DPP looked ...

  6. Colloidal Plasmas: Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various ...

  7. A new large-scale plasma source with plasma cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, K.; Hirokawa, K.; Suzuki, H.; Satake, T.

    1996-01-01

    A new large-scale plasma source (200 mm diameter) with a plasma cathode has been investigated. The plasma has a good spatial uniformity, operates at low electron temperature, and is highly ionized under relatively low gas pressure of about 10 -4 Torr. The plasma source consists of a plasma chamber and a plasma cathode generator. The plasma chamber has an anode which is 200 mm in diameter, 150 mm in length, is made of 304 stainless steel, and acts as a plasma expansion cup. A filament-cathode-like plasma ''plasma cathode'' is placed on the central axis of this source. To improve the plasma spatial uniformity in the plasma chamber, a disk-shaped, floating electrode is placed between the plasma chamber and the plasma cathode. The 200 mm diameter plasma is measure by using Langmuir probes. As a result, the discharge voltage is relatively low (30-120 V), the plasma space potential is almost equal to the discharge voltage and can be easily controlled, the electron temperature is several electron volts, the plasma density is about 10 10 cm -3 , and the plasma density is about 10% variance in over a 100 mm diameter. (Author)

  8. Bioactivity of plasma implanted biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D) is an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification of biomedical materials is described. NiTi alloys have unique super-elastic and shape memory properties and are suitable for orthopedic implants but the leaching of toxic Ni may pose health hazards in humans. We have recently investigated the use of acetylene, oxygen and nitrogen PIII and D to prevent out-diffusion of nickel and good results have been obtained. Silicon is the most important material in the microelectronics industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PIII into silicon to improve the surface bioactivity and observed biomimetic growth of apatite on the surface in simulated body fluids. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness and by incorporation of elements such as nitrogen and phosphorus, the surface blood compatibility can be improved. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results are discussed in this article

  9. Plasma physics an introduction to laboratory, space, and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The enlarged new edition of this textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The novel fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a concise description of modern plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple a...

  10. Waves in Space Plasmas Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredricks, R. W.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP) program is a joint international effort involving instrumentation to be designed and fabricated by funding from NASA and the National Research Council of Canada. The instrumentation, with a tentatively planned payload for 1986, can be used to perturb the plasma with radio waves to solve problems in ionospheric, atmospheric, magnetospheric, and plasma physics. Among the ionospheric and plasma phenomena to be investigated using WISP instrumentation are VLF wave-particle interactions; ELF/VLF propagation; traveling ionospheric disturbances and gravity wave coupling; equatorial plasma bubble phenomena; plasma wave physics such as mode-coupling, dispersion, and instabilities; and plasma physics of the antenna-plasma interactions.

  11. Proceedings of the thirty second national symposium on plasma science and technology: plasma for societal benefits: book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, Sandhya; Shravan Kumar, S.; Vijayakumaran; Singh, Raj; Awasthi, L.M.

    2017-01-01

    This symposium covers topics on: basic plasma, computer modelling for plasma, exotic plasma, industrial plasma, laser plasma theory, nuclear fusion, plasma diagnostics, laser plasma, plasma processing, pulsed power, space and astrophysical plasma. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. Plasma stabilization experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sziklas, E. A.; Fader, W. J.; Jong, R. A.; Stufflebeam, J. H.

    1980-07-01

    The plasma stabilization experiment is an effort to enhance stability in a mirror-confined plasma by trapping cold ions with rf fields applied near the mirror throats. Nagoya Type 3 antennas, coupled to a 60 kW rf power supply are mounted in the throats of the UTRC baseball magnet. An external washer gun provides a source of plasma for both streaming and confined plasma tests. Results show a strong stoppering effect on streaming plasmas and a marginal effect on confined plasmas. Theoretical calculations provide an explanation for the experimental observations. The field generates a ponderomotive force acting on the electrons. The resultant improvement in electron confinement changes the ambipolar potential and inhibits the flow of ions through the mirror throat. Criteria are derived for the validity of this trapping concept. The requisite field strengths are significantly lower than those required to trap ions directly. Scaling laws are developed for application of cold ion trapping to large mirror devices containing dense plasmas. The use of slow-wave antenna structures operated at frequencies above the lower hybrid frequency is recommended for these applications.

  13. Plasma Science Committee (PLSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) is a standing committee under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy, Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications of the National Academy of Sciences--National Research Council. Plasma sciences represent a broad and diverse field. The PLSC has accepted the responsibility of monitoring the continuing development and assessing the general health of the field as whole. Although select advisory bodies have been created to address specific issues that affect plasma science, such as the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC), the PLSC provides a focus for the plasma science community that is unique and essential. The membership of the PLSC is drawn from research laboratories in universities, industry, and government. Areas of expertise on the committee include accelerators and beams, space physics, astrophysics, computational physics and applied mathematics, fusion plasmas, fundamental experiments and theory, radiation sources, low temperature plasmas, and plasma-surface interactions. The PLSC is well prepared to respond to requests for studies on specific issues. This report discusses ion of the PLSC work

  14. Structural stability analysis considerations in fusion reactor plasma chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, M.J.; Cramer, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing a toroidal plasma chamber for the prevention of both static and dynamic buckling. Results of stability analyses performed for the doublet shaped plasma chamber of the General Atomic 3.8 meter radius TNS ignition test reactor are presented. Load conditions are the static external atmospheric pressure load and the dynamic plasma disruption pulse load. Methods for analysis of plasma chamber structures are presented for both types of load. Analysis for static buckling is based on idealizing the plasma chamber into standard structural shapes and applying classical cylinder and circular torus buckling equations. Results are verified using the Buckling of Shells of Revolution (BOSOR4) finite difference computer code. Analysis for the dynamic loading is based on a pulse buckling analysis method for circular cylinders

  15. Influence of plasma density and plasma sheath dynamics on the ion implantation by plasma immersion technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ensinger, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    Influence of plasma density and plasma sheath dynamics on the ion implantation by plasma immersion technique / B. Rauschenbach ... - In: Nuclear instruments and methods in physics research. B. 113. 1996. S. 266-269

  16. Electromagnetic separator of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasilin, V.V.; Nezovibatko, Yu.N.; Poklepach, G.S.; Shvets, O.M.; Taran, V.S.; Tereshin, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    The progress in the widespread utilization of the PVD methods is determined in many respects by the plasma quality and, therefore, the necessity of an application of plasma separators, in particular magnetic separators. One needs to note that traditional magnetic separators have a number of problems their using, namely their unwieldiness, the presence of the isolated cameras and so on. We have proposed, manufactured and investigated the simple separator of plasma that doesn't require using additional cameras. As a source of metallic plasma the standard cathode vaporizer in the installation 'BULAT 6' was in use. Plasma stream from the cathode flowed through the not protected by isolation spiral solenoid. The solenoid input (from the cathode side) was under floating potential. The solenoid output was connected to the autonomous power supply system. The solenoid was prepared with stride winding and 90 degree turn. The solenoid current was 20-90 A and the solenoid voltage with respect to the vessel (earth) was +15 V. In this case drifting charged particles could freely fly out from the interior solenoid region to its boundary. The glow of the turned flow of plasma was observed during the supplying of the cathode and the solenoid. Plasma flow was separated from the coils and extended along the axis of solenoid. One can assume that this device ensures radial electric with respect to the bulk of plasma (the diameter of the bulk of plasma is comparable with the cathode diameter), the toroidal magnetic field, produced by solenoid, was of an order of 20 Oe. Magnetic field strength was sufficient for the magnetization of electrons, but it was rather small for magnetizing the ions and charged micro-droplets. The experiments carried out with aluminum cathode on the deposition of coatings at the stainless steel substrate have shown the high effectiveness of this separator operation. Coatings without droplets were obtained also on the glass substrate with HF- displacement

  17. Dynamics of low density coronal plasma in low current x-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, D; Bott, S C; Vikhrev, V; Eshaq, Y; Ueda, U; Zhang, T; Baranova, E; Krasheninnikov, S I; Beg, F N

    2007-01-01

    Experiments were performed on an x-pinch using a pulsed power current generator capable of producing an 80 kA current with a rise time of 50 ns. Molybdenum wires with and without gold coating were employed to study the effect of high z coating on the low-density ( 18 cm -3 ) coronal plasma dynamics. A comparison of images from XUV frames and optical probing shows that the low density coronal plasma from the wires initially converges at the mid-plane immediately above and below the cross-point. A central jet is formed which moves with a velocity of 6 x 10 4 ms -1 towards both electrodes forming a z-pinch column before the current maximum. A marked change in the low density coronal plasma dynamics was observed when molybdenum wires coated with ∼ 0.09 μm of gold were used. The processes forming the jet structure were delayed relative to bare Mo x-pinches, and the time-resolved x-ray emission also showed differences. An m = 0 instability was observed in the coronal plasma along the x-pinch legs, which were consistent with x-ray PIN diode signals in which x-ray pulses were observed before x-ray spot formation. These early time x-ray pulses were not observed with pure molybdenum x-pinches. These observations indicate that a thin layer of gold coating significantly changes the coronal plasma behaviour. Two dimensional MHD simulations were performed and qualitatively agree with experimental observations of low density coronal plasma

  18. Radiofrequency power in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document includes the various communications that were presented at the 11th topical conference on radio frequency power in plasmas which took place in Palm Springs in May 1995. It includes current diffusion studies to assess the non-inductive current deposition profiles, experiments for plasma to reach quickly an equilibrium state, and modelling of electrons in plasma. Some comparison studies also reveal the efficiency of the Quasi-Optical Grill antenna for reactor applications. Finally, a scenario for efficient mode conversion heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequency is presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 6 papers in this volume. (TEC)

  19. Radiofrequency power in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document includes the various communications that were presented at the 11th topical conference on radio frequency power in plasmas which took place in Palm Springs in May 1995. It includes current diffusion studies to assess the non-inductive current deposition profiles, experiments for plasma to reach quickly an equilibrium state, and modelling of electrons in plasma. Some comparison studies also reveal the efficiency of the Quasi-Optical Grill antenna for reactor applications. Finally, a scenario for efficient mode conversion heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequency is presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 6 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  20. Ambipolar diffusion in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.L. da.

    1987-01-01

    Is this thesis, a numerical method for the solution of the linear diffusion equation for a plasma containing two types of ions, with the possibility of charge exchange, has been developed. It has been shown that the decay time of the electron and ion densities is much smaller than that in a plasma containing only a single type of ion. A non-linear diffusion equation, which includes the effects of an external electric field varying linearly in time, to describe a slightly ionized plasma has also been developed. It has been verified that the decay of the electron density in the presence of such an electric field is very slow. (author)

  1. Plasma Processes: Arc root dynamics in high power plasma torches ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although plasma torches have been commercially available for about 50 years, areas such as plasma gun design, process efficiency, reproducibility, plasma stability, torch lives etc. have remained mostly unattended. Recent torch developments have been focusing on the basic understanding of the plasma column and its ...

  2. Variation of plasma parameters in a modified mode of plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A modified mode of plasma production in a double plasma device is presented and plasma parameters are controlled in this configuration. Here plasma is produced by applying a discharge voltage between the hot filaments in the source (cathode) and the target magnetic cage (anode) of the device.

  3. Study of Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    ethanol , chloroform, carbon L I 111.4.29 tetrachloride, water and methanol. No color change was observed at any point and the PPVF film was not...34EC Catalysis of Ascorbic Acid Oxidation Using Plasma Polymerized Vinylferrocene Film Electrodes", J. Electroanal. Chem., 109, 301 (1980). 7...photolyzed at 254 ntm in the gas phase in the presence of 15-20 torf of certain alkenes or aromatics. The products were analyzed by GC-MS. Ethene gave

  4. Ferroelectric Plasma Thruster

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kovaleski, Scott D; Kemp, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    .... When radiofrequency high voltage is applied between the electrodes, through the thickness of the crystal, a combination of triple point and piezoelectric effects produce dense plasma on the crystal surface...

  5. Magnetospheric Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Barry H.

    Magnetospheric Plasma Physics is volume 4 of an ongoing series of review books entitled Developments in Earth and Planetary Sciences organized by the Center for Academic Publications Japan. The series is intended to stress Japanese work; however, the present volume was written by seven internationally selected authors who have reviewed works from a broad range of sources. This volume is composed of articles drawn from five lecture series presented at the Autumn College o f Plasma Physics, International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, October-November 1979. The audiences for these lecture series were plasma and/or space plasma physicists, or students of the same, and the level and tone of this volume clearly reflect that condition.

  6. Plasma turbulence in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldas, Ibere L.; Heller, M.V.A.P.; Brasilio, Z.A. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-12-31

    Full text. In this work we summarize the results from experiments on electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations in tokamak plasmas. Spectral analyses show that these fluctuations are turbulent, having a broad spectrum of wavectors and a broad spectrum of frequencies at each wavector. The electrostatic turbulence induces unexpected anomalous particle transport that deteriorates the plasma confinement. The relationship of these fluctuations to the current state of plasma theory is still unclear. Furthermore, we describe also attempts to control this plasma turbulence with external magnetic perturbations that create chaotic magnetic configurations. Accordingly, the magnetic field lines may become chaotic and then induce a Lagrangian diffusion. Moreover, to discuss nonlinear coupling and intermittency, we present results obtained by using numerical techniques as bi spectral and wavelet analyses. (author)

  7. Vol. 6: Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitenko, A.

    1993-01-01

    Problems of modern physics and the situation with physical research in Ukraine are considered. Programme of the conference includes scientific and general problems. Its proceeding are published in 6 volumes. The papers presented in this volume refer to plasma physics

  8. Micro Plasma Spectrometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this IRAD project is to develop a preliminary design elements of miniature electron and ion plasma spectrometers and supporting electronics, focusing...

