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Sample records for prevent elevated core

  1. Core Stability Training for Injury Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Huxel Bliven, Kellie C.; Anderson, Barton E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Enhancing core stability through exercise is common to musculoskeletal injury prevention programs. Definitive evidence demonstrating an association between core instability and injury is lacking; however, multifaceted prevention programs including core stabilization exercises appear to be effective at reducing lower extremity injury rates. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched for epidemiologic, biomechanic, and clinical studies of core stability for injury prevention (keywords: ...

  2. Central Core Disease Associated with Elevated Creatine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A further example of central core disease is described in a patient with various ... The abnormality was also present in the muscle of his mother, although few fibres were involved in her case. The details of this family have been described previously.'" CASE REPORT .... and the case of congenital myopathy associated with ...

  3. Central Core Disease Associated with Elevated Creatine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A further example of central core disease is described in a patient with various musculoskeletal abnormalities, who survived two episodes of malignant hyperpyrexia. Similar pathology, though less severe, was found in his asymptomatic mother. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 640 (1974) ...

  4. Core stability training for injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxel Bliven, Kellie C; Anderson, Barton E

    2013-11-01

    Enhancing core stability through exercise is common to musculoskeletal injury prevention programs. Definitive evidence demonstrating an association between core instability and injury is lacking; however, multifaceted prevention programs including core stabilization exercises appear to be effective at reducing lower extremity injury rates. PUBMED WAS SEARCHED FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC, BIOMECHANIC, AND CLINICAL STUDIES OF CORE STABILITY FOR INJURY PREVENTION (KEYWORDS: "core OR trunk" AND "training OR prevention OR exercise OR rehabilitation" AND "risk OR prevalence") published between January 1980 and October 2012. Articles with relevance to core stability risk factors, assessment, and training were reviewed. Relevant sources from articles were also retrieved and reviewed. Stabilizer, mobilizer, and load transfer core muscles assist in understanding injury risk, assessing core muscle function, and developing injury prevention programs. Moderate evidence of alterations in core muscle recruitment and injury risk exists. Assessment tools to identify deficits in volitional muscle contraction, isometric muscle endurance, stabilization, and movement patterns are available. Exercise programs to improve core stability should focus on muscle activation, neuromuscular control, static stabilization, and dynamic stability. Core stabilization relies on instantaneous integration among passive, active, and neural control subsystems. Core muscles are often categorized functionally on the basis of stabilizing or mobilizing roles. Neuromuscular control is critical in coordinating this complex system for dynamic stabilization. Comprehensive assessment and training require a multifaceted approach to address core muscle strength, endurance, and recruitment requirements for functional demands associated with daily activities, exercise, and sport.

  5. Elevations in core and muscle temperature impairs repeated sprint performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drust, B.; Rasmussen, P.; Mohr, Magni

    2005-01-01

    on a cycle ergometer in normal (approximately 20 degrees C, control) and hot (40 degrees C, hyperthermia) environments. RESULTS: Completion of the intermittent protocol in the heat elevated core and muscle temperatures (39.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C; 40.2 +/- 0.4 degrees C), heart rate (178 +/- 11 beats min(-1...... metabolic fatigue agents and we, therefore, suggest that it may relate to the influence of high core temperature on the function of the central nervous system.......)), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) (18 +/- 1) and noradrenaline (38.9 +/- 13.2 micromol l(-1)) (all P

  6. Preventing hairline elevation in endoscopic browlifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamas, R S; Rohrich, R J

    1997-04-01

    An endoscopic-assisted method of brow elevation using galea aponeurosis plication with direct suture fixation is presented. This technique does not elevate the hairline, nor is any skin or scalp resected. Dissection is easy because it is limited to the subgaleal plane of the forehead.

  7. Elevations in core and muscle temperature impairs repeated sprint performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drust, B.; Rasmussen, P.; Mohr, Magni

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The present study investigated the effects of hyperthermia on intermittent exercise and repeated sprint performance. METHODS: Seven men completed 40 min of intermittent cycling comprising of 15 s exercise (306 +/- 22 W) and 15 s rest periods (0 W) followed by 5 x 15 s maximal sprints...... on a cycle ergometer in normal (approximately 20 degrees C, control) and hot (40 degrees C, hyperthermia) environments. RESULTS: Completion of the intermittent protocol in the heat elevated core and muscle temperatures (39.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C; 40.2 +/- 0.4 degrees C), heart rate (178 +/- 11 beats min(-1...... during hyperthermia compared with the control trial (P repeated sprints was reduced by hyperthermia despite...

  8. Improving Core Strength to Prevent Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Gretchen D.; Adams-Blair, Heather R.

    2010-01-01

    Regardless of the sport or skill, it is essential to have correct biomechanical positioning, or postural control, in order to maximize energy transfer. Correct postural control requires a strong, stable core. A strong and stable core allows one to transfer energy effectively as well as reduce undue stress. An unstable or weak core, on the other…

  9. The investigation on the prevention of recriticality in ABLE core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tomoko; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2002-11-01

    A massive motion of molten fuel and increase of reactivity during a HCDA (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident) in a fast reactor may result in a recriticality, since the core configuration of a fast reactor does not produce the maximum reactivity. The analyses of HCDA performed in the past have shown that the severe recriticality, which affected the integrity of a containment, could occur only if a whole-core molten pool was formed in the disrupted core. ABLE (Axial BLanket Eliminated) subassemblies, in which a part of the axial blanket pellet is eliminated, have been proposed as a measure to prevent the occurrence of such a severe recriticality. This study investigates the enhancement of molten fuel discharge from a reactor core using SIMMER-III code in order to assess the ability to prevent the severe recriticality. It is concluded that ABLE subassemblies enhance the fuel discharge from a reactor core and have an capability to prevent the severe recriticality in the early stage of the transition phase. The capability depends on the fuel enthalpy level in the core region, and rises as the enthalpy becomes higher than the solidus enthalpy. However, it is also shown that the prevention of recriticality in a low enthalpy scenario, in which the average enthalpy level of the fuel in the core is less than solidus energy, needs further investigation. (author)

  10. [Construction of the addiction prevention core competency model for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Sook; Jung, Sun Young

    2013-12-01

    This study was done to provide fundamental data for the development of competency reinforcement programs to prevent addictive behavior in adolescents through the construction and examination of an addiction prevention core competency model. In this study core competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling were identified, and the addiction prevention core competency model was developed. It was validated methodologically. Competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents as defined by the addiction prevention core competency model are as follows: positive self-worth, self-control skill, time management skill, reality perception skill, risk coping skill, and positive communication with parents and with peers or social group. After construction, concurrent cross validation of the addiction prevention core competency model showed that this model was appropriate. The study results indicate that the addiction prevention core competency model for the prevention of addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling can be used as a foundation for an integral approach to enhance adolescent is used as an adjective and prevent addictive behavior. This approach can be a school-centered, cost-efficient strategy which not only reduces addictive behavior in adolescents, but also improves the quality of their resources.

  11. 78 FR 56174 - In-Core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... instruments that can provide proper warning and diagnostic information; for example, the measurement of the... warning of two-phase level drop to the top of the core and could be supplemented by other indicators such... Status Update in Response to Lessons Learned from Japan's March 11, 2011, Great Tohoku Earthquake and...

  12. 77 FR 30435 - In-core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... [probabilistic risk assessments]) on severe accidents and severe accident phenomena,' \\2\\ NRC and the nuclear industry have ignored experimental data indicating that CET measurements have significant limitations. And... experimental data indicates that core-exit temperature (``CET'') measurements have significant limitations: (1...

  13. Consensus on core competencies for preventive medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, D S; Ross, V

    1994-01-01

    Of the currently available literature on assessment of physician competency, very little applies to the needs of preventive medicine specialists. Yet the diversity of the field and the confusion among other medical specialists about the particular expertise of preventive medicine physicians suggest a need for consensus on fundamental competencies expected of graduates of preventive medicine residency training programs. We apply theoretical material on competency-based education from teacher training and instructional development to professional training in preventive medicine. We describe the process by which the Graduate Medical Education Subcommittee of the American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM), a working group of specialists, derived and refined core competencies in working sessions at professional meetings. The drafts produced at these sessions were circulated widely to residency directors and other individuals and groups in preventive medicine before being approved by the ACPM Board of Regents and included in the Residency Training Manual distributed by ACPM. This article includes this list of core competencies for preventive medicine residents. In addition, the article describes assumptions about competency development that guided the process and identifies recurrent problems in competency development. This information may be helpful to readers who wish to develop additional competencies or to tailor these competencies for their own preventive medicine residency programs.

  14. Computational analysis of the effect of fuel assembly features on the core thermohydraulics at elevated parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, S.; Sergeev, V.

    2009-01-01

    The results of the numerical calculations for single- and two-phase coolant flows in the WWER-1000 core at elevated parameters are presented. The non-uniformities of flow in the core caused by design features of fuel assemblies (TVS-2 or TVSA, different number of spacers, use of mixing grids), boiling in some fuel assemblies with increasing power under non-uniform power generation and non-uniform hydraulic resistance are discussed. The stability limits of flow in the core are estimated. The non-uniformity of power generation in fuel assemblies or their hydraulic resistance was demonstrated to result in disproportionate intensive boiling in some fuel assemblies and in reduction of the margin to CHF. The calculations were performed using the TURBOFLOW 2D code. It was shown that there are no important differences in the use of only TVS-2 or TVSA in the core (authors)

  15. Prevention of disability in children: elevating the role of environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Stephen A; Lanphear, Bruce P

    2012-01-01

    Much public attention and many resources are focused on medical research to identify risk factors and mitigate symptoms of disability for individual children. But this focus will inevitably fail to prevent disabilities. Stephen Rauch and Bruce Lanphear argue for a broader focus on environmental influences that put entire populations at risk. They argue that identifying and eliminating or controlling environmental risk factors that incrementally increase the prevalence of disability is the key to preventing many disorders. Rauch and Lanphear examine emerging evidence that many disabilities of childhood have their roots in the environment--from toxins in air, water, and soil, to the stressors of poverty, to marketing practices that encourage unhealthy choices or discourage healthy ones. They review research on well-known environmental causes of disability, such as exposures to lead, cigarette smoke, and industrial air pollution. They point to new evidence suggesting that chemicals found in commonly used plastics may have subtle but serious effects on child development, and that many disabilities spring from the complex interplay of environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility. Rauch and Lanphear make a case for turning our attention to societal or population-level interventions that would rely less on medical and genetic technology and more on policies and regulations that would reduce children's exposure to ubiquitous environmental risks. Examples include required testing of new chemicals for developmental toxicity before they are put on the market; zoning regulations that separate residential communities from industrial areas; and restrictions on advertising of unhealthy products, such as tobacco, alcohol, and junk foods, to children. Rauch and Lanphear outline and assess the effectiveness of interventions that could be adopted, and suggest what a healthy modern community might look like. Such interventions, they acknowledge, are likely to be highly

  16. Review on Core Designs for Prevention of Severe Accidents in SFRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Moohoon; Choi, Yong Won; Shin, Andong; Suh, Namduk

    2013-01-01

    Based on this characteristic of fast reactor core, potential impact of CDA (Core Disruptive Accident) caused by ATWS has been considered as an important safety issue, although it is extremely unlikely. In order to prevent and mitigate the severe accident, the fast reactor core has been designed with various safety features. In this paper, as a part of study to develop the domestic regulatory requirements and guidelines related to SFR core safety, international trends on safety features which have been considered in current SFR cores are reviewed. In order to develop the regulatory requirements and guidelines related to a SFR core design for prevention of CDA, the core safety features were reviewed. The safety features considered in current SFR cores have a function that prevents to progress into next step in accident sequences. The trends on current safety features are as follows: · 'passive shutdown systems' to prevent initiating events such as ULOF, UTOP, ULOHS, etc · 'core designs with low void effect' to prevent the large void reactivity insertion in initiating phase · 'specific provisions for core with conventional positive void effect' to prevent the core recriticality in transition phase Consequently, in regulatory review requirements and guidelines developed for SFR, contents for not only reduction of positive void effect but also features to ensure the safety of overall system should be reflected

  17. FDTD analysis of body-core temperature elevation in children and adults for whole-body exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Asano, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2008-09-01

    The temperature elevations in anatomically based human phantoms of an adult and a 3-year-old child were calculated for radio-frequency whole-body exposure. Thermoregulation in children, however, has not yet been clarified. In the present study, we developed a computational thermal model of a child that is reasonable for simulating body-core temperature elevation. Comparison of measured and simulated temperatures revealed thermoregulation in children to be similar to that of adults. Based on this finding, we calculated the body-core temperature elevation in a 3-year-old child and an adult for plane-wave exposure at the basic restriction in the international guidelines. The body-core temperature elevation in the 3-year-old child phantom was 0.03 °C at a whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate of 0.08 W kg-1, which was 35% smaller than in the adult female. This difference is attributed to the child's higher body surface area-to-mass ratio.

  18. FDTD analysis of body-core temperature elevation in children and adults for whole-body exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Asano, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    The temperature elevations in anatomically based human phantoms of an adult and a 3-year-old child were calculated for radio-frequency whole-body exposure. Thermoregulation in children, however, has not yet been clarified. In the present study, we developed a computational thermal model of a child that is reasonable for simulating body-core temperature elevation. Comparison of measured and simulated temperatures revealed thermoregulation in children to be similar to that of adults. Based on this finding, we calculated the body-core temperature elevation in a 3-year-old child and an adult for plane-wave exposure at the basic restriction in the international guidelines. The body-core temperature elevation in the 3-year-old child phantom was 0.03 deg. C at a whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate of 0.08 W kg -1 , which was 35% smaller than in the adult female. This difference is attributed to the child's higher body surface area-to-mass ratio

  19. FDTD analysis of body-core temperature elevation in children and adults for whole-body exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Asano, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Osamu [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology (Japan)], E-mail: ahirata@nitech.ac.jp

    2008-09-21

    The temperature elevations in anatomically based human phantoms of an adult and a 3-year-old child were calculated for radio-frequency whole-body exposure. Thermoregulation in children, however, has not yet been clarified. In the present study, we developed a computational thermal model of a child that is reasonable for simulating body-core temperature elevation. Comparison of measured and simulated temperatures revealed thermoregulation in children to be similar to that of adults. Based on this finding, we calculated the body-core temperature elevation in a 3-year-old child and an adult for plane-wave exposure at the basic restriction in the international guidelines. The body-core temperature elevation in the 3-year-old child phantom was 0.03 deg. C at a whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate of 0.08 W kg{sup -1}, which was 35% smaller than in the adult female. This difference is attributed to the child's higher body surface area-to-mass ratio.

  20. Preventing Heat Injuries by Predicting Individualized Human Core Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-14

    hardware/software warning system of an impending rise in TC and generate alerts to potentially prevent heat injuries. PREVENTING HEAT INJURIES BY...real-time warning system. 4.0 CONCLUSIONS In conclusion, we developed an alert algorithm to provide reliable ahead-of-time warning of an impending... warning system that can be deployed in ambulatory settings. Currently, we are in the process of integrating this model with the alert algorithm in a

  1. Core exercises elevate trunk stability to facilitate skilled motor behavior of the upper extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yuki; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Kelepecz, Dolly; Nakajima, Masaaki

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of core exercises on upper extremity function relative to skilled motor behavior and postural sway. We examined the effects of core exercises on the skilled motor behavior and postural sway of 40 healthy students who were assigned randomly to the core exercise group or the control group. Independent variable is extent of exposure to core exercise and dependent variables are skilled motor behavior and postural sway. A Purdue pegboard which measures skilled motor behavior and a stabilometer which measures postural sway were used to evaluate the influence of core exercises. Pre-intervention and post-intervention skilled motor behavior and postural sway were compared between the core exercise group and control group using the Wilcoxon rank sum test; a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Also, we investigated the application of core exercises in a clinical setting for one patient with cerebral vascular disease. The post intervention skilled motor behavior (p = 0.04) and postural sway, LNG (p = 0.05), LNG/TIME (p = 0.04) and X LNG (p = 0.02) were significantly higher in the core exercise group than control group. In the case report, there were good results; function of the upper extremity improved after doing the exercises. There were positive changes in some daily living activities. Core exercises are likely to enhance trunk stabilization to improve upper extremity function. It is possible for core exercises to be adapted for patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Apraclonidine versus brinzolamide-timolol combination to prevent intraocular pressure elevation after laser capsulotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Çelik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the efficacy of fixed combination of brinzolamide 1% and timolol 0.5%(FCBTwith apraclonidine 0.5%(APRAin preventing intraocular pressure(IOPelevations after neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet(Nd:YAGlaser posterior capsulotomy.METHODS: This prospective randomized clinical study included 90 eyes of 90 consecutive patients who had Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy for posterior capsule opacification(PCO. Patients were randomized to receive APRA(n=45or FCBT(n=45at 1h before laser surgery. A masked observer measured IOP by Goldmann applanation tonometry before the procedure and at 1, 2, 3, 24h and 7d after laser treatment. IOP outcome measures were grouped into the following categories: post laser IOP elevation of 5 to RESULTS:The mean IOP before surgery on the day of the procedure was 14.1±2.1 mm Hg in the APRA group and 13.2±2.1 mm Hg in the FCBT group. There was no statistically significant difference between the APRA and the FCBT groups of baseline IOPs measured(P=0.066. During the follow-up time, the mean IOP was lower in FCBT group, but this was not statistically significant. Six patients(13.3%in APRA group and 4(8.9%in FCBT group had IOP elevations of 5 to P=0.243. IOP elevations of 10 mm Hg or more occurred in 3 eyes(6.7%in the APRA group and 1 eyes(2.2%in the FCBT group; this was not statistically significant(P=0.542. CONCLUSION:Both of APRA and FCBT are effective for prevention and APRA is enough for most of routine cases. FCBT may be an option for the eyes those need more IOP reduction such as pre-existing glaucoma patients who are at higher risk for postoperative IOP elevations.

  3. Elevation devices for the prevention of heel pressure ulcers: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Rosie; Palfreyman, Simon

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this systematic literature review was to gain insight into the effectiveness of off-loading devices to prevent heel pressure ulcers within the acute hospital setting. Heels have been identified as the second most common site for pressure ulcers. Devices which off-load pressure can include pillows, wedges and boots. It is unclear as to which method or device is best at preventing pressure ulcers. A systematic review was carried out through the search of electronic databases and bibliographies of relevant publications. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews that compared devices which off-load heels to prevent pressure ulcers were identified. A total of five studies were included in the review. The methodological quality of the studies was generally poor. The studies reported that heel-boot elevation devices appeared more beneficial. However, poor compliance with wearing the devices was identified, as well as a perceived increased risk of falls. There were little data on cost-effectiveness. There is little high-quality trial evidence to support the routine use of heel devices to prevent pressure ulcers. However, they may have a role to play within a multifaceted programme of pressure-ulcer prevention.

  4. Core Competencies and the Prevention of High-Risk Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Vignetta Eugenia; Blum, Robert Wm.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent sexual risk-taking behavior has numerous individual, family, community, and societal consequences. In an effort to contribute to the research and propose new directions, this chapter applies the core competencies framework to the prevention of high-risk sexual behavior. It describes the magnitude of the problem, summarizes explanatory…

  5. Characteristics of Dust Deposition at High Elevation Sites in Caucasus Over the Past 190 years Recorded in Ice Cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutuzov, Stanislav; Ginot, Patrick; Mikhaenko, Vladimir; Krupskaya, Victoria; Legrand, Michel; Preunkert, Suzanne; Polukhov, Alexey; Khairedinova, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    The nature and extent of both radiative and geochemical impacts of mineral dust on snow pack and glaciers depend on physical and chemical properties of dust particles and its deposition rates. Ice cores can provide information about amount of dust particles in the atmosphere and its characteristic and also give insights on strengths of the dust sources and its changes in the past. A series of shallow ice cores have been obtained in Caucasus mountains, Russia in 2004 - 2015. A 182 meter ice core has been recovered at the Western Plateau of Mt. Elbrus (5115 m a.s.l.) in 2009. The ice cores have been dated using stable isotopes, NH4+ and succinic acid data with the seasonal resolution. Samples were analysed for chemistry, concentrations of dust and black carbon, and particle size distributions. Dust mineralogy was assessed by XRD. Individual dust particles were analysed using SEM. Dust particle number concentration was measured using the Markus Klotz GmbH (Abakus) implemented into the CFA system. Abakus data were calibrated with Coulter Counter multisizer 4. Back trajectory cluster analysis was used to assess main dust source areas. It was shown that Caucasus region experiencing influx of mineral dust from the Sahara and deserts of the Middle East. Mineralogy of dust particles of desert origin was significantly different from the local debris material and contained large proportion of calcite and clay minerals (kaolinite, illite, palygorskite) associated with material of desert origin. Annual dust flux in the Caucasus Mountains was estimated as 300 µg/cm2 a-1. Particle size distribution depends on individual characteristics of dust deposition event and also on the elevation of the drilling site. The contribution of desert dust deposition was estimated as 35-40 % of the total dust flux. Average annual Ca2+ concentration over the period from 1824 to 2013 was of 150 ppb while some of the strong dust deposition events led to the Ca2+ concentrations reaching 4400 ppb. An

  6. Computational model for calculating body-core temperature elevation in rabbits due to whole-body exposure at 2.45 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Sugiyama, Hironori; Kojima, Masami; Kawai, Hiroki; Yamashiro, Yoko; Fujiwara, Osamu; Watanabe, Soichi; Sasaki, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    In the current international guidelines and standards with regard to human exposure to electromagnetic waves, the basic restriction is defined in terms of the whole-body average-specific absorption rate. The rationale for the guidelines is that the characteristic pattern of thermoregulatory response is observed for the whole-body average SAR above a certain level. However, the relationship between energy absorption and temperature elevation was not well quantified. In this study, we improved our thermal computation model for rabbits, which was developed for localized exposure on eye, in order to investigate the body-core temperature elevation due to whole-body exposure at 2.45 GHz. The effect of anesthesia on the body-core temperature elevation was also discussed in comparison with measured results. For the whole-body average SAR of 3.0 W kg-1, the body-core temperature in rabbits elevates with time, without becoming saturated. The administration of anesthesia suppressed body-core temperature elevation, which is attributed to the reduced basal metabolic rate.

  7. Quercetin prevents pyrrolizidine alkaloid clivorine-induced liver injury in mice by elevating body defense capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ji

    Full Text Available Quercetin is a plant-derived flavonoid that is widely distributed in nature. The present study is designed to analyze the underlying mechanism in the protection of quercetin against pyrrolizidine alkaloid clivorine-induced acute liver injury in vivo. Serum transaminases, total bilirubin analysis, and liver histological evaluation demonstrated the protection of quercetin against clivorine-induced liver injury. Terminal dUTP nick end-labeling assay demonstrated that quercetin reduced the increased amount of liver apoptotic cells induced by clivorine. Western-blot analysis of caspase-3 showed that quercetin inhibited the cleaved activation of caspase-3 induced by clivorine. Results also showed that quercetin reduced the increase in liver glutathione and lipid peroxidative product malondialdehyde induced by clivorine. Quercetin reduced the enhanced liver immunohistochemical staining for 4-hydroxynonenal induced by clivorine. Results of the Mouse Stress and Toxicity PathwayFinder RT2 Profiler PCR Array demonstrated that the expression of genes related with oxidative or metabolic stress and heat shock was obviously altered after quercetin treatment. Some of the alterations were confirmed by real-time PCR. Our results demonstrated that quercetin prevents clivorine-induced acute liver injury in vivo by inhibiting apoptotic cell death and ameliorating oxidative stress injury. This protection may be caused by the elevation of the body defense capacity induced by quercetin.

  8. Quercetin Prevents Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Clivorine-Induced Liver Injury in Mice by Elevating Body Defense Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lili; Ma, Yibo; Wang, Zaiyong; Cai, Zhunxiu; Pang, Chun; Wang, Zhengtao

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin is a plant-derived flavonoid that is widely distributed in nature. The present study is designed to analyze the underlying mechanism in the protection of quercetin against pyrrolizidine alkaloid clivorine-induced acute liver injury in vivo. Serum transaminases, total bilirubin analysis, and liver histological evaluation demonstrated the protection of quercetin against clivorine-induced liver injury. Terminal dUTP nick end-labeling assay demonstrated that quercetin reduced the increased amount of liver apoptotic cells induced by clivorine. Western-blot analysis of caspase-3 showed that quercetin inhibited the cleaved activation of caspase-3 induced by clivorine. Results also showed that quercetin reduced the increase in liver glutathione and lipid peroxidative product malondialdehyde induced by clivorine. Quercetin reduced the enhanced liver immunohistochemical staining for 4-hydroxynonenal induced by clivorine. Results of the Mouse Stress and Toxicity PathwayFinder RT2 Profiler PCR Array demonstrated that the expression of genes related with oxidative or metabolic stress and heat shock was obviously altered after quercetin treatment. Some of the alterations were confirmed by real-time PCR. Our results demonstrated that quercetin prevents clivorine-induced acute liver injury in vivo by inhibiting apoptotic cell death and ameliorating oxidative stress injury. This protection may be caused by the elevation of the body defense capacity induced by quercetin. PMID:24905073

  9. IAEA Regional Workshop on Development and Validation of EOP/AMG for Effective Prevention/Mitigation of Severe Core Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Materials of the IAEA Regional Workshop contain 24 presented lectures. Authors deal with development and validation of emergency operating procedures as well as with accident management guidelines (EOP/AMG) for effective prevention and mitigation of severe core damage

  10. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art in network coding for wireless, meshed networks typically considers two problems separately. First, the problem of providing reliability for a single session. Second, the problem of opportunistic combination of flows by using minimalistic coding, i.e., by XORing packets from...... different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...

  11. The Impact of Central and Peripheral Cyclooxygenase Enzyme Inhibition on Exercise-Induced Elevations in Core Body Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltmeijer, Matthijs T W; Veeneman, Dineke; Bongers, Coen C C W; Netea, Mihai G; van der Meer, Jos W; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Hopman, Maria T E

    2017-05-01

    Exercise increases core body temperature (T C ) due to metabolic heat production. However, the exercise-induced release of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6) may also contribute to the rise in T C by increasing the hypothalamic temperature set point. This study investigated whether the exercise-induced increase in T C is partly caused by an altered hypothalamic temperature set point. Fifteen healthy, active men age 36 ± 14 y were recruited. Subjects performed submaximal treadmill exercise in 3 randomized test conditions: (1) 400 mg ibuprofen and 1000 mg acetaminophen (IBU/APAP), (2) 1000 mg acetaminophen (APAP), and (3) a control condition (CTRL). Acetaminophen and ibuprofen were used to block the effect of IL-6 at a central and peripheral level, respectively. T C , skin temperature, and heart rate were measured continuously during the submaximal exercise tests. Baseline values of T C , skin temperature, and heart rate did not differ across conditions. Serum IL-6 concentrations increased in all 3 conditions. A significantly lower peak T C was observed in IBU/APAP (38.8°C ± 0.4°C) vs CTRL (39.2°C ± 0.5°C, P = .02) but not in APAP (38.9°C ± 0.4°C) vs CTRL. Similarly, a lower ΔT C was observed in IBU/APAP (1.7°C ± 0.3°C) vs CTRL (2.0°C ± 0.5°C, P exercise compared with a CTRL. This observation suggests that a prostaglandin-E2-induced elevated hypothalamic temperature set point may contribute to the exercise-induced rise in T C .

  12. The Effect of Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D on Elevated Homocysteine Concentrations in Participants of a Preventive Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Truong-Minh; Ekwaru, John Paul; Mastroeni, Silmara S.; Mastroeni, Marco F.; Loehr, Sarah A.; Veugelers, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Both lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and elevated homocysteine concentrations are potential risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). A recent analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey reported an inverse association of serum 25(OH)D with homocysteine, however, the longitudinal relationship has yet to be investigated. We hypothesized and examined whether a temporal increase in 25(OH)D concentrations is paralleled by a reduction in the risk for elevated homocysteine. We analyzed data of 4475 participants with repeated assessments of serum 25(OH)D and homocysteine concentrations who enrolled in a preventive health program that encourages vitamin D supplementation and monitors serum 25(OH)D and homocysteine concentrations. We defined elevated homocysteine as concentrations greater than 13 micromoles per liter. Logistic regression was applied to assess the association of temporal changes in serum 25(OH)D with the risk of elevated homocysteine. We observed an inverse gradient whereby greater increases in 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with a lower prevalence of elevated homocysteine. Relative to those without temporal increases in 25(OH)D, participants who showed improvements in their serum 25(OH)D concentrations of “homocysteine, respectively. These observations suggest that temporal improvements in vitamin D status reduce serum homocysteine concentrations, and therefore may potentially contribute to the primary prevention of CVD. PMID:27548258

  13. FDTD analysis of human body-core temperature elevation due to RF far-field energy prescribed in the ICNIRP guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Asano, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Osamu [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2007-08-21

    This study investigated the relationship between the specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in an anatomically-based model named NORMAN for exposure to radio-frequency far fields in the ICNIRP guidelines (1998 Health Phys. 74 494-522). The finite-difference time-domain method is used for analyzing the electromagnetic absorption and temperature elevation in NORMAN. In order to consider the variability of human thermoregulation, parameters for sweating are derived and incorporated into a conventional sweating formula. First, we investigated the effect of blood temperature variation modeling on body-core temperature. The computational results show that the modeling of blood temperature variation was the dominant factor influencing the body-core temperature. This is because the temperature in the inner tissues is elevated via the circulation of blood whose temperature was elevated due to EM absorption. Even at different frequencies, the body-core temperature elevation at an identical whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) was almost the same, suggesting the effectiveness of the whole-body average SAR as a measure in the ICNIRP guidelines. Next, we discussed the effect of sweating on the temperature elevation and thermal time constant of blood. The variability of temperature elevation caused by the sweating rate was found to be 30%. The blood temperature elevation at the basic restriction in the ICNIRP guidelines of 0.4 W kg{sup -1} is 0.25 {sup 0}C even for a low sweating rate. The thermal time constant of blood temperature elevation was 23 min and 52 min for a man with a lower and a higher sweating rate, respectively, which is longer than the average time of the SAR in the ICNIRP guidelines. Thus, the whole-body average SAR required for blood temperature elevation of 1 {sup 0}C was 4.5 W kg{sup -1} in the model of a human with the lower sweating coefficients for 60 min exposure. From a comparison of this value with the basic restriction in the

  14. FDTD analysis of human body-core temperature elevation due to RF far-field energy prescribed in the ICNIRP guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Asano, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in an anatomically-based model named NORMAN for exposure to radio-frequency far fields in the ICNIRP guidelines (1998 Health Phys. 74 494-522). The finite-difference time-domain method is used for analyzing the electromagnetic absorption and temperature elevation in NORMAN. In order to consider the variability of human thermoregulation, parameters for sweating are derived and incorporated into a conventional sweating formula. First, we investigated the effect of blood temperature variation modeling on body-core temperature. The computational results show that the modeling of blood temperature variation was the dominant factor influencing the body-core temperature. This is because the temperature in the inner tissues is elevated via the circulation of blood whose temperature was elevated due to EM absorption. Even at different frequencies, the body-core temperature elevation at an identical whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) was almost the same, suggesting the effectiveness of the whole-body average SAR as a measure in the ICNIRP guidelines. Next, we discussed the effect of sweating on the temperature elevation and thermal time constant of blood. The variability of temperature elevation caused by the sweating rate was found to be 30%. The blood temperature elevation at the basic restriction in the ICNIRP guidelines of 0.4 W kg -1 is 0.25 0 C even for a low sweating rate. The thermal time constant of blood temperature elevation was 23 min and 52 min for a man with a lower and a higher sweating rate, respectively, which is longer than the average time of the SAR in the ICNIRP guidelines. Thus, the whole-body average SAR required for blood temperature elevation of 1 0 C was 4.5 W kg -1 in the model of a human with the lower sweating coefficients for 60 min exposure. From a comparison of this value with the basic restriction in the ICNIRP guidelines of

  15. Core components for effective infection prevention and control programmes: new WHO evidence-based recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Storr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health care-associated infections (HAI are a major public health problem with a significant impact on morbidity, mortality and quality of life. They represent also an important economic burden to health systems worldwide. However, a large proportion of HAI are preventable through effective infection prevention and control (IPC measures. Improvements in IPC at the national and facility level are critical for the successful containment of antimicrobial resistance and the prevention of HAI, including outbreaks of highly transmissible diseases through high quality care within the context of universal health coverage. Given the limited availability of IPC evidence-based guidance and standards, the World Health Organization (WHO decided to prioritize the development of global recommendations on the core components of effective IPC programmes both at the national and acute health care facility level, based on systematic literature reviews and expert consensus. The aim of the guideline development process was to identify the evidence and evaluate its quality, consider patient values and preferences, resource implications, and the feasibility and acceptability of the recommendations. As a result, 11 recommendations and three good practice statements are presented here, including a summary of the supporting evidence, and form the substance of a new WHO IPC guideline.

  16. Neutronics aspects associated to the prevention and mitigation of severe accidents in sodium cooled reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poumerouly, S.

    2010-01-01

    Among all the types of accidents to be considered for the safety licensing of a plant, some have a very low probability of occurrence but might have very important consequences: the severe accidents or Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents (HCDA). The studies on the scenario of these accidents are performed in parallel to the prevention studies. In this PhD report, two representative safety cases are studied: the Unprotected Loss Of Flow (ULOF) and the Total Instantaneous Blockage (TIB). The objectives are to understand what causes the reactivity increase during these accidents and to find means to reduce the energetic release of the scenario (ULOF) or to find ways to trigger the core prior to the propagation of the accident (TIB). At first, the accidents are studied in static calculations with the ERANOS code system. The accidents are divided into several steps and the reactivity insertions at each step are explained. This study shows the importance of the removal of the structures as well as of the radial leakage changes during the core slumping-down. The study also gives the amounts of fuel to be ejected or of absorber to be injected in both accidents. These values give tracks to the following more accurate studies, the transient studies. The transient studies were performed with the SIMMER code system, coupling thermo-hydraulics and neutronics. SIMMER data and algorithms have been improved so as to better predict ERANOS results (former discrepancies were up to 1.5$). The SIMMER reactivity calculation is improved by 0.8$ with variations of reactivity due to the motion of materials correctly predicted. A new algorithm for the β-effective was implemented in SIMMER so as to be more accurate and easier to manage. SIMMER is then used to calculate the secondary phase of the ULOF, while the primary phase is calculated with ERANOS thanks to some assumptions. The assumptions are very much based on the fact that the movement of materials stops whenever the energy

  17. Prevention and control of rheumatic heart disease: Overcoming core challenges in resource-poor environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Dougherty

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease (RHD has long receded as a significant threat to public health in high-income countries. In low-resource settings, however, the specter of RHD remains unabated, as exemplified by recent data from the Global Burden of Diseases Study. There are many complex reasons for this ongoing global disparity, including inadequate data on disease burden, challenges in effective advocacy, ongoing poverty and inequality, and weak health systems, most of which predominantly affect developing nations. In this review, we discuss how each of these acts as a core challenge in RHD prevention and control. We then examine key lessons learnt from successful control programs in the past and highlight resources that have been developed to help create strong national RHD control programs.

