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Sample records for prevent autonomic dysfunctions

  1. The treatment of autonomic dysfunction in tetanus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may either be spontaneous or triggered by touch, visual, auditory or emotional stimuli.[7] Autonomic dysfunction may occur, and does not necessarily correlate with the severity of tetanus. Wassay et al.[8] reported autonomic dysfunction in a third of tetanus cases. Autonomic dysfunction presents as labile hypertension, ...

  2. Dysautonomia (Autonomic Dysfunction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See More About Research The NINDS supports and conducts research on dysautonomia. This research aims to discover ways to diagnose, treat, and, ultimately, prevent these disorders. ... Publications Definition Dysautonomia ...

  3. The treatment of autonomic dysfunction in tetanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T van den Heever

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of generalised tetanus in a 50-year-old female patient after sustaining a wound to her right lower leg. She developed autonomic dysfunction, which included labile hypertension alternating with hypotension and sweating. The autonomic dysfunction was treated successfully with a combination of morphine sulphate infusion, magnesium sulphate, and clonidine. She also received adrenaline and phenylephrine infusions as needed for hypotension. We then discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features and treatment options of autonomic dysfunction.

  4. Autonomic dysfunction in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Winkler; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension are frequently associated with signs of circulatory dysfunction and peripheral polyneuropathy, which includes defects of the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction, which is seen in both alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis and increases wit...

  5. Autonomic dysfunction in a Jack Russell terrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caines, Deanne; Pinard, Chantale L.; Kruth, Stephen; Orr, Jeremy; James, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    A 4-year-old Jack Russell terrier was presented with an array of clinical signs suggestive of autonomic dysfunction. Many of the clinical signs were consistent with a diagnosis of dysautonomia; however, both chronicity and resolution of signs contradicted a diagnosis of this disease. PMID:21629424

  6. Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Parasympathetic versus sympathetic

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    Uehara, Akihiko; Kurata, Chinori; Sugi, Toshihiko; Mikami, Tadashi; Shouda, Sakae [Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction often causes lethal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. {sup 123}I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) can evaluate cardiac sympathetic dysfunction, and analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) can reflect cardiac parasympathetic activity. We examined whether cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction assessed by HRV may correlate with sympathetic dysfunction assessed by MIBG in diabetic patients. In 24-hour electrocardiography, we analyzed 4 HRV parameters: high-frequency power (HF), HF in the early morning (EMHF), rMSSD and pNN50. MIBG planar images and SPECT were obtained 15 minutes (early) and 150 minutes (late) after injection and the heart washout rate was calculated. The defect score in 9 left ventricular regions was scored on a 4 point scale (0=normal - 3=severe defect). In 20 selected diabetic patients without congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and renal failure, parasympathetic HRV parameters had a negative correlation with the sum of defect scores (DS) in the late images (R=-0.47 to -0.59, p<0.05) and some parameters had a negative correlation with the washout rate (R=-0.50 to -0.55, p<0.05). In a total of 64 diabetic patients also, these parameters had a negative correlation with late DS (R=-0.28 to -0.35, p<0.05) and early DS (R=-0.27 to -0.32, p<0.05). The progress of diabetic cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction may parallel the sympathetic one. (author)

  7. Autonomic dysfunction and neuropeptide Y in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, M; Iannuccelli, C; Alessandri, C; Paradiso, M; Riccieri, V; Libri, F; Valesini, G

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome associated with widespread pain and various other signs and symptoms. Several of these multisystem features could be explained on the basis of autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate ANS dysfunction in FM based on time-domain heart rate variability (HRV) analysis and serum neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels in 51 patients with FM, 25 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), and 15 healthy controls (NHS). Compared with the SSc and NHS groups, the FM group had significantly higher NPY levels, and in the FM subgroup subjected to HRV analysis (25/51 patients, 49%), certain HRV indices were significantly reduced. In this subgroup, NPY was significantly correlated with the SDANN index and the NN50, but neither NPY or HRV parameters showed any significant correlation with clinical aspects of the FM. These findings suggest that autonomic dysfunction and NPY are crucial elements in the pathophysiology of FM. Additional studies are necessary to define the complex roles played by NPY and ANS in modulating pain and immunological functions of different diseases.

  8. Autonomic dysfunction in different subtypes of multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Claudia; Herting, Birgit; Prieur, Silke; Junghanns, Susann; Schweitzer, Katherine; Globas, Christoph; Schöls, Ludger; Reichmann, Heinz; Berg, Daniela; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2008-09-15

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) can clinically be divided into the cerebellar (MSA-C) and the parkinsonian (MSA-P) variant. However, till now, it is unknown whether autonomic dysfunction in these two entities differs regarding severity and profile. We compared the pattern of autonomic dysfunction in 12 patients with MSA-C and 26 with MSA-P in comparison with 27 age- and sex-matched healthy controls using a standard battery of autonomic function tests and a structured anamnesis of the autonomic nervous system. MSA-P patients complained significantly more often about the symptoms of autonomic dysfunctions than MSA-C patients, especially regarding vasomotor, secretomotor, and gastrointestinal subsystems. However, regarding cardiovascular, sudomotor pupil, urogenital, and sleep subsystems, there were no significant quantitative or qualitative differences as analyzed by autonomic anamnesis and testing. Our results suggest that there are only minor differences in the pattern of autonomic dysfunction between the two clinical MSA phenotypes. (c) 2007 Movement Disorder Society.

  9. The treatment of autonomic dysfunction in tetanus | Maryke Spruyt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of generalised tetanus in a 50-year-old female patient after sustaining a wound to her right lower leg. She developed autonomic dysfunction, which included labile hypertension alternating with hypotension and sweating. The autonomic dysfunction was treated successfully with a combination of morphine ...

  10. Diastolic and autonomic dysfunction in early cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Emilie Kristine; Møller, Søren; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    cirrhosis during maximal β-adrenergic drive. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Nineteen patients with Child A (n = 12) and Child B cirrhosis (n = 7) and seven matched controls were studied during cardiac stress induced by increasing dosages of dobutamine and atropine. RESULTS. Pharmacological responsiveness was similar...... fraction was similar in patients and controls. Peak filling rate was longer in cirrhosis compared to controls (1.8 ± 0.4 and 1.4 ± 0.2 end-diastolic volume/s, p stress by 13% compared to 0% in controls, p ... indicate that patients with early stage cirrhosis exhibit early diastolic and autonomic dysfunction as well as elevated pro-ANP. However, the cardiac chronotropic and inotropic responses to dobutamine stress were normal. The dynamics of ventricular repolarization appears normal in patients with early stage...

  11. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Children and Adolescents with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Autonomic neuropathy is less well documented in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and has received less attention than other diabetic complications. Sudden death and cardio-respiratory arrest in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been attributed to cardiac autonomic dysfunction.

  12. Perioperative implications of the patient with autonomic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, Stuart; Atria, Nicklaus P; Barwise, John A

    2014-06-01

    The autonomic nervous system functions to control heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, gastrointestinal motility, hormone release, and body temperature on a second-to-second basis. Here we summarize some of the latest literature on autonomic dysfunction, focusing primarily on the perioperative implications. The variety of autonomic dysfunction now extends to a large number of clinical conditions in which the cause or effect of the autonomic component is blurred. Methods for detecting dysautonomia can be as simple as performing a history and physical examination that includes orthostatic vital signs measured in both recumbent and vertical positions; however, specialized laboratories are required for definitive diagnosis. Heart rate variability monitoring is becoming more commonplace in the assessment and understanding of autonomic instability. Degenerative diseases of the autonomic nervous system include Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy, with the most serious manifestations being postural hypotension and paradoxical supine hypertension. Other conditions occur in which the autonomic dysfunction is only part of a larger disease process, such as diabetic autonomic neuropathy, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. Patients with dysautonomia often have unpredictable and paradoxical physiological responses to various perioperative stimuli. Knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology of their condition is required in order to reduce symptom exacerbation and limit morbidity and mortality during the perioperative period.

  13. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Katrien; Vandeput, Steven; Van Huffel, Sabine; Lagae, Lieven

    2012-12-01

    West syndrome is an age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy. Autonomic changes are increasingly being recognized in patients with epilepsy: cardiac autonomic function is mediated by sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent activity to the heart and can provide information on the functional state of the autonomic nervous system. The goal of the study is to evaluate the effect of an early epileptic encephalopathy on the autonomic nervous system by measuring heart rate variability. Cardiac autonomic function was evaluated in 13 patients with West syndrome by measuring heart rate variability during 5 min epochs of ECG in wake, stage 2 and slow wave sleep. In 5 patients who developed subsequently another type of epilepsy, a second evaluation was performed after 3 years of follow-up. Results showed a lower heart rate in stage 2 sleep in patients with West syndrome. Spectral components did not show significant differences compared to age matched controls at the moment of presentation. After follow-up of 3 years we were able to demonstrate higher low frequency (LF), lower high frequency (HF) and a higher LF/HF ratio during slow wave sleep. This study shows a lower heart rate in patients presenting with West syndrome, already at the onset of the syndrome and before ACTH treatment. The epileptic encephalopathy is not sufficient to alter spectral components of heart rate at the moment of presentation. However, already after 3 years of epilepsy, chronic autonomic changes appear. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Autonomic Dysfunction Because of Severe Tetanus in an Unvaccinated Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Syuan Lin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus is rare in a country with a national vaccination program. When it does occur, the associated autonomic dysfunction is a challenge for physicians. We report here a case of an unvaccinated 5-year-old boy who suffered from tetanus complicated by autonomic dysfunction, which was successfully controlled by the infusion of magnesium sulfate. This is the first case that demonstrated the therapeutic effect of magnesium sulfate in a child with tetanus. This case highlights the importance of implementing a vaccination program.

  15. The Prevalence and Severity of Autonomic Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasangulapati, Suresh Babu; Murthy, T V; Sivadasan, Ajith; Gideon, L Rynjah; Prabhakar, A T; Sanjith, Aaron; Mathew, Vivek; Alexander, Mathew

    2017-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), emphasis has been on motor disabilities, and autonomic dysfunction in these patients has not been addressed systematically. Autonomic function was prospectively analyzed in 38 patients with CIDP. Quantitative autonomic function testing was done using Finometer ® PRO and severity of adrenergic and cardiovagal dysfunction graded according to composite autonomic severity score and sudomotor dysfunction assessed using sympathetic skin response. Thirty-four (89%) patients had features of autonomic dysfunction. Thirty-three (86%) patients had cardiovagal dysfunction, 21 (55%) had adrenergic dysfunction, and 24 (63%) had sudomotor dysfunction. Autonomic dysfunction was mild to moderate in the majority (86%). Autonomic dysfunction in CIDP is underreported and potentially amenable to therapy. Our cohort had a high proportion of adrenergic dysfunction compared to previous studies.

  16. Autonomic dysfunction in primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszewicz, M; Gosk-Bierska, I; Bilińska, M; Podemski, R; Budrewicz, S; Adamiec, R; Słotwiński, K

    2009-04-01

    The pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon is still unclear. Neural and intravascular mechanisms are thought to be involved in the pathological process. The role of the autonomic nervous system is continually discussed, with particular attention to over-reactivity of the sympathetic part. The aim of this study was the clinical and electrophysiological analysis of autonomic nervous system function in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon. Thirty four patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and 31 sex and age-matched controls were examined. Neurological examination, modified Low's Questionnaire, orthostatic and sustained handgrip tests, conduction velocity study in three nerves, sympathetic skin response (SSR), and heart rate variability (HRV) during deep breathing and at rest with the fast Fourier transform were performed. In the clinical examinations, 35.3% of the primary Raynaud's patients presented sensory neuropathy, but this was not confirmed in the standard conduction velocity tests. The modified Low's Questionnaire revealed dysautonomy in 82% of the patients. Autonomic regulation during the orthostatic and handgrip tests were within the normal limits. HRV at rest and the E/I ratio were significantly lower in the patient group than in the controls, while HRV spectrum analysis revealed the predominance of the low-frequency band in the patients. These results indicate the presence of sympathetic dysregulation and impairment of parasympathetic modulation of heart function in primary Raynaud's patients. The different cardiovascular and sudomotor functions are not affected to the same degree. These observations might support the theory of a central impairment of autonomic function in primary Raynaud's phenomenon. Peripheral nerve lesion as a coexisting cause of the observed dysautonomy remains uncertain.

  17. Syncope due to Autonomic Dysfunction: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkisson, Wayne O; Benditt, David G

    2015-07-01

    Syncope is one of several disorders that cause transient loss of consciousness. Cerebral hypoperfusion is the proximate cause of syncope. Transient or fixed autonomic nervous system dysfunction is a major contributor in many causes. A structured approach to the evaluation of syncope allows for more effective therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Progression of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in Holmes-Adie syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldi, P; Mathias, C J

    2011-09-01

    The Holmes-Adie Syndrome (HAS) is a disorder of unknown aetiology comprising unilateral or bilateral tonic pupils with near light dissociation and tendon areflexia. Although considered to be benign, troublesome symptoms may result from autonomic disturbances, affecting vasomotor, sudomotor and respiratory function. It is unclear if the autonomic manifestations of the disease remain stable or progress, as longitudinal studies with detailed autonomic assessments have not been described. The authors report four HAS patients studied at intervals over 16, 8, 4 and 2 years with cardiovascular autonomic tests (head-up tilt, isometric exercise, mental arithmetic, cutaneous cold, deep breathing, Valsalva manoeuvre and standing). In each, there was progression of cardiovascular autonomic deficits with time, accompanied by symptomatic worsening. These observations in HAS, for the first time, indicate progression of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction of clinical significance. This has a number of implications, including those relating to aetiology and prognosis. The authors recommend regular clinical and laboratory follow-up, especially of cardiovascular autonomic function, in patients with HAS.

