WorldWideScience

Sample records for prevent heart attacks

  1. Can Vitamins Help Prevent a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamins help prevent a heart attack? Can taking vitamins help prevent heart disease or a heart attack? Answers ... M.D. It's not yet clear if taking vitamins can reduce your risk of developing heart disease ...

  2. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  3. Preventing Heart Attacks and Strokes: Increasing Awareness ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary: Chronic cardiovascular disease imposes a significant health and economic burden on individuals and communities. Despite decades of improvement in cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular disease and stroke remain the leading cause of death in the U.S. and disparities in health outcomes persist. Moreover, the continuous improvement in cardiovascular mortality typical of the last four decades has ended motivating new and innovative approaches to improve population health and wellbeing. Apart from continued focus on traditional risk factor modification such as identification and treatment of high blood pressure and cholesterol, cessation of smoking, and appropriate use of evidence-based pharmacological prevention measures and disease management, other factors should be considered such as increasing physical activity, dietary sodium reduction and modification of social and environmental determinants known to cause heart attacks and stroke and exacerbate vascular disease. Such an approach will require greater cooperation among public health, environmental health, the broader public and private healthcare delivery and payment systems, and federal agencies. To introduce this concept the U.S. EPA held a workshop in September 2016 bringing together representatives of local and state public health officials, the healthcare system, educators, data analytics, and federal partners (CMS, CDC, Dept. of State and EPA) for the purpose of exploring the idea of prom

  4. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year almost 800,000 Americans have a heart attack. A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart suddenly ... it's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if you or ...

  5. What Is a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help prevent your first heart attack. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes A heart-healthy lifestyle can help prevent ... blood to flow to the heart muscle. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Treatment for a heart attack usually includes ...

  6. Heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part in support groups for people with heart disease . Outlook (Prognosis) After a heart attack, you have a higher ... P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  7. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain Fatigue Heart attack Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  8. About Heart Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Heart Attacks Updated:Jan 11,2018 A heart attack is ... coronary artery damage leads to a heart attack . Heart Attack Questions and Answers What is a heart attack? ...

  9. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching sensation in your chest or arms that may spread to your neck, jaw or back Nausea, indigestion, heartburn or abdominal pain Shortness of breath Cold sweat Fatigue Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness Heart attack ...

  10. Heart attack first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle becomes ...

  11. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000166.htm Pericarditis - after heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... occur in the days or weeks following a heart attack . Causes Two types of pericarditis can occur after ...

  12. What Is a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Heart Attack Heart Attack Also known as Myocardial infarction Leer en español ... or years after the procedure. Other Treatments for Heart Attack Other treatments for heart attack include: Medicines Medical ...

  13. Heart attack - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and lifestyle Cholesterol - drug treatment Controlling your high blood pressure Deep vein thrombosis - discharge Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart attack - what to ask your doctor Heart bypass ... pacemaker - discharge High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor How to read ...

  14. Heart Attack Payment - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – state data. This data set includes state-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  15. Heart Attack Payment - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – provider data. This data set includes provider data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  16. Heart Attack Payment - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – national data. This data set includes national-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  17. Thrombolytic drugs for heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007488.htm Thrombolytic drugs for heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... supply blood and oxygen to the heart. A heart attack can occur if a blood clot stops the ...

  18. Depression After Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Attack? Redford B. Williams Download PDF https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.017285 Circulation. 2011; 123: ... e639-e640 , originally published June 27, 2011 https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.017285 Citation Manager Formats ...

  19. Panic Attack or Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MPI") that uses a nucleotide tracer (e.g. Thallium) that is injected into your veins to view blood flow to your heart muscle. MPI is used in combination with the stress test to improve accuracy in diagnosing heart disease. Women of child-bearing age may wish to opt for ultrasound ...

  20. Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease, Angina Basic Facts & Information What ... and oxygen supply; this is what causes a heart attack. If the damaged area is small, however, your ...

  1. Applying Magneto-rheology to Reduce Blood Viscosity and Suppress Turbulence to Prevent Heart Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R.

    Heart attacks are the leading causes of death in USA. Research indicates one common thread, high blood viscosity, linking all cardiovascular diseases. Turbulence in blood circulation makes different regions of the vasculature vulnerable to development of atherosclerotic plaque. Turbulence is also responsible for systolic ejection murmurs and places heavier workload on heart, a possible trigger of heart attacks. Presently, neither medicine nor method is available to suppress turbulence. The only method to reduce the blood viscosity is to take medicine, such as aspirin. However, using medicine to reduce the blood viscosity does not help suppressing turbulence. In fact, the turbulence gets worse as the Reynolds number goes up with the viscosity reduction by the medicine. Here we report our new discovery: application of a strong magnetic field to blood along its flow direction, red blood cells are polarized in the magnetic field and aggregated into short chains along the flow direction. The blood viscosity becomes anisotropic: Along the flow direction the viscosity is significantly reduced, but in the directions perpendicular to the flow the viscosity is considerably increased. In this way, the blood flow becomes laminar, turbulence is suppressed, the blood circulation is greatly improved, and the risk for heart attacks is reduced. While these effects are not permanent, they last for about 24 hours after one magnetic therapy treatment.

  2. The polypill and the prevention of heart attacks and strokes by Caroline Telfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, David S

    2013-07-01

    David S Wald speaks to Caroline Telfer, Assistant Commissioning Editor. David S Wald is a Consultant Cardiologist and Reader in Preventive Cardiology. He trained at Oxford University (UK) and Imperial College of Science and Technology, London (UK). His work combines interventional and preventive approaches to cardiovascular disease. He is currently leading a multicenter randomized trial assessing the value of preventive angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction and a UK trial of a polypill for people over the age of 50 years for the prevention of ischemic heart disease and stroke.

  3. Understand Your Risk of Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart-Health Basics Reducing your risk starts with smart choices. If you smoke, stop. The American Heart ... a Second Heart Attack | Spanish Cardiac Rehab Referral Card | Spanish Heart Attack Warning Signs: Patient sheet | Infographic | ...

  4. [Heart-attack in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Výtisková, T; Suchá, D; Fučíková, Z

    To describe hear-attack on crystal meth addicted pregnant woman. Case report. Acute heart-attack during pregnancy means unexpected obstetric complication. The consequences could be fatal for the mother and the fetus. Although good delivery management and treatment could reduce morbidity and mortality to a minimum.

  5. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some cases, surgical procedures. Your doctor may also run some diagnostic tests to determine how much your heart was damaged and what degree ... some cases, surgical procedures. Your doctor may also run some diagnostic tests to determine how much your heart was damaged and what degree ...

  6. Electrocardiographic measures of left ventricular hypertrophy in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michael E; Davis, Barry R; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Prineas, Ronald J; Okin, Peter M; Ghosh, Alokananda; Cushman, William C; Einhorn, Paula T; Oparil, Suzanne; Grimm, Richard H

    2016-12-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) predicts cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. We analyzed baseline/follow-up electrocardiographies in 26,376 Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial participants randomized to amlodipine (A), lisinopril (L), or chlorthalidone (C). Prevalent/incident LVH was examined using continuous and categorical classifications of Cornell voltage. At 2 and 4 years, prevalence of LVH in the C group (5.57%; 6.14%) was not statistically different from A group (2 years: 5.47%; P = .806, 4 years: 6.54%; P = .857) or L group (2 years: 5.64%; P = .857, 4 years: 6.50%; P = .430). Incident LVH followed similarly, with no difference at 2 years for C (2.99%) compared to A (2.57%; P = .173) or L (3.16%; P = .605) and at 4 years (C = 3.52%, A = 3.29%, L = 3.71%; P = .521 C vs. A, P = .618 C vs. L). Mean Cornell voltage decreased comparably across treatment groups (Δ baseline, 2 years = +3 to -27 μV, analysis of variance P = .8612; 4 years = +10 to -17 μV, analysis of variance P = .9692). We conclude that risk reductions associated with C treatment in secondary end points of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial cannot be attributed to differential improvements in electrocardiography LVH. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. All rights reserved.

  7. Mortality and morbidity during and after Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial: results by sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparil, Suzanne; Davis, Barry R; Cushman, William C; Ford, Charles E; Furberg, Curt D; Habib, Gabriel B; Haywood, L Julian; Margolis, Karen; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Whelton, Paul K; Wright, Jackson T

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril) or calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) is superior to a diuretic (chlorthalidone) in reducing cardiovascular disease incidence in sex subgroups, we carried out a prespecified subgroup analysis of 15 638 women and 17 719 men in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). Total follow-up (active treatment + passive surveillance using national administrative databases to ascertain deaths and hospitalizations) was 8 to 13 years. The primary outcome was fatal coronary heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included all-cause mortality, stroke, combined cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, angina, coronary revascularization, heart failure [HF], or peripheral vascular disease), and end-stage renal disease. In-trial rates of HF, stroke, and combined cardiovascular disease were significantly higher for lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone, and rates of HF were significantly higher for amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone in both men and women. There were no significant treatment sex interactions. These findings did not persist through the extension period with the exception of the HF result for amlodipine versus chlorthalidone, which did not differ significantly by sex. For both women and men, rates were not lower in the amlodipine or lisinopril groups than in the chlorthalidone group for either the primary coronary heart disease outcome or any other cardiovascular disease outcome, and chlorthalidone-based treatment resulted in the lowest risk of HF. Neither lisinopril nor amlodipine is superior to chlorthalidone for initial treatment of hypertension in either women or men. Clinical Trial Registration- clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT00000542.

  8. Heterogeneity in Early Responses in ALLHAT (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhruva, Sanket S; Huang, Chenxi; Spatz, Erica S; Coppi, Andreas C; Warner, Frederick; Li, Shu-Xia; Lin, Haiqun; Xu, Xiao; Furberg, Curt D; Davis, Barry R; Pressel, Sara L; Coifman, Ronald R; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2017-07-01

    Randomized trials of hypertension have seldom examined heterogeneity in response to treatments over time and the implications for cardiovascular outcomes. Understanding this heterogeneity, however, is a necessary step toward personalizing antihypertensive therapy. We applied trajectory-based modeling to data on 39 763 study participants of the ALLHAT (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial) to identify distinct patterns of systolic blood pressure (SBP) response to randomized medications during the first 6 months of the trial. Two trajectory patterns were identified: immediate responders (85.5%), on average, had a decreasing SBP, whereas nonimmediate responders (14.5%), on average, had an initially increasing SBP followed by a decrease. Compared with those randomized to chlorthalidone, participants randomized to amlodipine (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.31), lisinopril (odds ratio, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.73-2.03), and doxazosin (odds ratio, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.52-1.78) had higher adjusted odds ratios associated with being a nonimmediate responder (versus immediate responder). After multivariable adjustment, nonimmediate responders had a higher hazard ratio of stroke (hazard ratio, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.21-1.84), combined cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.11-1.31), and heart failure (hazard ratio, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.24-1.78) during follow-up between 6 months and 2 years. The SBP response trajectories provided superior discrimination for predicting downstream adverse cardiovascular events than classification based on difference in SBP between the first 2 measurements, SBP at 6 months, and average SBP during the first 6 months. Our findings demonstrate heterogeneity in response to antihypertensive therapies and show that chlorthalidone is associated with more favorable initial response than the other medications. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Being active after a heart attack (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best activity when you start exercising after a heart attack. Start slowly, and increase the amount of time ... best activity when you start exercising after a heart attack. Start slowly, and increase the amount of time ...

  10. Fuzzy Expert System for Heart Attack Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Norlida; Arbaiy, Nureize; Shah, Noor Aziyan Ahmad; Afizah Afif@Afip, Zehan

    2017-08-01

    Heart attack is one of the serious illnesses and reported as the main killer disease. Early prevention is significant to reduce the risk of having the disease. The prevention efforts can be strengthen through awareness and education about risk factor and healthy lifestyle. Therefore the knowledge dissemination is needed to play role in order to distribute and educate public in health care management and disease prevention. Since the knowledge dissemination in medical is important, there is a need to develop a knowledge based system that can emulate human intelligence to assist decision making process. Thereby, this study utilized hybrid artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to develop a Fuzzy Expert System for Diagnosing Heart Attack Disease (HAD). This system integrates fuzzy logic with expert system, which helps the medical practitioner and people to predict the risk and as well as diagnosing heart attack based on given symptom. The development of HAD is expected not only providing expert knowledge but potentially become one of learning resources to help citizens to develop awareness about heart-healthy lifestyle.

  11. Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aneurysm More Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack Updated:Mar 15,2018 Sometimes a heart attack ... Disease Go Red For Women Types of aneurysms Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ...

  12. Should Antihypertensive Treatment Recommendations Differ in Patients With and Without Coronary Heart Disease? (from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial [ALLHAT]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Michael H; Davis, Barry R; Piller, Linda B; Ford, Charles E; Baraniuk, M Sarah; Pressel, Sara L; Assadi, Mahshid A; Einhorn, Paula T; Haywood, L Julian; Ilamathi, Ekambaram; Oparil, Suzanne; Retta, Tamrat M

    2016-01-01

    Thiazide-type diuretics have been recommended for initial treatment of hypertension in most patients, but should this recommendation differ for patients with and without coronary heart disease (CHD)? The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) was a randomized, double-blind hypertension treatment trial in 42,418 participants with high risk of combined cardiovascular disease (CVD) (25% with preexisting CHD). This post hoc analysis compares long-term major clinical outcomes in those assigned amlodipine (n = 9048) or lisinopril (n = 9,054) with those assigned chlorthalidone (n = 15,255), stratified by CHD status. After 4 to 8 years, randomized treatment was discontinued. Total follow-up (active treatment + passive surveillance using national databases for deaths and hospitalizations) was 8 to 13 years. For most CVD outcomes, end-stage renal disease, and total mortality, there were no differences across randomized treatment arms regardless of baseline CHD status. In-trial rates of CVD were significantly higher for lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone, and rates of heart failure were significantly higher for amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone in those with and without CHD (overall hazard ratios [HRs] 1.10, p heart failure in amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone (HR 1.12; p = 0.01) during extended follow-up did not differ by baseline CHD status. In conclusion, these results provide no reason to alter our previous recommendation to include a properly dosed diuretic (such as chlorthalidone 12.5 to 25 mg/day) in the initial antihypertensive regimen for most hypertensive patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Outdoor Air Pollution, Heart Attack and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated outdoor ambient air particle pollution triggers heart attacks, strokes, and abnormal heart rhythms and worsens heart failure in individuals at high risk due to underlying medical conditions. Emergency Medical Services in communities are the first responders to these eme...

  14. Long-Term Follow-up of Participants with Heart Failure in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piller, Linda B.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Simpson, Lara M.; Cushman, William C.; Massie, Barry M.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Oparil, Suzanne; Ford, Charles E.; Graumlich, James F.; Dart, Richard A.; Parish, David C.; Retta, Tamrat M.; Cuyjet, Aloysius B.; Jafri, Syed Z.; Furberg, Curt D.; Saklayen, Mohammad G.; Thadani, Udho; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.; Davis, Barry R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT), a randomized, double-blind, practice-based, active-control, comparative effectiveness trial in high-risk hypertensive participants, risk of new-onset heart failure (HF) was higher in the amlodipine (2.5-10 mg/day) and lisinopril (10-40 mg/day) arms compared with the chlorthalidone (12.5-25 mg/day) arm . Similar to other studies, mortality rates following new-onset HF were very high (≥50% at 5 years), and were similar across randomized treatment arms. After the randomized phase of the trial ended in 2002, outcomes were determined from administrative databases. Methods and Results Using national databases, post-trial follow-up mortality through 2006 was obtained on participants who developed new-onset HF during the randomized (in-trial) phase of ALLHAT. Mean follow-up for the entire period was 8.9 years. Of 1761 participants with incident HF in-trial, 1348 died. Post-HF all-cause mortality was similar across treatment groups with adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 0.95 (0.81-1.12) and 1.05 (0.89-1.25), respectively, for amlodipine and lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone, and 10-year adjusted rates of 86%, 87%, and 83%, respectively. All-cause mortality rates were also similar among those with reduced ejection fractions (84%) and preserved ejection fractions (81%) with no significant differences by randomized treatment arm. Conclusions Once HF develops, risk of death is high and consistent across randomized treatment groups. Measures to prevent the development of HF, especially blood pressure control, must be a priority if mortality associated with development of HF is to be addressed. PMID:21969009

  15. Pharmacologic Prevention of Incident Atrial Fibrillation: Long-Term Results From the ALLHAT (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewland, Thomas A; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Davis, Barry R; Alonso, Alvaro; Albert, Christine M; Simpson, Lara M; Haywood, L Julian; Marcus, Gregory M

    2017-12-01

    Although atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines indicate that pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin system may be considered for primary AF prevention in hypertensive patients, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. We sought to determine whether randomization to lisinopril reduces incident AF or atrial flutter (AFL) compared with chlorthalidone in a large clinical trial cohort with extended post-trial surveillance. We performed a secondary analysis of the ALLHAT (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial), a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled clinical trial that enrolled hypertensive individuals ≥55 years of age with at least one other cardiovascular risk factor. Participants were randomly assigned to receive amlodipine, lisinopril, or chlorthalidone. Individuals with elevated fasting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were also randomized to pravastatin versus usual care. The primary outcome was the development of either AF or AFL as diagnosed by serial study ECGs or by Medicare claims data. Among 14 837 participants without prevalent AF or AFL, 2514 developed AF/AFL during a mean 7.5±3.2 years of follow-up. Compared with chlorthalidone, randomization to either lisinopril (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.15; P =0.46) or amlodipine (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-1.03; P =0.16) was not associated with a significant reduction in incident AF/AFL. Compared with chlorthalidone, treatment with lisinopril is not associated with a meaningful reduction in incident AF or AFL among older adults with a history of hypertension. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000542. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Calcium Supplements: A Risk Factor for Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for heart attack? I've read that calcium supplements may increase the risk of heart attack. Is ... Some doctors think it's possible that taking calcium supplements may increase your risk of a heart attack. ...

  17. Coronary heart disease risk in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease: findings from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Noncoronary forms of atherosclerosis (including transient ischemic attacks or stroke of carotid origin or >50% stenosis of the carotid artery) are associated with a 10-year vascular risk of >20% and are considered as a coronary heart disease (CHD) -risk equivalent from the standpoint of lipid...... management. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known CHD regardless of the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. We evaluated the risk of developing clinically recognized CHD in SPARCL patients....

  18. Know the Warning Signs of a Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... No. 22 Know the Warning Signs of a Heart Attack What is a heart attack? Aheart attack happens when the blood vessels that ... hurting your heart muscle. Another name for a heart attack is myocardial infarction, or MI. If you have ...

  19. Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or Stroke, Here Is What You Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicines Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or ... care provider can determine whether regular use of aspirin will help to prevent a heart attack or ...

  20. Efficacy of a Community-Based Physical Activity Program KM2H2 for Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention among Senior Hypertensive Patients: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Phase-II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jie; Chen, Xinguang; Li, Sijian

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the program Keep Moving toward Healthy Heart and Healthy Brain (KM2H2) in encouraging physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke among hypertensive patients enrolled in the Community-Based Hypertension Control Program (CBHCP). Cluster randomized controlled trial with three waves of longitudinal assessments at baseline, 3 and 6 months post intervention. Community-based and patient-centered self-care for behavioral intervention in urban settings of China. A total of 450 participants diagnosed with hypertension from 12 community health centers in Wuhan, China were recruited, and were randomly assigned by center to receive either KM2H2 plus standard CBHCP care (6 centers and 232 patients) or the standard care only (6 centers and 218 patients). KM2H2 is a behavioral intervention guided by the Transtheoretical Model, the Model of Personalized Medicine and Social Capital Theory. It consists of six intervention sessions and two booster sessions engineered in a progressive manner. The purpose is to motivate and maintain physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke. Heart attack and stroke (clinically diagnosed, primary outcome), blood pressure (measured, secondary outcome), and physical activity (self-report, tertiary outcome) were assessed at the individual level during the baseline, 3- and 6-month post-intervention. Relative to the standard care, receiving KM2H2 was associated with significant reductions in the incidence of heart attack (3.60% vs. 7.03%, p heart attack and stroke among senior patients who are on anti-hypertensive medication. Findings of this study provide solid data supporting a formal phase-III trial to establish the effectiveness of KM2H2 for use in community settings for prevention. ISRCTN Register ISRCTN12608966.

  1. Coronary heart disease risk in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease: findings from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik; Benavente, Oscar; Zweifler, Richard M; Callahan, Alfred; Hennerici, Michael G; Zivin, Justin A; Welch, K Michael A

    2010-03-01

    Noncoronary forms of atherosclerosis (including transient ischemic attacks or stroke of carotid origin or >50% stenosis of the carotid artery) are associated with a 10-year vascular risk of >20% and are considered as a coronary heart disease (CHD) -risk equivalent from the standpoint of lipid management. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known CHD regardless of the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. We evaluated the risk of developing clinically recognized CHD in SPARCL patients. A total of 4731 patients (mean age, 63 years) was randomized to 80 mg/day atorvastatin placebo. The rates of major coronary event, any CHD event, and any revascularization procedure were evaluated. After 4.9 years of follow-up, the risks of a major coronary event and of any CHD end point in the placebo group were 5.1% and 8.6%, respectively. The rate of outcome of stroke decreased over time, whereas the major coronary event rate was stable. Relative to those having a large vessel-related stroke at baseline, those having a transient ischemic attack, hemorrhagic stroke, small vessel stroke, or a stroke of unknown cause had similar absolute rates for a first major coronary event and for any CHD event; transient ischemic attack, small vessel, and unknown cause groups had lower absolute revascularization procedure rates. Major coronary event, any CHD event, and any revascularization procedure rates were similarly reduced in all baseline stroke subtypes in the atorvastatin arm compared with placebo with no heterogeneity between groups. CHD risk can be substantially reduced by atorvastatin therapy in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack regardless of stroke subtype.

  2. Clinical significance of incident hypokalemia and hyperkalemia in treated hypertensive patients in the antihypertensive and lipid-lowering treatment to prevent heart attack trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Michael H; Piller, Linda B; Ford, Charles E; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Oparil, Suzanne; Cushman, William C; Einhorn, Paula T; Franklin, Stanley S; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Ong, Stephen T; Eckfeldt, John H; Furberg, Curt D; Calhoun, David A; Davis, Barry R

    2012-05-01

    Concerns exist that diuretic-induced changes in serum potassium may have adverse effects in hypertensive patients. The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial, a large practice-based clinical trial, made it possible to examine consequences of observed changes in potassium during care in conventional practice settings. Normokalemic participants randomized to chlorthalidone (C) versus amlodipine or lisinopril as a first-step drug were stratified by year-1 potassium. Postyear-1 outcomes among hypokalemics (potassium, 5.4 mmol/L) were compared with normokalemics (potassium, 3.5-5.4 mmol/L). Year-1 hypokalemia incidence was 6.8%; incidence in C (12.9%) differed from amlodipine (2.1%; Pheart disease occurred in 8.1% with hypokalemia, 8.0% with normokalemia, and 11.1% with hyperkalemia. Overall, mortality was higher in hypokalemics than in normokalemics (Cox hazard ratio, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.02-1.44]) with statistically significant (interaction, P<0.01) disparity in hazard ratios for the 3 treatment arms (hazard ratios, C=1.21, amlodipine=1.60, lisinopril=3.82). Hyperkalemia was associated with increased risk of combined cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio, 1.58 [95% CI, 1.15-2.18]) without significant treatment interactions. In conventional practice settings, the uncommon appearance of hyperkalemia was associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Hypokalemia was associated with increased mortality; however, the statistically significant heterogeneity in hazard ratios across treatment groups strongly suggests that the observed increase in mortality is unrelated to the specific effects of C. Thus, for most patients, concerns about potassium levels should not influence the clinician's decision about initiating hypertension treatment with low-moderate doses of thiazide diuretics (12.5-25.0 mg of C).

  3. Baseline Quality of Life and Risk of Stroke in the ALLHAT Study (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Tanzila; Auchus, Alexander P; Oparil, Suzanne; Wright, Clinton B; Wright, Jackson; Furlan, Anthony J; Sila, Cathy A; Davis, Barry R; Pressel, Sara; Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Einhorn, Paula T; Lerner, Alan J

    2017-11-01

    The visual analogue scale is a self-reported, validated tool to measure quality of life (QoL). Our purpose was to determine whether baseline QoL predicted strokes in the ALLHAT study (Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial) and evaluate determinants of poststroke change in QoL. In the ALLHAT study, among the 33 357 patients randomized to treatment arms, 1525 experienced strokes; 1202 (79%) strokes were nonfatal. This study cohort includes 32 318 (97%) subjects who completed the baseline visual analogue scale QoL estimate. QoL was measured on a visual analogue scale and adjusted using a Torrance transformation (transformed QoL [TQoL]). Kaplan-Meier curves and adjusted proportional hazards analyses were used to estimate the effect of TQoL on the risk of stroke, on a continuous scale (0-1) and by quartiles (≤0.81, >0.81≤0.89, >0.89≤0.95, >0.95). We analyzed the change from baseline to first poststroke TQoL using adjusted linear regression. After adjusting for multiple stroke risk factors, the hazard ratio for stroke events for baseline TQoL was 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.98) per 0.1 U increase. The lowest baseline TQoL quartile had a 20% increased stroke risk (hazard ratio=1.20 [95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.44]) compared with the reference highest quartile TQoL. Poststroke TQoL change was significant within all treatment groups ( P ≤0.001). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that baseline TQoL was the strongest predictor of poststroke TQoL with similar results for the untransformed QoL. The lowest baseline TQoL quartile had a 20% higher stroke risk than the highest quartile. Baseline TQoL was the only factor that predicted poststroke change in TQoL. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000542. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Patients' perceptions of their heart attack and recovery: the influence of epidemiological "evidence" and personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, R

    1998-06-01

    Secondary prevention of heart disease is widely viewed as likely to be more successful and cost effective than primary prevention. However, people's willingness to adopt lifestyle change is a complex issue in which people's perceptions of disease causation and risk as well as a range of socio-economic factors are important. This paper reports on a qualitative study of people following heart attack which examines their understandings of heart attack and the salience that lifestyle advice has in the light of these understandings. In-depth, qualitative interviews were conducted with 25 people recovering from heart attack. Each person was interviewed twice: at around two weeks and five months following their heart attack. The study found that information about recovery provided by health professionals was based on a simplified version of epidemiological evidence. This information played a central role in people's understandings about the nature of heart attack and their future risk in the early weeks following heart attack. However, as interviewees came to terms with the shock of the event, they tended to lose their trust in "official" accounts of cause and recovery and evidence from lay epidemiology that contradicted official accounts tended to emerge. This evidence encouraged interviewees to question the explanatory power of official accounts and to view the adoption of long-term lifestyle change as an action that would not guarantee protection from a further heart attack. This was true whether or not people's experiences of recovery reflected those "predicted" by health professionals although those awaiting further surgery or tests tended to maintain trust in official accounts over a longer period. It is concluded that the failure of official accounts to acknowledge the random nature of the occurrence of heart attack, the severity of heart attack and the level of recovery from heart attack is a central feature in people's reluctance to view lifestyle change as a

  5. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different? Updated:Mar 15,2018 People often use these ... The heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men. What is cardiac arrest? Sudden cardiac ...

  6. The Association Between Antihypertensive Medication Nonadherence and Visit-to-Visit Variability of Blood Pressure: Findings From the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronish, Ian M; Lynch, Amy I; Oparil, Suzanne; Whittle, Jeff; Davis, Barry R; Simpson, Lara M; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Cushman, William C; Chang, Tara I; Muntner, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Low adherence to antihypertensive medication has been hypothesized to increase visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of blood pressure (BP). We assessed the association between antihypertensive medication adherence and VVV of BP in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). VVV of BP was calculated using SD independent of mean, SD, and average real variability across study visits conducted 6 to 28 months after randomization. Participants who reported taking heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or mortality risk. In conclusion, improving medication adherence may lower VVV of BP. However, VVV of BP is associated with cardiovascular outcomes independent of medication adherence. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Efficacy of a Community-Based Physical Activity Program KM2H2 for Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention among Senior Hypertensive Patients: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Phase-II Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Gong

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of the program Keep Moving toward Healthy Heart and Healthy Brain (KM2H2 in encouraging physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke among hypertensive patients enrolled in the Community-Based Hypertension Control Program (CBHCP.Cluster randomized controlled trial with three waves of longitudinal assessments at baseline, 3 and 6 months post intervention.Community-based and patient-centered self-care for behavioral intervention in urban settings of China.A total of 450 participants diagnosed with hypertension from 12 community health centers in Wuhan, China were recruited, and were randomly assigned by center to receive either KM2H2 plus standard CBHCP care (6 centers and 232 patients or the standard care only (6 centers and 218 patients.KM2H2 is a behavioral intervention guided by the Transtheoretical Model, the Model of Personalized Medicine and Social Capital Theory. It consists of six intervention sessions and two booster sessions engineered in a progressive manner. The purpose is to motivate and maintain physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke.Heart attack and stroke (clinically diagnosed, primary outcome, blood pressure (measured, secondary outcome, and physical activity (self-report, tertiary outcome were assessed at the individual level during the baseline, 3- and 6-month post-intervention.Relative to the standard care, receiving KM2H2 was associated with significant reductions in the incidence of heart attack (3.60% vs. 7.03%, p < .05 and stroke (5.11% vs. 9.90%, p<0.05, and moderate reduction in blood pressure (-3.72 mmHg in DBP and -2.92 mmHg in DBP at 6-month post-intervention; and significant increases in physical activity at 3- (d = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.85 and 6-month (d = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.85 post-intervention, respectively.The program KM2H2 is efficacious to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke among senior patients who are on anti

  8. Marital history and survival after a heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, Matthew E; Nelson, Alicia

    2016-12-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and nearly one million Americans will have a heart attack this year. Although the risks associated with a heart attack are well established, we know surprisingly little about how marital factors contribute to survival in adults afflicted with heart disease. This study uses a life course perspective and longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study to examine how various dimensions of marital life influence survival in U.S. older adults who suffered a heart attack (n = 2197). We found that adults who were never married (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73), currently divorced (OR = 1.70), or widowed (OR = 1.34) were at significantly greater risk of dying after a heart attack than adults who were continuously married; and the risks were not uniform over time. We also found that the risk of dying increased by 12% for every additional marital loss and decreased by 7% for every one-tenth increase in the proportion of years married. After accounting for more than a dozen socioeconomic, psychosocial, behavioral, and physiological factors, we found that current marital status remained the most robust indicator of survival following a heart attack. The implications of the findings are discussed in the context of life course inequalities in chronic disease and directions for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exercise Following a Heart Attack: Some Special Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardy, Paul S.

    This paper presents information on the effectiveness of exercise programs for heart attack victims. Some of the observations come from unpublished results of a two year experiment of the National Exercise and Heart Disease Project. The paper first establishes that a group exercise program with trained supervision is advantageous for people with…

  10. Learn What a Heart Attack Feels Like--It Could Save Your Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn What a Heart Attack Feels Like— It Could Save Your Life. This fact sheet tells you about heart attack signs. It also tells you what to do ... your life. 1. Know the signs of a heart attack. 2. Understand that heart attacks are not all ...

  11. Treatment-resistant hypertension and the incidence of cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease: results from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntner, Paul; Davis, Barry R; Cushman, William C; Bangalore, Sripal; Calhoun, David A; Pressel, Sara L; Black, Henry R; Kostis, John B; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Whelton, Paul K; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-11-01

    Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is defined as uncontrolled hypertension despite the use of ≥3 antihypertensive medication classes or controlled hypertension while treated with ≥4 antihypertensive medication classes. Although a high prevalence of aTRH has been reported, few data are available on its association with cardiovascular and renal outcomes. We analyzed data on 14 684 Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) participants to determine the association between aTRH (n=1870) with coronary heart disease, stroke, all-cause mortality, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, and end-stage renal disease. We defined aTRH as blood pressure not at goal (systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg) while taking ≥3 classes of antihypertensive medication or taking ≥4 classes of antihypertensive medication with blood pressure at goal during the year 2 ALLHAT study visit (1996-2000). Use of a diuretic was not required to meet the definition of aTRH. Follow-up occurred through 2002. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing participants with versus without aTRH were as follows: coronary heart disease (1.44 [1.18-1.76]), stroke (1.57 [1.18-2.08]), all-cause mortality (1.30 [1.11-1.52]), heart failure (1.88 [1.52-2.34]), peripheral artery disease (1.23 [0.85-1.79]), and end-stage renal disease (1.95 [1.11-3.41]). aTRH was also associated with the pooled outcomes of combined coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-1.71) and combined cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.64). These results demonstrate that aTRH increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease. Studies are needed to identify approaches to prevent aTRH and reduce risk for adverse outcomes among individuals with aTRH. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Being active after your heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6 weeks, you may be able to start swimming, but stay out of very cold or very ... American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines (Writing Committee to Revise the ...

  13. Make the call, don't miss a beat: Heart Attack Information for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other resources Learn more about heart disease and heart attacks. Make the Call, Don't Miss a Beat ... symptoms Learn the 7 most common signs of heart attack in men and women. Chest pain or discomfort " ...

  14. Self-reported heart attack in Mexican-American elders: examination of incidence, prevalence, and 7-year mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otiniano, Max E; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Markides, Kyriakos S; Ray, Laura A; Du, Xianglin L

    2003-07-01

    mellitus, hypertension, stroke, and ADL and IADL disabilities. Nearly half of subjects with heart attack had died of heart attack as underlying cause of death by 7-year follow-up. Prevention and control for this disease would be especially important in this population to avoid early mortality.

  15. Can You Recognize a Heart Attack or Stroke? What To Do When Every Moment Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 Print this issue Can You Recognize a Heart Attack or Stroke? What To Do When Every Moment ... When it comes to life-threatening conditions like heart attack or stroke, every minute counts. Get to know ...

  16. Applying the Principles of Homicide by Heart Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavaty, Leigh; Sung, LokMan

    2016-06-01

    Homicide by heart attack is a well-established model in forensic pathology that describes death elicited during or immediately after a criminal act where a threat or fear of physical injury is present. After its introduction nearly 4 decades ago, the principle has undergone a handful of modifications but still maintains its core concepts. All cases of this nature during a 20-year period at the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office were compared and contrasted for demographics, circumstances and scene investigation, and autopsy and toxicology findings. Of the cases fulfilling the previously established criteria for homicide by heart attack, more than 80% displayed significant changes because of hypertension. This finding coincides with the high prevalence of hypertension in our urban population and highlights the significance of this disease. Also present were minor external and internal injuries in select cases, which reinforce the understanding that physical contact between the decedent and assailant does not preclude this diagnosis.

  17. Recognizing a heart attack: the process of determining illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherck, K A

    1997-07-01

    To examine the process by which patients with acute myocardial infarction recognize illness and the need for medical treatment. Descriptive, exploratory, qualitative. The coronary care and progressive care units of two midwestern medical centers. Thirty men and women with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. Open-ended interviews were conducted on the fourth or fifth day of hospitalization. All interviews were recorded on audiotape and transcribed. Data were analyzed by using grounded theory methods. Findings of the study indicated that determining illness and the need for medical attention was often a difficult process involving phases. The first phase involved attending to or ignoring bodily sensations as they come and go or additional sensations develop. Some subjects moved precipitously to seeking treatment; others took days to attend to bodily sensations. The second phase involved comparing sensations with those from a previously experienced illness or with the subject's concept of sensations likely to accompany common ailments such as indigestion or flu or more serious illnesses such as ulcer, gallbladder disease, or heart attack. The quality of sensations experienced had an important influence on assigning probable cause and deciding that medical attention is warranted. The disruptive nature of signs and symptoms and how closely signs and symptoms matched the subject's prototype for a heart attack greatly influenced the determination that illness was present and healthcare was needed. These findings have implications for educating the public about the complex and variable manifestations of a heart attack.

  18. Disparities in adult African American women's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomatology: an analysis of 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Cumba, Marites T; McCullough, Joel Emery; Barlow, Erika Laverne; Lipsky, Martin S

    2008-06-01

    Heart disease and stroke are the first and third leading causes of death of American women, respectively. African American women experience a disproportionate burden of these diseases compared with Caucasian women and are also more likely to delay seeking treatment for acute symptoms. As knowledge is a first step in seeking care, this study examined the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among African American women. This was a cross-sectional study analyzing 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) data. A composite heart attack and stroke knowledge score was computed for each respondent from the 13 heart attack and stroke symptom knowledge questions. Multivariate logistic regression was performed using low scores on the heart attack and stroke knowledge questions as the dependent variable. Twenty percent of the respondents were low scorers, and 23.8% were high scorers. Logistic regression analysis showed that adult African American women who earned low scores on the composite heart attack and stroke knowledge questions (range 0-8 points) were more likely to be aged 18-34 (OR = 1.36, CI 1.35, 1.37), be uninsured (OR = 1.32, CI 1.31, 1.33), have an annual household income heart attack and stroke symptoms varied significantly among African American women, depending on socioeconomic variables. Targeting interventions to African American women, particularly those in lower socioeconomic groups, may increase knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms, subsequently improving preventive action taken in response to these conditions.

  19. Valsartan in the treatment of heart attack survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodh I Jugdutt

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Bodh I JugduttDivision of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Survivors of myocardial infarction (MI are at high risk of disability and death. This is due to infarct-related complications such as heart failure, cardiac remodeling with progressive ventricular dilation, dysfunction, and hypertrophy, and arrhythmias including ventricular and atrial fibrillation. Angiotensin (Ang II, the major effector molecule of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS is a major contributor to these complications. RAAS inhibition, with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors were first shown to reduce mortality and morbidity after MI. Subsequently, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, that produce more complete blockade of the effects of Ang II at the Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor, were introduced and the ARB valsartan was shown to be as effective as an ACE inhibitor in reducing mortality and morbidity in high-risk post-MI suvivors with left ventricular (LV systolic dysfunction and and/or heart failure and in heart failure patients, respectively, in two major trials (VALIANT and Val-HeFT. Both these trials used an ACE inhibitor as comparator on top of background therapy. Evidence favoring the use of valsartan for secondary prevention in post-MI survivors is reviewed.Keywords: valsartan, myocardial infarction, infarct survivors, remodeling, heart failure

  20. Health and cost benefits associated with the use of metoprolol in heart attack patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Ibanez, Borja

    2014-11-01

    Heart attack (myocardial infarction) is a highly prevalent entity worldwide. Widespread implementation of reperfusion strategies has dramatically reduced the mortality associated with infarction. Paradoxically, the mortality reduction has significantly increased the incidence of chronic heart failure (HF). Treatment of HF, once present, represents a huge socioeconomic burden on individuals and healthcare systems. The possibility of preventing rather than treating post-infarction HF would be of paramount importance. Given that infarct size is the main determinant of adverse post-infarction outcomes (including chronic HF), therapies able to reduce infarct size are needed. The single administration of intravenous metoprolol before reperfusion has been recently shown to reduce infarct size and reduce the cases of chronic HF in a proof-of-concept trial. If confirmed in larger trials, this low-cost therapy is expected to have a major health and socioeconomic impact.

  1. Use of Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation Among Heart Attack Survivors - 20 States and the District of Columbia, 2013 and Four States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Ayala, Carma; Luncheon, Cecily; Ritchey, Matthew; Loustalot, Fleetwood

    2017-08-25

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States (1). Each year, approximately 790,000 adults have a myocardial infarction (heart attack), including 210,000 that are recurrent heart attacks (2). Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) includes exercise counseling and training, education for heart-healthy living, and counseling to reduce stress. Cardiac rehab provides patients with education regarding the causes of heart attacks and tools to initiate positive behavior change, and extends patients' medical management after a heart attack to prevent future negative sequelae (3). A systematic review has shown that after a heart attack, patients using cardiac rehab were 53% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 41%-62%) less likely to die from any cause and 57% (95% CI = 21%-77%) less likely to experience cardiac-related mortality than were those who did not use cardiac rehab (3). However, even with long-standing national recommendations encouraging use of cardiac rehab (4), the intervention has been underutilized. An analysis of 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data found that only 34.7% of adults who reported a history of a heart attack also reported subsequent use of cardiac rehab (5). To update these estimates, CDC used the most recent BRFSS data from 2013 and 2015 to assess the use of cardiac rehab among adults following a heart attack. Overall use of cardiac rehab was 33.7% in 20 states and the District of Columbia (DC) in 2013 and 35.5% in four states in 2015. Cardiac rehab use was underutilized overall and differences were evident by sex, age, race/ethnicity, level of education, cardiovascular risk status, and by state. Increasing use of cardiac rehab after a heart attack should be encouraged by health systems and supported by the public health community.

  2. Heart lesion after the first attack of the rheumatic Fever 22 years experience in single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush A; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-02-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was established over the last 20 years. In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in children from Kosovo population with first attack of acute rheumatic fever. Also, we presented that echocardiography examination detects a greater prevalence of rheumatic heart disease than other diagnostic procedures. We aimed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cardiac auscultation, ECG record, lab analysis to echocardiography and to determine the feasibility of specific age in this setting. To optimize accurate diagnosis of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, we utilized two group models. In the first group of 388 children, hospitalized and treated before 1999, diagnosis of rheumatic fever was decided basing on the clinical and laboratory findings whereas in second group (221 children treated from1999 to 2010) clinical and lab diagnosis were amplified also on the detection by echocardiography. In second group, using echocardiography as a method of diagnosis and assessment children with rheumatic fever, we found high rates of undetected rheumatic heart disease in this high-risk group population. Echocardiographic examination of children with rheumatic fever for rheumatic heart disease may over diagnose rheumatic heart disease unless congenital mitral valve anomalies and physiological regurgitation are excluded.

  3. Heart Lesion After the First Attack of the Rheumatic Fever 22 Years Experience in Single Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush A.; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was established over the last 20 years. Aims: In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in children from Kosovo population with first attack of acute rheumatic fever. Also, we presented that echocardiography examination detects a greater prevalence of rheumatic heart disease than other diagnostic procedures. We aimed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cardiac auscultation, ECG record, lab analysis to echocardiography and to determine the feasibility of specific age in this setting. Methods: To optimize accurate diagnosis of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, we utilized two group models. In the first group of 388 children, hospitalized and treated before 1999, diagnosis of rheumatic fever was decided basing on the clinical and laboratory findings whereas in second group (221 children treated from1999 to 2010) clinical and lab diagnosis were amplified also on the detection by echocardiography. Conclusion: In second group, using echocardiography as a method of diagnosis and assessment children with rheumatic fever, we found high rates of undetected rheumatic heart disease in this high-risk group population. Echocardiographic examination of children with rheumatic fever for rheumatic heart disease may over diagnose rheumatic heart disease unless congenital mitral valve anomalies and physiological regurgitation are excluded. PMID:25870479

  4. Mortality from heart attack in Belgrade population during the period 1990-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratkov Isidora

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION In most countries, cardiovascular diseases are the leading disorders, with ischemic heart diseases being the leading cause of death. According to WHO data, every year about 17 million people die of cardiovascular diseases, which is 30% of all deaths. Ischemic heart diseases contribute from one-third to one-half of all deaths due to cardiovascular diseases. Three point eight million men and 3.4 million women in the world die every year from ischemic heart diseases, and in Europe about 2 million. The highest mortality rate from ischemic heart diseases occurs in India, China and Russia. OBJECTIVE The aim of this descriptive epidemiological study was to determine heart attack mortality in Belgrade population during the period 1990-2004. METHOD In the study, we conducted investigation of Belgrade population during the period 1990-2004. Mortality data were obtained from the city institution for statistics. The mortality rates were calculated based on the total Belgrade population obtained from the mean values for the last two register years (1991 and 2002. The mortality rates were standardized using the direct method of standardization according to the world (Segi standard population. RESULTS In the Belgrade population during the period 1990-2004, the participation of mortality rate due to heart attack among deaths from cardiovascular diseases was 17% in males and 10% in females. In Belgrade male population, mean standardized mortality rates (per 100,000 habitants were 50.5 for heart attack, 8.3 for chronic ischemic heart diseases and 4.6 for angina pectoris, while in females the rates were 30.8, 6.7 and 4.2, respectively. Mortality from ischemic heart diseases and from heart attack was higher in males than in females. During the studied 15-year period, on average 755 males and 483 females died due to heart attack every year. Mean standardized mortality rates per 100,000 habitants were 50.0 in male and 31.1 in female population. Males

  5. Heart attack risk perception biases among hypertension patients: the role of educational level and worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Laurel M; Helweg-Larsen, Marie; Volpp, Kevin G; Kimmel, Stephen E

    2012-01-01

    Risk biases such as comparative optimism (thinking one is better off than similar others) and risk inaccuracy (misestimating one's risk compared to one's calculated risk) for health outcomes are common. Little research has investigated racial or socioeconomic differences in these risk biases. Results from a survey of individuals with poorly controlled hypertension (N=813) indicated that participants showed (1) comparative optimism for heart attack risk by underestimating their heart attack risk compared to similar others, and (2) risk inaccuracy by overestimating their heart attack risk compared to their calculated heart attack risk. More highly educated participants were more comparatively optimistic because they rated their personal risk as lower; education was not related to risk inaccuracy. Neither race nor the federal poverty level was related to risk biases. Worry partially mediated the relationship between education and personal risk. Results are discussed as they relate to the existing literature on risk perception.

  6. Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the-Counter Medicines Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and ... any pharmacy, grocery or convenience store and buy aspirin without a prescription. The Drug Facts label on ...

  7. Knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke among Singapore residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Joy Li Juan; Yap, Susan; Cheah, Si Oon; Ng, Yih Yng; Goh, E Shaun; Doctor, Nausheen; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Tiah, Ling; Chia, Michael Yih Chong; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2014-01-01

    To determine the level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore resident population, in comparison to the global community. A population based, random sample of 7,840 household addresses was selected from a validated national sampling frame. Each participant was asked eight questions on signs and symptoms of heart attack and 10 questions on stroke. The response rate was 65.2% with 4,192 respondents. The level of knowledge for preselected, common signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke was 57.8% and 57.1%, respectively. The respondents scored a mean of 5.0 (SD 2.4) out of 8 for heart attack, while they scored a mean of 6.8 (SD 2.9) out of 10 for stroke. Respondents who were ≥ 50 years, with lower educational level, and unemployed/retired had the least knowledge about both conditions. The level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore is comparable to USA and Canada. We found a comparable knowledge of stroke and heart attack signs and symptoms in the community to countries within the same economic, educational, and healthcare strata. However older persons, those with lower educational level and those who are unemployed/retired, require more public health education efforts.

  8. Knowledge of Signs and Symptoms of Heart Attack and Stroke among Singapore Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Li Juan Quah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore resident population, in comparison to the global community. Methods. A population based, random sample of 7,840 household addresses was selected from a validated national sampling frame. Each participant was asked eight questions on signs and symptoms of heart attack and 10 questions on stroke. Results. The response rate was 65.2% with 4,192 respondents. The level of knowledge for preselected, common signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke was 57.8% and 57.1%, respectively. The respondents scored a mean of 5.0 (SD 2.4 out of 8 for heart attack, while they scored a mean of 6.8 (SD 2.9 out of 10 for stroke. Respondents who were ≥50 years, with lower educational level, and unemployed/retired had the least knowledge about both conditions. The level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore is comparable to USA and Canada. Conclusion. We found a comparable knowledge of stroke and heart attack signs and symptoms in the community to countries within the same economic, educational, and healthcare strata. However older persons, those with lower educational level and those who are unemployed/retired, require more public health education efforts.

  9. Quick Reference: Cyber Attacks Awareness and Prevention Method for Home Users

    OpenAIRE

    Haydar Teymourlouei

    2015-01-01

    It is important to take security measures to protect your computer information, reduce identify theft, and prevent from malicious cyber-attacks. With cyber-attacks on the continuous rise, people need to understand and learn ways to prevent from these attacks. Cyber-attack is an important factor to be considered if one is to be able to protect oneself from malicious attacks. Without proper security measures, most computer technology would hinder home users more than such t...

  10. RFID Distance Bounding Protocol with Mixed Challenges to Prevent Relay Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chong Hee; Avoine, Gildas

    RFID systems suffer from different location-based attacks such as distance fraud, mafia fraud and terrorist fraud attacks. Among them mafia fraud attack is the most serious since this attack can be mounted without the notice of both the reader and the tag. An adversary performs a kind of man-in-the-middle attack between the reader and the tag. It is very difficult to prevent this attack since the adversary does not change any data between the reader and the tag. Recently distance bounding protocols measuring the round-trip time between the reader and the tag have been researched to prevent this attack.

  11. Significance of estimated glomerular filtration rate in predicting brain or heart attacks in obese and non-obese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuji; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Konta, Tsuneo; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Kenjiro; Narita, Ichiei; Kondo, Masahide; Asahi, Koichi; Kurahashi, Issei; Ohashi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2015-10-01

    The Japanese Specific Health Checkup mainly focuses on metabolic syndrome for preventing cardiovascular events. Subjects are stratified by measuring waist circumference, body mass index, blood pressure, triglycerides, and fasting plasma glucose. However, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is not considered essential. A longitudinal cohort study assessed the association of eGFR with new-onset brain or heart attacks in a large Japanese nationwide Specific Health Checkup database. A total of 109,349 Japanese subjects (mean age 63.2 years, 39.5 % men) were examined for the events 2 years later. The odds ratios were calculated for new events in the total and subgroup populations divided by BMI proteinuria (dipstick test ≥1+), lower eGFR, and higher systolic and diastolic BP, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and triglycerides (TG). Rates of new-onset brain or heart attacks were 3.1 and 4.0 % in the groups of non-obese and obese subjects, respectively. In the total population, eGFR as well as higher BMI (≥25 kg/m(2)), higher BP (high-normal hypertension or greater), higher TG (≥150 mg/dl), and proteinuria were significant risk factors for developing brain or heart attacks. The eGFR was significant in non-obese subjects, but not in the obese. As the ultimate aim of 'Specific Health Checkup' is to prevent cardiovascular events, our study suggests that eGFR should be evaluated in non-obese subjects.

  12. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  13. Dysfunction of Right Heart in Attack Period of Bronchial Asthma in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.А. Kondratiev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There were performed Doppler echocardiography investigations of functional state of the right heart in 42 children aged 5–17 years old in attack period of bronchial asthma of moderate to severe degree. Changes of intra-cardiac hemodynamics of the right heart in children in attack period of bronchial asthma were characterized by disturbance of systolic and diastolic function of the right ventricle and right atrium. Combined systolic-diastolic variant of the right ventricle dysfunction was typical for attack period of bronchial asthma in children and developed in 95.5 % of cases. Elevation of pressure in pulmonary artery was typical and significantly more often occurred in severe asthma attack, herewith pulmonary hypertension of the second degree predominated.

  14. Does uninsurance affect the health outcomes of the insured? Evidence from heart attack patients in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daysal, N Meltem

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California (1999-2006). My results indicate that uninsured patients have an economically significant effect that increases the mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I show that these results are not driven by alternative explanations, including reverse causality, patient composition effects, sample selection or unobserved trends and that they are robust to a host of specification checks. The primary channel for the observed spillover effects is increased hospital uncompensated care costs. Although data limitations constrain my capacity to check how hospitals change their provision of care to insured heart attack patients in response to reduced revenues, the evidence I have suggests a modest increase in the quantity of cardiac services without a corresponding increase in hospital staff. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Attributing heart attack and stroke to "Old Age": Implications for subsequent health outcomes among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tara L; Chipperfield, Judith G; Perry, Raymond P; Hamm, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the extent to which older adults attribute a recent heart attack/stroke to "old age," and examined consequences for subsequent lifestyle behavior and health-care service utilization. Community-dwelling adults (N = 57, ages 73-98 years) were interviewed about their heart attack/stroke, and an objective health registry provided data on health-care utilization over a 3-year period. Endorsement of "old age" as a cause of heart attack/stroke negatively predicted lifestyle behavior change, and positively predicted frequency of physician visits and likelihood of hospitalization over the subsequent 3 years. Findings suggest the importance of considering "old age" attributions in the context of cardiovascular health events. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Heart failure: preventing disease and death worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; AlHabib, Khalid F; Cowie, Martin R; Force, Thomas L; Hu, Shengshou; Jaarsma, Tiny; Krum, Henry; Rastogi, Vishal; Rohde, Luis E; Samal, Umesh C; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Budi Siswanto, Bambang; Sliwa, Karen; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure is a life-threatening disease and addressing it should be considered a global health priority. At present, approximately 26 million people worldwide are living with heart failure. The outlook for such patients is poor, with survival rates worse than those for bowel, breast or prostate cancer. Furthermore, heart failure places great stresses on patients, caregivers and healthcare systems. Demands on healthcare services, in particular, are predicted to increase dramatically over the next decade as patient numbers rise owing to ageing populations, detrimental lifestyle changes and improved survival of those who go on to develop heart failure as the final stage of another disease. It is time to ease the strain on healthcare systems through clear policy initiatives that prioritize heart failure prevention and champion equity of care for all. Despite the burdens that heart failure imposes on society, awareness of the disease is poor. As a result, many premature deaths occur. This is in spite of the fact that most types of heart failure are preventable and that a healthy lifestyle can reduce risk. Even after heart failure has developed, premature deaths could be prevented if people were taught to recognize the symptoms and seek immediate medical attention. Public awareness campaigns focusing on these messages have great potential to improve outcomes for patients with heart failure and ultimately to save lives. Compliance with clinical practice guidelines is also associated with improved outcomes for patients with heart failure. However, in many countries, there is considerable variation in how closely physicians follow guideline recommendations. To promote equity of care, improvements should be encouraged through the use of hospital performance measures and incentives appropriate to the locality. To this end, policies should promote the research required to establish an evidence base for performance measures that reflect improved outcomes for patients

  17. Symptom recognition of heart attack and stroke in nine European countries: a representative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Jutta; Frank, Ronald; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death and a source of chronic disability. To assess recognition of and reaction to symptoms of heart attack and stroke, and how recognition is related to the frequency of consulting physicians and other information sources. Face-to-face computer-assisted personal interviews. Representative sample of 10,228 persons in Austria, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Spain and UK, aged 14-98. Recognition of heart attack and stroke symptoms and proper reaction to symptoms. Chest pain was the only heart attack symptom recognized by more than 50% of participants. Eight percent knew no symptoms. Of 14 stroke symptoms, none was recognized by more than 50% of participants; 19% could not identify any symptom. For both heart attack and stroke, Germans and Austrians recognized the largest number of symptoms. Persons in Italy, Poland, Russia and Spain knew only about half as many symptoms as in Germany or Austria. Only 51% of Europeans would call an ambulance when someone suffers a stroke, the fewest (33 and 34%) in Germany and Austria. In most countries, people who consulted their physician more frequently had no better recognition of heart attack or stroke symptoms. The majority of persons in nine European countries recognize few heart attack and stroke symptoms; many do not know how to react. This low level of knowledge constitutes a major health risk and likely leads to delay in treatment, contributing to the high mortality and morbidity from these diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Predictors of influenza vaccination uptake among adults with a history of heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; de Andres, Ana Lopez; Jimenez-Trujillo, Isabel; Esteban, Jesus; Gil, Angel; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

    2010-07-01

    Influenza vaccination can reduce morbidity and mortality caused by cardiovascular diseases. This study sought to evaluate influenza vaccination coverage among adults with a history of heart attack and to determine which variables were associated with vaccine uptake. A total of 716 adults reported having suffered a heart attack. The coverage among sufferers was 67.9% as against 35% for non sufferers. The variables that were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of receiving the vaccine among sufferers were: higher age; male gender, no smoking habit, "Physician visits in the preceding four weeks"; and, "Blood pressure control in the preceding three months". A descriptive study was conducted using individual data from adults aged ≥40 years included in the year 2006/7 Spanish Health Survey and comparing subjects with a history of heart attack with those who had not suffered this event. The number of participants surveyed was 20,060. Subjects were classified as heart attack sufferers if they answered affirmatively to the question: "Has your doctor told you that you have suffered a heart attack?" To assess influenza vaccination status we considered the response to the question, "Did you have a 'flu shot in the latest campaign?". Independent variables included sociodemographic, health-related, lifestyles and periodic control of cardiovascular risk factors. Influenza vaccination coverage among subjects who have suffered a heart attack is below desirable levels. Multiple strategies focused on providers and patients are needed to improve influenza vaccination coverage among these high risk subjects, particularly now with the emerging H1N1 pandemic.