  18. Methods to prevent the source term of methyl lodide during a core melt accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karhu, A. [VTT Energy (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to gather available information of the methods to prevent a source term of methyl iodide during a core melt accident. The most widely studied methods for nuclear power plants include the impregnated carbon filters and alkaline additives and sprays. It is indicated that some deficiencies of these methods may emerge. More reactive impregnants and additives could make a great improvement. As a new method in the field of nuclear applications, the potential of transition metals to decompose methyl iodide, is introduced in this review. This area would require an additional research, which could elucidate the remaining questions of the reactions. The ionization of the gaseous methyl iodide by corona-discharge reactors is also shortly described. (au)

  19. Suggested Methods for Preventing Core Saturation Instability in HVDC Transmission Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norheim, Ian

    2002-07-01

    In this thesis a study of the HVDC related phenomenon core saturation instability and methods to prevent this phenomenon is performed. It is reason to believe that this phenomenon caused disconnection of the Skagerrak HVDC link 10 August 1993. Internationally, core saturation instability has been reported at several HVDC schemes and thorough complex studies of the phenomenon has been performed. This thesis gives a detailed description of the phenomenon and suggest some interesting methods to prevent the development of it. Core saturation instability and its consequences can be described in a simplified way as follows: It is now assumed that a fundamental harmonic component is present in the DC side current. Due to the coupling between the AC side and the DC side of the HVDC converter, a subsequent second harmonic positive-sequence current and DC currents will be generated on the AC side. The DC currents will cause saturation in the converter transformers. This will cause the magnetizing current to also have a second harmonic positive-sequence component. If a high second harmonic impedance is seen from the commutation bus, a high positive-sequence second harmonic component will be present in the commutation voltages. This will result in a relatively high fundamental frequency component in the DC side voltage. If the fundamental frequency impedance at the DC side is relatively low the fundamental component in the DC side current may become larger than it originally was. In addition the HVDC control system may contribute to the fundamental frequency component in the DC side voltage, and in this way cause a system even more sensitive to core saturation instability. The large magnetizing currents that eventually will flow on the AC side cause large zero-sequence currents in the neutral conductors of the AC transmission lines connected to the HVDC link. This may result in disconnection of the lines. Alternatively, the harmonics in the large magnetizing currents may cause

  20. Rosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridker, Paul M.; Danielson, Eleanor; Fonseca, Francisco A. H.; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J.; Macfadyen, Jean G.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T.; Glynn, Robert J.; Ridker, P. M.; Fonseca, F. A. H.; Genest, J.; Gotto, A. M.; Koenig, W.; Libby, P.; Lorenzatti, A. J.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Shepherd, J.; Willerson, J. T.; Danielson, E.; Glynn, R. J.; MacFadyen, J. G.; Mora, S.; Collins, R.; Bailey, K.; Gersh, B.; Lamas, G.; Smith, S.; Vaughan, D.; Mahaffey, K.; Brown, P.; Montgomery, D.; Wilson, M.; Wood, F.; Altamirano, J.; Boskis, P.; Colombo, H.; Cuneo, C.; Diaz, M.; Esper, R.; Fernandez, A.; Foye, R.; Hershson, A.; Kuschnir, E.; La Greca, R.; Lorenzatti, A.; Lozada, A.; Luciardi, H.; Luquez, H.; Maffei, L.; Majul, C.; Marin, M.; Muntaner, J.; Nul, D.; Paolasso, E.; Rey, R.; Rodenas, P.; Rodriguez, P.; Rojas, C.; Telsolin, P.; Vita, N.; Adrianes, G.; Argento, O.; Bacart, P.; Baeck, L.; Baguet, J.; Balthazar, Y.; Battello, G.; Behets, J.; Beke, P.; Berwouts, P.; Boermans, P.; Bolly, F.; Borms, J.; Boulad, M.; Boulanger, L.; Bous, J.; van Boxstael, R.; Brands, Y.; Buyse, L.; Calozet, Y.; Camps, K.; Capiau, L.; Celis, H.; Coucke, F.; D'Argent, F.; Op de Beeck, G.; de Meulemeester, M.; de Praeter, K.; de Rouck, S.; Delcourt, A.; Delvaux, J.; Demanet, E.; Dendale, P.; Derijcke, M.; Deruyck, C.; Devaux, J.; Dupont, C.; van Duyse, J.; Erpicum, L.; Gilio, C.; Gillet, A.; Grosjean, J.; Heeren, J.; Henry, G.; Heyvaert, F.; Hollanders, G.; Hutsebaut, A.; Janssens, P.; Lannoy, H.; Ledoux, C.; Legros, P.; Leliaert, R.; Martens, R.; Maury, O.; Mehuys, G.; Michaux, J.; Migeotte, A.; Mortelmans, J.; van Mulders, N.; van Parijs, P.; van Peer, W.; Pieters, E.; Reynders, P.; van Riet, D.; Robert, P.; van Stee, J.; Teheux, J.; Teuwen, J.; Thoeng, J.; Timmermans, B.; Tshinkulu, M.; Vanden Bemden, S.; Vantroyen, D.; Veevaete, M.; Vercruysse, K.; Vereecken, G.; Vermeersch, L.; Vernijns, J.; Verspecht, E.; Vinck, G.; Vrancken, F.; Watté, G.; Weymans, J.; Windmolders, S.; Albuquerque, D. C.; Barbosa, E. C. D.; Bertolami, M. C.; Blacher, C.; Brasileiro, A. L. S.; Costa e Forti, A.; Eliaschewitz, F. G.; Esteves, J. P.; Feitosa, G. S.; Francischetti, E. A.; Franco, R. J. S.; Gomes, M. A.; Gross, J. L.; Jardim, P. C.; Kohlmann, O.; Loures-Vale, A. A.; Magalhães, M. E. C.; Maia, L. N.; Moriguchi, E. H.; Nogueira, P. R.; Oigman, W.; Repetto, G.; Santos, R. D.; Saraiva, J. F. K.; Xavier, H. T.; Benov, H.; Chompalova, B.; Donova, T.; Gocheva, N.; Goudev, A.; Grigorov, M.; Gruev, T.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Marchev, S.; Mihov, A.; Pasheva, V.; Penev, A.; Popov, A.; Raev, D.; Sirakova, V.; Slavcheva, A.; Stoikov, A.; Stoilov, R.; Tisheva, S.; Todorov, G.; Torbova, S.; Uzunangelov, J.; Achyuthan, G.; Akhras, R.; Barriere, G.; Bartlett, J.; Behiels, S.; Bell, A.; Bergeron, J.; Berlingieri, J.; Bhamjee, H.; Bodok-Nutzati, R.; Booth, W.; Boyd, C.; Brault, S.; Bruckswaiger, D.; Bukovy, B.; Campbell, G.; Carlson, B.; Cha, J.; Chehayeb, R.; Cheng, W.; Chilvers, M.; Chouinard, G.; Chow, W.; Conter, H.; Conway, J.; Craig, B.; Craig, D.; Dattani, I.; del Grande, R.; Dharamshi, S.; Dickson, M.; Dion, D.; Dowell, A.; Drexler, J.; Dube, S.; Dupont, A.; Dworkin, B.; Fields, L.; Filteau, P.; Gardiner, E.; Gervais, B.; Gillis, G.; Girard, R.; Goldman, H.; Gorfinkel, I.; Goulet, S.; Greenspoon, A.; Gritter, R.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M.; Habib, N.; Harding, R.; Hart, R.; Henein, S.; Henry, D.; Hirsch, Axxx; Ho, K.; Hoag, G.; Houde, D.; Howlett, E.; Ing, G.; Jadd, J.; Janes, J.; Jardine, F.; Johnston, T.; Kanani, S.; Kazimirski, M.; Kelly, A.; Klajner, F.; Kooy, J.; Lalani, A.; Lam, S.; Laranjeiro, J.; LaRose, D.; Leiter, L.; Leung, W.; Li, J.; Lowe, D.; Luces, K.; Ma, P.; MacKinnon, R.; Martinho, V.; Matangi, M.; McCrossin, M.; McIsaac, H.; McMullen, W.; Mehta, P.; Meunier, M.; Misik, K.; Nayar, A.; Ng, A.; Nigro, F.; Noronha, L.; O'Mahony, W.; Pandey, S.; Papp, E.; Patel, V.; Patrick, L.; Peddle, C.; Pinsky, N.; Poirier, P.; Powell, C.; Price, J.; Rolfe, A.; Saliba, N.; Sawkiw, R.; Senior, R.; Shu, D.; Smith, R.; Somani, R.; Soowamber, M.; Stakiw, K.; Talbot, P.; Taliano, J.; Tan, K.; Teitelbaum, I.; Threoux, P.; Tremblay, G.; Turcotte, C.; Tytus, R.; Walsh, P.; Webb, G.; Willoughby, P.; Woo, V.; Woodland, R.; Yee, G.; Acevedo, M.; Caorsi, C.; Cardenas, N.; Gonzalez, B.; Gutierrez, M.; Prieto, J.; Stockins, B.; Valerta, P.; Vejar, M.; Ardila, W.; Aschner, P.; Botero, J.; Botero, R.; Calderon, C.; Casas, L.; Castellanos, R.; Cure, C.; Escobar, I.; Fortich, A.; Garcia, L.; Hernandez, E.; Isaza, D.; Jaramillo, N.; Jiménez, C.; Kattah, W.; Luengas, C.; Matiz, C.; Perez, M.; Quintero, A.; Rizcala, A.; Ruiz, A.; Urina, M.; Valenzuela, A.; Cob-Sanchez, A.; Gutreiman-Golberg, M.; Lainez-Ventosilla, A.; Ramirez-Zamora, L.; Slon-Hitti, C.; Speranza-Sánchez, M.; Vinocour-Fornieri, M.; Hansen, H.; Nordestgaard, B.; Steffensen, R.; Stender, S.; Alvarado-Renderos, J.; Rivera-Ochoa, L.; Villarroel-Abrego, H.; Eha, J.; Jaanson, E.; Kaasik, U.; Keba, E.; Mäeots, E.; Petersen, M.; Reinmets, S.; Roostalu, U.; Vahula, V.; Veidrik, K.; Bellmann, R.; Hanefeld, M.; Horacek, T.; Klein, C.; Knels, R.; Laus, S.; Meissner, G.; Mondrof, C.; Schell, E.; Schuster, H.; Sehnert, W.; Stahl, H.; Szelazek, G.; Winkelmann, B.; Witczak, E.; Elis, A.; Gavish, A.; Grossman, E.; Harats, D.; Keidar, S.; Levy, Y.; Osamah, H.; Shapiro, I.; Shveydel, E.; Wolfovitz, E.; Yogev, R.; Zeltser, D.; Arenas, J. L.; Cardona-Muñoz, E.; Cervantes, J. L.; Flores-Lozano, F.; Gonzalez, Clicerio; Gonzalez-Galvez, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gutierrez-Fajardo, P.; Morales, E.; de los Rios, M.; Romero-Zazueta, A.; Talavera, J. O.; Velasco-Sanchez, R.; Vergara-Takahashi, H.; Zúñiga-Guajardo, S.; Agous, I.; Bak, A.; Bartels, G.; Basart, D.; Cornel, J.; de Schipper, L.; Holwerda, N.; Jonker, J.; Köse, V.; Lok, D.; Lokhorst, B.; Mosterd, A.; Nierop, P.; Oude Ophuis, A.; Somer, S.; Tiebesl, J.; Trip, M.; van Hessen, M.; van Kempen, W.; Andersen, M.; Berz, A.; Bjurstrom, M.; Bo, P.; Brunstad, O.; Daae-Johansen, T.; Elle, S.; Fauske, J.; Fossdal, B.; Gjefsen, O.; Hallaraker, A.; Haugen, J.; Helberg, S.; Holm-Johnsen, S.; Istad, H.; Jacobsen, T.; Johansen, R.; Jorstad, T.; Jorum, I.; Kjorlaug, K.; Kontny, F.; Langaker, K.; Larsen, B.; Lonning, S.; Loraas, A.; Mansilla-Tinoco, R.; Medhus, R.; Meyer, I.; Nasrala, S.; Ofjord, E.; Ose, L.; Palmas, J.; Risberg, K.; Sandberg, A.; Sirnes, P.; Skjegstad, E.; Skjelvan, G.; Solnor, L.; Storm-Larsen, A.; Tandberg, A.; Tomala, T.; Torkelsen, A.; Ursin, A.; Valnes, K.; Walaas, K.; Binns-Halman, R.; Delgado-Paredes, A.; Lombana-Vasquez, B.; Noriega-Aguirre, L.; Trujillo-Sagel, R.; Kowalczyk-Kram, M.; Artemiuk, E.; Asankowicz-Bargiel, B.; Banas, I.; Baranska, E.; Baranski, M.; Bijata-Bronisz, R.; Sikorska, A.; Blaszczyk, B.; Bolanowski, J.; Brokl-Stolarczyk, B.; Brzecki, K.; Buczkowski, K.; Chmielewski, T.; Chojnowska-Jezierska, J.; Chwist-Novak, A.; Cygan, W.; Czajkowska-Kaczmarek, E.; Dargiewicz, A.; Dluzniewski, M.; Dudka, C.; Fares, I.; Flasinska, J.; Gadzinski, W.; Gaszczyk, G.; Golebiowski, G.; Gozdur, W.; Grudzien, K.; Sobieska, E.; Kalamarz, J.; Kalinowska, A.; Kornacewicz-Jach, Z.; Korol, M.; Korycka, W.; Kostka, T.; Kostrzewska, A.; Kot, A.; Kowalska-Werbowy, B.; Krupinska, G.; Lotocka, E.; Luberda-Heynar, Z.; Lukas, W.; Lysek, R.; Machyna-Dybala, A.; Mlynarczyk-Jeremicz, K.; Mocarska-Gorna, B.; Niedbal-Yahfouf, I.; Pasternak, D.; Potakowska, I.; Ramian, U.; Roleder, M.; Rosinska-Migda, J.; Sidorowicz-Bialynicka, A.; Skierkowska, J.; Skorinko, I.; Slaboszewska, J.; Sleziak-Barglik, K.; Stachlewski, P.; Superson-Byra, E.; Tissler-Nahorska, G.; Turbak, R.; Uzunow, A.; Wasowicz, D.; Wodniecki, J.; Wojnowski, L.; Wrzol, A.; Zdrojewska, J.; Zurakowska-Krzywonos, A.; Zurowska-Gebala, M.; Ablachim, T.; Abobului, M.; Balanescu, S.; Bobescu, E.; Bojinca, M.; Cristea, M.; Gaita, D.; Stoicovici, R.; Tataru, R.; Tudose, A.; Ardashev, V.; Arutyunov, G.; Azarin, O.; Barbarash, O.; Bondarev, S.; Borisov, M.; Boyarkin, M.; Burova, N.; Chazova, I.; Dovgalevsky, P.; Duplyakov, D.; Egorova, L.; Goloshchekin, B.; Gratsianskiy, N.; Ivleva, A.; Karpov, R.; Karpov, Y. A.; Karpov, Y. B.; Khokhlov, A.; Khokhlov, R.; Khrustalev, O.; Konyakhin, A.; Kostenko, V.; Libov, I.; Lukyanov, Y.; Mezentseva, N.; Panov, A.; Repin, M.; Shabalin, A.; Shalaev, S.; Shilkina, N.; Shulman, V.; Sidorenko, B.; Smolenskaya, O.; Starodubtsev, A.; Talibov, O.; Titkov, Y.; Tsyba, L.; Uspenskiy, Y.; Vishnevsky, A.; Yarokhno, N.; Ahmed, S.; Ashtiker, H.; Bester, A.; Bhorat, Q.; Biermann, E.; Boyd, W.; Burgess, L.; Dindar, F.; Dulabh, R.; Engelbrecht, I.; Erasmus, E.; Fouche, L.; Furman, S.; Govind, U.; Herbst, L.; Jacovides, A.; Kahanovitz, C.; Kruger, C.; Lakha, D.; Lombaard, J.; Macleod, A.; Makan, H.; Manuel, E.; McDonald, M.; Mitha, E.; Mitha, I.; Moola, S.; Nell, H.; Nieuwoudt, G.; Olivier, P.; Padayachee, T.; Pillai, P.; Pillay, S.; Ranjith, N.; Reyneke, S.; Sandell, R.; Sandell, P.; Sebastian, P.; Skriker, M.; Smit, J.; van Rensburg, D.; van Zyl, L.; Vawda, Z.; Wellman, H.; Miserez, A.; Adbulhakim, E.; Angus, M.; Balmer, F.; Balmer, J.; Barrat, R.; Blair, D.; Blyth, A.; Brodie, R.; Brydie, D.; Campbell, C.; Campbell, I.; Church, M.; Clark, C.; Clements, R.; Donnachie, A. N.; Fitpatrick, P.; Godley, C.; Hill, J.; Jarvie, F.; Kieran, W.; Langridge, S.; Leslie, R.; Liddell, A.; MacKenzie, J.; MacKintosh, C.; Mair, R.; Marshall, G.; Martin, R.; McCann, C.; McKibbin, C.; Mclachlan, B.; McLean, F.; Murray, S.; Norris, A.; Pawa, R.; Pexton, N.; Ramage, A.; Reid, S.; Robertson, A.; Rourke, E.; Sarmiento, R.; Shaw, H.; Shaw, R.; Sheil, L.; Spence, G.; Stewart, E.; Thomas, H.; Thomson, J.; Thomson, W.; Travers, J.; Ward, R.; Williams, L.; Wooff, D.; Young, W.; Belzarena, C.; Huarte, A.; Kuster, F.; Lluberas, R.; Abarikwu, C.; Abate, L.; Abbott, R.; Ackley, C.; Adams, G.; Adkins, S.; Albakri, E.; Albarracin, C.; Allison, J.; Alvarado, O.; Alwine, L.; Amin, K.; Amin, M.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, M.; Anderson, W.; Andrawis, N.; Andrews, C.; Angles, L.; Aquino, N.; Ariani, M.; Armstrong, C.; Aronoff, S.; Arora, N.; Atri, P.; Baker, J.; Baker, K.; Balli, E.; Banish, D.; Bardenheier, J.; Barnett, G.; Bartkowiak, A.; Basista, M.; Beliveau, W.; Bell, G.; Benchimol, G.; Bennett, B.; Bennett, N.; Bermudez, Y.; Bernstein, J.; Berroya, A.; Bhargava, M.; Biaggioni, I.; Bimson, S.; Bittar, N.; Bleser, S.; Blumberg, M.; Bobson, C.; Boeren, J.; Bogan, R.; Boling, E.; Booras, C.; Borge, A.; Bradlau, C.; Brady, J.; Brandon, D.; Brideau, D.; Brobyn, T.; Brodowski, M.; Broker, R.; Broussard, C.; Brown, C.; Browning, D.; Brusco, O.; Bryant, J.; Buchanan, P.; Bueso, G.; Burgess, G.; Burke, B.; Buynak, R.; Byrd, L.; Camilo-Vazquez, E.; Campbell, J.; Cannon, L.; Capo, J.; Carmouche, D.; Castaldo, R.; Castilleja, J.; Caudill, T.; Caulin-Glaser, T.; Champlin, J.; Chardon-Feliciano, D.; Cheng, T.; Cherlin, R.; Cheung, D.; Chodock, A.; Christensen, J.; Christian, D.; Christiansen, L.; Ciemiega, R.; Clark, J.; Coble, S.; Cohen, K.; Colan, D.; Cole, F.; Cole, R.; Colleran, K.; Collins, G.; Conard, S.; Cook, J.; Cooperman, M.; Cooze, D.; Copeland, T.; Corder, C.; Courtney, D.; Cox, W.; Crump, W.; Cruz, L.; Cuellar, J.; Cunningham, T.; Daboul, N.; Dailey, R.; Dallas, A.; Dansinger, M.; Dao, L.; Darwin, C.; Dauber, I.; Davidson, M.; Davis, P.; Degarmo, R.; Degoma, R.; Dempsey, M.; Denny, D.; Denyer, G.; Desai, V.; Despot, J.; Dewan, M.; Dickert, J.; Diederich, C.; Doben, S.; Dobratz, D.; Douglas, B.; Drehobl, M.; Dresner, J.; Dreyfus, J.; Drummond, W.; Dunbar, W.; Dunlap, J.; Dunmyer, S.; Eaton, C.; Ecker, A.; Edris, M.; Egbujiobi, L.; Elkind, A.; Ellis, J.; Ellison, H.; Engeron, E.; Erdy, G.; Ervin, W.; Eshowsky, S.; Estock, D.; Fang, C.; Fanning, J.; Feinberg, B.; Feld, L.; Fenton, I.; Fernandez, E.; Ferrera, R.; Fiacco, P.; Fierer, R.; Finneran, M.; Fintel, D.; Fischer, M.; Flippo, G.; Flores, A.; Folkherth, S.; Forbes, R.; Fowler, R.; Francis, P.; Franco, M.; Frank, A.; Fraser, N.; Fuchs, R.; Gabriel, J.; Gaddam, S.; Gaffney, M.; Gamponia, M.; Gandhi, D.; Ganzman, H.; Gaona, R.; Garibian, G.; Garofalo, J.; Gatewood, R.; Gazda, S.; Geiger, R.; Geller, M.; Germino, W.; Gibbs, R.; Gifford, C.; Gilhooley, N.; Gill, S.; Gillespie, E.; Godwin, D.; Goldberg, M.; Goldberg, R.; Goldstein, M.; Gonzalez-Ortiz, E.; Goodman, D.; Gordon, G.; Gordon, M.; Goswami, A.; Gottlieb, D.; Gottschlich, G.; Graham, D.; Gray, J.; Gray, W.; Green, S.; Greenberg, R.; Greenspan, M.; Greenwald, M.; Grover, D.; Gupta, R.; Gupta-Bala, S.; Guthrie, R.; Gutmann, J.; Gvora, T.; Habib, G.; Hack, T.; Haidar, A.; Hamdy, O.; Hansen, M.; Hanshaw, C.; Hargrove, J.; Harris, H.; Harrison, B.; Hart, T.; Heacock, J.; Head, D.; Headley, D.; Henderson, D.; Herman, L.; Herrera, C.; Hershberger, V.; Hershon, K.; Heym, H.; Hill, G.; Hippert, R.; Hnatiuk, G.; Hoekstra, J.; Holt, W.; Homan, J.; Honsinger, R.; Howard, J.; Howard, V.; Howard, W.; Huling, R.; Imburgia, M.; Isajiw, G.; Ison, R.; Iverson, W.; Jacks, R.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, K.; Jacobs, J.; Jacobson, E.; James, A.; Jayanty, V.; Johary, A.; Johnson, G.; Jones, P.; Jones, T.; Joseph, J.; Julien, C.; Kahn, Z.; Kalvaria, I.; Kang, J.; Kaplan, I.; Karns, R.; Kashi, K.; Kaster, S.; Kaufman, A.; Kawley, F.; Keller, R.; Kenton, D.; Kerlin, J.; Kern, J.; Kerwin, E.; Kerzner, B.; Ketchum, J.; Khan, J.; Khan, S.; Khawar, M.; Khera, A.; Kinstrey, T.; Klein, B.; Klein, E.; Klein, S.; Klein, T.; Kleinsteuber, K.; Klementowicz, P.; Knopp, R.; Knutson, T.; Koch, S.; Kramer, M.; Krause, R.; Krisciunas, V.; Krueger, C.; Kruszewski, D.; Kumar, R.; Kunst, E.; Kuo, D.; Kuritsky, L.; Kushner, P.; Kutner, M.; Kwiterovich, P.; Kwong, S.; Lanese, J.; Lang, B.; Lary, J.; Lasalle, J.; Lasater, S.; Lasser, N.; Laughlin, D.; Lawless, J.; Lawlor, D.; Ledbetter, J.; Ledesma, G.; Lee, D.; Lemanski, P.; Levinson, G.; Levinson, L.; Lewis, D.; Lewis, L.; Lewis, S.; Linden, D.; Loh, I.; Look, M.; Lopez, D.; Loskovitz, L.; Lubin, B.; Lucas, M.; MacAdams, M.; Madden, B.; Magee, P.; Maggiacomo, F.; Magier, D.; Magnuson, S.; Mahaffey, R.; Makowski, D.; Maletz, L.; Mally, A.; Maloney, R.; Mancha, V.; Manolukas, P.; Marple, R.; Masri, A.; Masri, B.; Mattingly, G.; Mayer, N.; McCain, A.; McCall Bundy, J.; McCartney, M.; Mcclain, D.; McConn, M.; Mccullum, K.; Mcdavid, R.; McGettigan, J.; McIvor, M.; McNeff, J.; Mendolla, M.; Mercado, A.; Mersey, J.; Milam, J.; Milko, T.; Miller, M.; Miller, R.; Miller, S.; Mobley, D.; Modi, T.; Modiano, M.; Mollen, M.; Montgomery, R.; Moran, J.; Morelli, J.; Morin, D.; Moskow, H.; Moursi, M.; Mueller, N.; Mullins, M.; Myers, E.; Nadar, V.; Naiser, J.; Nash, S.; Natarajan, S.; Neft, M.; Neuman, D.; Nevins, B.; Newman, J.; Newman, R.; Newman, S.; Nolen, T.; Nwasuruba, C.; Oberoi, M.; Odom, A.; Ong, Y.; Oppy, J.; Owen, S.; Pampe, E.; Pangtay, D.; Parker, R.; Patel, B.; Patel, J.; Patel, M.; Patel, R.; Paul, A.; Pearlstein, R.; Penepent, P.; Peniston, J.; Perlman, M.; Persson, D.; Peters, P.; Peterson, G.; Peterson, J.; Pettyjohn, F.; Phillips, A.; Phillips, D.; Piel, M.; Pillai, T.; Pi-Sunyer, F.; Pollack, A.; Pond, M.; Pongonis, J.; Porras, C.; Portnoy, E.; Potos, W.; Powers, J.; Prasad, J.; Pritchett, K.; Pudi, K.; Pullman, J.; Purdy, A.; Quinones, Y.; Raad, G.; Radbill, M.; Radin, D.; Rai, K.; Raikhel, M.; Raine, C.; Ramanujan, R.; Ramirez, G.; Ramos-Santana, Z.; Rapo, S.; Ravin, S.; Rawtani, P.; Reeves, R.; Reeves, W.; Reiter, W.; Rendell, M.; Resnick, H.; Reynolds, W.; Rhudy, J.; Rice, L.; Rictor, K.; Ringrose, R.; Riser, J.; Rizvi, M.; Rizzo, W.; Robinson, J.; Robison, W.; Rogers, W.; Rohlf, J.; Rosen, R.; Ross, E.; Roth, E.; Rovner, S.; Rucki, P.; Runde, M.; Ryan, W.; Rybicki, J.; Saleem, T.; Salvato, P.; Santram, D.; Scharf, B.; Schear, M.; Schectman, G.; Schmidt, J.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, P.; Schneider, R.; Schoenfelder, S.; Schussheim, A.; Schwartz, R.; Schwartz, S.; Schwarze, M.; Scott, C.; Segal, S.; Settipane, R.; Shah, M.; Shamim, T.; Shanes, J.; Shapero, P.; Shapiro, J.; Shealy, N.; Shepard, M.; Shepherd, A.; Sheta, M.; Shrivastava, R.; Shusman, R.; Siddiqui, M.; Sidney, A.; Silvers, D.; Simek, C.; Simpson, C.; Sinatra, L.; Singh, S.; Singson, D.; Slabic, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.; Smith, T.; Snell, P.; Specter, J.; Speer, J.; Spees, R.; Sperling, M.; Spuhler, W.; Staab, P.; Stafford, J.; Stanton, D.; Stein, E.; Stern, S.; Stocks, T.; Stone, A.; Strader, W.; Strout, C.; Strzinek, R.; Subich, D.; Suen, J.; Sugimoto, D.; Sulman, S.; Suresh, D.; Sweeney, G.; Szatkowski, A.; Szeto, J.; Szewczak, S.; Szulawski, I.; Taber, L.; Taghizadeh, B.; Tague, R.; Tambunan, D.; Tannoury, G.; Tavaez Valle, J.; Thieneman, A.; Thigpen, D.; Thompson, P.; Tidman, R.; Tilton, G.; Tokatlian, E.; Topkis, R.; Torelli, M.; Tortorice, F.; Toth, P.; Touger, M.; Treat, S.; Trevino, M.; Trupin, S.; Turner, A.; Turner, M.; Tweel, C.; Ugarte, J.; Ulmer, E.; Urbach, D.; Vacker, M.; Vallecillo, J.; van de Beek, M.; Vargas, L.; Vazquez Tanus, J.; Verma, A.; Vijayaraghavan, K.; Wade, P.; Wade, T.; Wagner, S.; Wahle, J.; Walker, J.; Walker, M.; Weinstein, R.; Weisbrot, A.; Weiss, R.; West, P.; White, A.; Wickemeyer, W.; Wieskopf, B.; Wiggins, M.; Williams, H.; Wiseman, J.; Yataco, A.; Yates, S.; Zamarra, J.; Zamora, B.; Zawada, E.; Zemel, L.; Zigrang, W.; Zusman, R.; Aguiton, M.; Arroyo-Parejo, M.; Beaujon Sierralta, J.; Berrizbeitia, M.; Carrizales de Marlin, Y.; Colan Parraga, J.; Fernandez, C.; Fuenmayor, N.; Giesen, G.; Gonzalez Gomez, C.; Guaipo, A.; Herrera Rivera, C.; Jaua, L.; Lopez, N.; Lopez Nouel, R.; Marulanda, M.; Morr, I.; Nass, A.; Palmucci, G.; Perez, L.; Ponte, C.; Rivas, I.; de Roa, E.; Figarella Salazar, G.; Sanchez, F.; Siriti, U.; Viloria, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased levels of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein predict cardiovascular events. Since statins lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as well as cholesterol, we hypothesized that people with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels

  1. A systematic review of core implementation components in team ball sport injury prevention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, James; Finch, Caroline F

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the use of specific exercise programmes to prevent musculoskeletal injuries in team ball sports has gained considerable attention, and the results of large-scale, randomised controlled trials have supported their efficacy. To enhance the translation of these interventions into widespread use, research trials must be reported in a way that allows the players, staff and policymakers associated with sports teams to implement these interventions effectively. In particular, information is needed on core implementation components, which represent the essential and indispensable aspects of successful implementation. To assess the extent to which team ball sport injury prevention trial reports have reported the core implementation components of the intervention, the intervention target and the use of any delivery agents (ie, staff or other personnel delivering the intervention). To summarise which specific types of intervention, intervention target and delivery agents are reported. To develop consensus between reviewers on the reporting of these components. Six electronic databases were systematically searched for English-language, peer-reviewed papers on injury prevention exercise programme (IPEP) trials in team ball sports. The reporting of all eligible trials was assessed by two independent reviewers. The reporting of the three core implementation components were coded as 'yes', 'no' or 'unclear'. For cases coded as 'yes', the specific types of interventions, intervention targets and delivery agents were extracted and summarised. The search strategy identified 52 eligible trials. The intervention and the intervention target were reported in all 52 trials. The reporting of 25 trials (48%) specified the use of delivery agents, the reporting of three trials (6%) specified not using delivery agents, and in the reporting of the remaining 24 trials (46%) the use of delivery agents was unclear. The reported intervention type was an IPEP alone in 43 trials (83

  2. Early identification and preventive care for elevated cardiovascular disease risk within a remote Australian Aboriginal primary health care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Dea Kerin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the single greatest contributor to the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Our objective is to determine if holistic CVD risk assessment, introduced as part of the new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Adult Health Check (AHC, results in better identification of elevated CVD risk, improved delivery of preventive care for CVD and improvements in the CVD risk profile for Aboriginal adults in a remote community. Methods Interrupted time series study over six years in a remote primary health care (PHC service involving Aboriginal adults identified with elevated CVD risk (N = 64. Several process and outcome measures were audited at 6 monthly intervals for three years prior to the AHC (the intervention and three years following: (i the proportion of guideline scheduled CVD preventive care services delivered, (ii mean CVD medications prescribed and dispensed, (iii mean PHC consultations, (iv changes in participants' CVD risk factors and estimated absolute CVD risk and (v mean number of CVD events and iatrogenic events. Results Twenty-five percent of AHC participants were identified as having elevated CVD risk. Of these, 84% had not been previously identified during routine care. Following the intervention, there were significant improvements in the recorded delivery of preventive care services for CVD (30% to 53%, and prescription of CVD related medications (28% to 89% (P P = 0.004 following the intervention. However, there were no significant changes in the mean number of PHC consultations or mean number of CVD events or iatrogenic events. Conclusions Holistic CVD risk assessment during an AHC can lead to better and earlier identification of elevated CVD risk, improvement in the recorded delivery of preventive care services for CVD, intensification of treatment for CVD, and improvements in participants' CVD risk profile. Further research is required on

  3. The Impact of Central and Peripheral Cyclooxygenase Enzyme Inhibition on Exercise-Induced Elevations in Core Body Temperature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltmeijer, M.T.W.; Veeneman, D.; Bongers, C.C.W.G.; Netea, M.G.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Exercise increases core body temperature (TC) due to metabolic heat production. However, the exercise-induced release of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6) may also contribute to the rise in TC by increasing the hypothalamic temperature set point. This study investigated

  4. Instrumental considerations for the effective operation of short, highly efficient fused-core columns. Investigation of performance at high flow rates and elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalley, David V

    2010-07-02

    Fused core or superficially porous columns offer the advantages of higher efficiency compared with totally porous columns of the same particle size, but similar operating pressures. However, their performance may be adversely affected by extra-column effects that become more significant as the column efficiency increases, and as the diameter of the column is reduced. In this study, we show that 10cmx0.46cm fused-core columns can be used on modified conventional instruments ("microbore systems") without serious loss in performance, and this approach is at present likely to yield superior results compared with use of 0.21cm columns (of identical efficiency) on current UHPLC instruments that have minimised extra-column volume. Furthermore, the true efficiency of commercial narrow-bore fused-core columns appears to be reduced compared with those of conventional bore, which may be due to packing difficulties for the former type. The fused-core columns in general gave excellent performance, showing no evidence of an upturn in the Knox plots at high flow velocities and elevated temperatures. Careful control of experimental conditions is necessary to ensure accurate data for these plots. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. PROFILE VICTIMS OF NOTIFIED IN CORE AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION TO HEALTH PROMOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliete Tasca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Study aiming to identify the profile of the victims reported in the core of violence prevention and health promotion, in a city in the extreme south of Santa Catarina. Research of quali-quantitative methodological approach, descriptive-exploratory documentary and field. The survey was conducted from the analysis of notifications from SINAN-information system of reportable diseases-from 2010 to October 2012 and realization of interview with the nurse program participant. In the data analysis phase, the information were quantified through Microsoft Office Excel and presented by means of quantitative analysis. Organized analysis and interpretation of qualitative data from the categorization of data. In relation to the types of violence, 40.92 was characterised with physical violence; 16.47 auto injury caused; 13.07 neglect and abandonment; 10.29 disability or mental disorder; 6.71; moral psychological violence; 6.07 violence with a firearm; 3.24 sexual violence; 1.81 violence related to work; 1.02 torture; 0.26 legal intervention; 0.07 sexual O perfil das vítimas da violência exploitation; 0.07 trafficking human beings. The violence is considered a public health problem of multiple dimensions requiring increasingly in-depth studies and public policies involving beyond theme of violence, security, education and culture for peace.

  6. Profile victims of notified in Core and Violence Prevention to Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliete Tasca

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Study aiming to identify the profile of the victims reported in the core of violence prevention and health promotion, in a city in the extreme south of Santa Catarina. Research of quali-quantitative methodological approach, descriptive-exploratory documentary and field. The survey was conducted from the analysis of notifications from SINAN-information system of reportable diseases-from 2010 to October 2012 and realization of interview with the nurse program participant. In the data analysis phase, the information were quantified through Microsoft Office Excel and presented by means of quantitative analysis. Organized analysis and interpretation of qualitative data from the categorization of data. In relation to the types of violence, 40.92 was characterised with physical violence; 16.47 auto injury caused; 13.07 neglect and abandonment; 10.29 disability or mental disorder; 6.71; moral psychological violence; 6.07 violence with a firearm; 3.24 sexual violence; 1.81 violence related to work; 1.02 torture; 0.26 legal intervention; 0.07 sexual exploitation; 0.07 trafficking human beings. The violence is considered a public health problem of multiple dimensions requiring increasingly in-depth studies and public policies involving beyond theme of violence, security, education and culture for peace.

  7. Prevention and Treatment of Postoperative Infections after Sinus Elevation Surgery: Clinical Consensus and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Testori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Maxillary sinus surgery is a reliable and predictable treatment option for the prosthetic rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla. Nevertheless, these interventions are not riskless of postoperative complications with respect to implant positioning in pristine bone. Aim. The aim of this paper is to report the results of a clinical consensus of experts (periodontists, implantologists, maxillofacial surgeons, ENT, and microbiology specialists on several clinical questions and to give clinical recommendations on how to prevent, diagnose, and treat postoperative infections. Materials and Methods. A panel of experts in different fields of dentistry and medicine, after having reviewed the available literature on the topic and taking into account their long-standing clinical experience, gave their response to a series of clinical questions and reached a consensus. Results and Conclusion. The incidence of postop infections is relatively low (2%–5.6%. A multidisciplinary approach is advisable. A list of clinical recommendation are given.

  8. Prevention and Treatment of Postoperative Infections after Sinus Elevation Surgery: Clinical Consensus and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testori, Tiziano; Drago, Lorenzo; Wallace, Steven S.; Capelli, Matteo; Galli, Fabio; Zuffetti, Francesco; Parenti, Andrea; Deflorian, Matteo; Fumagalli, Luca; Weinstein, Roberto L.; Maiorana, Carlo; Di Stefano, Danilo; Valentini, Pascal; Giannì, Aldo B.; Chiapasco, Matteo; Vinci, Raffaele; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Mantovani, Mario; Torretta, Sara; Pipolo, Carlotta; Felisati, Giovanni; Padoan, Giovanni; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Mattina, Roberto; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Maxillary sinus surgery is a reliable and predictable treatment option for the prosthetic rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla. Nevertheless, these interventions are not riskless of postoperative complications with respect to implant positioning in pristine bone. Aim. The aim of this paper is to report the results of a clinical consensus of experts (periodontists, implantologists, maxillofacial surgeons, ENT, and microbiology specialists) on several clinical questions and to give clinical recommendations on how to prevent, diagnose, and treat postoperative infections. Materials and Methods. A panel of experts in different fields of dentistry and medicine, after having reviewed the available literature on the topic and taking into account their long-standing clinical experience, gave their response to a series of clinical questions and reached a consensus. Results and Conclusion. The incidence of postop infections is relatively low (2%–5.6%). A multidisciplinary approach is advisable. A list of clinical recommendation are given. PMID:22927851

  9. Elevated CO2degassing rates prevented the return of Snowball Earth during the Phanerozoic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Benjamin J W; Scotese, Christopher R; Walding, Nicholas G; Shields, Graham A; Lenton, Timothy M

    2017-10-24

    The Cryogenian period (~720-635 Ma) is marked by extensive Snowball Earth glaciations. These have previously been linked to CO 2 draw-down, but the severe cold climates of the Cryogenian have never been replicated during the Phanerozoic despite similar, and sometimes more dramatic changes to carbon sinks. Here we quantify the total CO 2 input rate, both by measuring the global length of subduction zones in plate tectonic reconstructions, and by sea-level inversion. Our results indicate that degassing rates were anomalously low during the Late Neoproterozoic, roughly doubled by the Early Phanerozoic, and remained comparatively high until the Cenozoic. Our carbon cycle modelling identifies the Cryogenian as a unique period during which low surface temperature was more easily achieved, and shows that the shift towards greater CO 2 input rates after the Cryogenian helped prevent severe glaciation during the Phanerozoic. Such a shift appears essential for the development of complex animal life.

  10. Linking the Prevention of Problem Behaviors and Positive Youth Development: Core Competencies for Positive Youth Development and Risk Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Nancy G.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a brief review of the developmental literature linking healthy adjustment to five core competencies: (1) positive sense of self, (2) self-control, (3) decision-making skills, (4) a moral system of belief, and (5) prosocial connectedness. A central premise of this chapter and the rest of the volume is that promoting…

  11. Significance of pregnancy test false negative results due to elevated levels of β-core fragment hCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah; Eapen, Saji; Smith, Peter; Warren, Graham; Zinaman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Very high levels of β-core fragment human chorionic gonadotrophin (βcf-hCG) are reported to potentially cause false negative results in point-of-care (POC)/over-the-counter (OTC) pregnancy tests. To investigate this further, women's daily early morning urine samples, collected prior to conception and during pregnancy, were analysed for intact, free β-, and βcf-hCG. The proportion of βcf-hCG was found to be related to that of hCG produced and in circulation. Therefore, best practice for accuracy testing of POC/OTC pregnancy tests would be to test devices against clinical samples containing high levels of βcf-hCG as well as standards spiked with biologically relevant ratios.

  12. Aircraft Loss-of-Control Accident Prevention: Switching Control of the GTM Aircraft with Elevator Jam Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bor-Chin; Kwatny, Harry G.; Belcastro, Christine; Belcastro, Celeste

    2008-01-01

    Switching control, servomechanism, and H2 control theory are used to provide a practical and easy-to-implement solution for the actuator jam problem. A jammed actuator not only causes a reduction of control authority, but also creates a persistent disturbance with uncertain amplitude. The longitudinal dynamics model of the NASA GTM UAV is employed to demonstrate that a single fixed reconfigured controller design based on the proposed approach is capable of accommodating an elevator jam failure with arbitrary jam position as long as the thrust control has enough control authority. This paper is a first step towards solving a more comprehensive in-flight loss-of-control accident prevention problem that involves multiple actuator failures, structure damages, unanticipated faults, and nonlinear upset regime recovery, etc.

  13. Isotope composition of bulk carbon in replicated Sphagnum peat cores from three central European high-elevation wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, Martin; Zemanova, Leona; Jackova, Iva; Buzek, Frantisek; Adamova, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Several processes may contribute to systematic downcore trends in δ 13 C of bulk Sphagnum peat. Whereas changes in water availability during C assimilation may change δ 13 C values in both a negative and positive direction, other processes would always cause a uni-directional shift in δ 13 C. Selective preservation of isotopically light lignin C may lead to more negative δ 13 C values with an increasing depth and age of peat. Anthropogenic change toward lower δ 13 C of atmospheric CO 2 due to massive coal burning since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution would result in lower δ 13 C of the youngest past layers, and in higher δ 13 C of older peat layers. Emissions of low-δ 13 C methane from wetlands should result in a progressive enrichment of the residual peat substrate in the heavier isotope 13 C. Consequently, deeper peat would have higher δ 13 C. In a specific peat profile, the downcore trend in δ 13 C will be the result of an interplay between all these isotope-sensitive processes. Most Central European wetlands studied previously show a 13 C enrichment (i.e., higher δ 13 C values) with an increasing depth and age. Here we focus on sites which showed lower δ 13 C with an increasing depth and age when a single peat core was taken. Replication did not confirm this negative downcore δ 13 C shift. A positive downcore δ 13 C shift is more widespread than previously believed. We suggest that decreasing δ 13 C of atmospheric CO 2 and emissions of low-δ 13 C methane belong to the main controls of the downcore δ 13 C trends in young peat substrate. (author)

  14. Pressurized core shroud for aligning a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A core shroud is disclosed including flexible panels sealingly attached to the inner surface of the shroud at an elevation opposite the fuel assembly grids nearest the core midplane. Each panel forms the outer wall of a deformable chamber which is pressurized through a conduit carried by the shroud. One end of the conduit is in fluid communication with the reactor coolant at a high pressure location remote from the panels, producing a pressure differential across the panel which urges the panel against the adjacent grid to prevent core bowing

  15. [Impact of the Core Training Law on preventive medicine and public health training and other common medical specialties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latasa, Pello; Gil-Borrelli, Christian; Aguilera, José Antonio; Reques, Laura; Barreales, Saúl; Ojeda, Elena; Alemán, Guadalupe; Iniesta, Carlos; Gullón, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the Core Training Law (CTL) is to amend specialised medical training to include 24 months of common training. The aim of this study is to assess its potential impact on the Preventive Medicine and Public Health (PM&PH) training programme and other medical specialties. The programmes of the 21 common medical specialties were analysed and the recommended training periods for each specialty collected, before the information was agreed upon by three observers. The training impact was calculated as the percentage of months that should be amended per specialty to adapt to the common training schedule. The Preventive Medicine and Public Health training programme is the specialty most affected by the Core Training Law (100%, 24 months). Intensive medicine (0%, 0 months) and medical oncology (17%, 4 months) is the least affected. The CTL affects the common medical specialties in different ways and requires a complete reorganisation of the activities and competencies of PM&PH professionals. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Intracoronary Poloxamer 188 Prevents Reperfusion Injury in a Porcine Model of ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Bartos, MD, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Poloxamer 188 (P188 is a nonionic triblock copolymer believed to prevent cellular injury after ischemia and reperfusion. This study compared intracoronary (IC infusion of P188 immediately after reperfusion with delayed infusion through a peripheral intravenous catheter in a porcine model of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. STEMI was induced in 55 pigs using 45 min of endovascular coronary artery occlusion. Pigs were then randomized to 4 groups: control, immediate IC P188, delayed peripheral P188, and polyethylene glycol infusion. Heart tissue was collected after 4 h of reperfusion. Assessment of mitochondrial function or infarct size was performed. Mitochondrial yield improved significantly with IC P188 treatment compared with control animals (0.25% vs. 0.13%, suggesting improved mitochondrial morphology and survival. Mitochondrial respiration and calcium retention were also significantly improved with immediate IC P188 compared with control animals (complex I respiratory control index: 7.4 vs. 3.7; calcium retention: 1,152 nmol vs. 386 nmol. This benefit was only observed with activation of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, suggesting a specific effect from ischemia and reperfusion on this complex. Infarct size and serum troponin I were significantly reduced by immediate IC P188 infusion (infarct size: 13.9% vs. 41.1%; troponin I: 19.2 μg/l vs. 77.4 μg/l. Delayed P188 and polyethylene glycol infusion did not provide a significant benefit. These results demonstrate that intracoronary infusion of P188 immediately upon reperfusion significantly reduces cellular and mitochondrial injury after ischemia and reperfusion in this clinically relevant porcine model of STEMI. The timing and route of delivery were critical to achieve the benefit.