  19. Association between autonomic dysfunction and fatigue in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kelvin L; Gilman, Sid; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2017-06-15

    Fatigue is a disabling non-motor symptom in Parkinson disease (PD). We investigated the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and fatigue in PD while accounting for possible confounding factors. 29 subjects with PD (8F/21M; mean age 61.6±5.9; mean disease duration 4.8±3.0years), underwent clinical assessment and completed several non-motor symptom questionnaires, including a modified version of the Mayo Clinic Composite Autonomic Symptom Score (COMPASS) scale and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). The mean modified COMPASS was 21.6±14.2 (range 1.7-44.2) and the mean FSS score was 3.3±1.6 (range 1.0-6.7). There was a significant bivariate relationship between the modified COMPASS and FSS scores (R=0.69, P<0.0001). Stepwise regression analysis was used to assess the specificity of the association between the modified COMPASS and FSS scores while accounting for possible confounder effects from other variables that were significantly associated with autonomic dysfunction. Results showed that the modified COMPASS (R 2 =0.52, F=28.4, P<0.0001) was highly associated with fatigue, followed by ESS (R 2 =0.13, F=8.4, P=0.008) but no other co-variates. Post-hoc analysis exploring the association between the different modified COMPASS autonomic sub-domain scores and FSS scores found significant regressor effects for the orthostatic intolerance (R 2 =0.45, F=21.2, P<0.0001) and secretomotor sub-domains (R 2 =0.09, F=4.8, P=0.04) but not for other autonomic sub-domains. Autonomic dysfunction, in particular orthostatic intolerance, is highly associated with fatigue in PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Children and Adolescents With Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Jaryal, Ashok; Gulati, Sheffali; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Singh, Akanksha; Deepak, K K; Pandey, R M; Gupta, Neerja; Sapra, Savita; Kabra, Madhulika; Khajuria, Rajni

    2017-05-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is common in children with Rett syndrome. They usually manifest with agitation, persistent screaming, constipation, gastroesophageal reflux, aerophagia, hyperventilation, and breath-holding episodes. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction may result in fatal a arrhythmia. Many of these events are mistaken for seizures and treated with antiepileptics. The present study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital in north India for more than a six month period. MeCP2 mutation positive, 24 cases with Rett syndrome and 24 age-matched healthy girls were evaluated for cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction (heart rate variability, head-up tilt test, and cold pressor test). The mean age was 9.06 years (±3.4) and 9.75 years (±3.13) for patients and control subjects, respectively. The heart rate variability contributed independently by parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system was significantly reduced in cases compared with control subjects (P = 0.033 and P = 0.001, respectively). There was significant sympathovagal imbalance with sympathetic overactivity in cases compared with control subjects (P = 0.001). The mean longest QT c interval was significantly prolonged in cases compared with control subjects (P = 0.001). Cold pressor test and head-up tilt test could be done in 16 Rett syndrome patients (because of poor cooperation) and in all 24 control subjects. The change in blood pressure during cold pressor test and head-up tilt test was not significantly different in cases and control subjects. Children with Rett syndrome exhibited significant cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in the form of sympathetic overactivity, parasympathetic underactivity, and sympathovagal imbalance. These findings have potentially important therapeutic- and outcome-related implications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Cognitive and autonomic dysfunction in presymptomatic and early Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobal, Jan; Melik, Ziva; Cankar, Ksenija; Strucl, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Huntington's disease is characterized by disorders of movement, cognition and behavior. Individuals with Huntington's disease display aberrant changes in the autonomic nervous system that are detected even before the onset of other symptoms. Subtle cognitive dysfunction may start before other clinical manifestations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the autonomic nervous system response to mental arithmetic and the relationship between the autonomic and cognitive/motor function in presymptomatic and early Huntington's disease. We examined 15 presymptomatic Huntington's disease gene carriers (PHD), 15 early Huntington's disease patients (EHD) and 30 healthy controls. PHD and EHD groups were determined according to Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) motor score. ECG, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and cutaneous laser Doppler flux were measured during rest and during a simple mental arithmetic test. UHDRS cognitive test battery was applied to determine cognitive dysfunction. During mental arithmetic, the heart rate of PHD/EHD increased significantly less than that of controls. Decreased microvascular response to mental arithmetic was found in EHD. Significant correlations for the PHD/EHD group were found between laser Doppler flux response and Symbol Digit Modalities Test score, and between laser Doppler flux response and UHDRS motor score. It seems that central autonomic dysregulation of cardiovascular system in Huntington's disease goes along with the degeneration of other central neuronal systems. This finding is relevant as it could enable simple and noninvasive testing of disease progression.

  2. Clozapine-Induced Cardiovascular Side Effects and Autonomic Dysfunction: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica W. Y. Yuen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clozapine is the antipsychotic of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia and has minimal risk for extrapyramidal symptoms. Therapeutic benefits, however, are accompanied by a myriad of cardiometabolic side-effects. The specific reasons for clozapine's high propensity to cause adverse cardiometabolic events remain unknown, but it is believed that autonomic dysfunction may play a role in many of these.Objective: This systematic review summarizes the literature on autonomic dysfunction and related cardiovascular side effects associated with clozapine treatment.Method: A search of the EMBASE, MEDLINE, and EBM Cochrane databases was conducted using the search terms antipsychotic agents, antipsychotic drug*, antipsychotic*, schizophrenia, schizophren*, psychos*, psychotic*, mental ill*, mental disorder*, neuroleptic*, cardiovascular*, cardiovascular diseases, clozapine*, clozaril*, autonomic*, sympathetic*, catecholamine*, norepinephrine, noradrenaline, epinephrine, adrenaline.Results: The search yielded 37 studies that were reviewed, of which only 16 studies have used interventions to manage cardiovascular side effects. Side effects reported in the studies include myocarditis, orthostatic hypotension and tachycardia. These were attributed to sympathetic hyperactivity, decreased vagal contribution, blockade of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors, reduced heart rate variability and elevated catecholamines with clozapine use. Autonomic neuropathy was identified by monitoring blood pressure and heart rate changes in response to stimuli and by spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Metoprolol, lorazepam, atenolol, propranolol, amlodipine, vasopressin and norepinephrine infusion were used to treat tachycardia and fluctuations in blood pressure, yet results were limited to case reports.Conclusion: The results indicate there is a lack of clinical studies investigating autonomic dysfunction and a limited use of interventions to manage

  3. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Offspring of Hypertensive Parents During Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Leonardo Barbosa de; Peçanha, Tiago; Mira, Pedro Augusto de Carvalho; Souza, Livia Victorino de; da Silva, Lílian Pinto; Martinez, Daniel Godoy; Freitas, Isabelle Magalhães Guedes; Laterza, Mateus Camaroti

    2017-12-01

    Offspring of hypertensive parents present autonomic dysfunction at rest and during physiological maneuvers. However, the cardiac autonomic modulation during exercise remains unknown. This study tested whether the cardiac autonomic modulation would be reduced in offspring of hypertensive parents during exercise. Fourteen offspring of hypertensive and 14 offspring of normotensive individuals were evaluated. The groups were matched by age (24.5±1.0 vs. 26.6±1.5 years; p=0.25) and BMI (22.8±0.6 vs. 24.2±1.0 kg/m 2 ; p=0.30). Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed simultaneously during 3 min at baseline followed by 3-min isometric handgrip at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction. Cardiac autonomic modulation was evaluated using heart rate variability. Primary variables were subjected to two-way ANOVA (group vs. time). P valueexercise protocol. In contrast, offspring of hypertensive subjects showed a reduction of SDNN (Basal=34.8±3.5 vs. 45.2±3.7 ms; Exercise=30.8±3.3 vs. 41.5±3.9 ms; p group=0.01), RMSSD (Basal=37.1±3.7 vs. 52.0±6.0 ms; Exercise=28.6±3.4 vs. 41.9±5.3 ms; p group=0.02) and pNN50 (Basal=15.7±4.0 vs. 29.5±5.5%; Exercise=7.7±2.4 vs. 18.0±4.3%; p group=0.03) during the exercise protocol in comparison with offspring of normotensive parents. We concluded that normotensive offspring of hypertensive parents exhibit impaired cardiac autonomic modulation during exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction: Link Between Multiple Sclerosis Osteoporosis and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Zohara

    2018-03-01

    The high prevalence of osteoporosis, observed in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, has been attributed to reduced mobility and or the use of disease-modifying drugs. However, MS-impaired cardiovascular autonomic nervous system (ANS) function has the potential of reducing bone mass density (BMD) by altering the expression and/or function of the neuronal, systemic, and local mediators of bone remodeling. This review describes the complex regulation of bone homeostasis with a focus on MS, providing evidence that ANS dysfunction and low BMD are intertwined with MS inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes, and with other MS-related morbidities, including depression, fatigue, and migraine. Strategies for improving ANS function could reduce the prevalence of MS osteoporosis and slow the rate of MS progression, with a significant positive impact on patients' quality of life.

  5. Anxiety, depression and autonomic nervous system dysfunction in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajkó, Zoltán; Szekeres, Csilla-Cecília; Kovács, Katalin Réka; Csapó, Krisztina; Molnár, Sándor; Soltész, Pál; Nyitrai, Erika; Magyar, Mária Tünde; Oláh, László; Bereczki, Dániel; Csiba, László

    2012-06-15

    This study examined the relationship between autonomic nervous system dysfunction, anxiety and depression in untreated hypertension. 86 newly diagnosed hypertensive patients and 98 healthy volunteers were included in the study. The psychological parameters were assessed with Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory by a skilled psychologist. Autonomic parameters were examined during tilt table examination (10min lying position, 10min passive tilt). Heart rate variability (HRV) was calculated by autoregressive methods. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was calculated by non-invasive sequence method from the recorded beat to beat blood pressure values and RR intervals. Significantly higher state (42.6±9.3 vs. 39.6±10.7 p=0.05) and trait (40.1±8.9 vs. 35.1±8.6, p<0.0001) anxiety scores were found in the hypertension group. There was no statistically significant difference in the depression level. LF-RRI (Low Frequency-RR interval) of HRV in passive tilt (377.3±430.6 vs. 494.1±547, p=0.049) and mean BRS slope (11.4±5.5 vs. 13.2±6.4, p=0.07) in lying position were lower in hypertensives. Trait anxiety score correlates significantly with sympatho/vagal balance (LF/HF-RRI) in passive tilt position (Spearman R=-0.286, p=0.01). Anxiety could play a more important role than depression in the development of hypertension. Altered autonomic control of the heart could be one of the pathophysiological links between hypertension and psychological factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Vitamin D in the Spectrum of Prediabetes and Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Rumyana; Tankova, Tsvetalina; Chakarova, Nevena

    2017-09-01

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble secosteroid hormone with pleiotropic effects. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D coordinates the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, which regulate cardiovascular autonomic function and may explain its putative role in the development of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN). CAN is an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with diabetes and prediabetes and is associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Accumulating data indicate the presence of peripheral nerve injury at these early stages of dysglycemia and its multifactorial pathogenesis. Prediabetes is associated with vitamin D insufficiency. Vitamin D is proposed to prevent the progression of glucose intolerance. The putative underlying mechanisms include maintenance of the intracellular calcium concentration, direct stimulation of insulin receptor expression, and enhancement of the insulin response to glucose transporters. Vitamin D exerts a protective effect on peripheral nerve fibers by decreasing the demyelination process and inducing axonal regeneration. The effects of vitamin D supplementation on glucose tolerance and related autonomic nerve dysfunction have been a recent focus of scientific interest. Although well-designed observational studies are available, the causative relation between vitamin D deficiency, glucose intolerance, and CAN is still debatable. One reason might be that interventional studies are unpersuasive with regard to the beneficial clinical effects of vitamin D supplementation. Because of its favorable side effect profile, vitamin D supplementation might represent an attractive therapeutic option for treating the pandemic prevalence of prediabetes and vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D supplementation can improve glucose tolerance and cardiovascular autonomic function and can thus reduce cardiovascular mortality among subjects with different stages of glucose intolerance and

  7. The symptom burden of autonomic dysfunction is positively associated with chronic rhinosinusitis status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W C; Chang, Y T; Chen, S F; Lin, W C; Su, Y Y; Luo, S D

    2018-03-21

    Dysregulation of the autonomic system can affect sinonasal physiological function and may exacerbate the symptom burden associated with rhinosinusitis. However, the association between autonomic dysfunction and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has seldom been studied. Here, we investigated the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and CRS. Patients with CRS who failed medical treatment were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent pre-operative examinations and completed questionnaires, including the reflux symptom index (RSI) and the Sino-nasal Outcome Test-22 (SNOT-22). Autonomic dysfunction was scored using the 31-item Composite Autonomic Symptom Score (COMPASS 31), a validated simple instrument used to evaluate dysautonomia. We prospectively enrolled a total of 89 CRS patients, including 37 with polyps (CRSwNP) and 52 without polyps (CRSsNP). The most common dysautonomic symptoms were dry eye, dry mouth, postural dizziness, and a sensation of excessive fullness after meals. Significant positive correlations were evident between COMPASS 31 and SNOT-22 scores in CRSwNP patients. CRS-associated symptoms, including cough, post-nasal drip, sleep, and psychological dysfunction, were correlated with the level of autonomic dysfunction. We found a positive correlation between the symptom burdens of autonomic dysfunction and CRSwNP. The relationship between autonomic dysfunction and CRS is highly complex; further work is needed.