  19. Awareness of heart attack and stroke symptoms among Hispanic male adults living in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Bardales, Ricardo; Bales, Robert; Aguero, Carlos; Brady, Shelly; Tobar, Adriana; McGrath, Cynthia; Zaiser, Julia; Lipsky, Martin S

    2010-10-01

    There is evidence that Hispanic men are a high risk group for treatment delay for both heart attack and stroke. More targeted research is needed to elucidate this specific population's knowledge of warning signs for these acute events. This study sought to describe within-group disparities in Hispanic men's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology. Multivariate techniques were used to analyze a multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Heart and Stroke module database. The data were cross-sectional and focused on health risk factors and behaviors. The research participants were U.S. male Hispanic adults aged 18-99. The main outcome measure for the study was heart attack and stroke symptom knowledge score. Multivariate logistic regression analysis yielded that Hispanic men aged >or=18 years who earned low scores on the composite heart attack and stroke knowledge questions (range 0-8 points) were more likely to: have less than a high school education, have deferred medical care because of cost, not have an identified health care provider, and be uninsured. There were significant within-group differences. Targeting educational efforts toward older (>or=55 years) Hispanic men with less than high school education, those who do not have an identified health care provider or health insurance, and who defer health care because of cost could be ways to improve the outcome of acute vascular events among the U.S. Hispanic adult male population.

  20. Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke and Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of High Cholesterol Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital ... chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too. It is best to call EMS for rapid transport to the emergency room. Learn more about ... More about stroke Immediately ...

  1. Does Uninsurance Affect the Health Outcomes of the Insured? Evidence from Heart Attack Patients in California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltem Daysal, N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the health of the insured, focusing on one health outcome - the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California

  2. Poor sleep linked to increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-19

    Insomnia is associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a study in China. Researchers carried out a meta-analysis of 15 cohort studies to assess the association between insomnia symptoms and incidence or death from cardiovascular disease and stroke.

  3. Does uninsurance affect the health outcomes of the insured? Evidence from heart attack patients in California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltem Daysal, N.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California (1999–2006). My results indicate that uninsured patients have an economically

  4. Racial disparities in knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs among Michigan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussman, Chris; Rafferty, Ann P; Reeves, Mathew J; Zackery, Shannon; Lyon-Callo, Sarah; Anderson, Beth

    2009-01-01

    To describe the level of knowledge regarding risk factors and warning signs for stroke and heart attack among White and African American adults in Michigan and to quantify racial disparities. Knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs was assessed by using data from the 2004 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. Prevalence estimates of knowledge were generated, and statistical differences in knowledge between Whites and African Americans were assessed. Adequate knowledge was defined as knowing 3 correct warning signs or risk factors. Logistic regression models were used to quantify the racial disparity in knowledge while controlling for potential confounding. Whites had substantially higher levels of adequate knowledge of risk factors (stroke: 31.6% vs 13.8%; heart attack: 52.6% vs 24.3%) and warning signs (stroke: 30.0% vs 17.2%; heart attack: 29.3% vs 13.8%) compared with African Americans (all observed differences were significant at P heart attack: AOR 3.4) and warning signs (stroke: AOR 2.0; heart attack: AOR 2.4) were significantly higher for Whites than for African Americans. A strong racial disparity in the knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs exists among Michigan adults. Communitywide public education programs in conjunction with targeted interventions for at-risk populations are necessary to produce meaningful improvements in the awareness of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs among Michigan adults.

  5. A REVIEW ON THE DETECTION OF HEART ATTACK USING DATA MINING BY ACO TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Pise Satish Prakashrao*1, Anoop Singh 2 & Ritesh Kumar Yadav3

    2018-01-01

    The goal of data mining is to extract knowledge from huge amount of data. Now a day’s data mining technique used in the field of medical diagnose of critical diesis and clinical data. In this research propose model give a solution to predict heart diseases. In this paper proposes a novel approach of applying the Ant Colony Optimization technique (ACO) for extracting the Association Rules (AR) from the database to detect heart attack. This algorithm is broadly are many types of heart disease ...

  6. Clinical and Demographic Characteristics Associated With Suboptimal Primary Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Prevention: Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Grace M; Calvert, Melanie; Feltham, Max G; Ryan, Ronan; Finnikin, Samuel; Marshall, Tom

    2018-03-01

    Primary prevention of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is important to reduce the burden of these conditions; however, prescribing of prevention drugs is suboptimal. We aimed to identify individual clinical and demographic characteristics associated with potential missed opportunities for prevention therapy with lipid-lowering, anticoagulant, or antihypertensive drugs before stroke/TIA. We analyzed anonymized electronic primary care records from a UK primary care database that covers 561 family practices. Patients with first-ever stroke/TIA, ≥18 years, with diagnosis between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013, were included. Missed opportunities for prevention were defined as people with clinical indications for lipid-lowering, anticoagulant, or antihypertensive drugs but not prescribed these drugs before their stroke/TIA. Mixed-effect logistic regression models evaluated the relationship between missed opportunities and individual clinical/demographic characteristics. The inclusion criteria were met by 29 043 people with stroke/TIA. Patients with coronary heart disease, chronic kidney disease, peripheral arterial disease, or diabetes mellitus were at less risk of a missed opportunity for prescription of lipid-lowering and antihypertensive drugs. However, patients with a 10-year cardiovascular disease risk ≥20% but without these diagnoses had increased risk of having a missed opportunity for prescription of lipid-lowering drugs or antihypertensive drugs. Women were less likely to be prescribed anticoagulants but more likely to be prescribed antihypertensive drugs. The elderly (≥85 years of age) were less likely to be prescribed all 3 prevention drugs, compared with people aged 75 to 79 years. Knowing the patient characteristics predictive of missed opportunities for stroke prevention may help primary care identify and appropriately manage these patients. Improving the management of these groups may reduce their risk and potentially prevent

  7. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  8. Women at risk for cardiovascular disease lack knowledge of heart attack symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flink, Laura E; Sciacca, Robert R; Bier, Michael L; Rodriguez, Juviza; Giardina, Elsa-Grace V

    2013-03-01

    It is not known whether cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk level is related to knowledge of the leading cause of death of women or heart attack symptoms. Women with higher CVD risk estimated by Framingham Risk Score (FRS) or metabolic syndrome (MS) have lower CVD knowledge. Women visiting primary care clinics completed a standardized behavioral risk questionnaire. Blood pressure, weight, height, waist size, fasting glucose, and lipid profile were assessed. Women were queried regarding CVD knowledge. Participants (N = 823) were Hispanic women (46%), non-Hispanic white (37%), and non-Hispanic black (8%). FRS was determined in 278: low (63%), moderate (29%), and high (8%); 24% had ≥3 components of MS. The leading cause of death was answered correctly by 54%, heart attack symptoms by 67%. Knowledge was lowest among racial/ethnic minorities and those with less education (both Pheart attack symptoms (P = 0.018), but not after multivariable adjustment. Women with higher FRS were less likely to know heart attack symptoms. Efforts to target those at higher CVD risk must persist, or the most vulnerable may suffer disproportionately, not only because of risk factors but also inadequate knowledge. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Depression and coronary artery disease -real heart attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, S.; Ahmed, B.

    2001-01-01

    Both depression and ischaemic heart disease are said to become the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries during the next two decades. The relationship between these two disorders has long been speculated but only recently addressed scientifically. A Medline search was conducted to obtain the articles that address the association between depressive disorders and coronary artery disease (CAD). Most studies following large cohorts over a period ranging from 4.5 to 27 years have shown that depression is associated with a significantly high risk of developing CAD. These studies also show that patients who have depression following myocardial infarction hat poorer prognosis on major cardiac end points like reoccurrence of myocardial infarction and death as compared to the non-depressed group. The psychosocial variables associated with depression like social isolation, acute and chronic stressful life events are also associated with increased risk of developing CAD. The mechanisms underlying this association between depression and CAD are unknown at present. The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in reducing this increased risks have been demonstrated while the trials assessing the efficacy and safety of anti depressed drugs are underway. The implications of these finding are discussed in the context of developing countries. (author)

  10. Factors influencing body image in individuals after a first heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarek, Aleksandra; Barański, Jarosław

    Experiencing a heart attack can change the attitude of patients towards their corporeality. Body image may significantly influence the recovery of patients, their adherence to medical recommendations, and adopting a healthy lifestyle. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between body image and personality characteristics, as well as sociodemographic, physical and medical factors in patients after a first myocardial infarction. The study comprised 160 patients after a first heart attack (80 women and 80 men) aged 34–65 years (mean = 53.44; SD = 6.40). Body image was measured with the Body Image Questionnaire, and personality was analyzed according to the Adjective Check List. The level of body satisfaction was shaped by two dimensions of personality (Sociability, Weakness and inhibition) and by respondents’ gender. In respondents’ personality profile, lower body satisfaction was associated with elevated Weakness and inhibition and with lowered Sociability. Women were less satisfied with their bodies than men. The significance attributed to one’s own body was shaped by two dimensions of personality (Expansiveness, Weakness and inhibition) and by respondents’ age. Patients with a higher degree of Expansiveness, a lower degree of Weakness and inhibition and more advanced in age gave greater priority to corporeality. Improving body image in persons after a first heart attack should be combined with the development of personality abilities important for self-efficacy and social competency.

  11. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health ...

  12. Emotional and cognitive changes during and post a near fatal heart attack and one-year after: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew M; Godfrey, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This case study reports on changes in emotions before and during an unexpected heart rate in a young, apparently healthy male with a life-long history of exercise in the absence of family history of heart problems. He completed the Brunel Mood Scale (Terry et al. , 2003) to assess emotions before, during, and after the heart attack, and also describing his thoughts during these periods. Results indicate he experienced unpleasant emotions in the build up to the heart attack, feelings he attributed at the time to frustration to achieve fitness goals. He maintained an exercise regime prior to having a heart attack, a finding consistent with previous research suggesting that early diagnosis, although vital for survival, is not likely to be identified among seemingly healthy individuals. During the heart attack, he experienced a rapid emotional change characterised by a rapid increase in anger coupled with thoughts of needing to survive. The intensity of emotions and regulation strategies employed before and during the heart attack provide insight this experience, and we suggest future research should investigate emotional change during adverse conditions. Key pointsThe present case study details emotions experienced and attempts to regulate these emotions before, during and post a heart attack. Unpleasant emotions experienced before the heart were attributed to lack of progress toward fitness goals, a perception that is plausible as he was a regular exerciser.Early identification of heart attack is critical as "Time is Muscle" (Whyte et al., 2009) and therefore even people perceived to be at low risk should consider the possibility of such an eventuality, and seek medical treatment early in the process.

  13. ShadowNet: An Active Defense Infrastructure for Insider Cyber Attack Prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Beaver, Justin M [ORNL; Treadwell, Jim N [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The ShadowNet infrastructure for insider cyber attack prevention is comprised of a tiered server system that is able to dynamically redirect dangerous/suspicious network traffic away from production servers that provide web, ftp, database and other vital services to cloned virtual machines in a quarantined environment. This is done transparently from the point of view of both the attacker and normal users. Existing connections, such as SSH sessions, are not interrupted. Any malicious activity performed by the attacker on a quarantined server is not reflected on the production server. The attacker is provided services from the quarantined server, which creates the impression that the attacks performed are successful. The activities of the attacker on the quarantined system are able to be recorded much like a honeypot system for forensic analysis.

  14. Awareness of heart attack symptoms among US adults in 2007, and changes in awareness from 2001 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Gillespie, Cathleen; Keenan, Nora L; Greenlund, Kurt J

    2011-05-01

    Timely access to emergency care, prompt receipt of advanced treatment and survival from heart attack is dependent on both the early recognition of heart attack symptoms, by both victims and bystanders, and by immediately calling the emergency services. The objective of this study is to measure the awareness of heart attack symptoms and the emergency response among US adults. We analyzed data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System's module on heart attack and stroke, which was conducted in 17 states/territories in 2001 and 12 states/territories in 2007. The module included five questions related to heart attack symptoms, one decoy question and one question regarding the first action to take if someone is having a heart attack. Age-adjusted prevalence of awareness was estimated, and odds ratios were calculated. Differences between 2001 and 2007 were assessed for five states that used the module in both years. In 2007, among 76,864 adults, awareness of individual heart attack symptoms ranged from 49% (pain in jaw, neck or back) to 92% (chest pain). Although 97% of adults recognized at least one symptom, only 10.7% recognized all five symptoms, knew that 'sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes' was not a symptom of heart attack and recognized the need to call the emergency services. This estimate varied significantly by age, sex, race/ethnicity and level of education. The estimate was significantly higher for women (12.2%) than men (7.7%), White (11.6%) than Black (5.7%) or Hispanic people (4.5%), those with a higher level of education (13.5%) than lower educational level (4.5%) and for those with coronary heart disease (16.2%) than without the disease (9.5%). Comparison of awareness between 2001 (the referent) and 2007, in five states, revealed that awareness of all symptoms and calling the emergency services, were 9.7 and 10.3% for 2001 and 2007, respectively (p heart attack symptoms among adults in 12 states was low and little improvement was

  15. EMOTIONAL AND COGNITIVE CHANGES DURING AND POST A NEAR FATAL HEART ATTACK AND ONE-YEAR AFTER: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Lane

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This case study reports on changes in emotions before and during an unexpected heart rate in a young, apparently healthy male with a life-long history of exercise in the absence of family history of heart problems. He completed the Brunel Mood Scale (Terry et al. , 2003 to assess emotions before, during, and after the heart attack, and also describing his thoughts during these periods. Results indicate he experienced unpleasant emotions in the build up to the heart attack, feelings he attributed at the time to frustration to achieve fitness goals. He maintained an exercise regime prior to having a heart attack, a finding consistent with previous research suggesting that early diagnosis, although vital for survival, is not likely to be identified among seemingly healthy individuals. During the heart attack, he experienced a rapid emotional change characterised by a rapid increase in anger coupled with thoughts of needing to survive. The intensity of emotions and regulation strategies employed before and during the heart attack provide insight this experience, and we suggest future research should investigate emotional change during adverse conditions

  16. Smartphone Based Heart Attack Risk Prediction System with Statistical Analysis and Data Mining Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raihan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD (Heart Attack is ubiquitous and one of the major reasons of death worldwide. Early screening of people at risk of having IHD may lead to minimize morbidity and mortality. A simple approach is proposed in this paper to predict risk of developing heart attack using smartphone and data mining. Clinical data from 835 patients was collected, analyzed and also correlated with their risk existing clinical symptoms which may suggest underlying non detected IHD. A user friendly Android application was developed by incorporating clinical data obtained from patients who admitted with chest pain in a cardiac hospital. Upon user input of risk factors, the application categorizes the level of IHD risks of the user as high, low or medium. It was found by analyzing and correlating the data that there was a significant correlation of having an IHD and the application results in high & low, medium & low and medium & high categories; where the p values were 0.0001, 0.0001 and 0.0001 respectively. The experimental results showed that the sensitivity and accuracy of the proposed technique were 89.25 % and 76.05 % respectively, whereas, using C4.5 decision tree, accuracy was found 86% and sensitivity was obtained 91.6%. Existing tools need mandatory input of lipid values which makes them underutilized by general people; though these risk calculators bear significant academic importance. Our research is motivated to reduce that limitation and promote a risk evaluation on time.

  17. Acute Limb Ischemia and Outcomes With Vorapaxar in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: Results From the Trial to Assess the Effects of Vorapaxar in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients With Atherosclerosis-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 50 (TRA2°P-TIMI 50).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaca, Marc P; Gutierrez, J Antonio; Creager, Mark A; Scirica, Benjamin M; Olin, Jeffrey; Murphy, Sabina A; Braunwald, Eugene; Morrow, David A

    2016-03-08

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) are at heightened risk of acute limb ischemia (ALI), a morbid event that may result in limb loss. We investigated the causes, sequelae, and predictors of ALI in a contemporary population with symptomatic PAD and whether protease-activated receptor 1 antagonism with vorapaxar reduced ALI overall and by type. The Trial to Assess the Effects of Vorapaxar in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients With Atherosclerosis-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 50 (TRA2°P-TIMI 50) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vorapaxar in stable patients, including 3787 with symptomatic PAD. ALI was a prespecified adjudicated end point using a formal definition. A total of 150 ALI events occurred in 108 patients during follow-up (placebo 3-year rate, 3.9%; 1.3% annualized). For patients with symptomatic PAD, previous peripheral revascularization, smoking, and the ankle-brachial index were predictive of ALI. The majority of ALI events occurred as a result of surgical graft thrombosis (56%), followed by native vessel in situ thrombosis (27%). Stent thrombosis and thromboembolism caused ALI in 13% and 5%, respectively. Amputation occurred in 17.6% presenting with ALI. Vorapaxar reduced first ALI events by 41% (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.86; P=0.006) and total ALI events by 41% (94 versus 56 events; risk ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.93; P=0.022). The efficacy of vorapaxar was consistent across types of ALI. In selected patients with symptomatic PAD and without atrial fibrillation, ALI occurs at a rate of 1.3%/y, is most frequently caused by acute bypass graft thrombosis or in situ thrombosis of a diseased vessel, and often results in limb loss. Vorapaxar reduces ALI in patients with symptomatic PAD with consistency across type, including PAD resulting from surgical graft thrombosis and in-situ thrombosis. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00526474

  18. Development and Validation of a Model to Predict Absolute Vascular Risk Reduction by Moderate-Intensity Statin Therapy in Individual Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Anglo Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial, Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial, and Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasenbrood, Lotte; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter S; Colhoun, Helen M; Livingstone, Shona J; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Pressel, Sara L; Davis, Barry R; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Visseren, Frank L J

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to translate the average relative effect of statin therapy from trial data to the individual patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus by developing and validating a model to predict individualized absolute risk reductions (ARR) of cardiovascular events. Data of 2725 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Lipid Lowering Arm of the Anglo Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT-LLA) study (atorvastatin 10 mg versus placebo) were used for model derivation. The model was based on 8 clinical predictors including treatment allocation (statin/placebo). Ten-year individualized ARR on major cardiovascular events by statin therapy were calculated for each patient by subtracting the estimated on-treatment risk from the estimated off-treatment risk. Predicted 10-year ARR by statin therapy was 4% (median ARR, 3.2%; interquartile range, 2.5%-4.3%; 95% confidence interval for 3.2% ARR, -1.4% to 6.8%). Addition of treatment interactions did not improve model performance. Therefore, the wide distribution in ARR was a consequence of the underlying distribution in cardiovascular risk enrolled in these trials. External validation of the model was performed in data from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT-LLT; pravastatin 40 mg versus usual care) and Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS; atorvastatin 10 mg versus placebo) of 3878 and 2838 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, respectively. Model calibration was adequate in both external data sets, discrimination was moderate (ALLHAT-LLT: c-statistics, 0.64 [95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.67] and CARDS: 0.68 [95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.72]). ARRs of major cardiovascular events by statin therapy can be accurately estimated for individual patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using a model based on routinely available patient characteristics. There is a wide distribution in ARR that may complement informed decision making. URL: http

  19. A SURVEY ON DELAY AND NEIGHBOR NODE MONITORING BASED WORMHOLE ATTACK PREVENTION AND DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir T Bagade

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In Mobile Ad-hoc Networks (MANET, network layer attacks, for example wormhole attacks, disrupt the network routing operations and can be used for data theft. Wormhole attacks are of two types: hidden and exposed wormhole. There are various mechanisms in literature which are used to prevent and detect wormhole attacks. In this paper, we survey wormhole prevention and detection techniques and present our critical observations for each. These techniques are based on cryptographic mechanisms, monitoring of packet transmission delay and control packet forwarding behavior of neighbor nodes. We compare the techniques using the following criteria- extra resources needed applicability to different network topologies and routing protocols, prevention/detection capability, etc. We conclude the paper with potential research directions.

  20. The effect of matrix stiffness of injectable hydrogels on the preservation of cardiac function after a heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Marian; Vaibavi, Srirangam Ramanujam; Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Nithya, Venkateswaran; Wang, Jing; Shachaf, Yonatan; Kofidis, Theo; Seliktar, Dror

    2014-02-01

    This study compares the effect of four injectable hydrogels with different mechanical properties on the post-myocardial infarction left ventricle (LV) remodeling process. The bioactive hydrogels were synthesized from Tetronic-fibrinogen (TF) and PEG-fibrinogen (PF) conjugates; each hydrogel was supplemented with two levels of additional cross-linker to increase the matrix stiffness as measured by the shear storage modulus (G'). Infarcts created by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in a rodent model were treated with the hydrogels, and all four treatment groups showed an increase in wall thickness, arterial density, and viable cardiac tissue in the peri-infarct areas of the LV. Echocardiography and hemodynamics data of the PF/TF treated groups showed significant improvement of heart function associated with the attenuated effects of the remodeling process. Multi-factorial regression analysis indicated that the group with the highest modulus exhibited the best rescue of heart function and highest neovascularization. The results of this study demonstrate that multiple properties of an injectable bioactive biomaterial, and notably the matrix stiffness, provide the multifaceted stimulation necessary to preserve cardiac function and prevent adverse remodeling following a heart attack. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Guidelines for the secondary prevention of rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrazaq Al-Jazairi

    2017-03-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease can be prevented with appropriate antibiotics administration to prevent the progression of valve damage. The current use of primary and secondary prevention antibiotics in Saudi Arabia is not known. Therefore, this clinical practice guideline is developed, based on the best available evidence, to promote appropriate antibiotics secondary prophylaxis use for prevention of rheumatic heart disease.

  2. US State-level income inequality and risks of heart attack and coronary risk behaviors: longitudinal findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabayo, Roman; Kawachi, Ichiro; Gilman, Stephen E

    2015-07-01

    To examine prospectively the association between US state income inequality and incidence of heart attack. We used data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (n = 34,445). Respondents completed interviews at baseline (2001-2002) and follow-up (2004-2005). Weighted multilevel modeling was used to determine if US state-level income inequality (measured by the Gini coefficient) at baseline was a predictor of heart attack during follow-up, controlling for individual-level and state-level covariates. In comparison to residents of US states in the lowest quartile of income inequality, those living in the second [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 1.71, 95 % CI 1.16-2.53)], third (AOR = 1.81, 95 % CI 1.28-2.57), and fourth (AOR = 2.04, 95 % CI 1.26-3.29) quartiles were more likely to have a heart attack. Similar findings were obtained when we excluded those who had a heart attack prior to baseline. This study is one of the first to empirically show the longitudinal relationship between income inequality and coronary heart disease. Living in a state with higher income inequality increases the risk for heart attack among US adults.

  3. Ultrasensitive cardiac troponin I antibody based nanohybrid sensor for rapid detection of human heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Deepika; Kaur, Inderpreet; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-02-01

    An ultrasensitive cardiac troponin I antibody conjugated with graphene quantum dots (GQD) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM) nanohybrid modified gold electrode based sensor was developed for the rapid detection of heart attack (myocardial infarction) in human. Screen printed gold (Au) electrode was decorated with 4-aminothiophenol for amine functionalization of the Au surface. These amino groups were further coupled with carboxyl functionalities of GQD with EDC-NHS reaction. In order to enhance the sensitivity of the sensor, PAMAM dendrimer was successively embedded on GQD through carbodiimide coupling to provide ultra-high surface area for antibody immobilization. The activated cardiac troponin I (cTnI) monoclonal antibody was immobilized on PAMAM to form nanoprobe for sensing specific heart attack marker cTnI. Various concentrations of cardiac marker, cTnI were electrochemically measured using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in human blood serum. The modifications on sensor surface were characterized by FTIR and AFM techniques. The sensor is highly specific to cTnI and showed negligible response to non-specific antigens. The sensitivity of the sensor was 109.23μAcm -2 μg -1 and lower limit of detection of cTnI was found 20fgmL -1 . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology: a cross-sectional comparison of rural and non-rural US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanoski, Michael T; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Amaro, Maria L; Akers, Michael F; Huot, Krista L

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the signs and symptoms of heart attacks and strokes are important not only in saving lives, but also in preserving quality of life. Findings from recent research have yielded that the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors are higher in rural populations, suggesting that adults living in rural locales may be at higher risk for heart attack and/or stroke. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology as well as calling 911 for a suspected heart attack or stroke are essential first steps in seeking care. This study sought to examine the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among rural adults in comparison to non-rural adults living in the U.S. Using multivariate techniques, a cross-sectional analysis of an amalgamated multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) database was performed. The dependent variable for this analysis was low heart attack and stroke knowledge score. The covariates for the analysis were: age, sex, race/ethnicity, annual household income, attained education, health insurance status, having a health care provider (HCP), timing of last routine medical check-up, medical care deferment because of cost, self-defined health status and geographic locale. The weighted n for this study overall was 103,262,115 U.S. adults  > =18 years of age. Approximately 22.0% of these respondents were U.S. adults living in rural locales. Logistic regression analysis revealed that those U.S. adults who had low composite heart attack and stroke knowledge scores were more likely to be rural (OR=1.218 95%CI 1.216-1.219) rather than non-rural residents. Furthermore, those with low scores were more likely to be: male (OR=1.353 95%CI 1.352-1.354), >65 years of age (OR=1.369 95%CI 1.368-1.371), African American (OR=1.892 95%CI 1.889-1.894), not educated beyond high school (OR=1.400 955CI 1.399-1.402), uninsured (OR=1.308 95%CI 1.3-6-1.310), without a HCP (OR=1.216 95%CI 1.215-1.218), and living in a household with an

  5. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology: a cross-sectional comparison of rural and non-rural US adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swanoski Michael T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the signs and symptoms of heart attacks and strokes are important not only in saving lives, but also in preserving quality of life. Findings from recent research have yielded that the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors are higher in rural populations, suggesting that adults living in rural locales may be at higher risk for heart attack and/or stroke. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology as well as calling 911 for a suspected heart attack or stroke are essential first steps in seeking care. This study sought to examine the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among rural adults in comparison to non-rural adults living in the U.S. Methods Using multivariate techniques, a cross-sectional analysis of an amalgamated multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS database was performed. The dependent variable for this analysis was low heart attack and stroke knowledge score. The covariates for the analysis were: age, sex, race/ethnicity, annual household income, attained education, health insurance status, having a health care provider (HCP, timing of last routine medical check-up, medical care deferment because of cost, self-defined health status and geographic locale. Results The weighted n for this study overall was 103,262,115 U.S. adults > =18 years of age. Approximately 22.0% of these respondents were U.S. adults living in rural locales. Logistic regression analysis revealed that those U.S. adults who had low composite heart attack and stroke knowledge scores were more likely to be rural (OR = 1.218 95%CI 1.216-1.219 rather than non-rural residents. Furthermore, those with low scores were more likely to be: male (OR = 1.353 95%CI 1.352-1.354, >65 years of age (OR = 1.369 95%CI 1.368-1.371, African American (OR = 1.892 95%CI 1.889-1.894, not educated beyond high school (OR = 1.400 955CI 1.399-1.402, uninsured (OR = 1.308 95%CI 1

  6. Detecting and Preventing Sybil Attacks in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Message Authentication and Passing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamodharan, Udaya Suriya Raj Kumar; Vayanaperumal, Rajamani

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks are highly indispensable for securing network protection. Highly critical attacks of various kinds have been documented in wireless sensor network till now by many researchers. The Sybil attack is a massive destructive attack against the sensor network where numerous genuine identities with forged identities are used for getting an illegal entry into a network. Discerning the Sybil attack, sinkhole, and wormhole attack while multicasting is a tremendous job in wireless sensor network. Basically a Sybil attack means a node which pretends its identity to other nodes. Communication to an illegal node results in data loss and becomes dangerous in the network. The existing method Random Password Comparison has only a scheme which just verifies the node identities by analyzing the neighbors. A survey was done on a Sybil attack with the objective of resolving this problem. The survey has proposed a combined CAM-PVM (compare and match-position verification method) with MAP (message authentication and passing) for detecting, eliminating, and eventually preventing the entry of Sybil nodes in the network. We propose a scheme of assuring security for wireless sensor network, to deal with attacks of these kinds in unicasting and multicasting.

  7. Detecting and Preventing Sybil Attacks in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Message Authentication and Passing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaya Suriya Raj Kumar Dhamodharan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are highly indispensable for securing network protection. Highly critical attacks of various kinds have been documented in wireless sensor network till now by many researchers. The Sybil attack is a massive destructive attack against the sensor network where numerous genuine identities with forged identities are used for getting an illegal entry into a network. Discerning the Sybil attack, sinkhole, and wormhole attack while multicasting is a tremendous job in wireless sensor network. Basically a Sybil attack means a node which pretends its identity to other nodes. Communication to an illegal node results in data loss and becomes dangerous in the network. The existing method Random Password Comparison has only a scheme which just verifies the node identities by analyzing the neighbors. A survey was done on a Sybil attack with the objective of resolving this problem. The survey has proposed a combined CAM-PVM (compare and match-position verification method with MAP (message authentication and passing for detecting, eliminating, and eventually preventing the entry of Sybil nodes in the network. We propose a scheme of assuring security for wireless sensor network, to deal with attacks of these kinds in unicasting and multicasting.

  8. [The daily rhythm of heart attack morbidity and mortality may be influenced by the time of sunrise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszbacher, Ildikó; Csoboth, Ildikó; Boncz, Imre; Bódis, József

    2008-11-16

    The morbidity and mortality of a myocardial infarction show characteristic seasonal and diurnal changes that may be influenced by the time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight during the day. We wish to study whether the time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight influence the seasonality of heart attack morbidity and mortality, and whether these have an effect on the diurnal rhythm of a heart attack. We have carried out the retrospective analysis of patients received at Hungarian hospitals with the diagnose of an acute heart attack ( n = 32,329) and those deceased due to a heart attack ( n = 5,142) between 2004 and 2005. Data were gained from the data-base of the National Health Insurance Fund according to the International Classification of Diseases. Positive correlation showed between the time of sunrise and both the incidence of an acute myocardial infarction and related mortality ( p heart attack morbidity and mortality, however, other factors are assumed to take a role as well.

  9. Knowledge of heart attack symptoms and risk factors among native Thais: a street-intercept survey method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poomsrikaew, Ornwanya; Ryan, Catherine J; Zerwic, Julie J

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to determine Thais' knowledge of heart attack symptoms and risk factors and whether that knowledge was related to age, gender or education. Via a street-intercept survey method, a convenience sample of people aged ≥ 35 years (n = 192) was recruited. Mean age was 47 ± 9.6 years (range 35-81), and 55.2% were female. Participants identified on average 5.6 of 9 heart attack symptoms (SD 1.8) and 5.3 of 8 heart attack risk factors (SD 2.1). However, 66.7% mistakenly thought the chest discomfort would be severe, sharp and stabbing, and many subjects erroneously selected symptoms that are actually stroke symptoms. There were no gender or educational differences in knowledge of heart attack symptoms and risk factors. Older adults recognized fewer total symptoms than did younger adults. These findings could direct health-care providers to help the Thai population differentiate symptoms of heart attack from stroke. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Cooperative Strategies to Develop Effective Stroke and Heart Attack Awareness Messages in Rural American Indian Communities, 2009–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohdes, Dorothy; Fogle, Crystelle C.; Tadios, Fawn; Doore, Velva; Bell, Doreen S.; Harwell, Todd S.; Helgerson, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction National initiatives to improve the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs have encouraged symptomatic people to seek early treatment, but few have shown significant effects in rural American Indian (AI) communities. Methods During 2009 and 2010, the Montana Cardiovascular Health Program, in collaboration with 2 tribal health departments, developed and conducted culturally specific public awareness campaigns for signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke via local media. Telephone surveys were conducted before and after each campaign to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaigns. Results Knowledge of 3 or more heart attack warning signs and symptoms increased significantly on 1 reservation from 35% at baseline to 47% postcampaign. On the second reservation, recognition of 2 or more stroke signs and symptoms increased from 62% at baseline to 75% postcampaign, and the level of awareness remained at 73% approximately 4 months after the high-intensity campaign advertisements ended. Intent to call 9-1-1 did not increase in the heart attack campaign but did improve in the stroke campaign for specific symptoms. Recall of media campaigns on both reservations increased significantly from baseline to postcampaign for both media outlets (ie, radio and newspaper). Conclusion Carefully designed, culturally specific campaigns may help eliminate disparities in the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs in AI communities. PMID:23680509

  11. Cooperative strategies to develop effective stroke and heart attack awareness messages in rural american Indian communities, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oser, Carrie S; Gohdes, Dorothy; Fogle, Crystelle C; Tadios, Fawn; Doore, Velva; Bell, Doreen S; Harwell, Todd S; Helgerson, Steven D

    2013-05-16

    National initiatives to improve the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs have encouraged symptomatic people to seek early treatment, but few have shown significant effects in rural American Indian (AI) communities. During 2009 and 2010, the Montana Cardiovascular Health Program, in collaboration with 2 tribal health departments, developed and conducted culturally specific public awareness campaigns for signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke via local media. Telephone surveys were conducted before and after each campaign to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaigns. Knowledge of 3 or more heart attack warning signs and symptoms increased significantly on 1 reservation from 35% at baseline to 47% postcampaign. On the second reservation, recognition of 2 or more stroke signs and symptoms increased from 62% at baseline to 75% postcampaign, and the level of awareness remained at 73% approximately 4 months after the high-intensity campaign advertisements ended. Intent to call 9-1-1 did not increase in the heart attack campaign but did improve in the stroke campaign for specific symptoms. Recall of media campaigns on both reservations increased significantly from baseline to postcampaign for both media outlets (ie, radio and newspaper). Carefully designed, culturally specific campaigns may help eliminate disparities in the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs in AI communities.

  12. A Survey on Detection Techniques to Prevent Cross-Site Scripting Attacks on Current Web Applications

    OpenAIRE

    García Alfaro, Joaquín; Navarro-Arribas, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    Security is becoming one of the major concerns for web applications and other Internet based services, which are becoming pervasive in all kinds of business models and organizations. Web applications must therefore include, in addition to the expected value offered to their users, reliable mechanisms to ensure their security. In this paper, we focus on the specific problem of preventing cross-site scripting attacks against web applications. We present a study of this kind of attacks, and surv...

  13. Review Of Prevention Techniques For Denial Of Service DOS Attacks In Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Rolla

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks comprised of several tiny sensor nodes which are densely deployed over the region to monitor the environmental conditions. These sensor nodes have certain design issues out of which security is the main predominant factor as it effects the whole lifetime of network. DDoS Distributed denial of service attack floods unnecessary packets in the sensor network. A review on DDoS attacks and their prevention techniques have been done in this paper.

  14. 'Heart attack' symptoms and decision-making: the case of older rural women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M N G; McCulloch, B J

    2014-01-01

    Women are just as vulnerable to 'heart attacks' (used throughout this study to mean 'myocardial infarction') as men and are often unaware of many associated symptoms. Researchers have illustrated that women have difficulty identifying the symptoms of cardiovascular disease, with patients often delaying treatment after the onset of symptoms. Some individuals wait hours or even days before seeking medical care. This is particularly concerning for older rural women because the rates of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer are higher in some rural areas. Despite idealistic views of country life as being active, less stressful, and possessing strong social and community support, rural Americans are more likely than their urban counterparts to face challenges to maintaining health. The purpose of this paper is to utilize information gathered from a qualitative study exploring older rural women's identification of symptoms and health decision-making specific to heart attack vignettes. Snowball sampling was the main approach utilized to access participants; after an initial contact was successful, participants contacted additional older rural women to see if they might be willing to participate in an interview. This resulted in a final sample of 33 women who resided in rural Midwestern areas of the USA, were 65 years or older, lived in a county defined as rural by the US Census, and were willing to participate in a face-to-face interview. Each interview included a demographic questionnaire, a health questionnaire, and three health vignettes with follow-up questions. Vignettes provided a way of initiating discussions about health decisions without invading the privacy known to be important to rural residents. The term 'heart attack' was used in the interviews because it was thought to be better recognised than the medical term 'myocardial infarction'. All data were audio taped, transcribed, and coded using line-by-line coding. Data were analyzed using content

  15. Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention: Data Trends & Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention's Data Trends & Maps online tool allows searching for and view of health indicators related to Heart...

  16. Detecting and Preventing Beacon Replay Attacks in Receiver-Initiated MAC Protocols for Energy Efficient WSNs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Mauro, Alessio; Fafoutis, Xenofon; Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander

    2013-01-01

    nodes, pretending to have a fake identity within the network. To prevent this attack we propose RAP, a challenge-response authentication protocol that is able to detect and prevent the beacon replay attack. The effectiveness of the protocol is formally verified using OFMC and ProVerif. Furthermore, we......In receiver-initiated MAC protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), communication is initiated by the receiver of the data through beacons containing the receiver's identity. In this paper, we consider the case of a network intruder that captures and replays such beacons towards legitimate...

  17. Optimism and death: predicting the course and consequences of depression trajectories in response to heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bonanno, George A

    2014-12-01

    The course of depression in relation to myocardial infarction (MI), commonly known as heart attack, and the consequences for mortality are not well characterized. Further, optimism may predict both the effects of MI on depression as well as mortality secondary to MI. In the current study, we utilized a large population-based prospective sample of older adults (N=2,147) to identify heterogeneous trajectories of depression from 6 years prior to their first-reported MI to 4 years after. Findings indicated that individuals were at significantly increased risk for mortality when depression emerged after their first-reported MI, compared with resilient individuals who had no significant post-MI elevation in depression symptomatology. Individuals with chronic depression and those demonstrating pre-event depression followed by recovery after MI were not at increased risk. Further, optimism, measured before MI, prospectively differentiated all depressed individuals from participants who were resilient. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Recovery From Heart Attack, Biomedicalization, and the Production of a Contingent Health Citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdridge, Darren

    2017-07-01

    In this article, I explore the experience of recovery from a heart attack through an analytic autoethnography. I discuss the tensions inherent in biomedical subjectivities of health and ill-health during cardiac recovery through three key themes: (a) the transfer of responsibility and becoming a subject "at risk," (b) technologies of biomedicine and the disciplining of subjectivities, and (c) the transformation of a body toward a new pharmaceuticalized bodily normal. Through an analysis driven by the biomedicalization thesis of Clarke, alongside work on biopower and the governmentality of health by Foucault, Rose, and Rabinow, I seek to provide new insights into the process of cardiac recovery and the relationship between individual experience and broader socio-political processes. Key to this analysis is a focus on the contingent subjectivities brought into being through biomedicalization that constitute a new form of health citizenship that is otherwise not accounted for in narratives of recovery.

  19. AN EFFICIENT APPROACH FOR DETECTION OF HEART ATTACK USING NOBLE ANT COLONY OPTIMIZATION CONCEPT OF DATA MINING

    OpenAIRE

    Pise Satish Prakashrao*1, Anoop Singh 2 & Ritesh Kumar Yadav3

    2018-01-01

    The goal of data mining is to extract knowledge from large amounts of data. Data Mining is an interdisciplinary field that focuses on machine learning, statistics and databases. In this article, we highlight a new framework that uses a combination of data extraction and ant colony optimization to collect heart disease such as early heart attacks to protect them and reduce mortality rates. This study focused on the formulation and implementation of an improved and reliable model for the diagno...

  20. Heart Lesion After the First Attack of the Rheumatic Fever 22 Years Experience in Single Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Bejiqi, Ramush A.; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was estab...

  1. Insider Threat: Preventing Direct Action Attacks Within the United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    of Other Actions Available to Commanders .............................55 Table 8. TARP Indicators of Potential International Terrorist-Associated...effectively prevent direct action attacks by insider threats? What actions are available to commanders who identify potential insider threats within... actions are available to commanders who identify potential insider threats within their organizations? As an initial research hypothesis the author

  2. Robust Structural Analysis and Design of Distributed Control Systems to Prevent Zero Dynamics Attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weerakkody, Sean [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Liu, Xiaofei [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Sinopoli, Bruno [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-12-12

    We consider the design and analysis of robust distributed control systems (DCSs) to ensure the detection of integrity attacks. DCSs are often managed by independent agents and are implemented using a diverse set of sensors and controllers. However, the heterogeneous nature of DCSs along with their scale leave such systems vulnerable to adversarial behavior. To mitigate this reality, we provide tools that allow operators to prevent zero dynamics attacks when as many as p agents and sensors are corrupted. Such a design ensures attack detectability in deterministic systems while removing the threat of a class of stealthy attacks in stochastic systems. To achieve this goal, we use graph theory to obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for the presence of zero dynamics attacks in terms of the structural interactions between agents and sensors. We then formulate and solve optimization problems which minimize communication networks while also ensuring a resource limited adversary cannot perform a zero dynamics attacks. Polynomial time algorithms for design and analysis are provided.

  3. The role of the emergency services in the optimisation of primary angioplasty: experience from London and the Heart Attack Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Miles; Whitbread, Mark

    2013-08-22

    Early ambulance services often confined their activities to a "scoop and run" approach, conveying sick patients quickly to the nearest emergency department. With the advent of modern ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) management and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), the role of the emergency medical service (EMS) has expanded significantly. This review discusses the critical and evolving collaboration between the EMS and the heart attack centre. Speed of reperfusion is a major determinant of outcome in STEMI and, whilst the patient delay (symptom to call time) has a central role in this, system delay (first medical contact to balloon time) is linked to mortality and is used to measure the response of a PPCI programme and is a key element of contemporary guidelines. In addition to rapid diagnosis and transfer to the heart attack centre, the EMS has to deliver a growing number of established treatments including resuscitation and drug therapy. EMS also continually needs to develop expertise in new techniques such as advanced management of cardiac arrest patients, including automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and will need to deliver newer therapies if trials support their use, including cooling and preconditioning. Ultimately, the EMS has a central role in the management of STEMI patients which needs to be fully aligned with the heart attack centres. This integration of services is perhaps best regarded as the Heart Attack Team.

  4. Socioeconomic and air pollution correlates of adult asthma, heart attack, and stroke risks in the United States, 2010-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Louis Anthony Tony

    2017-05-01

    Asthma in the United States has become an important public health issue, with many physicians, regulators, and scientists elsewhere expressing concern that criterion air pollutants have contributed to a rising tide of asthma cases and symptoms. This paper studies recent associations (from 2008 to 2012) between self-reported asthma experiences and potential predictors, including age, sex, income, education, smoking, and county-level average annual ambient concentrations of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels recorded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, for adults 50 years old or older for whom survey data are available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). We also examine associations between these variables and self-reported heart attack and stroke experience; all three health outcomes are positively associated with each other. Young divorced women with low incomes are at greatest risk of asthma, especially if they are ever-smokers. Income is an important confounder of other relations. For example, in logistic regression modeling, PM2.5 is positively associated (pheart attack risk when these are regressed only against PM2.5, sex, age, and ever-smoking status, but not when they are regressed against these variables and income. In this data set, PM2.5 is significantly negatively associated with asthma risk in regression models, with a 10μg/m 3 decrease in PM2.5 corresponding to about a 6% increase in the probability of asthma, possibly because of confounding by smoking, which is negatively associated with PM2.5 and positively associated with asthma risk. A variety of non-parametric methods are used to quantify these associations and to explore potential causal interpretations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Using Combined One-Time Password for Prevention of Phishing Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nasiri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Αs technologies and communications develop, more sabotaging attacks occur including phishing attacks which jeopardize users' security and critical information like their passwords and credentials. Several solutions have been proposed for existing dangers. One of which is the use of one-time passwords. This issue has remained as a main challenge and requires more extensive research. In this research, we have focused on one-time password combinations and we also have proposed solutions based on behavioral patterns which lead to significant optimizations while tending the simplicity for users. Efficiency of the proposed method has been measured through defining scenarios, modeling and simulations based on a prevention rate index. In addition, complexity coefficient of the proposed method showing the probability of unpredictability of passwords for attackers has been calculated. Ultimately, a descriptive comparison has shown that the proposed method is superior to some of the existing methods.

  6. Long-term use of ticagrelor in patients with prior heart attack: ticagrelor plus aspirin versus aspirin monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amico, Frank; Schlesinger, Alex; Mazzoni, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Bonaca MP, Bhatt DL, Cohen M, et al. Long-term use of ticagrelor in patients with prior myocardial infarction. N Engl J Med. 2015;372:1791-1800. This Practice Pearl reviews the recent study Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Prior Heart Attack Using Ticagrelor Compared With Placebo on a Background of Aspirin-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 54 (PEGASUS-TIMI 54). It challenges the current standard of care of 12 months of dual antiplatelet followed by aspirin indefinitely. The study demonstrated that patients who received ticagrelor, either the 60 mg or 90 mg twice daily plus aspirin, showed a decreased risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial also proved that the benefit of ticagrelor was seen early and continued to accrue over time, with a median of 33 months of follow-up, meaning that the benefit persists over time. It is important to note that both doses of the ticagrelor were associated with higher incidence of bleeding, but the rates of fatal bleeding did not show any difference between the ticagrelor or placebo.

  7. The association of a heart attack or stroke with depressive symptoms stratified by the presence of a close social contact: findings from the National Health and Aging Trends Study Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simning, Adam; Seplaki, Christopher L; Conwell, Yeates

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine whether the risk of having clinically significant depressive symptoms following a heart attack or stroke varies by the presence of a close social contact. The National Health and Aging Trends Study is a nationally representative longitudinal survey of US Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older initiated in 2011. A total of 5643 older adults had information on social contacts at baseline and depressive symptoms at the 1-year follow-up interview. The two-item Patient Health Questionnaire identified clinically significant depressive symptoms. Interview questions examined social contacts and the presence of self-reported heart attack or stroke during the year of follow-up. A total of 297 older adults reported experiencing a heart attack and/or stroke between their baseline and follow-up interviews. In regression analyses accounting for sociodemographics, baseline depressive symptoms, medical comorbidity, and activities of daily living impairment, older adults with no close social contacts had increased odds of depressive symptoms at follow-up after experiencing a heart attack or stroke, while those with close social contacts had increased odds of depressive symptoms at follow-up after experiencing a stroke, but not a heart attack. Older adults have increased odds of having depressive symptoms following a self-reported stroke, but only those with no close social contacts had increased odds of depressive symptoms following a heart attack. Social networks may play a role in the mechanisms underlying depression among older adults experiencing certain acute health events. Future work exploring the potential causal relationships suggested here, if confirmed, could inform interventions to alleviate or prevent depression among at risk older adults. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Adaptive Suspicious Prevention for Defending DoS Attacks in SDN-Based Convergent Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Nhu-Ngoc; Kim, Joongheon; Park, Minho; Cho, Sungrae

    2016-01-01

    The convergent communication network will play an important role as a single platform to unify heterogeneous networks and integrate emerging technologies and existing legacy networks. Although there have been proposed many feasible solutions, they could not become convergent frameworks since they mainly focused on converting functions between various protocols and interfaces in edge networks, and handling functions for multiple services in core networks, e.g., the Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS) technique. Software-defined networking (SDN), on the other hand, is expected to be the ideal future for the convergent network since it can provide a controllable, dynamic, and cost-effective network. However, SDN has an original structural vulnerability behind a lot of advantages, which is the centralized control plane. As the brains of the network, a controller manages the whole network, which is attractive to attackers. In this context, we proposes a novel solution called adaptive suspicious prevention (ASP) mechanism to protect the controller from the Denial of Service (DoS) attacks that could incapacitate an SDN. The ASP is integrated with OpenFlow protocol to detect and prevent DoS attacks effectively. Our comprehensive experimental results show that the ASP enhances the resilience of an SDN network against DoS attacks by up to 38%.

  9. Cancer and heart attack survivors' expectations of employment status: results from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijts, Saskia F A; van der Beek, Allard J; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Smith, Lee; Wardle, Jane

    2017-08-07

    Sociodemographic, health- and work-related factors have been found to influence return to work in cancer survivors. It is feasible though that behavioural factors, such as expectation of being at work, could also affect work-related outcomes. Therefore, the effect of earlier identified factors and expectation of being at work on future employment status in cancer survivors was explored. To assess the degree to which these factors specifically concern cancer survivors, a comparison with heart attack survivors was made. Data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing were used. Cancer and heart attack survivors of working age in the UK were included and followed up for 2 years. Baseline characteristics of both cancer and heart attack survivors were compared regarding employment status. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed in survivors at work, and the interaction between independent variables and diagnose group was assessed. In cancer survivors at work (N = 159), alcohol consumption, participating in moderate or vigorous sport activities, general health and participation were univariate associated with employment status at two-year follow-up. Only fair general health (compared to very good general health) remained statistically significant in the multivariate model (OR 0.31; 95% CI 0.13-0.76; p = 0.010). In heart attack survivors at work (N = 78), gender, general health and expectation of being at work were univariate associated with employment status at follow-up. Female gender (OR 0.03; 95% CI 0.00-0.57; p = 0.018) and high expectation of being at work (OR 10.68; 95% CI 1.23-93.92; p = 0.033) remained significant in the multivariate model. The influence of gender (p = 0.066) and general health (p = 0.020) regarding employment status was found to differ significantly between cancer and heart attack survivors. When predicting future employment status in cancer survivors in the UK, general health is the most relevant factor

  10. The relationship between knowledge and risk for heart attack and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Cameron; Vinson, Seth; Shofer, Frances; Brice, Jane

    2013-10-01

    Stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) represent 2 of the leading causes of death in the United States. The early recognition of risk factors and event symptoms allows for the mitigation of disability or death. We sought to compare subject knowledge of stroke and MI, assess subject risk for cardiovascular disease, and determine if an association exists between knowledge and risk. In this cross-sectional survey, adult, non-health care professionals were presented with a written knowledge test and risk assessment tool. Subjects were classified into 3 categories of cardiovascular risk. Associations were then calculated between knowledge, risk, and population demographics. Of 500 subjects approached, 364 were enrolled. The subjects were mostly white, middle-aged, and high school educated. Gender and income were evenly distributed. Forty-eight (14%) subjects were identified as ideal risk, 130 (38%) as low risk, and 168 (49%) as moderate/high risk. MI and stroke knowledge scores decreased as cardiovascular risk increased (85%, 79%, and 73% for ideal, low, and moderate/high risk groups, respectively; P heart attack knowledge scores. Knowledge about stroke and MI was modest, with knowledge of MI exceeding that of stroke at every level of risk. Subjects with higher risk were less knowledgeable about the stroke signs, symptoms, and risk factors than those of MI. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Graphene quantum dots FRET based sensor for early detection of heart attack in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Deepika; Kumar, Vanish; Kumar, Ashok; Kaur, Inderpreet

    2016-05-15

    Cardiac immunosensor for early detection of heart attack (myocardial infarction) was developed using amine functionalized graphene quantum dots (afGQDs) conjugated with antibody anti-cardiac Troponin I (anti-cTnI) to detect cardiac marker antigen Troponin I (cTnI) in blood based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between conjugate and graphene (quencher) only in 10 min. The anti-cTnI was covalently conjugated to afGQDs through carbodiimide coupling reaction. The conjugate was characterized by zeta potential UV-vis spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in the photon count and photoluminescence of GQDs based on interaction of target cTnI with its specific anti-cTnI antibody. The sensor is highly specific and shows negligible response to non-specific antigens. The sensor displayed a linear response to cTnI from 0.001 to 1000 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection of 0.192 pg mL(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Attacks on practical quantum key distribution systems (and how to prevent them)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitin; Stiller, Birgit; Khan, Imran; Elser, Dominique; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2016-07-01

    With the emergence of an information society, the idea of protecting sensitive data is steadily gaining importance. Conventional encryption methods may not be sufficient to guarantee data protection in the future. Quantum key distribution (QKD) is an emerging technology that exploits fundamental physical properties to guarantee perfect security in theory. However, it is not easy to ensure in practice that the implementations of QKD systems are exactly in line with the theoretical specifications. Such theory-practice deviations can open loopholes and compromise security. Several such loopholes have been discovered and investigated in the last decade. These activities have motivated the proposal and implementation of appropriate countermeasures, thereby preventing future attacks and enhancing the practical security of QKD. This article introduces the so-called field of quantum hacking by summarising a variety of attacks and their prevention mechanisms.

  13. SiC: An Agent Based Architecture for Preventing and Detecting Attacks to Ubiquitous Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Cristian; de Paz, Yanira; Bajo, Javier; Abraham, Ajith; Corchado, Juan M.

    One of the main attacks to ubiquitous databases is the structure query language (SQL) injection attack, which causes severe damages both in the commercial aspect and in the user’s confidence. This chapter proposes the SiC architecture as a solution to the SQL injection attack problem. This is a hierarchical distributed multiagent architecture, which involves an entirely new approach with respect to existing architectures for the prevention and detection of SQL injections. SiC incorporates a kind of intelligent agent, which integrates a case-based reasoning system. This agent, which is the core of the architecture, allows the application of detection techniques based on anomalies as well as those based on patterns, providing a great degree of autonomy, flexibility, robustness and dynamic scalability. The characteristics of the multiagent system allow an architecture to detect attacks from different types of devices, regardless of the physical location. The architecture has been tested on a medical database, guaranteeing safe access from various devices such as PDAs and notebook computers.

  14. Tracks FAQs: How Do Heart Attack Hospitalization Rates In My Community Compare With Other Counties Or States?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-09-01

    In this podcast, CDC Tracking experts discuss how to compare heart attack hospitalization rates in your community with other counties or states. Do you have a question for our Tracking experts? Please e-mail questions to trackingsupport@cdc.gov.  Created: 9/1/2011 by National Center for Environmental Health, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Environmental Health Tracking Branch.   Date Released: 9/1/2011.

  15. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stroke symptoms. Popular Topics TIA Cardiac Catheter Cholesterol Heart Attack Stent © 2018, American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use prohibited. ...

  16. Acute heart failure: Epidemiology, risk factors, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Parissis, John; Lekakis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-03-01

    Acute heart failure represents the first cause of hospitalization in elderly persons and is the main determinant of the huge healthcare expenditure related to heart failure. Despite therapeutic advances, the prognosis of acute heart failure is poor, with in-hospital mortality ranging from 4% to 7%, 60- to 90-day mortality ranging from 7% to 11%, and 60- to 90-day rehospitalization from 25% to 30%. Several factors including cardiovascular and noncardiovascular conditions as well as patient-related and iatrogenic factors may precipitate the rapid development or deterioration of signs and symptoms of heart failure, thus leading to an acute heart failure episode that usually requires patient hospitalization. The primary prevention of acute heart failure mainly concerns the prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and heart disease, including coronary artery disease, while the secondary prevention of a new episode of decompensation requires the optimization of heart failure therapy, patient education, and the development of an effective transition and follow-up plan. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Preventing shoulder-surfing attack with the concept of concealing the password objects' information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Peng Foong; Kam, Yvonne Hwei-Syn; Wee, Mee Chin; Chong, Yu Nam; Por, Lip Yee

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, picture-based password systems employ password objects (pictures/icons/symbols) as input during an authentication session, thus making them vulnerable to "shoulder-surfing" attack because the visual interface by function is easily observed by others. Recent software-based approaches attempt to minimize this threat by requiring users to enter their passwords indirectly by performing certain mental tasks to derive the indirect password, thus concealing the user's actual password. However, weaknesses in the positioning of distracter and password objects introduce usability and security issues. In this paper, a new method, which conceals information about the password objects as much as possible, is proposed. Besides concealing the password objects and the number of password objects, the proposed method allows both password and distracter objects to be used as the challenge set's input. The correctly entered password appears to be random and can only be derived with the knowledge of the full set of password objects. Therefore, it would be difficult for a shoulder-surfing adversary to identify the user's actual password. Simulation results indicate that the correct input object and its location are random for each challenge set, thus preventing frequency of occurrence analysis attack. User study results show that the proposed method is able to prevent shoulder-surfing attack.

  18. Heart to Heart: An Innovative Approach to Preventing Child Sexual Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounce of Prevention Fund.