  9. Computational plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    1975-08-01

    The behavior of a plasma confined by a magnetic field is simulated by a variety of numerical models. Some models used on a short time scale give detailed knowledge of the plasma on a microscopic scale, while other models used on much longer time scales compute macroscopic properties of the plasma dynamics. In the last two years there has been a substantial increase in the numerical modelling of fusion devices. The status of MHD, transport, equilibrium, stability, Vlasov, Fokker-Planck, and Hybrid codes is reviewed. These codes have already been essential in the design and understanding of low and high beta toroidal experiments and mirror systems. The design of the next generation of fusion experiments and fusion test reactors will require continual development of these numerical models in order to include the best available plasma physics description and also to increase the geometric complexity of the model. (auth)

  10. Fizeau plasma interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a technique by which the sensitivity of plasma interferometers can be increased. Stabilization and fractional fringe measurement techniques have improved to the point where additional optical sensitivity could be useful

  11. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitkumar B Pandav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma, also known as inflammatory pseudotumor is a tumor-like lesion that manifests primarily in the lungs. But it may occur in various other anatomic locations like orbit, head and neck, liver and rarely in the oral cavity. We here report an exceedingly rare case of gingival plasma cell granuloma in a 58 year old woman who presented with upper gingival polypoidal growth. The histopathological examination revealed a mass composed of proliferation of benign spindle mesenchymal cells in a loose myxoid and fibrocollagenous stroma along with dense infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells predominantly containing plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  12. Plasma formation in TBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Bosco, E.

    1981-01-01

    In this work are presented and discussed results of the formation and equilibrium of the plasma current in TBR, a small tokamak, designed and contructed at the Instituto de Fisica of Universidade de Sao Paulo. The measured breakdown curves for H 2 , A and He are compared with the predictions of a simple model with reasonable agreement. The influence of stray magnetic fields in the plasma formation is investigated and conditions are chosen to facilitate the breakdown. The time profile of loop voltage and plasma current for shots with plasma equilibrium are shown. A comparison is made between experimental results and analytical-numerical model for tokamaks discharges with ohmic heating. Reasonable agreement is obtained when Z, effective atomic number, is assumed as a parameter. (Author) [pt

  13. Energy of plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.

    1975-01-01

    A new definition of the sign of wave energy is given, which is valid where the old definition based on an expansion procedure breaks down. It is shown that a beam-plasma wave does not produce explosive instabilities

  14. Oscillations in quasineutral plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the limit, as the vacuum electric permittivity goes to zero, of a plasma physics system, deduced from the Vlasov-Poisson system for special initial data (distribution functions which are analytic in the space variable, with compact support in velocity), a limit also called open-quotes quasineutral regimeclose quotes of the plasma, and the related oscillations of the electric field, with high frequency in time. 20 refs

  15. The plasma scalpel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, W J; Incropera, F P; Glover, J L

    1976-01-01

    The plasma scalpel simultaneously cuts tissue and cauterizes blood vessels measuring 3 mm in diameter with a small, hot (3000 C) gas jet. In animal studies, the amount of hemorrhage has been shown to be less with the plasma scalpel than with steel or electrosurgical scalpels, and incisions have healed without complications. Amount of damaged tissue is limited. Human trials are under way, and the device shows promise as a clinical tool.

  16. Multicusp plasma containment apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limpaecher, R.

    1980-01-01

    It has been discovered that plasma containment by a chamber having multi-pole magnetic cusp reflecting walls in combination with electronic injection for electrostatic containment provides the means for generating magnetic field free quiescent plasmas for practical application in ion-pumps, electronic switches, and the like. 1250 ''alnico v'' magnets 1/2 '' X 1/2 '' X 1 1/2 '' provide containment in one embodiment. Electromagnets embodying toroidal funneling extend the principle to fusion apparatus

  17. Plasma jet takes off.

    OpenAIRE

    Frazer, L

    1999-01-01

    Thanks to a series of joint research projects by Los Alamos National Laboratory, Beta Squared of Allen, Texas, and the University of California at Los Angeles, there is now a more environmentally sound method for cleaning semiconductor chips that may also be effective in cleaning up chemical, bacterial, and nuclear contaminants. The Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet uses a type of ionized gas called plasma to clean up contaminants by binding to them and lifting them away. In contrast to the cor...

  18. NSTX-U Research Goals and Plans for Materials and Plasma-Facing Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaita, R.; Capece, A. M.; Jaworski, M. A.; Koel, B. E.; Roszell, J. P.; Skinner, C. H.; Stotler, D. P.; NSTX Team

    2013-10-01

    A major need for NSTX-U is plasma facing components (PFCs) that can survive heat and particle fluxes that result from increasing the maximum heating power to 19.2 MW, which leads to one of highest divertor PFC power densities in the world. This is expressible as the ratio of heating power to major radius of about 21 MW/m, which NSTX-U PFCs are expected to withstand for five to eight seconds. From the perspective of materials and PFCs, this challenge is being addressed through research in three major areas. 1) Understanding why lithium is effective for PFC conditioning, and determining its suitability for long-pulse discharges. Surface analytic techniques are thus being applied to study the complexes that are formed when lithium is deposited various substrates. 2) Investigating erosion and re-deposition of PFCs, including research on lithium-conditioned materials in linear plasma devices that simulate particle fluxes to tokamak walls. 3) Developing techniques for mitigating plasma-surface responsible for reducing wall lifetimes, such as continuous vapor shielding. Present plans are to change NSTX-U PFCs gradually from low-Z carbon to high-Z metallic PFCs. Liquid metals may provide the only long-term PFC solution, and a program to develop flowing lithium PFCs has been initiated. Work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  19. Analysis, modeling, and design of short-wavelength laser-plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, W.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Goldman, S.R.; Stover, E.K.; Goldstone, P.D.; Hauer, A.; Kindel, J.M.; Montierth, L.

    1985-01-01

    We present analysis and LASNEX modeling of two experiments designed to explore the mechanisms and scaling of laser-plasma coupling in high-Z plasmas. The first used layered Au-on-CH spheres irradiated symmetrically using the Omega (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) 0.35 μm laser to observe the x-ray emission and energy penetration in gold plasmas. Measurements of the subkilovolt and kilovolt emission from targets with varying Au-coating thicknesses were made using diagnostics of varying spectral, temporal, and spatial resolution. The results indicate that the x-ray conversion efficiency is a function of target size, with larger targets yielding x-ray emission in excellent agreement with calculations. The x-ray emission fall-off with decreasing gold thickness agrees well with predictions. The second experiment used the Novette (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) laser to irradiate solid gold disk targets, examining wavelength scaling to 0.26 μm. The measured subkilovolt x-ray emission is in good agreement with calculations using mildly inhibited thermal electron transport, indicating enhanced target coupling, compared with previous experiments using smaller spot sizes. The experiment also indicates very low suprathermal electron populations, on the order of 0.1% at about 30 keV effective temperature. Finally, we present preliminary plans and designs for experiments which will use the Aurora 5 kJ, 5 ns, 0.25 μm KrF laser now being constructed at Los Alamos

  20. Online plasma calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, H.; Gourdain, P.-A.

    2017-10-01

    APOLLO is an online, Linux based plasma calculator. Users can input variables that correspond to their specific plasma, such as ion and electron densities, temperatures, and external magnetic fields. The system is based on a webserver where a FastCGI protocol computes key plasma parameters including frequencies, lengths, velocities, and dimensionless numbers. FastCGI was chosen to overcome security problems caused by JAVA-based plugins. The FastCGI also speeds up calculations over PHP based systems. APOLLO is built upon the WT library, which turns any web browser into a versatile, fast graphic user interface. All values with units are expressed in SI units except temperature, which is in electron-volts. SI units were chosen over cgs units because of the gradual shift to using SI units within the plasma community. APOLLO is intended to be a fast calculator that also provides the user with the proper equations used to calculate the plasma parameters. This system is intended to be used by undergraduates taking plasma courses as well as graduate students and researchers who need a quick reference calculation.

  1. Plasma position control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Haruhiko.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct position control stably to various plasmas and reduce the burden on the control coil power source. Constitution: Among the proportional, integration and differentiation controls, a proportional-differentiation control section and an integration control section are connected in parallel. Then, a signal switching circuit is disposed to the control signal input section for the proportional-differentiation control section such that either a present position of plasmas or deviation between the present plasma position and an aimed value can be selected as a control signal depending on the control procedures or the state of the plasmas. For instance, if a rapid response is required for the control, the deviation between the present plasma position and the aimed value is selected as the input signal to conduct proportional, integration and differentiation controls. While on the other hand, if it is intended to reduce the burden on the control coil power source, it is adapted such that the control signal inputted to the proportional-differentiation control section itself can select the present plasma position. (Yoshihara, H.)

  2. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunaevsky, A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma

  3. Plasma Injection Schemes for Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Faure, J.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma injection schemes are crucial for producing high-quality electron beams in laser-plasma accelerators. This article introduces the general concepts of plasma injection. First, a Hamiltonian model for particle trapping and acceleration in plasma waves is introduced; ionization injection and colliding-pulse injection are described in the framework of this Hamiltonian model. We then proceed to consider injection in plasma density gradients.

  4. Inductively coupled helium plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Akbar; Chan, Shi-Kit; Van Hoven, Raymond L.

    1989-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma torch including a base member, a plasma tube and a threaded insert member within the plasma tube for directing the plasma gas in a tangential flow pattern. The design of the torch eliminates the need for a separate coolant gas tube. The torch can be readily assembled and disassembled with a high degree of alignment accuracy.

  5. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas

  6. Echo phenomena in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism of echo phenomenon in different plasma media: laboratory and cosmic plasma, metals and semiconductors is analyzed to get a more comprehensive idea on collective processes in a plasma and for practical applications in radiophysics and plasma diagnostics. The echo phenomenon permitted to confirm a reversible nature of the Landau damping, to prove the fact that the information on perturbation is conserved in a plasma (as non-damping oscillations of the distribution function) even after disappearing of the macroscopic field. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the velocity is measured, microturbulences in a plasma are investigated. New ways of the plasma wave conversion are suggested, as well as ''lightning'' of super-critical plasma layers and regions of plasma non-transparency. Prospective advantages of using echo for studying the mechanisms of charged particle interaction with the surface bounding a plasma are revealed

  7. Dust in flowing magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Birendra P.; Samarian, Alex A.; Vladimirov, Sergey V.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma flows occur in almost every laboratory device and interactions of flowing plasmas with near-wall impurities and/or dust significantly affects the efficiency and lifetime of such devices. The charged dust inside the magnetized flowing plasma moves primarily under the influence of the plasma drag and electric forces. Here, the charge on the dust, plasma potential, and plasma density are calculated self-consistently. The electrons are assumed non-Boltzmannian and the effect of electron magnetization and electron-atom collisions on the dust charge is calculated in a self-consistent fashion. For various plasma magnetization parameters viz. the ratio of the electron and ion cyclotron frequencies to their respective collision frequencies, plasma-atom and ionization frequencies, the evolution of the plasma potential and density in the flow region is investigated. The variation of the dust charge profile is shown to be a sensitive function of plasma parameters. (author)

  8. Physics of partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is one of the four fundamental states of matter; the other three being solid, liquid and gas. Several components, such as molecular clouds, diffuse interstellar gas, the solar atmosphere, the Earth's ionosphere and laboratory plasmas, including fusion plasmas, constitute the partially ionized plasmas. This book discusses different aspects of partially ionized plasmas including multi-fluid description, equilibrium and types of waves. The discussion goes on to cover the reionization phase of the universe, along with a brief description of high discharge plasmas, tokomak plasmas and laser plasmas. Various elastic and inelastic collisions amongst the three particle species are also presented. In addition, the author demonstrates the novelty of partially ionized plasmas using many examples; for instance, in partially ionized plasma the magnetic induction is subjected to the ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect, as well as the usual resistive dissipation. Also included is an observation of kinematic dynam...