  17. Functional role of long-lived flowers in preventing pollen limitation in a high elevation outcrossing species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Mary T K; Pacheco, Diego Andrés; Dudley, Leah S

    2017-11-01

    Low pollinator visitation in harsh environments may lead to pollen limitation which can threaten population persistence. Consequently, avoidance of pollen limitation is expected in outcrossing species subjected to habitually low pollinator service. The elevational decline in visitation rates on many high mountains provides an outstanding opportunity for addressing this question. According to a recent meta-analysis, levels of pollen limitation in alpine and lowland species do not differ. If parallel trends are manifested among populations of alpine species with wide elevational ranges, how do their uppermost populations contend with lower visitation? We investigated visitation rates and pollen limitation in high Andean Rhodolirium montanum . We test the hypothesis that lower visitation rates at high elevations are compensated for by the possession of long-lived flowers. Visitation rates decreased markedly over elevation as temperature decreased. Pollen limitation was absent at the low elevation site but did occur at the high elevation site. While initiation of stigmatic pollen deposition at high elevations was not delayed, rates of pollen arrival were lower, and cessation of pollination, as reflected by realized flower longevity, occurred later in the flower lifespan. Comparison of the elevational visitation decline and levels of pollen limitation indicates that flower longevity partially compensates for the lower visitation rates at high elevation. The functional role of flower longevity, however, was strongly masked by qualitative pollen limitation arising from higher abortion levels attributable to transference of genetically low-quality pollen in large clones. Stronger clonal growth at high elevations could counterbalance the negative fitness consequences of residual pollen limitation due to low visitation rates and/or difficult establishment under colder conditions. Visitation rates on the lower part of the elevational range greatly exceeded community rates

  18. Full system decontamination for dose reduction at the preventive maintenance work of the reactor core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Inami, I.; Suzuki, N.; Fujimori, A.; Wille, H.

    2000-01-01

    At the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station unit 3 and unit 2 of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the replacement of the core shroud and internals have been conducted respectively in the FY 1997 outage and in the FY 1998 outage. The replacement of the welded core internals in operating BWR plants is the first time in the world as complete countermeasure to improve SCC resistance. At present both units are operating smoothly. The developed technology concept is to restore those internals in air inside the reactor pressure vessel. To reduce the radiation dose rate inside the RPV, not only a shielding method was applied to cut the radiation from the irradiated structures but also a chemical decontamination method was applied to dissolve the radioactive crud deposit on the surface by using chemical agents. The CORD UV process was applied for this Full System Decontamination including operating the reactor recirculation pumps. The critical pass time required was approximately 7 days for each unit. In both units the radioactivity of 10 TBq (280 Ci) and the Fe, Ni, Cr crud of 60-70 kg as metal in total was dissolved and removed by 5 m 3 (175 ft 3 ) ion exchange resins as only waste generated. The obtained decontamination factor (DF) at the RPV bottom reached 40-100. As result, the dose rate decreased to approximately 0.1 mSv/h under water. Before and after the installation of the in-vessel shielding, a mechanical cleaning was extensively applied inside the RPV to remove the residual crud as well as the cutting particles. As result, the RPV bottom dose rate decreased further to 0.03 mSv/h under water and 0.2 mSv/h in air. A better working environment for human access than expected was established inside the RPV, resulting the 70, 140 man*Sv saving respectively at unit 3 (1F-3) and unit 2 (1F-2). (author)

  19. Rosuvastatin for primary prevention among individuals with elevated high-sensitivity c-reactive protein and 5% to 10% and 10% to 20% 10-year risk. Implications of the Justification for Use of Statins in Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridker, Paul M; Macfadyen, Jean G; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2010-01-01

    Recent primary prevention guidelines issued in Canada endorse the use of statin therapy among individuals at "intermediate risk" who have elevated levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). However, trial data directly addressing whether this recommendation defines a patient populatio...

  20. Elevating your elevator talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  1. Releasing the digital elevation model for the whole Italian territory: a case study reporting two years of core-data dissemination for Earth Sciences communities and other stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquini, Simone; Nannipieri, Luca

    2014-05-01

    EPOS (European Plate Observing System) is the European initiative for the implementation and integration of European Research Infrastructures in the field of Solid Earth Sciences. In particular, EPOS is aimed at creating a common environment for data exchange for both the scientific community and relevant stakeholders interested in Earth Sciences. In such a context, a service providing access to the complete topography of one of the countries participating in EPOS represents a step forward towards the realization of the EPOS mission. Here we report about two years of activity of a data dissemination service which released (for free) a digital elevation model (DEM) of the whole Italian territory at 10 m-resolution named TINTALY/01. The new TINITALY/01 DEM for the whole Italian territory was completed and presented by INGV in 2007. This DEM was the final result of a project funded by the Italian Ministry of the Environment. TINITALY/01 was completed in two phases: in a first phase, independent elevation models for single regions were derived, and in a second phase, all the regional models were merged into a single, seamless model covering the whole territory of Italy. In early 2012, a web portal was published (http://tinitaly.pi.ingv.it/) through which the above DEM is open for a full web-GIS navigation (3-D navigation in anaglyph mode or standard 2-D hillshade), and where internet navigators can ask for the download of the DEM dataset (in grid format, 10 m-resolution) through the compilation of an online form (http://tinitaly.pi.ingv.it/account_request_form.html). Submission of the form implies stating the destination of use for the data, and acceptance of the policy of use (i.e. no-profit use). After nearly two years from the opening of the portal, the DEM is still browsed by up to 10-20 users per day (about 3000 visits throughout 2013). As of 31 December 2013, about 220 users affiliated to nearly 150 different institutions or associations (i.e. universities

  2. Core competencies for cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention professionals: 2010 update: position statement of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Larry F; Sanderson, Bonnie K; Ades, Philip A; Berra, Kathy; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Roitman, Jeffrey L; Williams, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention (CR/SP) services are typically delivered by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) recognizes that to provide high-quality services, it is important for these health care professionals to possess certain core competencies. This update to the previous statement identifies 10 areas of core competencies for CR/SP health care professionals and identifies specific knowledge and skills for each core competency. These core competency areas are consistent with the current list of core components for CR/SP programs published by the AACVPR and the American Heart Association and include comprehensive cardiovascular patient assessment; management of blood pressure, lipids, diabetes, tobacco cessation, weight, and psychological issues; exercise training; and counseling for psychosocial, nutritional, and physical activity issues.

  3. Screening for elevated albuminuria and subsequently hypertension identifies subjects in which treatment may be warranted to prevent renal function decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyilmaz, Akin; de Jong, Paul E; Bakker, Stephan J L; Visser, Sipke T; Thio, Chris; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2017-04-01

    We investigated whether initial population screening for elevated albuminuria with subsequent screening for hypertension in case albuminuria is elevated may be of help to identify subjects at risk for accelerated decline in kidney function. We included subjects who participate in the PREVEND observational, general population-based cohort study and had two or more glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) measurements available during follow-up. Elevated albuminuria was defined as an albumin concentration ≥20 mg/L in a first morning urine sample confirmed by an albumin excretion ≥30 mg/day in two 24-h urines. Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg or use of blood pressure-lowering drugs. eGFR was estimated with the CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C equation. Overall, 6471 subjects were included with a median of 4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2-5] eGFR measurements during a follow-up of 11.3 (95% CI 4.0-13.7) years. Decline in eGFR was greater in the subgroups with elevated albuminuria. This held true, not only in subjects with known hypertension (-1.84 ± 2.27 versus -1.16 ± 1.45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 per year, P albuminuria had higher blood pressure than subjects with normoalbuminuria, and in subjects with elevated albuminuria as yet undiagnosed hypertension was twice as prevalent as diagnosed hypertension. Initial screening for elevated albuminuria followed by screening for hypertension may help to detect subjects with increased risk for a steeper decline in kidney function.

  4. Dietary phosphate restriction suppresses phosphaturia but does not prevent FGF23 elevation in a mouse model of chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shiqin; Gillihan, Ryan; He, Nan; Fields, Timothy; Liu, Shiguang; Green, Troy; Stubbs, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic hormone that in end-stage renal disease is markedly increased in serum; however, the mechanisms responsible for this increase are unclear. Here, we tested whether phosphate retention in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is responsible for the elevation of FGF23 in serum using Col4α3 knockout mice, a murine model of Alport disease exhibiting CKD. We found a significant elevation in serum FGF23 in progressively azotemic 8 and 12 week-old CKD mice...

  5. Dietary phosphate restriction suppresses phosphaturia but does not prevent FGF23 elevation in a mouse model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiqin; Gillihan, Ryan; He, Nan; Fields, Timothy; Liu, Shiguang; Green, Troy; Stubbs, Jason R

    2013-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic hormone that in end-stage renal disease is markedly increased in serum; however, the mechanisms responsible for this increase are unclear. Here, we tested whether phosphate retention in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is responsible for the elevation of FGF23 in serum using Col4α3 knockout mice, a murine model of Alport disease exhibiting CKD. We found a significant elevation in serum FGF23 in progressively azotemic 8- and 12-week-old CKD mice along with an increased fractional excretion of phosphorus. Both moderate and severe phosphate restriction reduced fractional excretion of phosphorus by 8 weeks, yet serum FGF23 levels remained strikingly elevated. By 12 weeks, FGF23 levels were further increased with moderate phosphate restriction, while severe phosphate restriction led to severe bone mineralization defects and decreased FGF23 production in bone. CKD mice on a control diet had low serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D) levels and 3-fold higher renal Cyp24α1 gene expression compared to wild-type mice. Severe phosphate restriction increased 1,25(OH)(2)D levels in CKD mice by 8 weeks and lowered renal Cyp24α1 gene expression despite persistently elevated serum FGF23. Renal klotho gene expression declined in CKD mice on a control diet, but improved with severe phosphate restriction. Thus, dietary phosphate restriction reduces the fractional excretion of phosphorus independent of serum FGF23 levels in mice with CKD.

  6. Developing Core Competencies for the Prevention and Management of Prescription Drug Misuse: A Medical Education Collaboration in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antman, Karen H; Berman, Harris A; Flotte, Terence R; Flier, Jeffrey; Dimitri, Dennis M; Bharel, Monica

    2016-10-01

    Drug overdose has become the leading cause of injury death in the United States. More than half of those deaths involve prescription drugs, specifically opioids. A key component of addressing this national epidemic is improving prescriber practices.A review of the curricula at the four medical schools in Massachusetts revealed that, although they taught components of addiction medicine, no uniform standard existed to ensure that all students were taught prevention and management strategies for prescription drug misuse. To fill this gap, the governor and the secretary of health and human services invited the deans of the state's four medical schools to convene to develop a common educational strategy for teaching safe and effective opioid-prescribing practices. With leadership from the Department of Public Health and Massachusetts Medical Society, the deans formed the Medical Education Working Group in 2015. This group reviewed the relevant literature and current standards for treating substance use disorders and defined 10 core competencies for the prevention and management of prescription drug misuse.The medical schools have incorporated these competencies into their curricula and have committed to assessing students' competence in these areas. The members of the Medical Education Working Group have agreed to continue to work together on key next steps, including connecting these competencies to those for residents, equipping interprofessional teams to address prescription drug misuse, and developing materials in pain management and opioid misuse for practicing physicians. This first-in-the-nation partnership has yielded cross-institutional competencies that aim to address a public health emergency in real time.

  7. Use of Molten Salt Fluxes and Cathodic Protection for Preventing the Oxidation of Titanium at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2014-12-01

    The current study demonstrates that it is possible to protect both solid and liquid titanium and titanium alloys from attack from air by cathodically polarizing the titanium component using an electro-active high-temperature molten salt flux and a moderate polarization potential. The electrolytic cell used comprises a cathode of either solid titanium or liquid titanium alloy, an electrolyte based on molten calcium chloride or fluoride salt, and an anode consisting of an inert oxygen-evolving material such as iridium metal. The new approach renders possible the processing of titanium at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen-containing atmospheres.

  8. Caffeine prevents weight gain and cognitive impairment caused by a high-fat diet while elevating hippocampal BDNF

    OpenAIRE

    Moy, Gregory A.; McNay, Ewan C.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity, high-fat diets, and subsequent type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are associated with cognitive impairment. Moreover, T2DM increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and leads to abnormal elevation of brain beta-amyloid levels, one of the hallmarks of AD. The psychoactive alkaloid caffeine has been shown to have therapeutic potential in AD but the central impact of caffeine has not been well-studied in the context of a high-fat diet. Here we investigated the impact of caffeine administration...

  9. Estrogen receptor-a in the medial amygdala prevents stress-induced elevations in blood pressure in females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychological stress contributes to the development of hypertension in humans. The ovarian hormone, estrogen, has been shown to prevent stress-induced pressor responses in females by unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that the antihypertensive effects of estrogen during stress were blunted in femal...

  10. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  11. Estimating root lifespan of two grasses at contrasting elevation in a salt marsh by applying vitality staining on roots from in-growth cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Hengst, K.; Koutstaal, B.P.; Van Soelen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Contrasting soil conditions caused by different inundation frequencies require different root growth strategies along the elevational gradient of coastal salt marshes. The objective of this study was to examine (1) if root lifespan was shorter in Elymus pycnanthus, a relatively fast-growing

  12. Intracranial Pressure Elevation 24 Hours after Ischemic Stroke in Aged Rats is Prevented by Early, Short Hypothermia Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Anne Murtha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is predominantly a senescent disease, yet most preclinical studies investigate treatment in young animals. We recently demonstrated that short-duration hypothermia-treatment completely prevented the dramatic intracranial pressure (ICP rise seen post-stroke in young rats. Here, our aim was to investigate whether a similar ICP rise occurs in aged rats and to determine whether short-duration hypothermia is an effective treatment in aged animals. Experimental Middle Cerebral Artery occlusion (MCAo - 3 hour occlusion was performed on male Wistar rats aged 19-20 months. At one hour after stroke-onset, rats were randomized to 2.5 hours hypothermia-treatment (32.5 °C or normothermia (37 °C. ICP was monitored at baseline, for 3.5 hours post-occlusion, and at 24 hours post-stroke. Infarct and edema volumes were calculated from histology. Baseline pre-stroke ICP was 11.2 ± 3.3 mmHg across all animals. Twenty-four hours post-stroke, ICP was significantly higher in normothermic animals compared to hypothermia-treated animals (27.4 ± 18.2 mmHg vs. 8.0 ± 5.0 mmHg, p = 0.03. Infarct and edema volumes were not significantly different between groups. These data demonstrate ICP may also increase 24 hours post-stroke in aged rats, and that short-duration hypothermia treatment has a profound and sustained preventative effect. These findings may have important implications for the use of hypothermia in clinical trials of aged stroke patients.

  13. Chlorophytum borivilianum (Safed Musli) root extract prevents impairment in characteristics and elevation of oxidative stress in sperm of streptozotocin-induced adult male diabetic Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giribabu, Nelli; Kumar, Kilari Eswar; Rekha, Somesula Swapna; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-08-08

    We hypothesized that C. borivilianum root, known to improve male reproductive performance, prevents impairment in characteristics, morphology and elevation of oxidative stress in sperm of diabetics. We therefore investigated the effect of aqueous root extract of C. borivilianum on these parameters in diabetic rat model. C. borivilianum root aqueous extract (250 and 500 mg/kg/day) or glibenclamide (600 μg/kg/day) were administered to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic male rats for 28 consecutive days. At the end of treatment, animals were sacrificed and sperm were collected. Sperm count and percentages of forward motility, viability, hypoosmotic swelling (HOS) tail-coiled and abnormal sperm were evaluated. Sperm lipid peroxidation product (LPO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) levels, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), activity levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase-SOD, catalase-CAT and glutathione peroxidase-GPx), epididymal sperm density, serum fasting blood glucose (FBG) and HbA1c levels were measured. The expression of sperm caspase-3 was assessed. Meanwhile, in-vitro free radical scavenging activity of C. borivilianum root extract was determined and the root extract was analyzed for the presence of bioactive compounds by FTIR spectroscopy. C. borivilianum root aqueous extract prevents the decrease in sperm count, percentages of forward motility, viability, HOS and the increase in abnormal sperm percentage and caspase-3 level in diabetic rats. Sperm LPO, H2O2 and NO levels, FBG and HbA1c were lower while TAC, SOD, CAT, GPx and epididymal sperm density were higher in diabetic rats receiving C. borivilianum root extract treatment. C. borivilianum root exhibited strong in-vitro free radical scavenging activity which may be due to the phenolic compound. C. borivilianum root extract prevents impairment in sperm characteristics and morphology via preventing elevation of oxidative stress, apoptosis and free radicals levels of

  14. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  15. Core indicators evaluation of effectiveness of HIV-AIDS preventive-control programmes carried out by nongovernmental organizations. A mixed method study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansilla Rosa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of nongovernmental organizations working on AIDS has grown. There is great diversity in the type of activities and population groups that have been targeted. The purposes of this study are: to describe and analyze the objectives and HIV-AIDS preventive activities that are carried out by the AIDS-NGOs that work with AIDS in Catalonia and that receive subsidies from the Department of Health; and to develop a comprehensive proposal for measurable and agreed upon core quality evaluation indicators to monitor and assess those objectives and activities that can have an impact on the fight against inequalities and stigmatization, and incorporate the perspectives of the service providers and users. Methods A mixed method study has been carried out with professionals from the 36 NGOs that work with HIV/AIDS in Catalonia, as well as their users. This study achieved the completeness model using the following phases: 1. A systematic review of AIDS-NGOs annual reports and preparation of a catalogue of activities grouped by objectives, level of prevention and AIDS-NGOs target population; 2. A transversal study through an ad-hoc questionnaire administered to the AIDS-NGOs representatives; 3. A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach through focus groups, individual interviews and observations; 4. Consensus meetings between AIDS-NGOs professionals and the research team using Haddon matrices in order to establish a proposal of evaluation indicators. Results The information was classified according to level of prevention and level of intervention. A total of 248 objectives and 258 prevention activities were identified. 1564 evaluation indicators, addressed to 7 target population groups, were produced. Thirty core activities were selected. The evaluation indicators proposed for these activities were: 76 indicators for 15 primary prevention activities, 43 for 5 secondary prevention activities and 68 for 10 tertiary

  16. Rivaroxaban for Preventing Atherothrombotic Events in People with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Elevated Cardiac Biomarkers: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandor, Abdullah; Pollard, Daniel; Chico, Tim; Henderson, Robert; Stevenson, Matt

    2016-05-01

    As part of its Single Technology Appraisal process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the company that manufactures rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of rivaroxaban for the prevention of adverse outcomes in patients after the acute management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, based upon the company's submission to NICE. The evidence was derived mainly from a randomised, double-blind, phase III, placebo-controlled trial of rivaroxaban (either 2.5 or 5 mg twice daily) in patients with recent ACS [unstable angina, non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)]. In addition, all patients received antiplatelet therapy [aspirin alone or aspirin and a thienopyridine either as clopidogrel (approximately 99 %) or ticlopidine (approximately 1 %) according to national or local guidelines]. The higher dose of rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily) did not form part of the marketing authorisation. A post hoc subgroup analysis of the licensed patients who had ACS with elevated cardiac biomarkers (that is, patients with STEMI and NSTEMI) without prior stroke or transient ischaemic stroke showed that compared with standard care, the addition of rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) to existing antiplatelet therapy reduced the composite endpoint of cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction or stroke, but increased the risk of major bleeding and intracranial haemorrhage. However, there were a number of limitations in the evidence base that warrant caution in its interpretation. In particular, the evidence may be confounded because of the post hoc subgroup

  17. Synthesis and characterization of Nb2O5@C core-shell nanorods and Nb2O5nanorods by reacting Nb(OEt5via RAPET (reaction under autogenic pressure at elevated temperatures technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George PP

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe reaction of pentaethoxy niobate, Nb(OEt5, at elevated temperature (800 °C under autogenic pressure provides a chemical route to niobium oxide nanorods coated with amorphous carbon. This synthetic approach yielded nanocrystalline particles of Nb2O5@C. As prepared Nb2O5@C core-shell nanorods is annealed under air at 500 °C for 3 h (removing the carbon coating results in neat Nb2O5nanorods. According to the TEM measurements, the Nb2O5crystals exhibit particle sizes between 25 nm and 100 nm, and the Nb2O5crystals display rod-like shapes without any indication of an amorphous character. The optical band gap of the Nb2O5nanorods was determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS and was found to be 3.8 eV.

  18. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A SPECIALIST Prevention Strengthening Exercise Committee Exercise Committee Core Strengthening Many popular forms of exercise focus on ... acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from ...

  19. Elevated dietary magnesium during pregnancy and postnatal life prevents ectopic mineralization in Enpp1asj mice, a model for generalized arterial calcification of infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingman, Joshua; Uitto, Jouni; Li, Qiaoli

    2017-06-13

    Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ENPP1 gene. It is characterized by mineralization of the arterial blood vessels, often diagnosed prenatally, and associated with death in early childhood. There is no effective treatment for this devastating disorder. We previously characterized the Enpp1asjmutant mouse as a model of GACI, and we have now explored the effect of elevated dietary magnesium (five-fold) in pregnant mothers and continuing for the first 14 weeks of postnatal life. The mothers were kept on either control diet or experimental diet supplemented with magnesium. Upon weaning at 4 weeks of age the pups were placed either on control diet or high magnesium diet. The degree of mineralization was assessed at 14 weeks of age by histopathology and a chemical calcium assay in muzzle skin, kidney and aorta. Mice placed on high magnesium diet showed little, if any, evidence of mineralization when their corresponding mothers were also placed on diet enriched with magnesium during pregnancy and nursing. The reduced ectopic mineralization in these mice was accompanied by increased calcium and magnesium content in the urine, suggesting that magnesium competes calcium-phosphate binding thereby preventing the mineral deposition. These results have implications for dietary management of pregnancies in which the fetus is suspected of having GACI. Moreover, augmenting a diet with high magnesium may be beneficial for other ectopic mineralization diseases, including nephrocalcinosis.

  20. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  1. Multi-functional electrospun antibacterial core-shell nanofibrous membranes for prolonged prevention of post-surgical tendon adhesion and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalumon, K T; Sheu, Chialin; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Shih-Heng; Jose, Gils; Kuo, Chang-Yi; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2018-04-05

    The possibility of endowing an electrospun anti-adhesive barrier membrane with multi-functionality, such as lubrication, prevention of fibroblast attachment and anti-infection and anti-inflammation properties, is highly desirable for the management of post-surgical tendon adhesion. To this end, we fabricated core-shell nanofibrous membranes (CSNMs) with embedded silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) in the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)/poly(caprolactone) (PCL) shell and hyaluronic acid (HA)/ibuprofen in the core. HA imparted a lubrication effect for smooth tendon gliding and reduced fibroblast attachment, while Ag NPs and ibuprofen functioned as anti-infection and anti-inflammation agents, respectively. CSNMs with a PEG/PCL/Ag shell (PPA) and HA core containing 0% (H/PPA), 10% (HI10/PPA), 30% (HI30/PPA) and 50% (HI50/PPA) ibuprofen were fabricated through co-axial electrospinning and assessed through microscopic, spectroscopic, thermal, mechanical and drug release analyses. Considering nutrient passage through the barrier, the microporous CSNMs exerted the same barrier effect but drastically increased the mass transfer coefficients of bovine serum albumin compared with the commercial anti-adhesive membrane SurgiWrap®. Cell attachment/focal adhesion formation of fibroblasts revealed effective reduction of initial cell attachment on the CSNM surface with minimum cytotoxicity (except HI50/PPA). The anti-bacterial effect against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was verified to be due to the Ag NPs in the membranes. In vivo studies using H/PPA and HI30/PPA CSNMs and SurgiWrap® in a rabbit flexor tendon rupture model demonstrated the improved efficacy of HI30/PPA CSNMs in reducing inflammation and tendon adhesion formation based on gross observation, histological analysis and functional assays. We conclude that HI30/PPA CSNMs can act as a multifunctional barrier membrane to prevent peritendinous adhesion after tendon surgery. A multi-functional anti-adhesion barrier

  2. Rosuvastatin for Primary Prevention in Older Persons With Elevated C-Reactive Protein and Low to Average Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels: Exploratory Analysis of a Randomized Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glynn, R.J.; Koenig, W.; Nordestgaard, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Randomized data on statins for primary prevention in older persons are limited, and the relative hazard of cardiovascular disease associated with an elevated cholesterol level weakens with advancing age. Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin in persons 70 years ...

  3. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  4. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise ...

  5. Erythropoietin prevention trial of coronary restenosis and cardiac remodeling after ST-elevated acute myocardial infarction (EPOC-AMI): a pilot, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Norimasa; Nakamura, Takeshi; Sawada, Takahisa; Matsubara, Kinya; Furukawa, Keizo; Hadase, Mitsuyoshi; Nakahara, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2010-11-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) enhances re-endothelialization and anti-apoptotic action. Larger clinical studies to examine the effects of high-dose EPO are in progress in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this multi-center pilot study was to investigate the effect of `low-dose EPO' (6,000 IU during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), 24 h and 48 h) in 35 patients with a first ST-elevated AMI undergoing PCI who was randomly assigned to EPO or placebo (saline) treatment. Neointimal volume, cardiac function and infarct size were examined in the acute phase and 6 months later (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00423020). No significant regression in in-stent neointimal volume was observed, whereas left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction was significantly improved (49.2% to 55.7%, P=0.003) and LV end-systolic volume was decreased in the EPO group (47.7 ml to 39.0 ml, P=0.036). LV end-diastolic volume tended to be reduced from 90.2% to 84.5% (P=0.159), whereas in the control group it was inversely increased (91.7% to 93.7%, P=0.385). Infarction sizes were significantly reduced by 38.5% (P=0.003) but not in the control group (23.7%, P=0.051). Hemoglobin, peak creatine kinase values, and CD34(+)/CD133(+)/CD45(dim) endothelial progenitors showed no significant changes. No adverse events were observed during study periods. This is a first study demonstrating that short-term `low-dose' EPO to PCI-treated AMI patients did not prevent neointimal hyperplasia but rather improved cardiac function and infarct size without any clinical adverse effects.

  6. Usefulness of lung impedance-guided pre-emptive therapy to prevent pulmonary edema during ST-elevation myocardial infarction and to improve long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shochat, Michael; Shotan, Avraham; Blondheim, David S; Kazatsker, Mark; Dahan, Iris; Asif, Aya; Shochat, Ilia; Rabinovich, Paul; Rozenman, Yoseph; Meisel, Simcha R

    2012-07-15

    Patients sustaining an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) frequently develop pulmonary congestion or pulmonary edema (PED). We previously showed that lung impedance (LI) threshold decrease of 12% to 14% from baseline during admission for STEMI marks the onset of the transition zone from interstitial to alveolar edema and predicts evolution to PED with 98% probability. The aim of this study was to prove that pre-emptive LI-guided treatment may prevent PED and improve clinical outcomes. Five hundred sixty patients with STEMI and no signs of heart failure underwent LI monitoring for 84 ± 36 hours. Maximal LI decrease throughout monitoring did not exceed 12% in 347 patients who did not develop PED (group 1). In 213 patients LI reached the threshold level and, although still asymptomatic (Killip class I), these patients were then randomized to conventional (group 2, n = 142) or LI-guided (group 3, n = 71) pre-emptive therapy. In group 3, treatment was initiated at randomization (LI = -13.8 ± 0.6%). In contrast, conventionally treated patients (group 2) were treated only at onset of dyspnea occurring 4.1 ± 3.1 hours after randomization (LI = -25.8 ± 4.3%, p <0.001). All patients in group 2 but only 8 patients in group 3 (11%) developed Killip class II to IV PED (p <0.001). Unadjusted hospital mortality, length of stay, 1-year readmission rate, 6-year mortality, and new-onset heart failure occurred less in group 3 (p <0.001). Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, left ventricular ejection fraction, risk factors, peak creatine kinase, and admission creatinine and hemoglobin levels showed improved clinical outcome in group 3 (p <0.001). In conclusion, LI-guided pre-emptive therapy in patients with STEMI decreases the incidence of in-hospital PED and results in better short- and long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The nitroxide radical TEMPOL prevents obesity, hyperlipidaemia, elevation of inflammatory cytokines, and modulates atherosclerotic plaque composition in apoE-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Christine H J; Mitchell, James B; Bursill, Christina A; Sowers, Anastasia L; Thetford, Angela; Cook, John A; van Reyk, David M; Davies, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    The nitroxide compound TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl radical) has been shown to prevent obesity-induced changes in adipokines in cell and animal systems. In this study we investigated whether supplementation with TEMPOL inhibits inflammation and atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). ApoE-/- mice were fed for 12 weeks on standard chow diet or a high-fat diet. Half the mice were supplemented with 10 mg/g TEMPOL in their food. Plasma samples were analysed for triglycerides, cholesterol, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, inflammatory cytokines and markers (interleukin-6, IL-6; monocyte-chemotactic protein, MCP-1; myeloperoxidase, MPO; serum amyloid A, SAA; adiponectin; leptin). Plaques in the aortic sinus were analysed for area, and content of collagen, lipid, macrophages and smooth muscle cells. High fat feeding resulted in marked increases in body mass and plasma lipid levels. Dietary TEMPOL decreased both parameters. In the high-fat-fed mice significant elevations in plasma lipid levels and the inflammatory markers IL-6, MCP-1, MPO, SAA were detected, along with an increase in leptin and a decrease in adiponectin. TEMPOL supplementation reversed these effects. When compared to HFD-fed mice, TEMPOL supplementation increased plaque collagen content, decreased lipid content and increased macrophage numbers. These data indicate that in a well-established model of obesity-associated hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis, TEMPOL had a significant impact on body mass, atherosclerosis, hyperlipidaemia and inflammation. TEMPOL may therefore be of value in suppressing obesity, metabolic disorders and increasing atherosclerotic plaque stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevention of hepatitis B virus infection from hepatitis B core antibody-positive donor graft using hepatitis B immune globulin and lamivudine in living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, Taketoshi; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kishikawa, Keiji; Shimura, Tatsuo; Soejima, Yuji; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Hashimoto, Kohji; Mochida, Yasushi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2005-12-01

    Hepatic grafts from hepatitis B surface antigen-negative and anti-core antibody (HBcAb)-positive donors have been shown to transmit hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Recently, it has been reported that combined hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) and lamivudine therapy is effective in the prevention of hepatitis B recurrence after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). In this report, we assessed the efficacy of combined HBIG and lamivudine therapy in preventing HBV transmission by graft with HBcAb-positive donors. We studied 22 patients who had undergone LDLT with allografts from HBcAb-positive living donors at Gunma University Hospital and Kyushu University Hospital. Long-term combined HBIG and lamivudine therapy were administrated to all recipients. Serum samples from the donor and recipient were tested for HBcAb, HBV DNA, and hepatitis B surface antibody. Liver biopsies from grafts were tested for HBV DNA. All recipients were HBcAb negative before LDLT. All of the donor livers were HBV DNA positive at the time of LDLT. All of the recipients had HBsAb titers greater than 300 mIU/ml 4 weeks after LDLT, and remained 100 mIU/ml thereafter. None of the recipients have become infected with HBV with a follow-up of 25-86 months. Perioperative combined HBIG and lamivudine therapy can prevent HBV infection in recipients who receive liver grafts from HBcAb-positive donors.

  9. PREVENTION OF POST-TRANSFUSION HEPATITIS BY SCREENING OF ANTIBODY TO HEPATITIS B CORE ANTIGEN IN HEALTHY BLOOD DONORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Transfusion-associated hepatitis B viral infection continues to be a major problem in India even after adoption of mandatory screening for HBsAg by ELISA method. The high incidence of TAHBV is reported in patients receiving multiple transfusions.

    Objective: To study the seroprevalence of hepatitis B core antibody among healthy voluntary blood donors

    Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted in the department of Transfusion Medicine of a tertiary care referral hospital. A total of 12,232 volunteers after passing through the stringent criteria were selected for blood donation. Donor samples were tested for all mandatory transfusion transmissible infections and anti HBc IgM (Monolisa HBc IgM PLUS:BIO-RAD, France. Reactive results were confirmed by repeat testing in duplicate. Donor data was analyzed using SPSS software and Chi-square test was used to calculate the significance of difference between the groups.

    Results:A total of 12,232 healthy voluntary blood donors were recruited. Majority (93.4% were males. Median age of donor population was 26 years (range: 18-60 years. Eighty six (0.7% were positive for HBsAg, which comes under “low prevalence (<2% zone” as per WHO. On screening for HBcAg Ig M, 15 (0.1% were found to be positive and none were HBsAg reactive. There was no significance of difference in the mean age between reactive and non-reactive donors.

    Conclusion:Evaluating the usefulness of anti-HBc screening is critical. Anti HBcAg IgM screening may be included in routine screening of donors as it is an indicator of occult HBV during window period. The cost and the unnecessary wastage of the blood units when they are positive for anti HBsAg along with the core antibody need to be studied.

     

  10. Central Core Disease Associated with Elevated Creatine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    packed, with marked zig-zagging and streaming of the. Z-lines (Fig. 5). Glycogen granules were present in normal quantity. Fig. 3. Electron photomicrograph (X 10000) showing an area of total fibre depletion with scanty mitochondria and excessive folding of the plasma membrane. Fig. 4. Electron photomicrograph (X ...

  11. Data Elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-29

    Data Elevator: Efficient Asynchronous Data Movement in Hierarchical Storage Systems Multi-layer storage subsystems, including SSD-based burst buffers and disk-based parallel file systems (PFS), are becoming part of HPC systems. However, software for this storage hierarchy is still in its infancy. Applications may have to explicitly move data among the storage layers. We propose Data Elevator for transparently and efficiently moving data between a burst buffer and a PFS. Users specify the final destination for their data, typically on PFS, Data Elevator intercepts the I/O calls, stages data on burst buffer, and then asynchronously transfers the data to their final destination in the background. This system allows extensive optimizations, such as overlapping read and write operations, choosing I/O modes, and aligning buffer boundaries. In tests with large-scale scientific applications, Data Elevator is as much as 4.2X faster than Cray DataWarp, the start-of-art software for burst buffer, and 4X faster than directly writing to PFS. The Data Elevator library uses HDF5's Virtual Object Layer (VOL) for intercepting parallel I/O calls that write data to PFS. The intercepted calls are redirected to the Data Elevator, which provides a handle to write the file in a faster and intermediate burst buffer system. Once the application finishes writing the data to the burst buffer, the Data Elevator job uses HDF5 to move the data to final destination in an asynchronous manner. Hence, using the Data Elevator library is currently useful for applications that call HDF5 for writing data files. Also, the Data Elevator depends on the HDF5 VOL functionality.

  12. Prevention of de novo hepatitis B with adefovir dipivoxil in recipients of liver grafts from hepatitis B core antibody-positive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Matthew S; Olsen, Sonja K; Pichardo, Elsa M; Heese, Scott; Stiles, Jessica B; Abdelmessih, Rita; Verna, Elizabeth C; Guarrera, James V; Emond, Jean C; Brown, Robert S

    2012-07-01

    Lamivudine has been shown to prevent de novo hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections in liver transplantation (LT) patients receiving hepatitis B core antibody-positive (HBcAb(+)) grafts, but it may produce long-term resistance. Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) might be effective in preventing de novo hepatitis and resistance. A single-center, prospective trial was conducted with 16 adults (10 men and 6 women, mean age = 54 ± 11 years) who underwent LT with HBcAb(+) grafts between September 2007 and October 2009. After LT, patients were given ADV [10 mg daily (adjusted for renal function)]. No hepatitis B immune globulin was administered. At LT, all graft recipients were hepatitis B surface antigen-negative (HBsAg(-)), 38% were surface antibody-positive (HBsAb(+)), and 50% were HBcAb(+). The median follow-up after LT was 1.8 years (range = 1.0-2.6 years). All recipients had undetectable HBV DNA (HBcAb(-) before LT became HBsAg(+) after 52 weeks. One recipient was switched from ADV to entecavir for chronic renal insufficiency, and 19% of the patients had renal dose adjustments. There was a nonsignificant trend of increasing creatinine levels over time (1.2 mg/dL at LT, 1.3 mg/dL 1 year after LT, and 2.0 mg/dL 2 years after LT, P = 0.27). A comparison with a control cohort of LT recipients with hepatitis C virus who did not receive ADV showed no difference in the creatinine levels at LT or 1 year after LT. In conclusion, ADV prophylaxis prevents HBV replication in recipients of HBcAb(+) livers but does not fully protect recipients from de novo HBV. Long-term follow-up is needed to better determine the risk of de novo infection. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  13. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  14. Rosuvastatin for Primary Prevention Among Individuals With Elevated High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and 5% to 10% and 10% to 20% 10-Year Risk Implications of the Justification for Use of Statins in Prevention: An Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) Trial for "Intermediate Risk"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridker, Paul M.; Macfadyen, Jean G.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kastelein, John J. P.; Genest, Jacques; Glynn, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Background-Recent primary prevention guidelines issued in Canada endorse the use of statin therapy among individuals at "intermediate risk" who have elevated levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). However, trial data directly addressing whether this recommendation defines a patient

  15. Evaluation of a school-based depression prevention program among adolescents with elevated depressive symptoms : Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge-Heesen, Karlijn W.J.; van Ettekoven, Kim M.; Rasing, Sanne P.A.; Liempd, Farina H.J.Oprins-van; Vermulst, Ad; Engels, Rutger C.M.E.; Creemers, Daan H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adolescents are at risk of developing depressive symptoms. Given the prevalence, recurrence and negative consequences of adolescent depression, it is crucial to implement prevention programs for high-risk adolescents. Prevention programs at an indicated level have shown to be successful

  16. Evaluation of a school-based depression prevention program among adolescents with elevated depressive symptoms: Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge-Heesen, K.W.J. de; Ettekoven, K.M. van; Rasing, S.P.A.; Oprins-van Liempd, F.H.J.; Vermulst, A.A.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Creemers, D.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adolescents are at risk of developing depressive symptoms. Given the prevalence, recurrence and negative consequences of adolescent depression, it is crucial to implement prevention programs for high-risk adolescents. Prevention programs at an indicated level have shown to be successful

  17. Low muscle glycogen and elevated plasma free fatty acid modify but do not prevent exercise-induced PDH activation in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian; Gudmundsson, Mikkel; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2010-01-01

    to the contra-lateral leg (CON) the day before the experiment day. On the experimental days, plasma FFA was ensured normal or remained elevated by consuming breakfast rich (low FFA) or poor (high FFA) in carbohydrate, 2 hours before performing 20 min of two-legged knee extensor exercise. Vastus lateralis...

  18. Prevention of de novo hepatitis B in recipients of core antibody-positive livers with lamivudine and other nucleos(t)ides: a 12-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Matthew S; Olsen, Sonja K; Pichardo, Elsa M; Stiles, Jessica B; Rosenthal-Cogan, Lori; Brubaker, William D; Guarrera, James V; Emond, Jean C; Brown, Robert S

    2013-04-15

    Lamivudine (LAM) has been shown to prevent de novo hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in recipients of hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb)-positive liver transplants (LT) but primarily in small studies with limited follow-up. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of HBcAb+ graft recipients at our institution from October 1999 to August 2008. One hundred nineteen recipients without prior HBV were identified (median age, 54 years; 70% male), of which 62 received LAM. The median follow-up was 2.6 years overall and 5.3 years in the LAM group. Among LAM recipients, 44% were HBV naïve (HBsAb-/HBcAb-) at LT, of which 6% developed HBsAb+ and 3% developed HBcAb+ after LT. Eight percent developed de novo HBV: two recipients became hepatitis B surface antigen positive at 70 and 23 months and three experienced breakthrough with HBV DNA more than 2000 IU at 1 to 9 months after LT. Sixty percent (3 of 5) were HBV naïve. Four (6%) other recipients also had transiently detectable HBV less than 2000 IU, which did not require any changes to their prophylaxis regimen. When compared with recipients who received other nucleos(t)ide analogues, there was no difference in de novo rates: LAM 8% (5 of 62), adefovir 15% (5 of 33), tenofovir 0% (0 of 3), entecavir 0% (0 of 1), and 5% (1 of 20) for those not given prophylaxis (P=0.59). LAM monoprophylaxis was effective in preventing de novo HBV in the vast majority of recipients over long-term follow-up. Adefovir had a higher rate of de novo infections numerically, whereas tenofovir and entecavir had no cases and may be more effective, but this was limited by a small sample size.