    This pamphlet discusses the problems of child sexual abuse, and introduces the Heart to Heart program created by the Ounce of Prevention Fund in Illinois. The pamphlet begins with reflections of adolescents who were sexually abused during childhood, and presents statistical information on this issue. It also discusses the various effects of…

  19. Comparing Asian American Women's Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Risk of Heart Attack to Other Racial and Ethnic Groups: The mPED Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Lisha, Nadra E; Vittinghoff, Eric

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare knowledge and awareness of heart attacks/heart disease and perceived risk for future heart attack in Asian/Pacific Islander women, compared to other racial and ethnic groups. In this cross-sectional study, 318 women enrolled in a mobile phone-based physical activity education trial were analyzed. Heart attack knowledge, self-efficacy for recognizing and responding to heart attack symptoms, and perceived risk for a future heart attack were measured. Analyses were conducted using logistic, proportional odds, and linear regression models, depending on the outcome and adjusting for age. Pairwise differences between Asian/Pacific Islanders and the other four groups were assessed using a Bonferroni correction (p perceived risk did not differ among the groups. Forty-six percent of the Asian American women, compared to 25% of Caucasian women, falsely believed "breast cancer is the number one cause of death for women (p = 0.002)." In addition, Asian/Pacific Islander women were less likely to report "arm pain, numbness, tingling, or radiating" as one of the heart attack symptoms compared to the Caucasian and the multiracial group (34%, 63% [p < 0.001], and 66% [p = 0.004], respectively). These findings highlight the urgent need to develop effective, tailored campaigns to close the knowledge gap between Asian/Pacific Islander women and Caucasian women.

  20. When and why do heart attacks occur? Cardiovascular triggers and their potential role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Bryan G; Mayeda, Guy S; Burstein, Steven; Economides, Christina; Kloner, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    Coronary heart disease affects 7.6% of the population in the United States, where > 900,000 myocardial infarctions (MIs) occur annually. Approximately half of all MIs have an identifiable clinical trigger. Myocardial ischemia, MI, sudden cardiac death, and thrombotic stroke each occur with circadian variation and peak after waking in the morning. In addition, physical exertion and mental stress are common precipitants of MI. Waking in the morning, physical exertion, and mental stress influence a number of physiologic parameters, including blood pressure, heart rate, plasma epinephrine levels, coronary blood flow, platelet aggregability, and endothelial function. Upregulation of sympathetic output and catecholamines increase myocardial oxygen demand and can decrease myocardial oxygen supply and promote thrombosis. Ischemia ensues when myocardial oxygen demand exceeds supply. Increases in blood pressure and ventricular contractility increase intravascular shear stress and may cause vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques to rupture, forming a nidus for thrombosis that can precipitate MI. Numerous clinical triggers of MI have been identified, including blizzards, the Christmas and New Year's holidays, experiencing an earthquake, the threat of violence, job strain, Mondays for the working population, sexual activity, overeating, smoking cigarettes, smoking marijuana, using cocaine, and particulate air pollution. Avoiding clinical triggers or participating in therapies that prevent clinical triggers from precipitating cardiac events could potentially postpone clinical events by several years and improve cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Direct or indirect evidence suggests that the risk of triggered MIs is reduced with β-blockers, aspirin, statins, stress management, and transcendental meditation.

  1. Empowered to gain a new foothold in life--A study of the meaning of participating in cardiac rehabilitation to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte P; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D; Birkelund, Regner

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate what it means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack to participate in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). CR is well-established internationally to support patients towards moving forward in satisfying, healthy, and well-functioning lives. Studies indicate that patients achieve improvement in quality of life when participating in CR. However, knowledge of how patients are supported during CR is sparse. Moreover, knowledge of what participating in CR means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack is lacking. In-depth knowledge in this area is crucial in order to understand these patients' particular gains and needs. In a phenomenological-hermeneutic frame field observations, focus group interviews, and individual interviews were conducted among 11 patients during and after their participation in CR. Field notes and transcribed interviews underwent three-phased interpretation. It was found that patients were supported to gain renewed balance in their lives during CR. Three themes were identified: (1) receiving a helpful but limited caring hand, (2) being supported to find new values in life, and (3) developing responsibility for the remaining time. The patients were carefully guided through a difficult time and supported to continue in healthy everyday lives. They were given hope which enabled them to find themselves a new foothold in life with respect to their own sense of well-being. This guidance and a sense of hopefulness were provided by heart specialists and more seasoned heart patients. In conclusion, patients were empowered to achieve a healthier lifestyle and improve their personal well-being during CR. However, structural barriers in the programme prevented adequate support regarding the patients' total needs. Knowledge of the benefits of CR emphasizes the significance of the programme and highlights the importance of high inclusion. Efforts should be made to develop more flexible and longer lasting programmes and

  2. Empowered to gain a new foothold in life—A study of the meaning of participating in cardiac rehabilitation to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte P. Simonÿ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate what it means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack to participate in cardiac rehabilitation (CR. CR is well-established internationally to support patients towards moving forward in satisfying, healthy, and well-functioning lives. Studies indicate that patients achieve improvement in quality of life when participating in CR. However, knowledge of how patients are supported during CR is sparse. Moreover, knowledge of what participating in CR means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack is lacking. In-depth knowledge in this area is crucial in order to understand these patients’ particular gains and needs. In a phenomenological-hermeneutic frame field observations, focus group interviews, and individual interviews were conducted among 11 patients during and after their participation in CR. Field notes and transcribed interviews underwent three-phased interpretation. It was found that patients were supported to gain renewed balance in their lives during CR. Three themes were identified: (1 receiving a helpful but limited caring hand, (2 being supported to find new values in life, and (3 developing responsibility for the remaining time. The patients were carefully guided through a difficult time and supported to continue in healthy everyday lives. They were given hope which enabled them to find themselves a new foothold in life with respect to their own sense of well-being. This guidance and a sense of hopefulness were provided by heart specialists and more seasoned heart patients. In conclusion, patients were empowered to achieve a healthier lifestyle and improve their personal well-being during CR. However, structural barriers in the programme prevented adequate support regarding the patients’ total needs. Knowledge of the benefits of CR emphasizes the significance of the programme and highlights the importance of high inclusion. Efforts should be made to develop more flexible and longer lasting

  3. The time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight may influence the diurnal rhythm of acute heart attack mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszbacher, Ildikó; Bódis, József; Boncz, Imre; Koppan, Agnes; Koppan, Miklós

    2010-04-01

    We investigated whether the time of sunrise and the number of daylight hours have an effect on the seasonality, or the daily rhythm of heart attack mortality. We analyzed retrospectively data of patients admitted to hospitals with the diagnosis of heart attack (n=32,329) and patients who deceased of a heart attack (n=5142) between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2005 in Hungary. Heart attack mortality was highest during winter, while lowest number of events was recorded during summer . The daily peak of diurnality was between 6:00 am and 12:00 pm (33.77%). A positive correlation was found between the time of sunrise, time of sunset and the mortality caused by myocardial infarction (pheart attack mortality we found a negative correlation (r=-0.105, pheart attack mortality. Our data suggest, that the occurrence and the mortality of heart attack may be related to the time of sunrise and the number of daylight hours. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Shilling Attack Prevention for Recommender Systems Using Social-based Clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Tak

    2011-06-06

    A Recommender System (RS) is a system that utilizes user and item information to predict the feeling of users towards unfamiliar items. Recommender Systems have become popular tools for online stores due to their usefulness in confidently recommending items to users. A popular algorithm for recommender system is Collaborative Filtering (CF). CF uses other users\\' profiles to predict whether a user is interested in a particular object. This system, however, is vulnerable to malicious users seeking to promote items by manipulating rating predictions with fake user profiles. Profiles with behaviors similar to "victim" users alter the prediction of a Recommender System. Manipulating rating predictions through injected profiles is referred to as a shilling attack. It is important to develop shilling attack prevention frameworks for to protect the trustworthiness of Recommender Systems. In this thesis, we will demonstrate a new methodology that utilizes social information to prevent malicious users from manipulating the prediction system. The key element in our new methodology rests upon the concept of trust among real users, an element we claim absent among malicious profiles. In order to use trust information for shilling attack prevention, we first develop a weighting system which makes the system rely more on trustworthy users when making predictions. We then use this trust information to cluster out untrustworthy users to improve rating robustness. The robustness of the new and classic systems is then evaluated with data from a public commercial consumer RS, Epinions.com. Several complexity reduction procedures are also introduced to make implementing the algorithms mentioned possible for a huge commercial database.

  5. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute National Asthma Education and Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... take care of a student who has an asthma attack? In an emergency, such as a fire, weather ... student’s doctor to help manage asthma and prevent asthma attacks.) Is there a school nurse or other school ...

  6. A qualitative study of younger men's experience of heart attack (myocardial infarction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Christopher J; de Zoysa, Nicole; Hutton, Jane M

    2017-09-01

    The effects of heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), across psychosocial domains may be particularly acute in younger adults, for whom serious health events are non-normative. MI morbidity is declining in Western countries, but in England MI numbers have plateaued for the under-45 cohort, where approximately 90% of patients are male. Qualitative research on younger adults' experience of MI is limited, and no study has sampled exclusively under-45s. This study aimed to understand how a sample of men under 45 adjusted to and made sense of MI. Qualitative research design based on semi-structured in-depth interviews. Ten men aged under 45 who had experienced MI in the past 3-6 months were purposively recruited and interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Seven superordinate themes were identified. This article focuses in depth on the three most original themes: (1) 'I'm less of a man', which described experiences of losing 'maleness' (strength, independence, ability to provide) post-MI; (2) 'Shortened horizons', which covered participants' sense of foreshortened future and consequent reprioritization; and (3) 'Life loses its colour', describing the loss of pleasure from lifestyle-related changes. Themes broadly overlapped with the qualitative literature on younger adult MI. However, some themes (e.g., loss of 'maleness' post-MI, and ambivalence towards MI risk factors) appeared unique to this study. Themes were also discussed in relation to risk factors for anxiety and depression and how this might inform clinical care for a younger, male population. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Myocardial infarction (MI) morbidity is not declining in England for under-45s. Adjustment to MI is particularly challenging for younger adults, perhaps because it is non-normative. However, little is known about the experience of MI in younger adults. What does this study add? This

  7. Cerebral correlates of heart rate variations during a spontaneous panic attack in the fMRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelhalder, Kai; Hornyak, Magdolna; Kyle, Simon David; Paul, Dominik; Blechert, Jens; Seifritz, Erich; Hennig, Jürgen; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Riemann, Dieter; Feige, Bernd

    2009-12-01

    We report the first published case study of a suddenly occurring panic attack in a patient with no prior history of panic disorder during combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, 1.5 Tesla) and electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. The single case was a 46-year-old woman who developed a panic attack near the planned end of the fMRI acquisition session, which therefore had to be aborted. Correlational analysis of heart rate fluctuations and fMRI data revealed a significant negative association in the left middle temporal gyrus. Additionally, regions-of-interest (ROI) analyses indicated significant positive associations in the left amygdala, and trends towards significance in the right amygdala and left insula.

  8. Preventing DoS attacks in peer-to-peer media streaming systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, William; Nahrstedt, Klara; Gupta, Indranil

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for preventing both selfishness and denial-of-service attacks in peer-to-peer media streaming systems. Our framework, called Oversight, achieves prevention of these undesirable activities by running a separate peer-to-peer download rate enforcement protocol along with the underlying peer-to-peer media streaming protocol. This separate Oversight protocol enforces download rate limitations on each participating peer. These limitations prevent selfish or malicious nodes from downloading an overwhelming amount of media stream data that could potentially exhaust the entire system. Since Oversight is based on a peer-to-peer architecture, it can accomplish this enforcement functionality in a scalable, efficient, and decentralized way that fits better with peer-to-peer media streaming systems compared to other solutions based on central server architectures. As peer-to-peer media streaming systems continue to grow in popularity, the threat of selfish and malicious peers participating in such large peer-to-peer networks will continue to grow as well. For example, since peer-to-peer media streaming systems allow users to send small request messages that result in the streaming of large media objects, these systems provide an opportunity for malicious users to exhaust resources in the system with little effort expended on their part. However, Oversight addresses these threats associated with selfish or malicious peers who cause such disruptions with excessive download requests. We evaluated our Oversight solution through simulations and our results show that applying Oversight to peer-to-peer media streaming systems can prevent both selfishness and denial-of-service attacks by effectively limiting the download rates of all nodes in the system.

  9. "First-hit" heart attack risk calculators on the world wide web: implications for laypersons and healthcare practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Elved B; Ramnath, Rajesh; Fallows, Stephen; Sykes, Kevin

    2008-06-01

    Heart attack risk calculators are readily accessible on the world wide web, offering potentially powerful means of health education and risk awareness. Laypersons may be unaware of differences in applicability, risk calculation algorithms and output formats among such calculators. This study assesses the impact of basic web searching terms on type of calculator accessed and on the resulting risk score. Observational study. Seventy-two notional individual risk factor profiles were constructed, based on six combinations of presence or absence of smoking habit, hypercholesterolaemia, mixed hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and family history of premature coronary disease among males and females in age groups 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 years. The term heart attack risk calculator was entered into the Google, Yahoo, MSN, AltaVista and Excite search engines. The first five web pages purporting to contain heart attack risk calculators were included. Subpages of URLs leading to duplicate calculators were excluded. All search engines provided similar "hits" for the same search term. Framingham or PROCAM risk prediction models were the templates for all calculators. Different calculators often gave different absolute percentage risk scores for the same notional risk factor profiles. Differences were clinically insignificant in most cases when comparisons were made between bracketed risk scores within 5% of one another. One calculator gave disproportionately high risk estimates for women compared to men with the same risk factor profile and compared to other calculators into which identical risk profiles were entered. Simple search terms resulted in appropriate "hits". All calculators were based on reputable risk assessment models. There was broad agreement across different calculators for the range of risk factor profiles entered, but one calculator gave inconsistent risk scores.

  10. Patient confidence regarding secondary lifestyle modification and knowledge of 'heart attack' symptoms following percutaneous revascularisation in Japan: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitakata, Hiroki; Kohno, Takashi; Kohsaka, Shun; Fujino, Junko; Nakano, Naomi; Fukuoka, Ryoma; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Maekawa, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2018-03-16

    To assess patient perspectives on secondary lifestyle modification and knowledge of 'heart attack' after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for coronary artery disease (CAD). Observational cross-sectional study. A single university-based hospital centre in Japan. In total, 236 consecutive patients with CAD who underwent PCI completed a questionnaire (age, 67.4±10.1 years; women, 14.8%; elective PCI, 75.4%). The survey questionnaire included questions related to confidence levels about (1) lifestyle modification at the time of discharge and (2) appropriate recognition of heart attack symptoms and reactions to these symptoms on a four-point Likert scale (1=not confident to 4=completely confident). The primary outcome assessed was the patients' confidence level regarding lifestyle modification and the recognition of heart attack symptoms. Overall, patients had a high level of confidence (confident or completely confident,>75%) about smoking cessation, alcohol restriction and medication adherence. However, they had a relatively low level of confidence (heart attack, almost all respondents answered 'yes' to the item 'I should go to the hospital as soon as possible when I have a heart attack'; however, only 28% of the responders were confident in their ability to distinguish between heart attack symptoms and other conditions. There were substantial disparities in the confidence levels associated with lifestyle modification and recognition/response to heart attack. These gaps need to be studied further and disseminated to improve cardiovascular care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Antibiotics for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, Naqash J.; Safi, Sanam; Korang, Steven Kwasi

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antibiotics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. As a secondary objective, we plan to assess the effects of individual types of antibiotics...

  12. Predicting the effect of prevention of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Priority setting in public health policy must be based on information on the effectiveness of alternative preventive and therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this study is to predict the effect on mortality from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in Denmark of reduced exposure to the risk factors...

  13. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  14. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  15. Current strategies for preventing renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure: a heart failure stage approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Victor Sarli; Andrade, Lúcia; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common during episodes of acute decompensated heart failure, and historical data indicate that the mean creatinine level at admission has risen in recent decades. Different mechanisms underlying this change over time have been proposed, such as demographic changes, hemodynamic and neurohumoral derangements and medical interventions. In this setting, various strategies have been proposed for the prevention of renal dysfunction with heterogeneous results. In the present article, we review and discuss the main aspects of renal dysfunction prevention according to the different stages of heart failure. PMID:23644863

  16. Preventing Hereditary Angioedema Attacks in Children Using Cinryze®: Interim Efficacy and Safety Phase 3 Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Soteres, Daniel; Moldovan, Dumitru; Christensen, Jim; Van Leerberghe, Arthur; Hao, James; Schranz, Jennifer; Jacobson, Kraig W.; Martinez-Saguer, Inmaculada

    2017-01-01

    Background Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease causing unpredictable and potentially life-threatening subcutaneous and submucosal edematous attacks. Cinryze® (Shire ViroPharma Inc., Lexington, MA, USA), a nanofiltered C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), is approved in Europe for the treatment, preprocedure prevention, and routine prophylaxis of HAE attacks, and for the routine prophylaxis of attacks in the USA. This phase 3 study assessed the safety and efficacy of 2 C1-INH doses in preventing attacks in children aged 6–11 years. Methods A randomized single-blind crossover study was initiated in March 2014. Results for the first 6 patients completing the study are reported here. After a 12-week qualifying observation period, patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 C1-INH doses, 500 or 1,000 U, every 3–4 days for 12 weeks and crossed over to the alternative dose for a second 12-week period. The primary efficacy endpoint was the number of angioedema attacks per month. Results Six females with HAE type I and a median age of 10.5 years received 2 doses of C1-INH (500 and 1,000 U). The mean (SD) difference in the number of monthly angioedema attacks between the baseline observation period and the treatment period was −1.89 (1.31) with 500 U and −1.89 (1.11) with 1,000 U. During the treatment periods, cumulative attack severity, cumulative daily severity, and the number of attacks needing acute treatment were lower. No serious adverse events or study drug discontinuations occurred. Conclusions Interim findings from this study indicate that routine prevention with intravenous administration of C1-INH is efficacious, safe, and well tolerated in children ≥6 years of age. PMID:28662509

  17. Location Authentication based on Wireless Access Point Information to Prevent Wormhole Attack in Samsung Pay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RYU, G.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a location authentication method to prevent wormhole payment attack in Samsung Pay. The primary feature of this method is comparing wireless Access Point (AP information collected by the current Samsung Pay user and a wireless AP model (WM that was created from wireless AP information (WI sent by previous Samsung Pay users. To create the WM, an autoencoder is used. Unlike the existing location authentication techniques that use WI, our method does not require additional hardware, modification of the Point of Sale (POS software, or any pre-requisite information such as the location coordinates of the POS. We show that the proposed location authentication technique exhibits the minimum Equal Error Rate (EER of 2.4% in real payment environments.

  18. Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation for Secondary Prevention After Transient Ischemic Attack or Mild Stroke: PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Peter L; Hachinski, Vladimir; Chan, Richard; Unsworth, Karen; Mytka, Sharon; Harnadek, Michael; OʼCallaghan, Christina; Suskin, Neville

    2017-11-01

    Having previously reported that comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR) is effective for secondary prevention post-transient ischemic attack (TIA)/mild nondisabling stroke (MNDS), we present psychometric findings for the same sample that elucidate subacute TIA/MNDS psychological outcomes and test whether CCR would be independently associated with psychological improvements. In this prospective cohort trial patients with ≥1 risk factor, recruited from a stroke prevention clinic within 12 months (mean = 11.5 weeks) post-TIA/MNDS, entered CCR. Of the 110 recruited patients, 100 (mean age = 65.4 years; 46 females) entered CCR and 80 completed CCR (mean duration = 7.6 months). At CCR entry, 16.5% and 39.2% screened positively for depression and anxiety, decreasing nonsignificantly at exit to 4.2%, and significantly to 16.9% (P = .008), respectively. Age-corrected deficits occurred more frequently than expected (P ≤ .03); at entry, mental health status (13.3%), clock-drawing (31.6%), oral-verbal fluency (16.9%), word-list learning (11.2%), and recall (12.6%); at exit, clock-drawing (30.0%). Entry-to-exit, mean depression, anxiety, mental and physical health status, word-list learning, memory, digit-symbol coding, and oral-verbal fluency scores improved significantly (P ≤ .031). No reliable change indices were significant. Psychological service recipients improved significantly more than nonrecipients in depression (P = .049). Baseline North American Adult Reading Test score predicted exercise attendance (R = 0.275; P = .044); New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and depression score predicted exit physical health status (R = 0.770, P psychological improvements. CCR psychological treatment may benefit depression. Subacute NYHA class and depression may later affect quality of life.

  19. Preventing Wormhole Attacks on Wireless Ad Hoc Networks: A Graph Theoretic Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lazos, L; Poovendran, Radha; Meadows, C; Syverson, P; Chang, L. W

    2005-01-01

    We study the problem of characterizing the wormhole attack, an attack that can be mounted on a wide range of wireless network protocols without compromising any cryptographic quantity or network node...

  20. Clinical case: paroxysmal tachycardia attack in a newborn with multiple heart rhabdomyomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernenkov Yu.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the clinical observation is to study the early symptoms of multiple heart rhabdomiomas of a newborn; to draw the attention of specialists on one of the rarely occurred problems in the neonatal practice.

  1. Clinical case: paroxysmal tachycardia attack in a newborn with multiple heart rhabdomyomas

    OpenAIRE

    Chernenkov Yu.V.; Pozgaleva N.V.; Panina O.S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the clinical observation is to study the early symptoms of multiple heart rhabdomiomas of a newborn; to draw the attention of specialists on one of the rarely occurred problems in the neonatal practice.

  2. 'BeAWARE': supporting non-clinical staff within general practice to promptly identify patients presenting with warning signs of heart attack or stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, Christopher; Stewart, Michelle; Fitzpatrick, Cliona; Keech, Wendy; Stavreski, Bill; Grenfell, Robert

    2014-06-01

    General practice requires systems to deal with patients presenting with urgent needs. BeAWARE was developed to support non-clinical staff to promptly identify patients with symptoms of heart attack or stroke. Data were collected from May 2012 to December 2012 on participants completing the BeAWARE learning module, including pre- and post-assessments on knowledge, confidence and intended action. From May 2012 to December 2012, 1865 participants completed the module. There were significant increases in recall of heart attack and stroke symptoms among non-clinical participants, including chest tightness (23.4-48.7%, P DISCUSSION: BeAWARE fulfils a practice gap in patient safety by improving non-clinical staff's knowledge, confidence and intended action in response to patients presenting with heart attack or stroke warning signs.

  3. Heart rate is a prognostic risk factor for myocardial infarction: a post hoc analysis in the PERFORM (Prevention of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular Events of ischemic origin with teRutroban in patients with a history oF ischemic strOke or tRansient ischeMic attack) study population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kim; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Amarenco, Pierre; Chamorro, Angel; Fisher, Marc; Ford, Ian; Hennerici, Michael G; Mattle, Heinrich P; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-10-09

    Elevated resting heart rate is known to be detrimental to morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease, though its effect in patients with ischemic stroke is unclear. We analyzed the effect of baseline resting heart rate on myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with a recent noncardioembolic cerebral ischemic event participating in PERFORM. We compared fatal or nonfatal MI using adjusted Cox proportional hazards models for PERFORM patients with baseline heart rate heart rate was analyzed as a continuous variable. Other cerebrovascular and cardiovascular outcomes were also explored. Heart rate ≥70 bpm was associated with increased relative risk for fatal or nonfatal MI (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=0.029). For every 5-bpm increase in heart rate, there was an increase in relative risk for fatal and nonfatal MI (11.3%, P=0.0002). Heart rate ≥70 bpm was also associated with increased relative risk for a composite of fatal or nonfatal ischemic stroke, fatal or nonfatal MI, or other vascular death (excluding hemorrhagic death) (Pheart rate, there were increases in relative risk for fatal or nonfatal ischemic stroke, fatal or nonfatal MI, or other vascular death (4.7%, Pheart rate ≥70 bpm places patients with a noncardioembolic cerebral ischemic event at increased risk for MI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Family history and body mass index predict perceived risks of diabetes and heart attack among community-dwelling Caucasian, Filipino, Korean, and Latino Americans--DiLH Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Choi, JiWon; S Bender, Melinda; Gonzalez, Prisila; Arai, Shoshana

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the perceived risk for diabetes and heart attack and associated health status of Caucasian, Filipino, Korean, and Latino Americans without diabetes. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 904 urban adults (mean age 44.3±16.1 years; 64.3% female) in English, Spanish or Korean between August and December 2013. Perceived risk for developing diabetes was indicated by 46.5% (n=421), and 14.3% (n=129) perceived themselves to be at risk for having a heart attack in their lifetime. Significant predictors of pessimistic diabetes risk perceptions: Filipino (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.7; 95% CI: 1.04-2.86) and Korean (AOR=2.4; 1.33-4.48) ethnicity, family history of diabetes (AOR=1.4; 1.00-1.84), female gender (AOR=1.4; 1.04-1.96), high cholesterol (AOR= 1.6; 1.09-2.37) and higher body mass index (BMI) (AOR=1.1; 1.08-1.15). Predictors of pessimistic heart attack risk perceptions were family history of an early heart attack (AOR=2.9; 1.69-5.02), high blood pressure (AOR=2.4; 1.45-3.84), and higher BMI (AOR=1.1; 1.04-1.12) after controlling for socio-demographic factors. Older age, physical inactivity, smoking, and low HDL levels were not associated with risk perceptions. Multiple risk factors were predictive of greater perceived diabetes risk, whereas, only family history of heart attack, high blood pressure and increases in BMI significantly contributed to perceived risk of heart attack among ethnically diverse at risk middle-aged adults. It is important that healthcare providers address the discordance between an individual's risk perceptions and the presence of actual risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Population-based effectiveness and safety of different antiplatelet regimens as secondary prevention for ischemic stroke/Transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorsyahdy, Alfi; De Boer, Anthonius; Deneer, Vera H.M.; Ten Berg, Jurrien M.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Klungel, Olaf H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different antiplatelet regimens are used for secondary prevention after ischemic stroke (IS)/transient ischemic attack (TIA), but studies on the relative effectiveness and safety of each regimen in daily practice are lacking. Objectives: To assess the relative effectiveness and safety of

  6. Total Dietary Fiber, and Selected Vegetable, Fruit, Legume and Cereal Fiber Intake and Risk of Heart Attack in Periodontitis Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Wood

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiological studies have found an association between periodontal disease and coronary artery disease(Arbes, Slade et al. 1999; Beck, Elter et al. 2001; Genco, Offenbacher et al. 2002, and have even implicated periodontal disease as a risk factor(Arbes, Slade et al. 1999; Beck, Elter et al. 2001, however have not proven causality(Hujoel, Drangholt et al. 2000. Although dietary amounts, sources, and types (soluble versus insoluble of fiber have been shown to reduce the risk of heart attack (Liu, Buring et al. 2002; Negri, Vecchia et al. 2003, this author is unaware of studies that have examined the association between food sources of dietary fiber and heart attack risk in subjects with periodontitis.This study was designed to determine whether total dietary fiber and fiber from different plant sources (vegetables, fruits, legumes, or cereals modified self-reported HA risk, as well as acute-phase inflammatory responses in subjects with periodontitis using NHANES III data.Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between total dietary fiber intake levels, and selected vegetables, fruits, legumes, and cereal fiber intake and the risk of self-reported history of heart attack (HA in periodontitis subjects using data available in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III.Materials and Methods: Adult participants in NHANES III were used in this study. Zero to thirty three (0-33 percent of sites with periodontal attachment loss > 3 mm was considered a healthy periodontium, while greater than thirty three percent (>33 of sites with periodontal attachment loss of > 3 mm as periodontitis. The outcome variable was the self-reported history of HA. Total dietary fiber, and monthly selected vegetable, fruit, legume and cereal consumption were divided into low and adequate levels. Data was analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, ANOVA and multivariate analyses using SPSS ®. P<0.05 was used to

  7. Faith and use of complementary and alternative medicine among heart attack patients in a secular society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekke-Hansen, Sidsel; Pedersen, Christina Gundgaard; Thygesen, Kristian; Christensen, Søren; Waelde, Lynn C; Zachariae, Robert

    2012-10-01

    To explore the associations of religious and spiritual faith (unambiguous, ambiguous and no faith), existential considerations and disease severity with use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among heart patients in a secular society, and to address patients' perceived influence of CAM on their quality of life and heart disease. Prospective questionnaire study among 97 consecutively recruited patients (72.2% male; mean age 60.6 years) with acute coronary syndrome from a Danish cardiac university hospital unit. Total CAM use in the 6 months following hospitalisation. Altogether 24.7% used CAM with dietary/exercise counselling and dietary/nutritional supplements being the most prevalent types. In a final multivariate logistic regression model entering faith in God, faith in a spiritual power and previous CAM use, only unambiguous faith in God predicted CAM use following the event (OR: 11.24, CI: 2.19-57.65, p=0.004). No significant association was found between heart disease severity and CAM use. The majority of CAM treatments were rated as having some degree of positive influence on quality of life (75.9%) and the heart disease (58.6%). Faith among heart patients in a secular society was associated with CAM use. It may be speculated that believers in God were more inclined to use lifestyle-oriented CAM types such as dietary/exercise counselling. Patients' perceived benefits of CAM may be strong motivational factors for present or future use. However, considering the potential adverse effect of combining some complementary therapies with conventional medicine, an open dialogue on CAM use is warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Are urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons associated with adult hypertension, heart attack, and cancer? USA NHANES, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-11-01

    Links between environmental chemicals and human health have emerged over the last few decades, but the effects from polyaromatic hydrocarbons were less studied, compared to other commonly known environmental chemicals such as heavy metals, phthalates, arsenic, phenols and pesticides. Therefore, it was aimed to study the relationships of urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons and adult cardiovascular disease and cancer using human sample in a national and population-based study in recent years. Data was retrieved from US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2011-2012, including demographics, self-reported health conditions and urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Statistical analyses included chi-square test, t test, survey-weighted logistic regression modeling and population attributable risk (PAR) estimation. Of 5560 American adults aged 20-80 and included in the statistical analysis, urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons (representatively in one-third sample) were observed to be higher in people with cardiovascular disease and total cancer. In particular, urinary 4-hydroxyphenanthrene was associated with hypertension (odds ratio (OR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.76, P = 0.048, PAR 5.1%), urinary 1-hydroxypyrene was significantly associated with heart attack (OR 1.47, 95%CI 1.05-2.06, P = 0.027, PAR 1.7%), and urinary 2-hydroxynapthalene (2-naphthol) was associated with cancer (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.12-1.90, P = 0.008, PAR 3.9%). Urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons were associated with adult hypertension, heart attack and cancer, although the causality cannot be established. From the research perspective, future studies with a longitudinal or experimental approach would be suggested. From the law and public health perspectives, regulation on minimizing exposure to polyaromatic hydrocarbons might need to be considered in future health and environmental policies and intervention programs.

  9. Whole population secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in Scotland: the HEARTS database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Frank M; Donnan, Peter T; Love, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Implementing the evidence base for the management of chronic disease is as challenging as discovering which interventions are effective. The HEARTS collaboration (Heart disease Evidence-based Audit and Research in Tayside Scotland) is achieving that goal for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD by linking national databases to manually validated hospital and family practice electronic patient records. Specific data from the system is fed back to practices in a facilitated educational process and through the NHS intranet. This paper describes some of the key features of this strategic decision support system. All residents of the Tayside region of Scotland (n=484,013 mid year estimate 2002) are covered by the system. 9,828 patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction(MI) or who have undergone angioplasty or bypass surgery are registered on the system. Improvements in clinical status and prescribing of effective therapies are 5-10% greater than elsewhere in Scotland.

  10. Lifestyle interventions for secondary disease prevention in stroke and transient ischaemic attack: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Olive; Galvin, Rose; Smith, Kathryn; Doody, Catherine; Blake, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    Secondary prevention in ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is dominated by pharmacological interventions with evidence for non-pharmacological interventions being less robust. This systematic review and meta-analysis examines the impact of lifestyle interventions on secondary prevention in stroke or TIA. A systematic literature search was performed. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effectiveness of intervention packages incorporating any key component of health education/promotion/counselling on lifestyle and/or aerobic exercise compared to usual care ± a sham intervention in participants with ischaemic stroke or TIA were included. Outcomes of interest were mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) event rates, cardiovascular risk factors including blood pressure, lipid profiles and physical activity participation. Methodological quality was assessed. Statistical analyses determining treatment effect were conducted using Cochrane Review Manager Software. Seventeen RCTs were included. Data pooled from eight studies with a total of 2478 patients, demonstrated no effect in favour of lifestyle interventions compared to routine or sham interventions on mortality (risk ratio (RR) = 1.13 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85-1.52), I(2) = 0%). Data relating to CVD events were pooled from four studies (1013 patients), demonstrated non-significant findings (RR = 1.16 (95% CI, 0.80--1.71), I(2) = 0%). Similar results were reported for total cholesterol. Physical activity participation demonstrated significant improvement [SMD 0.24 (95% CI, 0.08-0.41), l (2) = 47%]. Blood pressure reductions were noted but were non-significant when corrected for multimodal packages including enhanced pharmacotherapy compliance. There is currently insufficient high quality research to support lifestyle interventions post-stroke or TIA on mortality, CVD event rates and cardio-metabolic risk factor profiles. Promising blood pressure reductions were noted in

  11. Priming and warnings are not effective to prevent social engineering attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junger, Marianne; Montoya, L.; Overink, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    Humans tend to trust each other and to easily disclose personal information. This makes them vulnerable to social engineering attacks. The present study investigated the effectiveness of two interventions that aim to protect users against social engineering attacks, namely priming through cues to

  12. Migraine Trainers as Models: the effectiveness of Lay trainerswith migraine for behavioural attack prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.Y.M. Mérelle (Saskia)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMigraine is a chronic brain disorder, characterized by attacks of severe headache accompanied by nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light, sound and smell. Attacks can be preceded by premonitory symptoms such as fatigue, muscular stiff ness or negative aff ect. It has been shown that

  13. Heart rate as a predictor of stroke in high-risk, hypertensive patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Berge, Eivind; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Julius, Stevo; Holzhauer, Björn; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Hua, Tsushung A

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for first stroke are well established, but less is known about risk factors for recurrent stroke. In the present analysis, we aimed to assess the effect of heart rate and other possible predictors of stroke in a hypertensive population with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-Term Use Evaluation trial was a multicentre, double-masked, randomized controlled, parallel group trial comparing the effects of an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan) and a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) in patients with hypertension and high cardiovascular risk. We used Cox proportional hazard models to investigate the effect of baseline variables on the risk of stroke. Quadratic terms of the continuous variables were entered in the models to test for linearity. Of 15,245 patients included in the trial, 3014 had a previous stroke or TIA at baseline and were included in the present analysis. Stroke recurrence occurred in 239 patients (7.9%) during a median of 4.5 years of follow-up. Resting heart rate (per 10 beats per minute; hazard ratio [HR], 2.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-6.58) and diabetes mellitus at baseline (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.03-2.10) were significantly associated with an increased risk of stroke recurrence in the multivariable analysis. In high-risk, hypertensive patients with previous stroke or TIA, resting heart rate was the strongest predictor of recurrent stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Serious as a heart attack: health-related content of late-night comedy television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Josh

    2006-01-01

    Although the medical community hoped that Vice President Dick Cheney's public experiences with heart problems and subsequent treatments would serve to raise awareness, educate the public about heart disease and treatment options, and showcase advances in cardiac care, late-night comedians saw Cheney's health problems as joke fodder. Comedians like Jay Leno, David Letterman, and Conan O'Brien ridiculed Cheney in their monologues, suggesting the vice president was frail, weak, and near death-certainly not a "poster boy" for contemporary cardiac care. This investigation presents a textual analysis of late-night comedy monologue jokes from July 25, 2000, to October 7, 2003. The themes that emerge in the jokes include Cheney's infirmity, his questionable fitness for office, and ridicule for his state-of-the-art defibrillator. Implications of health-related content in late-night comedy programs are offered, including the potential impacts on health knowledge and attitudes toward illness. This study takes an important step toward understanding health messages in an unconventional yet powerful media venue.

  15. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  16. Elevated troponin in patients with acute stroke - Is it a true heart attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dous, George V; Grigos, Angela C; Grodman, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Although the prognostic value of a positive troponin in an acute stroke patient is still uncertain, it is a commonly encountered clinical situation given that Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) frequently co-exist in the same patient and share similar risk factors. Our objectives in this review are to (1) identify the biologic relationship between acute cerebrovascular stroke and elevated troponin levels, (2) determine the pathophysiologic differences between positive troponin in the setting of acute stroke versus acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and (3) examine whether positive troponin in the setting of acute stroke has prognostic significance. We also will provide an insight analysis of some of the available studies and will provide guidance for a management approach based on the available data according to the current guidelines.

  17. Crowdsourcing Intelligence to Combat Terrorism: Harnessing Bottom-Up Collection to Prevent Lone-Wolf Terror Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    doesn’t require a lot pre-operational surveillance and is only happening in the mind of the offender , from an intelligence standpoint, from a...but were not members of 55 Bob Drogin and April Choi, “ Teen Held in Alleged Portland Bomb Plot,” Los Angeles Times, November 28, 2010, http...car-bomb-cops-evacuate-heart-nyc-potential- terrorist-attack-article-1.444423. 75 Pat Pheifer, “Waseca Teen Accused in School Shooting Plot had been

  18. Evaluation of heart attack by cardiac magnetic resonance and its association with collateral circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lluberas, N.; Mila, R.; Parma, G.; Florio, L.; Vignolo, G.; Trujillo, P.; Lluberas, R.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: It is known that infarct size depends on the magnitude of the area at risk (territory irrigation culprit vessel), ischemic time and presence of collateral circulation. MRI Heart (RMC) has high accuracy in estimating infarct area. To study the relationship between the presence of collateral circulation and infarct size assessed by RMC. 38 patients were included with STEMI reperfused medianteATC primary (34 above) those who had made an RMC in the acute phase (<30 days). Collateral circulation graduated as the classification Rentrop Quantification of delayed enhancement (mass of myocardial infarction and% relative to VI) He performed with software by manually tracing RT areas. Microvascular obstruction (OMV) was defined as areas of low signal intensity within the necrotic tissue. They were compared RMC parameters between two groups: group No Collateral (n = 30) [Rentrop 0-1] vs group Yes Collaterals (n = 8) [Rentrop 2-3]. The mean age was 57 ± 14 years, 68% were women. 87% of patients with circulation collateral event had previous angina vs 28% no collaterals (p = 0.004). The main results em is the table. According to the international literature, the group of patients with collateral circulation to the artery responsible for AMI showed a smaller infarct size assessed both by release Enzymatic as RMC and OMV lesser extent. These findings highlight the importance of circulation collateral and validates our methodology to quantify infarct size for future studies research

  19. How to Prevent Heart Disease: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease - At Any Age (American Heart Association) Red Wine and Resveratrol: Good for Your Heart? (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Time to Talk: Five Things to Know about Omega-3s for Heart Disease (National Center for ...

  20. Family history and body mass index predict perceived risks of diabetes and heart attack among community-dwelling Caucasian, Filipino, Korean, and Latino Americans—DiLH Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Choi, JiWon; Bender, Melinda S.; Gonzalez, Prisila; Arai, Shoshana

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the study was to explore the perceived risk for diabetes and heart attack and associated health status of Caucasian, Filipino, Korean, and Latino Americans without diabetes. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 904 urban adults (mean age 44.3 ± 16.1 years; 64.3% female) in English, Spanish or Korean between August and December 2013. Results Perceived risk for developing diabetes was indicated by 46.5% (n = 421), and 14.3% (n = 129) perceived themselves to be at risk for having a heart attack in their lifetime. Significant predictors of pessimistic diabetes risk perceptions: Filipino (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.04–2.86) and Korean (AOR = 2.4; 1.33–4.48) ethnicity, family history of diabetes (AOR = 1.4; 1.00–1.84), female gender (AOR = 1.4; 1.04–1.96), high cholesterol (AOR= 1.6; 1.09–2.37) and higher body mass index (BMI) (AOR = 1.1; 1.08–1.15). Predictors of pessimistic heart attack risk perceptions were family history of an early heart attack (AOR = 2.9; 1.69–5.02), high blood pressure (AOR = 2.4; 1.45–3.84), and higher BMI (AOR = 1.1; 1.04–1.12) after controlling for socio-demographic factors. Older age, physical inactivity, smoking, and low HDL levels were not associated with risk perceptions. Conclusion Multiple risk factors were predictive of greater perceived diabetes risk, whereas, only family history of heart attack, high blood pressure and increases in BMI significantly contributed to perceived risk of heart attack among ethnically diverse at risk middle-aged adults. It is important that healthcare providers address the discordance between an individual’s risk perceptions and the presence of actual risk factors. PMID:25931282

  1. Iran the aerial defense facing a preventive attack against the nuclear sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruselle, B.; Payre, G.

    2006-01-01

    In the context of the nuclear uranium enrichment program development facing the international opinion, the author discusses the Iran policy of implementing a defense against an aerial attack. Even with the modernization of its anti-aerial defense, the Iran will cannot support an aerial american campaign, precise and long. (A.L.B.)

  2. 'I was in control of it from the start': A qualitative study of men's experiences of positive adjustment following a heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fran; Banwell, Elizabeth; Rakhit, Roby

    2017-09-01

    A qualitative design was used to explore the experience of positive adjustment following a heart attack. Ten men attending a cardiac rehabilitation programme completed in-depth semi-structured interviews. An overarching theme: 'I was in control of it from the start' emerged with six subthemes, relating to intrapersonal and interpersonal factors and processes. The subthemes reflected the importance of identifying controllable versus non-controllable factors and employing adaptive coping strategies.

  3. C-reactive protein, waist circumference, and family history of heart attack are independent predictors of body iron stores in apparently healthy premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ortegón, M F; Arbeláez, A; Mosquera, M; Méndez, F; Aguilar-de Plata, C

    2012-08-01

    Ferritin levels have been associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prediction of ferritin levels by variables related to cardiometabolic disease risk in a multivariate analysis. For this aim, 123 healthy women (72 premenopausal and 51 posmenopausal) were recruited. Data were collected through procedures of anthropometric measurements, questionnaires for personal/familial antecedents, and dietary intake (24-h recall), and biochemical determinations (ferritin, C reactive protein (CRP), glucose, insulin, and lipid profile) in blood serum samples obtained. Multiple linear regression analysis was used and variables with no normal distribution were log-transformed for this analysis. In premenopausal women, a model to explain log-ferritin levels was found with log-CRP levels, heart attack familial history, and waist circumference as independent predictors. Ferritin behaves as other cardiovascular markers in terms of prediction of its levels by documented predictors of cardiometabolic disease and related disorders. This is the first report of a relationship between heart attack familial history and ferritin levels. Further research is required to evaluate the mechanism to explain the relationship of central body fat and heart attack familial history with body iron stores values.

  4. Costs of heart disease and risk behaviour: implications for expenditure on prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Davidsen, Michael; Madsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    among individuals at risk of heart disease was about 11%-16% of the attributable cost of heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: Heart disease incurs significant additional costs to the healthcare sector, and more so if heart patients have a history of leading an unhealthy life. Consequently, strategies to prevent......AIMS: The objective of this paper is firstly to estimate the healthcare costs attributable to heart disease in Denmark using recently available data for 2002-05. Secondly, to estimate the attributable healthcare costs of lifestyle risk factors among heart patients, in order to inform decision...... making about prevention programmes specifically targeting patients with heart disease. METHODS: For a cohort consisting of participants in a national representative health interview survey, register-based information about hospital diagnosis was used to identify patients with heart disease. Healthcare...

  5. A Novel Technique to Prevent PUE Attack in Cognitive Radio Network

    OpenAIRE

    Poonam; Ekta gupta; C.K. Nagpal

    2016-01-01

    Need of wireless communication is increasing to work from distance. That is why new applications are made everyday which increases demand of spectrum but due to limitation of spectrum and inefficient utilization of spectrum. A new paradigm is constituted which is called Cognitive Radio Network (CRN). It get more attention in recent times due to most promising solution for the efficient utilization of spectrum. Spectrum sensing in CRN makes it prone to many attacks on each layer. One of these ...

  6. Preoperative Prevention of Heart Failure in Noncardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Likhvantsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congestive heart failure is consistently associated with adverse outcomes, and is characterized by a twofold increase in mortality in noncardiac surgery. In this regard, developing the methods aimed to prevent and treatacute heart failure (AHF in the intraoperative period remain a challenging problem.Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of preoperative levosimendan infusion in reduction both mortality and duration of treatment of elderly patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction in noncardiac surgery.Material and Methods. Design: Multicenter blind randomized placebocontrolled study. Patients: 81 patients operated on abdominal organs. The main endpoint of the study: The length of stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU and at the hospital were chosen as the primary endpoints. The secondary endpoints of the study were 30 day and annual mortality, the rate of acute myocardial infarction and stroke.Results. Levosimendan infusion at a rate of 0,05 μg/kg/min — 0,1 μg/kg/min to patients with low left ven tricular ejection fraction just before the surgery reduced the length of stay in ICU for 2 days and required hospital stay for 3 days. NTproBNP showed the best ratio of sensitivity/specificity in predicting 30day mortality in cumulative group: AUC=0,86 (90,77 to 0,93, P<0,0001. From other indicators the most informative were the Inotropes scoring, no change or decrease of a left ventricular ejection fraction, and cardiac index.Conclusion. To reduce perioperative mortality, the intravenous infusion of levosimendan at a rate of 0,05—0,1 μg/kg/min in elderly patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction is recommened as a preoperative preparation the day before the alleged noncardiac surgery.

  7. Heart Attack and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  8. Healthy Heart Collaboration and Developed Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impact: EPA is raising awareness of heart disease and its link to air pollution and other environmental factors as a partner in Million Hearts, a national initiative to prevent heart attacks and strokes. The talk will provide an up to date review of the evidence linking air poll...

  9. [Mortality rate of acute heart attack in Zalaegerszeg micro-region. Results of the first Hungarian 24-hour acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction intervention care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupkovics, Géza; Motyovszki, Akos; Németh, Zoltán; Takács, István; Kenéz, András; Burkali, Bernadett; Menyhárt, Ildikó

    2010-04-04

    Morbidity and mortality rates of acute heart attack emphasize the significance of this patient group worldwide. The prompt and exact diagnosis and the timing of adequate therapy is crucial for this patients. Modern supply of acute heart attack includes invasive cardiology intervention, primer percutaneous coronary intervention. In year 1999, American and European recommendations suggested primer percutaneous coronary intervention only as an alternative possibility instead of thrombolysis, or in case of cardiogenic shock. 24 hour intervention unit for patients with acute heart attack was first organized in Hungary in Zala County Hospital's Cardiology Department, in year 1998. Our present study confirms, that since the intervention treatment has been introduced, average mortality rate has been reduced considerably in our area comparing to the national average. Mortality rates in West Transdanubian region and in Zalaegerszeg's micro-region were studied and compared for the period between 1997-2004, according to the data of National Public Health and Medical Officer Service. These data were then compared with the national average mortality data of Hungarian Central Statistical Office. With the help of our own computerized database we examined this period and compared the number of the completed invasive interventions to the mortality statistics. In the first full year, in 1998, we completed 82 primer and 283 elective PCIs; these number increased to 318 and 1265 by year 2005. At the same time, significant decrease of acute infarction related mortality was detectable among men of the Zalaegerszeg micro-region, comparing to the national average (pheart attack intervention care improved the area's mortality statistics significantly, comparing to the national average. The skilled work of the experienced team means an important advantage to the patients in Zalaegerszeg micro-region.

  10. Estimating Longitudinal Risks and Benefits From Cardiovascular Preventive Therapies Among Medicare Patients: The Million Hearts Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment Tool: A Special Report From the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Huffman, Mark D; Karmali, Kunal N; Sanghavi, Darshak M; Wright, Janet S; Pelser, Colleen; Gulati, Martha; Masoudi, Frederick A; Goff, David C

    2017-03-28

    The Million Hearts Initiative has a goal of preventing 1 million heart attacks and strokes-the leading causes of mortality-through several public health and healthcare strategies by 2017. The American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology support the program. The Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Model was developed by Million Hearts and the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services as a strategy to assess a value-based payment approach toward reduction in 10-year predicted risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) by implementing cardiovascular preventive strategies to manage the "ABCS" (aspirin therapy in appropriate patients, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, and smoking cessation). The purpose of this special report is to describe the development and intended use of the Million Hearts Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment Tool. The Million Hearts Tool reinforces and builds on the "2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk" by allowing clinicians to estimate baseline and updated 10-year ASCVD risk estimates for primary prevention patients adhering to the appropriate ABCS over time, alone or in combination. The tool provides updated risk estimates based on evidence from high-quality systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the ABCS therapies. This novel approach to personalized estimation of benefits from risk-reducing therapies in primary prevention may help target therapies to those in whom they will provide the greatest benefit, and serves as the basis for a Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services program designed to evaluate the Million Hearts Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Model. Copyright © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc., and the American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Heart Age PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  12. Can the Pelargonium sidoides root extract EPs® 7630 prevent asthma attacks during viral infections of the upper respiratory tract in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahan, Fulya; Yaman, Melih

    2013-01-15

    Asthma is a chronic disease characterized by airway inflammation. Viral infection initiates an immune inflammatory response that may produce asthma attacks. There is no effective preventing therapy for asthma attack during upper respiratory tract viral infections. To investigate the efficacy of 5 days of Pelargonium sidoides therapy for preventing asthma attack during upper respiratory tract viral infections. Sixty one asthmatic children with upper respiratory tract viral infection were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomized to receive Pelargonium sidoides daily for 5 days (n=30) or not (n=31). Before and after treatment, they all were examined and symptom scores were determined. Following five days treatment, children were evaluated whether or not they had an asthma attack. Treatment with Pelargonium sidoides was not associated with a statistically significant differences in fever and muscle aches (p>0.05, Chi-square test). There were significant differences in cough frequency and nasal congestion between the groups (pasthma attack between the groups (pasthma attack. Our study shows that Pelargonium sidoides may prevent asthma attacks during upper respiratory tract viral infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Special Operations Soldier With Cardiac Family History: Use of CCTA and Protein Biomarker Testing to Detect Risk of Heart Attack From Noncalcified Plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Millee; Kroman, Anne; Singh, Juile; Tariq, Hassan; Amin, Shetal; Morales-Pablon, Cesar Alberto; Cahill, Kristina Vanessa; Harrison, Eric Edward

    2015-01-01

    We sought to characterize the risk of a heart attack in a 48-year-old asymptomatic US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Soldier without known coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among most age groups in the United States. Much research is dedicated to establishing new techniques to predict myocardial infarction (MI). Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography, also known as CCTA, along with 7-protein serum biomarker risk assessment was performed for risk evaluation. A 48-year-old SOCOM Soldier with a family history of heart disease had skeletal chest pain from war injuries and a 5-fold higher risk of heart attack over the next 5 years on the basis of protein markers. A nonobstructive left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) plaque with a lipid-rich core and a thin fibrous cap (i.e., vulnerable plaque) was detected by CCTA. The patient was warned about his risk and prescribed four cardiac medications and scheduled for angioplasty even though he fell outside the guidelines by not having a severe obstructive blockage. Four days later, unfortunately, he had a heart attack before starting his medications and before angioplasty. CCTA with biomarker testing may have an important role in predicating acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Special Operations Forces (SOF) Soldiers with at least one risk factor. Conventional stress testing and nuclear scanning would not detect non-flow-limiting vulnerable plaques in vulnerable patients. In order to collect more data, the PROTECT Registry has been started to evaluate asymptomatic Soldiers with at least one risk factor referred to the clinic by military physicians. 2015.

  14. Contemporary trends in cardiogenic shock: Incidence, intra-aortic balloon pump utilisation and outcomes from the London Heart Attack Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Krishnaraj S; Koganti, Sudheer; Iqbal, M Bilal; Jain, Ajay K; Kalra, Sundeep S; Astroulakis, Zoe; Lim, Pitt; Rakhit, Roby; Dalby, Miles C; Lockie, Tim; Malik, Iqbal S; Knight, Charles J; Whitbread, Mark; Mathur, Anthony; Redwood, Simon; MacCarthy, Philip A; Sirker, Alexander; O'Mahony, Constantinos; Wragg, Andrew; Jones, Daniel A

    2018-02-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. We aimed to assess the current trends in cardiogenic shock management, looking specifically at the incidence, use of intra-aortic balloon pump therapy and outcomes in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. We undertook an observational cohort study of 21,210 ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients treated between 2005-2015 at the eight Heart Attack Centres in London, UK. Patients' details were recorded at the time of the procedure into local databases using the British Cardiac Intervention Society percutaneous coronary intervention dataset. There were 1890 patients who presented with cardiogenic shock. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at a median follow-up of 4.1 years (interquartile range: 2.2-5.8 years). Increasing rates of cardiogenic shock were seen over the course of the study with consistently high mortality rates of 45-70%. A total of 685 patients underwent intra-aortic balloon pump insertion during primary percutaneous coronary intervention for cardiogenic shock with decreasing rates over time. Those patients undergoing intra-aortic balloon pump therapy were younger, more likely to have poor left ventricular function and less likely to have had previous percutaneous coronary intervention compared to the control group. Procedural success rates were similar (86.0% vs 87.1%, p=0.292) although crude, in-hospital major adverse cardiac event rates were higher (43.8% vs 33.7%, p<0.0001) in patients undergoing intra-aortic balloon pump therapy. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated significantly higher mortality rates in patients receiving intra-aortic balloon pump therapy (50.9% intra-aortic balloon pump vs 39.9% control, p<0.0001) during the follow-up period. After multivariate Cox analysis (hazard ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0

  15. DAILY CHANGES OF CENTRAL HEMODYNAMICS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE WITH NIGHT-TIME DYSPNOEA ATTACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Dovgolis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study daily changes of central hemodynamics (CHD in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and the effects of therapy. Materials and methods. 22 patients with ischemic heart disease and CHF of III-IV functional class (FC by NYHA, age 60,5±10,5 were observed. Patients were suffering from night-time dyspnoea attacks and had pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP 15-20 mm Hg. CHD was monitored invasively before the treatment and after 4 weeks of CHF treatment. Results. According to the cardiac index (CI at admission patients were split into two groups. 9 patients of group-I had CI ≤2,15 l\\min\\m2, and 13 patients of group-II had CI >2,15 l\\min\\m2. In patients of group-I CI increased in 4 weeks of treatment. The treatment caused considerable clinical improvement in all patients. The CHD indexes also improved. Initially evening-night-time peaks of PAOP (р≤0,002, systolic (SBP (р≤0,003, diastolic (DBP (р=0,002 and average (BPa (р=0,0007 blood pressure (BP as well as double multiplication (DM (р≤0,008 were registered in patients of group-I. At the end of treatment only evening-night increase in DBP (р=0,002 and BPa (р≤0,006 were noted. In patients of group-II after 4 weeks of treatment CI decreased or didn’t change. Towards 28-th day of treatment 10 patients had clinical improvements. Only one patient’s FC NYHA increased. At the end of treatment the normalization of CHD was registered totally in group. Initially evening-night-time peaks of PAOP (р≤0,002, SBP (р≤0, 0001, CI (р=0,057 and DM (р=0,084 were registered in patients of group-II. At the end of treatment evening-night-time peaks of PAOP (р≤0,015, SBP (р≤0,044, CI (р≤0,005 and DM (р≤0,044 still remained. Besides, evening-night-time peaks of cardiac output (р≤0,01 and systolic index (р≤0, 06 have added. Conclusion. In patients with CHF with initial CI ≤2,15 l\\min\\m2 treatment results in the normalization of CHD and its daily

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life with Subcutaneous C1-Inhibitor for Prevention of Attacks of Hereditary Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumry, William R; Craig, Timothy; Zuraw, Bruce; Longhurst, Hilary; Baker, James; Li, H Henry; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Anderson, John; Riedl, Marc A; Manning, Michael E; Keith, Paul K; Levy, Donald S; Caballero, Teresa; Banerji, Aleena; Gower, Richard G; Farkas, Henriette; Lawo, John-Philip; Pragst, Ingo; Machnig, Thomas; Watson, Douglas J

    2018-01-31

    Hereditary angioedema with C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) impairs health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The objective of this study was to assess HRQoL outcomes in patients self-administering subcutaneous C1-INH (C1-INH[SC]; HAEGARDA) for routine prevention of HAE attacks. Post hoc analysis of data from the placebo-controlled, crossover phase III COMPACT study (Clinical Studies for Optimal Management of Preventing Angioedema with Low-Volume Subcutaneous C1-Inhibitor Replacement Therapy). Ninety patients with C1-INH-HAE were randomized to 1 of 4 treatment sequences: C1-INH(SC) 40 or 60 IU/kg twice weekly for 16 weeks, preceded or followed by 16 weeks of twice weekly placebo injections. All HAE attacks were treated with open-label on-demand treatment as necessary. HRQoL assessments at week 14 (last visit) included the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D-3L), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire (WPAI), and the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM). Compared with placebo (on-demand treatment alone), treatment with twice weekly C1-INH(SC) (both doses combined) was associated with better EQ-5D visual analog scale general health, less HADS anxiety, less WPAI presenteeism, work productivity loss, and activity impairment, and greater TSQM effectiveness and overall treatment satisfaction. More patients self-reported a "good/excellent" response during routine prevention with C1-INH(SC) compared with on-demand only (placebo prophylaxis) management. For each HRQoL measure, a greater proportion of patients had a clinically meaningful improvement during C1-INH(SC) treatment compared with placebo. In patients with frequent HAE attacks, a treatment strategy of routine prevention with self-administered twice weekly C1-INH(SC) had a greater impact on improving multiple HAE-related HRQoL impairments, most notably anxiety and work productivity, compared with on

  17. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  18. Performance analysis and implementation of proposed mechanism for detection and prevention of security attacks in routing protocols of vehicular ad-hoc network (VANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Tyagi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation communication networks have become widely popular as ad-hoc networks, broadly categorized as the mobile nodes based on mobile ad-hoc networks (MANET and the vehicular nodes based vehicular ad-hoc networks (VANET. VANET is aimed at maintaining safety to vehicle drivers by begin autonomous communication with the nearby vehicles. Each vehicle in the ad-hoc network performs as an intelligent mobile node characterized by high mobility and formation of dynamic networks. The ad-hoc networks are decentralized dynamic networks that need efficient and secure communication requirements due to the vehicles being persistently in motion. These networks are more susceptible to various attacks like Warm Hole attacks, denial of service attacks and Black Hole Attacks. The paper is a novel attempt to examine and investigate the security features of the routing protocols in VANET, applicability of AODV (Ad hoc On Demand protocol to detect and tackle a particular category of network attacks, known as the Black Hole Attacks. A new algorithm is proposed to enhance the security mechanism of AODV protocol and to introduce a mechanism to detect Black Hole Attacks and to prevent the network from such attacks in which source node stores all route replies in a look up table. This table stores the sequences of all route reply, arranged in ascending order using PUSH and POP operations. The priority is calculated based on sequence number and discard the RREP having presumably very high destination sequence number. The result show that proposed algorithm for detection and prevention of Black Hole Attack increases security in Intelligent Transportation System (ITS and reduces the effect of malicious node in the VANET. NCTUNs simulator is used in this research work.