  9. On the origin, properties, and implications of asymmetries in the tungsten impurity density in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odstrcil, Tomas

    2017-07-03

    In this thesis, the transport of tungsten ions is studied in the plasma of ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The plasma facing components of the fusion reactors are expected to be built from high-Z materials such as W, Mo or Fe. These materials provide advantages like a high melting point, small erosion rates, and low tritium retention. However, due to the interaction of the plasma with the wall, ions of this material will be inevitably present also in the main plasma. These ions are not entirely stripped even at fusion plasma temperatures, and therefore emit strong line radiation, which can significantly degrade the performance of the fusion plasma. Thus the understanding and control of impurity transport are of critical importance to the success of fusion. The high mass and charge of the heavy impurities make them susceptible to some of the forces acting upon the plasma, resulting in a poloidal variation of their density. The most prominent are the centrifugal force arising from the plasma rotation and the electric force caused by magnetically trapped non-thermal ions. Furthermore, the poloidal asymmetries should have a significant impact on the radial transport of heavy ions, which was widely ignored up to date. In the present work, the poloidal asymmetries in the heavy impurity density were inferred from the soft X-ray radiation using a newly developed tomographic method. The high accuracy of the tomography and of the model for the centrifugal force allowed to identify for the first time in an experiment the effect of the fast ion distribution produced by neutral beam injection on the poloidal asymmetry of the tungsten density. The measured asymmetry was compared to several fast ion models, and the best match was found with the Monte Carlo code in the TRANSP code suite that includes finite orbits effects of the fast ions. Similarly, fast ions accelerated by ion cyclotron heating and localized mainly in the outboard side of the plasma due to a magnetic trapping and produce

  10. Plasma particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) will require an 87-kilometer accelerator ring to boost particles to 40 TeV. The SSC's size is due in part to the fact that its operating principle is the same one that has dominated accelerator design for 50 years: it guides particles by means of magnetic fields and propels them by strong electric fields. If one were to build an equally powerful but smaller accelerator, one would need to increase the strength of the guiding and propelling fields. Actually, however, conventional technology may not be able to provide significant increases in field strength. There are two reasons. First, the forces from magnetic fields are becoming greater than the structural forces that hold a magnetic material together; the magnets that produce these fields would themselves be torn apart. Second, the energy from electric fields is reaching the energies that bind electrons to atoms; it would tear electrons from nuclei in the accelerator's support structures. It is the electric field problem that plasma accelerators can overcome. Plasma particle accelerators are based on the principle that particles can be accelerated by the electric fields generated within a plasma. Because the plasma has already been ionized, plasma particle accelerators are not susceptible to electron dissociation. They can in theory sustain accelerating fields thousands of times stronger that conventional technologies. So far two methods for creating plasma waves for accelerators have been proposed and tested: the wakefield and the beat wave. Although promising electric fields have been produced, more research is necessary to determine whether plasma particle accelerators can compete with the existing accelerators. 7 figs

  11. How do we reduce plasma transfusion in Rhode Island?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Christian P; Tavares, Maria F; Sweeney, Joseph D

    2017-08-01

    Plasma transfusions are given to patients with coagulopathy, either prophylactically, before an invasive procedure; or therapeutically, in the presence of active bleeding; and as an exchange fluid in therapeutic plasma exchange for disorders such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. There is consensus that many prophylactic plasma transfusions are non-efficacious, and the misdiagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura results in unnecessary therapeutic plasma exchange. Beginning in 2001, programs to reduce plasma transfusion in the three major teaching hospitals in Rhode Island were initiated. The programs evolved through the establishment of guidelines, education for key prescribers of plasma, screening of plasma prescriptions, and engagement of individual prescribing physicians for out-of-guidelines prescriptions with modification or cancellation. Establishment of an in-house ADAMTS13 (ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1, motif 13) assay in 2013 was used to prevent therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with non-thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura microangiopathy. Transfusion service data were gathered at the hospital level regarding blood component use, hospital data for discharges, inpatient mortality, and mean case-mix index, and, at the state level, for units of plasma shipped from the community blood center to in-state hospitals. Between 2006 and 2016, a reduction in plasma use from 11,805 to 2677 units (a 77% decrease) was observed in the three hospitals and was mirrored in the state as a whole. This decline was not associated with any increase in red blood cell transfusion. Inpatient mortality either declined or was unchanged. An active program focused on education and interdiction can achieve a large decrease in plasma transfusions without evidence of patient harm. © 2017 AABB.

  12. L-Carnitine protects plasma components against oxidative alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk, Joanna; Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2011-06-01

    L-Carnitine as a dietary supplement has been reported to have a beneficial effect on several cardiovascular risk parameters and exercise capacity, but the biological relevance of its activity is poorly understood. Dietary supplements (including L-carnitine) are often used to foster exercise performance; however, these may affect some pathways of human body metabolism. The aim of this study in vitro was to determine antioxidative properties of L-carnitine (0.1-100 μM) added to plasma and to assess if L-carnitine might protect plasma proteins and lipids against oxidative/nitrative damage (determined by levels of protein carbonyl groups, thiols, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances generation) caused by 100 μM peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), a strong physiologic oxidative/nitrative agent. The level of carbonyl group generation was measured by a colorimetric method. For the estimation of 3-nitrotyrosine formation, a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed. Plasma lipid peroxidation was measured spectrophotometrically as the production of thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to analyze total free thiol groups of plasma proteins and low-molecular-weight thiols (glutathione, cysteine, and homocysteine) in plasma. The L-carnitine added to plasma inhibited in vitro ONOO(-)-induced oxidation and nitration of blood plasma proteins. Incubation of plasma with peroxynitrite resulted in the decrease of protein thiols. L-Carnitine had a protective effect on peroxynitrite-induced decreased -SH level in plasma proteins. The presence of L-carnitine also prevented the decrease of low-molecular-weight thiols (glutathione, cysteine, and homocysteine) in plasma caused by peroxynitrite and protected plasma lipids against peroxidation induced by peroxynitrite. These results demonstrated that L-carnitine possesses antioxidative activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely as white men to die from stomach cancer. Stomach Cancer Prevention Key Points Avoiding risk factors and increasing ... factors and increasing protective factors may help prevent stomach cancer. Avoiding cancer risk factors may help prevent certain ...

  14. Plasma state. The universe's fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, Th.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma is the fourth state of matter, obtained at a very high temperature by the separation of the electrons from their nuclei. Plasma represents 99% of the visible mass of our present day universe and was the unique state of matter at its very beginning. Plasmas are present in the core of stars and in the interstellar environment. More closer to us, they are responsible of spectacular phenomena, like aurora borealis, lightning, comet queues etc.. This book makes a review of the different types of plasmas (electromagnetic, Earth's plasmas, spatial plasmas, solar plasmas, astrophysical plasmas). One chapter presents the thermonuclear fusion as future energy source. Another one treats of the chaos and turbulence inside plasmas. Some applications of plasmas are reviewed: MHD and ionic propulsion systems, MHD energy conversion and MHD generators, thermo-ionic converters, solid-state plasmas, particle accelerators, coherent radiation sources, 'Zeta' machines, X-ray lasers, isotopic separation, non-neutral plasmas and charged beams, free-electrons lasers, electrons and positrons plasmas, industrial applications (etching and cleaning, manufacturing of solar cells, flat screens, industrial reactors, waste treatment, cold plasma-assisted sterilization, effluents decontamination etc.). A last chapter makes an overview of the modern research in plasma physics. (J.S.)

  15. Perioperative coagulation management--fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kor, Daryl J; Stubbs, James R; Gajic, Ognjen

    2010-03-01

    Clinical studies support the use of perioperative fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in patients who are actively bleeding with multiple coagulation factor deficiencies and for the prevention of dilutional coagulopathy in patients with major trauma and/or massive haemorrhage. In these settings, current FFP dosing recommendations may be inadequate. However, a substantial proportion of FFP is transfused in non-bleeding patients with mild elevations in coagulation screening tests. This practice is not supported by the literature, is unlikely to be of benefit and unnecessarily exposes patients to the risks of FFP. The role of FFP in reversing the effects of warfarin anticoagulation is dependent on the clinical context and availability of alternative agents. Although FFP is commonly transfused in patients with liver disease, this practice needs broad reconsideration. Adverse effects of FFP include febrile and allergic reactions, transfusion-associated circulatory overload and transfusion-related acute lung injury. The latter is the most serious complication, being less common with the preferential use of non-alloimmunised, male-donor predominant plasma. FP24 and thawed plasma are alternatives to FFP with similar indications for administration. Both provide an opportunity for increasing the safe plasma donor pool. Although prothrombin complex concentrates and factor VIIa may be used as alternatives to FFP in a variety of specific clinical contexts, additional study is needed.

  16. Mechanisms of Plasma Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2015-09-01

    In this talk, I address research directed towards biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasma such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy. The field has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that plasmas readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. It is postulated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) can trigger a therapeutic shielding response in tissue in part by creating a time- and space-localized, burst-like form of oxy-nitrosative stress on near-surface exposed cells through the flux of plasma-generated RONS. RONS-exposed surface layers of cells communicate to the deeper levels of tissue via a form of the ``bystander effect,'' similar to responses to other forms of cell stress. In this proposed model of CAP therapeutics, the plasma stimulates a cellular survival mechanism through which aerobic organisms shield themselves from infection and other challenges.

  17. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  18. Plasma-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckner, M J; Nelson, C T; Sant, S P; Jindal, A K; Joseph, E A; Zhou, B S; Padron-Wells, G; Jarvis, B; Pierce, R; Overzet, L J

    2008-01-01

    Materials processing is at a crossroads. Currently a large fraction of industrially viable materials processing is via plasmas. Until recently it has been economical to just examine the influence the plasma properties on the desired surface processes and through this ultimately optimize manufacturing. For example, it is well known that the surface processes (etch or deposition), occur in the top few mono-layers of the surface. Thus, in film growth one requires that molecules from the gas-phase land and bond on the surface. However as processing has reached the nano-scale, development of viable processes has become more and more difficult. In part, this is because of all of the free parameters that exist in plasmas. To overcome this economic issue, tool vendors and semiconductor companies have turned to complex computational models of processing plasmas. For those models to work, one requires a through understanding of all of the gas-phase and surface-phase processes that are exhibited in plasmas. Unfortunately, these processes, particularly those at the surface, are not well understood. In this article we describe a viable model of the surface-phase based on cross sections for processes that occur. While originally developed of fluorocarbon systems, the model also appears to be applicable to hydrocarbon systems.

  19. ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, T.; Vieider, G.; Akiba, M.

    1991-01-01

    This document summarizes results of the Conceptual Design Activities (1988-1990) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project, namely those that pertain to the plasma facing components of the reactor vessel, of which the main components are the first wall and the divertor plates. After an introduction and an executive summary, the principal functions of the plasma-facing components are delineated, i.e., (i) define the low-impurity region within which the plasma is produced, (ii) absorb the electromagnetic radiation and charged-particle flux from the plasma, and (iii) protect the blanket/shield components from the plasma. A list of critical design issues for the divertor plates and the first wall is given, followed by discussions of the divertor plate design (including the issues of material selection, erosion lifetime, design concepts, thermal and mechanical analysis, operating limits and overall lifetime, tritium inventory, baking and conditioning, safety analysis, manufacture and testing, and advanced divertor concepts) and the first wall design (armor material and design, erosion lifetime, overall design concepts, thermal and mechanical analysis, lifetime and operating limits, tritium inventory, baking and conditioning, safety analysis, manufacture and testing, an alternative first wall design, and the limiters used instead of the divertor plates during start-up). Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Plasma treatment of onychomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zilan; Roe, Jeff; Grammer, Tim; Him, Yeon-Ho; Graves, David B.

    2015-09-01

    Onychomycosis or fungal infection of the toenail or fingernail is a common affliction. Approximately 10% of the world's adult population is estimated to suffer from onychomycosis. Current treatment options such as topical creams, oral drugs, or laser treatments are generally limited by a variety of problems. We present results for an alternative onychomycosis treatment scheme using atmospheric pressure cold air plasmas. Using thinned cow hoof as a model nail material, we tested the ability of various plasma sources to act through the model nail to eradicate either bacteria or fungus deposited on the opposite side. Following 20 minute exposure to a surface microdischarge (SMD) device operating in room air, we observed a ~ 2 log reduction of E. coli. A similar result was obtained against T. rubrum after 45 min plasma treatment. NOx species concentration penetrating through the model nail as well as uptake into the nail were measured as a function of nail thickness. We propose that these plasma-generated species, or perhaps their reaction products, are responsible for at least part of the observed anti-microbial effect. We also explore the use of ultraviolet light acting in synergy with plasma-generated chemical species.

  1. Optical plasma torch electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wittig

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel, flexible method of witness electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators is described. A quasistationary plasma region is ignited by a focused laser pulse prior to the arrival of the plasma wave. This localized, shapeable optical plasma torch causes a strong distortion of the plasma blowout during passage of the electron driver bunch, leading to collective alteration of plasma electron trajectories and to controlled injection. This optically steered injection is more flexible and faster when compared to hydrodynamically controlled gas density transition injection methods.

  2. Advantages of porcine blood plasma as a component of functional drinks

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Kriger

    2014-01-01

    The composition and properties of blood plasma obtained from slaughtered farm animals and intended for use in the manufacturing of foods for the prevention of oxygen deficiency (hypoxia) are analyzed in the present paper. The use of aerated functional products (oxygen cocktails) is an efficient approach to hypoxia prevention. Protein-based foaming agents are known to form the most stable foams. Porcine blood plasma is a rich source of high molecular weight proteins. A method of processing of ...

  3. Plasma rico en plaquetas Platelet -rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. González Lagunas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available El Plasma Rico en Plaquetas es una suspensión concentrada de la sangre centrifugada que contiene elevadas concentraciones de trombocitos. Durante los últimos años, este producto ha aparecido de forma repetida en publicaciones científicas y en medios de comunicación generales como un producto que por sus características induce la curación y regeneración de los tejidos. La premisa de su uso es que las elevadas concentraciones de plaquetas en el PRP, liberan cantidades significativas de factores de crecimiento. En este artículo se van a recoger las evidencias científicas que se han presentado en la literatura médica con respecto al PRP y a la curación ósea, así como las diferentes aplicaciones clínicas que se han sugerido.Platelet-rich plasma is a by-product of centrifuged whole blood that contains high levels of thrombocytes. In the last decade, scientific and media interest has been generated by this product that apparently has the capacity of inducing and promoting tissue healing and regeneration. The premise of its use is that the large number of platelets in PRP release significant amounts of growth factors. In this paper, a critical review of the medical literature regarding PRP and bone healing will be presented. Also, the suggested clinical applications of the product will be addressed.