  19. Core stability exercise principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuthota, Venu; Ferreiro, Andrea; Moore, Tamara; Fredericson, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Core stability is essential for proper load balance within the spine, pelvis, and kinetic chain. The so-called core is the group of trunk muscles that surround the spine and abdominal viscera. Abdominal, gluteal, hip girdle, paraspinal, and other muscles work in concert to provide spinal stability. Core stability and its motor control have been shown to be imperative for initiation of functional limb movements, as needed in athletics. Sports medicine practitioners use core strengthening techniques to improve performance and prevent injury. Core strengthening, often called lumbar stabilization, also has been used as a therapeutic exercise treatment regimen for low back pain conditions. This article summarizes the anatomy of the core, the progression of core strengthening, the available evidence for its theoretical construct, and its efficacy in musculoskeletal conditions.

  20. Core stability and bicycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Chad; Ross, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Bicycling is a popular fitness activity in the United States and around the world. Because of the nature of the bicycling position, the neck and back are at risk for injury. One method to prevent these injuries is to ensure that the body's "core" is strong and stable. A strong and stable core also provides a platform to maximize power transfer, improving performance. Core exercises also may enhance recovery from intense bicycling efforts. Simple stability exercises can improve performance and may prevent injuries in bicyclists.

  1. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  2. The impact of prostate volume, number of biopsy cores and American Urological Association symptom score on the sensitivity of cancer detection using the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankerst, Donna P; Till, Cathee; Boeck, Andreas; Goodman, Phyllis; Tangen, Catherine M; Feng, Ziding; Partin, Alan W; Chan, Daniel W; Sokoll, Lori; Kagan, Jacob; Wei, John T; Thompson, Ian M

    2013-07-01

    We assessed the independent predictive value of prostate volume, number of biopsy cores and AUASS (American Urological Association symptom score) compared to risk factors included in the PCPTRC (Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator for prostate cancer) and PCPTHG (Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator for high grade cancer [Gleason grade 7 or greater]). Of 5,519 PCPT (Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial) participants used to construct the PCPTRC 4,958 with AUASS and prostate specific antigen 10 ng/ml or less were included on logistic regression analysis. Risk algorithms were evaluated in 571 EDRN (Early Detection Research Network) participants using the ROC AUC. A total of 1,094 participants (22.1%) had prostate cancer, of whom 232 (21.2%) had high grade disease. For prostate cancer prediction higher prostate specific antigen, abnormal digital rectal examination, family history of prostate cancer and number of cores were associated with increased risk, while volume was associated with decreased risk. Excluding prostate volume and number of cores, a history of negative biopsy and increased AUASS were also associated with lower risk. For high grade cancer higher prostate specific antigen, abnormal digital rectal examination, black race and number of cores were associated with increased risk and volume, while AUASS was associated with decreased risk. The AUC of the PCPTRC adjusted for volume and number of cores was 72.7% (using EDRN data), 68.2% when adjusted for AUASS alone and 67.6% PCPTRC. For high grade disease the AUCs were 74.8%, 74.0% and 73.5% (PCPTHG), respectively. Adjusted PCPT risk calculators for volume, number of cores and AUASS improve cancer detection. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic ... Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain ...

  4. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! ...

  5. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES Patient ... popular forms of exercise focus on core strengthening, or building the muscles that provide support for your body. Pilates, yoga and martial arts ...

  6. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastorguyev, M.A.; Maloyarovslavtesv, D.A.; Prokopov, O.I.; Tukayev, Sh.V.; Zanilov, I.F.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body with a turning collar locking device and a rod with longitudinal grooves, which are flexibly linked with jaws positioned in grooves in the body. To increase safety through ensuring automatic locking of the jaws in the closed position, the locking device is made in the form of head on wedges, spring loaded relative to the collar and made with cams and positioned with the capability of interacting with the grooves of the rod and through the cams with the collar.

  7. Bucket elevator

    OpenAIRE

    Chromek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Cílem této bakalářské práce je návrh svislého korečkového elevátoru, který má sloužit k dopravě obilovin s dopravní výškou 19 m a dopravovaným množstvím 100 t/hod. Práce se skládá z popisu korečkového elevátoru a jeho hlavních částí, zmiňující se v úvodní rešerši. Tato práce je zaměřena na funkční a kapacitní výpočet, určení pohonu a napínacího zařízení. Další výpočet je kontrolní, skládající se z pevnostní kontroly hnacího hřídele, výpočtu pera, životnosti ložisek a výpočtu napínacího zaříze...

  8. HIV Prevention Services and Testing Utilization Behaviors among Men Who Have Sex with Men at Elevated Risk for HIV in Chongqing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yifei; Wu, Guohui; Jia, Yujiang; Lu, Rongrong; Xiao, Yan; Raymond, H. F.; Ruan, Yuhua; Sun, Jiangping

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate barriers and correlates of the use of HIV prevention services and HIV testing behaviors among men who have sex with men in Chongqing. Methods. Three consecutive cross-sectional surveys provided demographic, sexual behavior, HIV/syphilis infection, HIV prevention service, and testing behavior data. Results. Of 1239 participants, 15.4% were infected with HIV, incidence was 12.3 per 100 persons/year (95% CI: 9.2–15.3), 38% of the participants reported ever having unprotected insertive anal sex, 40% ever received free condom/lubricants in the past year, and 27.7% ever obtained free sexually transmitted infection examination/treatment in the past year. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that lower levels of HIV/AIDS related stigmatizing/discriminatory attitudes, full-time jobs, and sex debut with men at a younger age were independently associated with use of free condom/lubricants. Large social networks, higher incomes, and sexual debut with men at a younger age were associated with use of any HIV prevention and HIV testing services. Lower levels of stigmatizing/discriminatory attitudes were also associated with HIV testing. Fearing needles and being unaware of the venues for testing were top barriers for testing service utilization. Conclusion. It is imperative to address HIV/AIDS related stigmatizing/discriminatory attitudes and other barriers while delivering intervention and testing services. PMID:24783195

  9. Pre-germinated brown rice prevents high-fat diet induced hyperglycemia through elevated insulin secretion and glucose metabolism pathway in C57BL/6J strain mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kuo-Ping; Hao, Chi-Long; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Chen, Chun-Yen; Wu, Bin-Nan; Lin, Hui-Li

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect and mechanism of pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) prevented hyperglycemia in C57BL/6J mice fed high-fat-diet (HFD). Normal six-week-old mice were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 was fed standard-regular-diet (SRD) and group 2 was fed HFD for 16 weeks. In group 3, the mice were fed a HFD with its carbohydrate replaced with PGBR for 16 weeks. Comparing the SRD and HFD groups, we found the HFD group had higher blood pressure, higher concentrations of blood glucose and HbA1c. The HFD group had less protein expression of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) and glucokinase (GCK) and greater expression of glucogen synthase kinase (GSK) in skeletal muscle. The HFD group also had less expression of IR, serine/threonine kinase PI3K-linked protein kinase B (Akt/PKB), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), GCK and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in liver. In the HFD + PGBR group, the PGBR could reverse the disorders of blood pressure, blood glucose, HbA1c and increase insulin concentration. PGBR increased the IR, IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, GLUT-1 and GLUT-4 proteins, and ameliorated AMPK, GCK, GSK and PPARγ proteins. Together, PGBR prevented HFD-induced hyperglycemia through improving insulin levels, insulin receptor, glucose transporters and enhancing glucose metabolism.

  10. Low muscle glycogen and elevated plasma free fatty acid modify but do not prevent exercise-induced PDH activation in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilerich, Kristian; Gudmundsson, Mikkel; Birk, Jesper B; Lundby, Carsten; Taudorf, Sarah; Plomgaard, Peter; Saltin, Bengt; Pedersen, Per A; Wojtaszewski, Jorgen F P; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that free fatty acid (FFA) and muscle glycogen modify exercise-induced regulation of PDH (pyruvate dehydrogenase) in human skeletal muscle through regulation of PDK4 expression. On two occasions, healthy male subjects lowered (by exercise) muscle glycogen in one leg (LOW) relative to the contra-lateral leg (CON) the day before the experimental day. On the experimental days, plasma FFA was ensured normal or remained elevated by consuming breakfast rich (low FFA) or poor (high FFA) in carbohydrate, 2 h before performing 20 min of two-legged knee extensor exercise. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained before and after exercise. PDK4 protein content was approximately 2.2- and approximately 1.5-fold higher in LOW than CON leg in high FFA and low FFA, respectively, and the PDK4 protein content in the CON leg was approximately twofold higher in high FFA than in low FFA. In all conditions, exercise increased PDHa (PDH in the active form) activity, resulting in similar levels in LOW leg in both trials and CON leg in high FFA, but higher level in CON leg in low FFA. PDHa activity was closely associated with the PDH-E1alpha phosphorylation level. Muscle glycogen and plasma FFA attenuate exercise-induced PDH regulation in human skeletal muscle in a nonadditive manner. This might be through regulation of PDK4 expression. The activation of PDH by exercise independent of changes in muscle glycogen or plasma FFA suggests that exercise overrules FFA-mediated inhibition of PDH (i.e., carbohydrate oxidation), and this may thus be one mechanism behind the health-promoting effects of exercise.

  11. Aqueous Extract of Phyllanthus niruri Leaves Displays In Vitro Antioxidant Activity and Prevents the Elevation of Oxidative Stress in the Kidney of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelli Giribabu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available P. niruri has been reported to possess antidiabetic and kidney protective effects. In the present study, the phytochemical constituents and in vitro antioxidant activity of P. niruri leaf aqueous extract were investigated together with its effect on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes levels in diabetic rat kidney. Results. Treatment of diabetic male rats with P. niruri leaf aqueous extract (200 and 400 mg/kg for 28 consecutive days prevents the increase in the amount of lipid peroxidation (LPO product, malondialdehyde (MDA, and the diminution of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx activity levels in the kidney of diabetic rats. The amount of LPO showed strong negative correlation with SOD, CAT, and GPx activity levels. P. niruri leaf aqueous extract exhibits in vitro antioxidant activity with IC50 slightly lower than ascorbic acid. Phytochemical screening of plant extract indicates the presence of polyphenols. Conclusion. P. niruri leaf extract protects the kidney from oxidative stress induced by diabetes.

  12. Children with Elevated Psychosocial Risk Load Benefit Most from a Family-Based Preventive Intervention: Exploratory Differential Analyses from the German "Strengthening Families Program 10-14" Adaptation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröning, Sonja; Baldus, Christiane; Thomsen, Monika; Sack, Peter-Michael; Arnaud, Nicolas; Thomasius, Rainer

    2017-11-01

    While the effectiveness of substance use prevention programs such as the Strengthening Families Program 10-14 (SFP) has been demonstrated in the USA, European SFP adaptations have not replicated these sizable effects. Following the rationale of the risk moderation hypothesis positing that elevated risk groups may benefit more from a preventive intervention than lower-risk groups, we reanalyzed evaluation data from a randomized controlled trial testing the adapted German version of SFP (SFP-D). We hypothesized a differential impact of risk status on intervention results. The study employed a minimal control condition. Of the N = 292 participating children, 73.5% qualified as at-risk because they lived in a deprived urban district, and 26.5% qualified as high risk because they additionally scored as "difficult" in the German Strengths and Difficulty Questionnaire (parents' reports using gender- and age-specific German norms). Outcomes were children's self-reports on substance use, mental health, family functioning, and quality of life. Data were analyzed with repeated measures linear mixed models and relative risk analyses. The high-risk group in the SFP-D condition achieved the best results compared with all other groups, especially in mental health and quality of life. Relative risk analyses on tobacco [alcohol] abstinence showed that an additional percentage of 29.8% [16.0%] of high-risk children in nonabstinent controls would have remained abstinent if they had participated in SFP-D. We conclude that risk load influences the impact of substance use prevention programs and discuss to what extent differential analyses can add value to prevention research.

  13. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Lowering for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Among Men With Primary Elevations of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels of 190 mg/dL or Above: Analyses From the WOSCOPS (West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study) 5-Year Randomized Trial and 20-Year Observational Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J; Robertson, Michele; Catapano, Alberico L; Watts, Gerald F; Kastelein, John J; Packard, Chris J; Ford, Ian; Ray, Kausik K

    2017-11-14

    Patients with primary elevations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥190 mg/dL are at a higher risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease as a result of long-term exposure to markedly elevated LDL-C levels. Therefore, initiation of statin therapy is recommended for these individuals. However, there is a lack of randomized trial evidence supporting these recommendations in primary prevention. In the present analysis, we provide hitherto unpublished data on the cardiovascular effects of LDL-C lowering among a primary prevention population with LDL-C ≥190 mg/dL. We aimed to assess the benefits of LDL-C lowering on cardiovascular outcomes among individuals with primary elevations of LDL-C ≥190 mg/dL without preexisting vascular disease at baseline. We performed post hoc analyses from the WOSCOPS (West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study) randomized, placebo-controlled trial, and observational posttrial long-term follow-up, after excluding individuals with evidence of vascular disease at baseline. WOSCOPS enrolled 6595 men aged 45 to 64 years, who were randomly assigned to pravastatin 40 mg/d or placebo. In the present analyses, 5529 participants without evidence of vascular disease were included, stratified by LDL-C levels into those with LDL-C coronary heart disease and major adverse cardiovascular events were assessed over the 4.9-year randomized controlled trial phase and on mortality outcomes over a total of 20 years of follow-up. Among 5529 individuals without vascular disease, pravastatin reduced the risk of coronary heart disease by 27% ( P =0.002) and major adverse cardiovascular events by 25% ( P =0.004) consistently among those with and without LDL-C ≥190 mg/dL ( P -interaction >0.9). Among individuals with LDL-C ≥190 mg/dL, pravastatin reduced the risk of coronary heart disease by 27% ( P =0.033) and major adverse cardiovascular events by 25% ( P =0.037) during the initial trial phase and the risk of coronary heart disease death

  14. Core catcher for nuclear reactor core meltdown containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.; Bowman, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    A bed of graphite particles is placed beneath a nuclear reactor core outside the pressure vessel but within the containment building to catch the core debris in the event of failure of the emergency core cooling system. Spray cooling of the debris and graphite particles together with draining and flooding of coolant fluid of the graphite bed is provided to prevent debris slump-through to the bottom of the bed

  15. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  16. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  17. Core outcome measures for interventions to prevent or slow the progress of dementia for people living with mild to moderate dementia: Systematic review and consensus recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Webster

    Full Text Available There are no disease-modifying treatments for dementia. There is also no consensus on disease modifying outcomes. We aimed to produce the first evidence-based consensus on core outcome measures for trials of disease modification in mild-to-moderate dementia.We defined disease-modification interventions as those aiming to change the underlying pathology. We systematically searched electronic databases and previous systematic reviews for published and ongoing trials of disease-modifying treatments in mild-to-moderate dementia. We included 149/22,918 of the references found; with 81 outcome measures from 125 trials. Trials involved participants with Alzheimer's disease (AD alone (n = 111, or AD and mild cognitive impairment (n = 8 and three vascular dementia. We divided outcomes by the domain measured (cognition, activities of daily living, biological markers, neuropsychiatric symptoms, quality of life, global. We calculated the number of trials and of participants using each outcome. We detailed psychometric properties of each outcome. We sought the views of people living with dementia and family carers in three cities through Alzheimer's society focus groups. Attendees at a consensus conference (experts in dementia research, disease-modification and harmonisation measures decided on the core set of outcomes using these results. Recommended core outcomes were cognition as the fundamental deficit in dementia and to indicate disease modification, serial structural MRIs. Cognition should be measured by Mini Mental State Examination or Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale. MRIs would be optional for patients. We also made recommendations for measuring important, but non-core domains which may not change despite disease modification.Most trials were about AD. Specific instruments may be superseded. We searched one database for psychometric properties.This is the first review to identify the 81 outcome measures the research community

  18. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  19. National Elevation Dataset (NED)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a National Elevation Database (NED). The NED is a seamless mosaic of best-available elevation data. The 7.5-minute elevation...

  20. Compliance to The Joint Commission proposed Core Measure set on osteoporosis-associated fracture: review of different secondary fracture prevention programs in an open medical system from 2010 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojas, Ma Conchitina; Southerland, Lauren T; Phieffer, Laura S; Stephens, Julie A; Srivastava, Tanya; Ing, Steven W

    2017-12-01

    There are care gaps in the evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis after a fragility fracture. The Joint Commission is considering adoption of core measures. We compared compliance between two secondary fracture prevention programs in our institution. Incorporating strengths of both may provide the best outcomes for secondary fracture prevention. There are significant care gaps in the evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis after occurrence of fragility fracture. The Joint Commission is considering adoption of a core measure set on osteoporosis-associated fractures, including laboratory assessment, bone density testing, and osteoporosis pharmacologic therapy. We compared compliance to these proposed measures between two secondary fracture prevention programs in patients hospitalized for acute fracture in an open medical system. We conducted a retrospective, single center medical records review of a nurse practitioner-led Fracture Liaison Service (FLS), a physician-led Fracture Prevention Program (FPP), and a historical time without any secondary fracture prevention program (Usual Care) for baseline care. Primary outcomes were the completion of five laboratory tests (calcium, 25-hydroxy vitamin D, renal function, liver function, and complete blood count), order placement and completion of dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan within 3 months, prescription of osteoporosis medication within 3 months, and medication adherence at 6 months after hospital discharge. Completion of all five laboratory tests was higher in FPP versus FLS (84.7 vs. 36.9%, p < 0.001). DXA scan completion was higher in FPP than FLS but not statistically significant (66.7 vs. 54.9%, p = 0.11). Medication prescription at 3 months and adherence at 6 months were significantly higher in FPP versus FLS (65.3 vs. 24.0%, p < 0.001 and 70.8 vs. 27.7%, p < 0.001, respectively). Incorporating strengths of both FLS (care coordination) and FPP (physician direction) may provide the best outcomes

  1. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  2. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    extensions. Combined with the fact that the language definition does not provide a formal semantics, it is an arduous task to work formally with the language (e.g. to give an implementation). In this paper we identify a core subset of the language, called Core BPEL, which has fewer and simpler constructs......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...... formally with WS-BPEL, as one, without loss of generality, need only consider the much simpler Core BPEL. This report may also be viewed as an addendum to the WS-BPEL standard specification, which clarifies the WS-BPEL syntax and presents the essential elements of the language in a more concise way...

  3. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES ... The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND ...

  4. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURE ON ELEVATED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    concrete. Data obtained at 7 and 28 days for the effects of temperature with compressive strength are shown in Tables 1 and 2 respectively while the loss of weight as related to elevated temperature and age, are in. Figure 1. The effect of elevated temperature on the compressive strength at 7 days and 28 days for concrete ...

  5. Coring apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mount, W.W.

    1967-11-14

    This invention relates to coring equipment and has special reference to such as are intended to be driven or otherwise inserted into sand or other loose formations to obtain a true sample of the formation. The device includes a plurality of elongated angular members positioned to form an elongated core receptacle between them. A plurality of links are each pivotally mounted at each end on an adjacent member to hold the members in spaced-apart relation in one position. The receptable is driven into the sand, and the members are moved toward one another when they are longitudinally moved with respect to one another to close the receptable. (3 claims)

  6. Increasing heel skin perfusion by elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Jacqueline; Reddy, Raj; Pitham, Tom; Huber, David

    2008-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of elevation in the primary prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers by studying the blood flow in tissue at risk of ulceration. A prospective study was used to compare different preventative devices with an elevating prosthesis. : Wollongong Hospital Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. Normal subjects and subjects with vasculopathy were tested with their heel resting on a hospital bed, medical-grade lamb's wool, or a viscoelastic gel overlay, with or without the test prosthesis. Skin perfusion was measured throughout using a laser Doppler monitor. A device designed to elevate the heel off the bed and distribute the weight of the leg and foot on the calf. Heel capillary blood perfusion. Perfusion in the heel was significantly greater when elevated than when using the other devices tested. The differences in mean red blood cell flux were significant, with P pressure ulcer prevention and treatment and should be incorporated into health care practice.

  7. Performance evaluation of four dominant anti-hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb) kits in Japan for preventing de novo hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Deguchi, Matsuo; Kagita, Masanori; Yoshioka, Nori; Kita, Mifumi; Asari, Seishi; Suehisa, Etsuji; Hidaka, Yoh; Iwatani, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    The determination of antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb) has become an important means of evaluating the risk factors of de novo hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection before starting intensive immunosuppressive drug therapies. Four dominant HBcAb determination reagents used in Japan were evaluated with HBcIgM, HBsAg, HBsAb, HBeAb, and HBV DNA reagents in order to study their clinical utility. Four kinds of HBcAb reagent kits (HBcAb Total and HBcAb-IgG reagent) were evaluated with 526 clinical specimens, including 344 negative specimens, at Osaka University Hospital. The dynamic range of each kit was evaluated by testing serially diluted serum from pooled sera with high HBcAb concentration. The reagent that showed the largest dynamic range was the Lumipulse HBcAb-N (HBcAb-IgG reagent). Regarding clinical sensitivity and specificity, Centaur HBcAb (HBcAb Total reagent) gave several "doubtful negative" results and ARCHITECT HBcII (HBcAb Total reagent) had the most discrepant positive results. By comparing the cut-off-index distribution of negative specimens using a parameter of "distance from the mean to the cut-off divided by the SD", Centaur was determined to be the best (distance/SD = 12.65), with Lumipulse and Elecsys Anti-HBc (HBcAb Total reagent) in the second group (8.13 and 7.00, respectively), and ARCHITECT rated as the worst (3.25). In this evaluation, Elecsys and Lumipulse HBcAb kits showed good clinical sensitivity and specificity and were considered to be suitable for evaluating the risk factors of de novo HBV infection.

  8. Iowa Bedrock Surface Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the bedrock surface elevation in Iowa was compiled using all available data, principally information from GEOSAM, supplemented...

  9. Analysis of Transient Performance of KALIMER-600 Reactor Pool by Changing the Elevation of Intermediate Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ji Woong; Eoh, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Seong O

    2010-01-01

    The effect of increasing the elevation of an IHX (intermediate heat exchanger) on the transient performance of the KALIMER-600 reactor pool during the early phase of a loss of normal heat sink accident was investigated. Three reactors equipped with IHXs that were elevated to different heights were designed, and the thermal-hydraulic analyses were carried out for the steady and transient state by using the COMMIX-1AR/P code. In order to analyze the effects of the elevation of an IHX between reactors, various thermal-hydraulic properties such as mass flow rate, core peak temperature, RmfQ (ratio of mass flow over Q) and initiation time of decay heat removal via DHX (decay heat exchanger) were evaluated. It was found that with an increase in the IHX elevation, the circulation flow rate increases and a steep rise in the core peak temperature under the same coastdown flow condition is prevented without a delay in the initiation of the second stage of cooling. The available coastdown flow range in the reactor could be increased by increasing the elevation of the IHX

  10. SCORPIO - VVER core surveillance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalesky, K.; Svarny, J.; Novak, L.; Rosol, J.; Horanes, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Halden Project has developed the core surveillance system SCORPIO which has two parallel modes of operation: the Core Follow Mode and the Predictive Mode. The main motivation behind the development of SCORPIO is to make a practical tool for reactor operators which can increase the quality and quantity of information presented on core status and dynamic behavior. This can first of all improve plant safety as undesired core conditions are detected and prevented. Secondly, more flexible and efficient plant operation is made possible. So far the system has only been implemented on western PWRs but the basic concept is applicable to a wide range of reactor including WWERs. The main differences between WWERs and typical western PWRs with respect to core surveillance requirements are outlined. The development of a WWER version of SCORPIO was initiated in cooperation with the Nuclear Research Institute at Rez and industry partners in the Czech Republic. The first system will be installed at the Dukovany NPP. (author)

  11. The myth of core stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Eyal

    2010-01-01

    The principle of core stability has gained wide acceptance in training for the prevention of injury and as a treatment modality for rehabilitation of various musculoskeletal conditions in particular of the lower back. There has been surprisingly little criticism of this approach up to date. This article re-examines the original findings and the principles of core stability/spinal stabilisation approaches and how well they fare within the wider knowledge of motor control, prevention of injury and rehabilitation of neuromuscular and musculoskeletal systems following injury.

  12. De stille elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Lindqvist, Ditte Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Det er blevet en afgørende samværskompetence i uddannelsessystemet at stå aktivt frem og deltage verbalt i skoleklassens liv både fagligt og socialt. Men ikke alle elever deltager lige villigt verbalt i plenum. Artiklen handler om de stille elever og konsekvenserne af stillehed i skolen. Det...... foreslås at skolesystemet sanktionerer ældre elever hårdere for stillehed end yngre elever og det forklares med at skolelivet også er en kultivering henimod elevhed som social identitet og denne er der forventning om at eleverne mestrer i udskolingen....

  13. Multi-core Microprocessors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    core processors. Abstract. Multi-core microprocessor is an interconnected set of independentprocessors called cores integrated on a single siliconchip. These processing cores communicate and cooperatewith one another to execute one or more ...

  14. Undervisning af tosprogede elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horst, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Artiklen fremdrager hovedresultaterne fra Virginia P. Collier's og Wayne P. Thomas's længdeundersøgelser af tosprogede elever i USA, som formentlig er de mest omfattende undersøgelser af undervisningen af tosprogede elever overhovedet. Resultaterne diskuteres i relation til udviklingen af en...

  15. Elevators or stairs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin; O’Byrne, Michael; Wilson, Merne; Wilson, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Staff in hospitals frequently travel between floors and choose between taking the stairs or elevator. We compared the time savings with these two options. Methods: Four people aged 26–67 years completed 14 trips ranging from one to six floors, both ascending and descending. We compared the amount of time per floor travelled by stairs and by two banks of elevators. Participants reported their fatigue levels using a modified Borg scale. We performed two-way analysis of variance to compare the log-transformed data, with participant and time of day as independent variables. Results: The mean time taken to travel between each floor was 13.1 (standard deviation [SD] 1.7) seconds by stairs and 37.5 (SD 19.0) and 35.6 (SD 23.1) seconds by the two elevators (F = 8.61, p elevator equaled about 15 minutes a day. Self-reported fatigue was less than 13 (out of 20) on the Borg scale for all participants, and they all stated that they were able to continue their duties without resting. The extra time associated with elevator use was because of waiting for its arrival. There was a difference in the amount of time taken to travel by elevator depending on the time of day and day of the week. Interpretation: Taking the stairs rather than the elevator saved about 15 minutes each workday. This 3% savings per workday could translate into improved productivity as well as increased fitness. PMID:22159365

  16. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  17. Photoreflectance at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hongen

    1990-08-01

    Using the contactiess modulation spectroscopy technique of photoreflectance, the temperature variations of the direct gap E0 of GaAs, InP, GaA1As, InGaAs have been measured at elevated temperatures up to 600°C. The parameters which describe the temperature dependence of the band gap energies have been evaluated. The ability to measure the band gap at elevated temperatures opens up many new possibilities for in-situ monitoring of MBE and MOCVD processes. In this paper, we review some of the recent developments in the use of photoreflectance at elevated temperatures.

  18. Core principles of evolutionary medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunspan, Daniel Z; Nesse, Randolph M; Barnes, M Elizabeth; Brownell, Sara E

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives Evolutionary medicine is a rapidly growing field that uses the principles of evolutionary biology to better understand, prevent and treat disease, and that uses studies of disease to advance basic knowledge in evolutionary biology. Over-arching principles of evolutionary medicine have been described in publications, but our study is the first to systematically elicit core principles from a diverse panel of experts in evolutionary medicine. These principles should be useful to advance recent recommendations made by The Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to make evolutionary thinking a core competency for pre-medical education. Methodology The Delphi method was used to elicit and validate a list of core principles for evolutionary medicine. The study included four surveys administered in sequence to 56 expert panelists. The initial open-ended survey created a list of possible core principles; the three subsequent surveys winnowed the list and assessed the accuracy and importance of each principle. Results Fourteen core principles elicited at least 80% of the panelists to agree or strongly agree that they were important core principles for evolutionary medicine. These principles over-lapped with concepts discussed in other articles discussing key concepts in evolutionary medicine. Conclusions and implications This set of core principles will be helpful for researchers and instructors in evolutionary medicine. We recommend that evolutionary medicine instructors use the list of core principles to construct learning goals. Evolutionary medicine is a young field, so this list of core principles will likely change as the field develops further. PMID:29493660

  19. Indsatser for tosprogede elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dines; Jakobsen, Vibeke; Jensen, Vibeke Myrup

    Fagligt set klarer tosprogede elever sig dårligere i skolen og det videre uddannelsessystem end ’danske’ elever. Kommuner og folkeskoler har derfor sat en række tiltag i værk, som sigter mod at forbedre de tosprogede elevers skole- og uddannelsessituation. Rapporten kortlægger og analyserer...... af klasseundervisningen. Analysen viser, at de elever, der bliver taget ud af klassen for at få ekstra undervisning i dansk som andetsprog, klarer sig dårligere end elever, der modtager ekstraundervisningen i klassen eller uden for skoletid. Undersøgelsen er baseret på spørgeskemaundersøgelser blandt...... kommunale forvaltningschefer, skoleledere, lærere og forældre til børn i 2. klasse samt lærere til og elever i 9. klasse, SFI’s forløbsundersøgelse af årgang 1995 og registerdata. Undersøgelsen er via Ministeriet for Børn og Undervisning betalt med midler fra satspuljeaftalen 2009 om integration....

  20. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Lowering for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Among Men With Primary Elevations of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels of 190 mg/dL or Above Analyses From the WOSCOPS (West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study) 5-Year Randomized Trial and 20-Year Observational Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J.; Robertson, Michele; Catapano, Alberico L.; Watts, Gerald F.; Kastelein, John J.; Packard, Chris J.; Ford, Ian; Ray, Kausik K.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with primary elevations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) >= 190 mg/dL are at a higher risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease as a result of long-term exposure to markedly elevated LDL-C levels. Therefore, initiation of statin therapy is recommended for

  1. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  2. Global elevational diversity and diversification of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Ignacio; Jetz, Walter

    2018-03-08

    Mountain ranges harbour exceptionally high biodiversity, which is now under threat from rapid environmental change. However, despite decades of effort, the limited availability of data and analytical tools has prevented a robust and truly global characterization of elevational biodiversity gradients and their evolutionary origins. This has hampered a general understanding of the processes involved in the assembly and maintenance of montane communities. Here we show that a worldwide mid-elevation peak in bird richness is driven by wide-ranging species and disappears when we use a subsampling procedure that ensures even species representation in space and facilitates evolutionary interpretation. Instead, richness corrected for range size declines linearly with increasing elevation. We find that the more depauperate assemblages at higher elevations are characterized by higher rates of diversification across all mountain regions, rejecting the idea that lower recent diversification rates are the general cause of less diverse biota. Across all elevations, assemblages on mountains with high rates of past temperature change exhibit more rapid diversification, highlighting the importance of climatic fluctuations in driving the evolutionary dynamics of mountain biodiversity. While different geomorphological and climatic attributes of mountain regions have been pivotal in determining the remarkable richness gradients observed today, our results underscore the role of ongoing and often very recent diversification processes in maintaining the unique and highly adapted biodiversity of higher elevations.

  3. Interaktive tavler - interaktive elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reusch, Charlotte; Otzen, Elsebeth

    Abstract, Poster-præsentation 13.-14. juni 2012, Pilotprojekt: Interaktive tavler ? interaktive elever Lektor, cand. pæd., Elsebeth Otzen og Lektor, cand. mag., Charlotte Reusch, Institut for Skole og Læring, Læreruddannelsen, Professionshøjskolen Metropol, København Hvordan motiverer en interaktiv...... tavle lærere og elever? Hvad sker der mellem elev, stof og lærer, når læreren bliver i stand til at billedliggøre og dynamisere sine oplæg på tavlen? Bliver læreroplæg prioriteret? Bliver eleverne aktive, eller ender den interaktive tavle med blot at understøtte lærerens envejskommunikation til klassen......? Og hvad sker der mellem eleverne? Disse spørgsmål var igangsættende for arbejdet med pilotprojektet Interaktive tavler ? interaktive elever, som blev afviklet i skoleåret 2010-2011. Projektet blev udført af en tværfaglig gruppe, bestående af lektorer i matematik, biologi og dansk i læreruddannelsen...

  4. Udeskole og elevers handlekompetence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiting, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Elever elsker at komme væk fra undervisningen i skolen. Er det positivt eller negativt? Og hvad har betydning for, at eleverne får mest muligt ud af oplevelserne uden for skolen? Forskellige former for udeskole giver nogle oplagte muligheder, så eleverne udvikler sig som engagerede borgere i et...

  5. Interaktive tavler - interaktive elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reusch, Charlotte F.; Otzen, Elsebeth

    Abstract, Poster-præsentation 13.-14. juni 2012, Pilotprojekt: Interaktive tavler – interaktive elever Lektor, cand. pæd., Elsebeth Otzen og Lektor, cand. mag., Charlotte Reusch, Institut for Skole og Læring, Læreruddannelsen, Professionshøjskolen Metropol, København Hvordan motiverer en interaktiv...... tavle lærere og elever? Hvad sker der mellem elev, stof og lærer, når læreren bliver i stand til at billedliggøre og dynamisere sine oplæg på tavlen? Bliver læreroplæg prioriteret? Bliver eleverne aktive, eller ender den interaktive tavle med blot at understøtte lærerens envejskommunikation til klassen......? Og hvad sker der mellem eleverne? Disse spørgsmål var igangsættende for arbejdet med pilotprojektet Interaktive tavler – interaktive elever, som blev afviklet i skoleåret 2010-2011. Projektet blev udført af en tværfaglig gruppe, bestående af lektorer i matematik, biologi og dansk i læreruddannelsen...

  6. Influence of elevated CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annibale, D' Alessandra; Larsen, Thomas; Sechi, Valentina; Cortet, Jérôme; Strandberg, Beate; Vincze, Éva; Filser, Juliane; Audisio, Paolo Aldo; Krogh, Paul Henning

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the combined effect of rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and increasing use of genetically modified (GM) crops in agriculture may affect soil food-webs. So we designed a study for the assessment of the effects of elevated CO2

  7. SCORPIO - VVER core surveillance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornaes, A.; Bodal, T.; Sunde, S.

    1998-01-01

    The Institutt for energiteknikk has developed the core surveillance system SCORPIO, which has two parallel modes of operation: the Core Follow Mode and the Predictive Mode. The main motivation behind the development of SCORPIO is to make a practical tool for reactor operators, which can increase the quality and quantity of information presented on core status and dynamic behavior. This can first of all improve plant safety, as undesired core conditions are detected and prevented. Secondly, more flexible and efficient plant operation is made possible. The system has been implemented on western PWRs, but the basic concept is applicable to a wide range of reactors including VVERs. The main differences between VVERs and typical western PWRs with respect to core surveillance requirements are outlined. The development of a VVER version of SCORPIO has been done in co-operation with the Nuclear Research Institute Rez, and industry partners in the Czech Republic. The first system is installed at Dukovany NPP, where the Site Acceptance Test was completed 6. March 1998.(author)

  8. Skuldertesten "Kombineret Elevation"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mikkel Bek; Overkær, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Formål: At udarbejde en testprotokol for testen Kombineret Elevation (KE) og undersøge test-retest variationen ved test af elite svømmere, samt diskutere testens relevans og validitet. Materiale og Metode: 9 elite og 10 sub-elite svømmere, heraf var 11 mænd og 8 kvinder, gennemførte testen KE 2...

  9. k -core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, P.; Estevez Fernandez, M.A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, M.G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  10. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  11. Reactor core and control rod assembly in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Itooka, Satoshi.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel assemblies and control rod assemblies are attached respectively to reactor core support plates each in a cantilever fashion. Intermediate spacer pads are disposed to the lateral side of a wrapper tube just above the fuel rod region. Intermediate space pads are disposed to the lateral side of a control rod guide tube just above a fuel rod region. The thickness of the intermediate spacer pad for the control rod assembly is made smaller than the thickness of the intermediate spacer pad for the fuel assembly. This can prevent contact between intermediate spacer pads of the control guide tube and the fuel assembly even if the temperature of coolants is elevated to thermally expand the intermediate spacer pad, by which the radial displacement amount of the reactor core region along the direction of the height of the control guide tube is reduced substantially to zero. Accordingly, contribution of the control rod assembly to the radial expansion reactivity can be reduced to zero or negative level, by which the effect of the negative radial expansion reactivity of the reactor is increased to improve the safety upon thermal transient stage, for example, loss of coolant flow rate accident. (I.N.)

  12. Results of prostatic biopsies in Algerian patients with an elevated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: to report on prostatic biopsy results in Algerian patients presenting with a suspicious Digital Rectal Examination (DRE) and\\or an elevated total PSA. Methods: data collected on prepared index cards were age, result of DRE, rate of PSA and number of cores, as well as the histological result. The biopsies were ...

  13. Emergency reactor core cooling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Iwata, Yasutaka

    1996-11-01

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor core cooling device for a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, D/S pit (gas/water separator storage pool) water is used as a water source for the emergency reactor core cooling facility upon occurrence of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) by introducing the D/S pit water to the emergency reactor core cooling (ECCS) pump. As a result, the function as the ECCS facility can be eliminated from the function of the condensate storage tank which has been used as the ECCS facility. If the function is unnecessary, the level of quality control and that of earthquake resistance of the condensate storage tank can be lowered to a level of ordinary facilities to provide an effect of reducing the cost. On the other hand, since the D/S pit as the alternative water source is usually a facility at high quality control level and earthquake resistant level, there is no problem. The quality of the water in the D/S pit can be maintained constant by elevating pressure of the D/S pit water by a suppression pool cleanup (SPCU) pump to pass it through a filtration desalter thereby purifying the D/S pit water during the plant operation. (I.S.)

  14. The ‘MAP strategy’ (Maximum aspiration of atherothrombus and adjunctive glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor utilization combined with prolonged inflation of balloon/stent for preventing no-reflow in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: A retrospective analysis of seventy-one cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Potdar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ‘No-reflow’ phenomenon is a common occurrence in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. A three-component ‘MAP strategy’ was designed to prevent no-reflow by addressing both intralesional and intraluminal thrombus in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. In this analysis, we observed Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI flow grade 3 or 2 in all patients, with no incidence of no-reflow. Myocardial blush grade (MBG 3 or 2 was observed in most (87.32% patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was improved, without any incidence of death up to 9-month follow-up. All patients safely tolerated the strategy-driven prolonged, 35-s inflation of the balloon/stent.

  15. FAST FOSSIL ROTATION OF NEUTRON STAR CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melatos, A.

    2012-01-01

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed ∼10 3 yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  16. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  17. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  18. Elevation data for floodplain mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Floodplain Mapping Technologies; National Research Council; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

    2007-01-01

    .... Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping shows that there is sufficient two-dimensional base map imagery to meet FEMA's flood map modernization goals, but that the three-dimensional base elevation data...

  19. Core Competence and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Gary; Hooper, Nick

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the concept of core competence and applies it to postcompulsory education in the United Kingdom. Adopts an educational perspective that suggests accreditation as the core competence of universities. This economic approach suggests that the market trend toward lifetime learning might best be met by institutions developing a core competence…

  20. Wound Care: Preventing Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or wearing your Immediate Post-op or preliminary prosthesis; keep it elevated whenever possible. The limb should be raised above the level of your heart to prevent swelling. Take care of your whole self – body, mind, and spirit. Eat well and drink plenty ...

  1. Design study on metal fuel FBR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoo, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Ogata, T.