  19. Preventing the Decodability Attack Based Cross-Matching in a Fuzzy Commitment Scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelkboom, E.J.C.; Breebaart, Jeroen; Kevenaar, Tom A.M.; Buhan, I.R.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    Template protection techniques are used within biometric systems in order to safeguard the privacy of the system's subjects. This protection also includes unlinkability, i.e., preventing cross-matching between two or more reference templates from the same subject across different applications. In

  20. Survival of resuscitated cardiac arrest patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) conveyed directly to a Heart Attack Centre by ambulance clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Rachael T; Watson, Lynne R; Virdi, Gurkamal K; Moore, Fionna P; Whitbread, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This study reports survival outcomes for patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) subsequent to ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and who were conveyed directly by ambulance clinicians to a specialist Heart Attack Centre for expert cardiology assessment, angiography and possible percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This is a retrospective descriptive review of data sourced from the London Ambulance Service's OHCA registry over a one-year period. We observed excellent survival rates for our cohort of patients with 66% of patients surviving to be discharged from hospital, the majority of whom were still alive after one year. Those who survived tended to be younger, to have had a witnessed arrest in a public place with an initial cardiac rhythm of VF/VT, and to have been transported to the specialist centre more quickly than those who did not. A system allowing ambulance clinicians to autonomously convey OHCA STEMI patients who achieve a return of spontaneous circulation directly to a Heart Attack Centre is highly effective and yields excellent survival outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. It is not just a Minor Thing - A Phenomenological-Hermeneutic Study of Patients' Experiences when afflicted by a Minor Heart Attack and Participating in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte P; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D; Birkelund, Regner

    2017-06-01

    To improve cardiac care, especially cardiac rehabilitation, patients' perspectives should be better addressed. In Denmark, patients afflicted by a minor heart attack in terms of unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction are treated in fast-track programmes with subacute treatment in hospital, early discharge and follow-up specialised outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Knowledge of these patients' experiences of their life situation is essential to develop sufficient care protocols. To gain in-depth understanding of how patients afflicted by a minor heart attack experience their life situation when following cardiac rehabilitation. Focus group interviews and individual interviews were conducted with 11 patients enrolled in the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Data consisted of text in the form of transcribed interviews. A three-phased interpretation inspired by Paul Ricoeur's theory of interpretation was applied. As an overall concept, the patients experienced being forced into a demanding life shaking journey. Three themes emerged: Difficulty accepting the disease: facing the disease is a difficult challenge for the patients, leading to vulnerability and helplessness; Understanding that life has become frail: patients feel shaken as they realise that the disease is chronic and life-threatening; and An altered life: patients must adjust to new limitations in their everyday lives. Patients experience an overall demanding transition when they are afflicted by a minor heat attack, whereby their lives are sweepingly changed. Supporting patients' integrity, which becomes vulnerable during the various stages of transitions, is essential to ensure a healthy outcome. Being together with fellow patients during cardiac rehabilitation is a facilitating factor in the course of transition. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 μM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt max of 105 ± 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 ± 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 ± 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 ± 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 ± 1 μM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 ± 3 μM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  3. The potential role of honey and its polyphenols in preventing heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the risk of coronary heart disease by three major actions: improving coronary vasodilatation, decreasing the ability of platelets in the blood to clot, and preventing low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) from oxidizing. In this review paper, we discussed the preventive role of polyphenols of honey against cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Research on the technology of detecting the SQL injection attack and non-intrusive prevention in WEB system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haibin

    2017-05-01

    Among numerous WEB security issues, SQL injection is the most notable and dangerous. In this study, characteristics and procedures of SQL injection are analyzed, and the method for detecting the SQL injection attack is illustrated. The defense resistance and remedy model of SQL injection attack is established from the perspective of non-intrusive SQL injection attack and defense. Moreover, the ability of resisting the SQL injection attack of the server has been comprehensively improved through the security strategies on operation system, IIS and database, etc.. Corresponding codes are realized. The method is well applied in the actual projects.

  5. Evaluation of polyphenols-rich natural compounds as treatments to prevent attacks by subterranean and drywood termites: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Maistrello

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the view to find sustainable methods to prevent termite attacks to wooden objects and structural timbers, this study represents a preliminary step in the evaluation of some natural substances considered as effective by some African popular traditions. Dark shea cake, obtained from the kernels of Vitellaria paradoxa (Sapotaceae, is the phase just before the extraction of shea (= karitè butter. In some West African regions, by-products from this extraction are traditionally believed to protect houses from termites. To verify if this practice has scientific basis, shea cake was used in experiments with both subterranean and drywood termites, respectively Reticulitermes lucifugus (Rossi (Rhinotermitidae and Kalotermes flavicollis (Fabricius (Kalotermitidae. As shea nuts are extremely rich in polyphenols, the trials included a comparison with tannins from chestnut (Castanea sativa. Short-term experiments to evaluate repellency and feeding deterrence of the two compounds were performed. Results showed differences in the behavior of the two termites species and that shea cake is significantly more repellent than chestnut tannins, especially for K. flavicollis. No feeding deterrence activity was detected for either substance for either termite species. Further investigation is currently being performed to better clarify how these compounds affect termite biology.

  6. Heart-Healthy Families. Helping Your Kids Stay Fit Could Prevent Heart Disease in Their Futures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnini, Frederic J.; Malone, Mary Jo

    1994-01-01

    The conditions and habits that lead to heart disease begin early in life. Obesity is the predecessor of a host of cardiovascular-related diseases; childhood obesity poses serious physical and psychological roadblocks for youngsters as they mature. The article suggests how families can adopt fitter lifestyles and instill good eating and exercise…

  7. A UNIFIED APPROACH FOR DETECTION AND PREVENTION OF DDOS ATTACKS USING ENHANCED SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINES AND FILTERING MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subbulakshmi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS attacks were considered to be a tremendous threat to the current information security infrastructure. During DDoS attack, multiple malicious hosts that are recruited by the attackers launch a coordinated attack against one host or a network victim, which cause denial of service to legitimate users. The existing techniques suffer from more number of false alarms and more human intervention for attack detection. The objective of this paper is to monitor the network online which automatically initiates detection mechanism if there is any suspicious activity and also defense the hosts from being arrived at the network. Both spoofed and non spoofed IP’s are detected in this approach. Non spoofed IP’s are detected using Enhanced Support Vector Machines (ESVM and spoofed IP’s are detected using Hop Count Filtering (HCF mechanism. The detected IP’s are maintained separately to initiate the defense process. The attack strength is calculated using Lanchester Law which initiates the defense mechanism. Based on the calculated attack strength any of the defense schemes such as Rate based limiting or History based IP filtering is automatically initiated to drop the packets from the suspected IP. The integrated online monitoring approach for detection and defense of DDoS attacks is deployed in an experimental testbed. The online approach is found to be obvious in the field of integrated DDoS detection and defense.

  8. The polypill: the solution for prevention of coronary heart disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendarto Natadidjaja

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In Western countries, cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death and it is expected that it will continue to be so in the near future.(1 If the resulting physical impairment and psychosocial disturbances are also taken into account, clearly this is a serious problem from the viewpoint of productivity, quality of life, as well as community health level. Therefore the institution of preventive measures is an important issue. Unfortunately, however, currently preventive measures that are effective, safe, and at the same time practical and economical, are almost nonexistent.

  9. Beliefs among black and white adults about causes and prevention of cardiovascular disease: the Minnesota Heart Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, A R; Sprafka, J M; Luepker, R V; Jacobs, D R

    1988-01-01

    We assessed beliefs about the symptoms, causes, and prevention of cardiovascular disease in population-based surveys of black and white Twin Cities adults in 1985-86. Whites had a generally higher awareness of heart attack symptoms than did blacks; 72% of blacks and 85% of whites mentioned chest pain as a likely symptom. Sixty-five percent of blacks and 76% of whites correctly offered at least one of the three major, modifiable risk factors (smoking, hypertension, and high cholesterol in blood or diet) as likely causes of cardiovascular disease. However, less than 5% of respondents mentioned all three major risk factors. The most frequent response offered as a cause was stress/worry (54% of blacks, 51% of whites). Individuals with higher educational levels generally responded more correctly than those with less education. After accounting for differences in educational level, blacks demonstrated a higher awareness of hypertension as a risk factor, whereas whites were more knowledgeable about smoking and cholesterol. In light of the high percentage of adults still lacking awareness about cardiovascular risk, public education about prevention should continue. Such efforts are broadly desirable but may be most effectively targeted toward minorities and groups with less education, in whom awareness is low and risk of disease is high.

  10. [Current developments in prevention of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, E

    1996-02-01

    The Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S-Studie) has provided proof beyond any doubt that reduction of plasma cholesterol decreases mortality. The enormous rise of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in both gender calls for preventative measures as an urgent task. With a reduction of cardiac events by 30-40% and of mortality in the same order of magnitude, cholesterol lowering and increase in HDL-cholesterol are most effective measures for the treatment of coronary artery disease. However, not treatment of late stages of the disease, but primary prevention to reduce the incidence of coronary artery disease in this country should be the principle aim. Thus, the international guidelines for the treatment of lipid disorders considering the individual patient's risk profile have been revised.

  11. Essential role of stress hormone signaling in cardiomyocytes for the prevention of heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Robert H; Ren, Rongqin; Cruz-Topete, Diana; Bird, Gary S; Myers, Page H; Boyle, Michael C; Schneider, Michael D; Willis, Monte S; Cidlowski, John A

    2013-10-15

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death in humans, and stress is increasingly associated with adverse cardiac outcomes. Glucocorticoids are primary stress hormones, but their direct role in cardiovascular health and disease is poorly understood. To determine the in vivo function of glucocorticoid signaling in the heart, we generated mice with cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These mice are born at the expected Mendelian ratio, but die prematurely from spontaneous cardiovascular disease. By 3 mo of age, mice deficient in cardiomyocyte GR display a marked reduction in left ventricular systolic function, as evidenced by decreases in ejection fraction and fractional shortening. Heart weight and left ventricular mass are elevated, and histology revealed cardiac hypertrophy without fibrosis. Removal of endogenous glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids neither augmented nor lessened the hypertrophic response. Global gene expression analysis of knockout hearts before pathology onset revealed aberrant regulation of a large cohort of genes associated with cardiovascular disease as well as unique disease genes associated with inflammatory processes. Genes important for maintaining cardiac contractility, repressing cardiac hypertrophy, promoting cardiomyocyte survival, and inhibiting inflammation had decreased expression in the GR-deficient hearts. These findings demonstrate that a deficiency in cardiomyocyte glucocorticoid signaling leads to spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and death, revealing an obligate role for GR in maintaining normal cardiovascular function. Moreover, our findings suggest that selective activation of cardiomyocyte GR may represent an approach for the prevention of heart disease.

  12. Counseling with Heart: A Relationship Violence Prevention Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Danica G.; Michel, Rebecca E.; Bayne, Hannah B.; Neuer Colburn, Anita A.; Smith Myers, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Relationship violence is a salient concern on college campuses today, and psychoeducational groups may be an appropriate prevention format. This article describes a study measuring the impact of college student participation in the HEART (Help End Abusive Relationships Today) program, a series of group sessions designed to increase knowledge and…

  13. Vital Signs – Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This podcast is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  14. Coated stents to prevent restenosis in coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In-stent-restenosis (ISR is considered to be an essential limiting factor of stenting in coronary heart disease (CHD. The development of coated stents has raised expectations on substantial lowering restenosis after stenting with decreasing the rate of restenosis and a reduction in the rate of clinical events. Objectives: The present analysis addresses the questions on medical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the use of various coated stent types in CHD. Methods: The literature was searched in December 2004 in the most relevant medical and economic databases. The medical evaluation was conducted on the basis of published RCT. The data from the studies regarding various angiographic, sonographic and clinical endpoints were checked for methodical quality and summarised in meta-analyses. Within the scope of economic evaluation the primary studies were analysed and modelling was performed, applying clinical effect estimates from the meta-analyses of the medical evaluation and current estimates of German costs. Results: Medical evaluation: Ten different stenttypes were used in the included 26 RCT. The results for heparin, silicon-carbide, carbon and PTFE coated stenttypes could not reveal any significant differences between the medical effectiveness of coated and uncoated stents. The application of sirolimus, paclitaxel, everolimus and 7-hexanoyltaxol eluting stents showed a significant lower restenosis at 6-9 months with decrease in the rate of restenosis for polymer-based sirolimus, paclitaxel and 7-hexanoyltaxol eluting stents. In contrast, the use of gold-coated and actinomycin-D eluting stents was associated with a significantly higher restenosis. The polymer-based sirolimus and paclitaxel eluting stents also showed a significant and considerable reduction in the rate of repeated percutaneous revascularisations at 6-12 months (3.5% vs. 19.7%; p<0.0001, RR=0.19 [95%CI: 0.11; 0.33] and 3.5% vs. 12.2%; p<0.0001, RR=0.30 [95%CI: 0

  15. Detection and Prevention of Denial of Service (DoS Attacks in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks using Reputation-based Incentive Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieso, K Denko

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs are dynamic mobile networks that can be formed in the absence of any pre-existing communication infrastructure. In addition to node mobility, a MANET is characterized by limited resources such as bandwidth, battery power, and storage space. The underlying assumption in MANETs is that the intermediate nodes cooperate in forwarding packets. However, this assumption does not hold in commercial and emerging civilian applications. MANETs are vulnerable to Denial of Service (DoS due to their salient characteristics. There is a need to provide an incentive mechanism that can provide cooperation among nodes in the network and improve overall network performance by reducing DoS attacks. In this paper, we propose a reputation-based incentive mechanism for detecting and preventing DoS attacks. DoS attacks committed by selfish and malicious nodes were investigated. Our scheme motivates nodes to cooperate and excludes them from the network only if they fail to do so. We evaluated the performance of our scheme using the packet delivery ratio, the routing and communication overhead, and misbehaving node detection in a discrete event-simulation environment. The results indicate that a reputation-based incentive mechanism can significantly reduce the effect of DoS attacks and improve performance in MANETs.

  16. Do-not-resuscitate orders in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction: the Worcester Heart Attack Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Elizabeth A; Yarzebski, Jorge L; Goldberg, Robert J; Wheeler, Brownell; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Lessard, Darleen M; Bedell, Susanna E; Gore, Joel M

    2004-04-12

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in Americans. Despite increased interest in end-of-life care, data regarding the use of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in acutely ill cardiac patients remain extremely limited. The objectives of this study were to describe use of DNR orders, treatment approaches, and hospital outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction. The study sample consisted of 4621 residents hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction at all metropolitan Worcester, Mass, area hospitals in five 1-year periods from 1991 to 1999. Significant increases in the use of DNR orders were observed during the study decade (from 16% in 1991 to 25% in 1999). The elderly, women, and patients with previous diabetes mellitus or stroke were more likely to have DNR orders. Patients with DNR orders were significantly less likely to be treated with effective cardiac medications, even if the DNR order occurred late in the hospital stay. Less than 1% of patients were noted to have DNR orders before hospital admission. Patients with DNR orders were significantly more likely to die during hospitalization than patients without DNR orders (44% vs 5%). The results of this community-wide study suggest increased use of DNR orders in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction during the past decade. Use of certain cardiac therapies and hospital outcomes are different between patients with and without DNR orders. Further efforts are needed to characterize the use of DNR orders in patients with acute coronary disease.

  17. Patients' understanding of their heart attack and the impact of exposure to a media campaign on pre-hospital time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Shrikar R; Farshid, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have a limited understanding of AMI symptoms and risk factors. This can lead to delays in the recognition of an AMI and hospital presentation. We aimed to assess patients' understanding of their AMI symptoms and risk factors and also assess the impact of exposure to a media campaign on their pre-hospital time. We surveyed 100 AMI patients admitted to the Canberra Hospital. We asked them about their AMI symptoms and risk factors and the impact of the National Heart Foundation (NHF) advertisements on their AMI experience. Only 26% of patients recognised that they were having an AMI. In 34% of cases, an ambulance was called. There was no significant difference in the median pre-hospital time between patients who encountered the NHF advertisements and those who had not (133 minutes vs. 137 minutes, p=0.809). Only 22% of patients could identify all of their personal AMI risk factors. Most AMI patients do not initially recognise their condition nor do they call for an ambulance. Exposure to the NHF advertisements had no significant influence on reducing pre-hospital time in this cohort. Most patients have a limited understanding of AMI risk factors and causes. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. MyHeart: fighting cardiovascular disease by preventive lifestyle and early diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauter, Josef

    2004-01-01

    MyHeart is an integrated project of the 6th framework programme for research and development of the European Commission under Philips Research Aachen leadership for fighting Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) by prevention and early diagnosis. The major goal of the project is to create business options using smart electronic systems and appropriate services that empower the users to take control of their own health status. MyHeart addresses a wide variety of applications in the cardiovascular disease space and intends to develop lifelong solutions for healthy people, at risk population as well for chronically ill patients.

  19. Rehab for the Heart (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-08-24

    Each year, nearly 790,000 adults in the U.S. suffer a heart attack. For a third of these, it’s not their first. Cardiac rehabilitation could have prevented many of these. In this podcast, Dr. Fleetwood Loustalot discusses the importance of getting cardiac rehab after a heart attack.  Created: 8/24/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 8/24/2017.

  20. Association of Osteopontin, Neopterin, and Myeloperoxidase With Stroke Risk in Patients With Prior Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attacks: Results of an Analysis of 13 Biomarkers From the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Peter; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik; Bao, Weihang; Preston, Gregory M; Welch, K Michael A

    2017-12-01

    Established risk factors do not fully identify patients at risk for recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial (Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels) evaluated the effect of atorvastatin on stroke risk in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease. This analysis explored the relationships between 13 plasma biomarkers assessed at trial enrollment and the occurrence of outcome strokes. We conducted a case-cohort study of 2176 participants; 562 had outcome strokes and 1614 were selected randomly from those without outcome strokes. Time to stroke was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards models. There was no association between time to stroke and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A 2 , monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, resistin, matrix metalloproteinase-9, N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, or soluble CD40 ligand. In adjusted analyses, osteopontin (hazard ratio per SD change, 1.362; P strokes. After adjustment for the Stroke Prognostic Instrument-II and treatment, osteopontin, neopterin, and myeloperoxidase remained independently associated with outcome strokes. The addition of these 3 biomarkers to Stroke Prognostic Instrument-II increased the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve by 0.023 ( P =0.015) and yielded a continuous net reclassification improvement (29.1%; P stroke and improved risk classification when added to a clinical risk algorithm. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT00147602. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Autonomic Nervous System and Stress to Predict Secondary Ischemic Events after Transient Ischemic Attack or Minor Stroke: Possible Implications of Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ling; Collet, Jean-Paul; Mazowita, Garey; Claydon, Victoria E

    2018-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke have high risks of recurrence and deterioration into severe ischemic strokes. Risk stratification of TIA and minor stroke is essential for early effective treatment. Traditional tools have only moderate predictive value, likely due to their inclusion of the limited number of stroke risk factors. Our review follows Hans Selye's fundamental work on stress theory and the progressive shift of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) from adaptation to disease when stress becomes chronic. We will first show that traditional risk factors and acute triggers of ischemic stroke are chronic and acute stress factors or "stressors," respectively. Our first review shows solid evidence of the relationship between chronic stress and stroke occurrence. The stress response is tightly regulated by the ANS whose function can be assessed with heart rate variability (HRV). Our second review demonstrates that stress-related risk factors of ischemic stroke are correlated with ANS dysfunction and impaired HRV. Our conclusions support the idea that HRV parameters may represent the combined effects of all body stressors that are risk factors for ischemic stroke and, thus, may be of important predictive value for the risk of subsequent ischemic events after TIA or minor stroke.

  2. Autonomic Nervous System and Stress to Predict Secondary Ischemic Events after Transient Ischemic Attack or Minor Stroke: Possible Implications of Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ling; Collet, Jean-Paul; Mazowita, Garey; Claydon, Victoria E.

    2018-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke have high risks of recurrence and deterioration into severe ischemic strokes. Risk stratification of TIA and minor stroke is essential for early effective treatment. Traditional tools have only moderate predictive value, likely due to their inclusion of the limited number of stroke risk factors. Our review follows Hans Selye’s fundamental work on stress theory and the progressive shift of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) from adaptation to disease when stress becomes chronic. We will first show that traditional risk factors and acute triggers of ischemic stroke are chronic and acute stress factors or “stressors,” respectively. Our first review shows solid evidence of the relationship between chronic stress and stroke occurrence. The stress response is tightly regulated by the ANS whose function can be assessed with heart rate variability (HRV). Our second review demonstrates that stress-related risk factors of ischemic stroke are correlated with ANS dysfunction and impaired HRV. Our conclusions support the idea that HRV parameters may represent the combined effects of all body stressors that are risk factors for ischemic stroke and, thus, may be of important predictive value for the risk of subsequent ischemic events after TIA or minor stroke. PMID:29556209

  3. Antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, John W; Hart, Robert G

    2012-05-01

    Cardioembolic strokes account for one-sixth of all strokes and are an important potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K antagonists (e.g., warfarin) are effective for the prevention of cardioembolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and in those with mechanical heart valves but because of their inherent limitations are underutilized and often suboptimally managed. Antiplatelet therapies have been the only alternatives to warfarin for stroke prevention in AF but although they are safer and more convenient they are much less efficacious. The advent of new oral anticoagulant drugs offers the potential to reduce the burden of cardioembolic stroke by providing access to effective, safe, and more convenient therapies. New oral anticoagulants have begun to replace warfarin for stroke prevention in some patients with AF, based on the favorable results of recently completed phase III randomized controlled trials, and provide for the first time an alternative to antiplatelet therapy for patients deemed unsuitable for warfarin. The promise of the new oral anticoagulants in patients with mechanical heart valves is currently being tested in a phase II trial. If efficacy and safety are demonstrated, the new oral anticoagulants will provide an alternative to warfarin for patients with mechanical heart valves and may also lead to increased use of mechanical valves for patients who would not have received them in the past because of the requirement for long term warfarin therapy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Forensics Investigation of Web Application Security Attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Amor Lazzez; Thabet Slimani

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, web applications are popular targets for security attackers. Using specific security mechanisms, we can prevent or detect a security attack on a web application, but we cannot find out the criminal who has carried out the security attack. Being unable to trace back an attack, encourages hackers to launch new attacks on the same system. Web application forensics aims to trace back and attribute a web application security attack to its originator. This may significantly reduce the sec...

  5. CDC Vital Signs-Heart Age

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This podcast is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  6. Oral health of children with congenital heart disease following preventive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Reshma M; Rai, Kavitha; Hegde, Amitha M

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), abnormalities in the structural development of the heart, occurs in approximately 8:1000 live births. The causative microorganism for infective endocarditis in more than 60% of the patients with positive hemoculture of viridans streptococci (s.mutans, s.mitior) thus making it mandatory for these children to maintain their oral health. The present study assessed the oral health of children with congenital heart disease following preventive treatment. A total of 74 children with congenital heart disease were selected for the study with 30 healthy controls between the ages 5-16. The oral health was assessed by measuring the microbial counts, the OHI-S and the gingival indices. The data thus obtained were subjected to paired and unpaired t-test. Poor oral health was prevalent among these children of the study group as compared to the controls indicating a lack of sound knowledge of the maintenance of oral hygiene. Following preventive treatment the oral health improved considerably.

  7. Splice variants of enigma homolog, differentially expressed during heart development, promote or prevent hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tomoko; Wälchli, Sébastien; Fujita, Toshitsugu; Ryser, Stephan; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Schlegel, Werner; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Maturana, Andrés D

    2010-06-01

    Proteins with a PDZ (for PSD-95, DLG, ZO-1) and one to three LIM (for Lin11, Isl-1, Mec-3) domains are scaffolding sarcomeric and cytoskeletal elements that form structured muscle fibres and provide for the link to intracellular signalling by selectively associating protein kinases, ion channels, and transcription factors with the mechanical stress-strain sensors. Enigma homolog (ENH) is a PDZ-LIM protein with four splice variants: ENH1 with an N-terminal PDZ domain and three C-terminal LIM domains and ENH2, ENH3, and ENH4 without LIM domains. We addressed the functional role of ENH alternative splicing. We studied the expression of the four ENH isoforms in the heart during development and in a mouse model of heart hypertrophy. All four isoforms are expressed in the heart but the pattern of expression is clearly different between embryonic, neonatal, and adult stages. ENH1 appears as the embryonic isoform, whereas ENH2, ENH3, and ENH4 are predominant in adult heart. Moreover, alternative splicing of ENH was changed following induction of heart hypertrophy, producing an ENH isoform pattern similar to that of neonatal heart. Next, we tested a possible causal role of ENH1 and ENH4 in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. When overexpressed in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, ENH1 promoted the expression of hypertrophy markers and increased cell volume, whereas, on the contrary, ENH4 overexpression prevented these changes. Antagonistic splice variants of ENH may play a central role in the adaptive changes of the link between mechanical stress-sensing and signalling occurring during embryonic development and/or heart hypertrophy.

  8. Secondary prevention- an essential component of the comprehensive rehabilitation of patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Dana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is currently a real public health problem due to the extremely high morbidity and mortality of this disease. In this context, cardiovascular prevention measures should be implemented as early as possible. In addition to classic prevention measures, a number of extremely important specific recommendations should be considered: informing patients about their underlying disease, identifying the cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular factors that have led to cardiac decompensation, reducing daily salt consumption, monitoring body weight, forbidding smoking and recreational substances, conducting a regular exercise program under supervision, and increasing adherence to treatment.

  9. Determinants for acceptance of preventive treatment against heart disease - a web-based population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Nielsen Jesper; Ejg, Jarbøl Dorte; Dorte, Gyrd-Hansen; Lind, Barfoed Benedicte Marie; Veldt, Larsen Pia

    2014-08-02

    Patients' perception of risk and their lifestyle choices are of major importance in the treatment of common chronic diseases. This study reveals determinants for and knowledge about why people accept or reject preventive medical interventions against heart disease. A representative sample of 40-60-year-old Danish inhabitants was invited to participate in a web-based survey. The respondents were presented with a hypothetical scenario and asked to imagine that they were at an increased risk of heart disease, and subsequently presented with an offer of a preventive medical intervention. The aim was to elicit preference structures when potential patients are presented with different treatment conditions. About one third of the respondents were willing to accept preventive medical treatment. Respondents with personal experience with heart disease were more likely to accept treatment than respondents with family members with heart disease or no prior experience with heart disease. The willingness to accept treatment was similar for both genders, and when adjusting for experience with heart disease, age was not associated with willingness to accept treatment. Socioeconomic status in terms of lower education was positively associated with acceptance. The price of treatment reduced willingness to accept for the lower income groups, whereas it had no effect in the highest income group. Some 57% of respondents who were willing to accept treatment changed their decision following information on potential side effects. In accordance with our pre-study hypothesis, individuals with low income were more sensitive to price than individuals with high income. Thus, if the price of preventive medication increases above certain limits, a substantial proportion of the population may refrain from treatment. More than half of the respondents who were initially willing to accept treatment changed their decision when informed about the presence of potential side effects. This is an

  10. Attack surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruschka, Nils; Jensen, Meiko

    2010-01-01

    The new paradigm of cloud computing poses severe security risks to its adopters. In order to cope with these risks, appropriate taxonomies and classification criteria for attacks on cloud computing are required. In this work-in-progress paper we present one such taxonomy based on the notion...... of attack surfaces of the cloud computing scenario participants....

  11. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  12. Ivabradine Prevents Heart Rate Acceleration in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Coronary Heart Disease after Salbutamol Inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta C. Hoppe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated sinus rhythm is an important side effect of inhaled salbutamol which is especially harmful in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and coronary heart disease (CHD. Cross-over, randomized, open label study design. 20 patients (18 males and two females with COPD stage II–IV and comorbide CHD NYHA class I–III were included. Spirometry with 400 mg salbutamol inhalation was performed at two consecutive days of the study. Patients in group I were prescribed 5 mg ivabradine per os 3 h before salbutamol inhalation solely on the first day of the study and patients of group II received 5 mg ivabradine only on the second day of the study. Salbutamol caused a significant increase of HR by 5.5 bpm (95% CI 0.8; 10.2, p < 0.03. After ivabradine ingestion salbutamol did not change HR significantly by −2.4 bpm (−7.0; 2.3, p = 0.33. The attenuation of HR elevation by ivabradine was significant, p < 0.01. Salbutamol alone increased FEV1 by 6.0% (2.7; 9.3, p < 0.01. This effect was not impaired by ivabradine (FEV1 increase by 7.7% (2.8; 12.6, p < 0.01 versus baseline, p = 0.5 versus no ivabradine. Ivabradine 5 mg per os prevents heart rate acceleration after inhalation of 400 mg salbutamol. Ivabradine has no impact on lung function in patients with moderate-to-very-severe COPD and CHD comorbidity.

  13. Challenges to developing effective streptococcal vaccines to prevent rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abhinay Sharma, D Patric Nitsche-SchmitzDepartment of Medical Microbiology, Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, Braunschweig, GermanyAbstract: Acute rheumatic fever is a sequela of Streptococcus pyogenes and potentially of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis infections. Acute rheumatic fever is caused by destructive autoimmunity and inflammation in the extracellular matrix and can lead to rheumatic heart disease, which is the most frequent cardiologic disease that is acquired in youth. Although effective treatments are available, acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain serious threats to human health, which affect millions and cause high economic losses. This has motivated the search for a vaccine that prevents the causative streptococcal infections. A variety of potential vaccine candidates have been identified and investigated in the past. Today, new approaches are applied to find alternative candidates. Nevertheless, several obstacles lie in the way of an approved S. pyogenes vaccine for use in humans. Herein, a subjective selection of promising vaccine candidates with respect to the prevention of acute rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease and safety regarding immunological side effects is discussed.Keywords: autoimmune disease, side effects, M protein vaccine, molecular mimicry, coiled-coil, collagen binding, PARF

  14. Heart Attack Symptoms in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out these healthy cooking tips . You’ll learn smart substitutions, healthy snacking ideas and better prep methods. For example, with poultry, use the leaner light meat (breasts) instead of the fattier dark meat ( ...

  15. Healthy Heart Handbook for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who use high-dose birth control pills (oral contraceptives) are more likely to have a heart attack ... given to people who arrive at a hospital emergency department with a suspected heart attack or stroke. ...

  16. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Ischemic Heart Disease: Primary and Preventive Care Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Brittany S; Carlyle, Lynn; Voeltz, Michele D

    2017-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women in the United States. Obstetrician-gynecologists often are the sole health care providers for otherwise healthy women. Therefore, they must be aware of risk factors, signs, and symptoms of cardiovascular disease and be prepared to recognize and treat this condition in patients as well as provide referrals when specialized care is indicated. Women with cardiac problems typically present with chest discomfort; however, they also are more likely than healthy women to present with other common symptoms, such as shortness of breath, back pain, jaw pain, or nausea and vomiting. This monograph, with a primary focus on ischemic heart disease (IHD), discusses the basic anatomy of the heart and coronary arteries; vascular biology; pathogenesis of atherosclerosis; and the screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of IHD as well as the multiple risk factors associated with the development of IHD that contribute to both increased morbidity and mortality.

  17. Population Trends in Aspirin Use for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention 1980-2009: The Minnesota Heart Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luepker, Russell V; Steffen, Lyn M; Duval, Sue; Zantek, Nicole D; Zhou, Xia; Hirsch, Alan T

    2015-12-23

    Daily low-dose aspirin is recommended for primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke in higher-risk patients. Population trends in aspirin use for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention in an urban population (Minneapolis/St. Paul, 2010 population 2.85 million) from 1980 to 2009 were evaluated. Surveys of randomly selected adults aged 25 to 74 years were collected at 5-year intervals. Self-reports of regular aspirin use for CVD prevention and history of CVD were obtained. Six cross-sectional surveys included 12 281 men and 14 258 women. Age-adjusted aspirin use for primary prevention increased during this period from 1% to 21% among men and 1% to 12% among women. Aspirin use was highest in those aged 65 to 74 years. For secondary prevention, age-adjusted aspirin use increased from 19% to 74% among men and 11% to 64% among women. While data are based on self-report, a substudy using a biochemical indicator of aspirin use (serum thromboxane B2) supports the validity of self-report. Aspirin for CVD prevention is commonly used by a large and growing portion of the general population. It is not known if this is based on professional advice or self-prescribed use. It is also likely that many who would benefit do not use aspirin and others use aspirin inappropriately. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  18. Determinants for acceptance of preventive treatment against heart disease - a web-based population survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients' perception of risk and their lifestyle choices are of major importance in the treatment of common chronic diseases. This study reveals determinants for and knowledge about why people accept or reject preventive medical interventions against heart disease. Methods: A represen......Background: Patients' perception of risk and their lifestyle choices are of major importance in the treatment of common chronic diseases. This study reveals determinants for and knowledge about why people accept or reject preventive medical interventions against heart disease. Methods....... Socioeconomic status in terms of lower education was positively associated with acceptance. The price of treatment reduced willingness to accept for the lower income groups, whereas it had no effect in the highest income group. Some 57% of respondents who were willing to accept treatment changed their decision...... following information on potential side effects. Conclusions: In accordance with our pre-study hypothesis, individuals with low income were more sensitive to price than individuals with high income. Thus, if the price of preventive medication increases above certain limits, a substantial proportion...

  19. BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL BY DRUG GROUP IN THE ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AND LIPID-LOWERING TREATMENT TO PREVENT HEART ATTACK TRIAL (ALLHAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushma, William C.; Ford, Charles E.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Wright, Jackson T.; Preston, Richard A.; Davis, Barry R.; Basile, Jan N.; Whelton, Paul K.; Weiss, Robert J.; Bastien, Arnaud; Courtney, Donald L.; Hamilton, Bruce P.; Kirchner, Kent; Louis, Gail T.; Retta, Tamrat M.; Vidt, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control rates and number of antihypertensive medications were compared (average follow-up 4.9 years) by randomized groups: chlorthalidone, 12.5-25 mg/d (n=15,255), amlodipine 2.5-10 mg/d (n=9,048), or lisinopril 10-40 mg/d (n=9,054) in a randomized double-blind hypertension trial. Participants were hypertensives age t55 with additional cardiovascular risk factor(s), recruited from 623 centers. Additional agents from other classes were added as needed to achieve BP control. BP was reduced from 145/83 mmHg (27% control) to 134/76 mmHg (chlorthalidone, 68% control), 135/75 mmHg (amlodipine, 66% control), and 136/76 mmHg (lisinopril, 61% control) by 5 years; the mean number of drugs prescribed was 1.9, 2.0, and 2.1, respectively. Only 28% (chlorthalidone), 24% (amlodipine), and 24% (lisinopril) were controlled on monotherapy. A majority achieved BP control in each randomized group--a greater proportion with chlorthalidone. Over time, providers and patients should expect multidrug therapy to achieve BP<140/90 mmHg in a majority of patients. PMID:19090876

  20. Securing public transportation systems an integrated decision analysis framework for the prevention of terrorist attacks as example

    CERN Document Server

    Brauner, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Florian Brauner addresses the risk reduction effects of security measures (SecMe) as well as economic and social effects using terrorist threats in public transportation as use case. SecMe increase the level of security but cause interferences and restrictions for customers (e.g. privacy). This study identifies the interferences and analyzes the acceptance with an empirical survey of customers. A composite indicator for the acceptance of different SecMe is developed and integrated into a risk management framework for multi-criteria decision analysis achieving the right balance of risk reduction, costs, and social acceptance. Contents Assessment of Security Measures for Risk Management Measurement of Objective Effectiveness of Security Measures Against Terrorist Attacks Determination of Subjective Effects of Security Measures (Customer Acceptance Analysis) Cost Analysis of Security Measures Multi-Criteria Decision Support Systems Target Groups Scientists with Interest in Civil Security Research Providers and S...

  1. Transient ischemic attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society. Circulation . 2014;130(23):2071-2104. PMID: 24682348 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24682348 . Keman WN, Ovbiagele B, Black HR, et al. Guidelines for the prevention of ...

  2. Role of the polypill for secondary prevention in ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellano, José M; Fuster, Valentín; Jennings, Catriona

    2017-01-01

    transition. At the same time, the increase in cardiovascular risk factors, together with a decline in mortality in high-income countries in the past two decades, has led to a significant upsurge in the prevalence of secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease. With this, the effect that non...... therapeutic approach for improving medication adherence in cardiovascular disease. In the current paper, we aim to review the need for a polypill strategy in the present scenario of cardiovascular disease, the available data that support such a strategy and the various clinical trials that are in progress...

  3. Attacks on RFID Identification Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Mikhaylov

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is about attacks on RFID systems. Currently antivirus developers are not developing systems that protect from viruses that could exist on RFID tags. Such viruses are considered as not existing because the RFID tag memory is very small. Unfortunately such viruses exist. This article is concerned to such viruses and attacks that hackers could do using such viruses. Based on this article methods to prevent RFID-viruses attacks could be developed.

  4. Role of depression in secondary prevention of Chinese coronary heart disease patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Feng

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI have higher rates of depression than the general population. However, few researchers have assessed the impact of depression on the secondary prevention of CHD in China.The main purpose of this investigation was to explore the relationship between depression and secondary prevention of CHD in Chinese patients after PCI.This descriptive, cross-sectional one-site study recruited both elective and emergency PCI patients one year after discharge. Data from 1934 patients were collected in the clinic using questionnaires and medical history records between August 2013 and September 2015. Depression was evaluated by the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Secondary prevention of CHD was compared between depression and non-depression groups.We found that depression affected secondary prevention of CHD in the following aspects: lipid levels, blood glucose levels, smoking status, physical activity, BMI, and rates of medication use.Depressive patients with CHD are at increased risk of not achieving the lifestyle and risk factor control goals recommended in the 2006 AHA guidelines. Screening should focus on patients after PCI because treating depression can improve outcomes by improving secondary prevention of CHD.

  5. Comparing primary prevention with secondary prevention to explain decreasing coronary heart disease death rates in Ireland, 1985-2000.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kabir, Zubair

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate whether primary prevention might be more favourable than secondary prevention (risk factor reduction in patients with coronary heart disease(CHD)). METHODS: The cell-based IMPACT CHD mortality model was used to integrate data for Ireland describing CHD patient numbers, uptake of specific treatments, trends in major cardiovascular risk factors, and the mortality benefits of these specific risk factor changes in CHD patients and in healthy people without recognised CHD. RESULTS: Between 1985 and 2000, approximately 2,530 fewer deaths were attributable to reductions in the three major risk factors in Ireland. Overall smoking prevalence declined by 14% between 1985 and 2000, resulting in about 685 fewer deaths (minimum estimate 330, maximum estimate 1,285) attributable to smoking cessation: about 275 in healthy people and 410 in known CHD patients. Population total cholesterol concentrations fell by 4.6%, resulting in approximately 1,300 (minimum estimate 1,115, maximum estimate 1,660) fewer deaths attributable to dietary changes(1,185 in healthy people and 115 in CHD patients) plus 305 fewer deaths attributable to statin treatment (45 in people without CHD and 260 in CHD patients). Mean population diastolic blood pressure fell by 7.2%, resulting in approximately 170 (minimum estimate 105, maximum estimate 300) fewer deaths attributable to secular falls in blood pressure (140 in healthy people and 30 in CHD patients), plus approximately 70 fewer deaths attributable to antihypertensive treatments in people without CHD. Of all the deaths attributable to risk factor falls, some 1,715 (68%) occurred in people without recognized CHD and 815(32%) in CHD patients. CONCLUSION: Compared with secondary prevention, primary prevention achieved a two-fold larger reduction in CHD deaths. Future national CHD policies should therefore prioritize nationwide interventions to promote healthy diets and reduce smoking.

  6. Can we reduce preventable heart failure readmissions in patients enrolled in a Disease Management Programme?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) are successful in reducing hospital readmissions in heart failure (HF). However, there remain a number of patients enrolled in a DMP who are readmitted with HF. The primary aim of the study was to determine the proportion of preventable readmissions (PR). The secondary aim was to recognise patient characteristics which would identify certain patients at risk of having a PR. METHODS: A retrospective chart search was performed on patients readmitted over a 1-year period. RESULTS: 38.5% of readmissions were classified as PR. None of these patients made prior contact with the DMP. Admission levels of BNP, potassium, urea and creatinine were significantly lower in the PR group. CONCLUSION: DMP have proven benefits in reducing hospital readmission nonetheless a significant proportion of these readmissions are preventable. Further work is required to prospectively analyse why these patients fail to contact the DMP.

  7. Noninvasive imaging in the assessment and prevention of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llerena Rojas, Luis Roberto; Peix Gonzalez, Amalia; Valiente Mustelier, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear cardiology can all help prevent coronary heart disease. Echocardiography can identify asymptomatic individuals who are at risk of coronary disease and who should receive aggressive preventative therapy by providing data on the carotid intima-media thickness, arterial stiffness and flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery. The calcium score is an independent predictor of cardiac events that influences clinical risk scores such as the Framingham risk score. By using multidetector computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for coronary angiography, it is possible to visualize both the lumen and vessel walls of coronary arteries and to discriminate between calcified and noncalcified atherosclerotic plaque before invasive coronary angiography is performed. With nuclear cardiology, the functional effects of atherosclerotic lesions can be evaluated by assessing perfusion and ventricular function simultaneously

  8. Heart healthy and stroke free: successful business strategies to prevent cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson Koffman, Dyann M; Goetzel, Ron Z; Anwuri, Victoria V; Shore, Karen K; Orenstein, Diane; LaPier, Timothy

    2005-12-01

    Heart disease and stroke, the principal components of cardiovascular disease (CVD), are the first and third leading causes of death in the United States. In 2002, employers representing 88 companies in the United States paid an average of 18,618 dollars per employee for health and productivity-related costs. A sizable portion of these costs are related to CVD. Employers can yield a 3 dollar to 6 dollar return on investment for each dollar invested over a 2 to 5 year period and improve employee cardiovascular health by investing in comprehensive worksite health-promotion programs, and by choosing health plans that provide adequate coverage and support for essential preventive services. The most effective interventions in worksites are those that provide sustained individual follow-up risk factor education and counseling and other interventions within the context of a comprehensive health-promotion program: (1) screening, health risk assessments, and referrals; (2) environmental supports for behavior change (e.g., access to healthy food choices); (3) financial and other incentives; and (4) corporate policies that support healthy lifestyles (e.g., tobacco-free policies). The most effective practices in healthcare settings include systems that use (1) standardized treatment and prevention protocols consistent with national guidelines, (2) multidisciplinary clinical care teams to deliver quality patient care, (3) clinics that specialize in treating/preventing risk factors, (4) physician and patient reminders, and (5) electronic medical records. Comprehensive worksite health-promotion programs, health plans that cover preventive benefits, and effective healthcare systems will have the greatest impact on heart disease and stroke and are likely to reduce employers' health and productivity-related costs.

  9. L-Carnitine prevents the development of ventricular fibrosis and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in hypertensive heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Yosuke; Ohtani, Tomohito; Sakata, Yasushi; Mano, Toshiaki; Takeda, Yasuharu; Tamaki, Shunsuke; Tsukamoto, Yasumasa; Kamimura, Daisuke; Aizawa, Yoshihiro; Miwa, Takeshi; Komuro, Issei; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-09-01

    Prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) remains poor because of unknown pathophysiology and unestablished therapeutic strategy. This study aimed to identify a potential therapeutic intervention for HFpEF through metabolomics-based analysis. Metabolomics with capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed using plasma of Dahl salt-sensitive rats fed high-salt diet, a model of hypertensive HFpEF, and showed decreased free-carnitine levels. Reassessment with enzymatic cycling method revealed the decreased plasma and left-ventricular free-carnitine levels in the HFpEF model. Urinary free-carnitine excretion was increased, and the expression of organic cation/carnitine transporter 2, which transports free-carnitine into cells, was down-regulated in the left ventricle (LV) and kidney in the HFpEF model. L-Carnitine was administered to the hypertensive HFpEF model. L-Carnitine treatment restored left-ventricular free-carnitine levels, attenuated left-ventricular fibrosis and stiffening, prevented pulmonary congestion, and improved survival in the HFpEF model independent of the antihypertensive effects, accompanied with increased expression of fatty acid desaturase (FADS) 1/2, rate-limiting enzymes in forming arachidonic acid, and enhanced production of arachidonic acid, a precursor of prostacyclin, and prostacyclin in the LV. In cultured cardiac fibroblasts, L-carnitine attenuated the angiotensin II-induced collagen production with increased FADS1/2 expression and enhanced production of arachidonic acid and prostacyclin. L-Carnitine-induced increase of arachidonic acid was canceled by knock-down of FADS1 or FADS2 in cultured cardiac fibroblasts. Serum free-carnitine levels were decreased in HFpEF patients. L-carnitine supplementation attenuates cardiac fibrosis by increasing prostacyclin production through arachidonic acid pathway, and may be a promising therapeutic option for HFpEF.

  10. B vitamins in patients with recent transient ischaemic attack or stroke in the VITAmins TO Prevent Stroke (VITATOPS) trial: a randomised, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    serious adverse reactions and no significant differences in common adverse effects between the treatment groups. Daily administration of folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 to patients with recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack was safe but did not seem to be more effective than placebo in reducing the incidence of major vascular events. These results do not support the use of B vitamins to prevent recurrent stroke. The results of ongoing trials and an individual patient data meta-analysis will add statistical power and precision to present estimates of the effect of B vitamins. Australia National Health and Medical Research Council, UK Medical Research Council, Singapore Biomedical Research Council, Singapore National Medical Research Council, Australia National Heart Foundation, Royal Perth Hospital Medical Research Foundation, and Health Department of Western Australia. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Dementia on the Use of Drugs for Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole R. Fowler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dementia and cardiovascular disease (CVD are frequently comorbid. The presence of dementia may have an effect on how CVD is treated. Objective. To examine the effect of dementia on the use of four medications recommended for secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease (IHD: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, lipid-lowering medications, and antiplatelet medications. Design. Retrospective analysis of data from the Cardiovascular Health Study: Cognition Study. Setting and Subjects. 1,087 older adults in four US states who had or developed IHD between 1989 and 1998. Methods. Generalized estimating equations to explore the association between dementia and the use of guideline-recommended medications for the secondary prevention of IHD. Results. The length of follow-up for the cohort was 8.7 years and 265 (24% had or developed dementia during the study. Use of medications for the secondary prevention of IHD for patients with and without dementia increased during the study period. In models, subjects with dementia were not less likely to use any one particular class of medication but were less likely to use two or more classes of medications as a group (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–0.99. Conclusions. Subjects with dementia used fewer guideline-recommended medications for the secondary prevention of IHD than those without dementia.

  12. [Efficacy of an intensive prevention programme of coronary heart disease: 5 year follow-up outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Miguel A; Subirana, Isaac; Ramos, Rafael; Franzi, Alicia; Vila, Joan; Marrugat, Jaume

    2008-04-19

    Most evidence on the efficacy of intensive preventive programs of secondary prevention of coronary diseases comes from Anglo-Saxon countries and effectiveness remains controversial. We have scarce information about the efficacy of these types of programs in Spain. In the present analysis we show the results of the ICAR (Intervención en la Comunidad de Alto Riesgo coronario) study, aimed to analyze the efficacy of an intensive preventive program primary care based in reducing the cardiovascular recurrences and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. We designed a randomized clinical trial, multicenter and community based, which included 23 health care areas in Catalonia, Spain. We followed for 5 years 2 cohorts of patients with coronary heart disease, aged 30-80 years. The intervention group was quarterly examined by their general practitioner, who adjusted treatments to control their cardiovascular risk factors thoroughly and reinforced life style behaviours. In order to do that, patient's weight and blood pressure were determined in each visit and laboratory test carried out twice a year. Patients in the control group received the usual care. In order to analyze the effect of the intervention cardiovascular recurrences and mortality were registered. We included 983 patients. Mean (standard deviation) age was 64 (10) and 74.5% were men. During the follow-up 235 patients suffered some non-fatal cardiovascular recurrence (109 vs 126 in the control and intervention group, respectively; p = 0.84), and 45 died from cardiovascular recurrences (23 vs 22, respectively; p = 0.57). Adjusted hazard ratio of cardiovascular event and total mortality, for the intervention group were 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-1.39), and 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 0.54-1.56), respectively. The implementation of an intensive secondary prevention program based on periodical reminds to patients with stable coronary heart disease to attend their general practitioners did not

  13. Prevention of hypoxic fetal complications in pregnant women with congenital heart disease and anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iu. Davydova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is — to develop a strategy of prevention of hypoxic fetal abnormalities in pregnant women with congenital heart disease, heart failure and iron deficiency anemia. Materials and methods. The study included 86 pregnant women with CHD and NYHA II–III. 68 women in the third trimester of pregnancy is diagnosed anemia (group I, 18 pregnant women with CHD, NYHA II–III without anemia (II group, the control group consisted of 24 pregnant women without cardiac disease, with physiological pregnancy. All pregnant with information registration consent studied the concentration of ferritin, hemoglobin level, morphological study of the placenta. All pregnant women were assigned to iron supplements, oral iron (III hydroxide polymaltose complex (Maltofer when hemoglobin levels above 95 g/l and the expected delivery date more than 40 days of starting treatment. When the hemoglobin level below 95 g/l of intravenously administered iron (III hydroxide sucrose complex (Venofer followed by transfer to oral iron (III. Results. In groups of pregnant I and II did not have perinatal losses, births in gestation less than 28 weeks, with a score Apgar at birth of less than 4 points. Pregnant women with cyanotic heart defects and the need for early delivery in less than 37 weeks are not included in the study. Also, there is a correlation between the degree of severity of anemia in women with CHD with HF and prematurity, and the presence of IUGR child birth asphyxia able to varying degrees (respectively, r=0.8, r=0.75 and r=0.85. Conclusions. Formation of fetoplacental unit in women with CHD on a background of heart failure occurs with complications associated with the presence of tissue hypoxia, as well as the possible impact on the process of oxidative stress. The development of iron deficiency anemia in this group is an additional risk factor for placental dysfunction, which is confirmed by morphometric and morphological studies of placentas

  14. Shark attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidera, K J; Ogden, J A; Highhouse, K; Pugh, L; Beatty, E

    1991-01-01

    Shark attacks are rare but devastating. This case had major injuries that included an open femoral fracture, massive hemorrhage, sciatic nerve laceration, and significant skin and muscle damage. The patient required 15 operative procedures, extensive physical therapy, and orthotic assistance. A review of the literature pertaining to shark bites is included.

  15. Serelaxin treatment promotes adaptive hypertrophy but does not prevent heart failure in experimental peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonhoff, Justus; Ricke-Hoch, Melanie; Mueller, Mirco; Stapel, Britta; Pfeffer, Tobias; Kasten, Martina; Scherr, Michaela; von Kaisenberg, Constantin; Bauersachs, Johann; Haghikia, Arash; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise

    2017-05-01

    angiogenesis and compensatory hypertrophy in the diseased heart, but the effects are not sufficient to prevent heart failure in an experimental PPCM model. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  16. Interest of analyses of heart rate variability in the prevention of fatigue states in senior runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leti, Thomas; Bricout, Véronique A

    2013-01-01

    The use of heart rate variability (HRV) in the management of sport training is a practice which tends to spread, especially in order to prevent the occurrence of fatigue states. To estimate the HRV parameters obtained using a heart rate recording, according to different exercise impacts, and to make the link with the appearance of subjective fatigue. Ten senior runners, aged 51±5 years, were each monitored over a period of 12 weeks in different conditions: (i) after a resting period, (ii) after a day with training, (iii) after a day of competition and (iv) after a rest day. They also completed three questionnaires, to assess fatigue (SFMS), profile of mood states (POMS) and quality of sleep. The HRV indices (heart rate, LF (n.u.), HF (n.u.) and LF/HF) were significantly altered with the competitive impact, shifting toward a sympathetic predominance. After rest and recovery nights, the LF (n.u.) increased significantly with the competitive impact (62.1±15.2 and 66.9±11.6 vs. 76.0±10.7; p<0.05 respectively) whereas the HF (n.u.) decreased significantly (37.9±15.2 and 33.1±11.6 vs. 24.0±10.7; p<0.05 respectively). Positive correlations were found between fatigue and frequency domain indices and between fatigue and training impact. Autonomic nervous system modulation-fatigue relationships were significant, suggesting the potential use of HRV in follow-up and control of training. Furthermore, the addition of questionnaires constitutes complementary tools that allow to achieve a greater relevance and accuracy of the athletes' fitness and results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Maximizing survival benefit with primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in a heart failure population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Wayne C; Lee, Kerry L; Hellkamp, Anne S; Poole, Jeanne E; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Linker, David T; Maggioni, Aldo P; Anand, Inder; Poole-Wilson, Philip A; Fishbein, Daniel P; Johnson, George; Anderson, Jill; Mark, Daniel B; Bardy, Gust H

    2009-09-08

    Although implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy reduces mortality in moderately symptomatic heart failure patients with an ejection fraction benefits of ICD treatment in the primary prevention Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure Trial (SCD-HeFT). In the placebo arm, predicted 4-year mortality grouped into 5 equal-sized risk groups varied from 12% to 50% (c statistic=0.71), whereas the proportion of SCD in those same risk groups decreased from 52% to 24% of all deaths. ICD treatment decreased relative risk of SCD by 88% in the lowest-risk group versus 24% in the highest-risk group (P=0.009 for interaction) and decreased relative risk of total mortality by 54% in the lowest-risk group versus no benefit (2%) in the highest-risk group (P=0.014 for interaction). Absolute 4-year mortality reductions were 6.6%, 8.8%, 10.6%, 14.0%, and -4.9% across risk quintiles. In highest-risk patients (predicted annual mortality >20%), no benefit of ICD treatment was seen. Projected over each patient's predicted lifespan, ICD treatment added 6.3, 4.1, 3.0, 1.9, and 0.2 additional years of life in the lowest- to highest-risk groups, respectively. A clinical risk prediction model identified subsets of moderately symptomatic heart failure patients in SCD-HeFT in whom single-lead ICD therapy was of no benefit and other subsets in which benefit was substantial.