  4. Plasma polymerization for high Tc oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohashi, Shin'ichi; Tamura, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Akira; Hasuo, Shinya

    1988-05-01

    Plasma polymerization using CHF3 gas, which prevents the degradation of high Tc oxide superconductors due to moisture and annealing, was developed. The resistive transitions of Y1Ba2Cu3Ox thin films, coated by plasma polymerization, did not change before and after soaking in 20 °C water for 60 min. In addition, the critical temperature of those films was unchanged after annealing at 200 °C for 30 min in air, and then soaking in 90 °C water for 10 min. We confirmed that the polymer film grown by this method was dense, and the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox film reacted with the fluorine at the interface using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  5. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  6. Plasma processing of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Sankaran, R Mohan

    2014-01-01

    CRC Press author R. Mohan Sankaran is the winner of the 2011 Peter Mark Memorial Award "… for the development of a tandem plasma synthesis method to grow carbon nanotubes with unprecedented control over the nanotube properties and chirality." -2011 AVS Awards Committee"Readers who want to learn about how nanomaterials are processed, using the most recent methods, will benefit greatly from this book. It contains very recent technical details on plasma processing and synthesis methods used by current researchers developing new nano-based materials, with all the major plasma-based processing techniques used today being thoroughly discussed."-John J. Shea, IEEE Electrical Insulation Magazine, May/June 2013, Vol. 29, No. 3.

  7. Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    OAK B188 Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program. The purpose of the Travel Grant Program is to increase the awareness of plasma research. The new results and techniques of plasma research in fusion plasmas, plasma processing space plasmas, basic plasma science, etc, have broad applicability throughout science. The benefits of these results are limited by the relatively low awareness and appreciation of plasma research in the larger scientific community. Whereas spontaneous interactions between plasma scientists and other scientists are useful, a focused effort in education and outreach to other scientists is efficient and is needed. The academic scientific community is the initial focus of this effort, since that permits access to a broad cross-section of scientists and future scientists including undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and research staff

  8. Quantum Plasmas An Hydrodynamic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the basic concepts and new methods in the emerging scientific area known as quantum plasmas. In the near future, quantum effects in plasmas will be unavoidable, particularly in high density scenarios such as those in the next-generation intense laser-solid density plasma experiment or in compact astrophysics objects. Currently, plasmas are in the forefront of many intriguing questions around the transition from microscopic to macroscopic modeling of charged particle systems. Quantum Plasmas: an Hydrodynamic Approach is devoted to the quantum hydrodynamic model paradigm, which, unlike straight quantum kinetic theory, is much more amenable to investigate the nonlinear realm of quantum plasmas. The reader will have a step-by-step construction of the quantum hydrodynamic method applied to plasmas. The book is intended for specialists in classical plasma physics interested in methods of quantum plasma theory, as well as scientists interested in common aspects of two major areas of...

  9. Plasma-material interaction under simulated disruption conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhtin, V.P.; Safronov, V.M.; Toporkov, D.A.; Vasenin, S.G.; Wurz, H.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Sudden evaporation of divertor plate surface under high heat load during tokamak plasma disruption instantaneously produces a vapor shield. The cloud of vaporized material prevents the divertor plates from the bulk of incoming energy flux and thus reduces the further material erosion. Dynamics and effectiveness of the vapor shield are studied experimentally at the 2MK-200 facility under simulated disruption conditions. (orig.)

  10. Plasma vitamin C concentration in pregnant women with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Oxidative stress plays a role in the aetiology of pre-eclampsia and vitamin C may prevent pre-eclampsia. Objective: To determine the association between plasma vitamin C and pre-eclampsia in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. Methods: This case-control study was conducted at Mulago Hospital from 1st ...

  11. Successful Plasma Exchange for Acute Pancreatitis Complicated With Hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Takahira MD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male with acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia had problems during treatment with plasma exchange. The hypercoagulable state was prevented by introducing innovative methods for cleaning and warming of the circuit and dialyzer. This enabled successful therapy, and the patient fully recovered from life-threatening acute pancreatitis.

  12. Successful Plasma Exchange for Acute Pancreatitis Complicated With Hypertriglyceridemia

    OpenAIRE

    Takahira, Shuji; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kin, Hunsook; Ooya, Yoshitaka; Sekine, Yasumasa; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yushi; Takane, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Youhei; Tsukamoto, Isao; Nemoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia had problems during treatment with plasma exchange. The hypercoagulable state was prevented by introducing innovative methods for cleaning and warming of the circuit and dialyzer. This enabled successful therapy, and the patient fully recovered from life-threatening acute pancreatitis.

  13. Plasma-material interaction under simulated disruption conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.I. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Bakhtin, V.P. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Toporkov, D.A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Vasenin, S.G. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Wurz, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INR (Germany); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Sudden evaporation of divertor plate surface under high heat load during tokamak plasma disruption instantaneously produces a vapor shield. The cloud of vaporized material prevents the divertor plates from the bulk of incoming energy flux and thus reduces the further material erosion. Dynamics and effectiveness of the vapor shield are studied experimentally at the 2MK-200 facility under simulated disruption conditions. (orig.).

  14. Plasma Simulation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-10-04

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a

  15. QED plasma and magnetars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freytsis, Marat; Gralla, Samuel E., E-mail: freytsis@physics.harvard.edu, E-mail: sgralla@physics.harvard.edu [Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Magnetars are surrounded by diffuse plasma in magnetic field strengths well above the quantum electrodynamic critical value. We derive equations of ''quantum force-free electrodynamics'' for this plasma using effective field theory arguments. We argue that quantum effects do not modify the large scale structure of the magnetosphere, and in particular that the spin-down rate does not deviate significantly from the classical result. We provide definite evolution equations that can be used to explore potentially important small-scale corrections, such as shock formation, which has been proposed as a mechanism for both burst and quiescent emission from magnetars.

  16. Steam torch plasma modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeništa, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2017), s. 653-687 ISSN 0272-4324 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-19444S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Arc * Evaporation * Mass flow rate * Water-vortex stabilization * Net emission coefficients * Partial characteristics * Local thermodynamic equilibrium Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11090-017-9789-7

  17. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, Rainer

    1978-01-01

    The plasma wall interactions for two extreme cases, the 'vacuum model' and the 'cold gas blanket' are outlined. As a first step for understanding the plasma wall interactions the elementary interaction processes at the first wall are identified. These are energetic ion and neutral particle trapping and release, ion and neutral backscattering, ion sputtering, desorption by ions, photons and electrons and evaporation. These processes have only recently been started to be investigated in the parameter range of interest for fusion research. The few measured data and their extrapolation into regions not yet investigated are reviewed

  18. Kinetics of complex plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh

    2014-01-01

    The presentation in the book is based on charge balance on the dust particles, number and energy balance of the constituents and atom-ion-electron interaction in the gaseous plasma. Size distribution of dust particles, statistical mechanics, Quantum effects in electron emission from and accretion on dust particles and nonlinear interaction of complex plasmas with electric and electromagnetic fields have been discussed in the book. The book introduces the reader to basic concepts and typical applications. The book should be of use to researchers, engineers and graduate students.

  19. Plasma YKL-40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Wiell, C; Milting, K

    2013-01-01

    Background  Plasma YKL-40 is an inflammatory biomarker. No useful biomarker exists in patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Objective  To measure YKL-40 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis before and during treatment. Methods......-CRP at inclusion and during 48 weeks of adalimumab treatment. The patients with psoriatic arthritis were divided into responders and non-responders. Results  In patients with psoriasis, the baseline median PASI score was 10.8 and baseline YKL-40 was 45 μg/L. Seventeen per cent had elevated plasma YKL-40 compared...

  20. Dust-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of our theoretical research under this grant over the past 3 years was to develop new understanding in a range of topics in the physics of dust-plasma interactions, with application to space and the laboratory. We conducted studies related to the physical properties of dust, waves and instabilities in both weakly coupled and strongly coupled dusty plasmas, and innovative possible applications. A major consideration in our choice of topics was to compare theory with experiments or observations, and to motivate new experiments, which we believe is important for developing this relatively new field. Our research is summarized, with reference to our list of journal publications.

  1. Plasma return current discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangano, J.A.; Hsia, J.; Jacob, J.H.; Srivastava, B.N.

    1978-01-01

    A discharge technique based on the use of an electron-beam-induced plasma return current to produce and heat large-volume plasmas is described. The results of discharge studies using this technique in attachment-dominated mixtures are presented. The results are found to be adequately described by a simple theory. The electron attachment rate by F 2 inferred from these measurements agrees well with those of other workers. KrF laser action at 248 nm is reported in return-current discharge-excited mixtures of F 2 /Kr/He

  2. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamae, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy (PPS) is now becoming a standard diagnostic technique for working with laboratory plasmas. This new area needs a comprehensive framework, both experimental and theoretical. This book reviews the historical development of PPS, develops a general theoretical formulation to deal with this phenomenon, along with an overview of relevant cross sections, and reports on laboratory experiments so far performed. It also includes various facets that are interesting from this standpoint, e.g. X-ray lasers and effects of microwave irradiation. It also offers a timely discussion of instrumentation that is quite important in a practical PPS experiment.

  3. Partial pressure analysis of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.

    1984-11-01

    The application of partial pressure analysis for plasma diagnostic measurements is reviewed. A comparison is made between the techniques of plasma flux analysis and partial pressure analysis for mass spectrometry of plasmas. Emphasis is given to the application of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS). The interface problems associated with the coupling of a QMS to a plasma device are discussed including: differential-pumping requirements, electromagnetic interferences from the plasma environment, the detection of surface-active species, ion source interactions, and calibration procedures. Example measurements are presented from process monitoring of glow discharge plasmas which are useful for cleaning and conditioning vacuum vessels

  4. PLASMA/ACCELERATORS: Working together

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The quest for ever higher performances in particle accelerators has made accelerator and plasma experts get together. The status of this interdisciplinary effort was the topic of the April 87 issue of the IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science devoted to plasma-based high energy accelerators. At CERN, a plasma lens has been developed to collect divergent antiproton beams for the ACOL Antiproton Collector project. More generally, a plasma lens could replace magnetic horns and lithium lenses employed for the same purpose. In 1984, a collaboration started with the Universities of Erlangen and Naples, and the results and problems encountered were discussed in a Plasma Lens Workshop held at CERN in September 1986

  5. Optical properties of cluster plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Downer, M.C.

    1998-03-01

    It is shown that unlike a gas plasma or an electron plasma in a metal, an ionized clustered material (`cluster plasma`) permits propagation below the plasma cut-off of electromagnetic (EM) waves whose phase velocity is close to but below the speed of light. This results from the excitation of a plasma oscillation mode (and/or polarization mode) through the cluster surface which does not exist in usual gaseous plasma. The existence of this new optical mode, cluster mode, is confirmed via numerical simulation. (author)

  6. Plasma scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sheffield, John

    1975-01-01

    Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation covers the theory and experimental application of plasma scattering. The book discusses the basic properties of a plasma and of the interaction of radiation with a plasma; the relationship between the scattered power spectrum and the fluctuations in plasma density; and the incoherent scattering of low-temperature plasma. The text also describes the constraints and problems that arise in the application of scattering as a diagnostic technique; the characteristic performance of various dispersion elements, image dissectors, and detectors; and the ge

  7. Partially ionized plasmas including the third symposium on uranium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, M. [ed.

    1976-09-01

    Separate abstracts are included for 28 papers on electrically generated plasmas, fission generated plasmas, nuclear pumped lasers, gaseous fuel reactor research, and applications. Five papers have been previously abstracted and included in ERA.

  8. "AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    HASELKORN, FLORENCE

    PREVENTION AS FUNCTION, VALUE ISSUE, CONCEPTUAL SHORTCOMING, AND PRACTICE IS DISCUSSED AND RELATED TO EDUCATIONAL TASK. PREVENTION AS FUNCTION IS GENERATED BY OUR VALUE PREMISES. IN SEEKING TO PREVENT SOME FORMS OF SOCIAL DYSFUNCTION, WE MAY BE PERPETUATING OTHERS. THE CONCEPT OF PREVENTION IS AMBIGUOUS. CRUCIAL CONCEPTUAL ISSUES INCLUDE THE…

  9. RF Plasma modeling of the Linac4 H− ion source

    CERN Document Server

    Mattei, S; Hatayama, A; Lettry, J; Kawamura, Y; Yasumoto, M; Schmitzer, C

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the modelling of the ICP RF-plasma in the Linac4 H− ion source currently being constructed at CERN. A self-consistent model of the plasma dynamics with the RF electromagnetic field has been developed by a PIC-MCC method. In this paper, the model is applied to the analysis of a low density plasma discharge initiation, with particular interest on the effect of the external magnetic field on the plasma properties, such as wall loss, electron density and electron energy. The use of a multi-cusp magnetic field effectively limits the wall losses, particularly in the radial direction. Preliminary results however indicate that a reduced heating efficiency results in such a configuration. The effect is possibly due to trapping of electrons in the multi-cusp magnetic field, preventing their continuous acceleration in the azimuthal direction.