  8. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Morbid Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sant Anna Junior, Maurício; Carneiro, João Regis Ivar; Carvalhal, Renata Ferreira; Torres, Diego de Faria Magalhães; da Cruz, Gustavo Gavina; Quaresma, José Carlos do Vale; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo; Guimarães, Fernando Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background Morbid obesity is directly related to deterioration in cardiorespiratory capacity, including changes in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. Objective This study aimed to assess the cardiovascular autonomic function in morbidly obese individuals. Methods Cross-sectional study, including two groups of participants: Group I, composed by 50 morbidly obese subjects, and Group II, composed by 30 nonobese subjects. The autonomic function was assessed by heart rate variability in the time domain (standard deviation of all normal RR intervals [SDNN]; standard deviation of the normal R-R intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals [RMSSD]; and the percentage of interval differences of successive R-R intervals greater than 50 milliseconds [pNN50] than the adjacent interval), and in the frequency domain (high frequency [HF]; low frequency [LF]: integration of power spectral density function in high frequency and low frequency ranges respectively). Between-group comparisons were performed by the Student’s t-test, with a level of significance of 5%. Results Obese subjects had lower values of SDNN (40.0 ± 18.0 ms vs. 70.0 ± 27.8 ms; p = 0.0004), RMSSD (23.7 ± 13.0 ms vs. 40.3 ± 22.4 ms; p = 0.0030), pNN50 (14.8 ± 10.4 % vs. 25.9 ± 7.2%; p = 0.0061) and HF (30.0 ± 17.5 Hz vs. 51.7 ± 25.5 Hz; p = 0.0023) than controls. Mean LF/HF ratio was higher in Group I (5.0 ± 2.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.9; p = 0.0189), indicating changes in the sympathovagal balance. No statistical difference in LF was observed between Group I and Group II (50.1 ± 30.2 Hz vs. 40.9 ± 23.9 Hz; p = 0.9013). Conclusion morbidly obese individuals have increased sympathetic activity and reduced parasympathetic activity, featuring cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. PMID:26536979

  9. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Morbid Obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sant Anna Junior, Maurício de [Programa de Tratamento Multidisciplinar da Obesidade do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Fisioterapia do Centro Universitário Anhanguera Niterói - UNIAN, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Programa de pós-graduação em Ciências Médicas, Universidade Federal Fluminense - UFF, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carneiro, João Regis Ivar; Carvalhal, Renata Ferreira [Programa de Tratamento Multidisciplinar da Obesidade do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Torres, Diego de Faria Magalhães [Programa de Tratamento Multidisciplinar da Obesidade do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Fisioterapia da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cruz, Gustavo Gavina da; Quaresma, José Carlos do Vale [Programa de Tratamento Multidisciplinar da Obesidade do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo [Divisão de Nefrologia - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal Fluminense - UFF, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Guimarães, Fernando Silva, E-mail: fguimaraes_pg@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Fisioterapia da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Programa de pós-graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação - Centro Universitário Augusto Motta, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-12-15

    Morbid obesity is directly related to deterioration in cardiorespiratory capacity, including changes in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. This study aimed to assess the cardiovascular autonomic function in morbidly obese individuals. Cross-sectional study, including two groups of participants: Group I, composed by 50 morbidly obese subjects, and Group II, composed by 30 nonobese subjects. The autonomic function was assessed by heart rate variability in the time domain (standard deviation of all normal RR intervals [SDNN]; standard deviation of the normal R-R intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals [RMSSD]; and the percentage of interval differences of successive R-R intervals greater than 50 milliseconds [pNN50] than the adjacent interval), and in the frequency domain (high frequency [HF]; low frequency [LF]: integration of power spectral density function in high frequency and low frequency ranges respectively). Between-group comparisons were performed by the Student’s t-test, with a level of significance of 5%. Obese subjects had lower values of SDNN (40.0 ± 18.0 ms vs. 70.0 ± 27.8 ms; p = 0.0004), RMSSD (23.7 ± 13.0 ms vs. 40.3 ± 22.4 ms; p = 0.0030), pNN50 (14.8 ± 10.4 % vs. 25.9 ± 7.2%; p = 0.0061) and HF (30.0 ± 17.5 Hz vs. 51.7 ± 25.5 Hz; p = 0.0023) than controls. Mean LF/HF ratio was higher in Group I (5.0 ± 2.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.9; p = 0.0189), indicating changes in the sympathovagal balance. No statistical difference in LF was observed between Group I and Group II (50.1 ± 30.2 Hz vs. 40.9 ± 23.9 Hz; p = 0.9013). morbidly obese individuals have increased sympathetic activity and reduced parasympathetic activity, featuring cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction.

  10. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Morbid Obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sant Anna Junior, Maurício de; Carneiro, João Regis Ivar; Carvalhal, Renata Ferreira; Torres, Diego de Faria Magalhães; Cruz, Gustavo Gavina da; Quaresma, José Carlos do Vale; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo; Guimarães, Fernando Silva

    2015-01-01

    Morbid obesity is directly related to deterioration in cardiorespiratory capacity, including changes in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. This study aimed to assess the cardiovascular autonomic function in morbidly obese individuals. Cross-sectional study, including two groups of participants: Group I, composed by 50 morbidly obese subjects, and Group II, composed by 30 nonobese subjects. The autonomic function was assessed by heart rate variability in the time domain (standard deviation of all normal RR intervals [SDNN]; standard deviation of the normal R-R intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals [RMSSD]; and the percentage of interval differences of successive R-R intervals greater than 50 milliseconds [pNN50] than the adjacent interval), and in the frequency domain (high frequency [HF]; low frequency [LF]: integration of power spectral density function in high frequency and low frequency ranges respectively). Between-group comparisons were performed by the Student’s t-test, with a level of significance of 5%. Obese subjects had lower values of SDNN (40.0 ± 18.0 ms vs. 70.0 ± 27.8 ms; p = 0.0004), RMSSD (23.7 ± 13.0 ms vs. 40.3 ± 22.4 ms; p = 0.0030), pNN50 (14.8 ± 10.4 % vs. 25.9 ± 7.2%; p = 0.0061) and HF (30.0 ± 17.5 Hz vs. 51.7 ± 25.5 Hz; p = 0.0023) than controls. Mean LF/HF ratio was higher in Group I (5.0 ± 2.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.9; p = 0.0189), indicating changes in the sympathovagal balance. No statistical difference in LF was observed between Group I and Group II (50.1 ± 30.2 Hz vs. 40.9 ± 23.9 Hz; p = 0.9013). morbidly obese individuals have increased sympathetic activity and reduced parasympathetic activity, featuring cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction

  11. Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autonomic function has received little attention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD pathology has an impact on brain regions which are important for central autonomic control, but it is unclear if AD is associated with disturbance of autonomic function. OBJECTIVE: To investigate autonomic...

  12. Autonomic Dysfunction in Cardiology: Pathophysiology, Investigation, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Amy C; Ng, Jessica; Lei, Lucy; Raj, Satish R

    2017-12-01

    Presyncope and syncope are common medical findings, with a > 40% estimated lifetime prevalence. These conditions are often elicited by postural stress and can be recurrent and accompanied by debilitating symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion. Therefore, it is critical for physicians to become familiar with the diagnosis and treatment of common underlying causes of presyncope and syncope. In some patients, altered postural hemodynamic responses result from a failure of compensatory autonomic nervous system reflex mechanisms. The most common presentations of presyncope and syncope secondary to this autonomic dysfunction include vasovagal syncope, neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, and postural tachycardia syndrome. The most sensitive method for diagnosis is a detailed initial evaluation with medical history, physical examination, and resting electrocardiogram to rule out cardiac syncope. Physical examination should include measurement of supine and standing blood pressure and heart rate to identify the pattern of hemodynamic regulation during orthostatic stress. Additional testing may be required in patients without a clear diagnosis after the initial evaluation. Management of patients should focus on improving symptoms and functional status and not targeting arbitrary hemodynamic values. An individualized structured and stepwise approach should be taken for treatment, starting with patient education, lifestyle modifications, and use of physical counter-pressure manoeuvres and devices to improve venous return. Pharmacologic interventions should be added only when conservative approaches are insufficient to improve symptoms. There are no gold standard approaches for pharmacologic treatment in these conditions, with medications often used off label and with limited long-term data for effectiveness. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Autonomic dysfunction in Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A paraneoplastic syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Bilora

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We wanted to determine whether autonomic dysfunction in patients with lymphoma is related to chemotherapy or represent a paraneoplastic syndrome. 40 patients with current or cured Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 40 healthy controls, matched for age, gender, hypertension and diabetes mellitus underwent autonomic evaluation (Deep Breath, Valsalva Maneuver, Hand Grip, Lying to Standing, Tilt Test. Current patients also suffering from diabetes or hypertension, or still on chemotherapy revealed autonomic changes, while cured or healthy subjects did not. Autonomic dysfunction in lymphoma is a transient manifestation of a paraneoplastic syndrome.

  14. Study of comparison between autonomic dysfunction and dyslipidemia in healthy postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavyach Yalamudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity, physical inactivity, and altered estrogen levels play an important role in contributing to disease risk profile and autonomic dysfunction in healthy postmenopausal women. This study was conducted to test the correlation between autonomic dysfunction and dyslipidemia in healthy postmenopausal women. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on sixty healthy postmenopausal women before the age of 65 years, without any gross systemic disease. The following five autonomic functional tests were performed on the study group: heart rate response to deep breathing, heart rate response to Valsalva maneuver, heart rate response to standing up from supine position, blood pressure response to sustained hand grip, and blood pressure response to standing up from supine position. Fasting lipid profile of the study group was tested. Results and Conclusion: In the present study, autonomic dysfunction was found in 67% of healthy postmenopausal women. Among the sixty female healthy postmenopausal women included in the study, 68% were found to have dyslipidemia. In our study, there is a statistically significant correlation between autonomic dysfunction and dyslipidemia in healthy postmenopausal women. In these healthy postmenopausal women with increased serum cholesterol, serum low-density lipoprotein, and serum triglycerides, there was autonomic dysfunction which is statistically significant. There is no statistical significance on comparing serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with autonomic dysfunction in healthy postmenopausal women.

  15. Pupillary Light Reflexes are Associated with Autonomic Dysfunction in Bolivian Diabetics But Not Chagas Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Anthony; Pajuelo, Monica; Tornheim, Jeffrey A; Vu, Nancy; Carnero, Andrés M; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Camacho, Marilyn; Justiniano, Juan; Colanzi, Rony; Bowman, Natalie M; Morris, Tiffany; MacDougall, Hamish; Bern, Caryn; Moore, Steven T; Gilman, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is common in Chagas disease and diabetes. Patients with either condition complicated by cardiac autonomic dysfunction face increased mortality, but no clinical predictors of autonomic dysfunction exist. Pupillary light reflexes (PLRs) may identify such patients early, allowing for intensified treatment. To evaluate the significance of PLRs, adults were recruited from the outpatient endocrine, cardiology, and surgical clinics at a Bolivian teaching hospital. After testing for Chagas disease and diabetes, participants completed conventional autonomic testing (CAT) evaluating their cardiovascular responses to Valsalva, deep breathing, and orthostatic changes. PLRs were measured using specially designed goggles, then CAT and PLRs were compared as measures of autonomic dysfunction. This study analyzed 163 adults, including 96 with Chagas disease, 35 patients with diabetes, and 32 controls. PLRs were not significantly different between Chagas disease patients and controls. Patients with diabetes had longer latency to onset of pupil constriction, slower maximum constriction velocities, and smaller orthostatic ratios than nonpatients with diabetes. PLRs correlated poorly with CAT results. A PLR-based clinical risk score demonstrated a 2.27-fold increased likelihood of diabetes complicated by autonomic dysfunction compared with the combination of blood tests, CAT, and PLRs (sensitivity 87.9%, specificity 61.3%). PLRs represent a promising tool for evaluating subclinical neuropathy in patients with diabetes without symptomatic autonomic dysfunction. Pupillometry does not have a role in the evaluation of Chagas disease patients. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. Brainstem and Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction: A Neurosurgical Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gallego, A; González-García, L; Carrasco-Brenes, A; Segura-Fernández-Nogueras, M; Delgado-Babiano, A; Ros-Sanjuán, A; Romero-Moreno, L; Domínguez-Páez, M; Dawid-Milner, M S; Arráez-Sánchez, M A

    2017-01-01

    Central autonomic control nuclei and pathways are mainly integrated within the brainstem, especially in the medulla oblongata. Lesions within these structures can lead to central dysautonomia.Central autonomic control structures can be damaged by tumors, during surgery, or by other neurosurgical pathologies. These may elicit clinical or subclinical autonomic complications that can constitute a serious clinical problem.The authors present a broad review of the central autonomic nervous system, its possible dysfunctions, and the relation between neurosurgery and this "not-well-known system". Preliminary results of an autonomic study of brainstem lesions that is currently being carried out by the authors are also shown.