    1991-01-01

    A design approach for metal fuel FBR core to maintain fuel integrity during transient events by limiting eutectic/liquid phase formation is proposed based on the current status of metallic fuel development. Its impact as the limitation on the core outlet temperature is assessed through its application to two of CRIEPI's core concepts, high linear power 1000 MWe homogeneous design and medium linear power 300 MWe radially heterogeneous design. SESAME/SALT code is used in this study to analyze steady state and transient fuel behavior. SE2-FA code is developed based on SUPERENERGY-2 and used to analyze core thermal-hydraulics with uncertainties. As the result, the core outlet temperatures of both designs are found to be limited to ≤500degC if it is required to prevent eutectic/liquid phase formation during operational transients in order to guarantee the fuel integrity. Additional assessment is made assuming an advanced limiting condition that allows small liquid phase formation based on the liquid phase penetration rate derived from existing experimental results. The result indicates possibility of raising core outlet temperature to ∼ 530degC. Also, it is found that core design technology improvements such as hot spot factors reduction can contribute to the core outlet temperature extension by 10 ∼ 20degC. (author)

  2. Choking Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  3. Core Competencies for Training Effective School Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie Lynn Sutton

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and validate a set of core competencies of effective school-based consultants for preservice school psychology consultation training. With recent changes in service delivery models, psychologists are challenged to engage in more indirect, preventative practices (Reschly, 2008). Consultation emerges as…

  4. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  5. Outcomes Following Traumatic Grain Elevator Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolefree, Sydnei; Truong, Anthony; Ward, Jeanette; Dong, Fanglong; Ablah, Elizabeth; Haan, James

    2017-01-01

    The absence of a comprehensive database of grain elevator-associated injuries hinders accurate evaluation of injury prevalence and may lead to discordant information about injury frequencies. The main purpose of this study was to identify the most common mechanisms of injury related to grain elevator events. Comparisons of hospital outcomes between patients who sustained traumatic injuries associated with grain elevators at Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)-regulated industrial sites versus those on OSHA-exempt farming operations were also made. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients' presenting with grain elevator-related injuries at a level-1 trauma center between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013. Data collected included demographics, mechanism of injury, injury severity, hospitalization details, and discharge disposition. Data were summarized, and comparisons were made between the groups. All patients (N = 18) in the study were male, with a mean age of 37 years. Falls and being caught in equipment each accounted for 27.8% of injuries. Among the 18 patients, there were a total of 37 injuries. The majority of injuries were either lower extremity (29.7%) or chest injuries (21.6%). The average hospital length of stay was 4 ± 4.5 days, and one patient required mechanical ventilation. There were no reported deaths. The literature reports entrapments as the leading cause of grain elevator-related injuries; however, this study found that falls and being caught in equipment were the most common mechanisms of injury. This suggests that a greater emphasis should be placed on fall prevention and equipment safety.

  6. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  7. Tanzania Elevation and Surface Characteristics

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The dataset displays Elevation, Slope, Aspect, Topographic Position Index, Terrain Ruggedness, and Roughness based on Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) (3...

  8. Lærer-elev-relationer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Per Fibæk; Nielsen, Anne Maj

    2015-01-01

    I kapitlet belyser vi relationskompetence i forholdet mellem lærer og elever og hvordan læreren kan arbejde med forhold til elever og med sin opmærksomhed på relationsarbejdet. Afslutningsvis ser vi på hvordan lærere fortsat kan udvikle deres relationskompetence.......I kapitlet belyser vi relationskompetence i forholdet mellem lærer og elever og hvordan læreren kan arbejde med forhold til elever og med sin opmærksomhed på relationsarbejdet. Afslutningsvis ser vi på hvordan lærere fortsat kan udvikle deres relationskompetence....

  9. Drilling history core hole DC-6 Hanford, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    Core hole DC-6 was completed in May 1978 by Boyles Brothers Drilling Company, Spokane, Washington, under subcontract to Fenix and Scisson, Inc. The hole was cored for the US Department of Energy and the Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. Fenix and Scisson, Inc. furnished the engineering, daily supervision of the core drilling activities, and geologic core logging for hole DC-6. Core hole DC-6 is located within the boundary of the Hanford Site at the old Hanford town site. The Hanford Site coordinates for DC-6 are North 54,127.17 feet and West 17,721.00 feet. The surface elevation is approximately 402 feet above sea level. The purpose of core hole DC-6 was to core drill vertically through the basalt and interbed units for stratigraphic depth determination and core collection and to provide a borehole for hydrologic testing. The total depth of core hole DC-6 was 4336 feet. Core recovery was 98.4% of the total footage cored

  10. Improved core protection calculator system algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Tae Young; Park, Young Ho; In, Wang Kee; Bae, Jong Sik; Baeg, Seung Yeob

    2009-01-01

    Core Protection Calculator System (CPCS) is a digitized core protection system which provides core protection functions based on two reactor core operation parameters, Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) and Local Power Density (LPD). It generates a reactor trip signal when the core condition exceeds the DNBR or LPD design limit. It consists of four independent channels which adapted a two out of four trip logic. CPCS algorithm improvement for the newly designed core protection calculator system, RCOPS (Reactor COre Protection System), is described in this paper. New features include the improvement of DNBR algorithm for thermal margin, the addition of pre trip alarm generation for auxiliary trip function, VOPT (Variable Over Power Trip) prevention during RPCS (Reactor Power Cutback System) actuation and the improvement of CEA (Control Element Assembly) signal checking algorithm. To verify the improved CPCS algorithm, CPCS algorithm verification tests, 'Module Test' and 'Unit Test', would be performed on RCOPS single channel facility. It is expected that the improved CPCS algorithm will increase DNBR margin and enhance the plant availability by reducing unnecessary reactor trips

  11. Vitamin C Prevents Sleep Deprivation-induced Elevation in Cortisol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Olayaki, L.A., Sulaiman S.O. and Anoba N.B.. Department of Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences,. University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria. Summary: Sleep deprivation (SD) is biological stressor that alters metabolic parameters, induced oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. Previous ...

  12. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exercise focus on core strengthening, or building the muscles that provide support for your body. Pilates, yoga ... doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from your ribs across your waist ...

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... support for your body. Pilates, yoga and martial arts all provide well-rounded core strengthening programs. Simple ... use progressively heavier balls, you will experience more benefit from this exercise... Sagittal Core Strengthening You can ...

  14. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Pilates, yoga and martial arts all provide well-rounded core strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as well. Some specific core strengthening exercises are described below. ...

  15. Making an Ice Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  16. Multi-core Microprocessors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Design cost of multi-core processors is lower than the cost of designing very complex single processors. This is because in a multi-core pro- cessor a simple processor is designed and replicated. The idea of using several independent processors to work simul- taneously and cooperate to execute a single program is quite ...

  17. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  18. Multi-core Microprocessors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    using these transistors and resultant improvement in the process-. Keywords. Moore's law, evolution of multi- core processors, programming multi-core processors. ing speed. Packing more transistors in a chip also enabled de- signers to improve the architecture of microprocessors in many. RESONANCE | December 2017.

  19. Mars' core and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  20. Lunar Core and Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  1. Elevation of the diaphragmatic cupola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V.M.; Talesnik, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Altogether 45 patients with elevation of the diaphragmatic cupola were examined. A high frequency of erroneous initial interpretation of examination results was noted in inflammatory and tumorous lesions and congenital conditions. Routine and contrast methods (pneumoperitoneum, bronchography, pleurography and fistulography) were used. Disease-related methods of X-ray investigation were proposed. A variety of causes of diaphragm elevation was indicated

  2. Space Station tethered elevator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Michael H.; Anderson, Loren A.; Hosterman, K.; Decresie, E.; Miranda, P.; Hamilton, R.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The tethered elevator is an unmanned, mobile structure which operates on a ten-kilometer tether spanning the distance between Space Station Freedom and a platform. Its capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The report discusses the potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design. Emphasis is placed on the elevator's structural configuration and three major subsystem designs. First, the design of elevator robotics used to aid in elevator operations and tethered experimentation is presented. Second, the design of drive mechanisms used to propel the vehicle is discussed. Third, the design of an onboard self-sufficient power generation and transmission system is addressed.

  3. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investigated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux ...

  4. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  5. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investi- gated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, ...

  6. On recriticality during reflooding of a degraded boiling water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoejerup, F.; Miettinen, J.; Puska, E.K.; Anttila, M.; Lindholm, I.; Nilsson, L.; Sjoevall, H.

    1997-02-01

    In-vessel core melt progression in Nordic BWRs has been studied as a part of the RAK-2 project within the Nordic Nuclear Safety Programme 1994-1997. A part of this study was the evaluation of possibility and consequences of recriticality in a re-flooded, degraded BWR core. The objective of the study was to examine, if a BWR core in a Nordic nuclear power plant can reach critical state in a severe accident, when the core is re-flooded with un-borated water from the emergency core cooling system and what is the possible power augmentation related to recriticality. The containment response to elevated power level and consequent enhanced steam production was evaluated. The first sub-task was to upgrade the existing neutronics/thermal hydraulic models to a level needed for a study of recriticality. Three different codes were applied for the task: RECRIT, SIMULATE-3K and APROS. Preliminary calculations were performed with the three codes. The results of present studies showed that reflodding of a partly control rod free core gives a recriticality power peak of a substantial amplitude, but with a short duration due to the Doppler feedback. The energy addition is small and contributes very little to heat-up of the fuel. However, with continued reflodding the fission power increases again and tend to stabilize on a level that can be ten per cent or more of the nominal power, the level being higher with higher reflooding flow rate. A scoping study on TVO BWR containment response to a presumed recriticality accident with a long-term power level being 20% of the nominal power was performed. The results indicated that containment venting system would not be sufficient to prevent containment overpressurization and containment failure would occur about 3-4 h after start of core reflooding. In the case of station blackout with operating ADS the present boron system would be sufficient to terminate the criticality even prior to containment failure, but in case of feedwater LOCA and

  7. Core shroud corner joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  8. IGCSE core mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Give your core level students the support and framework they require to get their best grades with this book dedicated to the core level content of the revised syllabus and written specifically to ensure a more appropriate pace. This title has been written for Core content of the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus for first teaching from 2013. ? Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of practice questions. ? Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every book. We are working with Cambridge

  9. Modular core component support for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, L.M.; Anthony, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The core of a nuclear reactor is made up of a plurality of support modules for containing components such as fuel elements, reflectors and control rods. Each module includes a component support portion located above a grid plate in a low-pressure coolant zone and a coolant inlet portion disposed within a module receptacle which depends from the grid plate into a zone of high-pressure coolant. Coolant enters the module through aligned openings within the receptacle and module inlet portion and flows upward into contact with the core components. The modules are hydraulically balanced within the receptacles to prevent expulsion by the upward coolant forces. (U.S.)

  10. Core Exercises: Why You Should Strengthen Your Core Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness You know core exercises are good for you — but do you include core exercises in your fitness routine? Here's why you should. By Mayo Clinic Staff Core exercises are an important part of a ...

  11. Loading method of core constituting elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Shigeo

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a remote-controlled replacing method for core constituting elements in a liquid-metal cooling fast breeder, wherein particularly, the core constituting elements are prevented from being loaded on the core position other than as designated. Constitution: The method comprises a first step which determines a position of a suitable neutron shielding body in order to measure a reference level of complete insertion of the core constituting elements, a second step which inserts a gripper for a fuel exchanger, a third step which decides stroke dimensions of the complete insertion, and a fourth step which discriminates the core constituting elements to begin handling of fuel rods. The method further comprises a fifth step which determines a loading position of fuel rod, and a sixth step which inserts and loads fuel rods into the core. The method still further comprises a seventh step which compares and judges the dimension of loading stroke and the dimension of complete inserting stroke so that when coincided, loading is completed, and when not coincided, loading is not completed and then the cycle of the fourth step is repeated. (Kawakami, Y.)

  12. Restraint system for core elements of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.

    1975-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, a core element bundle formed of a plurality of side-by-side arranged core elements is surrounded by restraining elements that exert a radially inwardly directed restraining force generating friction forces between the core elements in a restraining plane that is transverse to the core element axes. The adjoining core elements are in rolling contact with one another in the restraining plane by virtue of rolling-type bearing elements supported in the core elements

  13. INTEGRAL core programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  14. Core Flight Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Core Flight Software (CFS) project purpose is to analyze applicability, and evolve and extend the reusability of the CFS system originally developed by...

  15. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  16. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    Civil servants conduct the work which makes welfare states functions on an everyday bases: Police men police, school teachers teach, and tax inspectors inspect. Focus in this paper is on the core tasks of tax inspectors. The paper argues that their core task of securing the collection of revenue...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...... has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...

  17. iPSC Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Core was created in 2011 to accelerate stem cell research in the NHLBI by providing investigators consultation, technical...

  18. LMFBR core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.T.A

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses initial fuel and core designs that are conservative, emphasizing high reliability at the expense of breeding ration and doubling time. The progression in design improvements to better doubling time, plutonium inventory requirements, and power density are shown. The recent progress in advanced oxide fuel, cladding, and duct development is reported. Breeding ratios and compound system doubling times are computed for both the conventional homogeneous and alternative heterogeneous core configurations. Results are summarized and it is shown that both carbide and metal cores can achieve breeding ratios in the range of 1.5 to 1.6 versus 1.45 for oxide; the carbide and metal cores can achieve 10 year doubling times, which translate into millions of dollars savings in fuel cycle costs. Carbide fuel development is being continued at a modest level to provide backup to the mixed oxide design

  19. The Core Knowledge System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strat, Thomas M; Smith, Grahame B

    1987-01-01

    This document contains an in-depth description of the Core Knowledge System (CKS)-an integrative environment for the many functions that must be performed by sensor-based autonomous and semi-autonomous systems...

  20. Skin bacterial microbiome of a generalist Puerto Rican frog varies along elevation and land use gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myra C. Hughey

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Host-associated microbial communities are ubiquitous among animals, and serve important functions. For example, the bacterial skin microbiome of amphibians can play a role in preventing or reducing infection by the amphibian chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Evidence suggests that environmental bacteria likely serve as a source pool for at least some of the members of the amphibian skin bacterial community, underscoring the potential for local environmental changes to disrupt microbial community source pools that could be critical to the health of host organisms. However, few studies have assessed variation in the amphibian skin microbiome along clear environmental gradients, and so we know relatively little about how local environmental conditions influence microbiome diversity. We sampled the skin bacterial communities of Coqui frogs, Eleutherodactylus coqui (N = 77, along an elevational gradient in eastern Puerto Rico (0–875 m, with transects in two land use types: intact forest (N = 4 sites and disturbed (N = 3 sites forest. We found that alpha diversity (as assessed by Shannon, Simpson, and Phylogenetic Diversity indices varied across sites, but this variation was not correlated with elevation or land use. Beta diversity (community structure, on the other hand, varied with site, elevation and land use, primarily due to changes in the relative abundance of certain bacterial OTUs (∼species within these communities. Importantly, although microbiome diversity varied, E. coqui maintained a common core microbiota across all sites. Thus, our findings suggest that environmental conditions can influence the composition of the skin microbiome of terrestrial amphibians, but that some aspects of the microbiome remain consistent despite environmental variation.

  1. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masaru.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable quick cooling of a core by efficiently utilizing coolant supplied in an emergency. Constitution: A feedwater nozzle and a water level detector are disposed in the gap between a partition plate for supporting the top of a fuel assembly and a lattice plate for supporting the bottom of the fuel assembly. At the time of a loss of coolant accident, coolant is injected from a sprinkling nozzle toward the reactor core, and is also injected from a feedwater nozzle. When the coolant reaches a prescribed level in the reactor core, the water level is detected by the detector, the coolant is fed by a pump to the lower plenum, and the submerging speed of the reactor core is thereby accelerated. When the water level again becomes lower than the prescribed level, the coolant is again filled from the feedwater nozzle, and similar operation is thereafter repeated. Accordingly, the coolant filled in the reactor core can be efficiently utilized to cool the reactor core. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Rape prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date rape - prevention; Sexual assault - prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Sexual assault and abuse and STDs. In: 2015 sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2015. www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/sexual- ...

  3. Dengue Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This photograph ... medications to treat a dengue infection. This makes prevention the most important step, and prevention means avoiding ...

  4. Base Flood Elevation (BFE) Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally if...

  5. Elevated Fixed Platform Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Elevated Fixed Platform (EFP) is a helicopter recovery test facility located at Lakehurst, NJ. It consists of a 60 by 85 foot steel and concrete deck built atop...

  6. FEMA DFIRM Base Flood Elevations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally,...

  7. Coastal Digital Elevation Models (DEMs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digital elevation models (DEMs) of U.S. and other coasts that typically integrate ocean bathymetry and land topography. The DEMs support NOAA's mission to understand...

  8. Core Flow Distribution from Coupled Supercritical Water Reactor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an extended code package PARCS/RELAP5 to analyze steady state of SCWR US reference design. An 8 × 8 quarter core model in PARCS and a reactor core model in RELAP5 are used to study the core flow distribution under various steady state conditions. The possibility of moderator flow reversal is found in some hot moderator channels. Different moderator flow orifice strategies, both uniform across the core and nonuniform based on the power distribution, are explored with the goal of preventing the reversal.

  9. Temperature effect on vortex-core reversals in magnetic nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bosung; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-05-01

    We studied the temperature effect on vortex-core reversals in soft magnetic nanodots by micromagnetic numerical calculations within a framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert scheme. It was determined that vortex-core-switching events at non-zero temperatures occur stochastically, and that the threshold field strength increases with temperature for a given field frequency. The mechanism of core reversals at elevated temperatures is the same as that of vortex-antivortex-pair-mediated core reversals found at the zero temperature. The reversal criterion is also the out-of-plane component of a magnetization dip that should reach -p, which is to say, m z , dip = -p, where p is the original polarization, p = +1 (-1), for the upward (downward) core. By this criterion, the creation of a vortex-antivortex pair accompanies complete vortex-antivortex-annihilation-mediated core reversals, resulting in the maximum excess of the exchange energy density, Δ Eex cri ≈ 15.4 ± 0.2 mJ/cm3. This work provides the underlying physics of vortex-core reversals at non-zero temperatures, and potentiates the real application of vortex random access memory operating at elevated temperatures.

  10. Dominion Range Snow Pit and Ice Core, 1984 and 1985, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Information from snow pits and an ice core were collected at Dominion Range (location - 166 10' East, 85 15' South, elevation - 2,700m) in 1984-1985. The 6 meter...

  11. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis N. Mavridis; Maria Meliou; Efstratios-Stylianos Pyrgelis

    2015-01-01

    Troponin (tr) elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neur...

  12. Plague Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Clinicians Public Health Officials Veterinarians Prevention History of Plague Resources FAQ Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Reduce rodent habitat around your ...

  13. Predictors of Prevention Failure in College Students Participating in Two Indicated Depression Prevention Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Vanessa; Rohde, Paul; Vázquez, Fernando L.; Otero, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of university students with the highest likelihood of remaining at elevated levels of depressive symptoms six months following the receipt of a depressive prevention intervention on the basis of known risk factors and participation in one of two depression prevention programs. Data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating depression prevention among 133 college students with elevated depressive symptoms were analyzed. Participants were ...

  14. Reactor core control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor core control device, in which switching from a manual operation to an automatic operation, and the control for the parameter of an automatic operation device are facilitated. Namely, the hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter by an manual operation input means is stored. The hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter is collected. The state of the reactor core simulated by an operation control to which the collected operation parameters are manually inputted is determined as an input of the reactor core state to the automatic input means. The record of operation upon manual operation is stored as a hysteresis of control for the operation parameter, but the hysteresis information is not only the result of manual operation of the operation parameter. This is results of operation conducted by a skilled operator who judge the state of the reactor core to be optimum. Accordingly, it involves information relevant to the reactor core state. Then, it is considered that the optimum automatic operation is not deviated greatly from the manual operation. (I.S.)

  15. Mars' Inner Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows a cross-section of the planet Mars revealing an inner, high density core buried deep within the interior. Dipole magnetic field lines are drawn in blue, showing the global scale magnetic field that one associates with dynamo generation in the core. Mars must have one day had such a field, but today it is not evident. Perhaps the energy source that powered the early dynamo has shut down. The differentiation of the planet interior - heavy elements like iron sinking towards the center of the planet - can provide energy as can the formation of a solid core from the liquid.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  16. Core status computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate power distribution, flow rate and the like in the reactor core with high accuracy in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: Total flow rate signals, traverse incore probe (TIP) signals as the neutron detector signals, thermal power signals and pressure signals are inputted into a process computer, where the power distribution and the flow rate distribution in the reactor core are calculated. A function generator connected to the process computer calculates the absolute flow rate passing through optional fuel assemblies using, as variables, flow rate signals from the introduction part for fuel assembly flow rate signals, data signals from the introduction part for the geometrical configuration data at the flow rate measuring site of fuel assemblies, total flow rate signals for the reactor core and the signals from the process computer. Numerical values thus obtained are given to the process computer as correction signals to perform correction for the experimental data. (Moriyama, K.)

  17. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be done at home as well. Some specific core strengthening exercises are described below. If any of the following ... balls, you will experience more benefit from this exercise... Sagittal Core Strengthening You can stretch and strengthen the low back ...

  18. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be done at home as well. Some specific core strengthening exercises are described below. If any of the following ... balls, you will experience more benefit from this exercise... Sagittal Core Strengthening You can stretch and strengthen the low ...

  19. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... building the muscles that provide support for your body. Pilates, yoga and martial arts all provide well-rounded core strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as well. Some specific core strengthening ... your hips to push your body back to a standing position, then extend your ...

  20. Superconducting tin core fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2014-11-13

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  1. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  2. TMI-2 core examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper

  3. CORE COMPONENT POT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MARTIN RL; OMBERG RP

    1975-12-19

    The core component pot is an open top vessel used to hold both new and irradiated core components for storage in the IDS and for holding the components submerged in sodium while being trasported inside CLEM. The top of the CCP is equipped with a grapple lip which is engaged by the hoisting grapples. Heat for maintaining the preheat of new components and dissipation of decay heat of irradiated fuel assemblies is conducted between the wall of the pot and the surrounding environment by thermal radiation and convection.

  4. Nuclear core catchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1976-01-01

    A receptacle is described for taking the molten fragments of a nuclear reactor during a reactor core fusion accident. The receptacle is placed under the reactor. It includes at least one receptacle for the reactor core fragments, with a dome shaped part to distribute the molten fragments and at least one outside layer of alumina bricks around the dome. The characteristic of this receptacle is that the outer layer of bricks contains neutron poison rods which pass through the bricks and protrude in relation to them [fr

  5. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  6. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis N. Mavridis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Troponin (tr elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neurosurgical books, were used for this review. Some type of cardiovascular abnormality develops in most SAH patients. Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a frequent SAH complication, due to catecholamine surge which induces cardiac injury, as evidenced by increased serum tr levels, electrocardiographic (ECG changes and cardiac wall motion abnormalities. Tr elevation, usually modest, is an early and specific marker for cardiac involvement after SAH and its levels peak about two days after SAH. Cardiac tr elevation predictors include poor clinical grade, intraventricular hemorrhage, loss of consciousness at ictus, global cerebral edema, female sex, large body surface area, lower systolic blood pressure, higher heart rate and prolonged Q-Tc interval. Elevated tr levels are associated with disability and death (especially tr >1 μg/L, worse neurological grade, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, longer intensive care unit stay and incidence of vasospasm. Tr elevation is a common finding in SAH patients and constitutes a rightful cause of worry about the patients' cardiac function and prognosis. It should be therefore early detected, carefully monitored and appropriately managed by clinicians.

  7. Historie i spillefilm - for elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Lone Guldbrandt

    2016-01-01

    MOOC om historiebrug i spillefilm, hvor elever kan lære om, hvordan spillefilm bruger fortiden, og om hvordan vores opfattelse af historien både sætter sig spor i filmene og bliver påvirket af dem.......MOOC om historiebrug i spillefilm, hvor elever kan lære om, hvordan spillefilm bruger fortiden, og om hvordan vores opfattelse af historien både sætter sig spor i filmene og bliver påvirket af dem....

  8. Tether Elevator Crawler Systems (TECS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Frank R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the needs of the experimenters on the space station is access to steady and controlled-variation microgravity environments. A method of providing these environments is to place the experiment on a tether attached to the space station. This provides a high degree of isolation from structural oscillations and vibrations. Crawlers can move these experiments along the tethers to preferred locations, much like an elevator. This report describes the motion control laws developed for these crawlers and the testing of laboratory models of these tether elevator crawlers.

  9. Elevated carboxyhemoglobin: sources of carbon monoxide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchelli Ramirez, Herminia; Fernández Alvarez, Ramón; Rubinos Cuadrado, Gemma; Martinez Gonzalez, Cristina; Rodriguez Jerez, Francisco; Casan Clara, Pere

    2014-11-01

    Inhalation of carbon monoxide (CO) can result in poisoning, with symptoms ranging from mild and nonspecific to severe, or even death. CO poisoning is often underdiagnosed because exposure to low concentrations goes unnoticed, and threshold values for normal carboxyhemoglobin vary according to different authors. The aim of our study was to analyze carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels in an unselected population and detect sources of CO exposure In a cross-sectional descriptive study, we analyzed consecutive arterial blood gas levels processed in our laboratory. We selected those with COHb≥2.5% in nonsmokers and ≥5% in smokers. In these cases a structured telephone interview was conducted. Elevated levels of COHb were found in 64 (20%) of 306 initial determinations. Of these, data from 51 subjects aged 65±12 years, 31 (60%) of which were men, were obtained. Mean COHb was 4.0%. Forty patients (78%) were non-smokers with mean COHb of 3.2%, and 11 were smokers with COHb of 6.7%. In 45 patients (88.2%) we detected exposure to at least one source of ambient CO other than cigarette smoke. A significant proportion of individuals from an unselected sample had elevated levels of COHb. The main sources of CO exposure were probably the home, so this possibility should be explored. The population should be warned about the risks and encouraged to take preventive measures. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Core damage risk indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to show a method for the fast recalculation of the PSA. To avoid the information loose, it is necessary to simplify the PSA models, or at least reorganize them. The method, introduced in this document, require that preparation, so we try to show, how to do that. This document is an introduction. This is the starting point of the work related to the development of the risk indicators. In the future, with the application of this method, we are going to show an everyday use of the PSA results to produce the indicators of the core damage risk. There are two different indicators of the plant safety performance, related to the core damage risk. The first is the core damage frequency indicator (CDFI), and the second is the core damage probability indicator (CDPI). Of course, we cannot describe all of the possible ways to use these indicators, rather we will try to introduce the requirements to establish such an indicator system and the calculation process

  11. The Uncommon Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will…

  12. Utah's New Mathematics Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Utah has adopted more rigorous mathematics standards known as the Utah Mathematics Core Standards. They are the foundation of the mathematics curriculum for the State of Utah. The standards include the skills and understanding students need to succeed in college and careers. They include rigorous content and application of knowledge and reflect…

  13. Core Obstetrics and Gynaecology*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Core Obstetrics and Gynaecology*. By J. T. Nel. Pp xvii + 992. Illustrated. Durban: Butterworths. 1995. ISBN 0-409-10134-6. For some years now, I have lamented the absence of a good, home-grown, comprehensive, student-centred textbook of obstetrics and gynaecology designed specifically for South African needs.

  14. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  15. Investigation of EAS cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaulov S.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascade models in air in the late forties have shown informational content of the study of cores of extensive air showers (EAS. These investigations were the main goal in different experiments which were carried out over many years by a variety of methods. Outcomes of such investigations obtained in the HADRON experiment using an X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC as a core detector are considered. The Ne spectrum of EAS associated with γ-ray families, spectra of γ-rays (hadrons in EAS cores and the Ne dependence of the muon number, ⟨Nμ⟩, in EAS with γ-ray families are obtained for the first time at energies of 1015–1017 eV with this method. A number of new effects were observed, namely, an abnormal scaling violation in hadron spectra which are fundamentally different from model predictions, an excess of muon number in EAS associated with γ-ray families, and the penetrating component in EAS cores. It is supposed that the abnormal behavior of γ-ray spectra and Ne dependence of the muon number are explained by the emergence of a penetrating component in the 1st PCR spectrum ‘knee’ range. Nuclear and astrophysical explanations of the origin of the penetrating component are discussed. The necessity of considering the contribution of a single close cosmic-ray source to explain the PCR spectrum in the knee range is noted.

  16. Looking for Core Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    People who view themselves as leaders, not just managers or teachers, are innovators who focus on clarifying core values and aligning all aspects of the organization with these values to grow their vision. A vision for an organization can't be just one person's idea. Visions grow by involving people in activities that help them name and create…

  17. Nuclear core baffling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.W. Jr.; Silverblatt, B.L.; Knight, C.B.; Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for baffling the flow of reactor coolant fluid into and about the core of a nuclear reactor is described. The apparatus includes a plurality of longitudinally aligned baffle plates with mating surfaces that allow longitudinal growth with temperature increases while alleviating both leakage through the aligned plates and stresses on the components supporting the plates

  18. Inflation targeting and core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Smith

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the interaction of core inflation and inflation targeting as a monetary policy regime. Interest in core inflation has grown because of inflation targeting. Core inflation is defined in numerous ways giving rise to many potential measures; this paper defines core inflation as the best forecaster of inflation. A cross-country study finds before the start of inflation targeting, but not after, core inflation differs between non-inflation targeters and inflation targeters. Thr...

  19. Simulatd Nitrogen Cycling Response to Elevated CO2 in Pinus taeda and Mixed Dediduous Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.W. Johnson

    1999-01-01

    Interactions between elevated CO2 and N cycling were explored with a nutrient cycling model (NuCM, Johnson et al. 1993, 1995) for a Pinus tuedu L. site at Duke University North Carolina, and a mixed deciduous site at Walker Branch, Tennessee. The simulations tested whether N limitation would prevent growth increases in response to elevated CO...

  20. Systemic elevation of PTEN induces a tumor-suppressive metabolic state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Cao, Isabel; Song, Min Sup; Hobbs, Robin M.; Laurent, Gaelle; Giorgi, Carlotta; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Ito, Keisuke; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Rameh, Lucia; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Pinton, Paolo; Haigis, Marcia C.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Decremental loss of PTEN results in cancer susceptibility and tumor progression. PTEN elevation might therefore be an attractive option for cancer prevention and therapy. We have generated several transgenic mouse lines with PTEN expression elevated to varying levels by taking advantage of bacterial

  1. Coastal sediment elevation change following anthropogenic mangrove clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Heather L.; Granek, Elise F.

    2015-11-01

    Coastal mangrove forests along tropical shorelines serve as an important interface between land and sea. They provide a physical buffer protecting the coastline from erosion and act as sediment "traps" catching terrestrial sediment, thus preventing smothering of subtidal coral reefs. Coastal development that removes mangrove habitat may impact adjacent nearshore coral reefs through sedimentation and nutrient loading. We examined differences in sediment elevation change between patches of open-coast intact and anthropogenically cleared red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle) on the east side of Turneffe Atoll, Belize, to quantify changes following mangrove clearing. Samples were collected over a 24 month period at five study sites, each containing paired intact (+mangrove) and cleared (-mangrove) plots. Five sediment elevation pins were deployed in each plot: behind areas cleared of mangroves (-mangrove) and behind adjacent intact mangroves (+mangrove). Sediment elevation increased at intact mangrove sites (M = +3.83 mm, SE = 0.95) whereas cleared mangrove areas suffered elevation loss (M = -7.30 mm, SE = 3.38). Mangroves inshore of partial or continuous gaps in the adjacent fringing reefs had higher rates of elevation loss (M = -15.05 mm) than mangroves inshore of continuous fringing reefs (M = -1.90 mm). Our findings provide information on potential effects of mangrove clearing and the role of offshore habitat characteristics on coastal sediment trapping and maintenance of sediment elevation by mangroves. With implications for coastline capacity to adjust to sea level rise, these findings are relevant to management of coastal fringing mangrove forests across the Caribbean.

  2. Methylphenidatinduceret ST-elevations-myokardieinfarkt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin Huth; Ruwald, Anne-Christine Huth; Tønder, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Adult attention deficit and hyperkinetic disorder (ADHD) is increasingly diagnosed and treated with methylphenidate. We present the case of an 20 year-old man, who was diagnosed with ADHD and suffered a ST elevation acute myocardial infarction due to coronary vasospasm related to an overdose...

  3. Dannelsen af den ansvarlige elev

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Denne artikel handler om den del af lærergerningen, der har at gøre med udarbejdelse af elevplaner. Der tages udgangspunkt i en foucaultsk forståelse, hvor beskrivelsen af den enkelte elev udtrykker et særligt normativt ideal om, hvilke former for elevhed der er de ønskværdige i den danske...

  4. Pediatric heat-related illness: recommendations for prevention and management [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Roberta J; Kim, Tommy Y; Chaudhari, Pradip

    2017-08-22

    Infants, children, and adolescents are at increased risk for heat-related illness due to their inability to remove themselves from dangerous environments. Evidence shows that morbidity and mortality from heat illness is related to the length of time core temperature is elevated, so rapid reduction and accurate serial measurements are crucial to prevention of organ system damage and death. The primary methods of patient cooling are conduction (ice-water immersion, cold packs) and convection (moisture and moving air). The choice of method used may depend on availability of equipment, but there is evidence that can guide optimal use of resources. This issue presents evidence-based recommendations and best practices in heat-illness resuscitation, including managing children who are obese, have special needs or take medications, and advocacy for prevention strategies. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  5. Ice cores and palaeoclimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogh Andersen, K.; Ditlevsen, P.; Steffensen, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Ice cores from Greenland give testimony of a highly variable climate during the last glacial period. Dramatic climate warmings of 15 to 25 deg. C for the annual average temperature in less than a human lifetime have been documented. Several questions arise: Why is the Holocene so stable? Is climatic instability only a property of glacial periods? What is the mechanism behind the sudden climate changes? Are the increased temperatures in the past century man-made? And what happens in the future? The ice core community tries to attack some of these problems. The NGRIP ice core currently being drilled is analysed in very high detail, allowing for a very precise dating of climate events. It will be possible to study some of the fast changes on a year by year basis and from this we expect to find clues to the sequence of events during rapid changes. New techniques are hoped to allow for detection of annual layers as far back as 100,000 years and thus a much improved time scale over past climate changes. It is also hoped to find ice from the Eemian period. If the Eemian layers confirm the GRIP sequence, the Eemian was actually climatically unstable just as the glacial period. This would mean that the stability of the Holocene is unique. It would also mean, that if human made global warming indeed occurs, we could jeopardize the Holocene stability and create an unstable 'Eemian situation' which ultimately could start an ice age. Currenlty mankind is changing the composition of the atmosphere. Ice cores document significant increases in greenhouse gases, and due to increased emissions of sulfuric and nitric acid from fossil fuel burning, combustion engines and agriculture, modern Greenland snow is 3 - 5 times more acidic than pre-industrial snow (Mayewski et al., 1986). However, the magnitude and abruptness of the temperature changes of the past century do not exceed the magnitude of natural variability. It is from the ice core perspective thus not possible to attribute the

  6. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... martial arts all provide well-rounded core strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as ... doctor or physical therapist to prescribe an exercise program that matches your abilities. Neck Press This is ...

  7. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pain Other Scoliosis Back Pain and Emotional Distress Muscle Spasms Pinched Nerve Discitis Degenerative Conditions Bulge vs ... exercise focus on core strengthening, or building the muscles that provide support for your body. Pilates, yoga ...

  8. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! ... in a straight line. Hold for 10 seconds working towards 30 seconds. Repeat 1-5 times or ...

  9. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from your ribs across your waist and helps ... repetitions at a slow and controlled pace... Resistance Training Resistance training is exercise done against something providing ...

  10. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arts all provide well-rounded core strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as well. ... be done with weights (hand-held or training machines) or using isometric techniques. Common household items (like ...

  11. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as well. Some specific core strengthening exercises are ... a Success Story to Share? | Contact Us SPINE CARE PROVIDERS GO HERE © 2018 North American Spine Society | ...

  12. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy ... 15 repetitions at a slow and controlled pace... Resistance Training Resistance training is exercise done against something providing ...

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! ... hand-held or training machines) or using isometric techniques. Common household items (like small canned goods) can ...

  14. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/ ... something providing resistance. It can be done with weights (hand-held or training machines) or using isometric ...

  15. Preventing Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Susan Fordney

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the beginning counselor with an overview of prevention concepts. Prevention is a relatively new emphasis in community efforts to stem the rising costs of substance abuse and other high-risk behaviors. The paper discusses agent, host, and environmental prevention models and how they relate to causal theories…

  16. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... applications, and places emphasis on the development of polarization maintaining (PM) HC-PCF. The polarization cross-coupling characteristics of PM HC-PCF are very different from those of conventional PM fibers. The former fibers have the advantage of suffering far less from stress-field fluctuations...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  17. Reactor core lower support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent refers to the lower support of a nuclear reactor core, and is intended for supporting each fuel assembly of the core and for distributing the primary coolant through these assemblies. It is composed of: - A first thick plate supporting the fuel assemblies. Vertical channels are machined in this plate directly facing each assembly for the passage of the primary fluid: - A second thin plate drilled with orifices, fixed under the first plate, with no space between them, and so positioned that each orifice is directly facing one of the channels. The section of the orifices diminishes from the centre of the plate towards its periphery. The second plate can also be constituted of an assembly of juxtaposed smaller plates, each small plate being secured to the first plate independently of the neighbouring plates [fr

  18. 46 CFR 120.540 - Elevators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elevators. 120.540 Section 120.540 Shipping COAST GUARD... Requirements § 120.540 Elevators. Each elevator on a vessel must meet the requirements of American National Standards Institute (ANSI) A17.1. “Safety Code for Elevators, and Escalators,” or other standard specified...

  19. Critical review of the impact of core stability on upper extremity athletic injury and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfies, Sheri P; Ebaugh, David; Pontillo, Marisa; Butowicz, Courtney M

    2015-01-01

    Programs designed to prevent or rehabilitate athletic injuries or improve athletic performance frequently focus on core stability. This approach is based upon the theory that poor core stability increases the risk of poor performance and/or injury. Despite the widespread use of core stability training amongst athletes, the question of whether or not sufficient evidence exists to support this practice remains to be answered. 1) Open a dialogue on the definition and components of core stability. 2) Provide an overview of current science linking core stability to musculoskeletal injuries of the upper extremity. 3) Provide an overview of evidence for the association between core stability and athletic performance. Core stability is the ability to control the position and movement of the trunk for optimal production, transfer, and control of forces to and from the upper and lower extremities during functional activities. Muscle capacity and neuromuscular control are critical components of core stability. A limited body of evidence provides some support for a link between core stability and upper extremity injuries amongst athletes who participate in baseball, football, or swimming. Likewise, few studies exist to support a relationship between core stability and athletic performance. A limited body of evidence exists to support the use of core stability training in injury prevention or performance enhancement programs for athletes. Clearly more research is needed to inform decision making when it comes to inclusion or emphasis of core training when designing injury prevention and rehabilitation programs for athletes.

  20. Critical review of the impact of core stability on upper extremity athletic injury and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri P. Silfies

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Programs designed to prevent or rehabilitate athletic injuries or improve athletic performance frequently focus on core stability. This approach is based upon the theory that poor core stability increases the risk of poor performance and/or injury. Despite the widespread use of core stability training amongst athletes, the question of whether or not sufficient evidence exists to support this practice remains to be answered.OBJECTIVES: 1 Open a dialogue on the definition and components of core stability. 2 Provide an overview of current science linking core stability to musculoskeletal injuries of the upper extremity. 3 Provide an overview of evidence for the association between core stability and athletic performance.DISCUSSION: Core stability is the ability to control the position and movement of the trunk for optimal production, transfer, and control of forces to and from the upper and lower extremities during functional activities. Muscle capacity and neuromuscular control are critical components of core stability. A limited body of evidence provides some support for a link between core stability and upper extremity injuries amongst athletes who participate in baseball, football, or swimming. Likewise, few studies exist to support a relationship between core stability and athletic performance.CONCLUSIONS: A limited body of evidence exists to support the use of core stability training in injury prevention or performance enhancement programs for athletes. Clearly more research is needed to inform decision making when it comes to inclusion or emphasis of core training when designing injury prevention and rehabilitation programs for athletes.

  1. Some core contested concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  2. Schumpeter's core works revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2012-01-01

    This paper organises Schumpeter’s core books in three groups: the programmatic duology,the evolutionaryeconomic duology,and the socioeconomic synthesis. By analysing these groups and their interconnections from the viewpoint of modern evolutionaryeconomics,the paper summarises resolved problems...... and points at remaining challenges. Its analyses are based on distinctions between microevolution and macroevolution, between economic evolution and socioeconomic coevolution, and between Schumpeter’s three major evolutionary models (called Mark I, Mark II and Mark III)....

  3. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  4. Tethered elevator: A unique opportunity for space processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, R.

    1986-01-01

    The latest fluid dynamic and material science experiments in the microgravity environment have emphasized the importance of the residual gravity level and of the g-jitter on fluid physics phenomena. The tethered elevator presents the possibility of providing variable g-levels (both steady and g-jitter) around a very low steady g-level (that can be realized when the elevator is near the center of mass of the space station-tether complex). When positioning a variable periodic oscillation to the payload a clean g-jitter disturbance can be obtained that would not be otherwise obtainable by other systems. These two possibilities make the elevator a facility to help resolve a number of still open questions that are preventing wider utilization of the space environment in the microgravity area.