  10. Review on plasmas in extraordinary media: plasmas in cryogenic conditions and plasmas in supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Sven; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Terashima, Kazuo

    2018-02-01

    Plasma science and technology has enabled advances in very diverse fields: micro- and nanotechnology, chemical synthesis, materials fabrication and, more recently, biotechnology and medicine. While many of the currently employed plasma tools and technologies are very advanced, the types of plasmas used in micro- and nanofabrication pose certain limits, for example, in treating heat-sensitive materials in plasma biotechnology and plasma medicine. Moreover, many physical properties of plasmas encountered in nature, and especially outer space, i.e. very-low-temperature plasmas or plasmas that occur in high-density media, are not very well understood. The present review gives a short account of laboratory plasmas generated under ’extreme’ conditions: at cryogenic temperatures and in supercritical fluids. The fundamental characteristics of these cryogenic plasmas and cryoplasmas, and plasmas in supercritical fluids, especially supercritical fluid plasmas, are presented with their main applications. The research on such exotic plasmas is expected to lead to further understanding of plasma physics and, at the same time, enable new applications in various technological fields.

  11. Double plasma system with inductively coupled source plasma and quasi-quiescent target plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massi, M.; Maciel, H.S.

    1995-01-01

    Cold plasmas have successfully been used in the plasma-assisted material processing industry. An understanding of the physicochemical mechanisms involved in the plasma-surface interaction is needed for a proper description of deposition and etching processes at material surfaces. Since these mechanisms are dependent on the plasma properties, the development of diagnostic techniques is strongly desirable for determination of the plasma parameters as well as the characterization of the electromagnetic behaviour of the discharge. In this work a dual discharge chamber, was specially designed to study the deposition of thin films via plasma polymerization process. In the Pyrex chamber an inductively coupled plasma can be excited either in the diffuse low density E-mode or in the high density H-mode. This plasma diffuses into the cylindrical stainless steel chamber which is covered with permanent magnets to produce a multidipole magnetic field configuration at the surface. By that means a double plasma is established consisting of a RF source plasma coupled to a quasi-quiescent target plasma. The preliminary results presented here refer to measurements of the profiles of plasma parameters along the central axis of the double plasma apparatus. Additionally a spectrum analysis performed by means of a Rogowski coil probe immersed into the source plasma is also presented. The discharge is made in argon with pressure varying from 10 -2 to 1 torr, and the rf from 10 to 150 W

  12. Plasma spheroidization of nickel powders in a plasma reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    quenching]. In the present investigation a d.c. non-trans- ferred plasma torch is used to generate a thermal plasma jet. 2. Experimental. 2.1 Plasma reactor. The experimental set-up consists of a 40 kW d.c. plasma spray torch (Ion Arc machines (I) Pvt. Ltd) mounted on a water-cooled reaction chamber made of stainless steel.

  13. Vitamin E plasma concentration in osteoporotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajimahmoodi M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cause of osteoporosis is multifactorial and many dietary factors are important in the prevention of this disease. Antioxidants as free radical scavengers may influence osteoporosis by reducing the effects of oxidative stress that may be associated with bone loss. Vitamin E is an important antioxidant that protects polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in cell membranes from oxidation. There are only two studies regarding vitamin E plasma levels in subjects suffering from osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between plasma vitamin E levels and bone mineral density (BMD in Iranian patients. Methods: Subjects were consecutively recruited between May and September 2005 from among a total of approximately 1000 people referred for instrumental screening for osteoporosis to the Jami Clinic in Tehran. Inclusion criteria for the study group were: a femoral neck T-score of -1 or less, osteopenia, severe osteopenia and osteoporosis. A total of 137 subjects were enrolled. According to their femoral and spinal BMD scores, 54 persons were selected as a control group. The control group consisted of subjects with a femoral neck T-score and spine T-score of -1 or more. In selecting the case group, only the femoral BMD score was used. Plasma vitamin E was measured, after extraction with methanol, by HPLC with UV detection at 280 nm. Methanol, deionized water and butanol (90:4:6 was used as a mobile phase with a C8 column. The flow rate was 1.0 ml. min-1 and the acetate ester of vitamin E was used as an internal standard. Results: The results show no significant difference in plasma vitamin E between the control and case groups, however linear regression analysis does reveal a significant difference between the T-score and plasma vitamin E. Conclusion: Deceleration Femoral bone Density during osteoporosis will be Accelerated with Decrease of Vitamin E Antioxidant level.

  14. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic. Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dis- persion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming ...

  15. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dispersion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming instability.

  16. Implicit plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langdon, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Implicit time integration methods have been used extensively in numerical modelling of slowly varying phenomena in systems that also support rapid variation. Examples include diffusion, hydrodynamics and reaction kinetics. This article discussed implementation of implicit time integration in plasma codes of the ''particle-in-cell'' family, and the benefits to be gained

  17. Quark gluon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quark gluon plasma; heavy ion collisions; equation of state; hadron gas; early universe. PACS Nos 25.75-q; .... is, therefore, necessary to perform calculation with different number of lattice points (or different lattice .... dynamical model assumes that the initial condition in heavy-ion collision corresponds to a state in local ...

  18. Plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.R.; Forest, C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors' technique allows the ion implantation to be performed directly within the ion source at higher currents without ion beam extraction and transport. The potential benefits include greatly increased production rates (factors of 10-1000) and the ability to implant non-planar targets without rastering or shadowing. The technique eliminates the ion extractor grid set, beam raster equipment, drift space and target manipulator equipment. The target to be implanted is placed directly within the plasma source and is biased to a large negative potential so that plasma ions gain energy as they accelerate through the potential drop across the sheath that forms at the plasma boundary. Because the sheath surrounds the target on all sides, all surfaces of the target are implanted without the necessity to raster the beam or to rotate the target. The authors have succeeded in implanting nitrogen ions in a silicon target to the depths and concentrations required for surface treatment of materials like stainless steel and titanium alloys. They have performed ESCA measurements of the penetration depth profile of a silicon target that was biased to 30 kV in a nitrogen discharge plasma. Nitrogen ions were implanted to a depth of 700A at a peak concentration of 30% atomic. The measured profile is quite similar to a previously obtained profile in titanium targets with conventional techniques

  19. Fundamentals of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bittencourt, J A

    1986-01-01

    A general introduction designed to present a comprehensive, logical and unified treatment of the fundamentals of plasma physics based on statistical kinetic theory. Its clarity and completeness make it suitable for self-learning and self-paced courses. Problems are included.

  20. Reprocessing of spent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierini, G.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for removing helium and other impurities from a mixture containing deuterium and tritium, a deuterium/tritium mixture when purified in accordance with such a process and, more particularly, to a process for the reprocessing of spent plasma removed from a thermofusion reactor. (U.K.)

  1. Plasma erosion switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Goldstein, S.A.; Miller, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    The plasma erosion switch is a device capable of initially carrying high currents, and then of opening in nanoseconds to stand off high voltages. It depends upon the erosion of a plasma which initially fills the switch. The sheath between the plasma and the cathode behaves as a diode with a rapidly increasing A-K gap. Preliminary tests of the switch on the Proto I accelerator at Sandia will be described. In these tests, the switch consisted of a cylinder of highly ionized plasma four inches in diameter and one-inch thick surrounding a one-inch cathode. The switch shorted out prepulse voltages and allowed energy to be stored in the diode inductance outside the switch until the accelerator current reached 75 kA. The switch impedance then rose rapidly to approximately 100 ω in 5 nanoseconds, whereupon the accelerator current transferred to the cathode. Current rise rates of 3.10 13 A/sec were limited by cathode turn-on. Voltage rise rates of 10 15 V/sec were achieved. The elimination of prepulse and machine turn-on transients allowed A-K gaps of 2 mm to be used with 2.5 MV pulses, yielding average E fields of 12 MV/cm. Staged versions of the device are being built and should improve rise rates. The switch shows promise for use with future, higher power, lower inductance machines

  2. Plasma impurities and cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drawin, H.W.

    1976-11-01

    In high-temperature low-density plasmas radiation cooling by impurity atoms can be an important energy loss mechanism, since the radiation is not reabsorbed. In a brief historical survey it is shown that the problem is not new but was discussed since the first beginning of controlled thermonuclear fusion research. It is then shown radiation losses enter into the general power balance equation of a plasma containing impurities. The equations for the different types of radiation losses are given as a function of the atomic quantities. In a special section simplifications due to the corona model assumption are discussed. It follows a detailed survey of the results obtained by several authors for the ionization balance and power losses of impurity elements observed in present high-temperature plasma machines used in CTR, especially in TOKAMAKS. In the conclusion a survey is given of the atomic data which experimentalists and theorists need for current research on impurities in fusion-like plasmas. (86 references)

  3. PLASMA EQUILIBRIUM IN TOKAMAKS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blank, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    This lecture treats the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium of axisymmetric plasmas, as given by the Grad-Shafranov equation. In a brief introduction, equilibrium parameters such as the q-profile, the internal inductance, and the poloidal beta are introduced. The properties of these quantities

  4. Plasma equilibrium in tokamaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blank, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    This lecture treats the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium of axisymmetric plasmas, as given by the Grad-Shafranov equation. In a brief introduction, equilibrium parameters such as the q-profile, the internal inductance, and the poloidal beta are introduced. The properties of these quantities

  5. Plasma equilibrium in tokamaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blank, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture treats the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium of axisymmetric plasmas, as given by the Grad-Shafranov equation. In a brief introduction, equilibrium parameters such as the q-profile, the internal inductance, and the poloidal beta are introduced. The properties of these quantities

  6. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.; Jensen, B.; Tien, J.K.; Panayotou, N.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to provide information on important phenomena occurring when a hot, dense plasma containing a transverse magnetic field is brought into sudden contact with a cold metal wall. Computational simulation has been used to study the physics of the fusion plasma boundary layer which forms at the plasma-wall interface. Thermal, magnetic, and neutral gas boundary layers rapidly develop. The rate of energy transfer to the metal wall is computed and compared with experimental data. The agreement is rather good. Candidate fusion-reactor first wall materials have been exposed repeatedly to a warm (T/sub i/ approximately 600 eV) deuterium plasma containing a transverse 1.0 W/m 2 magnetic field. Polished samples were subjected to 6 x 10 21 eV cm -2 , the energy flux expected at the first wall in about one year operation of a tokamak fusion power reactor. Stainless steels show significant erosion at grain boundaries, formation of deuterium blisters on the surface, evidence of surface melting to a depth of 25 μm, and rapid resolidification. Some cracking is observed, which extends for about a grain size length along grain boundaries into the bulk material. Decrease in tensile ductility is also measured, indicative of possible hydrogen embrittlement

  7. 5. Laser plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaune, C.; Fuchs, J.; Bandulet, H.

    2002-01-01

    Imprint elimination, smoothing and preheat control are considerable problems in inertial fusion and their possible solution can be achieved by using low-density porous materials as a buffer in target design. The articles gathered in this document present various aspects of the laser-plasma interaction, among which we have noticed: -) numerical algorithmic improvements of the Vlasov solver toward the simulation of the laser-plasma interaction are proposed, -) the dependence of radiation temperatures and X-ray conversion efficiencies of hohlraum on the target structures and laser irradiation conditions are investigated, -) a study of laser interaction with ultra low-density (0,5 - 20 mg/cm 3 ) porous media analyzing backscattered light at incident laser frequency ω 0 and its harmonics 3*ω 0 /2 and 2*ω 0 is presented, -) investigations of laser interaction with solid targets and crater formation are carried out with the objective to determine the ablation loading efficiency, -) a self organization in an intense laser-driven plasma and the measure of the relative degree of order of the states in an open system based on the S-theorem are investigated, and -) the existence and stability of electromagnetic solitons generated in a relativistic interaction of an intense laser light with uniform under-dense cold plasma are studied

  8. Baryons in the plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarts, Gert; Allton, Chris; Boni, Davide de

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the fate of baryons made out of u, d and s quarks in the hadronic gas and the quark-gluon plasma, using nonperturbative lattice simulations, employing the FASTSUM anisotropic Nf=2+1 ensembles. In the confined phase a strong temperature dependence is seen in the masses of the negative...

  9. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  10. Planetary plasmas and fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roederer, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    The magnetospheres of earth, Jupiter, and Mercury are discussed. The main features and physical processes characteristic of the quiet time earth magnetosphere are examined. Jupiter's larger and more distant magnetosphere is compared with the earth's and recent findings are reviewed. The plasma and field environment of Mercury is also discussed and similarities with the earth's magnetosphere are noted

  11. Plasma membrane ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Bækgaard, Lone; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2011-01-01

    membrane include ABC transporters, vacuolar (V-type) H+ pumps, and P-type pumps. These pumps all utilize ATP as a fuel for energizing pumping. This review focuses on the physiological roles of plasma membrane P-type pumps, as they represent the major ATP hydrolytic activity in this membrane....

  12. Plasma focus matching conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, H.M.; Masoud, M.M.; Elkhalafawy, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A snow-plough and slug models have been used to obtain the optimum matching conditions of the plasma in the focus. The dimensions of the plasma focus device are, inner electrode radius = 2 cm, outer electrode radius = 5.5 cm, and its length = 8 cm. It was found that the maximum magnetic energy of 12.26 kJ has to be delivered to plasma focus whose density is 10 19 /cm 3 at focusing time of 2.55 μs and with total external inductance of 24.2 n H. The same method is used to evaluate the optimum matching conditions for the previous coaxial discharge system which had inner electrode radius = 1.6 cm, outer electrode radius = 3.3 cm and its length = 31.5 cm. These conditions are charging voltage = 12 kV, capacity of the condenser bank = 430 μf, plasma focus density = 10 19 /cm 3 focusing time = 8 μs and total external inductance = 60.32 n H.3 fig., 2 tab

  13. Plasma Processes: Sheath and plasma parameters in a magnetized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The variation of electron temperature and plasma density in a magnetized 2 plasma is studied experimentally in presence of a grid placed at the middle of the system. Plasma leaks through the negatively biased grid from the source region into the diffused region. It is observed that the electron temperature increases with ...