  17. Autonomic dysfunction is a major feature of cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, vestibular areflexia 'CANVAS' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teddy Y; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kilfoyle, Dean H; Smith, Andrew D; McGuinness, Ben J; Simpson, Mark P; Walker, Elizabeth B; Bergin, Peter S; Cleland, James C; Hutchinson, David O; Anderson, Neil E; Snow, Barry J; Anderson, Tim J; Paermentier, Laura A F; Cutfield, Nick J; Chancellor, Andrew M; Mossman, Stuart S; Roxburgh, Richard H

    2014-10-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is a recently recognized neurodegenerative ganglionopathy. Prompted by the presence of symptomatic postural hypotension in two patients with CANVAS, we hypothesized that autonomic dysfunction may be an associated feature of the syndrome. We assessed symptoms of autonomic dysfunction and performed autonomic nervous system testing among 26 patients from New Zealand. After excluding three patients with diabetes mellitus, 83% had evidence of autonomic dysfunction; all patients had at least one autonomic symptom and 91% had more than two symptoms. We also found a higher rate of downbeat nystagmus (65%) than previously described in CANVAS. We confirmed that sensory findings on nerve conduction tests were consistent with a sensory ganglionopathy and describe two patients with loss of trigeminal sensation consistent with previous pathological descriptions of trigeminal sensory ganglionopathy. Our results suggest that autonomic dysfunction is a major feature of CANVAS. This has implications for the management of patients with CANVAS as the autonomic symptoms may be amenable to treatment. The findings also provide an important differential diagnosis from multiple system atrophy for patients who present with ataxia and autonomic failure. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Frequency of autonomic neuropathy in patients with erectile dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, A.; Zaidi, S.M.H.; Moazzam, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among diabetic patients autonomic neuropathy (AN) is one of the most frequent complications. This affects peripheral nervous system and thus results into erectile dysfunction (ED). The main objectives of the study were to determine the frequency of autonomic neuropathy (AN) in diabetic patients with ED and to find out the associated risk factors. Method: In this descriptive case series, a total 200 consecutive patients of Diabetes Mellitus with erectile dysfunction attended the Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DEM), Services Hospital Lahore during three months (from June to August 2013), were included. For assessing erectile dysfunction (ED) and autonomic neuropathy (AN) International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and Composite Autonomic Scoring System (CASS) were used respectively. Other factors impacting the autonomic functions in diabetes like duration of diabetes, age of patient, body mass index (BMI), and glycaemic control (HbAlc), hypertension and smoking status were recorded. Results: Average age of the patients was 57.58±9.53 years (95 percentage C.I. 55.54-59.63). Frequency of autonomic neuropathy (AN) in ED patients was 86 (43 percentage). Duration of diabetes Mellitus and BMI were statistically significantly different among patients with severe, moderate and mild autonomic neuropathy. Conclusions: Autonomic neuropathy was very frequent in diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction. The associated risk factors are duration of disease and body mass index. (author)

  19. The Link Between Stress Disorders and Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Rasna eSabharwal

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this p...

  20. The link between stress disorders and autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Rasna

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this perspective is to highlight the importance of autonomic dysfunction and psychological stress disorders in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy. This article will for the first time-(i) outline autonomic mechanisms that are common to both psychological stress and cardiovascular disorders in muscular dystrophy; (ii) propose therapies that would improve behavioral and autonomic functions in muscular dystrophy.

  1. The Link Between Stress Disorders and Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasna eSabharwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this perspective is to highlight the importance of autonomic dysfunction and psychological stress disorders in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy. This article will for the first time - (i outline autonomic mechanisms that are common to both psychological stress and cardiovascular disorders in muscular dystrophy; (ii propose therapies that would improve behavioral and autonomic functions in muscular dystrophy.

  2. The link between stress disorders and autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Rasna

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this perspective is to highlight the importance of autonomic dysfunction and psychological stress disorders in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy. This article will for the first time—(i) outline autonomic mechanisms that are common to both psychological stress and cardiovascular disorders in muscular dystrophy; (ii) propose therapies that would improve behavioral and autonomic functions in muscular dystrophy. PMID:24523698

  3. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction due to diabetes mellitus: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a common form of diabetes autonomic neuropathy, causes abnormalities in heart rate control as well as central and peripheral vascular dynamics, and may carry an increased risk of mortality. The aim of this article was to review the importance of identifying CAN and ...

  4. Autonomic Dysfunction in Children with Acute Community-Acquired Pneumonia and the Ways of Drug Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Nyankovsky

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the features of clinical course, intensity of toxic, asthenic syndromes, autonomic functioning in children of 7 years old with signs of community-acquired pneumonia based on instrumental autonomic testing and EEG findings. The probiotic Enterol and metabolic medication Stimol included into the treatment scheme fasten normalization of clinical, instrumental and functional parameters, reduce autonomic dysfunction, improve physical condition, adaptive opportunities, stress resistance, reduce imbalance between humoral-metabolic and central ergotropic influence, normalize responsiveness of parasympathetic nervous system and balance of autonomic modulation of cardiac rhythm, improve EEG findings.

  5. Interleukin-6 blockade Improves Autonomic Dysfunction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashit Syngle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system (ANS involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is well recognised and contributes to arrhythmia and sudden death. However, there is no study documented the therapeutic efficacy on autonomic neuropathy (AN in RA. This is the first reported observation of improvement in AN with interleukin-6 (IL-6 blockade with tocilizumab in RA. We report a case of 61-year old female with seropositive RA with severe disease activity, investigated for autonomic neuropathy. A battery of non invasive tests was used for accurate assessment of AN function based on assessment of peripheral sympathetic autonomic function and cardiovascular reflex tests. Tocilizumab 8mg/kg intravenous infusion at weeks 0, 4 and 8 was added to her treatment regimen. Cardiovascular autonomic function tests at baseline showed marked abnormalities of parasympathetic cardiovascular reflexes. After the first dose of tocilizumab there was a rapid improvement with normalization of parasympathetic autonomic activity with subsequent doses. IL-6 blockade with tocilizumab seems to have the potential to improve the vagus nerve mediated parasympathetic neuropathy and hence has the potential to restore cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

  6. The association between autonomic dysfunction, inflammation and atherosclerosis in men under investigation for carotid plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus A Ulleryd

    Full Text Available Autonomic dysfunction is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, however, the exact mechanism linking autonomic dysfunction to cardiovascular disease is not known. In this study we hypothesized that autonomic dysfunction increases inflammation, which subsequently accelerates atherosclerosis. The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between autonomic tone, inflammation and atherosclerosis.124 men under investigation for carotid atherosclerosis were examined for autonomic function (heart rate variability; HRV and baroreflex sensitivity; BRS, inflammatory markers (white blood cell count; WBCC and C-reactive protein; CRP and degree of carotid atherosclerosis. The direct or indirect associations between autonomic function, inflammatory parameters and carotid plaque area were investigated with multiple linear regressions.Male subjects with prevalent CVD showed larger carotid plaque area, higher WBCC, and reduced BRS compared to subjects with no history of CVD. Further, BRS was inversely associated with carotid plaque area (r = -0.21, p = 0.018 as well as inflammatory parameters WBCC and CRP (r = -0.29, p = 0.001, and r = -0.23, p = 0.009, respectively, whereas HRV only was inversely associated with WBCC (r = -0.22, p = 0.014. To investigate if inflammation could provide a link between autonomic function and carotid atherosclerosis we adjusted the associations accordingly. After adjusting for WBCC and CRP the inverse association between BRS and carotid plaque area was attenuated and did not remain significant, while both WBCC and CRP remained significantly associated with carotid plaque area, indicating that low-grade inflammation can possibly link BRS to atherosclerosis. Also, after adjusting for age, antihypertensive treatment and cardiovascular risk factors, BRS was independently inversely associated with both WBCC and CRP, and HRV independently inversely associated with WBCC. WBCC was the only inflammatory marker

  7. Autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy: a theoretical framework for muscle reflex involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott A; Downey, Ryan M; Williamson, Jon W; Mizuno, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically inherited disorders whose most prominent clinical feature is progressive degeneration of skeletal muscle. In several forms of the disease, the function of cardiac muscle is likewise affected. The primary defect in this group of diseases is caused by mutations in myocyte proteins important to cellular structure and/or performance. That being stated, a growing body of evidence suggests that the development of autonomic dysfunction may secondarily contribute to the generation of skeletal and cardio-myopathy in muscular dystrophy. Indeed, abnormalities in the regulation of both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity have been reported in a number of muscular dystrophy variants. However, the mechanisms mediating this autonomic dysfunction remain relatively unknown. An autonomic reflex originating in skeletal muscle, the exercise pressor reflex, is known to contribute significantly to the control of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity when stimulated. Given the skeletal myopathy that develops with muscular dystrophy, it is logical to suggest that the function of this reflex might also be abnormal with the pathogenesis of disease. As such, it may contribute to or exacerbate the autonomic dysfunction that manifests. This possibility along with a basic description of exercise pressor reflex function in health and disease are reviewed. A better understanding of the mechanisms that possibly underlie autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy may not only facilitate further research but could also lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

  8. Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy: A Theoretical Framework for Muscle Reflex Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Alan Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically inherited disorders whose most prominent clinical feature is progressive degeneration of skeletal muscle. In several forms of the disease, the function of cardiac muscle is likewise affected. The primary defect in this group of diseases is caused by mutations in myocyte proteins important to cellular structure and/or performance. That being stated, a growing body of evidence suggests that the development of autonomic dysfunction may secondarily contribute to the generation of skeletal and cardio-myopathy in muscular dystrophy. Indeed, abnormalities in the regulation of both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity have been reported in a number of muscular dystrophy variants. However, the mechanisms mediating this autonomic dysfunction remain relatively unknown. An autonomic reflex originating in skeletal muscle, the exercise pressor reflex, is known to contribute significantly to the control of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity when stimulated. Given the skeletal myopathy that develops with muscular dystrophy, it is logical to suggest that the function of this reflex might also be abnormal with the pathogenesis of disease. As such, it may contribute to or exacerbate the autonomic dysfunction that manifests. This possibility along with a basic description of exercise pressor reflex function in health and disease are reviewed. A better understanding of the mechanisms that possibly underlie autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy may not only facilitate further research but could also lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

  9. Insights into the clinical and functional significance of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Junqueira Junior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Exclusive or associated lesions in various structures of the autonomic nervous system occur in the chronic forms of Chagas disease. In the indeterminate form, the lesions are absent or mild, whereas in the exclusive or combined heart and digestive disease forms, they are often more pronounced. Depending on their severity these lesions can result mainly in cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction but also in sympathetic dysfunction of variable degrees. Despite the key autonomic effect on cardiovascular functioning, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease remains unknown. METHODS: Review of data on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease and their potential consequences, and considerations supporting the possible relationship between this disturbance and general or cardiovascular clinical and functional adverse outcomes. RESULTS: We hypothesise that possible consequences that cardiac dysautonomia might variably occasion or predispose in Chagas disease include: transient or sustained arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, adverse overall and cardiovascular prognosis with enhanced morbidity and mortality, an inability of the cardiovascular system to adjust to functional demands and/or respond to internal or external stimuli by adjusting heart rate and other hemodynamic variables, and immunomodulatory and cognitive disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cardiac autonomic modulation in Chagas disease might not be a mere epiphenomenon without significance. Indirect evidences point for a likely important role of this alteration as a primary predisposing or triggering cause or mediator favouring the development of subtle or evident secondary cardiovascular functional disturbances and clinical consequences, and influencing adverse outcomes.

  10. Autonomic dysfunction in pediatric patients with headache: migraine versus tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabner, Jonathan; Caruso, Alessandra; Zurakowski, David; Lazdowsky, Lori; LeBel, Alyssa

    2016-12-01

    To examine symptoms indicating central nervous system (CNS) autonomic dysfunction in pediatric patients with migraine and tension-type headache. A retrospective chart review assessed six symptoms (i.e. constipation, insomnia, dizziness, blurry vision, abnormal blood pressure, and cold and clammy palms and soles) indicating central nervous system (CNS) autonomic dysfunction in 231 patients, ages 5-18 years, diagnosed with migraine, tension-type headache (TTH), or Idiopathic Scoliosis (IS). Higher frequencies of "insomnia," "dizziness," and "cold and clammy palms and soles" were found for both migraine and TTH patients compared to the IS control group (P pediatric headache patients is discussed.

  11. Autonomic dysfunction in children with sleep disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Lisa M; Nixon, Gillian M; Davey, Margot J; Anderson, Vicki; Walker, Adrian M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2013-05-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) has adverse effects on cardiovascular health in adults, partly due to changes in autonomic activity. However, there have been limited studies in children. We analysed the impact of SDB and sleep stage on autonomic control of heart rate in 7-12-year-old children, utilizing spectral heart rate variability (HRV) as a measure of autonomic activity. Eighty children underwent overnight polysomnography. Subjects were grouped according to their obstructive apnoea-hypopnoea index (OAHI): controls, OAHI ≤1 event/h and no history of snoring; primary snorers (PS) OAHI ≤1, Mild (OAHI 1-5) and moderate/severe (MS) OAHI >5. HRV was analysed during Wake, nonrapid eye movement (NREM) 1&2, slow wave sleep (SWS) and REM. Compared with controls, total power, low (LF) and high frequency (HF) power were reduced in all SDB severities during REM. LF/HF ratio was less in MS SDB (median = 0.34; range, 0.20-0.49; p children with SDB, which may signify an overall depression of autonomic tone, perhaps a consequence of their elevated blood pressure during sleep coupled with repeated exposure to SDB event-related cardiovascular disturbance. Further research is warranted to elucidate the long-term effects on the cardiovascular system of subjects exhibiting impaired HRV and elevated BP in childhood.