  18. 75 FR 70273 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and... Institute Special Emphasis Panel, The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering to Prevent Heart Attack Trial... Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  19. Regenerative Therapy Prevents Heart Failure Progression in Dyssynchronous Nonischemic Narrow QRS Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satsuki; Arrell, D Kent; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Behfar, Atta; Kane, Garvan C; Perez-Terzic, Carmen M; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; McDonald, Robert J; Wyles, Saranya P; Zlatkovic-Lindor, Jelena; Nelson, Timothy J; Terzic, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy using bi-ventricular pacing is proven effective in the management of heart failure (HF) with a wide QRS-complex. In the absence of QRS prolongation, however, device-based resynchronization is reported unsuitable. As an alternative, the present study tests a regenerative cell-based approach in the setting of narrow QRS-complex HF. Methods and Results Progressive cardiac dyssynchrony was provoked in a chronic transgenic model of stress-triggered dilated cardiomyopathy. In contrast to rampant end-stage disease afflicting untreated cohorts, stem cell intervention early in disease, characterized by mechanical dyssynchrony and a narrow QRS-complex, aborted progressive dyssynchronous HF and prevented QRS widening. Stem cell-treated hearts acquired coordinated ventricular contraction and relaxation supporting systolic and diastolic performance. Rescue of contractile dynamics was underpinned by a halted left ventricular dilatation, limited hypertrophy, and reduced fibrosis. Reverse remodeling reflected a restored cardiomyopathic proteome, enforced at systems level through correction of the pathological molecular landscape and nullified adverse cardiac outcomes. Cell therapy of a dyssynchrony-prone cardiomyopathic cohort translated prospectively into improved exercise capacity and prolonged survivorship. Conclusions In narrow QRS HF, a regenerative approach demonstrated functional and structural benefit, introducing the prospect of device-autonomous resynchronization therapy for refractory disease. PMID:25964205

  20. Prevention and control of rheumatic heart disease: Overcoming core challenges in resource-poor environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Dougherty

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease (RHD has long receded as a significant threat to public health in high-income countries. In low-resource settings, however, the specter of RHD remains unabated, as exemplified by recent data from the Global Burden of Diseases Study. There are many complex reasons for this ongoing global disparity, including inadequate data on disease burden, challenges in effective advocacy, ongoing poverty and inequality, and weak health systems, most of which predominantly affect developing nations. In this review, we discuss how each of these acts as a core challenge in RHD prevention and control. We then examine key lessons learnt from successful control programs in the past and highlight resources that have been developed to help create strong national RHD control programs.

  1. Prevention of device-related tissue damage during percutaneous deployment of tissue-engineered heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, U A; Degenkolbe, I; Attmann, T; Schenke-Layland, K; Freitag, S; Lutter, G

    2006-06-01

    Endovascular application of pulmonary heart valves has been recently introduced clinically. A tissue-engineering approach was pursued to overcome the current limitations of bovine jugular vein valves (degeneration and limited longevity). However, deployment of the delicate tissue-engineered valves resulted in severe tissue damage. Therefore the objective of this study was to prevent tissue damage during the folding and deployment maneuver. Porcine pulmonary heart valves, small intestinal submucosa, and ovine carotid arteries were obtained from a slaughterhouse. After dissection and antimicrobial incubation, the valves were trimmed (removal of sinus and most of the muscular ring) to fit into the deployment catheter. The inside (in-stent group, n = 6) or outside (out-stent group, n = 6) of a nitinol stent was covered by an acellular small intestinal submucosa, and the valves were sutured into the stent. The valves were folded, tested for placement in the deployment catheter, and decellularized enzymatically. Myofibroblasts were obtained from carotid artery segments and seeded onto the scaffolds. The seeded constructs were placed in a dynamic bioreactor system and cultured for 16 consecutive days. After endothelial cell seeding, the constructs were folded, deployed, and processed for histology and surface electron microscopy. The valves opened and closed competently throughout the entire dynamic culture. Surface electron microscopy revealed an almost completely preserved tissue in the in-stent group. Stents covered with small intestinal submucosa on the outside, however, showed severe damage. This study demonstrates that small intestinal submucosa covering of the inside of a pulmonary valved stent can prevent stent strut-related tissue damage.

  2. Risk of stroke and cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in patients with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome: secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Alfred; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B

    2011-01-01

    To perform a secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial, which tested the effect of treatment with atorvastatin in reducing stroke in subjects with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, to explore the effects of treatment...

  3. Embodied Revelation: A Classic Grounded Theory of Heart Failure Patient Decision Making Surrounding Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Barton-Caro Ph.D.,

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this classic grounded theory study was to explain the complex decision making process of heart failure (HF) patients considering primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy. Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death for people with HF as well as the primary cause of death in the United States (US). ICDs represent the standard of care as the only effective therapy for primary prevention of SCD. However, a significant proportion of quali...

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Vorapaxar With and Without a Thienopyridine for Secondary Prevention in Patients With Previous Myocardial Infarction and No History of Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: Results from TRA 2°P-TIMI 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohula, Erin A; Aylward, Philip E; Bonaca, Marc P; Corbalan, Ramon L; Kiss, Robert G; Murphy, Sabina A; Scirica, Benjamin M; White, Harvey; Braunwald, Eugene; Morrow, David A

    2015-11-17

    Vorapaxar antagonizes protease-activated receptor 1, the primary receptor for thrombin on human platelets, and reduces recurrent thrombotic events in stable patients with a previous myocardial infarction (MI). We wished to determine whether the efficacy and safety of antiplatelet therapy with vorapaxar was modified by concurrent thienopyridine use. The Thrombin Receptor Antagonist in Secondary Prevention of Atherothrombotic Ischemic Events-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 50 (TRA 2°P-TIMI 50) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vorapaxar in 26,449 patients with previous atherothrombosis. This prespecified analysis included 16,897 patients who qualified with a MI in the preceding 2 weeks to 12 months and was restricted to patients without a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack given its contraindication in that population. Randomization was stratified on the basis of planned thienopyridine use. Thienopyridine was planned at randomization in 12,410 (73%). Vorapaxar significantly reduced the composite of cardiovascular death, MI, and stroke in comparison with placebo regardless of planned thienopyridine therapy (planned thienopyridine, hazard ratio, 0.80, 0.70-0.91, PGlobal Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO) moderate or severe bleeding risk was increased with vorapaxar and was not significantly altered by planned thienopyridine (planned, hazard ratio, 1.50; 1.18-1.89, Phistory of previous MI, whether treated concomitantly with a thienopyridine or not. The relative risk of moderate or severe bleeding was similarly increased irrespective of thienopyridine use. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00526474. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. A survey in an Italian primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesti, A; Del Papa, C; Modesti, L; Bartaloni, R; Galloni, V; Dell'omo, G; Pedrinelli, R

    2010-04-01

    Management of patients with pre-existing coronary heart disease (CHD) relies for the most part on primary care physicians, an endeavour whose success is dependent upon acceptance and day-to-day application of guideline recommendations for secondary CHD prevention. The aim of this study is to analyze the status of secondary CHD prevention in an Italian primary care practice consisting of five partnered general practitioners attending 7006 subjects aged 15 years or more (3137 males, 3869 females) in Pontedera, Tuscany. Retrieval of patients with history of CHD (previous myocardial infarction, [MI], and stable angina) from computerized records of the 5987 (2735 men, 3252 women) subjects aged 35-85 years enlisted in the practice. Patients with myocardial infarction <3 months at the time of the query were excluded. Search retrieved 153 (2.6%) subjects with history of CHD, 93 (3.4%) males and 60 (1.8%) females. Females were older and smoked more frequently than men. Antiplatelet drugs, beta-blockers, renin-angiotensin system blockers and statins were prescribed in 84%, 56%, 66% and 68% of the ischemic patients. LDL cholesterol targets of 100 and 70 mg/dL were achieved in only 60 (45%) and 11 (9%) respectively. Systolic blood pressure was above 140 mmHg in 25 out of 146 patients with available data. The surveys shows satisfactory uptake of guideline recommendations but also pitfalls in the implementation of secondary CHD prevention requirements. Targeted interventions on primary care physicians are critically needed to enhance further provider adherence to consensus guidelines for CHD risk reduction.

  6. Targeting the CaMKII/ERK Interaction in the Heart Prevents Cardiac Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolletta, Ersilia; Rusciano, Maria Rosaria; Maione, Angela Serena; Santulli, Gaetano; Sorriento, Daniela; Del Giudice, Carmine; Ciccarelli, Michele; Franco, Antonietta; Crola, Catherine; Campiglia, Pietro; Sala, Marina; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel; De Luca, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Iaccarino, Guido; Illario, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    Aims Activation of Ca2+/Calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII) is an important step in signaling of cardiac hypertrophy. The molecular mechanisms by which CaMKII integrates with other pathways in the heart are incompletely understood. We hypothesize that CaMKII association with extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), promotes cardiac hypertrophy through ERK nuclear localization. Methods and Results In H9C2 cardiomyoblasts, the selective CaMKII peptide inhibitor AntCaNtide, its penetratin conjugated minimal inhibitory sequence analog tat-CN17β, and the MEK/ERK inhibitor UO126 all reduce phenylephrine (PE)-mediated ERK and CaMKII activation and their interaction. Moreover, AntCaNtide or tat-CN17β pretreatment prevented PE induced CaMKII and ERK nuclear accumulation in H9C2s and reduced the hypertrophy responses. To determine the role of CaMKII in cardiac hypertrophy in vivo, spontaneously hypertensive rats were subjected to intramyocardial injections of AntCaNtide or tat-CN17β. Left ventricular hypertrophy was evaluated weekly for 3 weeks by cardiac ultrasounds. We observed that the treatment with CaMKII inhibitors induced similar but significant reduction of cardiac size, left ventricular mass, and thickness of cardiac wall. The treatment with CaMKII inhibitors caused a significant reduction of CaMKII and ERK phosphorylation levels and their nuclear localization in the heart. Conclusion These results indicate that CaMKII and ERK interact to promote activation in hypertrophy; the inhibition of CaMKII-ERK interaction offers a novel therapeutic approach to limit cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26110816

  7. Targeting the CaMKII/ERK Interaction in the Heart Prevents Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersilia Cipolletta

    Full Text Available Activation of Ca2+/Calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII is an important step in signaling of cardiac hypertrophy. The molecular mechanisms by which CaMKII integrates with other pathways in the heart are incompletely understood. We hypothesize that CaMKII association with extracellular regulated kinase (ERK, promotes cardiac hypertrophy through ERK nuclear localization.In H9C2 cardiomyoblasts, the selective CaMKII peptide inhibitor AntCaNtide, its penetratin conjugated minimal inhibitory sequence analog tat-CN17β, and the MEK/ERK inhibitor UO126 all reduce phenylephrine (PE-mediated ERK and CaMKII activation and their interaction. Moreover, AntCaNtide or tat-CN17β pretreatment prevented PE induced CaMKII and ERK nuclear accumulation in H9C2s and reduced the hypertrophy responses. To determine the role of CaMKII in cardiac hypertrophy in vivo, spontaneously hypertensive rats were subjected to intramyocardial injections of AntCaNtide or tat-CN17β. Left ventricular hypertrophy was evaluated weekly for 3 weeks by cardiac ultrasounds. We observed that the treatment with CaMKII inhibitors induced similar but significant reduction of cardiac size, left ventricular mass, and thickness of cardiac wall. The treatment with CaMKII inhibitors caused a significant reduction of CaMKII and ERK phosphorylation levels and their nuclear localization in the heart.These results indicate that CaMKII and ERK interact to promote activation in hypertrophy; the inhibition of CaMKII-ERK interaction offers a novel therapeutic approach to limit cardiac hypertrophy.

  8. Niacin and heart disease prevention: Engraving its tombstone is a mistake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superko, Harold Robert; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Hodis, Howard N; Guyton, John R

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) has been used for primary and secondary coronary heart disease prevention for over 40 years. Until recently clinical trials incorporating niacin as part of an intervention strategy consistently demonstrated reduction in clinical events and lesion improvement, including ≥6% absolute mortality reduction. Two large clinical event trials in 2011 (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides and Impact on Global Health Outcomes) and 2014 (Heart Protection Study 2-Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events) concluded that niacin added to statin therapy did not provide clinical event benefit over statin alone. This has prompted some individuals to call for an end to the use of niacin in statin-treated patients and the US Food and Drug Administration to halt marketing of statin/niacin combination tablets. There are significant differences between the earlier clinical trials that revealed cardiovascular benefit of niacin and the 2 trials that failed to demonstrate a benefit. These differences include dyslipidemia types, niacin formulation, dosing, and timing. In general, the patient population that benefits the most from incorporating niacin in their treatment regimen can be defined by elevations in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The niacin formulation and dose should be capable of achieving adequate lipoprotein change. Mealtime dosing of niacin, as opposed to bedtime dosing, may avoid a counter-regulatory hormone response, including catecholamines, because of altered fuel supply potentially leading to unexpected cardiovascular outcomes. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Program of rehabilitative exercise and education to avert vascular events after non-disabling stroke or transient ischemic attack (PREVENT Trial: a multi-centred, randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Kara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite lack of outward signs, most individuals after non-disabling stroke (NDS and transient ischemic attack (TIA have significant cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and are at high risk of a major stroke, hospitalization for other vascular events, or death. Most have multiple modifiable risk factors (e.g., hypertension, physical inactivity, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, tobacco consumption, psychological stress. In addition, accelerated rates of depression, cognitive decline, and poor quality of sleep have been reported following TIA, which correlate with poor functional outcomes and reduced quality of life. Thus, NSD and TIA are important warning signs that should not be overlooked. The challenge is not unlike that facing other 'silent' conditions - to identify a model of care that is effective in changing people's current behaviors in order to avert further morbidity. Methods/Design A single blind, randomized controlled trial will be conducted at two sites to compare the effectiveness of a program of rehabilitative exercise and education versus usual care in modifying vascular risk factors in adults after NDS/TIA. 250 adults within 90 days of being diagnosed with NDS/TIA will be randomly allocated to a 12-week program of exercise and education (PREVENT or to an outpatient clinic assessment and discussion of secondary prevention recommendations with return clinic visits as indicated (USUAL CARE. Primary outcome measures will include blood pressure, waist circumference, 12-hour fasting lipid profile, and 12-hour fasting glucose/hemoglobin A1c. Secondary measures will include exercise capacity, walking endurance, physical activity, cognitive function, depression, goal attainment and health-related quality of life. Outcome assessment will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention, and 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Direct health care costs incurred over one year by PREVENT versus USUAL CARE participants will also be

  10. A novel proposed network security management approach for cyber attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Z.; Nazir, B.; Zafar, M.F.; Anwar, M.M.; Azam, K.; Asar, A.U.

    2007-01-01

    Network security is a discipline that focuses on securing networks from unauthorized access. Given the Escalating threats of malicious cyber attacks, modern enterprises employ multiple lines of defense. A comprehensive defense strategy against such attacks should include (I) an attack detection component that deter- mines the fact that a program is compromised, (2) an attack identification and prevention component that identifies attack packets so that one can block such packets in the future and prevents the attack from further propagation. Over the last decade, a significant amount of research has been vested in the systems that can detect cyber attacks either statically at compile time or dynamically at run time, However, not much effort is spent on automated attack packet identification or attack prevention. In this paper we present a unified solution to the problems mentioned above. We implemented this solution after the forward engineering of Open Source Security Information Management (OSSIM) system called Preventive Information Security management (PrISM) system that correlates input from different sensors so that the resulting product can automatically detect any cyber attack against it and prevents by identifying the actual attack packet(s). The PrISM was always able to detect the attacks, identify the attack packets and most often prevent by blocking the attacker's IP address to continue normal execution. There is no additional run-time performance overhead for attack prevention. (author)

  11. Beneficial effects of Resveratrol, present in grapes in the prevention and treatment of heart disease and failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Movahed

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3, 5, 4- trihydroxystilbene is one of the natural polyphenolic bioactive compounds synthesized by plants to serve many functions, especially defense against fungal infections, environmental stresses and UV radiation. It is found mainly in grapes, green tea, peanuts and berries. This compound has recently received increased attention in medical research, due to its effects on prevention and treatment of many diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome. Over the past two decades, researchers from all over the world studied the beneficial effects of resveratrol against cardiovascular diseases and heart failure in different animal models. Importantly, the results of these studies have been promising and recently this knowledge has been translated into examining the efficacy of resveratrol in humans with heart failure. Since heart failure continues to be a significant cause of cardiovascular mortality in the developed and also developing countries, and despite different medicines available for the treatment of such common chronic systemic diseases, preventive measures to be necessary to combat the incidence of heart problems. In this review article the protective effects of resveratrol and its mechanisms of action on different metabolic pathways with respect to heart disease and failure will be discussed.

  12. Prevention preferable to treatment: 3 case reports of patients experiencing right-sided heart failure after Ebstein anomaly correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Lin, Jing; Qin, Zhen; Du, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Ebstein anomaly is a common congenital heart disease that may induce severe tricuspid regurgitation and dilation of the “atrialized” portion of the right ventricle. Patients who undergo surgery to correct Ebstein anomaly are at high risk of postoperative right-sided heart failure, yet little is known about what pre-, peri-, or postoperative procedures may help reduce this risk. Patient concerns: Here, we describe 3 cases of adults with Ebstein anomaly who underwent corrective surgery and in whom right-sided heart failure occurred with severe tricuspid regurgitation detected by transesophageal echocardiography. Diagnoses: Ebstein anomaly. Intervention: Various approaches were applied to prevent right heart failure: perioperative control of atrial and ventricle arrhythmia, protection of myocardium, reduction of right-side cardiac workload after cardiopulmonary bypass, and mechanical support for right heart. Outcomes: One of the 3 patients died, another experienced kidney failure despite postoperative support on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and the third patient survived without complications. Lessons: Our case series suggests that surgical prognosis can be improved through aggressive preoperative treatment, vasoactive and anti-arrhythmia medications, and comprehensive measures designed to reduce myocardial injury, prevent myocardial edema, and reduce pre- and afterload on the right ventricle. PMID:28072699

  13. Life-years gained from coronary heart disease mortality reduction in Scotland: prevention or treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, J A; Capewell, S; Unal, B

    2003-06-01

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) death rates have fallen considerably in many countries. We estimated the life-years-gained (LYG) in Scotland between 1975 and 1994 attributable to cardiology treatments, and population reductions in major CHD risk factors, using a previously validated mortality model. This combines published effectiveness data with information on uptake of CHD treatments; risk factor trends; and median survival by age and sex. Compared with 1975, there were 4,536 fewer CHD deaths in 1994, resulting in approximately 48,016 LYG among those aged 45-84 (maximum estimate 53,317; minimum estimate 36,867). Medical and surgical treatments for CHD patients gained approximately 12,025 life-years; the largest contribution coming from pharmacologic secondary prevention. Population reductions in major risk factors (smoking, cholesterol, and blood pressure) accounted for some 35,991 LYG, reductions in smoking accounted for over 50% of this. Modern cardiologic treatments gained many thousands of life-years in Scotland, but modest reductions in risk factors gained almost three times as many life-years.

  14. Role of the polypill for secondary prevention in ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, José M; Fuster, Valentín; Jennings, Catriona; Prescott, Eva; Bueno, Héctor

    2017-06-01

    In 2011, for the first time in the history of humankind, non-communicable diseases became the leading cause of death worldwide. This change in trend is obviously multifactorial and very complex, as it is the paradoxical result of social, economic and health system growth worldwide. Vaccination and infectious diseases control, changing dietary habits worldwide, sedentary behaviour, globalisation, industrialisation (resulting in a shift from manual to sedentary labour), tobacco and sugary beverage surges in low- and middle-income countries and rapid urbanisation have all played a role in this epidemic transition. At the same time, the increase in cardiovascular risk factors, together with a decline in mortality in high-income countries in the past two decades, has led to a significant upsurge in the prevalence of secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease. With this, the effect that non-adherence to cardioprotective drugs is having has become progressively clear, both in terms of clinical outcomes and as a driver of increased healthcare expenditure. The cardiovascular polypill, which was originally proposed as a strategy to improve accessibility to cardioprotective drugs worldwide, has proven to be a mainstay therapeutic approach for improving medication adherence in cardiovascular disease. In the current paper, we aim to review the need for a polypill strategy in the present scenario of cardiovascular disease, the available data that support such a strategy and the various clinical trials that are in progress that will help further shape future indications for the cardiovascular polypill.

  15. Role of Biomarkers for the Prevention, Assessment, and Management of Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sheryl L; Maisel, Alan S; Anand, Inder; Bozkurt, Biykem; de Boer, Rudolf A; Felker, G Michael; Fonarow, Gregg C; Greenberg, Barry; Januzzi, James L; Kiernan, Michael S; Liu, Peter P; Wang, Thomas J; Yancy, Clyde W; Zile, Michael R

    2017-05-30

    Natriuretic peptides have led the way as a diagnostic and prognostic tool for the diagnosis and management of heart failure (HF). More recent evidence suggests that natriuretic peptides along with the next generation of biomarkers may provide added value to medical management, which could potentially lower risk of mortality and readmissions. The purpose of this scientific statement is to summarize the existing literature and to provide guidance for the utility of currently available biomarkers. The writing group used systematic literature reviews, published translational and clinical studies, clinical practice guidelines, and expert opinion/statements to summarize existing evidence and to identify areas of inadequacy requiring future research. The panel reviewed the most relevant adult medical literature excluding routine laboratory tests using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science through December 2016. The document is organized and classified according to the American Heart Association to provide specific suggestions, considerations, or contemporary clinical practice recommendations. A number of biomarkers associated with HF are well recognized, and measuring their concentrations in circulation can be a convenient and noninvasive approach to provide important information about disease severity and helps in the detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and management of HF. These include natriuretic peptides, soluble suppressor of tumorgenicity 2, highly sensitive troponin, galectin-3, midregional proadrenomedullin, cystatin-C, interleukin-6, procalcitonin, and others. There is a need to further evaluate existing and novel markers for guiding therapy and to summarize their data in a standardized format to improve communication among researchers and practitioners. HF is a complex syndrome involving diverse pathways and pathological processes that can manifest in circulation as biomarkers. A number of such biomarkers are now clinically available, and monitoring their

  16. WITHDRAWN: Smoking cessation for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, Julia A; Capewell, Simon

    2012-02-15

    Although the importance of smoking as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is beyond doubt, the speed and magnitude of risk reduction when a smoker with coronary heart disease quits are still subjects of debate. To estimate the magnitude of risk reduction when a patient with CHD stops smoking. We searched the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) , MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, CINAHL, PsychLit, Dissertation Abstracts, BIDS ISI Index to Scientific and Technical Proceedings, UK National Research Register from the start of each database. Sixty-one large international cohort studies of cardiovascular disease were identified, and contact made with authors to search for any unpublished results. The search was supplemented by cross-checking references and contact with various experts. Date of last search was April 2003. Any prospective cohort studies of patients with a diagnosis of CHD, which include all-cause mortality as an outcome measure. Smoking status must be measured on at least two occasions to ascertain which smokers have quit, and followed-up for at least two years. Eligibility and trial quality were assessed independently by two reviewers. Twenty studies were included. There was a 36% reduction in crude relative risk (RR) of mortality for those who quit smoking compared with those who continued to smoke (RR 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58 to 0.71). There was also a reduction in non-fatal myocardial infarctions (crude RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.82). Many studies did not adequately address quality issues, such as control of confounding, and misclassification of smoking status. However, there was little difference in the results for the six 'higher quality' studies, and little heterogeneity between these studies. This review was not able to assess how quickly the risk of mortality was reduced. Quitting smoking is associated with a substantial reduction in risk of all-cause mortality among patients with CHD. The pooled crude RR was

  17. Is the incidence of heart attack still decreasing in Australia? Developing reliable methods for monitoring trends in myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease (AUS-MOCHA): a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedkoff, Lee; Knuiman, Matthew; Hobbs, Michael S T; Hung, Joseph; Mathur, Sushma; Beilby, John; Reynolds, Anna; Briffa, Tom G; Lopez, Derrick; Sanfilippo, Frank M

    2016-08-24

    Accurate monitoring of acute coronary heart disease (CHD) is essential for understanding the effects of primary and secondary prevention and for planning of healthcare services. The ability to reliably monitor acute CHD has been affected by new diagnostic tests for myocardial infarction (MI) and changing clinical classifications and management of CHD. Our study will develop new and reliable methods for monitoring population trends in incidence, outcomes and health service usage for acute CHD and chest pain. The study cohort of all CHD will be identified from the Western Australian Data Linkage System using state-wide data sets for emergency department presentation, hospitalisations and mortality data for 2002-2014. This core linked data set will be supplemented with data from hospital medical record reviews, pathology data and hospital pharmacy dispensing databases. The consistency over time of the coding of the different subgroups of CHD/chest pain (ST-elevation MI, non-ST elevation MI, unstable angina, stable angina, other CHD, non-CHD chest pain) in linked data will be assessed using these data sources, and an algorithm developed detailing groups in which temporal trends can be reliably measured. This algorithm will be used for measurement of trends in incidence and outcomes of acute CHD, and to develop further methods for monitoring acute CHD using unlinked and linked data with varying availability of hospitalisation history. Ethics approval has been obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committees of the WA Department of Health (#2016/23) and The University of Western Australia (RA/4/1/7230). Findings will be disseminated via publication in peer-reviewed journals, and presentation at national and international conferences. There will also be a strong platform for dissemination of new monitoring methods via collaboration with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare which will assist with promotion of these methods at state and national levels

  18. Running nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease in primary care: qualitative study of health professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D; Thain, Joan

    2005-07-01

    A randomised trial of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease resulted in improved secondary prevention and significantly lowered all-cause mortality at 4-year follow-up. This qualitative trial was conducted to explore the experience of health professionals that had been involved in running the clinics. To identify the barriers and facilitators to establishing secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease within primary care. Semi-structured audiotaped telephone interviews with GPs and nurses involved in running clinics. A stratified, random sample of 19 urban, suburban, and rural general practices in north-east Scotland. Semi-structured telephone interviews with 19 GPs and 17 practice-based nurses involved in running nurse-led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Eight practices had run clinics continuously and 11 had stopped, with eight subsequently restarting. Participants accounted for these patterns by referring to advantages and disadvantages of the clinics in four areas: patient care, development of nursing skills, team working, and infrastructure. Most practitioners perceived benefits for patients from attending secondary prevention clinics, but some, from small rural practices, thought they were unnecessary. The extended role for nurses was welcomed, but was dependent on motivated staff, appropriate training and support. Clinics relied on, and could enhance, team working, however, some doctors were wary of delegating. With regard to infrastructure, staff shortages (especially nurses) and accommodation were as problematic as lack of funds. Nurse-led secondary prevention clinics were viewed positively by most healthcare professionals that had been involved in running them, but barriers to their implementation had led most to stop running them at some point. Lack of space and staff shortages are likely to remain ongoing problems, but improvements in funding training and communication within

  19. Efficacy of atorvastatin therapy in prevention of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rubanenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the efficacy of atorvastatin therapy in prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF development after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD with the assessment of inflammation, sheer stress and myocardial injury indicators. Material and methods. The study included 105 patients with IHD who were divided into two groups: patients of group 1 were treated with atorvastatin (59 patients, 81% males, mean age 62.1±7.5 years; patients of group 2 received no HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (46 patients, 89% males, and mean age 61.7±8.1 years. Results. Postoperative AF occurred more often in patients of group 2 (41.3% vs 16.9%; р=0.047. Laboratory analysis revealed the following: the levels of total leukocytes, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, superoxide dismutase and troponin did not different significantly among the patients of two groups. Interleukin-6 level in preand postoperative period was significantly higher in patients of group 2 (35.4±28.5 pg/ml vs 24.1±14.8 pg/ml, р=0.03; 63.7±54.8 pg/ml vs 50.7±40.8 pg/ml, р=0.04, respectively. Conclusion. Our study has shown that atorvastatin therapy contributed to the reduction of number of new cases of AF after CABG in patients with IHD. At that, the efficacy of atorvastatin therapy correlated with the size of left atrium and the severity of inflammatory response. Patients with atorvastatin therapy had significantly lower interleukin-6 level, as a proinflammatory marker, in preand postoperational period as compared with the patients without such treatment.

  20. Rheumatic and nonrheumatic valvular heart disease: epidemiology, management, and prevention in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essop, Mohammed Rafique; Nkomo, Vuyisile T

    2005-12-06

    Unlike the Western world, valvular disease ranks among the major cardiovascular afflictions in Africa. Acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic valvular disease in their most virulent form are still commonly encountered and impose a huge burden on limited healthcare resources. We performed a systematic review of the literature with PubMed using rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, valvular disease, warfarin anticoagulation, and pregnancy as search items. Literature emanating from Africa was emphasized. Epidemiology, current concepts on pathogenesis, and aspects of the medical and surgical management of this disease as seen from an African perspective are presented. The association of pregnancy with mitral stenosis is common and may be fatal if not managed appropriately. A practical approach to these patients is presented to optimize maternal and fetal outcome. Pregnant patients with mechanical valves require careful attention to ensure maternal survival and prevent fetal warfarin embryopathy. Prolonged subcutaneous heparin and frequent monitoring of the partial thromboplastin time are impractical in this setting, and the merits of different anticoagulation regimens are discussed. Congenital submitral aneurysms are a unique cause of mitral regurgitation, with the vast majority of cases originating from sub-Saharan Africa. Although the precise etiology is as yet unclear, the clinical and echocardiographic features are sufficiently characteristic to allow a preoperative diagnosis to be made. Transesophageal echocardiography allows much better definition of the size and anatomic relationships of the aneurysm. Surgical resection can be difficult but is usually curative. Mitral valve prolapse and endocarditis constitute the remaining frequent causes of valvular disease and are discussed briefly. The spectrum and presentation of valvular disease in Africa are uniquely different from elsewhere. Together with socioeconomic issues and the HIV pandemic, this fact

  1. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Ruediger

    2011-01-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation.

  2. The potential role of honey and its polyphenols in preventing heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many epidemiological studies have shown that regular intake of phenolic compounds is associated with reduced risk of heart diseases. In coronary heart disease, the protective effects of phenolic compounds include mainly antithrombotic, anti-ischemic, anti-oxidant, and vasorelaxant. It is suggested that flavonoids decrease ...

  3. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  4. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger

    2011-08-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Persistent effect at 30-month post intervention of a community-based randomized trial of KM2H2 in reducing stroke and heart attack among senior hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jie; Xu, Yunan; Chen, Xinguang; Yang, Niannian; Li, Fang; Yan, Yaqiong

    2018-01-02

    The effect of the Keep Moving toward Healthy Heart and Healthy Brain (KM2H2) program at 6-month post intervention has been assessed.  The purpose of this study is to evaluate the KM2H 2 program at 30-month post intervention. A total of 450 senior hypertensive patients from 12 community health centers were randomized by center to either receive KM2H 2 plus standard care (6 centers, n = 232) or standard care only (6 centers, n = 218). Data for outcome measures at 30-month post intervention were analyzed. New cases of stroke and heart attack were verified with medical records; levels of physical activity were assessed using self-reported questionnaire. In addition to comparative analysis, adjusted incidence rate and program effects were determined using mixed effects modeling method. At the 30-month follow-up, the adjusted incidence rate [95% CI] of stroke was 11.81% [5.90, 17.72] for patients in the intervention group and 19.78% [14.07, 25.50] (p = 0.03) for the control group. The adjusted incidence rate of heart attack was 3.34% [1.91, 8.58] and 6.68% [1.64, 11.73] for the intervention and control groups (p = 0.16), respectively; the proportion and the duration of engaging in regular physical activity were significantly greater for the intervention group than the control group. The reductions in blood pressure between the intervention and the control was not statistically significant. The KM2H 2 program showed a persistent effect up to 30 months post intervention in enhancing physical activity and reducing the risk of cardio-cerebrovascular events, particularly stroke. These findings demonstrate the persistent effect of the KM2H 2 and suggest the need for a full-scale evaluation of the intervention program for practical use. ISRCTN Register ISRCTN12608966 . Registered 03 March 2015. Retrospectively registered.

  6. Whispering through DDoS attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miralem Mehic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Denial of service (DoS attack is an attempt of the attacker to disable victim's machine by depleting network or computing resources. If this attack is performed with more than one machine, it is called distributed denial of service (DDoS attack. Covert channels are those channels which are used for information transmission even though they are neither designed nor intended to transfer information at all. In this article, we investigated the possibility of using of DDoS attack for purposes of hiding data or concealing the existing covert channel. In addition, in this paper we analyzed the possibility of detection of such covert communication with the well-known statistical method. Also, we proposed the coordination mechanisms of the attack which may be used. A lot of research has been done in order to describe and prevent DDoS attacks, yet research on steganography on this field is still scarce.

  7. Network Protection Against DDoS Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Dzurenda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with possibilities of the network protection against Distributed Denial of Service attacks (DDoS. The basic types of DDoS attacks and their impact on the protected network are presented here. Furthermore, we present basic detection and defense techniques thanks to which it is possible to increase resistance of the protected network or device against DDoS attacks. Moreover, we tested the ability of current commercial Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS, especially Radware DefensePro 6.10.00 product against the most common types of DDoS attacks. We create five scenarios that are varied in type and strength of the DDoS attacks. The attacks intensity was much greater than the normal intensity of the current DDoS attacks.

  8. A Diet Rich in Unsaturated Fatty Acids Prevents Progression Toward Heart Failure in a Rabbit Model of Pressure and Volume Overload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Ruijter, Hester M.; Verkerk, Arie O.; Schumacher, Cees A.; Houten, Sander M.; Belterman, Charly N. W.; Baartscheer, Antonius; Brouwer, Ingeborg A.; van Bilsen, Marc; de Roos, Baukje; Coronel, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Background-During heart failure (HF), cardiac metabolic substrate preference changes from fatty acid (FA) toward glucose oxidation. This change may cause progression toward heart failure. We hypothesize that a diet rich in FAs may prevent this process, and that dietary omega 3-FAs have an added

  9. The interleukin-6 receptor as a target for prevention of coronary heart disease: a mendelian randomisation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Holmes, Michael V; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Engmann, Jorgen E L; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Guo, Yiran; Chung, Christina; Peasey, Anne; Pfister, Roman; Mooijaart, Simon P; Ireland, Helen A; Leusink, Maarten; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Ka Wah; Palmen, Jutta; Howard, Philip; Cooper, Jackie A; Drenos, Fotios; Hardy, John; Nalls, Michael A; Li, Yun Rose; Lowe, Gordon; Stewart, Marlene; Bielinski, Suzette J; Peto, Julian; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gallacher, John; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Tomlinson, Ian; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Luan, Jian'an; Boer, Jolanda M A; Forouhi, Nita G; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Schnabel, Renate B; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Kubinova, Ruzena; Baceviciene, Migle; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pajak, Andrzej; Topor-Madry, Roman; Malyutina, Sofia; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sennblad, Bengt; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandenelli, Stefania; Tanaka, Toshiko; Meschia, James F; Singleton, Andrew; Navis, Gerjan; Mateo Leach, Irene; Bakker, Stephan J L; Gansevoort, Ron T; Ford, Ian; Epstein, Stephen E; Burnett, Mary Susan; Devaney, Joe M; Jukema, J Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Jan de Borst, Gert; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Jong, Pim A; Mailand-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Klungel, Olaf H; de Boer, Anthonius; Doevendans, Pieter A; Stephens, Jeffrey W; Eaton, Charles B; Robinson, Jennifer G; Manson, JoAnn E; Fowkes, F Gerry; Frayling, Timonthy M; Price, Jackie F; Whincup, Peter H; Morris, Richard W; Lawlor, Debbie A; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Redline, Susan; Lange, Leslie A; Kumari, Meena; Wareham, Nick J; Verschuren, W M Monique; Benjamin, Emelia J; Whittaker, John C; Hamsten, Anders; Dudbridge, Frank; Delaney, J A Chris; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Connolly, John J; van der Harst, Pim; Brunner, Eric J; Marmot, Michael G; Wassel, Christina L; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J; Kivimaki, Mika; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Voevoda, Mikhail; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek; Wilson, James G; Hakonarson, Hakon; Reiner, Alex P; Keating, Brendan J; Sattar, Naveed; Hingorani, Aroon D; Casas, Juan Pablo

    2012-03-31

    A high circulating concentration of interleukin 6 is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Blockade of the interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) with a monoclonal antibody (tocilizumab) licensed for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis reduces systemic and articular inflammation. However, whether IL6R blockade also reduces risk of coronary heart disease is unknown. Applying the mendelian randomisation principle, we used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene IL6R to evaluate the likely efficacy and safety of IL6R inhibition for primary prevention of coronary heart disease. We compared genetic findings with the effects of tocilizumab reported in randomised trials in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In 40 studies including up to 133,449 individuals, an IL6R SNP (rs7529229) marking a non-synonymous IL6R variant (rs8192284; p.Asp358Ala) was associated with increased circulating log interleukin-6 concentration (increase per allele 9·45%, 95% CI 8·34-10·57) as well as reduced C-reactive protein (decrease per allele 8·35%, 95% CI 7·31-9·38) and fibrinogen concentrations (decrease per allele 0·85%, 95% CI 0·60-1·10). This pattern of effects was consistent with IL6R blockade from infusions of tocilizumab (4-8 mg/kg every 4 weeks) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis studied in randomised trials. In 25,458 coronary heart disease cases and 100,740 controls, the IL6R rs7529229 SNP was associated with a decreased odds of coronary heart disease events (per allele odds ratio 0·95, 95% CI 0·93-0·97, p=1·53×10(-5)). On the basis of genetic evidence in human beings, IL6R signalling seems to have a causal role in development of coronary heart disease. IL6R blockade could provide a novel therapeutic approach to prevention of coronary heart disease that warrants testing in suitably powered randomised trials. Genetic studies in populations could be used more widely to help to validate and prioritise novel drug targets or to repurpose existing

  10. Astragalus Granule Prevents Ca2+ Current Remodeling in Heart Failure by the Downregulation of CaMKII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinai Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Astragalus was broadly used for treating heart failure (HF and arrhythmias in East Asia for thousands of years. Astragalus granule (AG, extracted from Astragalus, shows beneficial effect on the treatment of HF in clinical research. We hypothesized that administration of AG prevents the remodeling of L-type Ca2+ current (ICa-L in HF mice by the downregulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII. Methods. HF mice were induced by thoracic aortic constriction (TAC. After 4 weeks of AG treatment, cardiac function and QT interval were evaluated. Single cardiac ventricular myocyte was then isolated and whole-cell patch clamp was used to record action potential (AP and ICa-L. The expressions of L-type calcium channel alpha 1C subunit (Cav1.2, CaMKII, and phosphorylated protein kinase A (p-PKA were examined by western blot. Results. The failing heart manifested distinct electrical remodeling including prolonged repolarization time and altered ICa-L kinetics. AG treatment attenuated this electrical remodeling, supported by AG-related shortened repolarization time, decreased peak ICa-L, accelerated ICa-L inactivation, and positive frequency-dependent ICa-L facilitation. In addition, AG treatment suppressed the overexpression of CaMKII, but not p-PKA, in the failing heart. Conclusion. AG treatment protected the failing heart against electrical remodeling and ICa-L remodeling by downregulating CaMKII.

  11. Expanding the value of qualitative theories of illness experience in clinical practice: a grounded theory of secondary heart disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ononeze, V; Murphy, A W; MacFarlane, A; Byrne, M; Bradley, C

    2009-06-01

    Qualitative theories of illness experience are about the individual interpretations of the psychosocial and cultural aspects of living with illness. Thus, they contribute to a better understanding of health and health care provision. In this paper, we examine how a grounded theory (GT) of heart disease experience can inform secondary prevention. In-depth interviews of individual experience of heart disease were conducted with 26 patients, using GT iterative data collection and analysis framework. A GT was compiled from data and examined within a sociocultural framework to ascertain how experience influenced health behaviour. Despite individual contextual variations, the theory of 'keeping it going' describes the study sample's common attitude to living with heart disease. The theory was adequate in explaining secondary cardiac behaviour, because it identified the aspects of patients' beliefs and attitudes which are key to effective secondary prevention. The assessment of the impact of illness experience on health behaviour within a sociocultural framework helped to articulate the strong influence of social and contextual factors. The study offers an appropriate explanatory framework for encouraging health behaviour change. It emphasizes the importance of interventions being relevant to individual perceptions and interpretations. It provides a framework for designing and evaluating cardiac interventions and the theoretical principles which underpin them.

  12. Diverticulitis Diet: Can Certain Foods Trigger an Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there trigger foods I should avoid to prevent diverticulitis attacks? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L. ... Actually, no specific foods are known to trigger diverticulitis attacks. And no special diet has been proved ...

  13. MI: Not a Heart Attack but a Gut Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rosemary K; Cabrera, Ana M

    2018-02-01

    Mesenteric ischemia and infarction are infrequent but often deadly conditions in acute and critically ill patients. Mesenteric ischemia may be a primary admission diagnosis or may develop secondary to another diagnosis. Having a high index of suspicion for patients at risk of mesenteric ischemia and mesenteric infarction can alter a poor outcome. This article reviews the pathophysiology, risk factors, assessment, medical and nursing diagnoses, as well as collaborative management for mesenteric ischemia. Early identification of patients at risk and the appropriate diagnostic testing are stressed. Nurses armed with the knowledge of this condition are better able to provide safe care to their patients. ©2018 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  14. Coronary artery problems and disease in adults with congenital heart disease: how to evaluate, how to prevent, how to treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, S; Stuart, A G

    2014-10-01

    There are a wide variety of coronary artery anomalies and disease in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). In fact, the increasing burden of acquired coronary artery disease (CAD) has to be considered in addition to congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries, isolated or associated to other congenital diseases. This is largely a consequence of the increasing number of patients reaching older age. Due to complex underlying cardiac anatomy, previous surgery and comorbidities, treatment can be challenging. Individualized and multidisciplinary management involving congenital heart cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, coronary interventionists and imaging specialists is essential. This review gives an overview of coronary artery involvement in adults with CHD, summarizes the current literature and focuses on prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The potential role of cardiovascular risk factors for CAD is also discussed.

  15. Internet-based interventions for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Reena; Singh, Sally J; Powell, John; Fulton, Emily A; Igbinedion, Ewemade; Rees, Karen

    2015-12-22

    The Internet could provide a means of delivering secondary prevention programmes to people with coronary heart disease (CHD). To determine the effectiveness of Internet-based interventions targeting lifestyle changes and medicines management for the secondary prevention of CHD. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, in December 2014. We also searched six other databases in October 2014, and three trials registers in January 2015 together with reference checking and handsearching to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating Internet-delivered secondary prevention interventions aimed at people with CHD. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We assessed evidence quality using the GRADE approach and presented this in a 'Summary of findings' table. Eighteen trials met our inclusion criteria. Eleven studies are complete (1392 participants), and seven are ongoing. Of the completed studies, seven interventions are broad, targeting the lifestyle management of CHD, and four focused on physical activity promotion. The comparison group in trials was usual care (n = 6), minimal intervention (n = 3), or traditional cardiac rehabilitation (n = 2).We found no effects of Internet-based interventions for all-cause mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04 to 1.63; participants = 895; studies = 6; low-quality evidence). There was only one case of cardiovascular mortality in a control group (participants = 895; studies = 6). No incidences of non-fatal re-infarction were reported across any of the studies. We found no effects for revascularisation (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.37 to 1.27; participants = 895; studies = 6; low-quality evidence).We found no effects for total cholesterol (mean difference (MD) 0.00, 95% CI -0.27 to 0.28; participants = 439; studies = 4; low

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Heart Age - Is Your Heart Older Than You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age. About 3 in 4 heart attacks and strokes are due to risk factors that increase heart age. Problem US adults have ... and reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. Doctors, nurses, and other ... the effect of risk factors on their heart health. Help patients choose a ...

  17. Prevention of bacterial endocarditis: current practice in The Netherlands. Netherlands Heart Foundation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    A working party of the Netherlands Heart Foundation has formulated guidelines which are simple and uniform in order to encourage maximum compliance. They have been widely publicised among medical and dental practitioners as well as patients. Cardiac conditions requiring or not requiring prophylaxis

  18. DETERMINANTS OF PREVENTIVE BEHAVIOR REGARDING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES AND RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION AND CHRONIC ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Platonov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze potential determinants of preventive behavior (PB in patients with essential hypertension (HT and chronic ischemic heart disease (CIHD, and to establish their significance and hierarchy. Material and methods. Patients with HT (n=285 and CIHD (n=223 were studied. Questioning of all patients was performed to assess the characteristics of their PB. Differentiated multivariate analysis of activity and efficacy of PB determinants was performed in HT and CIHD patients by the method of step-by-step backward logistic regression. Results. Awareness of the cardiovascular diseases (CVD and its prevention (odds ratio [OR] 6.08 as well as high level of general education (OR=2.29 were the most significant determinants of active PB in HT patients. Sufficient social support (OR=3.77, awareness of CVD and its prevention (OR=3.16 were the most significant determinants of active PB in patients with CIHD. Efficacy of PB in patients with HT and CIHD mostly depends on satisfaction of medical service (OR=10.2 and 6.63, respectively, social support (OR=6.25 and 10.5, respectively, adequate awareness of CVD and its prevention (OR, 6.92 and 6.64, respectively. Conclusion. PB activity and efficacy in patients with HT and CIHD depends on many contributing and impeding factors. Disregarding these factors can result in failure in preventive efforts at both individual and population levels.

  19. Dietary recommendations in the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease: do we have the ideal diet yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahoud, Georges; Aude, Y Wady; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2004-11-15

    To respond to the question of the best "heart-healthy" diet, we reviewed the effects of common diets on lipids, their efficacy, advantages, and limitations. The high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet is effective for weight loss over the short term, but its long-term benefits remain unproved. The very low-fat diet decreases levels of total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and, with lifestyle modifications, may slow progression of coronary atherosclerosis. The high-protein and very low-fat diets are difficult to follow over the long term. The American Heart Association diet, which is rich in fruits, vegetables, and nuts, decreases blood pressure and may be acceptable to most patients. However, it is rich in carbohydrates and may not be suitable for patients who are obese and/or have high levels of triglycerides. In such patients, diet based on foods with a low glycemic index may be an alternative. There is also immense interest in the Mediterranean diet, which is acceptable to most patients, may decrease some biomarkers of coronary atherosclerosis, and may decrease cardiovascular events and death. Despite these options, there is no "fits all" dietary recommendation for prevention of coronary heart disease. Importantly, dietary discretion is only 1 part of lifestyle changes, such as exercise and smoking cessation.

  20. Embodied Revelation: A Classic Grounded Theory of Heart Failure Patient Decision Making Surrounding Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Barton-Caro Ph.D.,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this classic grounded theory study was to explain the complex decision making process of heart failure (HF patients considering primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD therapy. Sudden cardiac death (SCD is the leading cause of death for people with HF as well as the primary cause of death in the United States (US. ICDs represent the standard of care as the only effective therapy for primary prevention of SCD. However, a significant proportion of qualifying HF patients declines this invasive, yet life-saving device. The grounded theory is of Embodied revelation. The threat of SCD for ICD candidates consists of four stages: living in conscious denial, heightening of awareness, sanctioning ICD therapy, and living in new assurance. The first stage ends abruptly with the critical juncture of grasping the threat of SCD. This grounded theory has implications for research, nursing and medical practice, as well as bioethical considerations.

  1. Securing internet by eliminating DDOS attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranchana, R.; Gayathri Devi, N.; Santhi, H.; Gayathri, P.

    2017-11-01

    The major threat caused to the authorised usage of Internet is Distributed Denial of Service attack. The mechanisms used to prevent the DDoS attacks are said to overcome the attack’s ability in spoofing the IP packets source addresses. By utilising Internet Protocol spoofing, the attackers cause a consequential load over the networks destination for policing attack packets. To overcome the IP Spoofing level on the Internet, We propose an Inter domain Packet Filter (IPF) architecture. The proposed scheme is not based on global routing information. The packets with reliable source addresses are not rejected, the IPF frame work works in such a manner. The spoofing capability of attackers is confined by IPF, and also the filter identifies the source of an attack packet by minimal number of candidate network.

  2. [Control of major cardiovascular risk factors of ischemic heart disease in secondary prevention in Aragón: COCINA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucalon Arenal, J M; Buisac Ramón, C; Marin Ibáñez, A; Castan Ruiz, S; Blay Cortes, M G; Barrasa Villar, J I

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease remains a leading cause of death in Spain. According to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) and European national societies, secondary prevention for these patients consists of control of major cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and suitable lifestyle habits. To determine the degree of control of CVRF in the Aragonese population in secondary prevention. Cross-sectional study of a sample of 705 patients of Aragon who had suffered a cardiac event, selected opportunistically in consultations of family physicians participating in the 3 provinces of Aragon. The study was conducted in the second half of 2012. To measure the degree of control of different FRVC and lifestyle habits in this population. Anthropometric, different cardiovascular risk factors, treatment and lifestyle. 58% of men and 52% of women met criteria for monitoring of measured variables. The best result was obtained with smoking cessation and the worst with BMI. Hypertension, Dyslipidemia and Diabetes Mellitus achieve poor control results. The results show that the degree of control of CVRF is still low, especially in variables such as dyslipidemia and Diabetes Mellitus. Only 16.5% of control patients met criteria given the pharmacologically-modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. An Overview Of Risk Factors For Coronary Heart Disease And Prevention Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Siddiqui

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, coronary heart disease (CHD accounts for 40-50% of all deaths, while 1 5-35% of all cardiac admissions in hospitals in our country are due to coronary heart disease1. The prevalence of CHD in our country varies from 1.7% to 6.5%2 and is rising, affecting young and middle aged persons in prime of their life and career 3a and it is said that CHD will replace infectious diseases as the major killer in India by year 2015 A.D.3b. Indian immigrants settled abroad have higher incidence and higher mortality as compared to native population. 4jb. The famous cardiologist Paul Dudley White has said "Heart disease before the age 80 is not God's will but due to our own faults" and it is the same message as given by Charaka about 30 centuries back, in 1000 B.C., who emphasized the role of overeating, heavy and fatty meals , worries and sedentary habits in causation of heart disease5. The human and economic costs of such a situation are very heavy.Atherosclerosis, the term introduced by Marchand in 1904, is the lipid rich lesion in the innermost layer of the arteries which is responsible for the majority of cases of myocardial and cerebral infarction. The endothelial lining of the artery is in direct and continuous contact with blood and interaction of blood cells & other constituents with the endothelium gives rise to atherosclerosis. This lesion presents as either fatty streak which is made up of foam cells, lipids & T lymphocytes and occurs early, commonly in children or fibrous plaque consisting of dense connective tissue, lipid droplets, smooth muscle cells, macrophages & T lymphocytes. Platelets adhere and aggregate to ulcerated or fissured plaques.

  4. Breast radiotherapy in the lateral decubitus position: A technique to prevent lung and heart irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campana, Francois; Kirova, Youlia M.; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude; Dendale, Remi; Vilcoq, Jacques R.; Dreyfus, Helene; Fourquet, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To present an original technique for breast radiotherapy, with the aim of limiting lung and heart irradiation, satisfying quality assurance criteria. Methods and Material: An original radiotherapy technique for breast irradiation has been developed at the Institute Curie in January 1996. It consists of isocentric breast irradiation in the lateral decubitus position (isocentric lateral decubitus [ILD]). This technique is indicated for voluminous or pendulous breasts needing breast irradiation only. Thin carbon fiber supports and special patient positioning devices have been developed especially for this technique. In vivo measurements were performed to check the dose distribution before the routine use of the technique. Results: ILD has been successfully implemented in routine practice, and 500 patients have been already treated. Breast radiotherapy is performed using a dose of 50 Gy at ICRU point in 25 fractions. ILD shows good homogeneity of the dose in breast treatment volume, treatment fields are perpendicular to the skin ensuring its protection, and extremely low dose is delivered to the underlying lung and heart. Conclusion: In cases of voluminous breasts or patients with a history of lung and heart disease, our technique provides several advantages over the conventional technique with opposing tangential fields. This technique improves the dose homogeneity according to the ICRU recommendations

  5. Social engineering attack framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available link. A social engineering attack targets this weakness by; using various manipulation techniques in order to elicit sensitive; information. The field of social engineering is still in its infancy; stages with regards to formal definitions and attack...

  6. Terrorists and Suicide Attacks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cronin, Audrey K

    2003-01-01

    Suicide attacks by terrorist organizations have become more prevalent globally, and assessing the threat of suicide attacks against the United States and its interests at home and abroad has therefore...

  7. Solidarity under Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meret, Susi; Goffredo, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    https://www.opendemocracy.net/can-europe-make-it/susi-meret-sergio-goffredo/solidarity-under-attack......https://www.opendemocracy.net/can-europe-make-it/susi-meret-sergio-goffredo/solidarity-under-attack...

  8. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery for a short time. The only difference between a stroke ...

  9. Iron-regulatory proteins secure iron availability in cardiomyocytes to prevent heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Saba; Wang, Yong; Galy, Bruno; Korf-Klingebiel, Mortimer; Hirsch, Valentin; Baru, Abdul M; Rostami, Fatemeh; Reboll, Marc R; Heineke, Jörg; Flögel, Ulrich; Groos, Stephanie; Renner, André; Toischer, Karl; Zimmermann, Fabian; Engeli, Stefan; Jordan, Jens; Bauersachs, Johann; Hentze, Matthias W; Wollert, Kai C; Kempf, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure (HF) but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Intracellular iron availability is secured by two mRNA-binding iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs), IRP1 and IRP2. We generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-targeted deletion of Irp1 and Irp2 to explore the functional implications of ID in the heart independent of systemic ID and anaemia. Iron content in cardiomyocytes was reduced in Irp-targeted mice. The animals were not anaemic and did not show a phenotype under baseline conditions. Irp-targeted mice, however, were unable to increase left ventricular (LV) systolic function in response to an acute dobutamine challenge. After myocardial infarction, Irp-targeted mice developed more severe LV dysfunction with increased HF mortality. Mechanistically, the activity of the iron-sulphur cluster-containing complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was reduced in left ventricles from Irp-targeted mice. As demonstrated by extracellular flux analysis in vitro, mitochondrial respiration was preserved at baseline but failed to increase in response to dobutamine in Irp-targeted cardiomyocytes. As shown by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo, LV phosphocreatine/ATP ratio declined during dobutamine stress in Irp-targeted mice but remained stable in control mice. Intravenous injection of ferric carboxymaltose replenished cardiac iron stores, restored mitochondrial respiratory capacity and inotropic reserve, and attenuated adverse remodelling after myocardial infarction in Irp-targeted mice but not in control mice. As shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, IRP activity was significantly reduced in LV tissue samples from patients with advanced HF and reduced LV tissue iron content. ID in cardiomyocytes impairs mitochondrial respiration and adaptation to acute and chronic increases in workload. Iron supplementation restores cardiac energy reserve and function in iron

  10. Cardiac outcome prevention effectiveness of glucocorticoids in acute decompensated heart failure: COPE-ADHF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Kunshen

    2014-04-01

    Newly emerging evidence showed that glucocorticoids could potentiate natriuretic peptides' action by increasing the density of natriuretic peptide receptor A, leading to a potent diuresis and a renal function improvement in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Therefore, glucocorticoid therapy may be used in patients with ADHF. One hundred two patients with ADHF were randomized to receive glucocorticoids or standard treatment. Change from baseline in serum creatinine (SCr) at day 7 and cardiovascular death within 30 days were recorded. The study was terminated early because of slow site initiation and patient enrolment. Glucocorticoid therapy seemed to be well tolerated. There was a remarkable SCr reduction after 7 days treatment. The change from baseline in SCr is -0.14 mg/dL in glucocorticoid group versus -0.02 mg/dL in standard treatment group (P glucocorticoid group with odds ratio of 0.26 (3 deaths in glucocorticoid vs. 10 deaths in standard treatment group, P glucocorticoid therapy persisted during the follow-up. Patient-assessed dyspnea and physician-assessed global clinical status were also improved in glucocorticoid group. Limited data indicate that glucocorticoid therapy may be used safely in patients with ADHF in short term. Glucocorticoid therapy did not cause heart failure deterioration. Further investigations are warranted.