  14. Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cargill, P J [Imperial College School of Medicine (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    The widespread importance of plasmas in many areas of contemporary physics makes good textbooks in the field that are both introductory and comprehensive invaluable. This new book by Paul Bellen from CalTech by and large meets these goals. It covers the traditional textbook topics such as particle orbits, the derivation of the MHD equations from Vlasov theory, cold and warm plasma waves, Landau damping, as well as in the later chapters less common subjects such as magnetic helicity, nonlinear processes and dusty plasmas. The book is clearly written, neatly presented, and each chapter has a number of exercises or problems at their end. The author has also thankfully steered clear of the pitfall of filling the book with his own research results. The preface notes that the book is designed to provide an introduction to plasma physics for final year undergraduate and post-graduate students. However, it is difficult to see many physics undergraduates now at UK universities getting to grips with much of the content since their mathematics is not of a high enough standard. Students in Applied Mathematics departments would certainly fare better. An additional problem for the beginner is that some of the chapters do not lead the reader gently into a subject, but begin with quite advanced concepts. Being a multi-disciplinary subject, beginners tend to find plasma physics quite hard enough even when done simply. For postgraduate students these criticisms fade away and this book provides an excellent introduction. More senior researchers should also enjoy the book, especially Chapters 11-17 where more advanced topics are discussed. I found myself continually comparing the book with my favourite text for many years, 'The Physics of Plasmas' by T J M Boyd and J J Sanderson, reissued by Cambridge University Press in 2003. Researchers would want both books on their shelves, both for the different ways basic plasma physics is covered, and the diversity of more advanced

  15. Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cargill, P J

    2007-01-01

    The widespread importance of plasmas in many areas of contemporary physics makes good textbooks in the field that are both introductory and comprehensive invaluable. This new book by Paul Bellen from CalTech by and large meets these goals. It covers the traditional textbook topics such as particle orbits, the derivation of the MHD equations from Vlasov theory, cold and warm plasma waves, Landau damping, as well as in the later chapters less common subjects such as magnetic helicity, nonlinear processes and dusty plasmas. The book is clearly written, neatly presented, and each chapter has a number of exercises or problems at their end. The author has also thankfully steered clear of the pitfall of filling the book with his own research results. The preface notes that the book is designed to provide an introduction to plasma physics for final year undergraduate and post-graduate students. However, it is difficult to see many physics undergraduates now at UK universities getting to grips with much of the content since their mathematics is not of a high enough standard. Students in Applied Mathematics departments would certainly fare better. An additional problem for the beginner is that some of the chapters do not lead the reader gently into a subject, but begin with quite advanced concepts. Being a multi-disciplinary subject, beginners tend to find plasma physics quite hard enough even when done simply. For postgraduate students these criticisms fade away and this book provides an excellent introduction. More senior researchers should also enjoy the book, especially Chapters 11-17 where more advanced topics are discussed. I found myself continually comparing the book with my favourite text for many years, 'The Physics of Plasmas' by T J M Boyd and J J Sanderson, reissued by Cambridge University Press in 2003. Researchers would want both books on their shelves, both for the different ways basic plasma physics is covered, and the diversity of more advanced topics. For

  16. Upgrades toward high-heat flux, liquid lithium plasma-facing components in the NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, M.A., E-mail: mjaworsk@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Brooks, A.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Lopes-Cardozo, N. [TU/Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Menard, J.; Ono, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Rindt, P. [TU/Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Tresemer, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • An upgrade path for the NSTX-U tokamak is proposed that maintains scientific productivity while enabling exploration of novel, liquid metal PFC. • Pre-filled liquid metal divertor targets are proposed as an intermediate step that mitigates technical and scientific risks associated with liquid metal PFC. • Analysis of leading edge features show a strong link between engineering design considerations and expected performance as a PFC. • A method for optimizing porous liquid metal targets restrained by capillary forces is provided indicating pore-sizes well within current technical capabilities. - Abstract: Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) provide numerous potential advantages over solid-material components. One critique of the approach is the relatively less developed technologies associated with deploying these components in a fusion plasma-experiment. Exploration of the temperature limits of liquid lithium PFCs in a tokamak divertor and the corresponding consequences on core operation are a high priority informing the possibilities for future liquid lithium PFCs. An all-metal NSTX-U is envisioned to make direct comparison between all high-Z wall operation and liquid lithium PFCs in a single device. By executing the all-metal upgrades incrementally, scientific productivity will be maintained while enabling physics and engineering-science studies to further develop the solid- and liquid-metal components. Six major elements of a flowing liquid-metal divertor system are described and a three-step program for implementing this system is laid out. The upgrade steps involve the first high-Z divertor target upgrade in NSTX-U, pre-filled liquid metal targets and finally, an integrated, flowing liquid metal divertor target. Two example issues are described where the engineering and physics experiments are shown to be closely related in examining the prospects for future liquid metal PFCs.

  17. [Prevention of dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakami, Katsuya

    2016-03-01

    The dementia prevention consists of three steps, primary prevention of dementia is to prevent from normal and mild cognitive impairment to dementia, secondary prevention is early detection and early treatment of dementia, and tertiary prevention is three stages of progress prevention of dementia. Primary prevention of dementia had been considered impossible until recently, but potential scientific evidence has been shown recently. The fact that 4.62 million people are person with dementia and 400 million people are person with mild cognitive impairment are considered to be urgent problem and we must intend to perform dementia prevention from primary to tertiary prevention thoroughly. We perform dementia screening using touch panel type computer and we recommend person with mild cognitive impairment to join dementia prevention classroom. Therefore, we can prevent progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia (primary prevention). Early diagnosis and introduction to the specialized medical institution are needed if you find early stage of dementia and treat early (secondary prevention). To prevent progression by the appropriate drug treatment and care for dementia is required (tertiary prevention).

  18. Plasma Wave Electronic Terahertz Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shur, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Plasma waves are oscillations of electron density in time and space. In deep submicron field effect transistors plasma wave frequencies lie in the terahertz range and can be tuned by applied gate bias...

  19. Controlled fusion and plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The contributions presented in the 17th European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Heating were focused on Tore Supra investigations. The following subjects were presented: ohmic discharges, lower hybrid experiments, runaway electrons, Thomson scattering, plasma density measurements, magnetic fluctuations, polarization scattering, plasma currents, plasma fluctuation measurements, evaporation of hydrogen pellets in presence of fast electrons, ripple induced stochastic diffusion of trapped particles, tearing mode stabilization, edge effects on turbulence behavior, electron cyclotron heating, micro-tearing modes, divertors, limiters

  20. Water-stabilized plasma generators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabovský, Milan

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 6 (1998), s. 1157-1162 ISSN 0033-4545 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/95/0592; GA ČR GV106/96/K245 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : thermal plasma, plasma torch, water -stabilized plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.677, year: 1998

  1. The measurement of the intrinsic impurities of molybdenum and carbon in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak plasma using low resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Finkenthal, M.; Regan, S. P.; Moos, H. W.; Terry, J. L.; Goetz, J. A.; Graf, M. A.; Rice, J. E.; Marmar, E. S.; Fournier, K. B.; Goldstein, W. H.

    1997-06-01

    The intrinsic impurity content of molybdenum and carbon was measured in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak using low resolution, multilayer mirror (MLM) spectroscopy ( Delta lambda ~1-10 AA). Molybdenum was the dominant high-Z impurity and originated from the molybdenum armour tiles covering all of the plasma facing surfaces (including the inner column, the poloidal divertor plates and the ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) limiter) at Alcator C-Mod. Despite the all metal first wall, a carbon concentration of 1 to 2% existed in the plasma and was the major low-Z impurity in Alcator C-Mod. Thus, the behaviour of intrinsic molybdenum and carbon penetrating into the main plasma and the effect on the plasma must be measured and characterized during various modes of Alcator C-Mod operation. To this end, soft X-ray extreme ultraviolet (XUV) emission lines of charge states, ranging from hydrogen-like to helium-like lines of carbon (radius/minor radius, r/a~1) at the plasma edge to potassium to chlorine-like (0.4Data Nucl. Data Tables 33 (1985) 149), which were incorporated into the collisional radiative model. The intrinsic i

  2. Gas-discharge plasma sources for nonlocal plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidov, V. I.; DeJoseph, C. A. Jr.; Simonov, V. Ya.

    2007-01-01

    Nonlocal plasma technology is based on the effect of self-trapping of fast electrons in the plasma volume [V. I. Demidov, C. A. DeJoseph, Jr., and A. A. Kudryavtsev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 215002 (2006)]. This effect can be achieved by changing the ratio of fast electron flux to ion flux incident on the plasma boundaries. This in turn leads to a significant change in plasma properties and therefore can be useful for technological applications. A gas-discharge device which demonstrates control of the plasma properties by this method is described

  3. Plasma Control for Next-Stage Plasma Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, N.; Iizuka, S.

    2000-01-01

    A short review is presented of our experiments on plasma controls for next-stage material and device manufacturing, which are concerned with uniform large-diameter plasma production, electron-temperature control, and dust-particle behaviors. We can provide uniform high-density ECR and rf plasmas, the diameters of which are larger than several ten centimeters. The electron temperature is controlled in the range of one or two orders of magnitude in a region separated from a discharge region. Basing on investigations of dust-particle behaviors in low-pressure discharge plasmas, we can now establish a simple method of dust-particle removal from dusty plasmas. (author)

  4. Investigation of Nonideal Plasma Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    a nonideal plasma is the ball lightning phenome- non, which consists of a highly ionized air plasma (n , 10 cm - 3) of low tempera- ture (T % 103 °K...In ball lightning , the plasma appears to be in a highly viscous, quasi-liquid state due to the balance of thermal and (negative) Coulomb interaction

  5. Optical properties of dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, S.

    1996-05-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Stellar spectra and stellar atmospheres, spectrocopic methods in the plasma diagnostic, Green function method, influence of charged plasma particles on the line profile, Storer-Strahler interaction, dynamic screening effects, line profile shift and asymmetry, collective plasma excitations, ion dynamic effects on line profiles

  6. Plasma chemistry and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, K.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between discharge phenomena and plasma chemistry, as well as the equipment and mechanisms of plasma chemical reactions are described. Various areas in which plasma chemistry is applied are surveyed, such as: manufacturing of semiconductor integrated circuits; synthetic fibers; high polymer materials for medical uses; optical lenses; and membrane filters (reverse penetration films).

  7. Elements of plasma kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1976-01-01

    The physical foundations of plasma kinetic equations are exposed inside a series of seminars on plasma and fusion physics. The Vlasov and collisional equations with its application range have been discussed. The momenta equations for the macroscopic magnitudes and the more usual approximations have been obtained: two fluid equations for cold and warm plasmas, magnetohydrodynamic equations and the double-adiabatic theory. (author)

  8. Plasma fibronectin and thyroid function.

    OpenAIRE

    Graninger, W; Pirich, K; Derfler, K; Waldhäusl, W

    1985-01-01

    Plasma fibronectin concentrations up to 85 mg/100 ml were found in hyperthyroid patients. There was a significant correlation between free thyroxine index and plasma fibronectin values. Hypothyroid patients had low to normal fibronectin concentrations. Parallel decreases of thyroid hormones and plasma fibronectin concentrations were noted during treatment with thiamazole. A direct effect of thyroid hormones on fibronectin synthesis seems probable.

  9. Laser-Driven Hydrodynamic Experiments in the Turbulent Plasma Regime: from OMEGA to NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robey, H F; Miles, A R; Hansen, J F; Blue, B E; Drake, R P

    2003-01-01

    There is a great deal of interest in studying the evolution of hydrodynamic phenomena in high energy density plasmas that have transitioned beyond the initial phases of instability into an Ely developed turbulent state. Motivation for this study arises both in fusion plasmas as well as in numerous astrophysical applications where the understanding of turbulent mixing is essential. Double-shell ignition targets, for example, are subject to large growth of short wavelength perturbations on both surfaces of the high-Z inner shell. These perturbations, initiated by Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, can transition to a turbulent state and will lead to deleterious mixing of the cooler shell material with the hot burning fuel. In astrophysical plasmas, due to the extremely large scale, turbulent hydrodynamic mixing is also of wide-spread interest. The radial mixing that occurs in the explosion phase of core-collapse supernovae is an example that has received much attention in recent years and yet remains only poorly understood. In all of these cases, numerical simulation of the flow field is very difficult due to the large Reynolds number and corresponding wide range of spatial scales characterizing the plasma. Laboratory experiments on high energy density facilities that can access this regime are therefore of great interest. Experiments exploring the transition to turbulence that are currently being conducted on the Omega laser will be described. We will also discuss experiments being planned for the initial commissioning phases of the NIF as well as the enhanced experimental parameter space that will become available, as additional quads are made operational

  10. Electrostatic potential generated by perpendicular neutral-beam injection to a tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Murakami, S.