  12. Gastrointestinal Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong-Seok Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, gastrointestinal dysfunctions in Parkinson’s disease (PD are well-recognized problems and are known to be an initial symptom in the pathological process that eventually results in PD. Gastrointestinal symptoms may result from the involvement of either the central or enteric nervous systems, or these symptoms may be side effects of antiparkinsonian medications. Weight loss, excessive salivation, dysphagia, nausea/gastroparesis, constipation, and defecation dysfunction all may occur. Increased identification and early detection of these symptoms can result in a significant improvement in the quality of life for PD patients.

  13. Total autonomic blockage and primary sinus node dysfunction in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    history confirmed the episodic headaches but there was no record of a similar incident. A Caesarean section done in 1996 had been uneventful. She apparently had ... dysfunction, the machine did not have a memory store for subsequent study, and moreover we were unable to confirm this diagnosis, as the hospital had no ...

  14. Regulation of cerebral blood flow in patients with autonomic dysfunction and severe postural hypotension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Birger; Mehlsen, Jesper; Boesen, Finn

    2002-01-01

    Whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation is maintained in autonomic dysfunction has been debated for a long time, and the rather sparse data available are equivocal. The relationship between CBF and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was therefore tested in eight patients with symptoms...

  15. Autonomic Dysfunction and Risk Factors Associated with Trypanosoma cruzi Infection among Children in Arequipa, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Natalie M.; Kawai, Vivian; Gilman, Robert H.; Bocangel, Cesar; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Cabrera, Lilia; Levy, Michael Z.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan Geny; Delgado, Freddy; Rosenthal, Lauren; Pinedo-Cancino, Vivian V.; Steurer, Francis; Seitz, Amy E.; Maguire, James H.; Bern, Caryn

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease affects an estimated 8 million people in Latin America. Infected individuals have 20–30% lifetime risk of developing cardiomyopathy, but more subtle changes in autonomic responses may be more frequent. We conducted a matched case-control study of children in Arequipa, Peru, where triatomine infestation and Trypanosoma cruzi infection are emerging problems. We collected data on home environment, history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and autonomic testing. Signs of triatomine infestation and/or animals sleeping in the child's room and household members with Chagas disease were associated with increased infection risk. Electrocardiogram findings did not differ between cases and controls. However, compared with control children, infected children had blunted autonomic responses by three different measures, the Valsalva maneuver, the cold pressor test, and the orthostatic test. T. cruzi-infected children show autonomic dysfunction, although the prognostic value of this finding is not clear. Sustained vector control programs are essential to decreasing future T. cruzi infections. PMID:21212207

  16. Neuromuscular abnormality and autonomic dysfunction in patients with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chi-Ren

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX is a rare lipid-storage disease. Neuromuscular abnormality and autonomic system (ANS dysfuction in CTX are rarely examined in large-scale studies in the literature. We studied the peripheral nervous system, myopathology, and autonomic system of four CTX patients and performed a literature review of the reported CTX patients with peripheral neuropathy. Methods Four biochemically and genetically confirmed CTX patients, belonging to two families, were included for study and all received nerve conduction study (NCS, muscle biopsy for histopathologic and ultrastructural study, skin biopsy for intraepidermal nerve fiber (INEF density measurement, autonomic testings including sympathetic skin response, R-R interval variation and head-up tilt test using an automated tilt table to record the changes of blood pressure and heart rate in different postures. The Q-Sweat test was also applied for the detection of sweat amount and onset time of response. The clinical characteristics, study methods and results of 13 studies of peripheral neuropathy in CTX patients in the literature were also recorded for analysis. Results The results of NCS study showed axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy in three CTX cases and mixed axonal and demyelinating sensor-motor polyneuropathy in one. The myopathological and histopathologic studies revealed mild denervation characteristics, but the ultrastructural study revealed changes of mitochondria and the membranous system, and increased amounts of glycogen, lipofuscin and lipid deposition. The ANS study revealed different degrees of abnormalities in the applied tests and the INEF density measurement showed small fiber neuropathy in three of the four CTX patients. The literature review of peripheral neuropathy in CTX revealed different types of peripheral neuropathy, of which axonal peripheral neuropathy was the most common. Conclusions Peripheral neuropathy, especially the

  17. Role of interleukin-6 levels in cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Tetsuji; Takahashi, Naohiko; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Hara, Masahide; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Yufu, Kunio; Anan, Futoshi; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Saikawa, Tetsunori

    2008-01-01

    Increased serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. However, the relationship between IL-6 levels and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether serum IL-6 levels are associated with cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients. Eighty type 2 diabetic patients who did not have organic heart disease were categorized into a high IL-6 group (>2.5 pg/ml, n= 0, age 59±12 years) or a non-high IL-6 group ( 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. The body mass index values (BMI), fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment index values were higher in the high IL-6 group than in the non-high IL-6 group (p 123 I-MIBG myocardial uptake values were lower (p 123 I-MIBG was higher (p 123 I-MIBG during the delayed phase. The results indicate that elevated IL-6 levels are associated with depressed cardiovascular autonomic function and obesity in type 2 diabetic patients. (orig.)

  18. Quantitative sensory and autonomic testing in male diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, A; Sharief, M K; Knowles, C H; Misra, V P; Kopelman, P; Ralph, D; Anand, P

    1999-01-01

    To correlate abnormalities of nerve fibres in the lower limbs with erectile dysfunction in male diabetic patients, using a range of quantitative sensory and autonomic function tests. The study included 68 male diabetic patients with symptomatic erectile dysfunction and 11 matched diabetics without erectile dysfunction; none had clinical evidence of peripheral vascular disease or psychological disorder. Patients were evaluated with a symptom questionnaire based on the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument questionnaire and examined clinically. Sural and peroneal nerve-conduction studies, and quantitative sensory and autonomic tests (vibration, thermal, light-touch thresholds, sensory and autonomic cutaneous axon-reflexes) were used to detect nerve abnormalities in the lower limbs, which were correlated with erectile dysfunction. Symptoms of neuropathy were more common in the group with male erectile dysfunction (MED), but statistically significant only for neuropathic pain (53% MED, 18% nonMED, P<0.05, chi-square test) and gastroparesis (44% MED, 0% nonMED, P<0.05). Tests of unmyelinated afferents (warming perception and capsaicin-induced sensory axon-reflex vasodilatation) were most often abnormal, sometimes with no other abnormalities on tests or neurological examination. However, abnormality of warm perception was not significantly different between groups (81% MED, 70% nonMED), suggesting that it is a poorer discriminant than abnormal sensory axon-reflex vasodilatation (89% MED, 22% nonMED, P<0.001). The only other significant test difference was decreased sural nerve action potential (70% MED, 22% non-MED, P<0.01). There appeared to be preferential involvement of unmyelinated sensory fibres that mediate axon-reflex vasodilatation in the limbs of diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction. This test appears to be a helpful indicator of neurological involvement in erectile dysfunction, and may be used to monitor the effect of new treatments.

  19. Autonomic and thermal sensory symptoms and dysfunction after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naver, H; Blomstrand, C; Ekholm, S; Jensen, C; Karlsson, T; Wallin, G

    1995-08-01

    Symptoms interpreted as unilateral disturbances of autonomic function, such as coldness, dryness, sweating, and trophic changes, are well known but incompletely understood clinical problems after stroke. The present study provides data related to the incidence and mechanisms behind such symptoms. Temperature perception thresholds, skin temperatures, evaporation rates, and skin blood flow responses were measured bilaterally in 37 stroke patients aged 58 +/- 13 years (mean +/- SD) and in a control group of 15 patients aged 64 +/- 15 years with a single transient ischemic attack. Of the 37 stroke patients, 43% reported a sensation of coldness in the contralesional side of the body. Basal skin blood flow and temperature were relatively lower in the contralesional side. There was an excess of evaporation in the contralesional side after brain stem lesions and in the ipsilesional side after hemispheric lesions. Vasomotor reflex asymmetries occurred in 34% of the patients and were due to weak vasodilator or vasoconstrictor reflexes in the ipsilesional side. These abnormalities correlated significantly to sensations of unilateral coldness, hypalgesia, and thermohypesthesia in the contralesional side and anatomically to lesions in spinothalamo-cortical pathways. Focal central nervous system lesions due to stroke may result in symptoms and measurable evidence of unilateral disturbance of skin sympathetic function. Vasomotor asymmetries are probably due to lesions of vasomotor pathways descending uncrossed. Subjective coldness may be due to disturbed central processing.

  20. Hereditary angioedema: Assessing the hypothesis for underlying autonomic dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena A Wu

    Full Text Available Attacks of Hereditary Angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAEare often triggered by stressful events/hormonal changes.Our study evaluates the relationship between autonomic nervous system (ANS and contact/complement system activation.Twenty-three HAE patients (6 males, mean age 47.5±11.4 years during remission and 24 healthy controls (8 males, mean age 45.3±10.6 years were studied. ECG, beat-by-beat blood pressure, respiratory activity were continuously recorded during rest (10' and 75-degrees-head-up tilt (10'. C1-INH, C4, cleaved high molecular weight kininogen (cHK were assessed; in 16 patients and 11 controls plasma catecholamines were also evaluated. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability allowed extraction of low-(LF and high-(HF frequency components, markers of sympathetic and vagal modulation respectively.HAE patients showed higher mean systolic arterial pressure (SAP than controls during both rest and tilt. Tilt induced a significant increase in SAP and its variability only in controls. Although sympathetic modulation (LFnu increased significantly with tilt in both groups, LF/HF ratio, index of sympathovagal balance, increased significantly only in controls. At rest HAE patients showed higher noradrenaline values (301.4±132.9 pg/ml vs 210.5±89.6pg/ml, p = 0.05. Moreover, in patients tilt was associated with a significant increase in cHK, marker of contact system activation (49.5 ± 7.5% after T vs 47.1 ± 7.8% at R, p = 0.01.Our data are consistent with altered ANS modulation in HAE patients, i.e. increased sympathetic activation at rest and blunted response to orthostatic challenge. Tilt test-induced increased HK cleavage suggests a link between stress and bradykinin production.

  1. Cardiovascular deconditioning: From autonomic nervous system to microvascular dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupé, M; Fortrat, J O; Larina, I; Gauquelin-Koch, G; Gharib, C; Custaud, M A

    2009-10-01

    Weightlessness induces an acute syndrome called the cardiovascular deconditioning, associating orthostatic intolerance with syncope, increase in resting heart rate and decrease in physical capability. Orthostatic intolerance occurs after short term and long term head down bed rest and after long term space flight. Both head down bed rest and space flight induce a significant decrease of the spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. However, spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity only characterizes the cardiac baroreflex loop. To go further with the analysis of cardiovascular deconditioning we were interested in the microcirculation. As the endothelium plays a crucial role in the regulation of vascular homeostasis and local blood flow, we hypothesized that endothelial dysfunction is associated with bed rest induced changes. We investigated endothelial properties before and after 56 days of bed rest in 8 women of control group and in 8 women who regularly performed physical exercise as countermeasure. Our study shows that prolonged bed rest causes impairment of endothelium-dependent functions at the microcirculation level, along with an increase in circulating endothelial cells. Endothelium should be a target for countermeasures during periods of prolonged bed rest or exposure to weightlessness.

  2. Autonomic dysfunction in HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy: studies of heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    and decreased morbidity. At present it is not known whether introduction of ART also has decreased autonomic dysfunction. AIM: To evaluate whether autonomic dysfunction is present in an ART-treated HIV population. METHODS: HIV patients receiving ART for at least 3 years (n = 16) and an age-matched control group...... guidelines and data reported as median (interquartile range). RESULTS: The resting heart rate was higher in HIV patients compared with controls [69 (62-74) versus 57 (52-60); PTotal HRV measured as standard deviation of normal-to-normal (SONN) was lower in the HIV group compared with the controls...... [36 (25-55) versus 74 (57-84) ms; Psquare root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals (RMSSD) [22 (9-30) versus 35 (24-62) ms; P

  3. Role of interleukin-6 levels in cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Tetsuji; Takahashi, Naohiko; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Hara, Masahide; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu [Oita University, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Faculty of Medicine, Yuhu, Oita (Japan); Yufu, Kunio; Anan, Futoshi; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Saikawa, Tetsunori [Oita University, Department of Cardiovascular Science, Oita (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    Increased serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. However, the relationship between IL-6 levels and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether serum IL-6 levels are associated with cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients. Eighty type 2 diabetic patients who did not have organic heart disease were categorized into a high IL-6 group (>2.5 pg/ml, n= 0, age 59{+-}12 years) or a non-high IL-6 group (<2.5 pg/ml, n=40, 61{+-}12 years). Cardiac autonomic function was assessed by baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate variability, plasma norepinephrine concentrations and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. The body mass index values (BMI), fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment index values were higher in the high IL-6 group than in the non-high IL-6 group (p<0.01). Early and delayed {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial uptake values were lower (p<0.01), and the percent washout rate of {sup 123}I-MIBG was higher (p<0.05) in the high IL-6 group than in the non-high IL-6 group. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis revealed that the IL-6 level was independently predicted by the BMI and the myocardial uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG during the delayed phase. The results indicate that elevated IL-6 levels are associated with depressed cardiovascular autonomic function and obesity in type 2 diabetic patients. (orig.)