  5. Core principles of evolutionary medicine: A Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunspan, Daniel Z; Nesse, Randolph M; Barnes, M Elizabeth; Brownell, Sara E

    2018-01-01

    Evolutionary medicine is a rapidly growing field that uses the principles of evolutionary biology to better understand, prevent and treat disease, and that uses studies of disease to advance basic knowledge in evolutionary biology. Over-arching principles of evolutionary medicine have been described in publications, but our study is the first to systematically elicit core principles from a diverse panel of experts in evolutionary medicine. These principles should be useful to advance recent recommendations made by The Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to make evolutionary thinking a core competency for pre-medical education. The Delphi method was used to elicit and validate a list of core principles for evolutionary medicine. The study included four surveys administered in sequence to 56 expert panelists. The initial open-ended survey created a list of possible core principles; the three subsequent surveys winnowed the list and assessed the accuracy and importance of each principle. Fourteen core principles elicited at least 80% of the panelists to agree or strongly agree that they were important core principles for evolutionary medicine. These principles over-lapped with concepts discussed in other articles discussing key concepts in evolutionary medicine. This set of core principles will be helpful for researchers and instructors in evolutionary medicine. We recommend that evolutionary medicine instructors use the list of core principles to construct learning goals. Evolutionary medicine is a young field, so this list of core principles will likely change as the field develops further.

  6. Elevator deflections on the icing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Randall K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of elevator deflection of the horizontal stabilizer for certain icing parameters is investigated. Elevator deflection can severely change the lower and upper leading-edge impingement limits, and ice can accrete on the elevator itself. Also, elevator deflection had practically no effect on the maximum local collection efficiency. It is shown that for severe icing conditions (large water droplets), elevator deflections that increase the projected height of the airfoil can significantly increase the total collection efficiency of the airfoil.

  7. Når elever producerer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Jesper; Hansen, Rune; Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    2017-01-01

    Dette kapitel præsenterer centrale resultater fra studiet Elevopgaver og elevproduktion i det 21. århundrede der blandt andet rummer den første større kvantitative undersøgelse af opgavedidaktik og elevers produktive arbejde i den danske grundskole. Studiet omfatter også en kvalitativ del, og i...... undersøgelsen præsenteres og diskuteres gennem en række konkrete eksempler fra de berørte fag. I forhold til elevers produktive arbejde peger undersøgelsens resultater både på potentialer og særlige barrierer i forbindelse med at udvikle en kompetenceorienteret undervisning. I kapitlet argumenteres desuden...

  8. Granulation of core particles suitable for film coating by agitation fluidized bed I. Optimum formulation for core particles and development of a novel friability test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashita, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Yasuo; Aketo, Takao; Watano, Satoru

    2007-08-01

    To prepare powdered medicines without bitter taste, film coating is required to cover the surface of core particles. In this study, effect of formulation and operating conditions of agitation fluidized bed on the core particle properties was investigated. In order to prevent breakage of the core particles during coating process, which sometimes causes variation of drug dissolution rate, addition of maltose syrup powder during the formulation process of the core particles was investigated. Also, a method for friability test in which the core particles were subjected to strong impact was proposed to evaluate strength of the core particles. The friability of the core particles determined by this test method correlated well with the actual friability of the particles during the coating process. Based on this result, we confirmed this novel friability test method could predict the core particle endurance during the coating process.

  9. Læring mellem elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgsen, Marianne; Davidsen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    I denne rapport præsenteres resultater fra følgeforskningen til projektet Læring gennem Bevægelse, som er gennemført på Søndervangskolen i Hammel i perioden august 2009 - maj 2010. Projektet er gennemført i samspil mellem lærere, it-vejleder, elever og skolens ledelse. Projektets overordnede formål...

  10. Safety aspects of core power distribution surveillance and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, D.; Grumbach, R.; Hoeld, A.; Werner, W.

    1978-01-01

    The incentives for improved core surveillance and core control systems are outlined. An efficient code for evaluating the power distribution is indispensable for designing and testing such a system. The characteristics of the core simulator QUABOX/CUBBOX and the features required for off-line and on-line applications are described. The important role of the simulator for the safety assessment of a digital core control system is underlined. With regard to the safety aspects of core control, possible disturbances are classified. Simulation results are given concerning the failure of a control actuator. It is shown that means can be devised to prevent unstable behaviour of the control system and, furthermore, to contribute to a safe reactor operation by accounting for process disturbances. (author)

  11. Update to Millstone 3 elevated pH tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, C.A.; Perock, J.D. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hudson, M.J.B.; King, R.W.; Macklin, S. [Northeast Utilities, Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In view of the potential radiological benefits of elevated coolant pH operation, Northwest Utilities (NU), in support of an EPRI-Westinghouse program, agreed to operate the Millstone 3 plant at the start of its second fuel cycle as a demonstration of the effect of elevated coolant pH on out-of-core radiation fields. Operating with an elevated pH is defined as operating with an average lithium concentration of 3.35 ppm, until reaching an end of cycle pH of 7.2 or 7.4. The plant operated during its second and third cycles with an elevated coolant pH. The end of cycle pH during the second cycle was 7.4, and 7.2 during the third cycle. (During the first cycle, operation was with a coordinated pH of 7.0). Evaluation of the dose rate trends in Millstone 3 after two cycles of elevated coolant pH operation concluded that an elevated coolant pH resulted in a 15 percent lower component dose rate compared to other plants that operated with coordinated pH 6.9. However, due to a possible increase in fuel clad corrosion, operation during cycle 4 was restricted to pH 6.9 coordinated chemistry, with the exception of the last two months during which the pH increased to 7.35. At the end of cycle 4 (EOC4), there was a greater increase in component and crud trap dose rates than expected. This paper reviews the radiological trends in the plant and discusses the potential causes for the increase in the dose rates at EOC4.

  12. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Tang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  13. Reactor core flow rate control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Hitoshi; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Miyakawa, Tetsuya.

    1996-01-01

    When an internal pump is started by a variable frequency power source device, if magnetic fields of an AC generator are introduced after the rated speed is reached, neutron flux high scram occurs by abrupt increase of a reactor core flow rate. Then, in the present invention, magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced at a speed previously set at which the fluctuation range of the reactor core flow rate (neutron flux) by the start up of the internal pump is within an allowable value. Since increase of the speed of the internal pump upon its start up is suppressed to determine the change of the reactor core flow rate within an allowable range, increase of neutron fluxes is suppressed to enable stable start up. Then, since transition boiling of fuels caused by abrupt decrease of the reactor core flow rate upon occurrence of abnormality in an external electric power system is prevented, and the magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced in such a manner to put the speed increase fluctuation range of the internal pump upon start up within an allowable value, neutron flux high scram is not caused to enable stable start-up. (N.H.)

  14. Planet heating prevents inward migration of planetary cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Llambay, Pablo; Masset, Frédéric; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Szulágyi, Judit

    2015-04-02

    Planetary systems are born in the disks of gas, dust and rocky fragments that surround newly formed stars. Solid content assembles into ever-larger rocky fragments that eventually become planetary embryos. These then continue their growth by accreting leftover material in the disk. Concurrently, tidal effects in the disk cause a radial drift in the embryo orbits, a process known as migration. Fast inward migration is predicted by theory for embryos smaller than three to five Earth masses. With only inward migration, these embryos can only rarely become giant planets located at Earth's distance from the Sun and beyond, in contrast with observations. Here we report that asymmetries in the temperature rise associated with accreting infalling material produce a force (which gives rise to an effect that we call 'heating torque') that counteracts inward migration. This provides a channel for the formation of giant planets and also explains the strong planet-metallicity correlation found between the incidence of giant planets and the heavy-element abundance of the host stars.

  15. Human Core Temperature Prediction for Heat-Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    degree in civil en- gineering from Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro , Brazil, and the B.B.A. degree in business administration from Rio ...de Janeiro Federal Univer- sity, Rio de Janeiro , in 1980 and 1985, respectively, and the M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engi- neering from the... populations without any additional adaption of the model parameters. 2168-2194 © 2014 IEEE. Translations and content mining are permitted for

  16. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  17. On core stability and extendability

    OpenAIRE

    Shellshear, Evan

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates conditions under which the core of a TU cooperative game is stable. In particular the author extends the idea of extendability to find new conditions under which the core is stable. It is also shown that these new conditions are not necessary for core stability.

  18. Core TuLiP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czenko, M.R.; Etalle, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    We propose CoreTuLiP - the core of a trust management language based on Logic Programming. CoreTuLiP is based on a subset of moded logic programming, but enjoys the features of TM languages such as RT; in particular clauses are issued by different authorities and stored in a distributed manner. We

  19. Dual-core Itanium Processor

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Intel’s first dual-core Itanium processor, code-named "Montecito" is a major release of Intel's Itanium 2 Processor Family, which implements the Intel Itanium architecture on a dual-core processor with two cores per die (integrated circuit). Itanium 2 is much more powerful than its predecessor. It has lower power consumption and thermal dissipation.

  20. A Case of Isolated Elevated Copper Levels during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaToya R. Walker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Outside of Wilson's Disease, abnormal copper metabolism is a rare condition. In pregnancy, excess copper levels can be associated with intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia and neurological disease. Case Report. A 32 year old Gravida 4 para 2012 with an obstetrical history complicated by elevated copper levels presented for routine prenatal care. Her children had elevated copper levels at birth, with her firstborn child being diagnosed with autism and suffering three myocardial infarctions and being treated for elevated copper levels. During her prior pregnancies, she declined treatment for her elevated copper levels. During this pregnancy, she had declined chelation therapy and instead choose zinc therapy. She delivered a healthy infant with normal copper levels. Conclusion. Alterations in copper metabolism are rare, the consequences in pregnancy can be devastating. While isolated elevations of copper in pregnancy is exceedingly rare, it is treated the same as Wilson's disease. The goal is to prevent fetal growth restricting and neurological sequelae in the newborn and preeclampsia in the mother. Counseling, along with treatment options and timely delivery can greatly improve neonatal and maternal outcome.

  1. Nuclear reactor core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to provide a fast reactor core assembly design for use with a fluid coolant such as liquid sodium or carbon monoxide incorporating a method of increasing the percentage of coolant flow though the blanket elements relative to the total coolant flow through the blanket and fuel elements during shutdown conditions without using moving parts. It is claimed that deterioration due to reactor radiation or temperature conditions is avoided and ready modification or replacement is possible. (U.K.)

  2. The core and cosmopolitans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlander, Linus; Frederiksen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Users often interact and help each other solve problems in communities, but few scholars have explored how these relationships provide opportunities to innovate. We analyze the extent to which people positioned within the core of a community as well as people that are cosmopolitans positioned...... across multiple external communities affect innovation. Using a multimethod approach, including a survey, a complete database of interactions in an online community, content coding of interactions and contributions, and 36 interviews, we specify the types of positions that have the strongest effect...

  3. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen ...

  4. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watchful Waiting and Education Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 ...

  5. Monitoring an electric cable core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Marris, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method of, and apparatus for, continuously monitoring an advancing core having a continuous covering comprises directing X-ray radiation laterally towards the advancing covered core; continuously forming an X-ray image pattern of the advancing covered core and translating the image pattern into a visible image pattern; continuously transforming the visible pattern into a digital bit pattern; and processing the digital bit pattern using a microprocessor with interfacing electronics to provide an image profile of the advancing covered core and/or to provide analogue and/or digital signals indicative of the overall diameter and eccentricity of the covered core and of the thickness of the covering. (author)

  6. Statistical core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelkers, E.; Heller, A.S.; Farnsworth, D.A.; Kearfott, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    The report describes the statistical analysis of DNBR thermal-hydraulic margin of a 3800 MWt, 205-FA core under design overpower conditions. The analysis used LYNX-generated data at predetermined values of the input variables whose uncertainties were to be statistically combined. LYNX data were used to construct an efficient response surface model in the region of interest; the statistical analysis was accomplished through the evaluation of core reliability; utilizing propagation of the uncertainty distributions of the inputs. The response surface model was implemented in both the analytical error propagation and Monte Carlo Techniques. The basic structural units relating to the acceptance criteria are fuel pins. Therefore, the statistical population of pins with minimum DNBR values smaller than specified values is determined. The specified values are designated relative to the most probable and maximum design DNBR values on the power limiting pin used in present design analysis, so that gains over the present design criteria could be assessed for specified probabilistic acceptance criteria. The results are equivalent to gains ranging from 1.2 to 4.8 percent of rated power dependent on the acceptance criterion. The corresponding acceptance criteria range from 95 percent confidence that no pin will be in DNB to 99.9 percent of the pins, which are expected to avoid DNB

  7. Intrinsically secure fast reactors with dense cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slessarev, Igor

    2007-01-01

    a small power NPP) then giving an attractive flexibility to the prospective NP. For both above-mentioned ISFR options, which possess the stabilized reactivity at equilibrium, void effects in all reactor types have been favourably corrected: positive void effects in sodium cooled reactors have been radically reduced from 5 to 8$$ (the range of values for the best traditional and some innovative projects) down to $/3. As for the modular core options, all void effects in sodium cooled reactors became negligible. Besides, all void effects in lead cooled ISFR can be 'designed' in a 'harmonious' way: they became modest and favourably negative thus significantly increasing their natural self-protection against severe accidents. These concepts imply using hard neutron spectra in the 'dense' reactor cores identifying fast reactors with: dense fuel (mono-nitride, carbides or metallic alloys similar to known projects like BREST, IFR), elevated fuel in-core fractions (where parasitic neutron capture is significantly depressed), and optimal core-blanket configurations

  8. Poison Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Poison Prevention Page Content Article Body Post the Poison Help number 1-800-222-1222 on the ... or empty container of a toxic substance, call Poison Help immediately. More than a million American children ...

  9. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic ... Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back ... Patient Information Feature Articles Patient Q&A Success Stories ...

  10. Operation experience with elevated ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankova, Katerina; Kysela, Jan; Malac, Miroslav; Petrecky, Igor; Svarc, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The 10 VVER units in the Czech and Slovak Republics are all in very good water chemistry and radiation condition, yet questions have arisen regarding the optimization of cycle chemistry and improved operation in these units. To address these issues, a comprehensive experimental program for different water chemistries of the primary circuit was carried out at the Rez Nuclear Research Institute, Czech Republic, with the goal of judging the influence of various water chemistries on radiation build-up. Four types of water chemistries were compared: standard VVER water chemistry (in common use), direct hydrogen dosing without ammonia, standard VVER water chemistry with elevated ammonia levels, and zinc dosing to standard VVER water chemistry. The test results showed that the types of water chemistry other than the common one have benefits for the operation of the nuclear power plant (NPP) primary circuit. Operation experience with elevated ammonia at NPP Dukovany Units 3 and 4 is presented which validates the experimental results, demonstrating improved corrosion product volume activity. (orig.)

  11. Global variation in elevational diversity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinfeng; Kelt, Douglas A; Sun, Zhongyu; Liu, Hongxiao; Hu, Liangjun; Ren, Hai; Wen, Jun

    2013-10-25

    While horizontal gradients of biodiversity have been examined extensively in the past, vertical diversity gradients (elevation, water depth) are attracting increasing attention. We compiled data from 443 elevational gradients involving diverse organisms worldwide to investigate how elevational diversity patterns may vary between the Northern and Southern hemispheres and across latitudes. Our results show that most elevational diversity curves are positively skewed (maximum diversity below the middle of the gradient) and the elevation of the peak in diversity increases with the elevation of lower sampling limits and to a lesser extent with upper limit. Mountains with greater elevational extents, and taxonomic groups that are more inclusive, show proportionally more unimodal patterns whereas other ranges and taxa show highly variable gradients. The two hemispheres share some interesting similarities but also remarkable differences, likely reflecting differences in landmass and mountain configurations. Different taxonomic groups exhibit diversity peaks at different elevations, probably reflecting both physical and physiological constraints.

  12. Digtial Elevation Model (DEM) 250K

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is the terminology adopted by the USGS to describe terrain elevation data sets in a digital raster form. The standard DEM consists of a...

  13. Digitial Elevation Model (DEM) 100K

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is the terminology adopted by the USG to describe terrain elevation data sets in a digital raster form. The standard DEM consists of a...

  14. Digital Elevation Model (DEM) 24K

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is the terminology adopted by the USGS to describe terrain elevation data sets in a digital raster form. The standard DEM consists of a...

  15. Solid charged-core model of ball lightning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Muldrew

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ball lightning (BL is assumed to have a solid, positively-charged core. According to this underlying assumption, the core is surrounded by a thin electron layer with a charge nearly equal in magnitude to that of the core. A vacuum exists between the core and the electron layer containing an intense electromagnetic (EM field which is reflected and guided by the electron layer. The microwave EM field applies a ponderomotive force (radiation pressure to the electrons preventing them from falling into the core. The energetic electrons ionize the air next to the electron layer forming a neutral plasma layer. The electric-field distributions and their associated frequencies in the ball are determined by applying boundary conditions to a differential equation given by Stratton (1941. It is then shown that the electron and plasma layers are sufficiently thick and dense to completely trap and guide the EM field. This model of BL is exceptional in that it can explain all or nearly all of the peculiar characteristics of BL. The ES energy associated with the core charge can be extremely large which can explain the observations that occasionally BL contains enormous energy. The mass of the core prevents the BL from rising like a helium-filled balloon – a problem with most plasma and burning-gas models. The positively charged core keeps the negatively charged electron layer from diffusing away, i.e. it holds the ball together; other models do not have a mechanism to do this. The high electrical charges on the core and in the electron layer explains why some people have been electrocuted by BL. Experiments indicate that BL radiates microwaves upon exploding and this is consistent with the model. The fact that this novel model of BL can explain these and other observations is strong evidence that the model should be taken seriously.

  16. Solid charged-core model of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldrew, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, ball lightning (BL) is assumed to have a solid, positively-charged core. According to this underlying assumption, the core is surrounded by a thin electron layer with a charge nearly equal in magnitude to that of the core. A vacuum exists between the core and the electron layer containing an intense electromagnetic (EM) field which is reflected and guided by the electron layer. The microwave EM field applies a ponderomotive force (radiation pressure) to the electrons preventing them from falling into the core. The energetic electrons ionize the air next to the electron layer forming a neutral plasma layer. The electric-field distributions and their associated frequencies in the ball are determined by applying boundary conditions to a differential equation given by Stratton (1941). It is then shown that the electron and plasma layers are sufficiently thick and dense to completely trap and guide the EM field. This model of BL is exceptional in that it can explain all or nearly all of the peculiar characteristics of BL. The ES energy associated with the core charge can be extremely large which can explain the observations that occasionally BL contains enormous energy. The mass of the core prevents the BL from rising like a helium-filled balloon - a problem with most plasma and burning-gas models. The positively charged core keeps the negatively charged electron layer from diffusing away, i.e. it holds the ball together; other models do not have a mechanism to do this. The high electrical charges on the core and in the electron layer explains why some people have been electrocuted by BL. Experiments indicate that BL radiates microwaves upon exploding and this is consistent with the model. The fact that this novel model of BL can explain these and other observations is strong evidence that the model should be taken seriously.

  17. Understanding core conductor fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, D E

    2011-01-01

    ESD Association standard test method ANSI/ESD STM2.1 - Garments (STM2.1), provides electrical resistance test procedures that are applicable for materials and garments that have surface conductive or surface dissipative properties. As has been reported in other papers over the past several years 1 fabrics are now used in many industries for electrostatic control purposes that do not have surface conductive properties and therefore cannot be evaluated using the procedures in STM2.1 2 . A study was conducted to compare surface conductive fabrics with samples of core conductor fibre based fabrics in order to determine differences and similarities with regards to various electrostatic properties. This work will be used to establish a new work item proposal within WG-2, Garments, in the ESD Association Standards Committee in the USA.

  18. Adult educators' core competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators’ required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural...... environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or “core......” requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students’ prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator’s reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence...

  19. CORE annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gut, A.

    2007-04-01

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the activities of the Swiss Federal Commission on Energy Research CORE in 2006. The six main areas of work during the period 2004 - 2007 are examined, including a review of the SFOE's energy research programme, a road-map for the way towards the realisation of a 2000-watt society, the formulation of an energy research concept for 2008 - 2011, international co-operation, the dissemination of information and the assessment of existing and new instruments. International activities and Switzerland's involvement in energy research within the framework of the International Energy Agency IEA are discussed. New and existing projects are listed and the work done at the Competence Centre for Energy and Mobility noted. The Swiss Technology Award 2007 is presented. Information supplied to interested bodies to help improve knowledge on research work being done and to help make discussions on future energy supply more objective is discussed

  20. Growth outside the core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  1. Um mundo de cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Artz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A pintura de Elis Artz é feita com muita alma e transborda alegria. A vitalidade de seu trabalho transparece nas cores fortes e nos traços simples e harmoniosos. Confira o trabalho da artista nesta edição da Revista Jangada. ELIS by ELIS Descobri meu talento artístisco e criativo há uns 25 anos. Nasci no Brasil e me mudei para os EUA 10 anos atrás por puro amor. Embora seja psicóloga de formação, o meu apreço pela pintura só cresceu e, com o passar dos anos, a paixão pelas tintas me direcionou a fazer cursos com artistas brasileiros renomados. Já morando nos EUA e com essa grande paixão adormecida, durante anos, decidi me entregar para as cores que sempre me trouxeram alegria e cor para os meus dias. Embora muitas de minhas pinturas tenham ido para minha família e amigos no Brasil, vendi inúmeras outras pelo país através de exposições em galerias de arte. Em 2014, fui uma das artistas em destaque no MTD ART nos Estados Unidos. Minha obra estava dentro de cada ônibus das cidades de Champaign e Urbana e exposta em destaque na Estação de Trem. Em maio de 2015, tive o prazer de ter outro trabalho meu nos outdoors da cidade, destacando a minha tela 'Frida' o ano inteiro e de expor em conjunto com alguns artistas locais no final de outubro. Desde então, tenho pintado cada vez mais e me interessado em divulgar o meu trabalho. E, como diria um amigo meu "Elis, você me mostrou que a vida não é só preto no branco". Ele estava certo.

  2. Thermal Behavior of Cylindrical Buckling Restrained Braces at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Talebi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary focus of this investigation was to analyze sequentially coupled nonlinear thermal stress, using a three-dimensional model. It was meant to shed light on the behavior of Buckling Restraint Brace (BRB elements with circular cross section, at elevated temperature. Such bracing systems were comprised of a cylindrical steel core encased in a strong concrete-filled steel hollow casing. A debonding agent was rubbed on the core’s surface to avoid shear stress transition to the restraining system. The numerical model was verified by the analytical solutions developed by the other researchers. Performance of BRB system under seismic loading at ambient temperature has been well documented. However, its performance in case of fire has yet to be explored. This study showed that the failure of brace may be attributed to material strength reduction and high compressive forces, both due to temperature rise. Furthermore, limiting temperatures in the linear behavior of steel casing and concrete in BRB element for both numerical and analytical simulations were about 196°C and 225°C, respectively. Finally it is concluded that the performance of BRB at elevated temperatures was the same as that seen at room temperature; that is, the steel core yields prior to the restraining system.

  3. Seasonal elevational movements of Eastern Olive Sunbird ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little is known about the seasonal elevational movements for most tropical avifauna species. Seasonal elevational movements of the Eastern Olive Sunbird Cyanomitra olivacea were studied along an elevational gradient from 600 to 1 500 m above sea level in the Uluguru Mountains, Tanzania, between May 2005 and ...

  4. Elevated Tank Due to Earthquake Even

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotrasová Kamila

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Elevated reservoirs are mainly used for storing of variety water. During earthquake activity the fluid exerts impulsive and convective (sloshing effects on the walls and bottom of tank. This paper provides theoretical background for analytical calculating of elevated water tank due to earthquake even and deals with simplified seismic design procedures for elevated tanks.

  5. Global variation in elevational diversity patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo; Douglas A. Kelt; Zhongyu Sun; Hongxiao Liu; Liangjun Hu; Hai Ren; Jun We

    2013-01-01

    While horizontal gradients of biodiversity have been examined extensively in the past, vertical diversity gradients (elevation, water depth) are attracting increasing attention. We compiled data from 443 elevational gradients involving diverse organisms worldwide to investigate how elevational diversity patterns may vary between the Northern and Southern hemispheres...

  6. 21 CFR 890.3930 - Wheelchair elevator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wheelchair elevator. 890.3930 Section 890.3930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... elevator. (a) Identification. A wheelchair elevator is a motorized lift device intended for medical...

  7. 46 CFR 183.540 - Elevators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elevators. 183.540 Section 183.540 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Miscellaneous Systems and Requirements § 183.540 Elevators. Each elevator on a vessel must meet...

  8. Edge and core dynamics in harness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.

    2007-01-01

    Resistive kink oscillations in tokamak plasmas are usually treated as core localized events, yet there there are several mechanisms by which they may interact with the edge dynamics. This suggests that we may regulate edge oscillatory behaviour, or ELMs, by harnessing the natural or contrived sawtooth period and amplitude. In this work I investigate core-edge oscillatory entrainment through direct propagation of heat pulses, inductive coupling, and global higher order resonance effects. In the core of auxiliary heated tokamak plasmas the ineluctable rhythm of slow buildup and rapid conversion of potential energy governs electron and heat radial transport. The growth phase of the sawtooth is accompanied by significant reconnection, then during the collapse the temperature and density in the core fall dramatically. There is evidence from experiments in reversed field pinch devices that ensuing energy fluxes can affect flow shear and confinement at the edge. The basis for this study is the dynamical (BDS) model for edge plasma behavior that was derived from electrostatic resistive MHD equations. The BDS model reflects the major qualitative features of edge dynamics that have been observed, such as L-H transitions and associated ELMs, hysteresis, and spontaneous reversal of poloidal shear flow. Under poorly dissipative conditions the transient behavior of the model can exhibit period-doubling, blue-sky, homoclinic, and other exotic bifurcations. Thus we might ask questions such as: Is it possible to mode-lock the edge dynamics to the core sawteeth? Can we induce, or prevent, a change in direction of shear flow? What about MHD effects? Is core-edge communication one way or is there some feedback? In the simplest prototype for coupled core-edge dynamics I model the sawtooth crash as a periodic power input to the edge potential energy reservoir. This is effected by coupling the BDS model to the dynamical system u = u(1 - u 2 - x 2 ) - ω s x, x = x(1-u 2 -x 2 ) + ω s u

  9. Preventive analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper will discuss the concepts of pre-emptive and preventive analgesia in acute and persistent postsurgical pain, based on the most recent experimental and clinical literature, with a special focus on injury-induced central sensitization and the development from acute to chronic pain. Recent...... of preventive analgesia for persistent postoperative pain are promising. However, clinicians must be aware of the demands for improved design of their clinical studies in order to get more conclusive answers regarding the different avenues for intervention. Summary: The concept of preventive analgesia is still...

  10. AGR core safety assessment methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, N.; Reed, J.; Metcalfe, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    To demonstrate the safety of its gas-cooled graphite-moderated AGR reactors, nuclear safety assessments of the cores are based upon a methodology which demonstrates no component failures, geometrical stability of the structure and material properties bounded by a database. All AGRs continue to meet these three criteria. However, predictions of future core behaviour indicate that the safety case methodology will eventually need to be modified to deal with new phenomena. A new approach to the safety assessment of the cores is currently under development, which can take account of these factors while at the same time providing the same level of protection for the cores. This approach will be based on the functionality of the core: unhindered movement of control rods, continued adequate cooling of the fuel and the core, continued ability to charge and discharge fuel. (author). 5 figs

  11. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back ... in very slightly. Hold a ball directly in front of you. Keep your abdominal muscles tight and ...

  12. Prevent Shingles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Prevent Shingles Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... that can result in vision loss. Older Adults & Shingles As you get older, you are more likely ...

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Education Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle ... Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 for Spine Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis ...

  14. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient ... the floor; rotate from side to side. Repeat 10 times. Check with your physician; if you are ...

  15. Overview of core disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchaterre, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the analysis of core-disruptive accidents is given. These analyses are for the purpose of understanding and predicting fast reactor behavior in severe low probability accident conditions, to establish the consequences of such conditions and to provide a basis for evaluating consequence limiting design features. The methods are used to analyze core-disruptive accidents from initiating event to complete core disruption, the effects of the accident on reactor structures and the resulting radiological consequences are described

  16. Community and ecosystem responses to elevational gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Maja K.; Sanders, Nate; Wardle, David A.

    2013-01-01

    elevational gradients for understanding community and ecosystem responses to global climate change at much larger spatial and temporal scales than is possible through conventional ecological experiments. However, future studies that integrate elevational gradient approaches with experimental manipulations...... will provide powerful information that can improve predictions of climate change impacts within and across ecosystems.......Community structure and ecosystem processes often vary along elevational gradients. Their responses to elevation are commonly driven by changes in temperature, and many community- and ecosystem-level variables therefore frequently respond similarly to elevation across contrasting gradients...

  17. HIV Prevention

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about steps people can take to protect their health from HIV.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  18. The INTEGRAL Core Observing Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, C.; Gehrels, N.; Lund, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements of the obser......The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements...

  19. Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The UCLA-DOE Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Facility provides the UCLA biochemistry community with easy access to sophisticated instrumentation for a wide variety...

  20. TMI-2 core debris analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.A.; Carlson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    One of the ongoing examination tasks for the damaged TMI-2 reactor is analysis of samples of debris obtained from the debris bed presently at the top of the core. This paper summarizes the results reported in the TMI-2 Core Debris Grab Sample Examination and Analysis Report, which will be available early in 1986. The sampling and analysis procedures are presented, and information is provided on the key results as they relate to the present core condition, peak temperatures during the transient, temperature history, chemical interactions, and core relocation. The results are then summarized

  1. Elevation Pattern in Growth Coherency on the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Lyu

    Full Text Available It is generally expected that inter-annual changes in radial growth among trees would be similar to the increase in altitude due to the limitation of increasingly harsher climatic factors. Here, we examine whether this pattern exists in alpine forests on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Increment cores were collected from mature trees at the lower, middle and upper limits of balfour spruce (Picea likiangensis var. balfouriana (Rehd. et Wils. Hillier ex Slsvin forests at the Buze and Yela Mountains in Basu County, Changdu Prefecture of Tibet, China. The treeline elevations are 4320 m and 4510 m a.s.l. for Buze and Yela, respectively. Tree-ring widths were measured, crossdated, and detrended to obtain a sequence of ring-width indices for each individual sample. Annual growth rate, climate sensitivity, growth-climate relationships, and growth synchrony among trees were calculated and compared across altitudes. In Buze Mountain, the annual growth rate of trees has no significant difference across altitudes. The mean sensitivity of trees is lower at the treelines than at lower elevations. Tree growth has stronger correlation with winter temperature at upper elevations than at lower elevations, has significant correlation with moisture, not temperature, in the growing season, and the growth response to moisture is lower at the treeline than at lower elevations. The correlation among individual tree-ring sequences is lower at the treeline than at sites at lower elevation. In Yela Mountain, the characterisitics of annual growth rate, mean sensitivity, tree growth-climate relationships, and inter-serial correlation are similar to those in Buze, but their differences along altitudinal gradients are less significant as those in Buze. Our data do not support the general expectation of growth convergence among individuals with increasing altitude. We conclude that individual heterogeneity and microhabitat diversity are important features for treeline trees

  2. Characterizing the Core via K-Core Covers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, S.M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Estevez, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  3. Hydraulic behaviour of a partially uncovered core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.; Hafner, W.

    1989-10-01

    A critical review of experimental data and theoretical models relevant to the thermohydraulic processes in a partially uncovered core has been performed. Presently available optimized thermohydraulic codes should be able to predict swell level elevations within an error band of ± 0.5 m. Rod temperature rising velocities could be predicted within an error bandwidth of ± 10%, provided the correct rod heat capacity is given. A general statement about the accuracy of predicted rod temperatures is not possible because the errors increase with simulation time. Highest errors are expected for long transients with low heating rates and low steam velocities. As a result, three areas for additional research are suggested: - a high-pressure test at 120 bar to complete the void correlation data base, - a low steam flow - low power experiment to improve heat transfer correlations, - a numerical investigation of three-dimensional effects in the reactor core with unequally heated rod bundles. For the present state of 1-dimensional experiments and models, suggestions for a satisfactory modeling have been derived. The suggested further work could improve the modelling capabilities and the code reliability for some limiting cases like high pressure boil-off, low-power long-term steam cooling, and unequal heating of neighbouring bundles considerably

  4. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  5. Review and role of plyometrics and core rehabilitation in competitive sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, John; Leiszler, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Core stability and plyometric training have become common elements of training programs in competitive athletes. Core stability allows stabilization of the spine and trunk of the body in order to allow maximal translation of force to the extremities. Plyometric training is more dynamic and involves explosive-strength training. Integration of these exercises theoretically begins with core stabilization using more static exercises, allowing safe and effective transition to plyometric exercises. Both core strengthening and plyometric training have demonstrated mixed but generally positive results on injury prevention rehabilitation of certain types of injuries. Improvement in performance compared to other types of exercise is unclear at this time. This article discusses the theory and strategy behind core stability and plyometric training; reviews the literature on injury prevention, rehabilitation of injury, and performance enhancement with these modalities; and discusses the evaluation and rehabilitation of core stability.

  6. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Oikawa, Hirohide.

    1990-01-01

    The device according to this invention can ensure cooling water required for emerency core cooling upon emergence such as abnormally, for example, loss of coolant accident, without using dynamic equipments such as a centrifugal pump or large-scaled tank. The device comprises a pressure accumulation tank containing a high pressure nitrogen gas and cooling water inside, a condensate storage tank, a pressure suppression pool and a jet stream pump. In this device there are disposed a pipeline for guiding cooling water in the pressure accumulation tank as a jetting water to a jetting stream pump, a pipeline for guiding cooling water stored in the condensate storage tank and the pressure suppression pool as pumped water to the jetting pump and, further, a pipeline for guiding the discharged water from the jet stream pump which is a mixed stream of pumped water and jetting water into the reactor pressure vessel. In this constitution, a sufficient amount of water ranging from relatively high pressure to low pressure can be supplied into the reactor pressure vessel, without increasing the size of the pressure accumulation tank. (I.S.)

  7. Experimental Constraints on Core Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Fei, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The Earth's core was discovered in 1906, when Oldham inferred the existence of a low-velocity region inside the Earth from changes in the amplitude of compressional waves traveling through the Earth's interior (Oldham, 1906). Over the last century, a wealth of knowledge has been obtained on the nature and dynamics of the core ( Figure 1; Dziewonski and Anderson, 1981; Stacey, 1992). Residing in the center of the planet, the core has a radius of 3,480 km, more than half of the Earth's radius. It occupies roughly one-eighth of the Earth's volume, and accounts for nearly one-third of its mass. The mass fraction in the core is much higher than its volume fraction, because the density in the core is much higher than that of the mantle ( Figure 2). With the density jumping from 5.5 g cm-3 to 9.9 g cm-3, the density contrast at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) is the largest in the whole planet. Based on analyses of the velocity and attenuation of seismic waves, the core has been established to have a layered structure. The central part comprising less than 5% of the core's mass or volume is solid, while the rest is largely molten. The pressure in the core ranges from 136 GPa (1,380 kbar) at the CMB to 360 GPa at the very center. In order to stay in the liquid state under such high pressures, the temperature in the core must be high as well. The temperature of the liquid-solid interface at the inner-outer core boundary (ICB) is estimated at 5,400±400 K (e.g., Brown and McQueen, 1986; Boehler, 2000; Hemley and Mao, 2001). (5K)Figure 1. Cross-section of the Earth showing its layered structure (source Dziewonski and Anderson, 1981). (6K)Figure 2. Preliminary reference Earth model (PREM) (source Dziewonski and Anderson, 1981). Combining geochemical and seismological observations on the Earth with laboratory measurements on relevant materials, more than 80 wt.% of the core has been deduced to consist of iron. Other elements with significant concentrations in the core include

  8. Effect of intravenous FX06 as an adjunct to primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction results of the F.I.R.E. (Efficacy of FX06 in the Prevention of Myocardial Reperfusion Injury) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atar, Dan; Petzelbauer, Peter; Schwitter, Jürg

    2009-01-01

    , there was no significant difference in total late gadolinium enhanced zone in the FX06 group compared with placebo (reduction by 21%; p = 0.207). The necrotic core zone, however, was significantly reduced by 58% (median 1.77 g [interquartile range 0.0, 9.09 g] vs. 4.20 g [interquartile range 0.3, 9.93 g]; p

  9. The Effects of the Heat and Moisture Exchanger on Humidity, Airway Temperature, and Core Body Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delventhal, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Findings from several studies have demonstrated that the use of a heat and moisture exchanger increases airway humidity, which in turn increases mean airway temperature and prevents decreases in core body temperature...

  10. Carbon allocation and decomposition of root-derived organic matter in a plant-soil system of Calluna vulgaris as affected by elevated CO2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.S.J.; Gorissenand, A.; Arp, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated CO2 on C allocation in plant and soil was assessed using soil cores planted with 1-y-old heather (Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull). Plants were pulse-labeled with 14CO2 at ambient and elevated CO2 and two nitrogen regimes (low and high). After harvesting the plants, the soil was

  11. The effects of therapeutic hip exercise with abdominal core activation on recruitment of the hip muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Mandy KY; Chow, Ka Wai; Lai, Alfred YS; Mak, Noble KC; Sze, Jason CH; Tsang, Sharon MH

    2017-01-01

    Background Core stabilization has been utilized for rehabilitation and prevention of lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. Previous studies showed that activation of the abdominal core muscles enhanced the hip muscle activity in hip extension and abduction exercises. However, the lack of the direct measurement and quantification of the activation level of the abdominal core muscles during the execution of the hip exercises affect the level of evidence to substantiate the proposed application o...

  12. Complicated Politics to the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    People dislike the Common Core for several different reasons, and so it is important to disaggregate the sources of opposition and to assess and then to dispel some of the myths that have built up around it. It also is important to understand the unusual political alliances that have emerged in opposition to Common Core implementation and how they…

  13. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maximum stellar iron core mass mass of iron into a neutron star. The radius of this highly compressed theoretical sphere may be somewhat smaller than the actual radius of a real spherical mass of iron, just prior to core collapse, because an unstable real spherical mass of iron is likely to achieve the critical density only at its ...

  14. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the computations that follow have been made by assuming that a stellar core, existing just prior to core collapse, consists primarily of highly compressed and very hot iron nuclei and electrons. Although nuclei near iron in atomic number, as well as smaller concentrations of other subatomic particles, may also exist in a stellar ...

  15. Nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement is described wherein a plurality of actuators, disposed in a pattern laterally surrounding a group of elongated fuel assemblies, press against respective contiguous fuel assemblies on the periphery of the group to reduce the clearance between adjacent fuel assemblies thereby forming a more compacted, vibration resistant core structure. 7 claims, 4 drawing figures

  16. The space station tethered elevator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Loren A.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The elevator is an unmanned mobile structure which operates on a ten kilometer tether spanning the distance between the Space Station and a tethered platform. Elevator capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design are discussed. Engineering development of the tethered elevator is the result of work conducted in the following areas: structural configurations; robotics, drive mechanisms; and power generation and transmission systems. The structural configuration of the elevator is presented. The structure supports, houses, and protects all systems on board the elevator. The implementation of robotics on board the elevator is discussed. Elevator robotics allow for the deployment, retrieval, and manipulation of tethered objects. Robotic manipulators also aid in hooking the elevator on a tether. Critical to the operation of the tethered elevator is the design of its drive mechanisms, which are discussed. Two drivers, located internal to the elevator, propel the vehicle along a tether. These modular components consist of endless toothed belts, shunt-wound motors, regenerative power braking, and computer controlled linear actuators. The designs of self-sufficient power generation and transmission systems are reviewed. Thorough research indicates all components of the elevator will operate under power provided by fuel cells. The fuel cell systems will power the vehicle at seven kilowatts continuously and twelve kilowatts maximally. A set of secondary fuel cells provides redundancy in the unlikely event of a primary system failure. Power storage exists in the form of Nickel-Hydrogen batteries capable of powering the elevator under maximum loads.

  17. Core body temperature in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikens, Marc J; Gorbach, Alexander M; Eden, Henry S; Savastano, David M; Chen, Kong Y; Skarulis, Monica C; Yanovski, Jack A

    2011-05-01

    A lower core body temperature set point has been suggested to be a factor that could potentially predispose humans to develop obesity. We tested the hypothesis that obese individuals have lower core temperatures than those in normal-weight individuals. In study 1, nonobese [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) temperature-sensing capsules, and we measured core temperatures continuously for 24 h. In study 2, normal-weight (BMI of 18-25) and obese subjects swallowed temperature-sensing capsules to measure core temperatures continuously for ≥48 h and kept activity logs. We constructed daily, 24-h core temperature profiles for analysis. Mean (±SE) daily core body temperature did not differ significantly between the 35 nonobese and 46 obese subjects (36.92 ± 0.03°C compared with 36.89 ± 0.03°C; P = 0.44). Core temperature 24-h profiles did not differ significantly between 11 normal-weight and 19 obese subjects (P = 0.274). Women had a mean core body temperature ≈0.23°C greater than that of men (36.99 ± 0.03°C compared with 36.76 ± 0.03°C; P body temperature. It may be necessary to study individuals with function-altering mutations in core temperature-regulating genes to determine whether differences in the core body temperature set point affect the regulation of human body weight. These trials were registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00428987 and NCT00266500.