    2018-01-01

    The electrostatic potential generated by neutral-beam-injection (NBI) heating in a tokamak plasma is investigated using numerical simulations. The density distribution of the NBI fast ions in an assumed tokamak is evaluated using the GNET drift-kinetic-equation solver which is based on the Monte Carlo method. The electrostatic potential is evaluated assuming an adiabatic response of the electrons to the fast-ion density distribution in the plasma. It is found that an electrostatic potential peak is generated near the beam-injection point owing to the trapped fast ions satisfying the zero-precession condition. An analytic model expressing the expected potential except for the peak is derived and shows a good agreement with the radial distribution and linear dependence on the electron temperature predicted by the simulation within a factor of 1–2. The existence of three-dimensional electrostatic trapping may break the poloidally-closed particle orbits, and may change the spatial distribution and transport of high-Z impurity ions.

  11. Radiation-hardened x-ray imaging for burning-plasma tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguin, Fredrick H.; Petrasso, Richard D.; Li, Chi Kang

    1997-01-01

    A special type of vacuum-photodiode detector is being developed for x-ray imaging of plasma in fusion-producing tokamaks such as the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), where the radiation environment will be too hostile for conventional x-ray detectors. The vacuum photodiode has modest efficiency, but it is intrinsically immune to radiation damage if built in such a manner as to expose only metal components to radiation. A design based on appropriately chosen materials (including high-Z cathodes) and geometries (including a small angle between cathode surface and incident x rays) can provide good signals from the 1-100 keV x rays that are of particular importance for imaging the plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET) and ITER. It should also provide better rejection of signal distortion and noise due to unwanted detection of neutrons and hard gamma rays than conventional detectors. A prototype design is described, along with performance parameters predicted for JET and ITER. In addition, we show results of laboratory experiments that confirm some of the predicted behaviors of the design.

  12. Fast ion emission from the plasma produced by the PALS laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Boody, F.P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of studies of fast ion emission from the multiply charged high-Z number plasma generated using the PALS high-energy iodine laser system (≤1.2 kJ, 0.4 ns) at the PALS Research Center in Prague. The properties of the emitted ion streams were investigated using ion collectors located at various angles with respect to the target normal and an electrostatic energy analyser. The x-ray emission from the plasma was measured using semiconductor detectors. Different groups of ions (slow, thermal and fast) were observed in the ion collector signals. Ion current densities higher than 80 mA cm -2 at ∼1 m from the target were demonstrated. The charge velocity distribution, ion current density and angular distribution of ion charge emission, as well as total charge and average ion energy were obtained from these signals. Using the electrostatic ion-energy analyser, the emission of highly charged heavy ions (Ta 52+ , Ag 38+ ) with energies up to 7 MeV for Ta ions was demonstrated. The dependence of ion stream parameters on the experimental conditions is discussed. We also report the results of preliminary experiments on the direct implantation of laser-produced ions into various materials. (author)

  13. The Plasma Archipelago: Plasma Physics in the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Gary J.

    2017-09-01

    With the foundation of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society in April 1959, plasma physics was presented as the general study of ionized gases. This paper investigates the degree to which plasma physics, during its first decade, established a community of interrelated specialties, one that brought together work in gaseous electronics, astrophysics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, space science, and aerospace engineering. It finds that, in some regards, the plasma community was indeed greater than the sum of its parts and that its larger identity was sometimes glimpsed in inter-specialty work and studies of fundamental plasma behaviors. Nevertheless, the plasma specialties usually worked separately for two inter-related reasons: prejudices about what constituted "basic physics," both in the general physics community and within the plasma community itself; and a compartmentalized funding structure, in which each funding agency served different missions.

  14. Application of nonlocal plasma technology for controlling plasma conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chengxun; Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Rudakova, T. V.; Zhou, Z. X.

    2017-10-01

    A promising approach for better control of the plasma parameters involves the exploitation of peculiarities of plasmas with a nonlocal electron energy distribution. Nonlocal plasma technology (NLP-technology) is based on the effect of energetic electrons in the plasma volume. In this work, an experimental study of influence of the chemo-ionization processes on non-stationary plasma conductivity has been conducted. Due to energetic, supra-thermal electrons, which appear in the chemo-ionization reactions, the highly non-equilibrium and time dependent nonlocal electron energy distribution function is formed. In such a plasma thermal electrons always have positive conductivity (mobility), while supra-thermal, energetic electrons may have negative conductivity in heavy (argon, krypton and xenon) noble gases dependently on conditions. Experiments demonstrate that this effect may lead to the non-monotonic temporal behavior of plasma conductivity and may potentially create the negative electron mobility.

  15. Scattering of electromagnetic waves into plasma oscillations via plasma particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A plasma subjected to an intense electromagnetic wave can exhibit a large number of parametric instabilities. An interesting example which has received little attention is the decay of the electromagnetic wave into a plasma oscillation with the excess energy and momentum being carried off by electrons. This process has been simulated on a one-and-two-halves dimensional electromagnetic code. The incident electromagnetic wave had a frequency near the plasma frequency so that decay into a plasma oscillation and a backscattered electromagnetic wave was excluded. As expected, the threshold for this instability was very large , so it is unlikely that this instability is competitive in most laser plasmas. Nevertheless, the physical mechanism involved provides a means for absorption of laser light and acceleration of particles in a plasma containing large amplitude plasma oscillations

  16. Estimating plasma temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.K.; Iglesias, C.A.; Chen, M.H.; Rogers, F.J.

    1992-04-01

    Recent laser-produced plasma experiments have relied on spectroscopic comparisons with models to infer plasma temperatures. The models use an experimentally determined value for the matter density as input and treat the temperature as a free parameter to obtain a best fit to the experimental absorption spectrum. However, uncertainties in the ionization balance theories lead to inferred temperatures that are model dependent. We report results of a new approach which combines high=quality atomic data with an ionization balance obtained from systematic expansions of the grand canonical ensemble. The latter avoids the ad hoc cutoffs required in free energy minimization schemes and includes Coulomb corrections usually neglected in other models. Comparisons to experimental spectra show excellent agreement

  17. Basics of plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuderi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This book is an introduction to contemporary plasma physics that discusses the most relevant recent advances in the field and covers a careful choice of applications to various branches of astrophysics and space science. The purpose of the book is to allow the student to master the basic concepts of plasma physics and to bring him or her up to date in a number of relevant areas of current research. Topics covered include orbit theory, kinetic theory, fluid models, magnetohydrodynamics, MHD turbulence, instabilities, discontinuities, and magnetic reconnection. Some prior knowledge of classical physics is required, in particular fluid mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. The mathematical developments are self-contained and explicitly detailed in the text. A number of exercises are provided at the end of each chapter, together with suggestions and solutions.

  18. Plasma and the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falthammar, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    Hannes Alfven has enjoyed a long and spectacular career in which he has time and again pioneered the path that other workers were able fruitfully to exploit. One thinks of the Alven waves, the concept of gyrocenter drift and the perturbation theory based on it, and the critical velocity phenomenon in the interaction of a plasma with a neutral gas. All of these discoveries have been of fundamental importance. By no means content to rest on his laurels, Alfven has, during the last decade, contributed to science in a major sense, especially in the field of cosmogeny. For example, he has used the latest data from the Voyager spacecraft to test his detailed predictions of the structure of the Saturnian rings. Alfven's current preoccupation is with the Plasma Universe and, as may be expected, some of his concepts are receiving observational support, while others are still controversial

  19. Underwater plasma arc cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leautier, R.; Pilot, G.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the work done to develop underwater plasma arc cutting techniques, to characterise aerosols from cutting operations on radioactive and non-radioactive work-pieces, and to develop suitable ventilation and filtration techniques. The work has been carried out in the framework of a contract between CEA-CEN Cadarache and the Commission of European Communities. Furthermore, this work has been carried out in close cooperation with CEA-CEN Saclay mainly for secondary emissions and radioactive analysis. The contract started in May 1986 and was completed in December 1988 by a supplementary agreement. This report has been compiled from several progress reports submitted during the work period, contains the main findings of the work and encloses the results of comparative tests on plasma arc cutting

  20. Plasma detachment in divertor tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A. W.

    2018-04-01

    Observations of divertor plasma detachment in tokamaks are reviewed. Plasma detachment is characterized in terms of transport and dissipation of power, momentum and particle flux along the open field lines from the midplane to the divertor. Asymmetries in detachment onset and other characteristics between the inboard and outboard divertor plasmas is found to be primarily driven by plasma E× B drifts. The effect of divertor plate geometry and magnetic configuration on divertor detachment is summarized. Control of divertor detachment has progressed with a development of a number of diagnostics to characterize the detached state in real-time. Finally the compatibility of detached divertor operation with high performance core plasmas is examined.

  1. Experimental Plasma Research project summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Diagnostics; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report

  2. Experimental plasma research project summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    This report contans descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Measurements and Instrumentation; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report

  3. Atmospheric-pressure plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogelschatz, U.

    2004-12-01

    Major industrial plasma processes operating close to atmospheric pressure are discussed. Applications of thermal plasmas include electric arc furnaces and plasma torches for generation of powders, for spraying refractory materials, for cutting and welding and for destruction of hazardous waste. Other applications include miniature circuit breakers and electrical discharge machining. Non-equilibrium cold plasmas at atmospheric pressure are obtained in corona discharges used in electrostatic precipitators and in dielectric-barrier discharges used for generation of ozone, for pollution control and for surface treatment. More recent applications include UV excimer lamps, mercury-free fluorescent lamps and flat plasma displays.

  4. Plasma expansion: fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engeln, R; Mazouffre, S; Vankan, P; Bakker, I; Schram, D C

    2002-01-01

    The study of plasma expansion is interesting from a fundamental point of view as well as from a more applied point of view. We here give a short overview of the way properties like density, velocity and temperature behave in an expanding thermal plasma. Experimental data show that the basic phenomena of plasma expansion are to some extent similar to those of the expansion of a hot neutral gas. From the application point of view, we present first results on the use of an expanding thermal plasma in the plasma-activated catalysis of ammonia, from N 2 -H 2 mixtures

  5. Plasma chemistry for inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, O.

    1980-01-01

    Practical application of plasma chemistry to the development of inorganic materials using both low temperature and warm plasmas are summarized. Topics cover: the surface nitrification and oxidation of metals; chemical vapor deposition; formation of minute oxide particles; the composition of oxides from chloride vapor; the composition of carbides and nitrides; freezing high temperature phases by plasma arc welding and plasma jet; use of plasma in the development of a substitute for petroleum; the production of silicon for use in solar cell batteries; and insulating the inner surface of nuclear fusion reactor walls.

  6. Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation are provided. Methods of using the devices for hydrocarbon reformation are also provided. The devices can include a liquid container to receive a hydrocarbon source, and a plasma torch configured to be submerged in the liquid. The plasma plume from the plasma torch can cause reformation of the hydrocarbon. The device can use a variety of plasma torches that can be arranged in a variety of positions in the liquid container. The devices can be used for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons and/or liquid hydrocarbons. The reformation can produce methane, lower hydrocarbons, higher hydrocarbons, hydrogen gas, water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or a combination thereof.

  7. Tecnical report- Group of Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanaka, P.H.; Boeckelmann, H.K.; Marotta, A.

    1985-01-01

    The research activities of Plasma Laboratory at UNICAMP (University of Campinas, Brazil) in the period from november 84 to july/85 are described. In the TUPA project, several works related to substructure and research programs were developed. Diagnostic techniques to analyse the theta Pinch implosion phase, a presure probe, an electrostatic ion energy analyser and laser-produced plasma spectroscopy were developed. The experimental results were obtained, using multiple magnetic probes inserted in the plasma. These results were analysed by numerical code using some MHD equations in 2 dimensions. A description of plasma dynamic was determined and the plasma parameters such as density and temperature were estimated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Plasmas and intense laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    The present article begins with a description of the laser technology required to reach the high irradiances of interest and provides a brief outline of the more important diagnostic techniques used in investigating the plasmas. An introduction to plasma waves is given and the linear and nonlinear excitation of waves is discussed. The remainder of the article describes some of the experimental evidence supporting the interpretation of the plasma behaviour at high laser-light intensities in terms of the excitation of plasma waves and the subsequent heating of plasma by these waves. (author)

  9. Measurement of plasma adenosine concentration: methodological and physiological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gewirtz, H.; Brown, P.; Most, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that measurements of plasma adenosine concentration made on samples of blood obtained in dipyridamole and EHNA (i.e., stopping solution) may be falsely elevated as a result of ongoing in vitro production and accumulation of adenosine during sample processing. Studies were performed with samples of anticoagulated blood obtained from anesthesized domestic swine. Adenosine concentration of ultra filtrated plasma was determined by HPLC. The following parameters were evaluated: (i) rate of clearance of [ 3 H]adenosine added to plasma, (ii) endogenous adenosine concentration of matched blood samples obtained in stopping solution alone, stopping solution plus EDTA, and perchloric acid (PCA), (iii) plasma and erythrocyte endogenous adenosine concentration in nonhemolyzed samples, and (iv) plasma adenosine concentration of samples hemolyzed in the presence of stopping solution alone or stopping solution plus EDTA. We observed that (i) greater than or equal to 95% of [ 3 H]adenosine added to plasma is removed from it by formed elements of the blood in less than 20 s, (ii) plasma adenosine concentration of samples obtained in stopping solution alone is generally 10-fold greater than that of matched samples obtained in stopping solution plus EDTA, (iii) deliberate mechanical hemolysis of blood samples obtained in stopping solution alone resulted in substantial augmentation of plasma adenosine levels in comparison with matched nonhemolyzed specimens--addition of EDTA to stopping solution prevented this, and (iv) adenosine content of blood samples obtained in PCA agreed closely with the sum of plasma and erythrocyte adenosine content of samples obtained in stopping solution plus EDTA

  10. Topics in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, Linda [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-05-31

    During the period 1998-2013, research under the auspices of the Department of Energy was performed on RF waves in plasmas. This research was performed in close collaboration with Josef Preinhaelter, Jakub Urban, Vladimir Fuchs, Pavol Pavlo and Frantisek Zacek (Czech Academy of Sciences), Martin Valovic and Vladimir Shevchenko (Culham). This research is detailed and all 38 papers which were published by this team are cited.