  4. Role of exercise training in cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and mortality in diabetic ovariectomized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Silvia Beatriz Paulino Cavasin de [UNIFESP; Flues, Karin; Paulini, Janaina; Mostarda, Cristiano [UNIFESP; Rodrigues, Bruno; Souza, Leandro E.; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia [UNIFESP; De Angelis, Katia

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes and menopause markedly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in women. the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of exercise training on cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and on total mortality in diabetic female rats undergoing ovarian hormone deprivation. Female Wistar rats were divided into ovariectomized groups: sedentary and trained controls and sedentary and trained diabetic rats (streptozotocin, 50 mg/kg IV). Trained groups were submitted to an...

  5. Plasma DNA Mediate Autonomic Dysfunctions and White Matter Injuries in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Hsiang Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is well known in Parkinson’s disease (PD presentation and it produces hypoperfusion of vital organs. The association between cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and oxidative stress was examined in previous animal models. Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation were thought to have roles in PD pathogenesis. Owing to the relative low intrinsic antioxidative properties, brain white matter (WM is vulnerable to the oxidative stress. This study is conducted to examine possible relationships by using a hypothesis-driven mediation model. Methods. Twenty-nine patients with PD and 26 healthy controls participated in this study, with complete examinations of cardiac autonomic parameters, plasma DNA level, and WM integrity. A single-level three-variable mediation model was used to investigate the possible relationships. Results. The elevated serum oxidative stress biomarkers include plasma nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA, and poorer cardiac autonomic parameters and multiple regional microstructural WM changes are demonstrated. Further mediation analysis shows that plasma nuclear DNA served as the mediators between poorer baroreflex sensitivity and mean diffusivity changes in cingulum. Conclusions. These results provide a possible pathophysiology for how the poor baroreflex sensitivity and higher oxidative stress adversely impacted the WM integrity. This model could provide us with a piece of the puzzle of the entire PD pathogenesis.

  6. Modulation of Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Ischemic Stroke following Ayurveda (Indian System of Medicine Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriranjini Sitaram Jaideep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in stroke has implications on morbidity and mortality. Ayurveda (Indian system of medicine describes stroke as pakshaghata. We intended to study the effect of Ayurveda therapies on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Methods. Fifty patients of ischemic stroke (middle cerebral artery territory (mean age 39.26 ± 9.88 years; male 43, female 7 were recruited within one month of ictus. All patients received standard allopathic medications as advised by neurologist. In addition, patients were randomized to receive physiotherapy (Group I or Ayurveda treatment (Group II for 14 days. Continuous electrocardiogram and finger arterial pressure were recorded for 15 min before and after treatments and analyzed offline to obtain heart rate and blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS. Results were analysed by RMANOVA. Results. Patients in Group II showed statistically significant improvement in cardiac autonomic parameters. The standard deviation of normal to normal intervals,and total and low frequency powers were significantly enhanced (F=8.16, P=0.007, F=9.73, P=0.004, F=13.51, and P=0.001, resp.. The BRS too increased following the treatment period (F=10.129, P=0.004. Conclusions. The current study is the first to report a positive modulation of cardiac autonomic activity after adjuvant Ayurveda treatment in ischemic stroke. Further long term studies are warranted.

  7. Diabetic retinopathy is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anan, Futoshi; Takayuki, Masaki; Takahashi, Naohiko; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Eshima, Nobuoki; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction are associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. This preliminary study was therefore designed to test the hypothesis that DR is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients without insulin treatment. Seventy persons were diagnosed to have type 2 diabetes in the examination from June 2004 to May 2006. The study group consisted of 29 type 2 diabetic patients with DR (age: 58±6 years, mean±standard deviation (s.d.)) and 41 type 2 diabetic patients with no DR (NDR) (n=41, 58±5 years). Cardiovascular autonomic function was assessed by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), heart rate variability, plasma norepinephrine concentration and cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphic findings. DR patients had lower BRS, early and delayed 123 I-MIBG myocardial uptake values and higher percent washout rate (WR) of 123 I-MIBG than the NDR patients. With respect to metabolic findings, DR patients had higher fasting plasma insulin concentration (P 123 I-MIBG (P 123 I-MIBG are independently associated with DR in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. (author)

  8. Microglia PACAP and glutamate: Friends or foes in seizure-induced autonomic dysfunction and SUDEP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandare, Amol M; Kapoor, Komal; Farnham, Melissa M J; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Seizure-induced cardiorespiratory autonomic dysfunction is a major cause of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Seizures lead to increased synthesis, and release of glutamate, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), and other neurotransmitters, and cause extensive activation of microglia at multiple regions in the brain including central autonomic cardiorespiratory brainstem nuclei. Glutamate contributes to neurodegeneration, and inflammation in epilepsy. PACAP has neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties, whereas microglia are key players in inflammatory responses in CNS. Seizure-induced increase in PACAP is neuroprotective. PACAP produces neuroprotective effects acting on microglial PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Microglia also express glutamate transporters, and their expression can be increased by PACAP in response to harmful or stressful situations such as seizures. Here we discuss the mechanism of autonomic cardiorespiratory dysfunction in seizure, and the role of PACAP, glutamate and microglia in regulating cardiorespiratory brainstem neurons in their physiological state that could provide future therapeutic options for SUDEP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Orthostatic intolerance and autonomic dysfunction following bariatric surgery: A retrospective study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Vanessa; Owens, Andrew P; Purkayastha, Sanjay; Iodice, Valeria; Mathias, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence and costs of the obesity epidemic and obesity-related conditions, including diabetes mellitus, is consistently increasing worldwide. Bariatric medicine is attempting to address this with weight loss and exercise programmes, and with increasing frequency, various forms of bariatric surgery. There has been considerable success reported after bariatric surgery but not without. We describe 14 patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI) post bariatric surgery. We report on OI (postural dizziness, palpitations and fainting), the results of cardiovascular autonomic testing and the associated and/or causative findings as well as reviewing the literature to consider the possible mechanisms. Comprehensive autonomic testing revealed that 35.7% (Buchwald et al., 2004) of these patients fulfilled the criteria for the Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (PoTS), 57.1% (Cremieux et al., 2008) had low levels of basal BP and 42.9% (Cammisotto & Bendayan, 2007) patients were presyncopal and 14.3% (Billakanty et al., 2008) experienced syncope. We propose that the incidence of OI post-bariatric surgery is higher than considered, that certain cohorts may be more susceptible to complications, and that further research is needed to identify the prevalence and, ideally anticipate occurrence. With the increasing prevalence of obesity and required clinical interventions, further understanding of the pathophysiological processes causing autonomic dysfunction after bariatric interventions will aid management, which may differ in those with an underlying disposition to autonomic involvement, such as diabetics, in whom such procedures are increasingly used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardiovascular autonomous dysfunction in diabetics: The influence of disease duration, glycoregulation degree and diabetes type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković Vladan

    2008-01-01

    exists regarding the ratio of damage of the sympathetic part of the autonomous nervous system and the value of HbA1c, as well as the ratio of CAN, that is, the total score and HbA1c. Almost two- fold, a bigger coefficient of correlation between the sympathetic score and HbA1c in relation to the coefficient of correlation of the parasympathetic score and HbA1c, points to bigger sensitivity of the sympathetic part of the autonomous nervous system to subacute deterioration of glycoregulation. The correlation between the values of autonomous scores and diabetes type has not been noted. CONCLUSION Our results show that besides disease duration, the subacute deterioration of glycoregulation also leads to the appearance of cardiovascular autonomous dysfunction in diabetes. The sympathetic nervous tissue is functionally more sensitive than the parasympathetic one to metabolic disorders in diabetes. The cardiovascular autonomous dysfunction will occur independently of the type of diabetes.

  11. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients With Infantile Spasm and the Effect of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencpinar, Pinar; Kocabas, Abdullah; Duman, Özgür; Dündar, Nihal Olgaç; Haspolat, Senay; Kardelen, Fırat

    2016-02-01

    Infantile spasm is an age-dependent epileptic-encephalopathy syndrome. Cardiac autonomic function is frequently altered in epilepsy. In this study, we examined heart rate variability in patients with infantile spasm before and after treatment. Nineteen patients with infantile spasm and 13 healthy comparisons were enrolled in the study. Cardiac rhythm was recorded with a Holter device for 24 hours before adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) (Synacthen depot) and B6 vitamin administration and 1 month after treatment. Heart rate variability analysis found lower heart rate variability parameters in patients with infantile spasm at the onset of the syndrome, prior to treatment with ACTH. The time domain parameters of heart rate variability values showed a statistically significant increase following ACTH treatment. Our data suggest that patients with infantile spasm exhibit lower heart rate variability parameters, and the treatment of spasms with ACTH and B6 together diminished the autonomic dysfunction in our cohort. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. [The role of dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system in idiopathic overactive urinary bladder in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, V V; Akarachkova, E S; Shvarkov, S B; Grigorashvili, I I; Romikh, V V

    2012-01-01

    A complex urological and neurological examination of female patients with idiopathic overactive bladder (IOAB) has detected clinical signs and neurophysiological correlates of vegetative dysfunction in the form of disturbed sympatho-parasympathic interrelations, failure of segmental and compensatory enhancement of suprasegmental mechanisms of regulation of lower urinary tract activity. The treatment with selective inhibitors of serotonin re-entry reduced severity ofpsychovegetative syndrome and symptoms of the lower urinary tract. This confirms an essential role of the autonomic nervous system in pathogenetic mechanisms of IOAB development and gives grounds for recommending selective inhibitors of serotonin re-entry for combined treatment of IOAB patients.

  13. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in primary ovarian insufficiency: clinical and experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmeier, Silvia; De Angelis, Kátia; Rabello Casali, Karina; Vilodre, César; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Belló Klein, Adriane; Plentz, Rodrigo; Spritzer, PoliMara; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Women with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) present an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In this study we tested the hypothesis that POI in women under hormone therapy (HT) are associated with vascular vasodilatation attenuation and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and these impairments are related to changes in systemic antioxidant enzymes. Furthermore, the possibility that ovarian hormone deprivation can induce such changes and that HT cannot reverse all of those impairments was examined in an experimental model of POI. Methods: Fifteen control and 17 patients with primary ovarian insufficiency receiving HT were included in the study. To test the systemic and cardiac consequences of ovarian hormone deprivation, ovariectomy was induced in young female rats that were submitted or not to HT. Spectral analysis of RR interval and blood pressure signals were performed and oxidative stress parameters were determined. Results: POI women under HT have increased mean arterial pressure (94±10 vs. 86±5 mmHg) despite normal endothelial and autonomic modulation of vasculature. Additionally, they presented impaired baroreflex sensitivity (3.9±1.38 vs. 7.15±3.62 ms/mmHg) and reduced heart rate variability (2310±1173 vs. 3754±1921 ms2). Similar results obtained in ovariectomized female rats were accompanied by an increased lipoperoxidation (7433±1010 vs. 6180±289 cps/mg protein) and decreased antioxidant enzymes in cardiac tissue. As it was observed in women, the HT in animals did not restore hemodynamic and autonomic dysfunctions. Conclusion: These data provide clinical and experimental evidence that long term HT may not restore all cardiovascular risk factors associated with ovarian hormone deprivation. PMID:24349626

  14. Trained breathing-induced oxygenation acutely reverses cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Pasquale; Mereu, Roberto; De Barbieri, Giacomo; Rampino, Teresa; Di Toro, Alessandro; Groop, Per-Henrik; Dal Canton, Antonio; Bernardi, Luciano

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, evaluated as baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), could be acutely corrected by slow breathing or oxygen administration in patients with type 1 diabetes, thus suggesting a functional component of the disorder. We tested this hypothesis in patients with the type 2 diabetes with or without renal impairment. Twenty-six patients with type 2 diabetes (aged 61.0 ± 0.8 years, mean ± SEM; duration of diabetes 10.5 ± 2 years, BMI 29.9 ± 0.7 kg/m(2), GFR 68.1 ± 5.6 ml/min) and 24 healthy controls (aged 58.5 ± 1.0 years) were studied. BRS was obtained from recordings of RR interval and systolic blood pressure fluctuations during spontaneous and during slow, deep (6 breaths/min) controlled breathing in conditions of normoxia or hyperoxia (5 l/min oxygen). During spontaneous breathing, diabetic patients had lower RR interval and lower BRS compared with the control subjects (7.1 ± 1.2 vs. 12.6 ± 2.0 ms/mmHg, p breathing and oxygen administration significantly increased arterial saturation, reduced RR interval and increased BRS in both groups (to 9.6 ± 1.8 and 15.4 ± 2.4 ms/mmHg, respectively, p breathing and hyperoxia (p breathing during normoxia). Autonomic dysfunction present in patients with type 2 diabetes can be partially reversed by slow breathing, suggesting a functional role of hypoxia, also in patients with DKD. Interventions known to relieve tissue hypoxia and improve autonomic function, like physical activity, may be useful in the prevention and management of complications in patients with diabetes.