  11. An Adaptive Approach for Defending against DDoS Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhai Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In various network attacks, the Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS attack is a severe threat. In order to deal with this kind of attack in time, it is necessary to establish a special type of defense system to change strategy dynamically against attacks. In this paper, we introduce an adaptive approach, which is used for defending against DDoS attacks, based on normal traffic analysis. The approach can check DDoS attacks and adaptively adjust its configurations according to the network condition and attack severity. In order to insure the common users to visit the victim server that is being attacked, we provide a nonlinear traffic control formula for the system. Our simulation test indicates that the nonlinear control approach can prevent the malicious attack packets effectively while making legitimate traffic flows arrive at the victim.

  12. Empagliflozin Prevents Worsening of Cardiac Function in an Experimental Model of Pressure Overload-Induced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikole J. Byrne, BSc

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine whether the sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin improved heart failure (HF outcomes in nondiabetic mice. The EMPA-REG OUTCOME (Empagliflozin, Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients trial demonstrated that empagliflozin markedly prevented HF and cardiovascular death in subjects with diabetes. However, despite ongoing clinical trials in HF patients without type 2 diabetes, there are no objective and translational data to support an effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on cardiac structure and function, particularly in the absence of diabetes and in the setting of established HF. Male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to either sham or transverse aortic constriction surgery to induce HF. Following surgery, mice that progressed to HF received either vehicle or empagliflozin for 2 weeks. Cardiac function was then assessed in vivo using echocardiography and ex vivo using isolated working hearts. Although vehicle-treated HF mice experienced a progressive worsening of cardiac function over the 2-week treatment period, this decline was blunted in empagliflozin-treated HF mice. Treatment allocation to empagliflozin resulted in an improvement in cardiac systolic function, with no significant changes in cardiac remodeling or diastolic dysfunction. Moreover, isolated hearts from HF mice treated with empagliflozin displayed significantly improved ex vivo cardiac function compared to those in vehicle-treated controls. Empagliflozin treatment of nondiabetic mice with established HF blunts the decline in cardiac function both in vivo and ex vivo, independent of diabetes. These data provide important basic and translational clues to support the evaluation of SGLT2 inhibitors as a treatment strategy in a broad range of patients with established HF.

  13. An ecological model using promotores de salud to prevent cardiovascular disease on the US-Mexico border: the HEART project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcázar, Hector; Wise, Sherrie; Rosenthal, E Lee; Ochoa, Cecilia; Rodriguez, Jose; Hastings, Diana; Flores, Leticia; Hernandez, Lorraine; Duarte-Gardea, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To address cardiovascular disease risk factors among Hispanics, a community model of prevention requires a comprehensive approach to community engagement. The objectives of our intervention were to reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors in Hispanics living in 2 low-income areas of El Paso, Texas, and to engage the community in a physical activity and nutrition intervention. Drawing on lessons learned in phase 1 (years 2005-2008) of the HEART Project, we used an iterative, community-based process to develop an intervention based on an ecological framework. New community partners were introduced and community health workers delivered several elements of the intervention, including the curriculum entitled "Mi Corazón, Mi Comunidad" ("MiCMiC" [My Heart, My Community]). We received feedback from the project's Community Health Academy and Leadership Council throughout the development process and established a policy agenda that promotes integration of community health workers into the local and state workforce. Collaboration with 2 new community partners, the YWCA and the Department of Parks and Recreation, were instrumental in the process of community-based participatory research. We enrolled 113 participants in the first cohort; 78% were female, and the mean age was 41 years. More than 50% reported having no health insurance coverage. Seventy-two (60%) participants attended 1 or more promotora-led Su Corazón, Su Vida sessions, and 74 (62%) participants attended 1 or more of the 15 exercise classes. HEART phase 2 includes a multilevel ecological model to address cardiovascular disease risk among Hispanics. Future similarly targeted initiatives can benefit from an ecological approach that also embraces the promotora model.

  14. Composite Dos Attack Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ramanauskaitė

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Preparation for potential threats is one of the most important phases ensuring system security. It allows evaluating possible losses, changes in the attack process, the effectiveness of used countermeasures, optimal system settings, etc. In cyber-attack cases, executing real experiments can be difficult for many reasons. However, mathematical or programming models can be used instead of conducting experiments in a real environment. This work proposes a composite denial of service attack model that combines bandwidth exhaustion, filtering and memory depletion models for a more real representation of similar cyber-attacks. On the basis of the introduced model, different experiments were done. They showed the main dependencies of the influence of attacker and victim’s properties on the success probability of denial of service attack. In the future, this model can be used for the denial of service attack or countermeasure optimization.

  15. [Prevention and treatment with cefoperazone of postoperative suppurative complications in heart surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchenko, V I

    1992-08-01

    Clinical trials of cefoperazone (cefobid, Pfizer, USA) were carried out in 49 patients with cardiovascular diseases who had undergone surgical operations. The pathogens of infectious complications were investigated bacteriologically. Good results of the treatment were observed in 43 patients. Allergic reaction developed in 1 patient. Cefoperazone was shown advantageous in treatment of pulmonary complications in the operated patients. It was found possible to use cefoperazone in combination with aminoglycosides. Cefoperazone was found to be one of the drugs of choice in the treatment of aerobic and anaerobic bacteriemia, as well as sepsis after surgical operations on the heart and great vessels. The results on the use of cefoperazone for short-term "perioperative" prophylaxis in cardiosurgery (in accordance with the WHO instructions) are also presented.

  16. Feasibility of recruiting families into a heart disease prevention program based on dietary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offspring of parents with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) inherit a similar genetic profile and share diet and lifestyle behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting families at risk of CVD to a dietary prevention program, determine the changes in diet achieved, an...

  17. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy prevents progression of renal failure in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevanantham, Vinodh; Turagam, Mohit; Shanberg, David; Reddy, Madhu; Atoui, Moustapha; Daubert, James P; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    The goal of this study is to assess the effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) over time on renal function and its impact on mortality. The effect of CRT on renal function in patients with heart failure is not well understood. All patients who underwent CRT implantation at University of Kansas between year 2000 and 2009 were reviewed and patients who had pre and post CRT renal function studied were included in our study. Stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) were defined based on Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) guidelines. The effect of CRT on renal and cardiac function were studied at short term (≤6 months post implantation) and long term (>6 months). A total of 588 patients with mean age of 67 ± 12 yrs were included in the study. CRT responders (defined by increase in LVEF ≥ 5%) were 54% during short term follow-up and 65% on long term follow-up. When compared to baseline, there was no significant deterioration in mean Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) during follow up. When analyzed based on the stages of CKD, there was significant improvement of renal function in patients with advanced kidney disease. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that stable GFR or an improvement in GFR independently predicted mortality after adjusting for co-morbidities. CRT was associated with stabilization of renal function in patients with severe LV dysfunction and improvement in stage 4 and 5 CKD. Improved renal function was associated with a lower mortality. Copyright © 2016 Indian Heart Rhythm Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased heart rate caused by atrial pacing with the closed-loop stimulation function prevented micturition syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Haraki, MD,PhD

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old man had been experiencing syncope several times a year. We implanted a DDD pacemaker with closed-loop stimulation (CLS function. When he urinated early in the morning, his increased atrial pacing rates elevated his heart rate (HR during and after micturition. After implantation of the DDD-CLS mode, he did not experience symptoms. In contrast, in the DDD-R mode, his intrinsic HR changed to atrial pacing after micturition but decreased to the basal rate within 2 min, and he experienced a sense of cold perspiration and presyncope. Increased HRs caused by atrial pacing with the CLS function were useful in the prevention of micturition syncope.

  19. Are the effects of drugs to prevent and to treat heart failure always concordant? The statin paradox and its implications for understanding the actions of antidiabetic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Milton

    2018-03-22

    Most treatments for chronic heart failure are effective both in preventing its onset and reducing its progression. However, statins prevent the development of heart failure, but they do not decrease morbidity and mortality in those with established heart failure. This apparent discordance cannot be explained by an effect to prevent interval myocardial infarctions. Instead, it seems that the disease that statins were preventing in trials of patients with a metabolic disorder was different from the disease that they were treating in trials of chronic heart failure. The most common phenotype of heart failure in patients with obesity and diabetes is heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). In this disorder, the anti-inflammatory effects of statins might ameliorate myocardial fibrosis and cardiac filling abnormalities, but these actions may have little relevance to patients with heart failure and a reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), whose primary derangement is cardiomyocyte loss and stretch. These distinctions may explain why statins were ineffective in trials that focused on HFrEF, but have been reported to produce with favourable effects in observational studies of HFpEF. Similarly, selective cytokine antagonists were ineffective in HFrEF, but have been associated with benefits in HFpEF. These observations may have important implications for our understanding of the effects of antihyperglycaemic medications. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have had neutral effects on heart failure events in people at risk for HFpEF, but have exerted deleterious actions in HFrEF. Similarly, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, which exert anti-inflammatory effects and reduce heart failure events in patients who are prone to HFpEF, may not be effective in HFrEF. The distinctions between HFrEF and HFpEF may explain why the effects of drugs on heart failure events in diabetes trials may not be relevant to their use in patients with systolic dysfunction

  20. Rotational Rebound Attacks on Reduced Skein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khovratovich, Dmitry; Nikolić, Ivica; Rechberger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we combine two powerful methods of symmetric cryptanalysis: rotational cryptanalysis and the rebound attack. Rotational cryptanalysis was designed for the analysis of bit-oriented designs like ARX (Addition-Rotation-XOR) schemes. It has been applied to several hash functions and block...... ciphers, including the new standard SHA-3 (Keccak). The rebound attack is a start-from-the-middle approach for finding differential paths and conforming pairs in byte-oriented designs like Substitution-Permutation networks and AES. We apply our new compositional attack to the reduced version of the hash...... function Skein, a finalist of the SHA-3 competition. Our attack penetrates more than two thirds of the Skein core—the cipher Threefish, and made the designers to change the submission in order to prevent it. The rebound part of our attack has been significantly enhanced to deliver results on the largest...

  1. B vitamins and magnetic resonance imaging-detected ischemic brain lesions in patients with recent transient ischemic attack or stroke: the VITAmins TO Prevent Stroke (VITATOPS) MRI-substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, Margherita; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chen, Christopher; Mok, Vincent; de Freitas, Gabriel R; Song, Swithin; Yi, Qilong; Ropele, Stefan; Grazer, Anja; Homayoon, Nina; Enzinger, Christian; Loh, Katherine; Wong, Ka Sing Lawrence; Wong, Adrian; Xiong, Yunyun; Chang, Hui Meng; Wong, Meng Cheong; Fazekas, Franz; Eikelboom, John W; Hankey, Graeme J

    2012-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of homocysteine are associated with cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD). B-vitamin supplementation with folate and vitamins B12 and B6 reduces homocysteine concentrations. In a substudy of the VITAmins TO Prevent Stroke (VITATOPS) trial, we assessed the hypothesis that the addition of once-daily supplements of B vitamins would reduce the progression of CSVD-related brain lesions. A total of 359 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, who were randomly allocated to double-blind treatment with placebo or b vitamins, underwent brain MRI at randomization and after 2 years of B-vitamin supplementation. MR images were analyzed blinded to treatment allocation. Outcomes related to the prespecified hypothesis were progression of white matter hyperintensities and incident lacunes. We also explored the effect of B-vitamin supplementation on the incidence of other ischemic abnormalities. After 2 years of treatment with b vitamins or placebo, there was no significant difference in white matter hyperintensities volume change (0.08 vs 0.13 cm3; P=0.419) and incidence of lacunes (8.0% vs 5.9%, P=0.434; odds ratio=1.38). In a subanalysis of patients with MRI evidence of severe CSVD at baseline, b-vitamin supplementation was associated with a significant reduction in white matter hyperintensities volume change (0.3 vs 1.7 cm3; P=0.039). Daily B-vitamin supplementation for 2 years did not significantly reduce the progression of brain lesions resulting from presumed CSVD in all patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack but may do so in the subgroup of patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack and severe CSVD. http://vitatops.highway1.com.au/. Unique identifier: NCT00097669 and ISRCTN74743444.

  2. Lifestyle changes and prevention of metabolic syndrome in the Heart of New Ulm Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Boucher, Jackie L; Sidebottom, Abbey C; Sillah, Arthur; Knickelbine, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Prior research has shown that unhealthy lifestyles increase the risk for developing a number of chronic diseases, but there are few studies examining how lifestyle changes impact metabolic syndrome. This study analyzed the association between two-year changes in key lifestyle risk metrics and incident metabolic syndrome in adults. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using data from metabolic syndrome free adults in the Heart of New Ulm Project (New Ulm, MN). The outcome was incident metabolic syndrome observed two years after baseline in 2009. The primary predictor was change in optimal lifestyle score based on four behavioral risk factors, including smoking, alcohol use, fruit/vegetable consumption, and physical activity. In the analytical sample of 1059 adults, 12% developed metabolic syndrome by 2011. Multivariable regression models (adjusted for baseline lifestyle score, age, sex, education, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes) revealed that a two-year decrease in optimal lifestyle score was associated with significantly greater odds of incident metabolic syndrome (OR = 2.92; 95% CI: 1.69, 5.04; p metabolic syndrome over the two-year study timeframe.

  3. Improved Geometry of Decellularized Tissue Engineered Heart Valves to Prevent Leaflet Retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Bart; Loerakker, Sandra; Fioretta, Emanuela S; Bax, Dave J P; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies on decellularized tissue engineered heart valves (DTEHVs) showed rapid host cell repopulation and increased valvular insufficiency developing over time, associated with leaflet shortening. A possible explanation for this result was found using computational simulations, which revealed radial leaflet compression in the original valvular geometry when subjected to physiological pressure conditions. Therefore, an improved geometry was suggested to enable radial leaflet extension to counteract for host cell mediated retraction. In this study, we propose a solution to impose this new geometry by using a constraining bioreactor insert during culture. Human cell based DTEHVs (n = 5) were produced as such, resulting in an enlarged coaptation area and profound belly curvature. Extracellular matrix was homogeneously distributed, with circumferential collagen alignment in the coaptation region and global tissue anisotropy. Based on in vitro functionality experiments, these DTEHVs showed competent hydrodynamic functionality under physiological pulmonary conditions and were fatigue resistant, with stable functionality up to 16 weeks in vivo simulation. Based on implemented mechanical data, our computational models revealed a considerable decrease in radial tissue compression with the obtained geometrical adjustments. Therefore, these improved DTEHV are expected to be less prone to host cell mediated leaflet retraction and will remain competent after implantation.

  4. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (Fish Oil) Supplementation and the Prevention of Clinical Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siscovick, David S; Barringer, Thomas A; Fretts, Amanda M; Wu, Jason H Y; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Costello, Rebecca B; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Jacobson, Terry A; Engler, Mary B; Alger, Heather M; Appel, Lawrence J; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2017-04-11

    Multiple randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have assessed the effects of supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, commonly called fish oils) on the occurrence of clinical cardiovascular diseases. Although the effects of supplementation for the primary prevention of clinical cardiovascular events in the general population have not been examined, RCTs have assessed the role of supplementation in secondary prevention among patients with diabetes mellitus and prediabetes, patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and those with prevalent coronary heart disease. In this scientific advisory, we take a clinical approach and focus on common indications for omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplements related to the prevention of clinical cardiovascular events. We limited the scope of our review to large RCTs of supplementation with major clinical cardiovascular disease end points; meta-analyses were considered secondarily. We discuss the features of available RCTs and provide the rationale for our recommendations. We then use existing American Heart Association criteria to assess the strength of the recommendation and the level of evidence. On the basis of our review of the cumulative evidence from RCTs designed to assess the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on clinical cardiovascular events, we update prior recommendations for patients with prevalent coronary heart disease, and we offer recommendations, when data are available, for patients with other clinical indications, including patients with diabetes mellitus and prediabetes and those with high risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. A refrigeration temperature of 4 degrees C does not prevent static growth of Yersinia pestis in heart infusion broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosian, Stephen D; Regan, Patrick M; Doran, Tara; Taylor, Michael A; Margolin, Aaron

    2009-09-01

    Multiple barriers such as inspections, testing, and proper storage conditions are used to minimize the risk of contaminated food. Knowledge of which barriers, such as refrigeration, are effective in preventing pathogen growth and persistence, can help direct the focus of efforts during food sampling. In this study, the doubling times were evaluated for 10 strains of Yersinia pestis of different genetic background cultured in heart infusion broth (HIB) kept at 4 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C under static conditions. Nine out of the 10 strains were able to grow at 4 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C. Apparent doubling times for 7 of the strains ranged from 41 to 50 h. Strain Harbin and strain D1 had apparent doubling times of 65 and 35 h, respectively, and strain O19 Ca-6 did not grow at all. Analysis of variance showed that the averaged growth data (colony forming units per mL) between strains that grew were not significantly different. The data presented here demonstrate that refrigeration alone is not an effective barrier to prevent static growth of Y. pestis in HIB. These findings provide the preliminary impetus to investigate Y. pestis growth in a variety of food matrices that may provide a similar environment as HIB.

  6. Muertes por enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares prevenibles - (Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de septiembre del 2013 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Más de 800,000 personas en los Estados Unidos mueren cada año a causa de enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares. Aprenda cómo controlar todos los principales factores de riesgo.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  7. Evaluating the Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Statin Use Guidelines for Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, David J; Coxson, Pamela G; Penko, Joanne; Pletcher, Mark J; Goldman, Lee; Odden, Michelle C; Kazi, Dhruv S; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2017-09-19

    Statins are effective in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline expands recommended statin use, but its cost-effectiveness has not been compared with other guidelines. We used the Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the ACC/AHA guideline relative to current use, Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, and universal statin use in all men 45 to 74 years of age and women 55 to 74 years of age over a 10-year horizon from 2016 to 2025. Sensitivity analyses varied costs, risks, and benefits. Main outcomes were incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and numbers needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Each approach produces substantial benefits and net cost savings relative to the status quo. Full adherence to the Adult Treatment Panel III guideline would result in 8.8 million more statin users than the status quo, at a number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 35. The ACC/AHA guideline would potentially result in up to 12.3 million more statin users than the Adult Treatment Panel III guideline, with a marginal number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 68. Moderate-intensity statin use in all men 45 to 74 years of age and women 55 to 74 years of age would result in 28.9 million more statin users than the ACC/AHA guideline, with a marginal number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 108. In all cases, benefits would be greater in men than women. Results vary moderately with different risk thresholds for instituting statins and statin toxicity estimates but depend greatly on the disutility caused by daily medication use (pill burden). At a population level, the ACC/AHA guideline for expanded statin use for primary prevention is projected to treat more people, to save more lives, and to cost less

  8. Kleptographic Attacks on ECDSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Anatolievna Chepick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents secretly trapdoor with universal protection (SETUP attacks on the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm ECDSA. It allows a malicious manufacturer of black-box cryptosystems to implement these attacks to get access to user’s private key. The attacker can obtain user’s private key. The way ECDSA can be used for encryption and key exchange is also described.

  9. Seven deadliest USB attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting USB technology? Then you need Seven Deadliest USB Attacks. This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to USB, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable. Attacks detailed in this book include: USB Hacksaw USB Switchblade USB Based Virus/Malicous Code Launch USB Device Overflow RAMdum

  10. A randomized trial of an intervention to improve use and adherence to effective coronary heart disease prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheridan Stacey L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficacious strategies for the primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD are underused, and, when used, have low adherence. Existing efforts to improve use and adherence to these efficacious strategies have been so intensive that they are impractical for clinical practice. Methods We conducted a randomized trial of a CHD prevention intervention (including a computerized decision aid and automated tailored adherence messages at one university general internal medicine practice. After obtaining informed consent and collecting baseline data, we randomized patients (men and women age 40-79 with no prior history of cardiovascular disease to either the intervention or usual care. We then saw them for two additional study visits over 3 months. For intervention participants, we administered the decision aid at the primary study visit (1 week after baseline visit and then mailed 3 tailored adherence reminders at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. We assessed our outcomes (including the predicted likelihood of angina, myocardial infarction, and CHD death over 10 years (CHD risk and self-reported adherence between groups at 3 month follow-up. Data collection occurred from June 2007 through December 2009. All study procedures were IRB approved. Results We randomized 160 eligible patients (81 intervention; 79 control and followed 96% to study conclusion. Mean predicted CHD risk at baseline was 11.3%. The intervention increased self-reported adherence to chosen risk reducing strategies by 25 percentage points (95% CI 8% to 42%, with the biggest effect for aspirin. It also changed predicted CHD risk by -1.1% (95% CI -0.16% to -2%, with a larger effect in a pre-specified subgroup of high risk patients. Conclusion A computerized intervention that involves patients in CHD decision making and supports adherence to effective prevention strategies can improve adherence and reduce predicted CHD risk. Clinical trials registration number Clinical

  11. The combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole is more effective in secondary prevention following transient ischaemic attack or cerebral infarction: The debate is closed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijckx, G.J.; De Keyser, J.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    The European/Australasian stroke prevention in reversible ischaemia trial (ESPRIT) confirms that long-term administration of the combination acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole is more effective than acetylsalicylic acid in reducing the risk of vascular events after cerebral ischaemia of arterial

  12. Haemochromatosis gene mutations and risk of coronary heart disease: a west of Scotland coronary prevention study (WOSCOPS) substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, I R; Maxwell, F K; Gaffney, D; McMahon, A D; Packard, C J

    2004-03-01

    To measure the frequency of genotypes of the HFE (haemochromatosis) gene in patients recruited to the west of Scotland coronary prevention study (WOSCOPS), and relate them to the subsequent occurrence of coronary clinical events. Nested case-control study, drawing samples of DNA from the biological bank of a cohort study. Men aged 45-64 years in 1989, with moderate hypercholesterolaemia and no evidence of coronary heart disease at baseline. Follow up for a mean period of 4.9 years. Typing for C282Y and H63D mutations of the HFE gene in 482 subjects with a subsequent coronary event and 1104 without an event. The C282Y mutation was present in 81 of 482 cases (16.8%) and 182 of 1104 controls (16.5%). Comparing the prevalence of gene mutations in the cases and controls, there were no significant differences. The hazard ratio for C282Y heterozygotes was 1.03 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.77 to 1.36) and for C282Y/H63D compound heterozygotes 1.04 (95% CI 0.50 to 2.14). Prespecified subgroup analyses of the pravastatin, placebo, smoking, and non-smoking groups showed no significant differences between cases and controls. Repeating the analyses after adjusting for possible confounding factors produced no change in the results. In a population of moderately hypercholesterolaemic middle aged Scottish men who did not have any evidence of coronary heart disease at baseline, the presence of a C282Y mutation in the HFE gene did not predict the occurrence of coronary events over a mean follow up of 4.9 years.

  13. Maternal Occupational Pesticide Exposure and Risk of Congenital Heart Defects in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Carissa M.; Bertke, Stephen J.; Lawson, Christina C.; Romitti, Paul A.; Sanderson, Wayne T.; Malik, Sadia; Lupo, Philip J.; Desrosiers, Tania A.; Bell, Erin; Druschel, Charlotte; Correa, Adolfo; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are common birth defects, affecting approximately 1% of live births. Pesticide exposure has been suggested as an etiologic factor for CHDs, but previous results were inconsistent. METHODS We examined maternal occupational exposure to fungicides, insecticides, and herbicides for 3328 infants with CHDs and 2988 unaffected control infants of employed mothers using data for 1997 through 2002 births from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a population-based multisite case-control study. Potential pesticide exposure from 1 month before conception through the first trimester of pregnancy was assigned by an expert-guided task-exposure matrix and job history details self-reported by mothers. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS Maternal occupational exposure to pesticides was not associated with CHDs overall. In examining specific CHD subtypes compared with controls, some novel associations were observed with higher estimated pesticide exposure: insecticides only and secundum atrial septal defect (OR =1.8; 95% CI, 1.3–2.7, 40 exposed cases); both insecticides and herbicides and hypoplastic left heart syndrome (OR =5.1; 95% CI, 1.7–15.3, 4 exposed cases), as well as pulmonary valve stenosis (OR =3.6; 95% CI, 1.3–10.1, 5 exposed cases); and insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) (OR =2.2; 95% CI, 1.2–4.0, 13 exposed cases). CONCLUSION Broad pesticide exposure categories were not associated with CHDs overall, but examining specific CHD subtypes revealed some increased odds ratios. These results highlight the importance of examining specific CHDs separately. Because of multiple comparisons, additional work is needed to verify these associations. PMID:26033688

  14. Exercise training prevents the deterioration in the arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groehs, Raphaela V; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M; Trevizan, Patrícia F; Rondon, Maria Urbana P B; Oliveira, Patrícia; Alves, Maria J N N; Almeida, Dirceu R; Middlekauff, Holly R; Negrão, Carlos E

    2015-05-01

    Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (ABRMSNA) is impaired in chronic systolic heart failure (CHF). The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training would improve the gain and reduce the time delay of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. Twenty-six CHF patients, New York Heart Association Functional Class II-III, EF ≤ 40%, peak V̇o2 ≤ 20 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) were divided into two groups: untrained (UT, n = 13, 57 ± 3 years) and exercise trained (ET, n = 13, 49 ± 3 years). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was directly recorded by microneurography technique. Arterial pressure was measured on a beat-to-beat basis. Time series of MSNA and systolic arterial pressure were analyzed by autoregressive spectral analysis. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA was obtained by bivariate autoregressive analysis. Exercise training was performed on a cycle ergometer at moderate intensity, three 60-min sessions per week for 16 wk. Baseline MSNA, gain and time delay of ABRMSNA, and low frequency of MSNA (LFMSNA) to high-frequency ratio (HFMSNA) (LFMSNA/HFMSNA) were similar between groups. ET significantly decreased MSNA. MSNA was unchanged in the UT patients. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA were unchanged in the ET patients. In contrast, the gain of ABRMSNA was significantly reduced [3.5 ± 0.7 vs. 1.8 ± 0.2, arbitrary units (au)/mmHg, P = 0.04] and the time delay of ABRMSNA was significantly increased (4.6 ± 0.8 vs. 7.9 ± 1.0 s, P = 0.05) in the UT patients. LFMSNA-to-HFMSNA ratio tended to be lower in the ET patients (P training prevents the deterioration of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Effect of High-Dose Atorvastatin on Renal Function in Subjects With Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack in the SPARCL Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Callahan, Alfred, III; Campese, Vito M.

    2014-01-01

    by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial assessed the effect of statin treatment on the risk of nonfatal and fatal stroke in subjects with a noncardioembolic stroke or transient ischemic attack, no known coronary heart disease, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol between 2.6 and 4.9 mmol...... ischemic attack with and without chronic kidney disease, and that atorvastatin treatment may prevent eGFR decline in patients with stroke and diabetes mellitus. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00147602....

  16. Plants under dual attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponzio, C.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Though immobile, plants are members of complex environments, and are under constant threat from a wide range of attackers, which includes organisms such as insect herbivores or plant pathogens. Plants have developed sophisticated defenses against these attackers, and include chemical responses such

  17. Membrane omega-3 Fatty Acid deficiency as a preventable risk factor for comorbid coronary heart disease in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Robert K

    2009-01-01

    Major depression disorder (MDD) significantly increases the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) which is a leading cause of mortality in patients with MDD. Moreover, depression is frequently observed in a subset of patients following acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and increases risk for mortality. Here evidence implicating omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid deficiency in the pathoaetiology of CHD and MDD is reviewed, and the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acid deficiency is a preventable risk factor for CHD comorbidity in MDD patients is evaluated. This hypothesis is supported by cross-national and cross-sectional epidemiological surveys finding an inverse correlation between n-3 fatty acid status and prevalence rates of both CHD and MDD, prospective studies finding that lower dietary or membrane EPA+DHA levels increase risk for both MDD and CHD, case-control studies finding that the n-3 fatty acid status of MDD patients places them at high risk for emergent CHD morbidity and mortality, meta-analyses of controlled n-3 fatty acid intervention studies finding significant advantage over placebo for reducing depression symptom severity in MDD patients, and for secondary prevention of cardiac events in CHD patients, findings that n-3 fatty acid status is inversely correlated with other documented CHD risk factors, and patients diagnosed with MDD after ACS exhibit significantly lower n-3 fatty acid status compared with nondepressed ACS patients. This body of evidence provides strong support for future studies to evaluate the effects of increasing dietary n-3 fatty acid status on CHD comorbidity and mortality in MDD patients.

  18. Efficacy and predictors of success of noninvasive ventilation for prevention of extubation failure in critically ill children with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Punkaj; Kuperstock, Jacob E; Hashmi, Sana; Arnolde, Vickie; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Prodhan, Parthak; Venkataraman, Shekhar; Roth, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    The study aimed primarily to evaluate the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and to identify possible predictors for success of NIV therapy in preventing extubation failure in critically ill children with heart disease. The secondary objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy of prophylactic NIV therapy initiated immediately after tracheal extubation and to determine the characteristics, outcomes, and complications associated with NIV therapy in pediatric cardiac patients. A retrospective review examined the medical records of all children between the ages 1 day and 18 years who sustained acute respiratory failure (ARF) that required NIV in the cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU) at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital between January 2008 and June 2010. Patients were assigned to a prophylactic group if NIV was started directly after extubation and to a nonprophylactic group if NIV was started after signs and symptoms of ARF developed. Patients were designated as responders if they received NIV and did not require reintubation during their CVICU stay and nonresponders if they failed NIV and reintubation was performed. The data collected included demographic data, preexisting conditions, pre-event characteristics, event characteristics, and outcome data. The outcome data evaluated included success or failure of NIV, duration of NIV, CVICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, and hospital mortality. The two complications of NIV assessed in the study included nasal bridge or forehead skin necrosis and pneumothorax. The 221 eligible events during the study period involved 172 responders (77.8 %) and 49 nonresponders (22.2 %). A total of 201 events experienced by the study cohort received continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), with 156 responders (78 %), whereas 20 events received bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP), with 16 responders (80 %). In the study, 58 events (26.3 %) were assigned to the prophylactic group and 163 events (73

  19. Pharmacological Inhibition of Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling Decreases Infection and Prevents Heart Damage in Acute Chagas' Disease▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghabi, Mariana C.; de Souza, Elen M.; de Oliveira, Gabriel M.; Keramidas, Michelle; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C.; Bailly, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Chagas' disease induced by Trypanosoma cruzi infection is an important cause of mortality and morbidity affecting the cardiovascular system for which presently available therapies are largely inadequate. We previously reported that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is implicated in several regulatory aspects of T. cruzi invasion and growth and in host tissue fibrosis. This prompted us to evaluate the therapeutic action of an inhibitor of TGF-β signaling (SB-431542) administered during the acute phase of experimental Chagas' disease. Male Swiss mice were infected intraperitoneally with 104 trypomastigotes of T. cruzi (Y strain) and evaluated clinically for the following 30 days. SB-431542 treatment significantly reduced mortality and decreased parasitemia. Electrocardiography showed that SB-431542 treatment was effective in protecting the cardiac conduction system. By 14 day postinfection, enzymatic biomarkers of tissue damage indicated that muscle injury was decreased by SB-431542 treatment, with significantly lower blood levels of aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase. In conclusion, inhibition of TGF-β signaling in vivo appears to potently decrease T. cruzi infection and to prevent heart damage in a preclinical mouse model. This suggests that this class of molecules may represent a new therapeutic agent for acute and chronic Chagas' disease that warrants further clinical exploration. PMID:19738024

  20. Nrf2 signaling and redox homeostasis in the aging heart: A potential target to prevent cardiovascular diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Palacios, Alejandro; Königsberg, Mina; Zazueta, Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    Aging process is often accompanied with a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) due to the synergistic effects of age-related changes in heart morphology/function and prolonged exposure to injurious effects of CVD risk factors. Oxidative stress, considered a hallmark of aging, is also an important feature in pathologies that predispose to CVD development, like hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Approaches directed to prevent the occurrence of CVD during aging have been explored both in experimental models and in controlled clinical trials, in order to improve health span, reduce hospitalizations and increase life quality during elderly. In this review we discuss oxidative stress role as a main risk factor that relates CVD with aging. As well as interventions that aim to reduce oxidative stress by supplementing with exogenous antioxidants. In particular, strategies of improving the endogenous antioxidant defenses through activating the nuclear factor related-2 factor (Nrf2) pathway; one of the best studied molecules in cellular redox homeostasis and a master regulator of the antioxidant and phase II detoxification response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Exercise training in heart failure: from theory to practice. A consensus document of the Heart Failure Association and the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepoli, Massimo F; Conraads, Viviane; Corrà, Ugo; Dickstein, Kenneth; Francis, Darrel P; Jaarsma, Tiny; McMurray, John; Pieske, Burkert; Piotrowicz, Ewa; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Anker, Stefan D; Solal, Alain Cohen; Filippatos, Gerasimos S; Hoes, Arno W; Gielen, Stefan; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Ponikowski, Piotr P

    2011-04-01

    The European Society of Cardiology heart failure guidelines firmly recommend regular physical activity and structured exercise training (ET), but this recommendation is still poorly implemented in daily clinical practice outside specialized centres and in the real world of heart failure clinics. In reality, exercise intolerance can be successfully tackled by applying ET. We need to encourage the mindset that breathlessness may be evidence of signalling between the periphery and central haemodynamic performance and regular physical activity may ultimately bring about favourable changes in myocardial function, symptoms, functional capacity, and increased hospitalization-free life span and probably survival. In this position paper, we provide practical advice for the application of exercise in heart failure and how to overcome traditional barriers, based on the current scientific and clinical knowledge supporting the beneficial effect of this intervention.

  2. Evaluation of medical and health economic effectiveness of non-pharmacological secondary prevention of coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiner, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary heart disease (CHD is a common and potentially fatal malady with a life time prevalence of over 20%. For Germany, the mortality attributable to chronic ischemic heart disease or acute myocardial infarction is estimated at 140,000 deaths per year. An association between prognosis of CHD and lifestyle risk factors has been consistently shown. To positively influence lifestyle risk factors in patients with CHD, non-pharmaceutical secondary prevention strategies are frequently recommended and implemented. Objectives: The aim of this HTA (HTA = Health Technology Assessment is to summarise the current literature on strategies for non-pharmaceutical secondary prevention in patients with CHD and to evaluate their medical effectiveness/efficacy and cost-effectiveness as well as the ethical, social and legal implications. In addition, this report aims to compare the effectiveness and efficacy of different intervention components and to evaluate the generalisability with regard to the German context. Methods: Relevant publications were identified by means of a structured search of databases accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI. In addition, a manual search of identified reference lists was conducted. The present report includes German and English literature published between January 2003 and September 2008 targeting adults with CHD. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed according to pre-defined quality criteria, based on the criteria of evidence based medicine. Results: Among 9,074 publications 43 medical publications met the inclusion criteria. Overall study quality is satisfactory, but only half the studies report overall mortality or cardiac mortality as an outcome, while the remaining studies report less reliable outcome parameters. The follow-up duration varies between twelve and 120 months. Although overall effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical secondary

  3. Using agility to combat cyber attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kerry

    2017-06-01

    Some incident response practitioners feel that they have been locked in a battle with cyber criminals since the popular adoption of the internet. Initially, organisations made great inroads in preventing and containing cyber attacks. In the last few years, however, cyber criminals have become adept at eluding defence security technologies and rapidly modifying their exploit strategies for financial or political gains. Similar to changes in military combat tactics, cyber criminals utilise distributed attack cells, real-time communications, and rapidly mutating exploits to minimise the potential for detection. Cyber criminals have changed their attack paradigm. This paper describes a new incident response paradigm aimed at combating the new model of cyber attacks with an emphasis on agility to increase the organisation's ability to respond rapidly to these new challenges.

  4. The history of hormone therapy use and recent controversy related to heart disease and breast cancer arising from prevention trial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Ivy M

    2012-01-01

    The reasons for hormone therapy use have changed dramatically over time from being very popular for the purpose of preserving youth in women to menopause-related symptom management, disease prevention, and now back to menopause-related symptom management. Over time, several important risks associated with the use of hormone therapy have become evident, causing dramatic reductions in the use of hormone therapy for periods of time following identification of these risks. Most recently, randomized controlled prevention trials that evaluated hormone therapy for the purpose of reducing or preventing coronary heart disease among women have found that hormone therapy is associated with increased rather than decreased risks for coronary heart disease. The most recent of these trials again identified increased risks for breast cancer associated with estrogen plus progestogen therapy. The evolving evidence base from these randomized controlled prevention trials is complicated and in some cases contradictory. Specifically, the data suggest that the timing of when hormone therapy is initiated once a woman is postmenopausal may influence her risk for developing heart disease and breast cancer. In this article, contradictory evidence is carefully sifted so risks and benefits can be weighed by clinicians when partnering with women to individualize decisions about using hormone therapy. © 2012 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  5. Nocturnal panic attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Fabiana L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The panic-respiration connection has been presented with increasing evidences in the literature. We report three panic disorder patients with nocturnal panic attacks with prominent respiratory symptoms, the overlapping of the symptoms with the sleep apnea syndrome and a change of the diurnal panic attacks, from spontaneous to situational pattern. The implication of these findings and awareness to the distinct core of the nocturnal panic attacks symptoms may help to differentiate them from sleep disorders and the search for specific treatment.

  6. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an ... a short time. The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage ...

  7. Facial Dog Attack Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Wei; Patil, Pavan Manohar

    2013-01-01

    The exposed position of the face makes it vulnerable to dog bite injuries. This fact combined with the short stature of children makes them a high-risk group for such attacks. In contrast to wounds inflicted by assaults and accidents, dog bite wounds are deep puncture type wounds compounded by the presence of pathologic bacteria from the saliva of the attacking dog. This, combined with the presence of crushed, devitalized tissue makes these wounds highly susceptible to infection. Key to succe...

  8. The Impact of Rurality on 30-Day Preventable Readmission, Illness Severity, and Risk of Mortality for Heart Failure Medicare Home Health Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsueh-Fen; Carlson, Erin; Popoola, Taiye; Suzuki, Sumihiro

    2016-01-01

    To examine the impact of rurality on 30-day preventable readmission, and the illness severity and risk of mortality for 30-day preventable readmissions. We analyzed heart failure Medicare beneficiaries who received home health services for postacute care after hospital discharge in 2009. The study was a cross-sectional design with the unit of analysis as the home health episode for postacute care. Data sources included the following: Medicare Beneficiary Summary File, Medicare Provider Analysis Review, Outcome Assessment Information Set, Home Health Agency Research Identifiable File, and Area Health Resources File. The dependent variables were 30-day preventable readmission, and the extreme/major level of illness severity and of risk of mortality for a 30-day preventable readmission. The key independent variable was rurality defined as remote rural, adjacent rural, and micropolitan areas, with urban areas in the reference group. Home health beneficiaries in remote rural areas had 27% lower 30-day preventable readmission than those in urban areas. Home health beneficiaries in adjacent rural areas were 33% less likely to have high illness severity at readmission due to a preventable condition than those in urban areas. Geographical location affects preventable readmission and illness severity of preventable readmission. Patients' geographic location along with patients' risk factors should be taken into consideration in the risk adjustment model for the financial incentive program that penalizes home health agencies with high preventable readmissions. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  9. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase prevents diabetes-induced pathological changes by inhibiting NF-κB signaling activation in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Weitao; Ruan, Dandan; Xuan, Yuanhu; Niu, Chao; Tao, Youli; Wang, Yang; Zhan, Kungao; Cai, Lu; Jin, Litai; Tan, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that specifically catabolizes hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Overexpression of catalase via a heart-specific promoter (CAT-TG) was reported to reduce diabetes-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and further prevent diabetes-induced pathological abnormalities, including cardiac structural derangement and left ventricular abnormity in mice. However, the mechanism by which catalase overexpression protects heart function remains unclear. This study found that activation of a ROS-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway was downregulated in hearts of diabetic mice overexpressing catalase. In addition, catalase overexpression inhibited the significant increase in nitration levels of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism, including α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase E1 component (α-KGD) and ATP synthase α and β subunits (ATP-α and ATP-β). To assess the effects of the NF-κB pathway activation on heart function, Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, was injected into diabetic mice, protecting mice against the development of cardiac damage and increased nitrative modifications of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that catalase protects mouse hearts against diabetic cardiomyopathy, partially by suppressing NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses and associated protein nitration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Task sharing to improve the prevention, diagnosis and management of rheumatic heart disease: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Leila Hussein; Smit, Inge; Engel, Mark E; Watkins, David A; Zühlke, Liesl Joanna

    2018-02-14

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality globally due to weak health systems in many countries. RHD can be effectively prevented and managed; however, RHD-related interventions have not been widely adopted in countries with severe human resource constraints. Task sharing is a recognised approach to personnel shortages that could prove effective for RHD and has, anecdotally, been attempted in a few settings. We propose a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol to assess models that use non-physician workers to expand access to, and quality of, RHD-related healthcare. We will include randomised controlled trials (RCT), cluster RCTs, quasi-experimental and controlled before and after studies providing information on the effectiveness of non-physician workers in providing care for streptoccocal pharyngitis, rheumatic fever and RHD. We will search relevant electronic databases and grey literature using medical subject headings. Standardised data extraction forms will be used to collect effect sizes that will be pooled in random-effects models. We will also conduct subgroup analyses and note other important quantitative findings, such as cost reduction, and qualitative findings, such as patient satisfaction. We will also assess study quality and risk of bias and metabias. Ethics approval is not required for this systematic review of previously published literature. The results of the systematic review will be broadly disseminated via conference presentations, multidisciplinary workshops and peer-reviewed publications. CRD42017072989. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Population-based health-economic evaluation of the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, Erkki J O; Davies, Glenn; Martikainen, Janne A; Hu, Henry X; Tunceli, Kaan; Niskanen, Leo

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of generic atorvastatin 20 mg (A20), branded rosuvastatin 10 mg (R10), generic simvastatin 40 mg (S40) and the combination of generic S40 + branded ezetimibe 10 mg (S40 + EZ10) for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) in Finnish patients not meeting the target goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) with S40. A probabilistic Markov model was employed to evaluate the costs and health outcomes of the different therapies based on the cardiovascular events avoided. The model included Framingham risk equations, Finnish population characteristics, event rates, quality of life estimates, resource use and unit costs. The LDL-C lowering efficacies were gathered from a systematic literature review, based on a search of Medline carried out in June 2008 (no time limit). Incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained and incremental cost per life year gained (LYG). The efficacy (LDL-C decrease) gained from switching S40 to S40 + EZ10 was consistent in the literature review, whereas the LDL-C decrease gained from switching S40 to A20/R10 was uncertain. The incremental cost per QALY gained from switching generic S40 was lowest for S40 + EZ10 (22,841 euros [24,017 euros] and 26,595 euros [46,686 euros] for diabetic and non-diabetic men [women], respectively). The respective incremental cost per QALY gained for S40 + EZ10 vs. A20 were 19,738 euros (21,405 euros) and 23,596 euros (40,087 euros). A20 dominated R10. Based on the cost-effectiveness acceptability frontier with a willingness-to-pay value of 30,000 euros per QALY gained, the probability of cost-effectiveness for switching generic S40 to S40 + EZ10 was 100% for men and diabetic women. Sensitivity analyses showed that results were robust. In the Finnish secondary prevention population that is not at goal on S40, switching generic S40 to S40 + EZ10 is more cost-effective than switching S40 to generic A20 or R10.

  12. Cost effectiveness of nurse led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease in primary care: follow up of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, James P; Yao, Guiqing L; Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D

    2005-03-26

    To establish the cost effectiveness of nurse led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease based on four years' follow up of a randomised controlled trial. Cost effectiveness analysis. 19 general practices in north east Scotland. 1343 patients (673 in intervention group and 670 in control group, as originally randomised) aged under 80 years with a diagnosis of coronary heart disease but without terminal illness or dementia and not housebound. Nurse led clinics to promote medical and lifestyle components of secondary prevention. Costs of clinics; overall costs to health service; and cost per life year and per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained, expressed as incremental gain in intervention group compared with control group. The cost of the intervention (clinics and drugs) was 136 pounds sterling (254 dollars; 195 euros) per patient higher (1998-9 prices) in the intervention group, but the difference in other NHS costs, although lower for the intervention group, was not statistically significant. Overall, 28 fewer deaths occurred in the intervention group leading to a gain in mean life years per patient of 0.110 and of 0.124 QALYs. The incremental cost per life year saved was 1236 pounds sterling and that per QALY was 1097 pounds sterling. Nurse led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in primary care seem to be cost effective compared with most interventions in health care, with the main gains in life years saved.

  13. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney problems. Bleeding in the stomach, intestines, or brain. Heart problems such as heart attack and congestive heart failure . Calcium It is not known if taking calcium supplements lowers the risk of colorectal cancer. Diet It is not known if a diet low ...

  14. Ultrasound-targeted transfection of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene carried by albumin nanoparticles to dog myocardium to prevent thrombosis after heart mechanical valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ji Jun, Ji Shang-Yi, Yang Jian-An, He Xia, Yang Xiao-Han, Ling Wen-Ping, Chen Xiao-LingDepartment of Pathology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Shenzhen Sun Yat-Sen Cardiovascular Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: There are more than 300,000 prosthetic heart valve replacements each year worldwide. These patients are faced with a higher risk of thromboembolic events after heart valve surgery and long-term or even life-long anticoagulative and antiplatelet therapies are necessary. Some severe complications such as hemorrhaging or rebound thrombosis can occur when the therapy ceases. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA is a thrombolytic agent. One of the best strategies is gene therapy, which offers a local high expression of t-PA over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhaging and local rebound thrombosis. There are some issues with t-PA that need to be addressed: currently, there is no up-to-date report on how the t-PA gene targets the heart in vivo and the gene vector for t-PA needs to be determined.Aims: To fabricate an albumin nano-t-PA gene ultrasound-targeted agent and investigate its targeting effect on prevention of thrombosis after heart mechanic valve replacement under therapeutic ultrasound.Methods: A dog model of mechanical tricuspid valve replacement was constructed. A highly expressive t-PA gene plasmid was constructed and packaged by nanoparticles prepared with bovine serum albumin. This nanopackaged t-PA gene plasmid was further cross-linked to ultrasonic microbubbles prepared with sucrose and bovine serum albumin to form the ultrasonic-targeted agent for t-PA gene transfection. The agent was given intravenously followed by a therapeutic ultrasound treatment (1 MHz, 1.5 w/cm2, 10 minutes of the heart soon after valve replacement had been performed. The expression of t-PA in myocardium was detected with multiclonal antibodies to t-PA by the indirect immunohistochemical method

  15. Cyber Attacks, Information Attacks, and Postmodern Warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valuch Jozef

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to evaluate and differentiate between the phenomena of cyberwarfare and information warfare, as manifestations of what we perceive as postmodern warfare. We describe and analyse the current examples of the use the postmodern warfare and the reactions of states and international bodies to these phenomena. The subject matter of this paper is the relationship between new types of postmodern conflicts and the law of armed conflicts (law of war. Based on ICJ case law, it is clear that under current legal rules of international law of war, cyber attacks as well as information attacks (often performed in the cyberspace as well can only be perceived as “war” if executed in addition to classical kinetic warfare, which is often not the case. In most cases perceived “only” as a non-linear warfare (postmodern conflict, this practice nevertheless must be condemned as conduct contrary to the principles of international law and (possibly a crime under national laws, unless this type of conduct will be recognized by the international community as a “war” proper, in its new, postmodern sense.

  16. Collaborative Attack vs. Collaborative Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shouhuai

    We have witnessed many attacks in the cyberspace. However, most attacks are launched by individual attackers even though an attack may involve many compromised computers. In this paper, we envision what we believe to be the next generation cyber attacks — collaborative attacks. Collaborative attacks can be launched by multiple attackers (i.e., human attackers or criminal organizations), each of which may have some specialized expertise. This is possible because cyber attacks can become very sophisticated and specialization of attack expertise naturally becomes relevant. To counter collaborative attacks, we might need collaborative defense because each “chain” in a collaborative attack may be only adequately dealt with by a different defender. In order to understand collaborative attack and collaborative defense, we present a high-level abstracted framework for evaluating the effectiveness of collaborative defense against collaborative attacks. As a first step towards realizing and instantiating the framework, we explore a characterization of collaborative attacks and collaborative defense from the relevant perspectives.

  17. Seven Deadliest Wireless Technologies Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Haines, Brad

    2010-01-01

    How can an information security professional keep up with all of the hacks, attacks, and exploits? One way to find out what the worst of the worst are is to read the seven books in our Seven Deadliest Attacks Series. Not only do we let you in on the anatomy of these attacks but we also tell you how to get rid of them and how to defend against them in the future. Countermeasures are detailed so that you can fight against similar attacks as they evolve. Attacks featured in this book include:Bluetooth AttacksCredit Card, Access Card, and Passport AttacksBad Encryption

  18. The clinical profile of women with stable ischaemic heart disease in Spain. More effort is needed in secondary prevention. SIRENA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, J M; Ripoll, T; Barrios, V; Anguita, M; Pedreira, M; Madariaga, I

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death for women, especially ischaemic heart disease, which is still considered a man's disease. In Spain, there are various registries on ischaemic heart disease, although none are exclusively for women. The objectives of the SIRENA study were to describe the clinical profile of women with ischaemic heart disease treated in cardiology consultations, to estimate its prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and understand its clinical management. A multicentre observational study was conducted with a sample of 631 women with stable ischaemic heart disease, consecutively included during cardiology consultations. Forty-one researchers from all over Spain participated in the study. The mean age was 68.5 years. The clinical presentation was in the form of acute coronary syndrome in up to 67.2% of the patients. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was high (77.7% of the patients had hypertension, 40.7% had diabetes and 68% had dyslipidaemia), with 30.7% having uncontrolled hypertension, 78.4% having LDL-cholesterol levels higher than 70mg/dL and 49.2% having HbA1c levels greater than 7%. The considerable majority of the patients underwent optimal medical treatment with antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers and hypolipidaemic agents. Coronary angiography was performed for 88.3% of the patients, and 63.4% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Women with stable ischaemic heart disease in Spain initially present some form of acute coronary syndrome and a high prevalence of inadequately controlled cardiovascular risk factors, despite undergoing optimal medical therapy. A high percentage of these women undergo coronary revascularisation. Increased efforts are required for secondary prevention in women with stable ischaemic heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. Need to combine individual strategies with population-level strategies in the prevention of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Johan Lerbech; Jørgensen, Torben; Borglykke, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the relation between the distribution of risk, the distribution of coronary heart disease (CHD) events and the proportion who develop CHD according to risk.......The aim of this paper was to examine the relation between the distribution of risk, the distribution of coronary heart disease (CHD) events and the proportion who develop CHD according to risk....

  20. Shark attack in Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J A

    1975-02-01

    The injuries in 5 cases of shark attack in Natal during 1973-74 are reviewed. Experience in shark attacks in South Africa during this period is discussed (1965-73), and the value of protecting heavily utilized beaches in Natal with nets is assessed. The surgical applications of elasmobranch research at the Oceanographic Research Institute (Durban) and at the Headquarters of the Natal Anti-Shark Measures Board (Umhlanga Rocks) are described. Modern trends in the training of surf life-guards, the provision of basic equipment for primary resuscitation of casualties on the beaches, and the policy of general and local care of these patients in Natal are discussed.

  1. High molecular weight fibroblast growth factor-2 in the human heart is a potential target for prevention of cardiac remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Jon-Jon; McNaughton, Leslie J; Koleini, Navid; Ma, Xin; Bestvater, Brian; Nickel, Barbara E; Fandrich, Robert R; Wigle, Jeffrey T; Freed, Darren H; Arora, Rakesh C; Kardami, Elissavet

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is a multifunctional protein synthesized as high (Hi-) and low (Lo-) molecular weight isoforms. Studies using rodent models showed that Hi- and Lo-FGF-2 exert distinct biological activities: after myocardial infarction, rat Lo-FGF-2, but not Hi-FGF-2, promoted sustained cardioprotection and angiogenesis, while Hi-FGF-2, but not Lo-FGF-2, promoted myocardial hypertrophy and reduced contractile function. Because there is no information regarding Hi-FGF-2 in human myocardium, we undertook to investigate expression, regulation, secretion and potential tissue remodeling-associated activities of human cardiac (atrial) Hi-FGF-2. Human patient-derived atrial tissue extracts, as well as pericardial fluid, contained Hi-FGF-2 isoforms, comprising, respectively, 53%(±20 SD) and 68% (±25 SD) of total FGF-2, assessed by western blotting. Human atrial tissue-derived primary myofibroblasts (hMFs) expressed and secreted predominantly Hi-FGF-2, at about 80% of total. Angiotensin II (Ang II) up-regulated Hi-FGF-2 in hMFs, via activation of both type 1 and type 2 Ang II receptors; the ERK pathway; and matrix metalloprotease-2. Treatment of hMFs with neutralizing antibodies selective for human Hi-FGF-2 (neu-AbHi-FGF-2) reduced accumulation of proteins associated with fibroblast-to-myofibroblast conversion and fibrosis, including α-smooth muscle actin, extra-domain A fibronectin, and procollagen. Stimulation of hMFs with recombinant human Hi-FGF-2 was significantly more potent than Lo-FGF-2 in upregulating inflammation-associated proteins such as pro-interleukin-1β and plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1. Culture media conditioned by hMFs promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, an effect that was prevented by neu-AbHi-FGF-2 in vitro. In conclusion, we have documented that Hi-FGF-2 represents a substantial fraction of FGF-2 in human cardiac (atrial) tissue and in pericardial fluid, and have shown that human Hi-FGF-2, unlike Lo-FGF-2, promotes deleterious

  2. A Review Of Recent Cyber-Attacks In Fiji

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj A. Sharma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Computing technology has evolved in such dramatic ways that a child can use such technology and their features. Internet is one such technology which allows peripheral devices to be connected to each other creating a network to share information. In the same way information can be attacked. In this paper we will be discussing the different types of cyber-attack that recently took place in Fiji. Common attacks discussed in this review paper are phishing email scams website defacement and skimming. Apart from common preventative methods some novel recommendations have been made. We believe the Fiji experiences and recommendations will assist technology users prepare better against such attacks.