  11. Plasma antioxidants from chocolate

    OpenAIRE

    Serafini, M.; Bugianesi, R.; Maiani, G.; Valtuena, S.; De Santis, S.; Crozier, A.

    2003-01-01

    There is some speculation that dietary flavonoids from chocolate, in particular (-)epicatechin, may promote cardiovascular health as a result of direct antioxidant effects or through antithrombotic mechanisms. Here we show that consumption of plain, dark chocolate results in an increase in both the total antioxidant capacity and the (-)epicatechin content of blood plasma, but that these effects are markedly reduced when the chocolate is consumed with milk or if milk is incorporated as milk ch...

  12. Advanced Plasma Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    conditions. Previous studies on the CHT showed that the majority of the xenon propellant is ionized at the border of the annular and cylindrical...edge of the cylindrical portion of the thruster channel). The border between high and low potential follows a portion of the kinetic energy contour...the background RF- produced plasma in CΘP-FARAD, is dominated by electron-neutral colli - sions. As the pressure increases, the frequency of these

  13. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations

  15. Fundamental Processes in Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Charles Fred [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-11-03

    This Final Technical Report gives brief summaries of the plasma physics results developed under DOE grant DE-SC0002451; and provides reference to the published journal articles giving full scientific descriptions. General topics include 1) cyclotron modes; 2) damping and decay of Langmuir modes; 3) 2D vortex dynamics and diocotron modes; 4) separatrix-induced transport and damping; and 5) long-range collisional velocity slowing.

  16. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jungman, Gerard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The mechanisms for pinch formation in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices, with the generation of high-energy ions beams and subsequent neutron production over a relatively short distance, are not fully understood. Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics and its associated instabilities and neutron production.

  17. Current drive in high density tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Seiichiro; Jotaki, Eriko; Kawasaki, Shoji; Moriyama, Shin-ichi; Nagao, Akihiro; Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoki; Itoh, Satoshi

    1989-01-01

    Current drive in high density tokamak plasma is investigated, with special attention given to mode conversion and proximity conditions that characterize the propagation of electromagnetic waves in the case of current drive by lower hybrid waves. A simple model is used to evaluate the current drive efficiency, and its dependence on various parameters associated with equipment is investigated to provide information required in designing experimental equipment. A strong troidal magnetic field is necessary to produce high density plasma, and incident electromagnetic waves should have a high frequency to prevent the mode conversion, suggesting that a high frequency and a strong troidal field are essential to permit desirable propagation of incident electromagnetic waves. The evaluation of the current drive efficiency shows that the proximity conditions and the power spectrum of the lower hybrid waves entering the plasma are of importance. The average refraction factor in the direction of the troidal field should be larger than but close to that determined from the proximity conditions in order to increase the drive efficiency. As the intensity of the troidal field increases, the refraction factor determined from the proximity conditions decreases, leading to an increase in the drive efficiency. (N.K.)

  18. Plasma-based Compressor Stall Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Ryan; Corke, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The use of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator casing treatment to prevent or delay stall inception in an axial fan is examined. The actuators are powered by a pulsed-DC waveform which induces a larger peak velocity than a purely AC waveform such as a sine or sawtooth wave. With this system, a high-voltage DC source is supplied to both electrodes, remaining constant in time for the exposed electrode. Meanwhile, the covered electrode is periodically grounded for several microseconds and allowed to rise back to the source DC level. To test the actuators' ability to interact with and modify the formation of stall cells, a facility has been designed and constructed around nonconductive fan blades. The actuators are installed in the fan casing near the blade tips. The instrumentation allows for the measurement of rotating pressure disturbances (traveling stall cells) in this tip gap region as well as fan performance characteristics including pressure rise and flow rate. The casing plasma actuation is found to reduce the correlation of the rotating stall cells, thereby extending the stall margin of the fan. Various azimuthal arrangements of the plasma actuator casing treatment is explored, as well as input voltage levels to the actuator to determine optimum conditions. NASA SBIR Contract NNX14CC12C.

  19. Radially inhomogeneous bounded plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri-Khatir, H.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of kinetic theory along with self-consistent field equations, the expressions for dielectric tensor of radially inhomogeneous magnetized plasma columns are obtained. The study of dielectric tensor characteristics allows the accurate analysis of the inhomogeneous properties, beyond limitations that exist in the conventional method. Through the Bessel-Fourier transformation, the localized form of material equations in a radially inhomogeneous medium are obtained. In order to verify the integrity of the model and reveal the effect of inhomogeneity, a special case of a cylindrical plasma waveguide completely filled with inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma was considered. The dispersion relation curves for four families of electromagnetic (EH and HE) and electrostatic (SC and C) modes are obtained and compared with the findings of the conventional model. The numerical analysis indicates that the inhomogeneity effect leads to coupling of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes each having different radial eigen numbers. The study also reveals that the electrostatic modes are more sensitive to inhomogeneous effects than the electromagnetic modes.

  20. Plasma control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Haruhiko.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain the optimum controllability for the plasmas and the thermonuclear device by selectively executing control operation for proportion, integration and differentiation (PID) by first and second controllers respectively based on selection instruction signals. Constitution: Deviation between a vertical direction equilibrium position: Zp as the plasma status amount measured in a measuring section and an aimed value Zref thereof is inputted to a first PID selection controller. The first controller selectively executes one of the PID control operations in accordance with the first selection signal instruction instructed by a PID control operation instruction circuit. Further, Zp is also inputted to a second PID selection controller, which selectively executes one of the PID control operations in accordance with the second selection instruction signal in the same manner as in the first controller. The deviation amount u between operations signals u1 and u2 from the first and second PID selection controllers is inputted to a power source to thereby supply a predetermined current value to control coils that generate equilibrium magnetic fields for making the vertical direction equilibrium position of plasmas constant. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Plasma interaction with microbes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroussi, M; Mendis, D A; Rosenberg, M

    2003-01-01

    The germicidal effects of a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma generated by a novel resistive barrier discharge on representatives of the two classes of bacteria (Gram-negative and Gram-positive) are discussed. The plasma exposure, while being lethal to both bacterial classes, also produced gross structural damage in the Gram-negative E. coli while none was observed in the more structurally robust Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. An electrophysical process involving the role of the electrostatic tension on a charged body in a plasma is invoked to explain both observations. Since the efficacy of this electrophysical process depends not only on the tensile strength of the bacterial cell wall but also on its shape and texture, the need for more experimental studies, using a wide range of bacteria belonging to various morphological groups, is suggested. Ways to further test the validity of this electrophysical lysis mechanism for Gram-negative bacteria on one hand, and also to extend its operation to the more robust Gram-positive bacteria on the other, are suggested

  2. The Hematocrit Affects the Volume of Plasma Treated With Coupled Plasma Filtration and Adsorption With Predilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finazzi, Stefano; Garbero, Elena; Trussardi, Giampietro; Bertolini, Guido

    2017-05-01

    Coupled plasma filtration and adsorption (CPFA) is an extracorporeal blood purification technique proposed for the treatment of septic-shock. By removing pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators from plasma, CPFA is supposed to have a therapeutic effect on the abnormal inflammatory response seen in this condition. Recently, blood predilution with citrate solution has been adopted to prevent clotting in the CPFA circuit-one of the main problems of the technique. Taking into account the patient's hematocrit, we worked out a formula for the volume of plasma effectively treated by CPFA after predilution. Neglecting this effect, as is commonly done, introduces significant distortions in the estimation of the volume, possibly causing under-treatment. The distortion is stronger when the hematocrit and the predilution fraction are large and weaker when both values shrink. By correctly indicating the daily dose of plasma adsorption received by patients, this formula is essential for assessing the therapeutic efficacy of CPFA and, subsequently, establishing its optimal doses. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Plasma turbulence calculations on supercomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.; Charlton, L.A.; Dominguez, N.; Drake, J.B.; Garcia, L.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Lee, D.K.; Lynch, V.E.; Sidikman, K.

    1991-01-01

    Although the single-particle picture of magnetic confinement is helpful in understanding some basic physics of plasma confinement, it does not give a full description. Collective effects dominate plasma behavior. Any analysis of plasma confinement requires a self-consistent treatment of the particles and fields. The general picture is further complicated because the plasma, in general, is turbulent. The study of fluid turbulence is a rather complex field by itself. In addition to the difficulties of classical fluid turbulence, plasma turbulence studies face the problems caused by the induced magnetic turbulence, which couples field by itself. In addition to the difficulties of classical fluid turbulence, plasma turbulence studies face the problems caused by the induced magnetic turbulence, which couples back to the fluid. Since the fluid is not a perfect conductor, this turbulence can lead to changes in the topology of the magnetic field structure, causing the magnetic field lines to wander radially. Because the plasma fluid flows along field lines, they carry the particles with them, and this enhances the losses caused by collisions. The changes in topology are critical for the plasma confinement. The study of plasma turbulence and the concomitant transport is a challenging problem. Because of the importance of solving the plasma turbulence problem for controlled thermonuclear research, the high complexity of the problem, and the necessity of attacking the problem with supercomputers, the study of plasma turbulence in magnetic confinement devices is a Grand Challenge problem

  4. Spectroscopic diagnostics of industrial plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, N.K.

    2004-01-01

    Plasmas play key role in modern industry and are being used for processing micro electronic circuits to the destruction of toxic waste. Characterization of industrial plasmas which includes both 'thermal plasmas' and non-equilibrium plasmas or 'cold plasmas' in industrial environment offers quite a challenge. Numerous diagnostic techniques have been developed for the measurement of these partially ionized plasma and/or particulate parameters. The 'simple' non-invasive spectroscopic methods for characterization of industrial plasmas will be discussed in detail in this paper. The excitation temperature in thermal (DC/RF) plasma jets has been determined using atomic Boltzmann technique. The central axis temperature of thermal plasma jets in a spray torch can be determined using modified atomic Boltzmann technique with out using Abel inversion. The Stark broadening of H β and Ar-I (430 nm) lines have been used to determine the electron number density in thermal plasma jets. In low-pressure non-equilibrium argon plasma, electron temperature has been measured using the Corona model from the ratio of line intensities of atomic and ionic transitions. (author)

  5. Electron waves and resonances in bounded plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Vandenplas, Paul E

    1968-01-01

    General theoretical methods and experimental techniques ; the uniform plasma slab-condenser system ; the hollow cylindrical plasma ; scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a plasma column in steady magnetic fields (cold plasma approximation) ; hot non-uniform plasma column ; metallic and dielectric resonance probes, plasma-dielectric coated antenna, general considerations.

  6. Jet lag prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000719.htm Jet lag prevention To use the sharing features on this page, ... Headache Irritability Stomach upset Sore muscles Tips for Prevention Before your trip: Get plenty of rest, eat ...

  7. Research Areas: Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI’s prevention research has a broad focus, from identifying environmental and lifestyle factors that influence cancer risk to studying the biology of how cancer develops and studying ways to disseminate prevention interventions.

  8. Marine Pollution Prevention Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Pollution Prevention Act of 2008 implements the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, including related Protocols (MARPOL)...

  9. Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sexual & Urologic Problems Clinical Trials Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Perhaps you have learned that you have a ... I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows ...

  10. Preventing Diabetes Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Clinical Trials Preventing Diabetes Problems View or Print All Sections Heart Disease & ... prevent or delay sexual and urologic problems. Depression & Diabetes Depression is common among people with a chronic, ...

  11. Statins and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell membrane integrity, cell signaling, protein synthesis, and cell cycle progression, all of which are potential areas of intervention to arrest the cancer process. What are the ... at the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention Web site at http://prevention. ...

  12. Preventing food poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007441.htm Preventing food poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. To prevent food poisoning , take the following steps when preparing food: Carefully ...

  13. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  14. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing ...

  15. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  16. Traditional preventive treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longbottom, C; Ekstrand, K; Zero, D

    2009-01-01

    Preventive treatment options can be divided into primary, secondary and tertiary prevention techniques, which can involve patient- or professionally applied methods. These include: oral hygiene (instruction), pit and fissure sealants ('temporary' or 'permanent'), fluoride applications (patient...... options....

  17. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure ...

  18. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What is “skin tolerance” and how can it be ... play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure sores among ...

  19. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Crisis Centers Stories of Hope and Recovery Mental Health & Suicide Prevention Glossary Get Involved Participate Our Crisis Centers Social Media Hub Promote National Suicide Prevention Month Providers & Professionals ...

  20. Prevention of gravitational collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, J.W.; Taylor, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    We apply a new theory of gravitation to the question of gravitational collapse to show that collapse is prevented in this theory under very reasonable conditions. This result also extends to prevent ultimate collapse of the Universe. (orig.)