  15. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-Hypermobile type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Alan; O'Callaghan, Chris; De Wandele, Inge; Stiles, Lauren; Pocinki, Alan; Rowe, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Autonomic dysfunction contributes to health-related impairment of quality of life in the hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS). Typical signs and symptoms include tachycardia, hypotension, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and disturbed bladder function and sweating regulation. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction may present as Orthostatic Intolerance, Orthostatic Hypotension, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, or Neurally Mediated Hypotension. The incidence, prevalence, and natural history of these conditions remain unquantified, but observations from specialist clinics suggest they are frequently seen in hEDS. There is growing understanding of how hEDS-related physical and physiological pathology contributes to the development of these conditions. Evaluation of cardiovascular symptoms in hEDS should include a careful history and clinical examination. Tests of cardiovascular function range from clinic room observation to tilt-table assessment to other laboratory investigations such as supine and standing catecholamine levels. Non-pharmacologic treatments include education, managing the environment to reduce exposure to triggers, improving cardiovascular fitness, and maintaining hydration. Although there are limited clinical trials, the response to drug treatments in hEDS is supported by evidence from case and cohort observational data, and short-term physiological studies. Pharmacologic therapy is indicated for patients with moderate-severe impairment of daily function and who have inadequate response or tolerance to conservative treatment. Treatment in hEDS often requires a focus on functional maintenance. Also, the negative impact of cardiovascular symptoms on physical and psycho-social well-being may generate a need for a more general evaluation and on-going management and support. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Autonomic dysfunction and clinical severity of disease in children with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, Ozkaya; Esra, Gursoy; Ufuk, Erenberk; Demiri, Aysegül; Ayhan, Sogut; Rusen, Dundaroz M

    2012-08-01

    The involvement of autonomic imbalance has been reported in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. To investigate the association between the clinical severity of childhood allergic rhinitis and autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction, to define whether the severity of disease correlates with ANS activity. In this cross-sectional, case-control study, we evaluated the ANS testing by measuring sympathetic skin response (SRR) and heart rate (R-R) interval variation (RRIV) in 55 children with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR), aged 7-12 yrs without any chronic co-morbidity, and the results were compared with 40 sex- and age-matched control subjects. The patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of allergic rhinitis. There were significant increase in calculated RRIV variables during at rest and deep breathing in children with PAR compared to controls, which reflect parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activity (p0.05). Lower RRIV and the prolonged SSR latencies in children with AR were closely correlated with disease severity (r=-0.65, p<0.05, and r=-0.59, p<0.05 respectively). Combined use of these two tests, allows separate testing of PNS and SNS function, and are very sensitive methods in assessing of severity of disease in children with PAR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction and serum levels of neurotoxic and neurotrophic cytokines in patients with cobalamin deficiency

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    Özcan Çeneli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available neurotrophiccytokines epidermal growth factor (EGF and interleukin-6 (IL-6 plays a role in the pathogenesisof cobalamin (Cbl deficiency-induced neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomicnervous system dysfunction and to look for any relationship between autonomic nervous systemdisturbances and serum cytokine levels (TNF-

  18. Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy, Sexual Dysfunction, and Urinary Incontinence in Women With Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Aruna V.; Patel, Darshan P.; Braffett, Barbara H.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Feldman, Eva; Herman, William H.; Martin, Catherine L.; Jacobson, Alan M.; Wessells, Hunter; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study evaluated associations among cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), female sexual dysfunction (FSD), and urinary incontinence (UI) in women with type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 580 women with T1DM in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study (DCCT/EDIC). CAN was defined as: 1) R-R variation 2) R-R variation of 15–19.9 plus Valsalva ratio ≤1.5 or a supine-to-standing drop of 10 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure. A Sandvik Severity Index of 3–12 defined UI, and a Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI-R) score ≥22.75 defined FSD. Multivariable models estimated associations among CAN, FSD, and UI. RESULTS At EDIC year 17, FSD was observed in 41% of women and UI in 30%. No statistically significant associations were observed between measures of CAN at DCCT closeout and subsequent report of FSD or UI. At EDIC year 16/17, there was a 53% increased odds of having UI with a Valsalva ratio ≤1.5. At both EDIC year 13/14 and EDIC year 16/17, a 5-unit increase in R-R variation was associated with a 1.11 greater odds of having FSD. CONCLUSIONS In women with T1DM in the DCCT/EDIC, we found significant increased odds of FSD and UI with specific measures of CAN. In long-standing T1DM, CAN may predict development of FSD and may be a useful surrogate for generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy. PMID:27352953

  19. Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy, Sexual Dysfunction, and Urinary Incontinence in Women With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotaling, James M; Sarma, Aruna V; Patel, Darshan P; Braffett, Barbara H; Cleary, Patricia A; Feldman, Eva; Herman, William H; Martin, Catherine L; Jacobson, Alan M; Wessells, Hunter; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated associations among cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), female sexual dysfunction (FSD), and urinary incontinence (UI) in women with type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM). We studied 580 women with T1DM in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study (DCCT/EDIC). CAN was defined as: 1) R-R variation 2) R-R variation of 15-19.9 plus Valsalva ratio ≤1.5 or a supine-to-standing drop of 10 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure. A Sandvik Severity Index of 3-12 defined UI, and a Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI-R) score ≥22.75 defined FSD. Multivariable models estimated associations among CAN, FSD, and UI. At EDIC year 17, FSD was observed in 41% of women and UI in 30%. No statistically significant associations were observed between measures of CAN at DCCT closeout and subsequent report of FSD or UI. At EDIC year 16/17, there was a 53% increased odds of having UI with a Valsalva ratio ≤1.5. At both EDIC year 13/14 and EDIC year 16/17, a 5-unit increase in R-R variation was associated with a 1.11 greater odds of having FSD. In women with T1DM in the DCCT/EDIC, we found significant increased odds of FSD and UI with specific measures of CAN. In long-standing T1DM, CAN may predict development of FSD and may be a useful surrogate for generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. Role of exercise training in cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and mortality in diabetic ovariectomized rats.

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    Souza, Silvia B C; Flues, Karin; Paulini, Janaina; Mostarda, Cristiano; Rodrigues, Bruno; Souza, Leandro E; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2007-10-01

    Diabetes and menopause markedly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in women. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of exercise training on cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and on total mortality in diabetic female rats undergoing ovarian hormone deprivation. Female Wistar rats were divided into ovariectomized groups: sedentary and trained controls and sedentary and trained diabetic rats (streptozotocin, 50 mg/kg IV). Trained groups were submitted to an exercise training protocol on a treadmill (8 weeks). The baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated by heart rate responses to arterial pressure changes. Heart rate variability was determined using the SD of the basal heart rate. Vagal and sympathetic tonus were evaluated by pharmacological blockade. Diabetes impaired baroreflex sensitivity ( approximately 55%), vagal tonus ( approximately 68%), and heart rate variability ( approximately 38%). Exercise training improved baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in control and diabetic groups in relation to their sedentary groups. Trained control rats presented increased vagal tonus compared with that of sedentary ones. The sympathetic tonus was reduced in the trained diabetic group as compared with that of other studied groups. Significant correlations were obtained between heart rate variability and vagal tonus with baroreflex sensitivity. Mortality, assessed during the training period, was reduced in trained diabetic (25%) rats compared with mortality in sedentary diabetic rats (60%). Together, these findings suggest that decreases in baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability may be related to increased mortality in female diabetic subjects and that improved autonomic regulation induced by exercise training may contribute to decreased mortality in this population.

  1. Overactive bladder and autonomic dysfunction: Lower urinary tract symptoms in females with postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Melissa R; Chang-Kit, Laura; Raj, Satish R; Black, Bonnie K; Milam, Douglas F; Reynolds, W Stuart; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David; Dmochowski, Roger R

    2017-03-01

    Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) represents an autonomic disorder predominantly affecting females between 15 and 50 years of age. POTS is a chronic disorder (>6 months) characterized by an excessive heart rate increment on standing (>30 beats/min) in the presence of characteristic symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion or sympathetic activation. Patients have clinically been noted to describe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), although urologic symptoms have not been methodically assessed in the POTS population. Herein, we present data from a pilot study designed to identify and quantitate overactive bladder (OAB) in patients diagnosed with POTS. Patients admitted to the Vanderbilt Autonomic Dysfunction Center between June 2009 and October 2010 for evaluation for the potential diagnosis of POTS completed a validated, standardized questionnaire for OAB (OAB-q) at presentation. Symptom score and subscale analyses were conducted. Subscale health related quality of life (HRQL) scores were transformed into a 0-100 scale, with higher scores reflecting superior HRQL. Data are presented as mean ± SD. Thirty-two females presented for evaluation of symptoms consistent with POTS. Twenty-nine women were subsequently diagnosed with POTS with 19 of these patients completing the OAB-q questionnaire (65.5% response rate). Average age was 33.5 ± 8.3 years. Symptom severity transformed score was 26.0 ± 16.4, with 13 of 19 patients (68.4%) meeting clinical criteria for diagnosis of probable clinically significant OAB. Nocturia was the most bothersome symptom, followed by increased daytime frequency and urgency. This pilot study describes bothersome lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients presenting with POTS as assessed by patient-reported questionnaire data. Nocturia demonstrated the greatest negative impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL), while social interaction was the least affected HRQL domain. In patients with dysautonomia, this data provides a

  2. Risk factors for autonomic and somatic nerve dysfunction in different stages of glucose tolerance.

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    Dimova, Rumyana; Tankova, Tsvetalina; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Tournev, Ivailo; Chakarova, Nevena; Grozeva, Greta; Dakovska, Lilia

    2017-03-01

    The present study evaluates autonomic and somatic nerve function in different stages of glucose tolerance and its correlation with different cardio-metabolic parameters. Four hundred seventy-eight subjects, mean age 49.3±13.7years and mean BMI 31.0±6.2kg/m2, divided according to glucose tolerance: 130 with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 227 with prediabetes (125 with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and 102 with isolated impaired glucose tolerance (iIGT)), and 121 with newly-diagnosed T2D (NDT2D), were enrolled. Glucose tolerance was studied during OGTT. Antropometric indices, blood pressure, HbA1c, serum lipids, hsCRP and albumin-to-creatinine ratio were assessed. Body composition was estimated by a bioimpedance method (InBody 720, BioSpace). Tissue AGEs accumulation was assessed by skin autofluorescence (AGE-Reader-DiagnOpticsTM). Electroneurography was performed by electromyograph Dantec Keypoint. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) was assessed by ANX-3.0 method applying standard clinical tests. CAN was found in 12.3% of NGT, 19.8% of prediabetes (13.2% of IFG and 20.6% of iIGT), and 32.2% of NDT2D. The prevalence of diabetic sensory polyneuropathy (DSPN) was 5.7% in prediabetes and 28.6% in NDT2D. The panel of age, QTc interval, waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, and 120-min plasma glucose was related to sympathetic activity (F [5451]=78.50, p<0.001). The panel of age, waist circumference, and QTc interval was related to parasympathetic power (F [3453]=132.26, p<0.001). HbA1c and age were related to sural SNAP (F [2454]=15.12, p<0.001). HbA1c and AGEs were related to sural SNCV (F [2454]=12.18, p<0.001). Our results demonstrate a high prevalence of autonomic and sensory nerve dysfunction in early stages of glucose intolerance. Age, postprandial glycemia, central obesity, diastolic blood pressure and QTc interval outline as predictive markers of CAN; hyperglycemia, glycation and age of DSPN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome: Blunted heart rate response and cardiac autonomic dysfunction at diagnosis.

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    Maia, Magda M; Gualano, Bruno; Sá-Pinto, Ana L; Sallum, Adriana M E; Pereira, Rosa M R; Len, Claudio A; Terreri, Maria T A; Barbosa, Cassia M; Roschel, Hamilton; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-12-01

    To assess aerobic capacity and cardiac autonomic modulation in juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome (JFM) patients at diagnosis in response to graded exercise text. A multicenter cross-sectional study included 25 JFM patients and 25 healthy controls. Both groups participated only in physical education classes at school. A treadmill graded cardiorespiratory test was performed and the heart-rate (HR) response during exercise was evaluated by the chronotropic reserve (CR). Pain, functional ability, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) were assessed. The median current age was similar in JFM and controls (15 vs. 15 years, p = 0.890), as well as body mass index (p = 0.332), female gender (p = 1.000), and Tanner stages (p = 0.822). The medians of HRQL parameters (total score/physical health/psychosocial health) were significantly lower in JFM vs. controls according to patient and parent self-reports (p < 0.001). The median of peak HR [181 (150-198) vs. 197 (181-202)bpm, p < 0.001], chronotropic reserve [84 (53-98) vs. 99 (84-103)%, p < 0.001], and resting to peak [96 (65-181) vs. 127 (61-185)bpm, p = 0.010] were significantly lower in JFM compared to controls. The median of ΔHRR1 [15 (3-39) vs. 35 (9-52)bpm, p < 0.001], ΔHRR2 [37 (20-57) vs. 51 (32-94)bpm, p < 0.001], peak VO 2 [32.34 (24.24-39.65) vs. 36.4 (28.56-52.71)ml/kg/min, p = 0.005], peak speed [5 (4-6.3) vs. 5.9 (4.0-6.3)mph, p = 0.001], time to exhaustion [11.5 (8.5-14.5) vs. 14 (11-18)min, p < 0.001], and working capacity on power [3.37 (2.04-5.6) vs. 3.89 (2.91-6.55)W/kg, p = 0.006] were significantly lower in JFM compared to controls. The frequency of chronotropic incompetence (≤80%) was significantly higher in JFM vs. controls (p = 0.0006). This study identified chronotropic incompetence and delayed HR recovery in JFM patients, indicating autonomic dysfunction. Aerobic exercise training should be considered in all JFM patients and may improve cardiac autonomic impairment, thus reducing cardiovascular

  4. Exercise training reverse autonomic dysfunction and hypertension in rats fed with high-fat diet

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    Carla Cristina de Sordi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract AIMS We evaluated whether exercise training ameliorates cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in obesity-induced by high-fat diet (HFD in rats. METHODS Wistar male rats were assigned in normal diet, sedentary (ND-S and trained (ND-T and HFD, sedentary (HFD-S and trained (HFD-T. Blood pressure (BP, heart rate (HR, HR variability (HRV, BP variability (BPV, cardiac baroreflex and cardiac autonomic tonus were assessed. RESULTS HFD-S showed higher bodyweight increase (19.4% compared to all other groups (HFD-T: 13.2%, ND-S: 14% and ND-T: 12.4%. Relative epididymal, retroperitoneal and visceral fat was also greater in HFD-S compared to all other groups. Resting bradycardia in ND-T (339.5±10.6 bpm and HFD-T (341.0 ± 9.4 bpm was more pronounced than ND-S (438.4 ± 6.3 bpm; p<0.05 and HFD-S (448.5 ± 18.7 bpm; p<0.05. The HFD-T group showed lower systolic (125.3 ( 1.9 mmHg, diastolic (88.5 ( 2.0 mmHg and mean BP (100.3 ± 2.5 mmHg in comparison with HFD-S (153.8 ( 3.7; 103.5 ( 2.6 and 120.5 ± 3.7 mmHg; p<0.05, respectively. Lower variance of HRV and higher variance of diastolic BPV was observed in HFD-S compared to other groups while sympathetic modulation of HRV and BPV was higher in HFD-S, as well as the LF/HF ratio. HFD-T showed a decrease in sympathetic tonus compared to HFD-S. ND-T and HFD-T showed higher cardiac vagal tonus than respective sedentary groups. Analysis showed an association between visceral fat, sympathetic activity and BP. CONCLUSIONS HFD induces hypertension and is associated with autonomic imbalance in rats, while exercise training may reverse these harmful changes.