  3. Teratogenic effects of diabetic conditions in chick heart in ovo and in micromass culture may be prevented by addition of vitamin C and folic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Samreen; Pratten, Margaret K

    2013-01-01

    Maternal diseases like diabetes mellitus may cause developmental defects. Supplementation with folic acid and vitamin C during the periconceptional period has been shown to prevent some neural tube and congenital heart defects. Hearts were dissected from 5 days-old White Leghorn chick embryos, the cells isolated and cultured in micromass under diabetic conditions, with and without folic acid and vitamin C. Contractile activity, cell viability (resazurin reduction) and protein assays were performed. Results indicated diabetic conditions reduced contractile activity and cell viability, whilst vitamin C (100 μM) and folic acid (1 mM) administered concurrently significantly improved them to values comparable with the control. Day 3 chick embryos in ovo were injected with glucose+hydroxybutyrate or a combination of these and vitamins. Diabetic conditions caused gross and histological malformations, but these effects were abrogated by vitamin supplement. Teratogenic effects on heart development could possibly be prevented by vitamin supplementation during pregnancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Biessels, Geert Jan; Doubal, Fergus N; Fornage, Myriam; Gorelick, Philip B; Greenberg, Steven M; Higashida, Randall T; Kasner, Scott E; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-02-01

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke, the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association convened a writing committee to evaluate existing evidence, to discuss clinical considerations, and to offer suggestions for future research on stroke prevention in patients with 3 cardinal manifestations of silent cerebrovascular disease: silent brain infarcts, magnetic resonance imaging white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin, and cerebral microbleeds. The writing committee found strong evidence that silent cerebrovascular disease is a common problem of aging and that silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are associated with future symptomatic stroke risk independently of other vascular risk factors. In patients with cerebral microbleeds, there was evidence of a modestly increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in patients treated with thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke but little prospective evidence on the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage in patients on anticoagulation. There were no randomized controlled trials targeted specifically to participants with silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke. Primary stroke prevention is indicated in patients with silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, or microbleeds. Adoption of standard terms and definitions for silent cerebrovascular disease, as provided by prior American Heart Association/American Stroke Association statements and by a consensus group, may facilitate diagnosis and communication of findings from radiologists to clinicians. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Telomere length, risk of coronary heart disease, and statin treatment in the West of Scotland Primary Prevention Study: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouilette, Scott W; Moore, Jasbir S; McMahon, Alex D; Thompson, John R; Ford, Ian; Shepherd, James; Packard, Chris J; Samani, Nilesh J

    2007-01-13

    Inter-individual differences in biological ageing could affect susceptibility to coronary heart disease. Our aim was to determine whether mean leucocyte telomere length is a predictor of the development of coronary heart disease. We compared telomere lengths at recruitment in 484 individuals in the West of Scotland Primary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS) who went on to develop coronary heart disease events with those from 1058 matched controls who remained event free. We also investigated whether there was any association between telomere length and observed clinical benefit of statin treatment in WOSCOPS. Mean telomere length decreased with age by 9% per decade (95% CI 3.6-14.1; p=0.001) in controls; much the same trend was seen in cases (-5.9% per decade, -3.1 to 14.1; p=0.1902). Individuals in the middle and the lowest tertiles of telomere length were more at risk of developing a coronary heart disease event than were individuals in the highest tertile (odds ratio [OR] for coronary heart disease: 1.51, 95% CI 1.15-1.98; p=0.0029 in the middle tertile; 1.44, 1.10-1.90, p=0.0090 in the lowest). In placebo-treated patients, the risk of coronary heart disease was almost double in those in the lower two tertiles of telomere length compared with those in the highest tertile (1.93, 1.33-2.80, p=0.0005 in the middle tertile; 1.94, 1.33-2.84, p=0.0006 in the lowest). By contrast, in patients treated with pravastatin, the increased risk with shorter telomeres was substantially attenuated (1.12, 0.75-1.69, p=0.5755 in the middle tertile; 1.02, 0.68-1.52, p=0.9380 in the lowest). Mean leucocyte telomere length is a predictor of future coronary heart disease events in middle-aged, high-risk men and could identify individuals who would benefit most from statin treatment. Our findings lend support to the hypothesis that differences in biological ageing might contribute to the risk--and variability in age of onset--of coronary heart disease.

  6. Why are heart operations postponed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadopoulos Dimitrios

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To investigate the reasons that lead to postponement of cardiac operations, in order to elucidate the problem and help patients through modes of prevention. Methods-Design We retrospectively included in the study all patients submitted to elective adult heart surgery in our department during the 4-year period 2007-2010 and noted all cases of postponement after official inclusion in the operating schedule. Results 94 out of a total of 575 patients (16.34% scheduled for elective cardiac operation had their procedure postponed. The reasons were mainly organisatory (in 49 cases, 52.12%, which in order of significance were: unavailability in operating rooms, shortage in matching erythrocyte units and shortage in anaesthetic/nursing staff. The rest of the cases (45, 47.88% were postponed due to medical reasons, which in order of significance were: febrile situations, including infections of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary system, problems with the regulation of antiplatelet and antithrombotic drugs, neurological manifestations such as stroke and transient ischaemic attacks, exacerbation of asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, arrhythmias, renal problems and allergic reactions to drugs. Patients with advanced age and increased Euroscore values were most possible to have their heart operation postponed. Conclusions Heart operations are postponed due to organisatory as well as medical reasons, the latter mainly affecting older, morbid patients who therefore require advanced preoperative care.

  7. Preventing and Profiling Malicious Insider Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    concern is that, of those individuals who used remote access, 88% of them were former employees. This means that the organisations failed to disable all...of employment, the stigma of a criminal record, travel restrictions and computer restrictions (Kowalski et al., 2008). UNCLASSIFIED 8 UNCLASSIFIED...the case studies. As part of this data collection process, a substantial amount of time was spent gathering information about childhood experiences

  8. Breakthrough attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema receiving long-term prophylaxis are responsive to icatibant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aberer, Werner; Maurer, Marcus; Bouillet, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) experience recurrent attacks of cutaneous or submucosal edema that may be frequent and severe; prophylactic treatments can be prescribed to prevent attacks. However, despite the use of long......-term prophylaxis (LTP), breakthrough attacks are known to occur. We used data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) to evaluate the characteristics of breakthrough attacks and the effectiveness of icatibant as a treatment option. METHODS: Data on LTP use, attacks, and treatments were recorded. Attack...... characteristics, treatment characteristics, and outcomes (time to treatment, time to resolution, and duration of attack) were compared for attacks that occurred with versus without LTP. RESULTS: Data on 3228 icatibant-treated attacks from 448 patients with C1-INH-HAE were analyzed; 30.1% of attacks occurred while...

  9. Temporal Cyber Attack Detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, Joey Burton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Draelos, Timothy J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Galiardi, Meghan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Doak, Justin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Rigorous characterization of the performance and generalization ability of cyber defense systems is extremely difficult, making it hard to gauge uncertainty, and thus, confidence. This difficulty largely stems from a lack of labeled attack data that fully explores the potential adversarial space. Currently, performance of cyber defense systems is typically evaluated in a qualitative manner by manually inspecting the results of the system on live data and adjusting as needed. Additionally, machine learning has shown promise in deriving models that automatically learn indicators of compromise that are more robust than analyst-derived detectors. However, to generate these models, most algorithms require large amounts of labeled data (i.e., examples of attacks). Algorithms that do not require annotated data to derive models are similarly at a disadvantage, because labeled data is still necessary when evaluating performance. In this work, we explore the use of temporal generative models to learn cyber attack graph representations and automatically generate data for experimentation and evaluation. Training and evaluating cyber systems and machine learning models requires significant, annotated data, which is typically collected and labeled by hand for one-off experiments. Automatically generating such data helps derive/evaluate detection models and ensures reproducibility of results. Experimentally, we demonstrate the efficacy of generative sequence analysis techniques on learning the structure of attack graphs, based on a realistic example. These derived models can then be used to generate more data. Additionally, we provide a roadmap for future research efforts in this area.

  10. Fatal crocodile attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Shee, Biplab; Sukul, Biswajit

    2013-11-01

    Attacks on human beings by various animals leading to varied types of injuries and even death in some cases are not uncommon. Crocodile attacks on humans have been reported from a number of countries across the globe. Deaths in such attacks are mostly due to mechanical injuries or drowning. Bites by the crocodiles often cause the limbs to be separated from the body. The present case refers to an incident of a fatal attack by a crocodile on a 35 years old female where only the mutilated head of the female was recovered. Multiple lacerated wounds over the face and scalp along with fracture of the cranial bones was detected on autopsy. Two distinct bite marks in the form of punched in holes were noted over the parietal and frontal bones. Injuries on the head with its traumatic amputation from the body were sufficient to cause death. However, the presence of other fatal injuries on the unrecovered body parts could not be ruled out. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. Preliminary data from γ-cardiography during the abatement of an asthmatic attack (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, R.; Vernejoul, P. de; Raynaud, C.; Blanchon, P.; Kellershohn, C.; Turiaf, J.

    1961-01-01

    The authors used gamma cardiology during the abatement of 16 cases of asthma with a view to detecting heart attacks not otherwise visible with routine methods of examination: clinical, radiological and electro-cardio-graphical. In gamma cardiology, a radioactive indicator is used and its path followed in the cavities of the heart. The method makes it possible to study the circulation in the right heart, the pulmonary crossing, and the left heart, as well as evaluation of the heart-flow. As a result of their investigations the authors, after having discussed the significance of the data obtained with the method, suggest that it is possible by the use of gamma cardiography during the abatement of an asthma attack: 1- To confirm attacks of the right heart which have already been detected by ordinary methods. 2- To confirm the presence of modifications in the recorded curves which suggest, in the case of the left heart, possible attack; such on attack is also indicated, in a small number of cases, by electrocardiography curves. Some considerations are put forward by the authors concerning the physiopathology of attacks on the left heart. (authors) [fr

  12. Why cryptography should not rely on physical attack complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    This book presents two practical physical attacks. It shows how attackers can reveal the secret key of symmetric as well as asymmetric cryptographic algorithms based on these attacks, and presents countermeasures on the software and the hardware level that can help to prevent them in the future. Though their theory has been known for several years now, since neither attack has yet been successfully implemented in practice, they have generally not been considered a serious threat. In short, their physical attack complexity has been overestimated and the implied security threat has been underestimated. First, the book introduces the photonic side channel, which offers not only temporal resolution, but also the highest possible spatial resolution. Due to the high cost of its initial implementation, it has not been taken seriously. The work shows both simple and differential photonic side channel analyses. Then, it presents a fault attack against pairing-based cryptography. Due to the need for at least two indepe...

  13. Developmental toxicity of ethanol in chick heart in ovo and in micromass culture can be prevented by addition of vitamin C and folic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Samreen; Pratten, Margaret K

    2009-09-01

    The teratogenic effects of ethanol include malformations of the cardiovascular system, which may be abrogated by multivitamin therapy. Chick cardiomyocytes in micromass culture were treated with ethanol alone or with supplementation with folate or vitamin C. Ethanol alone caused a loss of cell viability and differentiation (beating) whereas those cells treated in addition with vitamins were comparable to the control. Chick embryos were injected on day 3 of incubation with PBS, ethanol alone or with additional vitamin C or folic acid. On day 9 embryos were examined for viability, growth retardation and gross malformation and the hearts were processed for histology. Results showed that ethanol significantly decreased survival of embryos or caused growth retardation and gross malformation (pEmbryos incubated with addition of vitamin C or folic acid were comparable to the control. Data obtained in this study suggest that supplementation with vitamin C or folic acid during pregnancy may prevent defects in heart development brought about by ethanol.

  14. BIRD ATTACK OCULAR INJURIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Ali; Soleimani, Mohammad; Behrouz, Mahmoud Jabbarvand

    2017-03-29

    To report 30 patients with bird attack-related eye injuries. This study was performed among patients coming to Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from 2010 to 2015 with a history of bird attack causing eye injury. The inclusion criteria were a history of bird attack by pecking causing eye injury and having treatment and follow-up record for at least 6 months after treatment. The primary eye examinations included a full ophthalmic examination including evaluation of uncorrected visual acuity and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), anterior segment slit lamp biomicroscopy, and photography. For all patients with penetrating injury, primary repair was undertaken. Thirty patients (10 females and 20 males) with a mean age of 23.3 ± 18.5 years entered the study. The most common zone of injury was zone 1 (P < 0.001), and lensectomy was not needed in majority of patients (P < 0.001). The most common bird causing the injury was mynah (P < 0.001). Those patients with baseline BCVA of less than 20/200 or those with endophthalmitis had statistically worse final BCVA after treatment. Patients attacked by mynah bird had significantly better pretreatment uncorrected visual acuity and BCVA. The most common bird causing the eye injury among the sample of patients from Iran was mynah, which differs with previous studies indicating the rooster attack as the most common cause of eye injury. The authors also found that the most common zone of injury was zone 1, and the presence of endophthalmitis and lower baseline BCVA were significant risk factors for worse visual outcomes.

  15. A systematic review of published interventions for primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in rural populations of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Laura V; Peterson, Karen L; Jacobs, Jane P; Allender, Steven; Nichols, Melanie

    2016-08-27

    Rural Australians are known to experience a higher burden of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) than their metropolitan counterparts and the reasons for this appear to be highly complex and not well understood. It is not clear what interventions and prevention efforts have occurred specifically in rural Australia in terms of IHD. A summary of this evidence could have implications for future action and research in improving the health of rural communities. The aim of this study was to review all published interventions conducted in rural Australia that were aimed at the primary and/or secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in adults. Systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature published between January 1990 and December 2015. Search terms were derived from four major topics: (1) rural; (2) ischaemic heart disease; (3) Australia and; (4) intervention/prevention. Terms were adapted for six databases and three independent researchers screened results. Studies were included if the published work described an intervention focussed on the prevention or reduction of IHD or risk factors, specifically in a rural population of Australia, with outcomes specific to participants including, but not limited to, changes in diet, exercise, cholesterol or blood pressure levels. Of 791 papers identified in the search, seven studies met the inclusion criteria, and one further study was retrieved from searching reference lists of screened abstracts. Typically, excluded studies focused on cardiovascular diseases without specific reference to IHD, or presented intervention results without stratification by rurality. Larger trials that included metropolitan residents without stratification were excluded due to differences in the specific needs, characteristics and health service access challenges of rural populations. Six interventions were primary prevention studies, one was secondary prevention only and one included both primary and secondary intervention strategies. Two

  16. A systematic review of published interventions for primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD in rural populations of Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura V. Alston

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rural Australians are known to experience a higher burden of ischaemic heart disease (IHD than their metropolitan counterparts and the reasons for this appear to be highly complex and not well understood. It is not clear what interventions and prevention efforts have occurred specifically in rural Australia in terms of IHD. A summary of this evidence could have implications for future action and research in improving the health of rural communities. The aim of this study was to review all published interventions conducted in rural Australia that were aimed at the primary and/or secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD in adults. Methods Systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature published between January 1990 and December 2015. Search terms were derived from four major topics: (1 rural; (2 ischaemic heart disease; (3 Australia and; (4 intervention/prevention. Terms were adapted for six databases and three independent researchers screened results. Studies were included if the published work described an intervention focussed on the prevention or reduction of IHD or risk factors, specifically in a rural population of Australia, with outcomes specific to participants including, but not limited to, changes in diet, exercise, cholesterol or blood pressure levels. Results Of 791 papers identified in the search, seven studies met the inclusion criteria, and one further study was retrieved from searching reference lists of screened abstracts. Typically, excluded studies focused on cardiovascular diseases without specific reference to IHD, or presented intervention results without stratification by rurality. Larger trials that included metropolitan residents without stratification were excluded due to differences in the specific needs, characteristics and health service access challenges of rural populations. Six interventions were primary prevention studies, one was secondary prevention only and one included both

  17. Impact of the New American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Definition of Stroke on the Results of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kasab, Sami; Lynn, Michael J; Turan, Tanya N; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F; Janis, L Scott; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2017-01-01

    An American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) writing committee has recently recommended that tissue evidence of cerebral infarction associated with temporary symptoms (CITS) lasting Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial. We compared outcomes in the medical (n = 227) and stenting (n = 224) groups in SAMMPRIS using the following primary end point (new components in bold): any stroke, CITS, or death within 30 days after enrollment or within 30 days after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during follow-up; or ischemic stroke or CITS in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days. We also compared the use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in both treatment groups. By considering CITS as equivalent to stroke, the number of primary end points increased from 34 to 43 in the medical group and from 52 to 66 in the stenting group of SAMMPRIS. The Kaplan-Meier curves for the primary end points in the 2 groups were significantly different (P = .009). The percentage of patients with reported TIAs who underwent brain MRI was 69% in the medical group and 61% in the stenting group (P = .40). Using the AHA/ASA definition of stroke resulted in a substantially higher primary end point rate in both treatment groups and an even higher benefit from medical therapy over stenting than originally shown in SAMMPRIS. The higher rate of CITS in the stenting group was not due to ascertainment bias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario (HSFO) high blood pressure strategy's hypertension management initiative study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Lum-Kwong, Margaret Moy; Perkins, Nancy; Von Sychowski, Shirley; Sebaldt, Rolf J; Kiss, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Achieving control of hypertension prevents target organ damage at both the micro and macrovascular level and is a highly cost effective means of lowering the risk for heart attack and stroke particularly in people with diabetes. Clinical trials demonstrate that blood pressure control can be achieved in a large proportion of people. Translating this knowledge into widespread practice is the focus of the Hypertension Management Initiative, which began in 2004 with the goal o...

  19. Blocking of Brute Force Attack

    OpenAIRE

    M.Venkata Krishna Reddy

    2012-01-01

    A common threat Web developers face is a password-guessing attack known as a brute-force attack. A brute-force attack is an attempt to discover a password by systematically trying every possible combination of letters, numbers, and symbols until you discover the one correct combination that works. If your Web site requires user authentication, you are a good target for a brute-force attack. An attacker can always discover a password through a brute-force attack, but the downside is that it co...

  20. Bluetooth security attacks comparative analysis, attacks, and countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Haataja, Keijo; Pasanen, Sanna; Toivanen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    This overview of Bluetooth security examines network vulnerabilities and offers a comparative analysis of recent security attacks. It also examines related countermeasures and proposes a novel attack that works against all existing Bluetooth versions.

  1. Increased discordance between HeartScore and coronary artery calcification score after introduction of the new ESC prevention guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel C P; Mahabadi, Amir-Abbas; Gerke, Oke

    2015-01-01

    -contrast Cardiac-CT scan was performed to detect coronary artery calcification (CAC). RESULTS: Agreement of HeartScore risk groups with CAC groups was poor, but higher when applying the algorithm for the low-risk compared to the high-risk country model (agreement rate: 77% versus 63%, and weighted Kappa: 0......OBJECTIVES: The European HeartScore has traditionally differentiated between low and high-risk countries. Until 2012 Germany and Denmark were considered to be high-risk countries but have now been defined as low-risk countries. In this survey we aim to address the consequences of this downgrading....... METHODS: A screening of 3932 randomly selected (mean age 56 years, 46% male) individuals from Germany and Denmark free of cardiovascular disease was performed. Traditional risk factors were determined, and the HeartScore was measured using both the low-risk and the high-risk country models. A non...

  2. The Green, Amber, Red Delineation of Risk and Need (GARDIAN) management system: a pragmatic approach to optimizing heart health from primary prevention to chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Melinda J; Kok, Simone; Jansen, Kiki; Stewart, Simon

    2013-08-01

    A sustained epidemic of cardiovascular disease and related risk factors is a global phenomenon contributing significantly to premature deaths and costly morbidity. Preventative strategies across the full continuum of life, from a population to individual perspective, are not optimally applied. This paper describes a simple and adaptable 'traffic-light' system we have developed to systematically perform individual risk and need delineation in order to 'titrate' the intensity and frequency of healthcare intervention in a cost-effective manner. The GARDIAN (Green Amber Red Delineation of Risk and Need) system is an individual assessment of risk and need that modulates the frequency and intensity of future healthcare intervention. Individual assessment of risk and need for ongoing intervention and support is determined with reference to three domains: (1) clinical stability, (2) gold-standard management, and (3) a broader, holistic assessment of individual circumstance. This can be applied from a primary prevention, secondary prevention, or chronic disease management perspective. Our experience with applying and validating GARDIAN to titrate healthcare resources according to need has been extensive to date, with >5000 individuals profiled in a host of clinical settings. A series of clinical randomized trials will determine the impact of the GARDIAN system on important indices of healthcare utilization and health status. The GARDIAN model to delineating risk and need for varied intensity of management shows strong potential to cost effectively improve health outcomes for both individuals at risk of heart disease and those with established heart disease.

  3. Transient ischemic attack: diagnostic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messé, Steven R; Jauch, Edward C

    2008-08-01

    A transient ischemic attack portends significant risk of a stroke. Consequently, the diagnostic evaluation in the emergency department is focused on identifying high-risk causes so that preventive strategies can be implemented. The evaluation consists of a facilitated evaluation of the patient's metabolic, cardiac, and neurovascular systems. At a minimum, the following tests are recommended: fingerstick glucose level, electrolyte levels, CBC count, urinalysis, and coagulation studies; noncontrast computed tomography (CT) of the head; electrocardiography; and continuous telemetry monitoring. Vascular imaging studies, such as carotid ultrasonography, CT angiography, or magnetic resonance angiography, should be performed on an urgent basis and prioritized according to the patient's risk stratification for disease. Consideration should be given for echocardiography if no large vessel abnormality is identified.

  4. Inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channels ameliorates an imbalance in cardiac autonomic nerve activity and prevents lethal arrhythmias in mice with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuko; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Minami, Takeya; Yamada, Chinatsu; Shibata, Junko; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Cho, Kosai; Arai, Yuji; Yasuno, Shinji; Nishikimi, Toshio; Ueshima, Kenji; Kamakura, Shiro; Nishida, Motohiro; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Yasuo; Kimura, Takeshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2014-10-01

    Dysregulation of autonomic nervous system activity can trigger ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in patients with heart failure. N-type Ca(2+) channels (NCCs) play an important role in sympathetic nervous system activation by regulating the calcium entry that triggers release of neurotransmitters from peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals. We have investigated the ability of NCC blockade to prevent lethal arrhythmias associated with heart failure. We compared the effects of cilnidipine, a dual N- and L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, with those of nitrendipine, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, in transgenic mice expressing a cardiac-specific, dominant-negative form of neuron-restrictive silencer factor (dnNRSF-Tg). In this mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy leading to sudden arrhythmic death, cardiac structure and function did not significantly differ among the control, cilnidipine, and nitrendipine groups. However, cilnidipine dramatically reduced arrhythmias in dnNRSF-Tg mice, significantly improving their survival rate and correcting the imbalance between cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity. A β-blocker, bisoprolol, showed similar effects in these mice. Genetic titration of NCCs, achieved by crossing dnNRSF-Tg mice with mice lacking CACNA1B, which encodes the α1 subunit of NCCs, improved the survival rate. With restoration of cardiac autonomic balance, dnNRSF-Tg;CACNA1B(+/-) mice showed fewer malignant arrhythmias than dnNRSF-Tg;CACNA1B(+/+) mice. Both pharmacological blockade of NCCs and their genetic titration improved cardiac autonomic balance and prevented lethal arrhythmias in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy and sudden arrhythmic death. Our findings suggest that NCC blockade is a potentially useful approach to preventing sudden death in patients with heart failure. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Communicating with Professionals

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Defects Tools & Resources Heart Attack About Heart Attacks Warning Signs of a Heart Attack Understand Your Risks to Prevent a Heart Attack ...

  6. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Defects Tools & Resources Heart Attack About Heart Attacks Warning Signs of a Heart Attack Understand Your Risks to Prevent a Heart Attack ...

  7. Metabolic syndrome with and without C-reactive protein as a predictor of coronary heart disease and diabetes in the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Naveed; Gaw, Allan; Scherbakova, Olga; Ford, Ian; O'Reilly, Denis St J; Haffner, Steven M; Isles, Chris; Macfarlane, Peter W; Packard, Chris J; Cobbe, Stuart M; Shepherd, James

    2003-07-29

    The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) recently proposed a simple definition for metabolic syndrome. Information on the prospective association of this definition for coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes is currently limited. We used a modified NCEP definition with body mass index in place of waist circumference. Baseline assessments in the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study were available for 6447 men to predict CHD risk and for 5974 men to predict incident diabetes over 4.9 years of follow-up. Mean LDL cholesterol was similar but C-reactive protein was higher (Pdiseases.

  8. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may ... exercise program. You need to make sure the exercise you would like to do is safe for you. This is especially important if: You recently had a heart attack. You ...

  9. Automated Discovery of Mimicry Attacks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giffin, Jonathon T; Jha, Somesh; Miller, Barton P

    2006-01-01

    .... These systems are useful only if they detect actual attacks. Previous research developed manually-constructed mimicry and evasion attacks that avoided detection by hiding a malicious series of system calls within a valid sequence allowed by the model...

  10. The interleukin-6 receptor as a target for prevention of coronary heart disease : a mendelian randomisation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Holmes, Michael V.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Engmann, Jorgen E. L.; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Guo, Yiran; Chung, Christina; Peasey, Anne; Ster, Roman Pfi; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Ireland, Helen A.; Leusink, Maarten; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, KaWah; Palmen, Jutta; Howard, Philip; Cooper, Jackie A.; Drenos, Fotios; Hardy, John; Nalls, Michael A.; Li, Yun Rose; Lowe, Gordon; Stewart, Marlene; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Peto, Julian; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gallacher, John; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Tomlinson, Ian; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Luan, Jian'an; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Kubinova, Ruzena; Baceviciene, Migle; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pajak, Andrzej; Topor-Madry, Roman; Malyutina, Sofi A.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sennblad, Bengt; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandenelli, Stefania; Tanaka, Toshiko; Meschia, James F.; Singleton, Andrew; Navis, Gerjan; Mateo Leach, Irene; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Ford, Ian; Epstein, Stephen E.; Burnett, Mary Susan; Devaney, Joe M.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; de Borst, Gert Jan; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Jong, Pim A.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Klungel, Olaf H.; de Boer, Anthonius; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Eaton, Charles B.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Fowkes, F. Gerry R.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Price, Jackie F.; Whincup, Peter H.; Morris, Richard W.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Redline, Susan; Lange, Leslie A.; Kumari, Meena; Wareham, Nick J.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Whittaker, John C.; Hamsten, Anders; Dudbridge, Frank; Delaney, J. A. Chris; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Connolly, John J.; van der Harst, Pim; Brunner, Eric J.; Marmot, Michael G.; Wassel, Christina L.; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimaki, Mika; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Voevoda, Mikhail; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek; Wilson, James G.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Reiner, Alex P.; Keating, Brendan J.; Sattar, Naveed; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Background A high circulating concentration of interleukin 6 is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Blockade of the interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) with a monoclonal antibody (tocilizumab) licensed for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis reduces systemic and articular inflammation.

  11. beta-blockade with nebivolol for prevention of acute ischaemic events in elderly patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Flather, Marcus D.; Boehm, Michael; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Murrone, Adriano; Mascagni, Flavio; Spinucci, Giulio; Conti, Maria Giovanna; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Coats, Andrew J. S.

    Objectives This subanalysis of the Study of the Effects of Nebivolol Intervention on Outcomes and Hospitalisation in Seniors with Heart Failure (SENIORS) investigates whether treatment with nebivolol, a beta-blocker with nitric oxide-releasing properties, can provide additional benefits besides its

  12. beta-blockade with nebivolol for prevention of acute ischaemic events in elderly patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrosio, G.; Flather, M. D.; Boehm, M.; Cohen-Solal, A.; Murrone, A.; Mascagni, F.; Spinucci, G.; Conti, M. G.; van Veldhuisen, D. J.; Tavazzi, L.; Coats, A. J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Aim. This subanalysis of the Study of the Effects of Nebivolol Intervention on Outcomes and Hospitalisation in Seniors with Heart Failure (SENIORS) investigates whether treatment with nebivolol, a p-blocker with nitric oxide-releasing properties, can provide additional benefits besides its effects

  13. Prevention of coronary heart disease and osteoporosis in women aged 45 to 49 years: a challenging role for general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, H.M.M.; Kuik, A. van; Janse, M.E.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Lagro-Janssen, T.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Part of the risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) and osteoporosis in women are established by their lifestyle in the premenopausal period. Therefore, we assessed the risk of women aged 45 to 49 years for CHD and osteoporosis and its relation with socioeconomic status (SES) and access to

  14. Your Guide to Living Well with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trouble walking, dizziness, or loss of balance or coordination. ● A sudden, severe headache with no known cause. ... lifestyle changes and medications, still offer the best protection against heart attack and other complications of heart ...

  15. Attack Trees with Sequential Conjunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jhawar, Ravi; Kordy, Barbara; Mauw, Sjouke; Radomirović, Sasa; Trujillo-Rasua, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first formal foundation of SAND attack trees which are a popular extension of the well-known attack trees. The SAND at- tack tree formalism increases the expressivity of attack trees by intro- ducing the sequential conjunctive operator SAND. This operator enables the modeling of

  16. Can a Copycat Effect be Observed in Terrorist Suicide Attacks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Farnham

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore how a copycat effect – established within the field of suicide studies – may manifest itself in terrorist suicide attacks, and takes an exploratory approach in evaluating the prospect of incorporating open-data resources in future counter-terrorism research. This paper explores a possible ‘copycat effect’ in cases of suicide terrorism, which entails a perpetrator being inspired by a preceding attack to carry out a similar attack not long after the original. In the wake of mounting risks of lone wolf terrorist attacks today and due to the general difficulties faced in preventing such attacks, in this paper we explore a potential area of future prevention in media reporting, security and anti-terrorism policies today. Using the START Global Terrorism Database (GTD, this paper investigates terrorist suicide-attack clusters and analyses the relationship between attacks found within the same cluster. Using a mixed-method approach, our analyses did not uncover clear evidence supporting a copycat effect among the studied attacks. These and other findings have numerous policy and future research implications.

  17. Structural Learning of Attack Vectors for Generating Mutated XSS Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsun Wang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Web applications suffer from cross-site scripting (XSS attacks that resulting from incomplete or incorrect input sanitization. Learning the structure of attack vectors could enrich the variety of manifestations in generated XSS attacks. In this study, we focus on generating more threatening XSS attacks for the state-of-the-art detection approaches that can find potential XSS vulnerabilities in Web applications, and propose a mechanism for structural learning of attack vectors with the aim of generating mutated XSS attacks in a fully automatic way. Mutated XSS attack generation depends on the analysis of attack vectors and the structural learning mechanism. For the kernel of the learning mechanism, we use a Hidden Markov model (HMM as the structure of the attack vector model to capture the implicit manner of the attack vector, and this manner is benefited from the syntax meanings that are labeled by the proposed tokenizing mechanism. Bayes theorem is used to determine the number of hidden states in the model for generalizing the structure model. The paper has the contributions as following: (1 automatically learn the structure of attack vectors from practical data analysis to modeling a structure model of attack vectors, (2 mimic the manners and the elements of attack vectors to extend the ability of testing tool for identifying XSS vulnerabilities, (3 be helpful to verify the flaws of blacklist sanitization procedures of Web applications. We evaluated the proposed mechanism by Burp Intruder with a dataset collected from public XSS archives. The results show that mutated XSS attack generation can identify potential vulnerabilities.

  18. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  19. The Challenge and the Promise: Strengthening the Force, Preventing Suicide and Saving Lives. Final Report of the Department of Defense Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    with us. Their family, friends, fellow Service Members, and our Nation mourn their loss. We, the members of the Task Force, express our sincere...However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were already working on standardizing suicide nomenclature for the civilian sector...all heart attacks will be prevented, work continues toward that end state with education, training, and treatment Work must continue toward the same

  20. Desensitization by progressive up-titration prevents first-dose effects on the heart: guinea pig study with ponesimod, a selective S1P1 receptor modulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Rey

    Full Text Available Ponesimod, a selective S1P1 receptor modulator, reduces the blood lymphocyte count in all tested species by preventing egress of T and B cells from thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs. In addition, ponesimod transiently affects heart rate and atrioventricular (AV conduction in humans, effects not observed in mice, rats, and dogs with selective S1P1 receptor modulators, suggesting that the regulation of heart rate and rhythm is species dependent. In the present study, we used conscious guinea pigs implanted with a telemetry device to investigate the effects of single and multiple oral doses of ponesimod on ECG variables, heart rate, and blood pressure. Oral administration of ponesimod did not affect the sinus rate (P rate but dose-dependently induced AV block type I to III. A single oral dose of 0.1 mg/kg had no effect on ECG variables, while a dose of 3 mg/kg induced AV block type III in all treated guinea pigs. Repeated oral dosing of 1 or 3 mg/kg ponesimod resulted in rapid desensitization, so that the second dose had no or a clearly reduced effect on ECG variables as compared with the first dose. Resensitization of the S1P1 receptor in the heart was concentration dependent. After desensitization had been induced by the first dose of ponesimod, the cardiac system remained desensitized as long as the plasma concentration was ≥75 ng/ml. By using a progressive up-titration regimen, the first-dose effect of ponesimod on heart rate and AV conduction was significantly reduced due to desensitization of the S1P1 receptor. In summary, conscious guinea pigs implanted with a telemetry device represent a useful model to study first-dose effects of S1P1 receptor modulators on heart rate and rhythm. This knowledge was translated to a dosing regimen of ponesimod to be tested in humans to avoid or significantly reduce the first-dose effects.

  1. Statin treatment prevents increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality associated with clarithromycin in patients with stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gorm B; Hilden, Jørgen; Als-Nielsen, Bodil

    2010-01-01

    In the CLARICOR trial, significantly increased cardiovascular (CV) and all-cause mortality in stable patients with coronary heart disease were observed after a short course of clarithromycin. We report on the impact of statin treatment at entry on the CV and all-cause mortality. The multicenter...... CLARICOR trial randomized patients to oral clarithromycin (500 mg daily; n = 2172) versus matching placebo (daily; n = 2201) for 2 weeks. Patients were followed through public databases. In the 41% patients on statin treatment at entry, no significant effect of clarithromycin was observed on CV (hazard.......0003; statin-clarithromycin interaction P = 0.0029) and all-cause mortality (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.05-1.67; P = 0.016; statin-clarithromycin interaction P = 0.41). Multivariate analysis and 6-year follow up confirmed these results. Concomitant statin treatment in stable patients with coronary heart disease...

  2. DoD Task Force on the Prevention of the Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    with us. Their family, friends, fellow Service Members, and our Nation mourn their loss. We, the members of the Task Force, express our sincere...However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were already working on standardizing suicide nomenclature for the civilian sector, and...ideal of not one suicide in the Armed Forces. In the same way, while it is known that not all heart attacks will be prevented, work continues toward

  3. Seven Deadliest Unified Communications Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    York, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting Unified Communications technology? Then you need Seven Deadliest Unified Communication Attacks. This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to Unified Communications, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable. Attacks featured in this book include: UC Ecosystem Attacks Insecure Endpo

  4. N-acetylcysteine treatment prevents the up-regulation of MnSOD in chronically hypoxic rat hearts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balková, P.; Hlaváčková, M.; Milerová, Marie; Neckář, Jan; Kolář, František; Novák, F.; Nováková, O.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2011), s. 467-474 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0875; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/1008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : heart * chronic intermittent hypoxia * superoxide dismutase Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.555, year: 2011

  5. Mediterranean Diet and Other Dietary Patterns in Primary Prevention of Heart Failure and Changes in Cardiac Function Markers: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Sanches Machado d’Almeida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure (HF is a complex syndrome and is recognized as the ultimate pathway of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Studies using nutritional strategies based on dietary patterns have proved to be effective for the prevention and treatment of CVD. Although there are studies that support the protective effect of these diets, their effects on the prevention of HF are not clear yet. Methods: We searched the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases for studies that examined dietary patterns, such as dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH diet, paleolithic, vegetarian, low-carb and low-fat diets and prevention of HF. No limitations were used during the search in the databases. Results: A total of 1119 studies were identified, 14 met the inclusion criteria. Studies regarding the Mediterranean, DASH, vegetarian, and Paleolithic diets were found. The Mediterranean and DASH diets showed a protective effect on the incidence of HF and/or worsening of cardiac function parameters, with a significant difference in relation to patients who did not adhere to these dietary patterns. Conclusions: It is observed that the adoption of Mediterranean or DASH-type dietary patterns may contribute to the prevention of HF, but these results need to be analyzed with caution due to the low quality of evidence.

  6. Mediterranean Diet and Other Dietary Patterns in Primary Prevention of Heart Failure and Changes in Cardiac Function Markers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches Machado d'Almeida, Karina; Ronchi Spillere, Stefanny; Zuchinali, Priccila; Corrêa Souza, Gabriela

    2018-01-10

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome and is recognized as the ultimate pathway of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies using nutritional strategies based on dietary patterns have proved to be effective for the prevention and treatment of CVD. Although there are studies that support the protective effect of these diets, their effects on the prevention of HF are not clear yet. We searched the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases for studies that examined dietary patterns, such as dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH diet), paleolithic, vegetarian, low-carb and low-fat diets and prevention of HF. No limitations were used during the search in the databases. A total of 1119 studies were identified, 14 met the inclusion criteria. Studies regarding the Mediterranean, DASH, vegetarian, and Paleolithic diets were found. The Mediterranean and DASH diets showed a protective effect on the incidence of HF and/or worsening of cardiac function parameters, with a significant difference in relation to patients who did not adhere to these dietary patterns. It is observed that the adoption of Mediterranean or DASH-type dietary patterns may contribute to the prevention of HF, but these results need to be analyzed with caution due to the low quality of evidence.

  7. Improving Attack Graph Visualization through Data Reduction and Attack Grouping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Homer; Ashok Varikuti; Xinming Ou; Miles A. McQueen

    2008-09-01

    Various tools exist to analyze enterprise network systems and to produce attack graphs detailing how attackers might penetrate into the system. These attack graphs, however, are often complex and difficult to comprehend fully, and a human user may find it problematic to reach appropriate configuration decisions. This paper presents methodologies that can 1) automatically identify portions of an attack graph that do not help a user to understand the core security problems and so can be trimmed, and 2) automatically group similar attack steps as virtual nodes in a model of the network topology, to immediately increase the understandability of the data. We believe both methods are important steps toward improving visualization of attack graphs to make them more useful in configuration management for large enterprise networks. We implemented our methods using one of the existing attack-graph toolkits. Initial experimentation shows that the proposed approaches can 1) significantly reduce the complexity of attack graphs by trimming a large portion of the graph that is not needed for a user to understand the security problem, and 2) significantly increase the accessibility and understandability of the data presented in the attack graph by clearly showing, within a generated visualization of the network topology, the number and type of potential attacks to which each host is exposed.

  8. Effects of secondary prevention clinics on health status in patients with coronary heart disease: 4 year follow-up of a randomized trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D; Deans, H George; Thain, Joan

    2004-10-01

    The long-term effects of disease management programmes for coronary heart disease on health status are unknown. In a randomized trial of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics, we found significantly improved health status at 1 year. Participants were followed-up again at 4 years to determine if improvements had been sustained. Our aim was to evaluate the effects on health of nurse-led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in primary care. A total of 1343 patients with coronary heart disease were randomized to nurse-led secondary prevention clinics or usual care, with follow-up at 1 and 4 years by review of medical case notes and national data sets, and postal questionnaires. The study involved a stratified, random sample of 19 general practices in north-east Scotland. Health status was measured by the SF-36 questionnaire, chest pain by the angina TyPE specification and anxiety and depression by the hospital anxiety and depression scale. At 1 year, there were significant improvements in five of eight SF-36 domains (all functioning scales, pain and general health) in patients randomized to clinics. Role limitations attributed to physical problems improved the most [adjusted difference 8.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.16-12.9]. At 4 years, the intervention group scored higher than control in all domains, but differences were no longer significant. At 1 year, fewer patients in the intervention group reported worsening chest pain (odds ratio 0.59, 95% C1 0.37-0.94). At 4 years, there were no significant differences between the proportion of intervention or control group patients who reported chest pain in the last week or who reported worsening chest pain. No significant effects were observed on anxiety or depression at 1 or 4 years. We have demonstrated previously a significantly greater survival in attendees at nurse-led secondary prevention clinics. Despite this, improvements in health status achieved in the first year of the study were

  9. Randomized controlled trial of a coordinated care intervention to improve risk factor control after stroke or transient ischemic attack in the safety net: Secondary stroke prevention by Uniting Community and Chronic care model teams Early to End Disparities (SUCCEED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towfighi, Amytis; Cheng, Eric M; Ayala-Rivera, Monica; McCreath, Heather; Sanossian, Nerses; Dutta, Tara; Mehta, Bijal; Bryg, Robert; Rao, Neal; Song, Shlee; Razmara, Ali; Ramirez, Magaly; Sivers-Teixeira, Theresa; Tran, Jamie; Mojarro-Huang, Elizabeth; Montoya, Ana; Corrales, Marilyn; Martinez, Beatrice; Willis, Phyllis; Macias, Mireya; Ibrahim, Nancy; Wu, Shinyi; Wacksman, Jeremy; Haber, Hilary; Richards, Adam; Barry, Frances; Hill, Valerie; Mittman, Brian; Cunningham, William; Liu, Honghu; Ganz, David A; Factor, Diane; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2017-02-06

    Recurrent strokes are preventable through awareness and control of risk factors such as hypertension, and through lifestyle changes such as healthier diets, greater physical activity, and smoking cessation. However, vascular risk factor control is frequently poor among stroke survivors, particularly among socio-economically disadvantaged blacks, Latinos and other people of color. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an effective framework for multi-component interventions aimed at improving care processes and outcomes for individuals with chronic disease. In addition, community health workers (CHWs) have played an integral role in reducing health disparities; however, their effectiveness in reducing vascular risk among stroke survivors remains unknown. Our objectives are to develop, test, and assess the economic value of a CCM-based intervention using an Advanced Practice Clinician (APC)-CHW team to improve risk factor control after stroke in an under-resourced, racially/ethnically diverse population. In this single-blind randomized controlled trial, 516 adults (≥40 years) with an ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack or intracerebral hemorrhage within the prior 90 days are being enrolled at five sites within the Los Angeles County safety-net setting and randomized 1:1 to intervention vs usual care. Participants are excluded if they do not speak English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, or Korean or if they are unable to consent. The intervention includes a minimum of three clinic visits in the healthcare setting, three home visits, and Chronic Disease Self-Management Program group workshops in community venues. The primary outcome is blood pressure (BP) control (systolic BP control of other vascular risk factors including lipids and hemoglobin A1c, (3) inflammation (C reactive protein [CRP]), (4) medication adherence, (5) lifestyle factors (smoking, diet, and physical activity), (6) estimated relative reduction in risk for recurrent stroke or myocardial

  10. Attacks on computer systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan V. Vuletić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer systems are a critical component of the human society in the 21st century. Economic sector, defense, security, energy, telecommunications, industrial production, finance and other vital infrastructure depend on computer systems that operate at local, national or global scales. A particular problem is that, due to the rapid development of ICT and the unstoppable growth of its application in all spheres of the human society, their vulnerability and exposure to very serious potential dangers increase. This paper analyzes some typical attacks on computer systems.

  11. Haemochromatosis gene mutations and risk of coronary heart disease: a west of Scotland coronary prevention study (WOSCOPS) substudy

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, I R; Maxwell, F K; Gaffney, D; McMahon, A D; Packard, C J

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To measure the frequency of genotypes of the HFE (haemochromatosis) gene in patients recruited to the west of Scotland coronary prevention study (WOSCOPS), and relate them to the subsequent occurrence of coronary clinical events.

  12. The Office Guidelines Applied to Practice program improves secondary prevention of heart disease in Federally Qualified Healthcare Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesuwa Olomu

    2016-12-01

    Office-GAP resulted in increased use of guideline-based medications for secondary CVD prevention in underserved populations. The Office-GAP program could serve as a model for implementing guideline-based care for other chronic diseases.

  13. Pulse pressure as a haemodynamic variable in systolic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrie, Colin James

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart failure, the heart is unable to pump enough blood to satisfy the requirements of the body. Explanations for this include heart muscle damage after a heart attack. This could be very recently, or in the past, sometimes dating back many years. In other cases the explanation for

  14. Recent "phishing" attacks

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few weeks there has been a marked increase in the number of attacks on CERN made by cybercriminals. Typical attacks arrive in the form of e-mail messages purporting to come from the CERN Help Desk, Mail Service, or some similarly official-sounding entity and suggest that there is a problem with your account, such as it being over-quota. They then ask you to click on a link or to reply and give your password. Please don’t! Be cautious of any unexpected messages containing web links even if they appear to come from known contacts. If you happen to click on such a link and if your permission is requested to run or install software, always decline it. NEVER provide your password or other details if these are requested. These messages try to trick you into clicking on Web links which will help them to install malicious software on your computer, and anti-virus software cannot be relied on to detect all cases. In case of questions on this topic, you may contact mailto:helpdesk@cern.ch. CERN Comput...

  15. [Group therapy. Rehabilitation of heart and hemiplegic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, A

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, ideas and methods for working in group psychoterapy with hemiplegics and post-heart-attack patients in a general hospital in Mexico City are outlined. With hemiplegics support therapy is used and with heart-attack-patients, learning therapy. Both groups meet once a week.

  16. Rehab for the Heart (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-08-24

    Each year, nearly 790,000 adults in the U.S. suffer a heart attack. This podcast discusses the importance of getting cardiac rehab after a heart attack.  Created: 8/24/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 8/24/2017.

  17. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease includes but is not limited to coronary artery disease [heart attack or myocardial infarction, acute coronary ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  18. Heart murmurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  19. The timing hypothesis and hormone replacement therapy: a paradigm shift in the primary prevention of coronary heart disease in women. Part 2: comparative risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodis, Howard N; Mack, Wendy J

    2013-06-01

    A major misperception concerning postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is that the associated risks are large in magnitude and unique to HRT, but over the past 10 years, sufficient data have accumulated so that the magnitude and perspective of risks associated with the primary coronary heart disease prevention therapies of statins, aspirin, and postmenopausal HRT have become more fully defined. Review of randomized controlled trials indicates that the risks of primary prevention therapies and other medications commonly used in women's health are of similar type and magnitude, with the majority of these risks categorized as rare to infrequent (risks of postmenopausal HRT are predominantly rare (risks, including breast cancer, stroke, and venous thromboembolism are common across medications and are rare, and even rarer when HRT is initiated in women younger than 60 or who are less than 10 years since menopause. In Part 1 of this series, the sex-specificity of statins and aspirin and timing of initiation of HRT as modifiers of efficacy in women were reviewed. Herein, the comparative risks of primary prevention therapies in women are discussed. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Lack of current implantable cardioverter defibrillator guidelines application for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in Latin American patients with heart failure: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Zuelgaray, Jorge; Pellizon, Oscar; Muratore, Claudio A; Oropeza, Elsa Silva; Rabinovich, Rafael; Ramos, José Luis; Tentori, Maria Cristina; Reyes, Nicolás; Aguayo, Rubén; Marin, Jorge; Peterson, Brett J

    2013-02-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the application of accepted international implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) guidelines for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. The PLASMA (Probabilidad de Sufrir Muerte Arritmica) study was designed to characterize management of cardiac patients in Latin America. Twelve centres included 1958 consecutively admitted patients in cardiology units in 2008 and 2009. Discharged patients were evaluated for primary prevention, ICD indication and prescription by general cardiologists. Of 1711 discharged patients, 1525 (89%) had data available for evaluating indication status. Class I indications for ICD therapy were met for 153 (10%) patients based on collected data. Only 20 (13%, 95% confidence interval: 7.7-18.4%) patients with indication were prescribed an ICD. Patients prescribed an ICD were younger than patients who were not prescribed an ICD (62 vs. 68 years, P Latin America, international guidelines for primary prevention ICD implantation are not well followed. The main reason is that cardiologists believe that patients do not meet indication criteria, even though study data confirm that criteria are met. This poses a significant challenge and underlines the importance of continuous and improved medical education.

  1. Prophylactic levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Johanna; Rücker, Gerta; Stiller, Brigitte

    2017-08-02

    Low cardiac output syndrome remains a serious complication, and accounts for substantial morbidity and mortality in the postoperative course of paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Standard prophylactic and therapeutic strategies for low cardiac output syndrome are based mainly on catecholamines, which are effective drugs, but have considerable side effects. Levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser, enhances the myocardial function by generating more energy-efficient myocardial contractility than achieved via adrenergic stimulation with catecholamines. Thus potentially, levosimendan is a beneficial alternative to standard medication for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome in paediatric patients after open heart surgery. To review the efficacy and safety of the postoperative prophylactic use of levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. We identified trials via systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science, as well as clinical trial registries, in June 2016. Reference lists from primary studies and review articles were checked for additional references. We only included randomised controlled trials (RCT) in our analysis that compared prophylactic levosimendan with standard medication or placebo, in infants and children up to 18 years of age, who were undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias according to a pre-defined protocol. We obtained additional information from all but one of the study authors of the included studies. We used the five GRADE considerations (study limitations, consistency of effect, imprecision, indirectness, and publication bias) to assess the quality of evidence from the studies that contributed data to the meta-analyses for the prespecified outcomes. We created a 'Summary of findings' table to

  2. Exploring Windows Domain-Level Defenses Against Authentication Attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Curtis, Laura [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the security resilience of the current Windows Active Directory (AD) environments to Pass-the-Hash and Pass- the-Ticket credential theft attacks. While doing this, we discovered a way to trigger the removal of all previously issued authentication credentials for a client, thus preventing their use by attackers. After triggered, the user is forced to contact the domain administrators and to authenticate to the AD to continue. This could become the basis for a response that arrests the spread of a detected attack. Operating in a virtualized XenServer environment, we were able to carefully determine and recreate the conditions necessary to cause this response.

  3. Cyber Attacks and Combat Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carataș Maria Alina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyber terrorism is an intangible danger, a real over the corner threat in the life of individuals,organizations, and governments and is getting harder to deal with its damages. The motivations forthe cyber-attacks are different, depending on the terrorist group, from cybercrime to hacktivism,attacks over the authorities’ servers. Organizations constantly need to find new ways ofstrengthening protection against cyber-attacks, assess their cyber readiness, expand the resiliencecapacity and adopts international security regulations.

  4. Seven Deadliest Social Network Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Timm, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting social networks? Then you need Seven Deadliest Social Network Attacks. This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to social networks like Facebook, Twitter, and MySpace, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable. Attacks detailed in this book include: Social Networking Infrastruct

  5. Seven Deadliest Web Application Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Shema, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting web applications? Then you need Seven Deadliest Web Application Attacks. This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to web applications, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable. .. .. Attacks detailed in this book include: ..: ..; Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) ..; Cross-Site Request Fo

  6. The Timing of Terrorist Attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    I use a simple optimal stopping model to derive policy relevant insights on the timing of one-shot attacks by small autonomous terrorist units or “lone wolf” individuals. A main insight is that an increase in proactive counterterrorism measures can lead to a short term increase in the number...... of attempted terrorist attacks because it makes it more risky for existing terrorist units to pursue further development of capabilities. This is consistent with the events in London in 2005 where a terrorist attack on 7 July was followed by a similar but unsuccessful attack two weeks later....

  7. Relaxing music prevents stress-induced increases in subjective anxiety, systolic blood pressure, and heart rate in healthy males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, W E; Rickard PhD, N S

    2001-01-01

    Previous research suggests that while subjective anxiety is reduced by relaxing music, the effect of music on physiological stress indices is less consistent. In the current study, the effect of relaxing music on participants' subjective and physiological response to stress was explored, with attention paid to methodological factors and mediating variables that might have contributed to inconsistencies in previous studies. Undergraduate students (43 females & 44 males) were exposed to a cognitive stressor task involving preparation for an oral presentation either in the presence of Pachelbel's Canon in D major, or in silence. Measures of subjective anxiety, heart rate, blood pressure, cortisol, and salivary IgA were obtained during rest and after presentation of the stressor. The stressor caused significant increases in subjective anxiety, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure in male and female controls. These stress-induced increases were each prevented by exposure to music, and this effect was independent of gender. Music also enhanced baseline salivary IgA levels in the absence of any stress-induced effects. These findings provide experimental support for claims that music is an effective anxiolytic treatment, the robustness of which is demonstrated by retention of the effect in the presence of a range of potentially mediating variables.

  8. Self-Care for the Prevention and Management of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Barbara; Moser, Debra K; Buck, Harleah G; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Dunbar, Sandra B; Lee, Christopher S; Lennie, Terry A; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Mitchell, Judith E; Treat-Jacobson, Diane J; Webber, David E

    2017-08-31

    Self-care is defined as a naturalistic decision-making process addressing both the prevention and management of chronic illness, with core elements of self-care maintenance, self-care monitoring, and self-care management. In this scientific statement, we describe the importance of self-care in the American Heart Association mission and vision of building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The evidence supporting specific self-care behaviors such as diet and exercise, barriers to self-care, and the effectiveness of self-care in improving outcomes is reviewed, as is the evidence supporting various individual, family-based, and community-based approaches to improving self-care. Although there are many nuances to the relationships between self-care and outcomes, there is strong evidence that self-care is effective in achieving the goals of the treatment plan and cannot be ignored. As such, greater emphasis should be placed on self-care in evidence-based guidelines. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. Meal Timing and Frequency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Ard, Jamy; Baskin, Monica L; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Johnson, Heather M; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Varady, Krista

    2017-02-28

    Eating patterns are increasingly varied. Typical breakfast, lunch, and dinner meals are difficult to distinguish because skipping meals and snacking have become more prevalent. Such eating styles can have various effects on cardiometabolic health markers, namely obesity, lipid profile, insulin resistance, and blood pressure. In this statement, we review the cardiometabolic health effects of specific eating patterns: skipping breakfast, intermittent fasting, meal frequency (number of daily eating occasions), and timing of eating occasions. Furthermore, we propose definitions for meals, snacks, and eating occasions for use in research. Finally, data suggest that irregular eating patterns appear less favorable for achieving a healthy cardiometabolic profile. Intentional eating with mindful attention to the timing and frequency of eating occasions could lead to healthier lifestyle and cardiometabolic risk factor management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Magnesium Presence Prevents Removal of Antigenic Nuclear-Associated Proteins from Bovine Pericardium for Heart Valve Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgliesh, Ailsa J; Liu, Zhi Zhao; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2017-07-01

    Current heart valve prostheses are associated with significant complications, including aggressive immune response, limited valve life expectancy, and inability to grow in juvenile patients. Animal derived "tissue" valves undergo glutaraldehyde fixation to mask tissue antigenicity; however, chronic immunological responses and associated calcification still commonly occur. A heart valve formed from an unfixed bovine pericardium (BP) extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold, in which antigenic burden has been eliminated or significantly reduced, has potential to overcome deficiencies of current bioprostheses. Decellularization and antigen removal methods frequently use sequential solutions extrapolated from analytical chemistry approaches to promote solubility and removal of tissue components from resultant ECM scaffolds. However, the extent to which such prefractionation strategies may inhibit removal of antigenic tissue components has not been explored. We hypothesize that presence of magnesium in prefractionation steps causes DNA precipitation and reduces removal of nuclear-associated antigenic proteins. Keeping all variables consistent bar the addition or absence of magnesium (2 mM magnesium chloride hexahydrate), residual BP ECM scaffold antigenicity and removed antigenicity were assessed, along with residual and removed DNA content, ECM morphology, scaffold composition, and recellularization potential. Furthermore, we used proteomic methods to determine the mechanism by which magnesium presence or absence affects scaffold residual antigenicity. This study demonstrates that absence of magnesium from antigen removal solutions enhances solubility and subsequent removal of antigenic nuclear-associated proteins from BP. We therefore conclude that the primary mechanism of action for magnesium removal during antigen removal processes is avoidance of DNA precipitation, facilitating solubilization and removal of nuclear-associated antigenic proteins. Future studies are

  11. Nutrigenomics, the Microbiome, and Gene-Environment Interactions: New Directions in Cardiovascular Disease Research, Prevention, and Treatment: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane F; Allayee, Hooman; Gerszten, Robert E; Ideraabdullah, Folami; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Ordovás, José M; Rimm, Eric B; Wang, Thomas J; Bennett, Brian J

    2016-06-01

    Cardiometabolic diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide and are strongly linked to both genetic and nutritional factors. The field of nutrigenomics encompasses multiple approaches aimed at understanding the effects of diet on health or disease development, including nutrigenetic studies investigating the relationship between genetic variants and diet in modulating cardiometabolic risk, as well as the effects of dietary components on multiple "omic" measures, including transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, lipidomics, epigenetic modifications, and the microbiome. Here, we describe the current state of the field of nutrigenomics with respect to cardiometabolic disease research and outline a direction for the integration of multiple omics techniques in future nutrigenomic studies aimed at understanding mechanisms and developing new therapeutic options for cardiometabolic disease treatment and prevention. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. A randomized multifactorial intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (Inter99): The long-term effect on physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, L.V.H.; Ladelund, S.; Borch-Johnsen, K.