  18. Scientific Return of a Lunar Elevator

    OpenAIRE

    Eubanks, T. M.; Radley, C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a space elevator dates back to Tsilokovsky, but they are not commonly considered in near-term plans for space exploration, perhaps because a terrestrial elevator would not be possible without considerable improvements in tether material. A Lunar Space Elevator (LSE), however, can be built with current technology using commercially available tether polymers. This paper considers missions leading to infrastructure capable of shortening the time, lowering the cost and enhancing th...

  19. Epistemology and ontology in core ontologies: FOLaw and LRI-Core, two core ontologies for law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukers, J.A.P.J.; Hoekstra, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    For more than a decade constructing ontologies for legal domains, we, at the Leibniz Center for Law, felt really the need to develop a core ontology for law that would enable us to re-use the common denominator of the various legal domains. In this paper we present two core ontologies for law. The

  20. Cholecystokinin elevates mouse plasma lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lichun Zhou

    Full Text Available Cholecystokinin (CCK is a peptide hormone that induces bile release into the intestinal lumen which in turn aids in fat digestion and absorption in the intestine. While excretion of bile acids and cholesterol into the feces eliminates cholesterol from the body, this report examined the effect of CCK on increasing plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in mice. Our data demonstrated that intravenous injection of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK at a dose of 50 ng/kg significantly increased plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels by 22 and 31%, respectively, in fasting low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/- mice. The same dose of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK induced 6 and 13% increases in plasma triglyceride and cholesterol, respectively, in wild-type mice. However, these particular before and after CCK treatment values did not achieve statistical significance. Oral feeding of olive oil further elevated plasma triglycerides, but did not alter plasma cholesterol levels in CCK-treated mice. The increased plasma cholesterol in CCK-treated mice was distributed in very-low, low and high density lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL and HDL with less of an increase in HDL. Correspondingly, the plasma apolipoprotein (apo B48, B100, apoE and apoAI levels were significantly higher in the CCK-treated mice than in untreated control mice. Ligation of the bile duct, blocking CCK receptors with proglumide or inhibition of Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 transporter with ezetimibe reduced the hypercholesterolemic effect of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK in LDLR(-/- mice. These findings suggest that CCK-increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides as a result of the reabsorption of biliary lipids from the intestine.

  1. Bullying Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the milestone project is to focus on bridging the gap of bullying and classroom instruction methods. There has to be a defined expectations and level of accountability that has to be defined when supporting and implementing a plan linked to bullying prevention. All individuals involved in the student's learning have to be aware of…

  2. Prevent Pneumonia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-06

    CDC’s Matthew Westercamp explains what pneumonia is, its symptoms, and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/6/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Respiratory Diseases Branch (RDB).   Date Released: 8/6/2015.

  3. HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Collapse All Is abstinence the only 100% effective HIV prevention option? Yes. Abstinence means not having oral, ...

  4. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Feature Articles Patient Q&A Success Stories Definitions Anatomy of the Spine Definitions A-Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 for Spine Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Prevention ...

  5. Soil nematodes show a mid-elevation diversity maximum and elevational zonation on Mt. Norikura, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ke; Moroenyane, Itumeleng; Tripathi, Binu; Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Takahashi, Koichi; Yamamoto, Naomichi; An, Choa; Cho, Hyunjun; Adams, Jonathan

    2017-06-08

    Little is known about how nematode ecology differs across elevational gradients. We investigated the soil nematode community along a ~2,200 m elevational range on Mt. Norikura, Japan, by sequencing the 18S rRNA gene. As with many other groups of organisms, nematode diversity showed a high correlation with elevation, and a maximum in mid-elevations. While elevation itself, in the context of the mid domain effect, could predict the observed unimodal pattern of soil nematode communities along the elevational gradient, mean annual temperature and soil total nitrogen concentration were the best predictors of diversity. We also found nematode community composition showed strong elevational zonation, indicating that a high degree of ecological specialization that may exist in nematodes in relation to elevation-related environmental gradients and certain nematode OTUs had ranges extending across all elevations, and these generalized OTUs made up a greater proportion of the community at high elevations - such that high elevation nematode OTUs had broader elevational ranges on average, providing an example consistent to Rapoport's elevational hypothesis. This study reveals the potential for using sequencing methods to investigate elevational gradients of small soil organisms, providing a method for rapid investigation of patterns without specialized knowledge in taxonomic identification.

  6. An Automatic System for Elevator Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Haidar Sharif; Ibrahim Furkan Ince

    2015-01-01

    An elevator is a conveyor device or transport equipment that moves people or goods between floors or levels or decks of a building, vessel, or other structures. It has become a part and parcel of modern life in developed countries. The number of floors in high buildings, skyscrapers, and towers generate the usage of elevators. If it is simply assumed that each floor has at least two elevators in a thirty-floor building, people call the elevators in each floor even they are already occupied in...

  7. Comparison of the fractional power motor with cores made of various magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmyrek, Zbigniew; Lefik, Marcin; Cavagnino, Andrea; Ferraris, Luca

    2017-12-01

    The optimization of the motor cores, coupled with new core shapes as well as powering the motor at high frequency are the primary reasons for the use of new materials. The utilization of new materials, like SMC (soft magnetic composite), reduce the core loss and/or provide quasi-isotropic core's properties in any magnetization direction. Moreover, the use of SMC materials allows for avoiding degradation of the material portions, resulting from punching process, thereby preventing the deterioration of operating parameters of the motor. The authors examine the impact of technological parameters on the properties of a new type of SMC material and analyze the possibility of its use as the core of the fractional power motor. The result of the work is an indication of the shape of the rotor core made of a new SMC material to achieve operational parameters similar to those that have a motor with a core made of laminations.

  8. HOW STARLESS ARE STARLESS CORES?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnee, Scott; Friesen, Rachel; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Enoch, Melissa; Sadavoy, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy continuum and spectral line observations of the dense core Per-Bolo 45. Although this core has previously been classified as starless, we find evidence for an outflow and conclude that Per-Bolo 45 is actually an embedded, low-luminosity protostar. We discuss the impact of newly discovered, low-luminosity, embedded objects in the Perseus molecular cloud on starless core and protostar lifetimes. We estimate that the starless core lifetime has been overestimated by 4%-18% and the Class 0/I protostellar lifetime has been underestimated by 5%-20%. Given the relatively large systematic uncertainties involved in these calculations, variations on the order of 10% do not significantly change either core lifetimes or the expected protostellar luminosity function. Finally, we suggest that high-resolution (sub)millimeter surveys of known cores lacking near-infrared and mid-infrared emission are necessary to make an accurate census of starless cores.

  9. Results of the measurement survey of elevation and environmental media in surface impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, M.E.; Rose, D.A.; Brown, K.S.; Coe, R.H.C. III; Lawrence, J.D.; Winton, W.

    1998-07-01

    A measurement survey of the elevation and environmental media in impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during April 1998. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at the request of Bechtel Jacobs Company. Measurement activities were conducted at selected locations in order to determine the depth and appearance of the sediment and describe the clay underlying the impoundments prior to remediation. The survey was a follow-up to a previous elevation survey. The survey included the following: collection of sediment/clay cores from selected locations in each impoundment; measurement and documentation of the elevation at the water surface, at the top of sediment, at the top of clay, and at the bottom of each core; visual inspection of each core by a soil scientist to confirm the presence of clay and not material such as fly ash and soda lime compacted over the last 50 years; measurement and documentation of the background beta-gamma radiation level at the time and location of collection of each core, the highest beta-gamma level along the sediment portion of each core, and the highest beta-gamma level along the clay portion of each core; measurement and documentation of the length of the clay and of the sediment portion of each core; photographic documentation of each core; and replacement of each core in the impoundment.

  10. Results of the measurement survey of elevation and environmental media in surface impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Rose, D.A.; Brown, K.S.; Coe, R.H.C. III; Lawrence, J.D.; Winton, W.

    1998-07-01

    A measurement survey of the elevation and environmental media in impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during April 1998. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at the request of Bechtel Jacobs Company. Measurement activities were conducted at selected locations in order to determine the depth and appearance of the sediment and describe the clay underlying the impoundments prior to remediation. The survey was a follow-up to a previous elevation survey. The survey included the following: collection of sediment/clay cores from selected locations in each impoundment; measurement and documentation of the elevation at the water surface, at the top of sediment, at the top of clay, and at the bottom of each core; visual inspection of each core by a soil scientist to confirm the presence of clay and not material such as fly ash and soda lime compacted over the last 50 years; measurement and documentation of the background beta-gamma radiation level at the time and location of collection of each core, the highest beta-gamma level along the sediment portion of each core, and the highest beta-gamma level along the clay portion of each core; measurement and documentation of the length of the clay and of the sediment portion of each core; photographic documentation of each core; and replacement of each core in the impoundment

  11. Corning lightweight core fabrication technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBrocklin, Randy R.; Edwards, Mary J.; Hobbs, Thomas W.

    2003-12-01

    Fabrication of lightweight mirrors from low expansion glasses can be achieved using various core and faceplate lightweighting techniques. Lightweighting can be achieved using abrasive waterjet cutting, CNC milling and a new approach that Corning is developing to produce lightweight cores based on Corning's patented ceramic extrusion process. The selection of which lightweighting technology to use is dependent on customer design considerations of the lightweight mirror. These lightweighting techniques are reviewed and discussed, along with advantages and disadvantages of each technique. Corning will also introduce and discuss their new core lightweighting process.

  12. Characterizing Facesheet/Core Disbonding in Honeycomb Core Sandwich Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Martin; Ratcliffe, James G.; Adams, Daniel O.; Krueger, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation into facesheet core disbonding in carbon fiber reinforced plastic/Nomex honeycomb sandwich structures using a Single Cantilever Beam test. Specimens with three, six and twelve-ply facesheets were tested. Specimens with different honeycomb cores consisting of four different cell sizes were also tested, in addition to specimens with three different widths. Three different data reduction methods were employed for computing apparent fracture toughness values from the test data, namely an area method, a compliance calibration technique and a modified beam theory method. The compliance calibration and modified beam theory approaches yielded comparable apparent fracture toughness values, which were generally lower than those computed using the area method. Disbonding in the three-ply facesheet specimens took place at the facesheet/core interface and yielded the lowest apparent fracture toughness values. Disbonding in the six and twelve-ply facesheet specimens took place within the core, near to the facesheet/core interface. Specimen width was not found to have a significant effect on apparent fracture toughness. The amount of scatter in the apparent fracture toughness data was found to increase with honeycomb core cell size.

  13. National requirements for improved elevation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Gregory I.; Sugarbaker, Larry J.; Jason, Allyson L.; Maune, David F.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of surveys, structured interviews, and workshops conducted to identify key national requirements for improved elevation data for the United States and its territories, including coastlines. Organizations also identified and reported the expected economic benefits that would be realized if their requirements for improved elevation were met (appendixes 1–3). This report describes the data collection methodology and summarizes the findings. Participating organizations included 34 Federal agencies, 50 States and two territories, and a sampling of local governments, tribes, and nongovernmental orgnizations. The nongovernmental organizations included The Nature Conservancy and a sampling of private sector businesses. These data were collected in 2010-2011 as part of the National Enhanced Elevation Assessment (NEEA), a study to identify program alternatives for better meeting the Nation’s elevation data needs. NEEA tasks included the collection of national elevation requirements; analysis of the benefits and costs of meeting these requirements; assessment of emerging elevation technologies, lifecycle data management needs, and costs for managing and distributing a national-scale dataset and derived products; and candidate national elevation program alternatives that balance costs and benefits in meeting the Nation’s elevation requirements. The NEEA was sponsored by the National Digital Elevation Program (NDEP), a government coordination body with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as managing partner that includes the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), among the more than a dozen agencies and organizations. The term enhanced elevation data as used in this report refers broadly to three-dimensional measurements of land or

  14. Assessing Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  15. Obesity comorbidity in unipolar major depressive disorder: refining the core phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Robert D; Davis, Caroline; Kaplan, Allan S; Arenovich, Tamara; Phillips, D I W; Ravindran, Arun V

    2012-08-01

    While a significant body of research has demonstrated high comorbidity rates between depression and obesity, the vast majority of this work has considered depression as a unitary diagnosis. Given that increased appetite and weight gain are highly characteristic of the "atypical" subtype of depression, while classic depression is characterized by decreased appetite and weight loss, it would be important to examine whether increased obesity risk is consistent across the major vegetative subtypes of depression or is limited to the atypical subtype. Using data from the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), we identified 5,092 US adults with past or current major depression based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and 1,500 gender-matched controls. Each depressed subject was designated as having classic, atypical, or undifferentiated depression based on core vegetative symptoms. Logistic regression models examined rates of current obesity (defined as a current body mass index [kg/m2] > 30) across the 3 depressive subgroups and nondepressed controls, adjusting for demographic differences. To limit the possible effect of current depressive symptoms on observed obesity rates, secondary analyses were completed in individuals with past depression only. Subjects with atypical depression had markedly elevated obesity rates compared to population controls and to other depressed subjects, with corresponding pairwise odds ratios consistently greater than 2.0 (P obesity rates were not significantly different in subjects with classic depression and nondepressed controls. These results were manifest in individuals with either current or past depression and were independent of gender and age. While many individuals with classic depression will present with obesity due to the high prevalence of both disorders, only atypical depression is associated with an elevated risk of obesity relative to the population at large. Refining the target phenotype

  16. 28 CFR 36.404 - Alterations: Elevator exemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alterations: Elevator exemption. 36.404... Alterations: Elevator exemption. (a) This section does not require the installation of an elevator in an... facility has an elevator. ...

  17. SpaceCube Core Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a flexible, modular and user friendly SpaceCube Core Software system that will dramatically simplify SpaceCube application development and enable any...

  18. Discovering the Army's Core Competencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudesheim, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    This paper seeks to answer the question, "Has the Army correctly identified its core competencies to ensure the Army can adequately respond to the national military strategy?" FM 1, The Army (Prototype Draft...

  19. European core curriculum in neurorehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandrini, G.; Binder, H.; Homberg, V.; Saltuari, L.; Tarkka, I.; Smania, N.; Corradini, C.; Giustini, A.; Katterer, C.; Picari, L.; Diserens, K.; Koenig, E.; Geurts, A.C.; Anghelescu, A.; Opara, J.; Tonin, P.; Kwakkel, G.; Golyk, V.; Onose, G.; Perennou, D.; Picelli, A.

    2017-01-01

    To date, medical education lacks Europe-wide standards on neurorehabilitation. To address this, the European Federation of NeuroRehabilitation Societies (EFNR) here proposes a postgraduate neurorehabilitation training scheme. In particular, the European medical core curriculum in neurorehabilitation

  20. Core catchers for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, Micheal; Gardner, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    A core catcher for containing nuclear core debris in the event of a breach in the reactor pressure vessel caused by a core meltdown is described. It has a multilayer sandwich construction comprising a middle layer of interlocking tongue-and-groove jointed refractory (e.g. zirconia) tiles or bricks sandwiched between inner and outer steel plates in the form of domes. The refractory bricks are fixed against movement relative to each other and the inner and outer steel plates by means of refractory cement. The inner steel plate is sacrificial in the event that it comes into contact with molten nuclear material but gives the sandwich construction greater shock resistance during normal operational service. The outer steel plate provides the main structural support for the core catcher. (author)

  1. Core Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James

    2011-01-01

    The Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation (RHSEG) software has been repackaged to provide a version of the RHSEG software that is not subject to patent restrictions and that can be released to the general public through NASA GSFC's Open Source release process. Like the Core HSEG Software Package, this Core RHSEG Software Package also includes a visualization program called HSEGViewer along with a utility program HSEGReader. It also includes an additional utility program called HSEGExtract. The unique feature of the Core RHSEG package is that it is a repackaging of the RHSEG technology designed to specifically avoid the inclusion of the certain software technology. Unlike the Core HSEG package, it includes the recursive portions of the technology, but does not include processing window artifact elimination technology.

  2. Lunar Core Drive Tubes Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Contains a brief summary and high resolution imagery from various lunar rock and core drive tubes collected from the Apollo and Luna missions to the moon.

  3. Prioritizing Zakat Core Principles Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aam Slamet Rusydiana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Prioriting Zakat Core Principles CriteriaZakat Institution (OPZ is the intermediary organizations based on social. The entire of operating expense is taken from the zakat and infaq funds collected. The Zakat Core Principles are a starting point for the frameworks and standards of zakat-based governance best practices. The Zakat Core Principles is mainly aimed to improve the quality of the zakat systems by identifying such weaknesses in the existing of supervision and regulation. This study try to prioritize the Principles of ZCP and also the essential criteria from each level using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP.There are five core principles of charity principle, consisting of: regulation, supervision, collection and disbursement management, risk management, and audit and transparency. From these principles, the main priority is regulation following with audit and transparency.DOI: 10.15408/ess.v7i2.5275

  4. Viral Evolution Core | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon F. Keele, Ph.D. PI/Senior Principal Investigator, Retroviral Evolution Section Head, Viral Evolution Core Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Frederick, MD 21702-1201 Tel: 301-846-173

  5. 78 FR 22221 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... referenced ground [caret] Communities affected elevation ** Elevation in meters (MSL) Effective Modified Pitt... feet above ground. [caret] Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. \\**\\ BFEs to be changed... inspection at the Department of Public Works, 1500 Beatty Street, Greenville, NC 27834. Unincorporated Areas...

  6. 75 FR 77762 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... Flooding source(s) elevation in feet above Communities affected ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL..., rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ADDRESSES City of Aurora Maps are available for inspection at 15151 East... Arapahoe County Department of Public Works and Development, 10730 West Briarwood Avenue, Centennial, CO...

  7. 75 FR 69892 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ...: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth... county +899 City of Norwich, Town boundary. of Greene, Town of North Norwich, Town of Oxford, Town of...). Susquehanna River At the downstream county +965 Town of Afton, Town of boundary. Bainbridge, Village of Afton...

  8. 77 FR 6980 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth in feet above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Nowata County... Bayou An area bounded by the +100 Town of Mayersville, county boundary to the Unincorporated Areas of...

  9. 76 FR 1535 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth in feet above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Poinsett County... with the St. Francis River...... +212 Areas of Poinsett County. Approximately 0.45 mile downstream of...

  10. 77 FR 66737 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... follows: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding... +43 Town of Kingstree, Unincorporated Areas of Williamsburg County. Approximately 0.3 mile +48... Town of Hemingway, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Williamsburg County. Approximately 0.3 mile +50...

  11. 75 FR 29253 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ...: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet above State City/town/county Source of... +21 Town of Ebro, upstream of the Unincorporated Areas confluence with the of Washington County. East... County, Colorado, and Incorporated Areas Willow Creek At the confluence with None +8,154 Unincorporated...

  12. 75 FR 68710 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ...: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth... County, California Docket Nos.: FEMA-B-7762, FEMA-B-7795, and FEMA-B-1053 California Unincorporated Oregon Slough..... City of Montague +2503 Areas of Siskiyou and County. Unincorporated Siskiyou County...

  13. 77 FR 45262 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of Location Depth in feet flooding above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Solano County... Areas of Solano upstream of the County. McCune Creek confluence. Approximately 930 feet +149 upstream of...

  14. 76 FR 50918 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet State City/town/county Source of flooding... affected [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Jones County, Texas, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1122 Lake Fort Phantom Hill Just downstream of County +1642 City of Abilene, Highway 1082...

  15. 78 FR 10066 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... follows: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet State City/town/county Source...). Scriba Creek Approximately 0.90 mile +546 Town of Amboy. upstream of County Route 23 (Potter Road.... Town of Palermo Maps are available for inspection at the Palermo Town Municipal Offices, 53 County...

  16. 77 FR 49367 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth in feet above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Chickasaw County... Chickasaw County. (backwater effects feet upstream of from Cedar River). the Cedar River confluence...

  17. 77 FR 49379 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth in feet above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Washington County... of the +35 Areas of railroad. Washington County. Approximately 2.1 miles upstream of the railroad...

  18. 75 FR 43418 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... follows: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding... +869 Town of Peoria, upstream of Main Street. Unincorporated Areas of Ottawa County. Approximately 1.... Town of Peoria Maps are available for inspection at the Ottawa County Courthouse, 102 East Central...

  19. Insect Population Dynamics in Commercial Grain Elevators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data were collected in 1998-2002 from wheat stored in commercial grain elevators in south-central Kansas. Storage bins at these elevators had concrete walls and were typically 6-9 m in diameter and 30-35 m tall. A vacuum-probe sampler was used to collect ten 3-kg grain samples in the top 12 m of the...

  20. High elevation white pines educational website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna W. Schoettle; Michele Laskowski

    2011-01-01

    The high elevation five-needle white pines are facing numerous challenges ranging from climate change to invasion by a non-native pathogen to escalation of pest outbreaks. This website (http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/highelevationwhitepines/) serves as a primer for managers and the public on the high elevation North American five-needle pines. It presents information on each...

  1. Nanoporous polymer liquid core waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Ndoni, Sokol

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented.......We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented....

  2. The benefits of improved national elevation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Gregory I.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how the National Enhanced Elevation Assessment (NEEA) has identified substantial benefits that could come about if improved elevation data were publicly available for current and emerging applications and business uses such as renewable energy, precision agriculture, and intelligent vehicle navigation and safety. In order to support these diverse needs, new national elevation data with higher resolution and accuracy are needed. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative was developed to meet the majority of these needs and it is expected that 3DEP will result in new, unimagined information services that would result in job growth and the transformation of the geospatial community. Private-sector data collection companies are continuously evolving sensors and positioning technologies that are needed to collect improved elevation data. An initiative of this scope might also provide an opportunity for companies to improve their capabilities and produce even higher data quality and consistency at a pace that might not have otherwise occurred.

  3. LMFBR Ultra Long Life Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.E.; Doncals, R.A.; Porter, C.A.; Gundy, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Ultra Long Life Core is an attractive and innovative design approach with several extremely beneficial attributes. Long Life cores are applicable to the full range of LMR plant sizes resulting in lifetimes up to 30 years. Core life is somewhat limited for smaller plant sizes, however significant benefits of this approach still exist for all plant sizes. The union of long life cores and the complementary inherent safety technology offer a means of utilizing the well-proven oxide fuel in a system with unsurpassed safety capability. A further benefit is that the uranium fuel cycle can be used in long life cores, especially for initial LMR plant deployment, thereby eliminating the need for reprocessing prior to starting LMR plant construction in the U.S. Finally the long life core significantly reduces power costs. With inherent safety capability designed into an LMR and with the ULLC fuel cycle, power costs competitive with light water plants are achievable while offering improved operational flexibility derived through extending refueling intervals

  4. INTERNAL MOTIONS IN STARLESS DENSE CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Won; Myers, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the statistics of internal motions in starless dense cores and the relation of these motions to core density and evolution. Four spectral lines from three molecular species are analyzed from single-pointing and mapped observations of several tens of starless cores. Blue asymmetric profiles are dominant, indicating that inward motions are prevalent in sufficiently dense starless cores. These blue profiles are found to be more abundant, and their asymmetry is bluer, at core positions with stronger N 2 H + line emission or higher column density. Thirty-three starless cores are classified into four different types according to the blueshift and redshift of the lines in their molecular line maps. Among these cores, contracting motions dominate: 19 are classified as contracting, 3 as oscillating, 3 as expanding, and 8 as static. Contracting cores have inward motions all over the core with those motions predominating near the region of peak density. Cores with the bluest asymmetry tend to have greater column density than other cores and all five cores with peak column density >6 x 10 21 cm -2 are found to be contracting. This suggests that starless cores are likely to have contracting motions if they are sufficiently condensed. Our classification of the starless cores may indicate a sequence of core evolution in the sense that column density increases from static to contracting cores: the static cores in the earliest stage, the expanding and/or the oscillating cores in the next, and the contracting cores in the latest stage.

  5. Elevational and Spatial Gradients of Atmospheric Metal Pollution in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongebloed, U. A.; Osterberg, E. C.; Kreutz, K. J.; Ferris, D. G.; Campbell, S.; Saylor, P. L.; Winski, D.; Handley, M.

    2017-12-01

    The industrial revolution has led to a several-fold increase in the atmospheric concentrations of heavy metals and metalloids including Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Hg and As. Modern emissions inventories identify Asia as the largest emitter of many of these toxic pollutants, which are subsequently transported eastwards across the North Pacific Ocean by prevailing westerly winds in the mid-upper troposphere. Previous ice cores collected from the Yukon Territory in the eastern North Pacific reveal evolution-dependent metal pollution histories; the highest (5300 m elevation) core from Mt. Logan records a nearly pure trans-Pacific Asian pollution record, whereas cores from lower sites like the Eclipse Icefield (3017 m) record a complex combination of Asian and more local North American emission. However, it is unclear if this elevation gradient of pollution sources is found in other regions of the North Pacific. Furthermore, the previous ice core records end in the late 1990's, before efforts by some Asian nations to reduce metal pollution, and it is unknown if North Pacific atmospheric metal concentrations have declined in response to these efforts. Here we investigate metal and metalloid concentrations and sources recorded in ice core and snow pit samples recovered from a vertical transect spanning 2200 - 5242 m within Denali National Park in the Central Alaska Range. We compare these metal concentrations and crustal enrichment factors to data from the Yukon Territory to investigate North Pacific regional metal gradients. We also present preliminary results from a new 60 m ice core from the Eclipse Icefield to evaluate recent trends in metal concentrations since the end of the Mt. Logan and original Eclipse records in 1998, and compare this to the recent metal pollution history recorded in the 2013 Denali Ice Core collected from the summit plateau (3900 m) of Mt. Hunter.

  6. REPERFUSION THERAPY IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME WITH ST SEGMENT ELEVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Alyavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare effect of percutaneous balloon angioplasty (PCA and a systemic thrombolysis (STL on the central and intracardiac hemodynamics in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS with ST segment elevation.Material and methods. 80 patients with ACS with ST segment elevation were included in the study. Patients were split into 2 groups depending on reperfusion strategy. PCA was performed in 55 patients (first group. 25 patients of the second group had STL with Streptokinase, i/v, 1 500 000 units per hour. Echocardiography was performed in all patients at admission and after 3 and 7 days of treatment to evaluate intracardiac hemodynamics.Results. Both reperfusion methods significantly increase of ejection fraction (EF and maximal output speed of left ventricle (LV. Increase of LV EF in patients after PCA was higher than this in patients after STL. PCA improved LV diastolic function; STL did not change this characteristic. After PCA working diagnosis of ACS was transformed to the following final diagnosis: acute myocardial infarction (AMI with Q, AMI without Q and unstable angina in 37,5, 30,4 and 32,1% of patients, respectively. After STL diagnosis of AMI with Q was defined in all patients.Conclusion. PCA in patients with ACS with ST segment elevation results in fast improvement of global systolic and diastolic LV function. Besides, PCA prevents AMI with Q in a half of these patients.

  7. FDTD computation of temperature elevation in the elderly for far-field RF exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Tomoki; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2014-01-01

    Core temperature elevation and perspiration in younger and older adults is investigated for plane-wave exposure at whole-body averaged specific absorption rate of 0.4 W kg -1 . Numeric Japanese male model is considered together with a thermo-regulatory response formula proposed in the authors' previous study. The frequencies considered were at 65 MHz and 2 GHz where the total power absorption in humans becomes maximal for the allowable power density prescribed in the international guidelines. From the computational results used here, the core temperature elevation in the older adult model was larger than that in the younger one at both frequencies. The reason for this difference is attributable to the difference of sweating, which is originated from the difference in the threshold activating the sweating and the decline in sweating in the legs. (authors)

  8. Allergy prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muche-Borowski, Cathleen; Kopp, Matthias; Reese, Imke; Sitter, Helmut; Werfel, Thomas; Schäfer, Torsten

    2010-09-01

    The further increase of allergies in industrialized countries demands evidence-based measures of primary prevention. The recommendations as published in the guideline of 2004 were updated and consented on the basis of a systematic literature search. Evidence from the period February 2003-May 2008 was searched in the electronic databases Cochrane and MEDLINE as well as in reference lists of recent reviews and by contacting experts. The retrieved citations were screened for relevance first by title and abstract and in a second step as full paper. Levels of evidence were assigned to each included study and the methodological quality of the studies was assessed as high or low. Finally the revised recommendations were formally consented (nominal group process) by representatives of relevant societies and organizations including a self-help group. Of originally 4556 hits, 217 studies (4 Cochrane Reviews, 14 meta-analyses, 19 randomized controlled trials, 135 cohort and 45 case-control studies) were included and critically appraised. Grossly unchanged remained the recommendations on avoiding environmental tobacco smoke, breast-feeding over 4 months (alternatively hypoallergenic formulas for children at risk), avoiding a mold-promoting indoor climate, vaccination according to current recommendations, and avoidance of furry pets (especially cats) in children at risk. The recommendation on reducing the house dust mite allergen exposure as a measure of primary prevention was omitted and the impact of a delayed introduction of supplementary food was reduced. New recommendations were adopted concerning fish consumption (during pregnancy / breast-feeding and as supplementary food in the first year), avoidance of overweight, and reducing the exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollutants. The revision of this guideline on a profound evidence basis led to (1) a confirmation of existing recommendations, (2) substantial revisions, and (3) new recommendations. Thereby it is possible

  9. Earth's inner core nucleation paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Van Orman, James A.; Hauck, Steven A.; Willard, Matthew A.

    2018-04-01

    The conventional view of Earth's inner core is that it began to crystallize at Earth's center when the temperature dropped below the melting point of the iron alloy and has grown steadily since that time as the core continued to cool. However, this model neglects the energy barrier to the formation of the first stable crystal nucleus, which is commonly represented in terms of the critical supercooling required to overcome the barrier. Using constraints from experiments, simulations, and theory, we show that spontaneous crystallization in a homogeneous liquid iron alloy at Earth's core pressures requires a critical supercooling of order 1000 K, which is too large to be a plausible mechanism for the origin of Earth's inner core. We consider mechanisms that can lower the nucleation barrier substantially. Each has caveats, yet the inner core exists: this is the nucleation paradox. Heterogeneous nucleation on a solid metallic substrate tends to have a low energy barrier and offers the most straightforward solution to the paradox, but solid metal would probably have to be delivered from the mantle and such events are unlikely to have been common. A delay in nucleation, whether due to a substantial nucleation energy barrier, or late introduction of a low energy substrate, would lead to an initial phase of rapid inner core growth from a supercooled state. Such rapid growth may lead to distinctive crystallization texturing that might be observable seismically. It would also generate a spike in chemical and thermal buoyancy that could affect the geomagnetic field significantly. Solid metal introduced to Earth's center before it reached saturation could also provide a nucleation substrate, if large enough to escape complete dissolution. Inner core growth, in this case, could begin earlier and start more slowly than standard thermal models predict.

  10. Elevated tumour marker: an indication for imaging?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMahon, Colm J

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of imaging examinations in patients with elevated tumour markers when (a) the tumour marker is not validated for as a primary diagnostic test; (b) the patient had no personal history of cancer and (c) the patient had no other imaging indication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients without known cancer who had abnormal carcinoembryonic antigen, CA19-9, CA125 and\\/or CA15-3 serology over a one-year period were included. A retrospective medical record review was performed to assess the number of these cases who underwent imaging because of \\'elevated tumour marker\\' in the absence of a clinical indication for imaging. The number and result of these imaging studies were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight hundred and nineteen patients were included. Of those, 25 patients (mean age: 67.8 [range 41-91] y), were imaged to evaluate: \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. They underwent 29 imaging studies (mean [+\\/-standard deviation (SD)] per patient = 1.2 [+\\/-0.4]), and had 42 elevated tumour marker serology tests (mean [+\\/-SD] per patient = 1.7 [+\\/-0.7]). Four patients had >1 imaging test. No patient had an imaging study which diagnosed a malignancy or explained the elevated tumour marker. CONCLUSION: The non-judicious use of tumour markers can prompt further unnecessary investigations including imaging. In this study, there was no positive diagnostic yield for imaging performed for investigation of \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. \\'Elevated tumour marker\\

  11. Revised estimates of Greenland ice sheet thinning histories based on ice-core records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecavalier, B.S.; Milne, G.A.; Fisher, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    -based reconstructions and, to some extent, the estimated elevation histories. A key component of the ice core analysis involved removing the influence of vertical surface motion on the dO signal measured from the Agassiz and Renland ice caps. We re-visit the original analysis with the intent to determine if the use...

  12. Waves in the core and mechanical core-mantle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This Chapter focuses on time-dependent uid motions in the core interior, which can beconstrained by observations of the Earth's magnetic eld, on timescales which are shortcompared to the magnetic diusion time. This dynamics is strongly inuenced by the Earth's rapid rotation, which rigidies...... the motions in the direction parallel to the Earth'srotation axis. This property accounts for the signicance of the core-mantle topography.In addition, the stiening of the uid in the direction parallel to the rotation axis gives riseto a magnetic diusion layer attached to the core-mantle boundary, which would...... of the induction equation from Ohm's law and Maxwellequations, as presented in Chapter (8.03)....

  13. Toroidal-Core Microinductors Biased by Permanent Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieneweg, Udo; Blaes, Brent

    2003-01-01

    The designs of microscopic toroidal-core inductors in integrated circuits of DC-to-DC voltage converters would be modified, according to a proposal, by filling the gaps in the cores with permanent magnets that would apply bias fluxes (see figure). The magnitudes and polarities of the bias fluxes would be tailored to counteract the DC fluxes generated by the DC components of the currents in the inductor windings, such that it would be possible to either reduce the sizes of the cores or increase the AC components of the currents in the cores without incurring adverse effects. Reducing the sizes of the cores could save significant amounts of space on integrated circuits because relative to other integrated-circuit components, microinductors occupy large areas - of the order of a square millimeter each. An important consideration in the design of such an inductor is preventing magnetic saturation of the core at current levels up to the maximum anticipated operating current. The requirement to prevent saturation, as well as other requirements and constraints upon the design of the core are expressed by several equations based on the traditional magnetic-circuit approximation. The equations involve the core and gap dimensions and the magnetic-property parameters of the core and magnet materials. The equations show that, other things remaining equal, as the maximum current is increased, one must increase the size of the core to prevent the flux density from rising to the saturation level. By using a permanent bias flux to oppose the flux generated by the DC component of the current, one would reduce the net DC component of flux in the core, making it possible to reduce the core size needed to prevent the total flux density (sum of DC and AC components) from rising to the saturation level. Alternatively, one could take advantage of the reduction of the net DC component of flux by increasing the allowable AC component of flux and the corresponding AC component of current

  14. Studies of core response in local boron dilution accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siltanen, P.; Antila, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the past few years major attention has been given to analyzing the possibilities and potential consequences of a slug of diluted water entering the core of the WWER-440 reactors in Loviisa. Suitable countermeasures have already been implemented to reduce the probability of external inhomogeneous dilution. Inhomogeneous dilution scenarios with their high reactivity disturbance potential were not included in the original safe analyses. The presentation concentrates on typical dilution scenarios. Results of potential consequences in the core are presented for three typical dilution scenarios for the hot reactor condition. The calculations have been performed using the 3-dimensional dynamic core model HEXTRAN coupled with the circuit model SMABRE. The principles of the new preventive automation recently implemented at Loviisa NPS are also described. (7 refs., 6 figs.)

  15. Earth's Climate History from Glaciers and Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lonnie

    2013-03-01

    Glaciers serve both as recorders and early indicators of climate change. Over the past 35 years our research team has recovered climatic and environmental histories from ice cores drilled in both Polar Regions and from low to mid-latitude, high-elevation ice fields. Those ice core -derived proxy records extending back 25,000 years have made it possible to compare glacial stage conditions in the Tropics with those in the Polar Regions. High-resolution records of δ18O (in part a temperature proxy) demonstrate that the current warming at high elevations in the mid- to lower latitudes is unprecedented for the last two millennia, although at many sites the early Holocene was warmer than today. Remarkable similarities between changes in the highland and coastal cultures of Peru and regional climate variability, especially precipitation, imply a strong connection between prehistoric human activities and regional climate. Ice cores retrieved from shrinking glaciers around the world confirm their continuous existence for periods ranging from hundreds to thousands of years, suggesting that current climatological conditions in those regions today are different from those under which these ice fields originated and have been sustained. The ongoing widespread melting of high-elevation glaciers and ice caps, particularly in low to middle latitudes, provides strong evidence that a large-scale, pervasive and, in some cases, rapid change in Earth's climate system is underway. Observations of glacier shrinkage during the 20th and 21st century girdle the globe from the South American Andes, the Himalayas, Kilimanjaro (Tanzania, Africa) and glaciers near Puncak Jaya, Indonesia (New Guinea). The history and fate of these ice caps, told through the adventure, beauty and the scientific evidence from some of world's most remote mountain tops, provide a global perspective for contemporary climate. NSF Paleoclimate Program

  16. Vertebrate Fossils Imply Paleo-elevations of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, T.; Wang, X.; Li, Q.; Wu, F.; Wang, S.; Hou, S.

    2017-12-01

    The uplift of the Tibetan Plateau remains unclear, and its paleo-elevation reconstructions are crucial to interpret the geodynamic evolution and to understand the climatic changes in Asia. Uplift histories of the Tibetan Plateau based on different proxies differ considerably, and two viewpoints are pointedly opposing on the paleo-elevation estimations of the Tibetan Plateau. One viewpoint is that the Tibetan Plateau did not strongly uplift to reach its modern elevation until the Late Miocene, but another one, mainly based on stable isotopes, argues that the Tibetan Plateau formed early during the Indo-Asian collision and reached its modern elevation in the Paleogene or by the Middle Miocene. In 1839, Hugh Falconer firstly reported some rhinocerotid fossils collected from the Zanda Basin in Tibet, China and indicated that the Himalayas have uplifted by more than 2,000 m since several million years ago. In recent years, the vertebrate fossils discovered from the Tibetan Plateau and its surrounding areas implied a high plateau since the late Early Miocene. During the Oligocene, giant rhinos lived in northwestern China to the north of the Tibetan Plateau, while they were also distributed in the Indo-Pakistan subcontinent to the south of this plateau, which indicates that the elevation of the Tibetan Plateau was not too high to prevent exchanges of large mammals; giant rhinos, the rhinocerotid Aprotodon, and chalicotheres still dispersed north and south of "Tibetan Plateau". A tropical-subtropical lowland fish fauna was also present in the central part of this plateau during the Late Oligocene, in which Eoanabas thibetana was inferred to be closely related to extant climbing perches from South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. In contrast, during the Middle Miocene, the shovel-tusked elephant Platybelodon was found from many localities north of the Tibetan Plateau, while its trace was absent in the Siwaliks of the subcontinent, which implies that the Tibetan Plateau had

  17. In core monitor having multi-step seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Makoto; Ono, Susumu.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To completely prevent a sensor gas sealed in a pipe from leaking in an in-core neutron detector for use with a bwr type reactor. Constitution: In an in core monitor fabricated by disposing inner and outer electrodes in a housing, forming a layer of neutron conversion material on the outer electrode, filling an ionizing gas within the space between the layer and the inner electrode and, thereafter, attaching an insulation cable and an exhaust pipe respectively by way of insulators to both ends of the housing, the exhaust pipe is sealed in two-steps through pressure bonding using a multi-stepped pincher tool having two pressure bonding bits of a step shape and the outer sealing portion is further welded. The sensor gas sealed in the pipe can thus be prevented from leaking upon pressure bonding and welding. (Horiuchi, T.)

  18. Reactor core performance estimating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Akira; Yamamoto, Toru; Shinpuku, Kimihiro; Chuzen, Takuji; Nishide, Fusayo.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention can autonomously simplify a neural net model thereby enabling to conveniently estimate various amounts which represents reactor core performances by a simple calculation in a short period of time. Namely, a reactor core performance estimation device comprises a nerve circuit net which divides the reactor core into a large number of spacial regions, and receives various physical amounts for each region as input signals for input nerve cells and outputs estimation values of each amount representing the reactor core performances as output signals of output nerve cells. In this case, the nerve circuit net (1) has a structure of extended multi-layered model having direct coupling from an upper stream layer to each of downstream layers, (2) has a forgetting constant q in a corrected equation for a joined load value ω using an inverse error propagation method, (3) learns various amounts representing reactor core performances determined using the physical models as teacher signals, (4) determines the joined load value ω decreased as '0' when it is to less than a predetermined value upon learning described above, and (5) eliminates elements of the nerve circuit net having all of the joined load value decreased to 0. As a result, the neural net model comprises an autonomously simplifying means. (I.S.)

  19. Core break-off mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, Thomas M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A mechanism for breaking off and retaining a core sample of a drill drilled into a ground substrate has an outer drill tube and an inner core break-off tube sleeved inside the drill tube. The break-off tube breaks off and retains the core sample by a varying geometric relationship of inner and outer diameters with the drill tube. The inside diameter (ID) of the drill tube is offset by a given amount with respect to its outer diameter (OD). Similarly, the outside diameter (OD) of the break-off tube is offset by the same amount with respect to its inner diameter (ID). When the break-off tube and drill tube are in one rotational alignment, the two offsets cancel each other such that the drill can operate the two tubes together in alignment with the drill axis. When the tubes are rotated 180 degrees to another positional alignment, the two offsets add together causing the core sample in the break-off tube to be displaced from the drill axis and applying shear forces to break off the core sample.

  20. Risk factors associated with hepatitis B or C markers or elevated alanine aminotransferase level among blood donors on a tropical island: the Guadeloupe experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fest, T; Viel, J F; Agis, F; Coffe, C; Dupond, J L; Hervé, P

    1992-10-01

    Donated blood is currently screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels to prevent posttransfusion hepatitis. A prospective study of 2368 blood donors was carried out in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) with a view to determining the risk factors associated with serologic abnormalities. Blood donors included in the study had to complete a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed on the data thus obtained: 571 donations (24%) were positive for at least one of the four analyzed markers. The results were that 3.2 percent were positive for HBsAg, 22 percent for anti-HBc, and 0.8 percent for anti-HCV, and 1.4 percent had ALT > or = 45 IU per L. A good correlation was found between anti-HCV and elevated ALT. Transfusion history and two socioeconomic categories (working class, military personnel) were found to be risk factors. Other risk factors were lifelong residence in Guadeloupe (with risk increasing with the number of years), birthplace and current residence in the southern part of the island, and the existence of gastrointestinal discomfort unrelated to viral hepatitis (odds ratio = 2.98). The results of this study illustrate the difficulty of implementing a preventive policy against posttransfusion hepatitis in a tropical area. The unique epidemiologic situation of Guadeloupe as regards hepatitis B virus has led to more restrictive criteria for the acceptance of blood donors.

  1. In Vitro-Assembled Alphavirus Core-Like Particles Maintain a Structure Similar to That of Nucleocapsid Cores in Mature Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana; Chipman, Paul R.; Hong, Eunmee M.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    In vitro-assembled core-like particles produced from alphavirus capsid protein and nucleic acid were studied by cryoelectron microscopy. These particles were found to have a diameter of 420 Å with 240 copies of the capsid protein arranged in a T=4 icosahedral surface lattice, similar to the nucleocapsid core in mature virions. However, when the particles were subjected to gentle purification procedures, they were damaged, preventing generation of reliable structural information. Similarly, pu...

  2. Mice with chronically elevated dopamine exhibit enhanced motivation, but not learning, for a food reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagniard, Barbara; Balsam, Peter D; Brunner, Daniela; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2006-07-01

    Dopamine has been critically implicated in learning and motivation, although its precise role remains to be determined. In order to investigate the involvement of dopamine in learning and motivation for a food reward, we used dopamine transporter knockdown mice (DAT KD) that have chronically elevated levels of extracellular dopamine. The present study demonstrates that chronically elevated dopamine enhances tendency to work for a food reward without apparent effects on Pavlovian and operant learning for this reward. The increase in dopamine is associated with elevated levels of dynorphin and Fos B expression in the dorsal caudate-putamen and the core but not the shell subregion of the nucleus accumbens. These data suggest that motivation to work, but not learning, for a food reward appears to be under the critical influence of tonic dopaminergic activity in discrete brain areas relevant for a reward-directed behavior.

  3. SMART core protection system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. K.; Park, H. Y.; Koo, I. S.; Park, H. S.; Kim, J. S.; Son, C. H.

    2003-01-01

    SMART COre Protection System(SCOPS) is designed with real-tims Digital Signal Processor(DSP) board and Network Interface Card(NIC) board. SCOPS has a Control Rod POSition (CRPOS) software module while Core Protection Calculator System(CPCS) consists of Core Protection Calculators(CPCs) and Control Element Assembly(CEA) Calculators(CEACs) in the commercial nuclear plant. It's not necessary to have a independent cabinets for SCOPS because SCOPS is physically very small. Then SCOPS is designed to share the cabinets with Plant Protection System(PPS) of SMART. Therefor it's very easy to maintain the system because CRPOS module is used instead of the computer with operating system

  4. King Cove, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  5. Midway Atoll Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  6. Arecibo, Puerto Rico Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  7. Keauhou, Hawaii Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  8. Craig, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  9. Shemya, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  10. Daytona Beach, Florida Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  11. Kawaihae, Hawaii Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  12. Cordova, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  13. Arena Cove, California Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  14. Sand Point, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  15. Montauk, New York Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  16. Atka, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  17. Monterey, California Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  18. Garibaldi, Oregon Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  19. Juneau, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to support individual coastal States as part of the...

  20. Chenega, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to support individual coastal States as part of the...

  1. Mariana Trench Bathymetric Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) created a bathymetric digital elevation model (DEM) for the Mariana Trench and adjacent seafloor in the Western...

  2. Shaded Relief of Minnesota Elevation - Black & White

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This file is a product of a shaded relief process on the 30 meter resolution Digital Elevation Model data (dem30im3). This image was created using a custom AML...

  3. Nikolski, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  4. ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) was developed jointly by the U.S. National...

  5. La Push, Washington Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  6. Nantucket, Massachusetts Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  7. Ocean City, Maryland Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  8. Hilo, Hawaii Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  9. Portland, Maine Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  10. Hanalei, Hawaii Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  11. Chignik, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  12. Adak, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  13. Puerto Rico Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  14. Kachemak Bay, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  15. Lahaina, Hawaii Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  16. Oahu, Hawaii Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  17. Santa Barbara, California Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  18. Central Oregon Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  19. Virginia Beach, Virginia Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  20. Galveston, Texas Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  1. Biloxi, Mississippi Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  2. Ponce, Puerto Rico Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  3. Corpus Christi, Texas Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  4. ASTER Digital Elevation Model V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ASTER Digital Elevation Model (DEM) product is generated using bands 3N (nadir-viewing) and 3B (backward-viewing) of an ASTER Level-1A image acquired by the...

  5. Savannah, Georgia Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  6. Moral elevation reduces prejudice against gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Calvin K; Haidt, Jonathan; Nosek, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Disgust is linked to social evaluation. People with higher disgust sensitivity exhibit more sexual prejudice, and inducing disgust increases sexual prejudice. We tested whether inducing moral elevation, the theoretical opposite of disgust, would reduce sexual prejudice. In four studies (N = 3622), we induced elevation with inspiring videos and then measured sexual prejudice with implicit and explicit measures. Compared to control videos that elicited no particular affective state, we found that elevation reduced implicit and explicit sexual prejudice, albeit very slightly. No effect was observed when the target of social evaluation was changed to race (Black-White). Inducing amusement, another positive emotion, did not significantly affect sexual prejudice. We conclude that elevation weakly but reliably reduces prejudice towards gay men.

  7. Grain Elevators: New Source Performance Standards (NSPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for Grain Elevators aims to reduce particulate matter pollution. The new amendments seek to clarify definitions, and requirements, as well as propose new regulations on particulate matter emissions

  8. Elevator mechanism and method for scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, E.

    1975-01-01

    An elevator mechanism and method for raising and lowering radioactive samples through a shielded vertical counting chamber in a benchtop scintillation detector is described. The elevator mechanism adds little or nothing to the height of the detector by using an elongated flexible member such as a metal tape secured to the bottom of the elevator platform and extending downwardly through the counting chamber and its bottom shielding, where the tape is bent laterally for connection to a drive means. In the particular embodiment illustrated, the tape is bent laterally below the bottom shielding for the counting chamber, and then upwardly along or through one side of the shielding to a reel at the top of the shielding. The tape is wound onto the reel, and the reel is driven by a reversible motor which winds and unwinds the tape on the reel to raise and lower the elevator platform

  9. Southeast Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to support individual coastal States as part of the...

  10. Taholah, Washington Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  11. Whittier, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to support individual coastal States as part of the...

  12. Gustavus, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to support individual coastal States as part of the...

  13. Fajardo, Puerto Rico Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  14. Port Alexander Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to support individual coastal States as part of the...

  15. Dutch Harbor, Alaska Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  16. Port Orford, Oregon Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  17. Panama City, Florida Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  18. Guayama, Puerto Rico Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  19. Shaded Relief of Minnesota Elevation - Color

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This file is a product of a shaded relief process on the 30 meter resolution Digital Elevation Model data (dem30im3). This image was created using a custom AML...

  20. New Orleans, Louisiana Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions in the Gulf of Mexico....

  1. Elevated temperature erosive wear of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Solid particle erosion of metals and alloys at elevated temperature is governed by the nature of the interaction between erosion and oxidation, which, in turn, is determined by the thickness, pliability, morphology, adhesion characteristics and toughness of the oxide scale. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present state of understanding of the elevated temperature erosion behaviour of metals and alloys. First of all, the erosion testing at elevated temperature is reviewed. This is followed by discussion of the essential features of elevated temperature erosion with special emphasis on microscopic observation, giving details of the erosion-oxidation (E-O) interaction mechanisms. The E-O interaction has been elaborated in the subsequent section. The E-O interaction includes E-O maps, analysis of transition criteria from one erosion mechanism to another mechanism and quantification of enhanced oxidation kinetics during erosion. Finally, the relevant areas for future studies are indicated. (topical review)

  2. Full MOX core for PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puill, A.; Aniel-Buchheit, S.

    1997-01-01

    Plutonium management is a major problem of the back end of the fuel cycle. Fabrication costs must be reduced and plant operation simplified. The design of a full MOX PWR core would enable the number of reactors devoted to plutonium recycling to be reduced and fuel zoning to be eliminated. This paper is a contribution to the feasibility studies for achieving such a core without fundamental modification of the current design. In view of the differences observed between uranium and plutonium characteristics it seems necessary to reconsider the safety of a MOX-fuelled PWR. Reduction of the control worth and modification of the moderator density coefficient are the main consequences of using MOX fuel in a PWR. The core reactivity change during a draining or a cooling is thus of prime interest. The study of core global draining leads to the following conclusion: only plutonium fuels of very poor quality (i.e. with low fissile content) cannot be used in a 900 MWe PWR because of a positive global voiding reactivity effect. During a cooling accident, like an spurious opening of a secondary-side valve, the hypothetical return to criticality of a 100% MOX core controlled by means of 57 control rod clusters (made of hafnium-clad B 4 C rods with a 90% 10 B content) depends on the isotopic plutonium composition. But safety criteria can be complied with for all isotopic compositions provided the 10 B content of the soluble boron is increased to a value of 40%. Core global draining and cooling accidents do not present any major obstacle to the feasibility of a 100% MOX PWR, only minor hardware modifications will be required. (author)

  3. Identifying ELIXIR Core Data Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durinx, Christine; McEntyre, Jo; Appel, Ron; Apweiler, Rolf; Barlow, Mary; Blomberg, Niklas; Cook, Chuck; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Kim, Jee-Hyub; Lopez, Rodrigo; Redaschi, Nicole; Stockinger, Heinz; Teixeira, Daniel; Valencia, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The core mission of ELIXIR is to build a stable and sustainable infrastructure for biological information across Europe. At the heart of this are the data resources, tools and services that ELIXIR offers to the life-sciences community, providing stable and sustainable access to biological data. ELIXIR aims to ensure that these resources are available long-term and that the life-cycles of these resources are managed such that they support the scientific needs of the life-sciences, including biological research. ELIXIR Core Data Resources are defined as a set of European data resources that are of fundamental importance to the wider life-science community and the long-term preservation of biological data. They are complete collections of generic value to life-science, are considered an authority in their field with respect to one or more characteristics, and show high levels of scientific quality and service. Thus, ELIXIR Core Data Resources are of wide applicability and usage. This paper describes the structures, governance and processes that support the identification and evaluation of ELIXIR Core Data Resources. It identifies key indicators which reflect the essence of the definition of an ELIXIR Core Data Resource and support the promotion of excellence in resource development and operation. It describes the specific indicators in more detail and explains their application within ELIXIR's sustainability strategy and science policy actions, and in capacity building, life-cycle management and technical actions. The identification process is currently being implemented and tested for the first time. The findings and outcome will be evaluated by the ELIXIR Scientific Advisory Board in March 2017. Establishing the portfolio of ELIXIR Core Data Resources and ELIXIR Services is a key priority for ELIXIR and publicly marks the transition towards a cohesive infrastructure.

  4. Rotating preventers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangedahl, M.J.; Stone, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that recent changes in the oil and gas industry and ongoing developments in horizontal and underbalanced drilling necessitated development of a better rotating head. A new device called the rotating blowout preventer (RBOP) was developed by Seal-Tech. It is designed to replace the conventional rotating control head on top of BOP stacks and allows drilling operations to continue even on live (underbalanced) wells. Its low wear characteristics and high working pressure (1,500 psi) allow drilling rig crews to drill safely in slightly underbalanced conditions or handle severe well control problems during the time required to actuate other BOPs in the stack. Drilling with a RBOP allows wellbores to be completely closed in tat the drill floor rather than open as with conventional BOPs

  5. Core-to-core dimers forming switchable mesophase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horčic, M.; Svoboda, J.; Novotná, Vladimíra; Pociecha, D.; Gorecka, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 18 (2017), s. 2721-2724 ISSN 1359-7345 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02843S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : liquid crystals * bent-core mesogens * dimers Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Nano-materials (production and properties) Impact factor: 6.319, year: 2016

  6. Electrostatic Climber for Space Elevator and Launcher

    OpenAIRE

    Bolonkin, A.

    2007-01-01

    Author details research on the new, very prospective, electrostatic Space Elevator climber based on a new electrostatic linear engine previously offered at the 42nd Joint Propulsion Conference (AIAA-2006-5229) and published in AEAT, Vol.78, No.6, 2006, pp. 502-508. The electrostatic climber discussed can have any speed (and braking), the energy for climber movement is delivered by a lightweight high-voltage line into a Space Elevator-holding cable from Earth electric generator. This electric ...

  7. Elevator Illusion and Gaze Direction in Hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Malcolm M.; Hargens, Alan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A luminous visual target in a dark hypergravity (Gz greater than 1) environment appears to be elevated above its true physical position. This "elevator illusion" has been attributed to changes in oculomotor control caused by increased stimulation of the otolith organs. Data relating the magnitude of the illusion to the magnitude of the changes in oculomotor control have been lacking. The present study provides such data.

  8. Core seismic methods verification report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, B.E.; Shatoff, H.D.; Rakowski, J.E.; Rickard, N.D.; Thompson, R.W.; Tow, D.; Lee, T.H.

    1979-12-01

    This report presents the description and validation of the analytical methods for calculation of the seismic loads on an HTGR core and the core support structures. Analytical modeling, integration schemes, parameter assignment, parameter sensitivity, and correlation with test data are key topics which have been covered in detail. Much of the text concerns the description and the results of a series of scale model tests performed to obtain data for code correlation. A discussion of scaling laws, model properties, seismic excitation, instrumentation, and data reduction methods is also presented, including a section on the identification and calculation of statistical errors in the test data

  9. Nuclear reactor core cooling arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redding, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    A core cooling system for a nuclear reactor having a plurality of primary fluid flow systems is described. The reactor coolant flow from the primary systems is joined upon entering the pressure vessel. Jointure is accomplished in a common chamber causing high coolant flow velocities at low static pressures. If a pipe ruptures in one of the primary fluid flow systems, the low pressure in the common chamber minimizes leakage from the intact flow systems. This allows continuation of coolant flow through the nuclear core for a sufficient length of time to effectively eliminate the possibility of thermal damage

  10. Core baffle for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, O.J.; Berringer, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns the design of the core of a LWR with a large number of fuel assemblies formed by fuel rods and kept in position by spacer grids. According to the invention, at the level of the spacer grids match plates are mounted with openings so the flow of coolant directed upwards will not be obstructed and a parallel bypass will be obtained in the space between the core barrel and the baffle plates. In case of an accident, this configuration reduces or avoids damage from overpressure reactions. (HP) [de

  11. Chemical composition of Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, S.

    2017-12-01

    Many planetary scientists accept that the condensed planetesimals in the solar nebula eventually led to accretion of the earth. The details of the process have not been worked out. From the metallurgical experience, it is assumed that Earth's core may have formed by density differentiation with iron sinking to the core and the slag forming the mantle. This would be a post-accretionary process with temperature developing with self-compression. The problem with this hypothesis was recognized some time ago in that the seismic density profile of the core does not match the density of iron and requires the addition of a light element. Many elements such as Si, O, C and s have been proposed as diluents to decrease the density of a purely iron core. How and when this will be accomplished is still under discussion. Since the planetesimals (or condensates) formed in a well stirred nebula, it may be argued that a variety of condensed solids and fluids may have accreted and compressed without differentiation and the core does not necessarily contain mainly the differentiated iron. It is a matter of accumulating the condensate composition that would result in a density of 12 to 13 g/cm3 in the inner core. Therefore, we need a thermodynamic database that extends to 6000 K over the pressure range of ambient to 360 GPa. The development of such a database is currently in progress. It is a database with multicomponent solutions (C-Fe-Ni-S-Si) and all the major elements in the solar gas. Thermodynamic calculations using a preliminary dataset reveal that the solid species condensed at a temperature of 650 K and a pressure of 0.001 bar pressure, when self-compressed to various pressures and temperatures, yield densities that are appropriate for the mantle and core. Depending on H2/O of the escaping fluid, the formation of hydrous minerals, carbides, carbonates and iron melts with significant other elements have been found. Earth's core may have formed from solar condensate materials

  12. Moon model - An offset core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransford, G.; Sjogren, W.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar model proposed helps to account for the offset of the center of gravity from the center of the optical figure, the moments of inertia of the Moon, the 'mascons,' the localization of the maria basins on the near side of the Moon, the igneous nature of rocks, and the remanent magnetism. In the proposed model the Moon has a core whose center is offset from the center of the outside spheroid towards the earth. Such a core will be formed if the Moon were entirely molten at some time in its past, and on solidification was synchronous with the earth.

  13. Core Concepts: Orthopedic Intern Curriculum Boot Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Mark A; Kazarian, Erick; King, Brandon; Biermann, Janet S; Carpenter, James E; Caird, Michelle S; Irwin, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical interns must gain a broad array of clinical skills in a short time. However, recent changes in health care have limited resident-patient exposures. With the reported success of simulation training in the surgical literature, the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) and Residency Review Committee for Orthopaedic Surgery have required that surgical simulation training be a component of the intern curricula in orthopedic surgical residencies. This study examined the short-term effectiveness of an orthopedic "intern boot camp" covering 7 of 17 simulation training concept modules published by the ABOS. Eight orthopedic post-graduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents (study group) completed a structured 3-month curriculum and were compared with 7 post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) residents (comparison group) who had just completed their orthopedic surgical internship. Seven core skills were assessed using both task-specific and global rating scales. The PGY-1 residents demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in all 7 modules with respect to their task-specific pre-test scores: sterile technique (P=.001), wound closure (Porthopedic internship elevated a variety of clinical skills to levels exhibited by PGY-2 residents. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Energy considerations in the partial space elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Pamela; Misra, Arun K.

    2014-06-01

    The space elevator has been proposed as an alternate method for space transportation. A partial elevator is composed of a tether of several hundreds of kilometres, held vertically in tension between two end masses, with its centre of orbit placed at the geosynchronous orbit. A spacecraft can dock at the lower end, and then use the climber on the elevator to ascend to higher altitudes. In this paper, energy calculations are performed, to determine whether a partial elevator can provide sufficient savings in operational costs, compared to the traditional rocket-powered launch. The energy required to launch a spacecraft from a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to the geostationary orbit (GEO) is calculated for two trajectories. In the first trajectory, the spacecraft travels from LEO to GEO via a Hohmann transfer. In the second trajectory, the spacecraft travels from LEO to the lower end of the partial space elevator with a Hohmann transfer, and then uses the elevator to climb to GEO. The total energy required is compared between the two trajectories. The effects of tether length, spacecraft-to-climber mass ratio, altitude of LEO, and tether material are investigated.

  15. Caribbean mangroves adjust to rising sea level through biotic controls on change in soil elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, K.L.; Cahoon, D.R.; Feller, Ilka C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim The long-term stability of coastal ecosystems such as mangroves and salt marshes depends upon the maintenance of soil elevations within the intertidal habitat as sea level changes. We examined the rates and processes of peat formation by mangroves of the Caribbean Region to better understand biological controls on habitat stability. Location Mangrove-dominated islands on the Caribbean coasts of Belize, Honduras and Panama were selected as study sites. Methods Biological processes controlling mangrove peat formation were manipulated (in Belize) by the addition of nutrients (nitrogen or phosphorus) to Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove), and the effects on the dynamics of soil elevation were determined over a 3-year period using rod surface elevation tables (RSET) and marker horizons. Peat composition and geological accretion rates were determined at all sites using radiocarbon-dated cores. Results The addition of nutrients to mangroves caused significant changes in rates of mangrove root accumulation, which influenced both the rate and direction of change in elevation. Areas with low root input lost elevation and those with high rates gained elevation. These findings were consistent with peat analyses at multiple Caribbean sites showing that deposits (up to 10 m in depth) were composed primarily of mangrove root matter. Comparison of radiocarbon-dated cores at the study sites with a sea-level curve for the western Atlantic indicated a tight coupling between peat building in Caribbean mangroves and sea-level rise over the Holocene. Main conclusions Mangroves common to the Caribbean region have adjusted to changing sea level mainly through subsurface accumulation of refractory mangrove roots. Without root and other organic inputs, submergence of these tidal forests is inevitable due to peat decomposition, physical compaction and eustatic sea-level rise. These findings have relevance for predicting the effects of sea-level rise and biophysical processes on tropical

  16. P Elevator: An Innovatively Designed Elevator for Extraction of Third Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pradeep; Xiao, Shui Sheng; Ajmera, Deepal Haresh

    2015-01-01

    To modify the conventional straight elevator with a unique and innovative design in respect to approach and accessibility during extraction for patients with abrasions around corners of the mouth and with thick buccal mucosa, without causing overstretching of angles of the mouth. The shank of the straight elevator in the shape of a 'U' was modified, giving it a shape similar to 'P' in the English alphabet hence it is named the P Elevator. The P elevator utilises a 'U' shaped bend in the shank of the conventional straight elevator making space for the buccal soft tissues and the angle of the mouth, to accommodate properly in the 'U' shank. The application of this elevator in the successful removal of third molars is described. Two hundred patients underwent extraction of third molars with the P elevator including 166 patients with disimpaction of all third molars, 23 patients with abrasion around the angle of the mouth, and 11 patients with thick buccal mucosa. Satisfactory results were obtained in all the cases with no postoperative complications. The P elevator permits prudent, meticulous, innovative and proficient extraction of third molars in patients with thick buccal mucosa and abrasions around the angle of the mouth, without overstretching the corners of the mouth. We introduce novel applications of the P elevator in third molar extraction that provide substantial advantages over a conventional straight elevator.

  17. Shake Table Testing of an Elevator System in a Full-Scale Five-Story Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Hutchinson, Tara C; Astroza, Rodrigo; Conte, Joel P; Restrepo, José I; Hoehler, Matthew S; Ribeiro, Waldir

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the seismic performance of a functional traction elevator as part of a full-scale five-story building shake table test program. The test building was subjected to a suite of earthquake input motions of increasing intensity, first while the building was isolated at its base, and subsequently while it was fixed to the shake table platen. In addition, low-amplitude white noise base excitation tests were conducted while the elevator system was placed in three different configurations, namely, by varying the vertical location of its cabin and counterweight, to study the acceleration amplifications of the elevator components due to dynamic excitations. During the earthquake tests, detailed observation of the physical damage and operability of the elevator as well as its measured response are reported. Although the cabin and counterweight sustained large accelerations due to impact during these tests, the use of well-restrained guide shoes demonstrated its effectiveness in preventing the cabin and counterweight from derailment during high-intensity earthquake shaking. However, differential displacements induced by the building imposed undesirable distortion of the elevator components and their surrounding support structure, which caused damage and inoperability of the elevator doors. It is recommended that these aspects be explicitly considered in elevator seismic design.

  18. Gelcasting Alumina Cores for Investment Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, M A; Klug, F J

    2001-01-01

    General Electric currently uses silica investment casting cores for making superalloy turbine blades. The silica core technology does not provide the degree of dimensional control needed for advanced turbine system manufacture. The sum of the various process variables in silica core manufacturing produces cores that have more variability than is allowed for in advanced, power-generation gas turbine airfoils.

  19. Treating and Preventing Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  20. Relapse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S M; Wasserman, D A; Havassy, B E

    1991-01-01

    Although knowledge about relapse prevention is still at an early stage, the extant data highlight the importance of several constructs. 1. Motivation for abstinence remains central. The construct itself is often clouded because of its association with mystical notions such as willpower and self-control. We know that manipulation of environmental events can increase motivation. These interventions are effective, however, only as long as the contingencies are in effect. We need to develop and evaluate strategies for transferring contingency management to the natural environment, that is, to institutions and groups that can perpetuate them for the long term. Also, clarification of the kinds of abstinence goals needed to prevent relapse is important. 2. Coping skills have been studied by several investigators, but research on these, except for job-finding skills, is not encouraging. The skills usually taught may be too basic. Skills training oriented to complex targets, such as building nondrug-using networks, may be useful and should be further explored. 3. Social support is clearly important, yet we do not know how best to use it to promote abstinence. The little research available suggests that both familial and nonfamilial systems should be mobilized. We need to define abstinence-promoting supportive behaviors, identify and engage important support systems in treatment, and help patients expand their nondrug-using contacts. 4. Negative affect may be causally related to relapse. We need to continue efforts to identify dysphoric patients and develop interventions to ameliorate dysphoria concurrent with drug abuse treatment (cf. Zweben and Smith 1989). 5. Drug cue reactivity and extinction to drug cues have been demonstrated in the laboratory. What is needed in this promising line of research are (1) investigation of cues and cue-reactivity phenomena in the natural environment or in conditions closely mimicking that environment and (2) extinction methods that transfer

  1. Modeling of the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve technical - economical parameters fuel with 2.4% enrichment and burnable absorber is started to be used at Ignalina NPP. Using code QUABOX/CUBBOX the main neutronic - physical characteristics were calculated for selected reactor core conditions

  2. Core shift effect in blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A.; Mohan, P.; Gupta, Alok C.; Mangalam, A.; Volvach, A. E.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Gu, M. F.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tornikoski, M.; Volvach, L. N.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the pc-scale core shift effect using radio light curves for three blazars, S5 0716+714, 3C 279 and BL Lacertae, which were monitored at five frequencies (ν) between 4.8 and 36.8 GHz using the University of Michigan Radio Astronomical Observatory (UMRAO), the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO) and Metsähovi Radio Observatory for over 40 yr. Flares were Gaussian fitted to derive time delays between observed frequencies for each flare (Δt), peak amplitude (A) and their half width. Using A ∝ να, we infer α in the range of -16.67-2.41 and using Δ t ∝ ν ^{1/k_r}, we infer kr ∼ 1, employed in the context of equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energy density for parameter estimation. From the estimated core position offset (Ωrν) and the core radius (rcore), we infer that opacity model may not be valid in all cases. The mean magnetic field strengths at 1 pc (B1) and at the core (Bcore) are in agreement with previous estimates. We apply the magnetically arrested disc model to estimate black hole spins in the range of 0.15-0.9 for these blazars, indicating that the model is consistent with expected accretion mode in such sources. The power-law-shaped power spectral density has slopes -1.3 to -2.3 and is interpreted in terms of multiple shocks or magnetic instabilities.

  3. One Health Core Competency Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Frankson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting ‘One Health’ approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education as they describe the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  4. Nuclear reactor core servicing apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, C.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved core servicing apparatus for a nuclear reactor of the type having a reactor vessel, a vessel head having a head penetration therethrough, a removable plug adapted to fit in the head penetration, and a core of the type having an array of elongated assemblies. The improved core servicing apparatus comprises a plurality of support columns suspended from the removable plug and extending downward toward the nuclear core, rigid support means carried by each of the support columns, and a plurality of servicing means for each of the support columns for servicing a plurality of assemblies. Each of the plurality of servicing means for each of the support columns is fixedly supported in a fixed array from the rigid support means. Means are provided for rotating the rigid support means and servicing means between condensed and expanded positions. When in the condensed position, the rigid support means and servicing means lie completely within the coextensive boundaries of the plug, and when in the expanded position, some of the rigid support means and servicing means lie without the coextensive boundaries of the plug

  5. Core calculational techniques and procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, J.J.

    1977-10-01

    Described are the procedures and techniques employed by B and W in core design analyses of power peaking, control rod worths, and reactivity coefficients. Major emphasis has been placed on current calculational tools and the most frequently performed calculations over the operating power range

  6. Core Task and Organizational Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikkelsø, Signe

    2015-01-01

    of core objects such as ‘task’ and ‘coordination,’ contemporary organization studies emphasize, much like other social science disciplines, broader topics such as ‘network,’ ‘identity,’ and ‘change.’ The paper argues that this altered focus and vocabulary is accompanied by a diminished ability to specify...

  7. Fuzzy cores and fuzzy balancedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulick, G.; Norde, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    We study the relation between the fuzzy core and balancedness for fuzzy games. For regular games, this relation has been studied by Bondareva (Problemy Kibernet 10:119–139, 1963) and Shapley (Naval Res Logist Q 14: 453–460, 1967). First, we gain insight in this relation when we analyse situations

  8. Fuzzy Cores and Fuzzy Balancedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulick, G.; Norde, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    We study the relation between the fuzzy core and balancedness for fuzzy games. For regular games, this relation has been studied by Bondareva (1963) and Shapley (1967). First, we gain insight in this relation when we analyse situations where the fuzzy game is continuous. Our main result shows that

  9. HCV IRES-mediated core expression in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhao

    Full Text Available The lack of small animal models for hepatitis C virus has impeded the discovery and development of anti-HCV drugs. HCV-IRES plays an important role in HCV gene expression, and is an attractive target for antiviral therapy. In this study, we report a zebrafish model with a biscistron expression construct that can co-transcribe GFP and HCV-core genes by human hepatic lipase promoter and zebrafish liver fatty acid binding protein enhancer. HCV core translation was designed mediated by HCV-IRES sequence and gfp was by a canonical cap-dependent mechanism. Results of fluorescence image and in situ hybridization indicate that expression of HCV core and GFP is liver-specific; RT-PCR and Western blotting show that both core and gfp expression are elevated in a time-dependent manner for both transcription and translation. It means that the HCV-IRES exerted its role in this zebrafish model. Furthermore, the liver-pathological impact associated with HCV-infection was detected by examination of gene markers and some of them were elevated, such as adiponectin receptor, heparanase, TGF-β, PDGF-α, etc. The model was used to evaluate three clinical drugs, ribavirin, IFNα-2b and vitamin B12. The results show that vitamin B12 inhibited core expression in mRNA and protein levels in dose-dependent manner, but failed to impact gfp expression. Also VB12 down-regulated some gene transcriptions involved in fat liver, liver fibrosis and HCV-associated pathological process in the larvae. It reveals that HCV-IRES responds to vitamin B12 sensitively in the zebrafish model. Ribavirin did not disturb core expression, hinting that HCV-IRES is not a target site of ribavirin. IFNα-2b was not active, which maybe resulted from its degradation in vivo for the long time. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of the zebrafish model for screening of anti-HCV drugs targeting to HCV-IRES. The zebrafish system provides a novel evidence of using zebrafish as a HCV model organism.

  10. Integrated Models of School-Based Prevention: Logic and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrovich, Celene E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Embry, Dennis; Poduska, Jeanne M.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2010-01-01

    School-based prevention programs can positively impact a range of social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. Yet the current climate of accountability pressures schools to restrict activities that are not perceived as part of the core curriculum. Building on models from public health and prevention science, we describe an integrated approach to…

  11. Lunar transportation scenarios utilising the Space Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Kilian A.

    2005-07-01

    The Space Elevator (SE) concept has begun to receive an increasing amount of attention within the space community over the past couple of years and is no longer widely dismissed as pure science fiction. In light of the renewed interest in a, possibly sustained, human presence on the Moon and the fact that transportation and logistics form the bottleneck of many conceivable lunar missions, it is interesting to investigate what role the SE could eventually play in implementing an efficient Earth to Moon transportation system. The elevator allows vehicles to ascend from Earth and be injected into a trans-lunar trajectory without the use of chemical thrusters, thus eliminating gravity loss, aerodynamic loss and the need of high thrust multistage launch systems. Such a system therefore promises substantial savings of propellant and structural mass and could greatly increase the efficiency of Earth to Moon transportation. This paper analyzes different elevator-based trans-lunar transportation scenarios and characterizes them in terms of a number of benchmark figures. The transportation scenarios include direct elevator-launched trans-lunar trajectories, elevator-launched trajectories via L1 and L2, as well as launch from an Earth-based elevator and subsequent rendezvous with lunar elevators placed either on the near or on the far side of the Moon. The benchmark figures by which the different transfer options are characterized and evaluated include release radius (RR), required Δv, transfer times as well as other factors such as accessibility of different lunar latitudes, frequency of launch opportunities and mission complexity. The performances of the different lunar transfer options are compared with each other as well as with the performance of conventional mission concepts, represented by Apollo.

  12. Epithelial integrity in palatal shelf elevation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Okuhara

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The palate is the ceiling of the oral cavity that separates the nasal and oral cavities in mammals. Anterior two-thirds of the palate that has the bone and the rugae on the oral surface is the hard palate, and the posterior one-third of the palate lacks bone and is referred to as the soft palate. Palate development involves a sequential process of outgrowth, elevation, and fusion of palatal shelves. When these steps are interrupted or compromised, cleft palate, one of the most frequent human congenital anomalies, develops. In particular, during the elevation process, sufficient proliferation of palatal mesenchymal cells and concomitant synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM are required, and these are referred to as intrinsic factors. One of major extrinsic factors for this process is the functional maturation of masticatory muscles that are responsible for movement of the mandible and lingual muscles, such that the tongue can descend and sufficient space for shelf elevation is provided. In addition to these factors, recent findings have suggested that a third factor, epithelial integrity, may be an essential component for successful shelf elevation. For example, disruption of epithelial integrity can result in ectopic epithelial fusion between the palate and the mandible, or tongue, which anchors the palatal shelf to inhibit its elevation. Although most histological and molecular aspects of palatal elevation have been well reviewed, those of epithelial integrity have not been thoroughly elucidated. Therefore, in this review, features of epithelial integrity, and its contributing molecules, are described in relation to palatal shelf elevation in mice.

  13. Lunar transportation scenarios utilising the Space Elevator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Kilian A

    2005-01-01

    The Space Elevator (SE) concept has begun to receive an increasing amount of attention within the space community over the past couple of years and is no longer widely dismissed as pure science fiction. In light of the renewed interest in a, possibly sustained, human presence on the Moon and the fact that transportation and logistics form the bottleneck of many conceivable lunar missions, it is interesting to investigate what role the SE could eventually play in implementing an efficient Earth to Moon transportation system. The elevator allows vehicles to ascend from Earth and be injected into a trans-lunar trajectory without the use of chemical thrusters, thus eliminating gravity loss, aerodynamic loss and the need of high thrust multistage launch systems. Such a system therefore promises substantial savings of propellant and structural mass and could greatly increase the efficiency of Earth to Moon transportation. This paper analyzes different elevator-based trans-lunar transportation scenarios and characterizes them in terms of a number of benchmark figures. The transportation scenarios include direct elevator-launched trans-lunar trajectories, elevator launched trajectories via L1 and L2, as well as launch from an Earth-based elevator and subsequent rendezvous with lunar elevators placed either on the near or on the far side of the Moon. The benchmark figures by which the different transfer options are characterized and evaluated include release radius (RR), required delta v, transfer times as well as other factors such as accessibility of different lunar latitudes, frequency of launch opportunities and mission complexity. The performances of the different lunar transfer options are compared with each other as well as with the performance of conventional mission concepts, represented by Apollo. c2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Core mechanics and configuration behavior of advanced LMFBR core restraint concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.N.; Wei, B.C.

    1978-02-01

    Core restraint systems in LMFBRs maintain control of core mechanics and configuration behavior. Core restraint design is complex due to the close spacing between adjacent components, flux and temperature gradients, and irradiation-induced material property effects. Since the core assemblies interact with each other and transmit loads directly to the core restraint structural members, the core assemblies themselves are an integral part of the core restraint system. This paper presents an assessment of several advanced core restraint system and core assembly concepts relative to the expected performance of currently accepted designs. A recommended order for the development of the advanced concepts is also presented

  15. Predictors of Prevention Failure in College Students Participating in Two Indicated Depression Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Vanessa; Rohde, Paul; Vázquez, Fernando L.; Otero, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of university students with the highest likelihood of remaining at elevated levels of depressive symptoms six months following the receipt of a depressive prevention intervention on the basis of known risk factors and participation in one of two depression prevention programs. Data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating depression prevention among 133 college students with elevated depressive symptoms were analyzed. Participants were randomized to a cognitive-behavioral or relaxation training group preventive intervention. Classification tree analysis showed that older age was the strongest risk factor for persistently elevated depression. Additional risk factors were: (1) for younger students, fewer daily pleasant activities; (2) for those with higher level of pleasant activities, higher level of stressful events; and (3) for those with higher level of stressful events, lower assertiveness. Results offer directions for prevention foci, identify specific subgroups of college students to target for depression prevention efforts, and suggest that research aim to help older, non-traditional students or graduating students manage the transition from college to the work force. PMID:24714056

  16. Predictors of prevention failure in college students participating in two indicated depression prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Vanessa; Rohde, Paul; Vázquez, Fernando L; Otero, Patricia

    2014-04-04

    The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of university students with the highest likelihood of remaining at elevated levels of depressive symptoms six months following the receipt of a depressive prevention intervention on the basis of known risk factors and participation in one of two depression prevention programs. Data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating depression prevention among 133 college students with elevated depressive symptoms were analyzed. Participants were randomized to a cognitive-behavioral or relaxation training group preventive intervention. Classification tree analysis showed that older age was the strongest risk factor for persistently elevated depression. Additional risk factors were: (1) for younger students, fewer daily pleasant activities; (2) for those with higher level of pleasant activities, higher level of stressful events; and (3) for those with higher level of stressful events, lower assertiveness. Results offer directions for prevention foci, identify specific subgroups of college students to target for depression prevention efforts, and suggest that research aim to help older, non-traditional students or graduating students manage the transition from college to the work force.

  17. Polio and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Photo Collections Videos Polio Today → Polio + Prevention Polio + Prevention Polio and prevention Polio is a crippling and ... a child for life. Learn more about polio + prevention The Virus The Vaccines The Communities Related resources ...

  18. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recruiting Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) The NIDDK-sponsored Diabetes Prevention ... Diabetes Prevention Program for those who are eligible. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) DPP Goal The DPP looked ...

  19. Space Elevator Concept Considered a Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The `once upon a time' science fiction concept of a space elevator has been envisioned and studied as a real mass transportation system in the latter part of the 21st century. David Smitherman of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Advanced Projects Office has compiled plans for such an elevator. The space elevator concept is a structure extending from the surface of the Earth to geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) at 35,786 km in altitude. The tower would be approximately 50 km tall with a cable tethered to the top. Its center mass would be at GEO such that the entire structure orbits the Earth in sync with the Earth's rotation maintaining a stationary position over its base attachment at the equator. Electromagnetic vehicles traveling along the cable could serve as a mass transportation system for transporting people, payloads, and power between space and Earth. This illustration by artist Pat Rawling shows the concept of a space elevator as viewed from the geostationary transfer station looking down the length of the elevator towards the Earth.

  20. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We assumed the core spectral index αC = 0.0 and the extended spectral index αE = 0.80 (Yang et al. 2012) (Sν ∝ ν−α. ) when we transformed 5 GHz data to 1.64 ... Scheme (10A027S), Hunan Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China. (10JJ3020), and the research fund of Hunan University of Arts and Science (JJZD.