    2008-01-01

    on the development in physical activity when compared with group C. This was regardless of baseline physical activity level. At 36-month follow-up there was no significant difference between groups A and B. There was no intervention effect among women. CONCLUSIONS: Only men seemed to benefit from the intervention.......AIM: To examine the effect of a randomized multiple risk factor intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) on the development in physical activity over a 36-month period. METHODS: Two random samples (high intensity intervention, group A, n=11,708; low intensity intervention......, group B, n=1,308) were invited for a health examination, an assessment of absolute risk of developing IHD, and an individualized lifestyle intervention. The participation rate was 52.5%. High-risk persons in group A were also offered diet/physical activity and/or smoking cessation group counselling...

  13. A randomized multifactorial intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (Inter99): the long-term effect on physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Huth Smith, Lisa; Ladelund, Steen; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of a randomized multiple risk factor intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) on the development in physical activity over a 36-month period. METHODS: Two random samples (high intensity intervention, group A, n=11,708; low intensity intervention....... High-risk persons in group B were referred to their GP. High-risk persons were re-counselled after 12 and 36 months. The control group (group C, n=5,264, response rate=61.3%) answered a mailed questionnaire. Data were analysed using longitudinal linear regression models with random effects. MAIN...... OUTCOME: Change in physical activity from baseline to 12-and 36-month follow-up. RESULTS: In men, the high-intensity (group A) intervention had a beneficial effect at 12-month follow-up, whereas after 36 months both the high-intensity and the low-intensity (group B) intervention had a beneficial effect...

  14. What is killing? People's knowledge about coronary heart disease, attitude towards prevention and main risk reduction barriers in Ismailia, Egypt (descriptive cross-sectional study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seef, Sameh; Jeppsson, Anders; Stafström, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a public health concern everywhere, especially ischemic or coronary heart diseases (CHD) which are on top of causes list of mortality and morbidity in both genders globally. From which nearly 80% can be because of modifiable risks. In Egypt, there is a lack of studies on the knowledge of people about coronary heart diseases and its modifiable risks. So, this research reported here we designed to measure the dimensions of peoples knowledge about CHD and their attitude towards prevention, and to identify the main risk reduction barriers. By using comprehensive cross-sectional, descriptive research design, all adult individuals attending the family health clinic at Suez Canal University Hospital were eligible for inclusion with total number 125 participants. An interview questionnaire designed and used to collect data. The study revealed that (10.4%) of participants had a history of CHD, and (7.2%) had a family history of CHD. 79.2% Had a satisfactory total knowledge about CHD, and (94.4%) had a positive total attitude towards prevention. Risk reduction barriers as a medical setting barriers were (24%), patient related barriers were (22.4%). Community-societal barriers were almost the same as knowledge barriers which were around (16%). At last the systemic-organizational barriers were (9.6%). The findings settled that, total knowledge about CHD was satisfactory but lower than the level total of attitude. More effort the health system needs to improve the settings and engage patients in their plans and breaking related barriers, with development of health education programs based on needs assessment. Further studies we recommend to explore the reasons and follow up the changes.

  15. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Stroke Act Fast Preventing a Stroke Afib-Stroke Connection Lifestyle Risk Factors Medical Risk Factors Uncontrollable Risk Factors Impact of Stroke Women and Stroke Pediatric Stroke Minorities and Stroke ...

  16. Nursing approach in primary care of diabetes and heart as a key tool for prevention, care and promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daulys Alessa Mendinueta Marin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently it is clear the impact of primary care for people with diabetes and the belief that education about this disease is indispensable in the therapeutic approach, as this can contribute to an individualized patient plan that allows their subsequent treatment and the preservation of their health. Therefore, the nursing professional and the family should play a leading role, in performing preventive and educational activities, and rehabilitative care through building individual and community strategies. In the following guide you will find a series of interventions in primary care, such as: the role of the nurse and the vision of her in diabetes, assessment, monitoring and implementation of the model of Callista Roy, nursing care process, nutritional recommendations and indicators about the patient and family; in order to decrease risk factors and prevent such diseases.

  17. Global Mapping of Cyber Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Identifying factors behind countries weakness to cyber - attacks is an important step towards addressing these weaknesses at the root level. For...the lowest rates of cyber - attacks . This is surprising given the bad cyber reputation of some African countries such as Nigeria. Our research has many policy implications.

  18. Superposition Attacks on Cryptographic Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Funder, Jakob Løvstad; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2011-01-01

    string model. While our protocol is classical, it is sound against a cheating unbounded quantum prover and computational zero-knowledge even if the verifier is allowed a superposition attack. Finally, we consider multiparty computation and show that for the most general type of attack, simulation based...

  19. Multiculturalism & The Charlie Hebdo Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2016-01-01

    The attack on Charlie Hebdo has by many been linked to multiculturalism. But it is unclear exactly how the connection between multiculturalism and the attack should be understood and whether there indeed is such a connection. The article discusses this by distinguishing between different senses o...

  20. Automated Generation of Attack Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Roberto; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2014-01-01

    -prone and impracticable for large systems. Nonetheless, the automated generation of attack trees has only been explored in connection to computer networks and levering rich models, whose analysis typically leads to an exponential blow-up of the state space. We propose a static analysis approach where attack trees...

  1. CHA2DS2-VASc Score (Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 [Doubled], Diabetes Mellitus, Prior Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack [Doubled], Vascular Disease, Age 65-74, Female) for Stroke in Asian Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Korean Nationwide Sample Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yang, Pil-Sung; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jong-Youn; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Joung, Boyoung; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-06-01

    The CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc stroke score (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 (doubled), diabetes mellitus, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (doubled), vascular disease, age 65-74, female) is used in most guidelines for risk stratification in atrial fibrillation (AF), but most data for this score have been derived in Western populations. Ethnic differences in stroke risk may be present. Our objective was to investigate risk factors for stroke in AF and application of the CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score in an Asian AF population from Korea. A total of 5855 oral anticoagulant-naive nonvalvular AF patients aged ≥20 years were enrolled from Korea National Health Insurance Service Sample cohort from 2002 to 2008 and were followed up until December 2013. The incidence rates (per 100 person-years) of ischemic stroke were 3.32 in the total population, being 0.23 in low-risk (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score 0 [male] or 1 [female]) and 4.59 in high-risk patients (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc ≥2). Incidence rates of ischemic stroke or the composite thromboembolism end point showed a clear increase with increasing CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score. On multivariable analysis, significant associations between CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc risk factors and ischemic stroke were observed; however, the significance of vascular disease or diabetes mellitus was attenuated after multivariate adjustment, and female sex (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.84) had a lower risk of ischemic stroke than males. Patients who were categorized as low risk consistently had an event rate Heart Association, Inc.

  2. THE USE OF ATORVASTATIN FOR THE PREVENTION OF RECURRENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION AFTER ELECTRICAL CARDIOVERSION IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Tereshchenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of atorvastatin on the rate of atrial fibrillation (AF recurrence after electrical cardioversion in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD and paroxysmal AF.Material and Methods. Sixty outpatients and inpatients (aged 30-70 y.o. with IHD and paroxysmal AF were included into the open controlled randomized study immediately after the restoration of sinus rhythm by electrical cardioversion. Patients were randomized into 2 groups. Patients in Group 1 (n=30 received standard therapy recommended for maintenance of sinus rhythm in paroxysmal AF and atorvastatin (average dose 23.5±3.7 mg/day, and patients in Group 2 (n=30 had only the standard therapy. Routine blood analysis, blood chemistry (transaminases, creatine phosphokinase, creatinine, bilirubin, glucose, lipid profile, daily ECG monitoring, treatment safety evaluation were performed. AF relapse was considered as a primary endpoint.Results. Significant reduction in the rate of AF recurrence in was revealed in patients treated with atorvastatin. According to daily ECG monitoring AF relapse was recorded in 8.3 and 48% of patients in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively (p<0.001. Episodes of sinus tachycardia decreased on 52.3% (p<0.001 and 48,5% (p<0.01 in patients of the 1st and the 2 nd group, respectively.Conclusion. The addition of atorvastatin to the standard therapy for maintenance of sinus rhythm reduces effectively the rate of AF recurrence in patients with IHD and paroxysmal AF.

  3. Use of nitroglycerin by bolus prevents intensive care unit admission in patients with acute hypertensive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Suprat Saely; Kwiatkowski, Gregory M; Millis, Scott R; Purakal, John D; Mahajan, Arushi P; Levy, Phillip D

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare health care resource utilization among patients who were given intravenous nitroglycerin for acute heart failure (AHF) in the emergency department (ED) by intermittent bolus, continuous infusion, or a combination of both. We retrospectively identified 395 patients that received nitroglycerin therapy in the ED for the treatment of AHF over a 5-year period. Patients that received intermittent bolus (n=124) were compared with continuous infusion therapy (n=182) and combination therapy of bolus and infusion (n=89). The primary outcomes were the frequency of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and hospital length of stay (LOS). On unadjusted analysis, rates of ICU admission were significantly lower in the bolus vs infusion and combination groups (48.4% vs 68.7% vs 83%, respectively; PICU admission rate remained, and hospital LOS was 1.9 days shorter compared with infusion therapy alone. Use of intubation (bolus [8.9%] vs infusion [8.8%] vs combination [16.9%]; P=.096) and bilevel positive airway pressure (bolus [26.6%] vs infusion [20.3%] vs combination [29.2%]; P=.21) were similar as was the incidence of hypotension, myocardial injury, and worsening renal function. In ED patients with AHF, intravenous nitroglycerin by intermittent bolus was associated with a lower ICU admission rate and a shorter hospital LOS compared with continuous infusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thromboembolism in pregnancy: challenges and controversies in the prevention of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism and management of anticoagulation in women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLintock, Claire

    2014-05-01

    Thromboembolism in pregnancy is an important clinical issue. Despite identification of maternal and pregnancy-specific risk factors for development of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism, limited data are available to inform on optimal approaches for prevention. The relatively low overall prevalence of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism has prompted debate about the validity of recommendations, which are mainly based on expert opinion, and have resulted in an increased use of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis in pregnancy and postpartum. A pragmatic approach is required in the absence of more robust data. Anticoagulation management of pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves is particularly challenging. Continuation of therapeutic anticoagulation during pregnancy is essential to prevent valve thrombosis. Warfarin, the most effective anticoagulant, is associated with adverse fetal outcomes, including embryopathy and stillbirth. Fetal outcome is improved with therapeutic-dose low-molecular-weight heparin, but there may be more thromboembolic complications. More intensive anticoagulation, targeting higher trough anti-Xa levels, may reduce the risk of valve thrombosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase increases cardiac peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha expression and fatty acid oxidation and prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced heart dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosatos, Konstantinos; Drosatos-Tampakaki, Zoi; Khan, Raffay; Homma, Shunichi; Schulze, P Christian; Zannis, Vassilis I; Goldberg, Ira J

    2011-10-21

    Septic shock results from bacterial infection and is associated with multi-organ failure, high mortality, and cardiac dysfunction. Sepsis causes both myocardial inflammation and energy depletion. We hypothesized that reduced cardiac energy production is a primary cause of ventricular dysfunction in sepsis. The JNK pathway is activated in sepsis and has also been implicated in impaired fatty acid oxidation in several tissues. Therefore, we tested whether JNK activation inhibits cardiac fatty acid oxidation and whether blocking JNK would restore fatty acid oxidation during LPS treatment. LPS treatment of C57BL/6 mice and adenovirus-mediated activation of the JNK pathway in cardiomyocytes inhibited peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α expression and fatty acid oxidation. Surprisingly, none of the adaptive responses that have been described in other types of heart failure, such as increased glucose utilization, reduced αMHC:βMHC ratio or induction of certain microRNAs, occurred in LPS-treated mice. Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a general JNK inhibitor (SP600125) increased fatty acid oxidation in mice and a cardiomyocyte-derived cell line. JNK inhibition also prevented LPS-mediated reduction in fatty acid oxidation and cardiac dysfunction. Inflammation was not alleviated in LPS-treated mice that received the JNK inhibitor. We conclude that activation of JNK signaling reduces fatty acid oxidation and prevents the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α down-regulation that occurs with LPS.

  6. Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults: Synopsis of the 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Hypertension Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Robert M; Whelton, Paul K

    2018-03-06

    In November 2017, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) released a clinical practice guideline for the prevention, detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure (BP) in adults. This article summarizes the major recommendations. In 2014, the ACC and the AHA appointed a multidisciplinary committee to update previous reports of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. The committee reviewed literature and commissioned systematic reviews and meta-analyses on out-of-office BP monitoring, the optimal target for BP lowering, the comparative benefits and harms of different classes of antihypertensive agents, and the comparative benefits and harms of initiating therapy with a single antihypertensive agent or a combination of 2 agents. This article summarizes key recommendations in the following areas: BP classification, BP measurement, screening for secondary hypertension, nonpharmacologic therapy, BP thresholds and cardiac risk estimation to guide drug treatment, treatment goals (general and for patients with diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and advanced age), choice of initial drug therapy, resistant hypertension, and strategies to improve hypertension control.

  7. Role of electrocardiography and echocardiography in prevention and predicting outcome of subjects at increased risk of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bello, Vitantonio; La Carrubba, Salvatore; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Di Salvo, Giovanni; Caso, Pio; La Canna, Giovanni; Erlicher, Andrea; Badano, Luigi; Romano, Maria Francesca; Zito, Concetta; Vriz, Olga; Conte, Lorenzo; Carerj, Scipione

    2015-02-01

    Asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (ALVD) is relatively common in both community and high-risk populations. Early pharmacological intervention can improve clinical outcomes in subjects with this condition. This multicentre study consists on electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examination of stage A and B heart failure (HF) asymptomatic subjects with one or more cardiovascular risk factors, to assess the prognostic value of cardiovascular risk factors per se, clinical history, and electrocardiographic and echocardiographic parameters in prediction of progression of HF and/or in development of cardiovascular primary or secondary events. A total of 2142 asymptomatic subjects (mean age 63 years, 1162 males) performed an electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examination. Electrocardiogram (ECG) pathological signs according to Minnesota code and left ventricular dysfunction both systolic and diastolic by echocardiography were evaluated. There were 2002 subjects who were followed up for 26 ± 11 months, observing their primary and secondary end points. At follow up, the study population presented 111 primary end points (5.2%) and 441 secondary end points (20.6%). ECG criteria of LV hypertrophy and signs of ischaemia or previous myocardial infarction (p < 0.0001) were highly significantly related to primary end points. Both ECG and echocardiography (systolic function) are able at Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival curves to predict primary end points (p < 0.0001). Presence or absence of left ventricular systolic and /or diastolic dysfunction has an incremental value in comparison to cardiovascular risk factors, clinical history, and ECG findings to predict both the evolution towards a more severe HF stage (stage C) and also the occurrence of cardiovascular events. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. World Heart Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    For World Heart Day, learn more about what heart-healthy steps you can take in the workplace.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2009.

  9. Fatal injection: a survey of modern code injection attack countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Mitropoulos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available With a code injection attack (CIA an attacker can introduce malicious code into a computer program or system that fails to properly encode data that comes from an untrusted source. A CIA can have different forms depending on the execution context of the application and the location of the programming flaw that leads to the attack. Currently, CIAs are considered one of the most damaging classes of application attacks since they can severely affect an organisation’s infrastructure and cause financial and reputational damage to it. In this paper we examine and categorize the countermeasures developed to detect the various attack forms. In particular, we identify two distinct categories. The first incorporates static program analysis tools used to eliminate flaws that can lead to such attacks during the development of the system. The second involves the use of dynamic detection safeguards that prevent code injection attacks while the system is in production mode. Our analysis is based on nonfunctional characteristics that are considered critical when creating security mechanisms. Such characteristics involve usability, overhead, implementation dependencies, false positives and false negatives. Our categorization and analysis can help both researchers and practitioners either to develop novel approaches, or use the appropriate mechanisms according to their needs.

  10. Preparing for change in the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease: a qualitative evaluation of cardiac rehabilitation within a region of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alexander M; Barbour, Rosaline S; McIntyre, Paul D

    2002-09-01

    Secondary prevention of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is often poorly managed and its benefits attained in only a minority of those with CHD. Guidelines developed in the United Kingdom and North America suggest that in future cardiac rehabilitation programmes should provide services through individualized programmes that cater for a wide range of conditions associated with CHD. This will involve substantial and costly changes to current programmes that are mostly standardized and for postmyocardial infarction patients. Based on change theory, this study examined the dynamics, strengths and weaknesses of an existing programme in a Scottish region which was due to undergo the changes suggested by guidelines. To examine the perceived provision of secondary prevention services for CHD from the perspectives of health professionals within one region in the West of Scotland. A purposive sample of 14 health professionals (eight primary and six secondary care health professionals) was selected to cover a range of professional roles including both specialists and generalists. Separate focus group discussions (2) were held with primary care and secondary care professionals. Whilst the health professionals were enthusiastic about CHD prevention and their involvement, they perceived barriers to the success of the existing service as being complex and multifactorial, including patient, social and service-related factors. Although both groups identified motivation as the most influential personal factor, secondary care staff tended to focus on the importance of patient factors in influencing motivation to change, whereas the primary care staff referred more to the cumulative effects of social and cultural factors. Professionals highlighted weaknesses in the transition between hospital and community-based services with regard to the information flow between primary and secondary care. Although the study has immediate relevance for the local area, it highlighted issues of more

  11. Anatomy of the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connect the arterial and venous circulatory subsystems. The importance of capillaries lies in their very thin walls. ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Learn more about participating in a clinical ...

  12. Analisis Explotasi Keamanan Web Denial of Service Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junita Juwita Siregar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Internet network which is public and global is unsafe, so the security of public Internet-based information system needs to be considered. When a data is sent from one computer to another on the Internet, it will pass through a number of other computers that are meant to give the user an opportunity to take over one or several computers. denial of service attacks is one of the web security systems which can inhibit the activity of the work of a service even turn it off, so the authorized user cannot use the service. There is an attempt of certain parties to prevent a user access to a system or network by flooding the traffic network with so much data from unregistered users. It makes the user unable to log into the network system. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the cause of the denial of service attack on a web system using literature study. The result of thisresearch is a method to overcome denial of service attack as well as the prevention techniques. This study concludes that securing techniques should be implemented extra carefully on DoS attacks (Denial-of-Service Attacks. Therefore, the attacker cannot overwhelm the network IP address and disrupt communication between a server and its client that may reject user’s request access to a system or a network service provided by a host.

  13. On Node Replication Attack in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Qabulio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available WSNs (Wireless Sensor Networks comprise a large number of small, inexpensive, low power and memory constrained sensing devices (called sensor nodes that are densely deployed to measure a given physical phenomenon. Since WSNs are commonly deployed in a hostile and unattended environment, it is easy for an adversary to physically capture one or more legitimate sensor nodes, re-program and redeploy them in the network. As a result, the adversary becomes able to deploy several identical copies of physically captured nodes in the network in order to perform illegitimate activities. This type of attack is referred to as Node Replication Attack or Clone Node Attack. By launching node replication attack, an adversary can easily get control on the network which consequently is the biggest threat to confidentiality, integrity and availability of data and services. Thus, detection and prevention of node replication attack in WSNs has become an active area of research and to date more than two dozen schemes have been proposed, which address this issue. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review, classification and comparative analysis of twenty five of these schemes which help to detect and/or prevent node replication attack in WSNs

  14. Human behaviour can trigger large carnivore attacks in developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteriani, Vincenzo; Delgado, María del Mar; Pinchera, Francesco; Naves, Javier; Fernández-Gil, Alberto; Kojola, Ilpo; Härkönen, Sauli; Norberg, Harri; Frank, Jens; Fedriani, José María; Sahlén, Veronica; Støen, Ole-Gunnar; Swenson, Jon E; Wabakken, Petter; Pellegrini, Mario; Herrero, Stephen; López-Bao, José Vicente

    2016-02-03

    The media and scientific literature are increasingly reporting an escalation of large carnivore attacks on humans in North America and Europe. Although rare compared to human fatalities by other wildlife, the media often overplay large carnivore attacks on humans, causing increased fear and negative attitudes towards coexisting with and conserving these species. Although large carnivore populations are generally increasing in developed countries, increased numbers are not solely responsible for the observed rise in the number of attacks by large carnivores. Here we show that an increasing number of people are involved in outdoor activities and, when doing so, some people engage in risk-enhancing behaviour that can increase the probability of a risky encounter and a potential attack. About half of the well-documented reported attacks have involved risk-enhancing human behaviours, the most common of which is leaving children unattended. Our study provides unique insight into the causes, and as a result the prevention, of large carnivore attacks on people. Prevention and information that can encourage appropriate human behaviour when sharing the landscape with large carnivores are of paramount importance to reduce both potentially fatal human-carnivore encounters and their consequences to large carnivores.

  15. WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, J.

    2013-04-12

    Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

  16. Shark Attack Project - Marine Attack at Towed Hydrophone Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalmijn, Adrianus J

    2005-01-01

    The original objective of the SIO Marine Attack project was to identify the electric and magnetic fields causing sharks to inflict serious damage upon the towed hydrophone arrays of US Navy submarines...

  17. High-Fiber Diet and Acetate Supplementation Change the Gut Microbiota and Prevent the Development of Hypertension and Heart Failure in Hypertensive Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Francine Z; Nelson, Erin; Chu, Po-Yin; Horlock, Duncan; Fiedler, April; Ziemann, Mark; Tan, Jian K; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; El-Osta, Assam; Mackay, Charles R; Kaye, David M

    2017-03-07

    Dietary intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with lower incidence of hypertension, but the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. Here, we evaluated the effect of a high-fiber diet and supplementation with the short-chain fatty acid acetate on the gut microbiota and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Gut microbiome, cardiorenal structure/function, and blood pressure were examined in sham and mineralocorticoid excess-treated mice with a control diet, high-fiber diet, or acetate supplementation. We also determined the renal and cardiac transcriptome of mice treated with the different diets. We found that high consumption of fiber modified the gut microbiota populations and increased the abundance of acetate-producing bacteria independently of mineralocorticoid excess. Both fiber and acetate decreased gut dysbiosis, measured by the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, and increased the prevalence of Bacteroides acidifaciens . Compared with mineralocorticoid-excess mice fed a control diet, both high-fiber diet and acetate supplementation significantly reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressures, cardiac fibrosis, and left ventricular hypertrophy. Acetate had similar effects and markedly reduced renal fibrosis. Transcriptome analyses showed that the protective effects of high fiber and acetate were accompanied by the downregulation of cardiac and renal Egr1 , a master cardiovascular regulator involved in cardiac hypertrophy, cardiorenal fibrosis, and inflammation. We also observed the upregulation of a network of genes involved in circadian rhythm in both tissues and downregulation of the renin-angiotensin system in the kidney and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in the heart. A diet high in fiber led to changes in the gut microbiota that played a protective role in the development of cardiovascular disease. The favorable effects of fiber may be explained by the generation and distribution of one of the main metabolites of the gut

  18. Role of Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Measurement in Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease Among Chinese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi Ho; Woo, Yu Cho; Chow, Wing Sun; Cheung, Chloe Yu Yan; Fong, Carol Ho Yi; Yuen, Michele Mae Ann; Xu, Aimin; Tse, Hung Fat; Lam, Karen Siu Ling

    2017-06-06

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has demonstrated beneficial effects on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. In cross-sectional studies, an association of raised circulating FGF21 levels with coronary heart disease (CHD) was found in some but not all studies. Here we investigated prospectively whether baseline serum FGF21 levels could predict incident CHD in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and no known cardiovascular diseases. Baseline serum FGF21 levels were measured in 3528 Chinese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus recruited from the Hong Kong West Diabetes Registry. The role of baseline serum FGF21 levels in predicting incident CHD over a median follow-up of 3.8 years was analyzed using Cox regression analysis. Among 3528 recruited subjects without known cardiovascular diseases, 147 (4.2%) developed CHD over a mean follow-up of 4 years. Baseline serum log-transformed FGF21 levels were significantly higher in those who had incident CHD than those who did not (222.7 pg/mL [92.8-438.4] versus 151.1 pg/mL [75.6-274.6]; P 206.22 pg/mL derived from our study, independently predicted incident CHD (hazard ratio, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.10-2.19; P =0.013) and significantly improved net reclassification index and integrated discrimination improvement after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. We have demonstrated, for the first time, that serum FGF21 level is an independent predictor of incident CHD and might be usefully utilized as a biomarker for identifying type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects with raised CHD risk, for primary prevention. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  19. Countermeasures Against Blinding Attack on Superconducting Nanowire Detectors for QKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elezov M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs are used in Quantum Key Distribution (QKD instead of single-photon avalanche photodiodes. Recently bright-light control of the SSPD has been demonstrated. This attack employed a “backdoor” in the detector biasing technique. We developed the autoreset system which returns the SSPD to superconducting state when it is latched. We investigate latched state of the SSPD and define limit conditions for effective blinding attack. Peculiarity of the blinding attack is a long nonsingle photon response of the SSPD. It is much longer than usual single photon response. Besides, we need follow up response duration of the SSPD. These countermeasures allow us to prevent blind attack on SSPDs for Quantum Key Distribution.

  20. Securing Cloud Computing from Different Attacks Using Intrusion Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Achbarou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new way of integrating a set of old technologies to implement a new paradigm that creates an avenue for users to have access to shared and configurable resources through internet on-demand. This system has many common characteristics with distributed systems, hence, the cloud computing also uses the features of networking. Thus the security is the biggest issue of this system, because the services of cloud computing is based on the sharing. Thus, a cloud computing environment requires some intrusion detection systems (IDSs for protecting each machine against attacks. The aim of this work is to present a classification of attacks threatening the availability, confidentiality and integrity of cloud resources and services. Furthermore, we provide literature review of attacks related to the identified categories. Additionally, this paper also introduces related intrusion detection models to identify and prevent these types of attacks.

  1. The Cyber-Physical Attacker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    the security properties of CPSs, as a system cannot be secured without defining the threats it is subject to. In this work an attacker scenario is presented which addresses the peculiarities of a cyber-physical adversary, and we discuss how this scenario relates to other attacker models popular in the security......The world of Cyber-Physical Systems ranges from industrial to national interest applications. Even though these systems are pervading our everyday life, we are still far from fully understanding their security properties. Devising a suitable attacker model is a crucial element when studying...

  2. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease: integration of new data, evolving views, revised goals, and role of rosuvastatin in management. A comprehensive survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kones R

    2011-06-01

    . Hence, after all such fractional reductions are multiplied, only a modest portion of total cardiovascular risk burden is actually being eliminated, and the full potential of risk reduction remains unrealized. Worldwide the situation is similar, with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome approaching 50%. Primordial prevention, resulting from healthful lifestyle habits that do not permit the appearance of risk factors, is the preferred method to lower cardiovascular risk. Lowering the prevalence of obesity is the most urgent matter, and is pleiotropic since it affects blood pressure, lipid profiles, glucose metabolism, inflammation, and atherothrombotic disease progression. Physical activity also improves several risk factors, with the additional potential to lower heart rate. Given the current obstacles, success of primordial prevention remains uncertain. At the same time, the consequences of delay and inaction will inevitably be disastrous, and the sense of urgency mounts. Since most CHD events arise in a large subpopulation of low- to moderate-risk individuals, identifying a high proportion of those who will go on to develop events with accuracy remains unlikely. Without a refinement in risk prediction, the current model of targeting high-risk individuals for aggressive therapy may not succeed alone, especially given the rising burden of risk. Estimating cardiovascular risk over a period of 10 years, using scoring systems such as Framingham or SCORE, continues to enjoy widespread use and is recommended for all adults. Limitations in the former have been of concern, including the under- or over-estimation of risk in specific populations, a relatively short 10-year risk horizon, focus on myocardial infarction and CHD death, and exclusion of family history. Classification errors may occur in up to 37% of individuals, particularly women and the young. Several different scoring systems are discussed in this review. The use of lifetime risk is an important conceptual advance

  3. Gas in Attack and Gas in Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fries, Amos A

    1919-01-01

    Carrying out a gas attack is the most technical and dangerous of war's attacks, not only to those on board the airplane that is initiating the attack, but also to those friendly troops on the ground for miles around...

  4. Social Engineering Attack Detection Model: SEADMv2

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, F

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available and is only able to cater for social engineering attacks that use bidirectional communication. Previous research discovered that social engineering attacks can be classified into three different categories, namely attacks that utilise bidirectional...

  5. Neuroradiological study of transient ischemic attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takusagawa, Yoshihiko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Ichiki, Ken; Suga, Takeshi; Nishigaki, Shinichi

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-two patients with carotid TIAs and thirteen patients with vertebrobasilar TIAs were investigated by angiography and computed tomography. TIA was diagnosed by clinical symptoms in accordance with the criteria for TIA of the Joint Committee for Stroke Facilities in the U.S.A. (1974). The 65 patients with TIAs included 49 males and 16 females with average age of 63.5 years old at the initial episode of TIA. As for the diseases associated with TIA, hypertension (51 %), diabetes mellitus (15 %) and ischemic heart diseases (11 %) were the major disorders. Atrial fibrillation was observed in 2 cases. Intervals from last TIA attack to angiography were less than 7 days in 22 cases, 8 ∼ 30 days in 19 cases, 1 ∼ 4 monthes in 14 cases and more than 4 monthes in 10 cases, respectively. The cases in which angiography was done earlier after attacks displayed more abnormal findings. In 52 patients with caroted TIAs the artherosclerotic change of extracranial portion of the internal carotid artery was found in 14 cases (27 %), that of intracranial portion of the artery in 11 cases (21 %) and both lesions in 2 cases (4 %). On the other hand, in 13 patients with vertebrobasilar TIAs, this change was observed in 4 cases at the extracranival potion and in 1 case at the intracranial potion (siphon) of the internal carotid artery. Abnormal CT findings were found in 29 of 65 patients, namely 9 had ventricular dilatation and brain atrophy, 6 had cerebral infarction which was not associated with associated with symptoms of TIA. In carotid TIAs, Cerebral infarction was associated with symptoms of TIAs in 15 cases, namely 10 had a small low density area in the basal ganglia near the internal capsule and 5 had a low density area in the cortical or subcortical region. All of these 5 cases had cerebral embolism, which recanalized after attacks. (J.P.N.)

  6. Genetic attack on neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  7. Genetic attack on neural cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-01-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size

  8. Panic Attacks and Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in panic attacks. For example, if a grizzly bear came after you, your body would react instinctively. ... panic disorder Major life stress, such as the death or serious illness of a loved one A ...

  9. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... meal and snack options can help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty ...

  10. The contribution of qualitative research in designing a complex intervention for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in two different healthcare systems.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corrrigan, Mairead

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Developing complex interventions for testing in randomised controlled trials is of increasing importance in healthcare planning. There is a need for careful design of interventions for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). It has been suggested that integrating qualitative research in the development of a complex intervention may contribute to optimising its design but there is limited evidence of this in practice. This study aims to examine the contribution of qualitative research in developing a complex intervention to improve the provision and uptake of secondary prevention of CHD within primary care in two different healthcare systems. METHODS: In four general practices, one rural and one urban, in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, patients with CHD were purposively selected. Four focus groups with patients (N = 23) and four with staff (N = 29) informed the development of the intervention by exploring how it could be tailored and integrated with current secondary prevention activities for CHD in the two healthcare settings. Following an exploratory trial the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention were discussed in four focus groups (17 patients) and 10 interviews (staff). The data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Integrating qualitative research into the development of the intervention provided depth of information about the varying impact, between the two healthcare systems, of different funding and administrative arrangements, on their provision of secondary prevention and identified similar barriers of time constraints, training needs and poor patient motivation. The findings also highlighted the importance to patients of stress management, the need for which had been underestimated by the researchers. The qualitative evaluation provided depth of detail not found in evaluation questionnaires. It highlighted how the intervention needed to be more practical by minimising administration

  11. AntibIoTic: Protecting IoT Devices Against DDoS Attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Donno, Michele; Dragoni, Nicola; Giaretta, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    The 2016 is remembered as the year that showed to the world how dangerous Distributed Denial of Service attacks can be. Gauge of the disruptiveness of DDoS attacks is the number of bots involved: the bigger the botnet, the more powerful the attack. This character, along with the increasing availa...... availability of connected and insecure IoT devices, makes DDoS and IoT the perfect pair for the malware industry. In this paper we present the main idea behind AntibIoTic, a palliative solution to prevent DDoS attacks perpetrated through IoT devices.......The 2016 is remembered as the year that showed to the world how dangerous Distributed Denial of Service attacks can be. Gauge of the disruptiveness of DDoS attacks is the number of bots involved: the bigger the botnet, the more powerful the attack. This character, along with the increasing...

  12. Neutralizing SQL Injection Attack Using Server Side Code Modification in Web Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asish Kumar Dalai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports on web application security risks show that SQL injection is the top most vulnerability. The journey of static to dynamic web pages leads to the use of database in web applications. Due to the lack of secure coding techniques, SQL injection vulnerability prevails in a large set of web applications. A successful SQL injection attack imposes a serious threat to the database, web application, and the entire web server. In this article, the authors have proposed a novel method for prevention of SQL injection attack. The classification of SQL injection attacks has been done based on the methods used to exploit this vulnerability. The proposed method proves to be efficient in the context of its ability to prevent all types of SQL injection attacks. Some popular SQL injection attack tools and web application security datasets have been used to validate the model. The results obtained are promising with a high accuracy rate for detection of SQL injection attack.

  13. Burden and Prevention of Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients with Concomitant Chronic Heart Failure and Coronary Artery Disease: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Louis; Khoury, Hanane; Welner, Sharon; Briere, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-06-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) or coronary artery disease (CAD) confers risk for thromboembolism and secondary adverse cardiac events (ACEs) (e.g., mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke). When HF and CAD occur concomitantly, ACE risk is reported to be elevated. We investigated ACEs, their epidemiology, and the resulting burden among patients with concomitant HF and CAD through a structured review of recent literature. Antithrombotic treatment for ACE prevention was assessed. Pertinent databases (PubMed, other) were searched for relevant articles published from January 2004 to March 2015. Data collected included ACE incidence, healthcare resource use, costs, change in quality of life attributed to ACEs, and treatment practice for prevention of ACEs in patients with concomitant HF and CAD. Mortality rates for patients with both HF and CAD ranged from 4.9-12.3% at 30 days to 13.7-86% for periods between 9.9 months and 10 years. Incidence of ACEs among HF patients with CAD is, respectively, at least 82% and 15% higher than for patients without HF or without CAD, except for stroke investigated in two studies. All-cause and HF-related hospitalization is the main driver of the economic burden in patients with HF, the majority of whom had CAD origin. Despite high prevalence of ischemic complications, there is limited evidence to support the use of warfarin-type antithrombotics among HF patients. This study confirms that patients with concomitant HF and CAD are at elevated risk for ACEs and suggests the need for effective new antithrombotic treatments to further decrease ischemic complication rates in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease: a 10-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, E K; Murchie, P; Lee, A J; Ritchie, L D; Campbell, N C

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease (CHD) in primary care on total mortality and coronary event rates after 10 years. Follow-up of a randomised controlled trial by review of national datasets. Stratified random sample of 19 general practices in northeast Scotland. Original study cohort of 1343 patients, aged coronary events (non-fatal myocardial infarctions (MIs) and coronary deaths). Mean (SD) follow-up was at 10.2 (0.19) years. No significant differences in total mortality or coronary events were found at 10 years. 254 patients in the intervention group and 277 patients in the control group had died: cumulative death rates were 38% and 41%, respectively (p = 0.177). 196 coronary events occurred in the intervention group and 195 in the control group: cumulative event rates were 29.1% and 29.1%, respectively (p = 0.994). When Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, adjusted for age, sex and general practice, was used, proportional hazard ratios were 0.88 (0.74 to 1.04) for total mortality and 0.96 (0.79 to 1.18) for coronary death or non-fatal MI. No significant differences in the distribution of cause of death classifications was found at either 4 or 10 years. After 10 years, differences between groups were no longer significant. Total mortality survival curves for the intervention and control groups had not converged, but the coronary event survival curves had. Possibly, therefore, the earlier that secondary prevention is optimised, the less likely a subsequent coronary event is to prove fatal.

  15. QT corrected for heart rate and qtc dispersion in Gujarati type 2 diabetics predominantly using preventive pharmacotherapy and with very low electrocardiogram left ventricular hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh Dalpatbhai Solanki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a rising trend in the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hyperglycaemia is known to cause cardiac dysautonomia, which may lead to life-threatening arrhythmias. It can be screened by simple electrocardiogram (ECG-based QTc (QT corrected for heart rate and QTd (QTc dispersion indicating cardiac repolarisation abnormality. We studied QTc and QTd intervals in treated type 2 diabetics (T2D, testing the effect of age, gender, duration and control of disease. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Gujarat, India, on 199 T2D (67 males and 132 females. Standard 12-lead ECG was recorded to derive QTc by Bazett's formula, QTd and ECG left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH. QTc> 0.43 s in male and> 0.45 s in female, QTd> 80 msec were considered abnormal. Results: T2D (mean age 56 years, duration 6 years, coexisting hypertension 69%, glycaemic control 32% and use of β-blockers 56% had QTc and QTd abnormality prevalence 15% and 20% respectively with ECG LVH prevailing in 3%. Male gender, poor glycaemic control and increased duration had negative impact on QT parameters with statistical significance only for first two and not for all results. Conclusion: Our study showed low-to-moderate prevalence of prolonged QTc and QTd, qualitatively more than quantitatively, in T2D with very low LVH and high prevalence of preventive pharmacotherapy, associated with male gender and glycaemic control. It underscores high risk of repolarisation abnormality, though moderate, that can be further primarily prevented by early screening and strict disease control.

  16. The Healthy Heart-Mind trial: melatonin for prevention of delirium following cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Andrew H; Flicker, Leon; Passage, Jurgen; Wibrow, Bradley; Anstey, Matthew; Edwards, Mark; Almeida, Osvaldo P

    2016-01-28

    Delirium is a common occurrence in patients undergoing major cardiac surgery and is associated with a number of adverse consequences for the individual, their family and the health system. Current approaches to the prevention of delirium include identifying those at risk together with various non-pharmacological and pharmacological strategies, although the efficacy of these is often modest. Emerging evidence suggests that melatonin may be biologically implicated in the development of delirium and that melatonin supplementation may be beneficial in reducing the incidence of delirium in medical and surgical patients. We designed this trial to determine whether melatonin reduces the incidence of delirium following cardiac surgery compared with placebo. The Healthy Heart-Mind trial is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of 3 mg melatonin or matching placebo administered on seven consecutive days for the prevention of delirium following cardiac surgery. We will recruit 210 adult participants, aged 50 and older, undergoing elective or semi-elective cardiac surgery with the primary outcome of interest for this study being the difference in the incidence of delirium between the groups within 7 days of surgery. Secondary outcomes of interest include the difference between groups in the severity and duration of delirious episodes, hospital length of stay and referrals to mental health services during admission. In addition, we will assess differences in depressive and anxiety symptoms, as well as cognitive performance, at discharge and 3 months after surgery. The results of this trial will clarify whether melatonin reduces the incidence of delirium following cardiac surgery. The trial is registered with the Australian Clinical Trials Registry, trial number ACTRN12615000819527 (10 August 2015).

  17. Understanding the Heart's Electrical System and EKG Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that attack and damage the body's tissues or cells. In pregnant women, antibodies can cross the placenta. (The placenta is the organ that attaches the umbilical cord to the mother's womb.) These proteins can damage the baby's heart and lead to congenital heart block. Congenital heart ...

  18. Comparative Assessment of the Preventive Use of Intra-Aortic Baloon Counterpulsation and Levosimendan in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease and Low Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Boboshko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to compare the efficiency of the use of intraaortic balloon counterpulsation (IABP and levosi-mendan in patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction operated on under cardiopulmonary bypass. The study included 90 patients who were randomized into three groups according to the strategy of hemodynamic support. Group A patients received IABP 24 hours before surgery. In group B, preventive IABP was combined with intraoperative levosimendan infusion. Group C patients received intraoperative levosimendan infusion only. Hemodynamics, the markers of myocardial damage and heart failure, postoperative complications and length of hospital stay were observed. The patients treated with lev-osimendan had a more stable hemodynamic profile. Troponin I level was significantly lower in Group C six hours after cardiopulmonary bypass than that in group A. Length of stay in intensive care was significantly lower in Group C. The pre-operative concentration of BNP (>360 pg/ml is a predictor of inotropic support in the postoperative period. The results of our study indicate that the use of levosimendan in high-risk patients is effective and shows the results comparable with those of intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation.

  19. The effects of a cardiovascular disease prevention program on knowledge and adoption of a heart healthy lifestyle in Jordanian working adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshah, Nidal F; Bond, A Elaine; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2010-12-01

    Improving cardiac related knowledge to further healthy lifestyles is the best preventive strategy against coronary heart diseases (CHD). Previous studies revealed a critical shortage in all-around cardiac related knowledge, plus an overall shortage in adopting healthy lifestyle behaviors. To evaluate the effectiveness of an education, counseling and behavioral skill-building program in Jordanian working adults' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about CHD and adoption of a healthy lifestyle. A non-equivalent quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention program that is based on Pender's Health Promotion Model. The Response Questionnaire and HPLP-II were used to measure subjects' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and adoption of healthy lifestyle. One hundred six subjects completed the posttest questionnaires. Experimental group showed significantly better cardiac related knowledge, better scores for attitudes, and better scores for the health responsibility, nutritional behaviors, interpersonal relationships and total HPLP-II score. Subject's beliefs, physical activity, spiritual growth and stress management were not improved significantly. Men had better scores in beliefs and women had better scores for health responsibility. Individual commitment to healthier lifestyles should be encouraged, and researchers have to design and apply more specific interventions that are directed toward improving factors that are not significantly improved through traditional programs. Copyright © 2010 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DoS attacks targeting SIP server and improvements of robustness

    OpenAIRE

    Vozňák, Miroslav; Šafařík, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the vulnerability of SIP servers to DoS attacks and methods for server protection. For each attack, this paper describes their impact on a SIP server, evaluation of the threat and the way in which they are executed. Attacks are described in detail, and a security precaution is made to prevent each of them. The proposed solution of the protection is based on a specific topology of an intrusion protection systems components consisting of a combination of...

  1. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 7. Recommendations on stress management. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J D; Barnett, P A; Linden, W; Ramsden, V; Taenzer, P

    1999-05-04

    . Individualized cognitive behavioural interventions are more likely to be effective than single-component interventions. These recommendations were reviewed by all of the sponsoring organizations and by participants in a satellite symposium of the fourth International Conference on Preventive Cardiology. They have not been clinically tested. The Canadian Hypertension Society, the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

  2. Nursery Pest Management of Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott) Attack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The establishment of plantations of Milicia excelsa has been constrained by the gall-forming psyllid Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott) that causes extensive damage to young plants. We present findings of an experiment aimed at preventing Phytolyma attack on Milicia seedlings in the nursery using chemical control and ...

  3. The Increasing Complexity of Hacker Attacks on Personal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Technology and associated tools have brought both blessing and curse to humanity. In spite of awe-inspiring attacks of hackers and malware writers, the immense benefits of this technology have prevented many from withdrawing from its use. Just any one is affected by the services of Information Technology ...

  4. C-reactive protein as a risk factor for coronary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analyses for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, David I; Fu, Rongwei; Freeman, Michele; Rogers, Kevin; Helfand, Mark

    2009-10-06

    C-reactive protein (CRP) may help to refine global risk assessment for coronary heart disease (CHD), particularly among persons who are at intermediate risk on the basis of traditional risk factors alone. To assist the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) in determining whether CRP should be incorporated into guidelines for CHD risk assessment. MEDLINE search of English-language articles (1966 to November 2007), supplemented by reference lists of reviews, pertinent studies, editorials, and Web sites and by expert suggestions. Prospective cohort, case-cohort, and nested case-control studies relevant to the independent predictive ability of CRP when used in intermediate-risk persons. Included studies were reviewed according to predefined criteria, and the quality of each study was rated. The validity of the body of evidence and the net benefit or harm of using CRP for CHD risk assessment were evaluated. The combined magnitude of effect was determined by meta-analysis. The body of evidence is of good quality, consistency, and applicability. For good studies that adjusted for all Framingham risk variables, the summary estimate of relative risk for incident CHD was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.83) for CRP levels greater than 3.0 mg/L compared with levels less than 1.0 mg/L. Analyses from 4 large cohorts were consistent in finding evidence that including CRP improves risk stratification among initially intermediate-risk persons. C-reactive protein has desirable test characteristics, and good data exist on the prevalence of elevated CRP levels in intermediate-risk persons. Limited evidence links changes in CRP level to primary prevention of CHD events. Study methods for measuring Framingham risk variables and other covariates varied. Ethnic and racial minority populations were poorly represented in most studies, limiting generalizability. Few studies directly assessed the effect of CRP on risk reclassification in intermediate-risk persons. Strong evidence indicates

  5. Modeling attacker-defender interactions in information networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Michael Joseph

    2010-09-01

    The simplest conceptual model of cybersecurity implicitly views attackers and defenders as acting in isolation from one another: an attacker seeks to penetrate or disrupt a system that has been protected to a given level, while a defender attempts to thwart particular attacks. Such a model also views all non-malicious parties as having the same goal of preventing all attacks. But in fact, attackers and defenders are interacting parts of the same system, and different defenders have their own individual interests: defenders may be willing to accept some risk of successful attack if the cost of defense is too high. We have used game theory to develop models of how non-cooperative but non-malicious players in a network interact when there is a substantial cost associated with effective defensive measures. Although game theory has been applied in this area before, we have introduced some novel aspects of player behavior in our work, including: (1) A model of how players attempt to avoid the costs of defense and force others to assume these costs; (2) A model of how players interact when the cost of defending one node can be shared by other nodes; and (3) A model of the incentives for a defender to choose less expensive, but less effective, defensive actions.

  6. Muscular imbalance and shoulder pain in volleyball attackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, A; Krüger-Franke, M; Reininger, S; Trouillier, H H; Rosemeyer, B

    1996-09-01

    In overhead sports such as volleyball, baseball, or tennis shoulder problems are very common. The aim of this study was to identify features which may correlate with shoulder problems in volleyball attackers. 30 competitive volleyball attackers (mean age 25 years) were included in the study; 15 were suffering from shoulder pain and 15 had no history of shoulder pain. The results were compared with those of a control group of 15 recreational athletes without any overhead sports activities. Volleyball attackers have a different muscular and capsular pattern at the playing shoulder compared to the opposite shoulder. Their playing shoulder is depressed, the scapula lateralised, and the dorsal muscles and the posterior and inferior part of the shoulder capsule shortened. These differences were of more significance in volleyball attackers with shoulder pain than in volleyball players without shoulder pain. In contrast to recreational athletes without any overhead sports activity, there were no significant difference in the comparison of the two shoulders. The histories, clinical and sonographic findings did not reveal further typical features for volleyball attackers with shoulder pain. Muscular balance of the shoulder girdle is very important in this sport. It is therefore imperative to include adequate stretching and muscular training programme for the prevention, as well as for therapy, of shoulder pain in volleyball attackers.

  7. Predicting asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients with ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack: the PRECORIS score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, David; Song, Dongbeom; Yoo, Joonsang; Turc, Guillaume; Sablayrolles, Jean-Louis; Choi, Byoung Wook; Heo, Ji Hoe; Mas, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Identifying occult coronary artery stenosis may improve secondary prevention of stroke patients. The aim of this study was to derive and validate a simple score to predict severe occult coronary artery stenosis in stroke patients. We derived a score from a French hospital-based cohort of consecutive patients (n=300) who had an ischemic stroke or a transient ischemic attack and no previous history of coronary heart disease (Predicting Asymptomatic Coronary Artery Disease in Patients With Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack [PRECORIS] score) and validated the score in a similar Korean cohort (n=1602). In both cohorts, severe coronary artery stenosis was defined by the presence of at least 1≥50% coronary artery stenosis as detected by 64-section CT coronary angiography. A 5-point score (Framingham Risk Score-predicted 10-year coronary heart disease risk [≥20%=3; 10-19%=1; disease or 3-vessel disease were considered (C-statistic=0.83 [0.74-0.92] and 0.70 [0.66-0.74] in derivation and validation cohorts, respectively). The prevalence of occult≥50% coronary artery stenosis and ≥50% left main trunk or 3-vessel disease increased gradually with the PRECORIS score, reaching 44.2% and 13.5% in derivation cohort and 49.8% and 12.8% in validation cohort in patients with a PRECORIS score≥4. The PRECORIS score can identify a population of stroke or transient ischemic attack patients with a high prevalence of occult severe coronary artery stenosis.

  8. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  9. Using the Domain Name System to Thwart Automated Client-Based Attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Curtis R [ORNL; Shue, Craig A [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    On the Internet, attackers can compromise systems owned by other people and then use these systems to launch attacks automatically. When attacks such as phishing or SQL injections are successful, they can have negative consequences including server downtime and the loss of sensitive information. Current methods to prevent such attacks are limited in that they are application-specific, or fail to block attackers. Phishing attempts can be stopped with email filters, but if the attacker manages to successfully bypass these filters, then the user must determine if the email is legitimate or not. Unfortunately, they often are unable to do so. Since attackers have a low success rate, they attempt to compensate for it in volume. In order to have this high throughput, attackers take shortcuts and break protocols. We use this knowledge to address these issues by implementing a system that can detect malicious activity and use it to block attacks. If the client fails to follow proper procedure, they can be classified as an attacker. Once an attacker has been discovered, they will be isolated and monitored. This can be accomplished using existing software in Ubuntu Linux applications, along with our custom wrapper application. After running the system and seeing its performance on three popular Web browsers Chromium, Firefox and Internet Explorer as well as two popular email clients, Thunderbird and Evolution, we found that not only is this system conceivable, it is effective and has low overhead.

  10. [Priorities of secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease in conditions of a depressive region: preliminary results of the North Caucasian project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, M N; Didigova, R T; Ugurchieva, Z O; Inarokova, A M

    2011-01-01

    was detection of behavioral factors, main risk factors of development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), assessment of adequacy of their management, as well as assessment of quality of life in a cohort of patients with ischemic heart disease from three republics of the North Caucasian region. A sample of patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) aged 40-69 years (n=1500) from 3 republics of the North Caucasian Federal Okrug (Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, and North Ossetia - Alania) were included in a clinico-epidemiological project. In this work we present results obtained in three towns and districts of the Republic Ingushetia (300 men and 230 women with IHD and class II-III effort angina). Socio-demographic factors, family history of CVD, disturbances of nutrition, and physical activity were assessed by standard WHO questionnaires. For assessment of anthropometric deviations we measured height, body mass, and waist circumference. With the aim of detection of hyperlipidemia and disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism we measured levels of total cholesterol and fasting glucose in venous blood. Quality of life was assessed by EQ-5D questionnaire which comprised 5 points: movement, self service, everyday activity, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression. Each forth men (24.3%) smoked, and 12% were alcohol abusers. Each forth patient had severe disturbance of nutrition. Disturbances of nutrition of medium degree were detected twice more often. Way of life was sedentary in 63% of women and 46% of men. Abdominal obesity was detected in 46% of men and 72.6% of women. Prevalence of hypercholesterolemia was 96.7% among men and 90.7% among women. Every fifth patient with IHD had diabetes, in 10% of patients diabetes was newly detected. Quality of life changed in every second IHD patient with angina because of limitation in carrying out everyday work, movement and presence of chest discomfort, this was associated with presence of anxiety/depression. Main priority of

  11. Analytical Characterization of Internet Security Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellke, Sarah H.

    2010-01-01

    Internet security attacks have drawn significant attention due to their enormously adverse impact. These attacks includes Malware (Viruses, Worms, Trojan Horse), Denial of Service, Packet Sniffer, and Password Attacks. There is an increasing need to provide adequate defense mechanisms against these attacks. My thesis proposal deals with analytical…

  12. Relevance of genetics and genomics for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, the Stroke Council, and the Functional Genomics and Translational Biology Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Donna K; Baird, Alison E; Barkley, Ruth A; Basson, Craig T; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ganesh, Santhi K; Herrington, David M; Hong, Yuling; Jaquish, Cashell; McDermott, Deborah A; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2007-06-05

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem in the United States and around the world. Evidence accumulated over decades convincingly demonstrates that family history in a parent or a sibling is associated with atherosclerotic CVD, manifested as coronary heart disease, stroke, and/or peripheral arterial disease. Although there are several mendelian disorders that contribute to CVD, most common forms of CVD are believed to be multifactorial and to result from many genes, each with a relatively small effect working alone or in combination with modifier genes and/or environmental factors. The identification and the characterization of these genes and their modifiers would enhance prediction of CVD risk and improve prevention, treatment, and quality of care. This scientific statement describes the approaches researchers are using to advance understanding of the genetic basis of CVD and details the current state of knowledge regarding the genetics of myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic CVD, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension. Current areas of interest and investigation--including gene-environment interaction, pharmacogenetics, and genetic counseling--are also discussed. The statement concludes with a list of specific recommendations intended to help incorporate usable knowledge into current clinical and public health practice, foster and guide future research, and prepare both researchers and practitioners for the changes likely to occur as molecular genetics moves from the laboratory to clinic.

  13. Mitigate DoS and DDoS attacks in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michalas, Antonis; Komninos, Nikos; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a technique to defeat Denial of Service (DoS) and Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks in Ad Hoc Networks. The technique is divided into two main parts and with game theory and cryptographic puzzles. Introduced first is a new client puzzle to prevent DoS attacks...

  14. Heart Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kilometers), which is far enough to circle the earth more than twice! See also on other sites: ... For the Public Heart Information Center Project Heart Women’s Heart Health Clinical Trials 6770 Bertner Avenue Houston, ...

  15. [A heart attack: was the patient lucky or unlucky?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Hartman, T.C.; van Ravesteijn, H.; Lucassen, P.L.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    CIRCUMSTANCES WERE FAVOURABLE BUT OUTCOME ILL-FATED: The assessment of signs and symptoms in primary care is an important but difficult task for general practitioners (GPs) who have to decide whether symptoms require immediate action or rather a watchful waiting approach. However, the GP may

  16. Heartburn or Chest Pain: When Is It Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching sensation in your chest or arms that may spread to your neck, jaw or back Nausea, indigestion, heartburn or abdominal pain Shortness of breath Cold sweat Fatigue Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness The most ...

  17. When You Visit Your Doctor After a Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... today's hectic lifestyles, most of us end up eating out at least once a week. Get the latest news on health and wellness delivered to your inbox ! Men's Health Inside Men's Health: Erectile Dysfunction Exercise & Fitness Healthy Eating Men's Sexual Health Prostate Cancer Prostate Health & Disease ...

  18. Drug-Eluting Stents: Do They Increase Heart Attack Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intervention, or PCI). Drug-eluting stents have a polymer coating over mesh that emits a drug over ... Advisory Panel meeting on the Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold System. JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. 2016;9:1757. FDA ...

  19. Recurrent spontaneous attacks of dizziness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This article describes the common causes of recurrent vertigo and dizziness that can be diagnosed largely on the basis of history. Ninety percent of spontaneous recurrent vertigo and dizziness can be explained by six disorders: (1) Ménière disease is characterized by vertigo attacks, lasting 20 minutes to several hours, with concomitant hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. Aural symptoms become permanent during the course of the disease. (2) Attacks of vestibular migraine may last anywhere from minutes to days. Most patients have a previous history of migraine headaches, and many experience migraine symptoms during the attack. (3) Vertebrobasilar TIAs affect older adults with vascular risk factors. Most attacks last less than 1 hour and are accompanied by other symptoms from the posterior circulation territory. (4) Vestibular paroxysmia is caused by vascular compression of the eighth cranial nerve. It manifests itself with brief attacks of vertigo that recur many times per day, sometimes with concomitant cochlear symptoms. (5) Orthostatic hypotension causes brief episodes of dizziness lasting seconds to a few minutes after standing up and is relieved by sitting or lying down. In older adults, it may be accompanied by supine hypertension. (6) Panic attacks usually last minutes, occur in specific situations, and are accompanied by choking, palpitations, tremor, heat, and anxiety. Less common causes of spontaneous recurrent vertigo and dizziness include perilymph fistula, superior canal dehiscence, autoimmune inner ear disease, otosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmia, and medication side effects. Neurologists need to venture into otolaryngology, internal medicine, and psychiatry to master the differential diagnosis of recurrent dizziness.

  20. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 22,2017 Heart disease is the ... a marathon.” Learn more: Family History and Heart Disease, Stroke Make the Effort to Prevent Heart Disease with ...