  5. The impact of autonomic dysfunction on survival in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia.

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    Kajsa Stubendorff

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Autonomic dysfunction is a well-known feature in neurodegenerative dementias, especially common in α-synucleinopathies like dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia. The most common symptoms are orthostatic hypotension, incontinence and constipation, but its relevance in clinical practice is poorly understood. There are no earlier studies addressing the influence of autonomic dysfunction on clinical course and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of the three most common features of autonomic dysfunction and analyze how it affects survival. METHODS: Thirty patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia were included in this prospective, longitudinal follow-up study. Presence of incontinence and constipation was recorded at baseline. Blood pressure was measured at baseline, after 3 months and after 6 months according to standardized procedures, with 5 measurements during 10 minutes after rising. Orthostatic hypotension was defined using consensus definitions and persistent orthostatic hypotension was defined as 5 or more measurements with orthostatic hypotension. Difference in survival was analyzed 36 months after baseline. RESULTS: There was a high frequency of persistent orthostatic blood pressure (50%, constipation (30% and incontinence (30%. Patients with persistent orthostatic hypotension had a significantly shorter survival compared to those with no or non-persistent orthostatic hypotension (Log rank x(2 = 4.47, p = 0.034. Patients with constipation and/or urinary incontinence, in addition to persistent orthostatic hypotension, had a poorer prognosis compared to those with isolated persistent orthostatic hypotension or no orthostatic hypotension (Log rank x(2 = 6.370, p = 0.041. DISCUSSION: According to our findings, the identification of autonomic dysfunction seems to be of great importance in clinical practice, not only to

  6. Eldecalcitol prevents endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal osteoporosis model rats.

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    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Aizawa, Ken; Endo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women have high incidence of cardiovascular events as estrogen deficiency can cause endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin D is reported to be beneficial on endothelial function, but it remains controversial whether vitamin D is effective for endothelial dysfunction under the treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endothelial protective effect of eldecalcitol (ELD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. ELD (20  ng/kg) was orally administrated five times a week for 4 weeks from 1 day after surgery. After that, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as an indicator of endothelial function was measured by high-resolution ultrasound in the femoral artery of living rats. ELD ameliorated the reduction of FMD in OVX rats. ELD inhibited the increase in NOX4, nitrotyrosine, and p65 and the decrease in dimer/monomer ratio of nitric oxide synthase in OVX rat femoral arteries. ELD also prevented the decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in femoral arteries and cultured endothelial cells. Although PPARγ is known to inhibit osteoblastogenesis, ELD understandably increased bone mineral density of OVX rats without increase in PPARγ in bone marrow. These results suggest that ELD prevented the deterioration of endothelial function under condition of preventing bone loss in OVX rats. This endothelial protective effect of ELD might be exerted through improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, which is mediated by an antioxidative effect through normalization of vascular PPARγ/NF-κB signaling. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. Prevention of erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

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    Izak Faiena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With increasing scrutiny of prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis and treatment, much attention has been given to the morbidity caused by radical prostatectomy (RP and/or radiotherapy (RT. One of the most common side-effects of either treatment is erectile dysfunction (ED. [1] Approximately, 40% of patients will experience ED after RT for PCa. The post-RT ED causes significant patient dissatisfaction with cancer treatment as well as decrease in patient and partner psychosocial function. [2] To address this issue in patients undergoing RT, Pisansky et al. [3] conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a phosphodiesterase enzyme-5 inhibitor (PDE5i, tadalafil, as a preventive measure for patients undergoing RT for PCa and found no difference in erectile function between the control and treatment groups.

  8. Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Early Cardiac Affection in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

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    Khaled M. Othman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To detect the early preclinical alterations in cardiac autonomic control as well as altered cardiac function in systemic sclerosis (SSc patients and their relevance to the clinical features of the disease using noninvasive methods. Methods 30 SSc patients and 15 healthy controls matched for age and sex underwent clinical examination, serological analysis, and echocardiographic assessment including Doppler flow imaging to evaluate cardiac function, and 24-hour Holter monitoring analyzed for arrhythmia and heart rate variability (HRV in the time and frequency domains. Results The trans-mitral Doppler of early to atrial wave (E/A ratio was reversed in five patients (16.6% and the tricuspid E/A ratio was reversed in 10 patients (33.3%. Holter analysis for SSc patients revealed an increased prevalence of premature ventricular contractions (PVC ≥ 10/h ( P = 0.02, supra-ventricular tachycardias (SVTs ( P = 0.2, and total PVC count ( P = 0.0000. Highly significant ( P = 0.000 impairment in all HRV parameters was demonstrated in the SSc patients. Total skin thickness score (TSS, Raynaud's phenomenon and anti-scleroderma 70 (anti-SCL70 showed significant positive correlations with all arrhythmia parameters, while showing a significant negative correlation with the impaired ventricular diastolic function and various HRV parameters. No correlation was found between arrhythmia and HRV parameters and disease duration, disease type, or presence of anti-centromere antibodies. Conclusion Low heart rate variability, increased TSS and the presence of anti-SCL70 are correlated with preclinical cardiac involvement in SSc patients and may predict the likelihood of malignant arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Therefore, noninvasive HRV evaluation before clinical cardiac involvement in these patients might be beneficial when added to the clinical and laboratory assessments in detecting high-risk patients, and may allow for implementation of preventive

  9. Paediatric breath-holding spells are associated with autonomic dysfunction and iron deficiency may play a role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoum, H; Habeeb, N; Elagouza, I; Mobarez, H

    2018-04-01

    This study assessed cardiac performance and iron in subjects aged 12-36 months with breath-holding spells (BHSs). We consecutively recruited 40 subjects (55% male) experiencing BHSs from the general paediatric outpatients department at the Children's Hospital, Ain Shams University, Egypt, from 2015 to 2016. The 20 matched comparisons were mainly healthy siblings. The workup included iron levels and electrocardiograms. The age at the onset of BHSs was 5-24 months with a median monthly frequency of 13. Almost two-thirds of the patients had cyanotic spells, and one-third had pallid spells, lasting 25-90 seconds. Lower serum iron levels and higher QT dispersion and T-wave dispersion were recorded in patients than the comparison group, and 4.8% had dysrhythmia and bradycardia. We observed higher durations of bradycardia during attacks and higher occurrences of dysrhythmia during cyanotic spells, which were more frequent in patients with prolonged or frequent BHSs. Our study of patients aged 12-13 months supported the theory of autonomic dysfunction in BHSs. The ECG findings, especially in patients with prolonged or frequent spells, need to be studied further to evaluate the risk of life-threatening events. Iron deficiency may play a role in autonomic dysfunction in patients with BHSs. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. B-vitamin Supplementation Mitigates Effects of Fine Particles on Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction and Inflammation: A Pilot Human Intervention Trial

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    Zhong, Jia; Trevisi, Letizia; Urch, Bruce; Lin, Xinyi; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A.; Liss, Gary; Thompson, Aaron; Wu, Shaowei; Wilson, Ander; Koutrakis, Petros; Silverman, Frances; Gold, Diane R.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2017-04-01

    Ambient fine particle (PM2.5) pollution triggers acute cardiovascular events. Individual-level preventions are proposed to complement regulation in reducing the global burden of PM2.5-induced cardiovascular diseases. We determine whether B vitamin supplementation mitigates PM2.5 effects on cardiac autonomic dysfunction and inflammation in a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover pilot trial. Ten healthy adults received two-hour controlled-exposure-experiment to sham under placebo, PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under placebo, and PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under B-vitamin supplementation (2.5 mg/d folic acid, 50 mg/d vitamin B6, and 1 mg/d vitamin B12), respectively. At pre-, post-, 24 h-post-exposure, we measured resting heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) with electrocardiogram, and white blood cell (WBC) counts with hematology analyzer. Compared to sham, PM2.5 exposure increased HR (3.8 bpm, 95% CI: 0.3, 7.4; P = 0.04), total WBC count (11.5%, 95% CI: 0.3%, 24.0%; P = 0.04), lymphocyte count (12.9%, 95% CI: 4.4%, 22.1%; P = 0.005), and reduced low-frequency power (57.5%, 95% CI: 2.5%, 81.5%; P = 0.04). B-vitamin supplementation attenuated PM2.5 effect on HR by 150% (P = 0.003), low-frequency power by 90% (P = 0.01), total WBC count by 139% (P = 0.006), and lymphocyte count by 106% (P = 0.02). In healthy adults, two-hour PM2.5 exposure substantially increases HR, reduces HRV, and increases WBC. These effects are reduced by B vitamin supplementation.

  11. Pinpointing brainstem mechanisms responsible for autonomic dysfunction in Rett syndrome: therapeutic perspectives for 5-HT1A agonists

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    Ana Paula Abdala

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder caused by loss of function of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2. Reduced function of this ubiquitous transcriptional regulator has a devastating effect on the central nervous system. One of the most severe and life-threatening presentations of this syndrome is brainstem dysfunction, which results in autonomic disturbances such as breathing deficits, typified by episodes of breathing cessation intercalated with episodes of hyperventilation or irregular breathing. Defects in numerous neurotransmitter systems have been observed in Rett syndrome both in animal models and patients. Here we dedicate special attention to serotonin due to its role in promoting regular breathing, increasing vagal tone, regulating mood, alleviating Parkinsonian-like symptoms and potential for therapeutic translation. A promising new symptomatic strategy currently focuses on regulation of serotonergic function using highly selective serotonin type 1A (5-HT1A biased agonists. We address this newly emerging therapy for respiratory brainstem dysfunction and challenges for translation with a holistic perspective of Rett syndrome, considering potential mood and motor effects.

  12. Pinpointing brainstem mechanisms responsible for autonomic dysfunction in Rett syndrome: therapeutic perspectives for 5-HT1A agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Ana P.; Bissonnette, John M.; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder caused by loss of function of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Reduced function of this ubiquitous transcriptional regulator has a devastating effect on the central nervous system. One of the most severe and life-threatening presentations of this syndrome is brainstem dysfunction, which results in autonomic disturbances such as breathing deficits, typified by episodes of breathing cessation intercalated with episodes of hyperventilation or irregular breathing. Defects in numerous neurotransmitter systems have been observed in Rett syndrome both in animal models and patients. Here we dedicate special attention to serotonin due to its role in promoting regular breathing, increasing vagal tone, regulating mood, alleviating Parkinsonian-like symptoms and potential for therapeutic translation. A promising new symptomatic strategy currently focuses on regulation of serotonergic function using highly selective serotonin type 1A (5-HT1A) “biased agonists.” We address this newly emerging therapy for respiratory brainstem dysfunction and challenges for translation with a holistic perspective of Rett syndrome, considering potential mood and motor effects. PMID:24910619

  13. The autonomic dysfunction in patients with lupus disease: An electrophysiological study.

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    Haghighat, Shila; Fatemi, Alimohammad; Andalib, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate autonomic nervous system (ANS) function by using electrophysiological tests in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This descriptive analytical study was done on 28 individuals with a history of lupus and ten age- and sex-matched healthy objects were being selected randomly. The autonomy questionnaire has been used to determine clinical symptom of ANS involvement. The electrophysiological assessments of ANS function were performed by sympathetic skin response (SSR). The mean values of sympathetic (SSR latency and amplitude) parameters were compared to determine any correlations between SSR parameters and clinical characteristics of ANS. 28 SLE patients (3 males, 25 females) with a mean age of 34.6 ± 9.74 years and 10 control subjects (4 males, 6 females) with a mean age of 36.8 ± 6.43 years were included in the study. Among patients 17 (60.7%) exhibited autonomic symptoms. Headache was the most common issue with the highest percentage rate (41.17%). The mean latency and amplitude of SSR were increased (1.52 ± 0.16 vs. 1.39 ± 0.16 and 107 ± 15.6 vs. 110 ± 15.6, respectively), compared to control. A significant difference was observed between the SSR test results of patients with lupus compared to normal healthy objects (P autonomy questionnaire scores and SSR (P system assessment.

  14. Exercise training improves hypertension-induced autonomic dysfunction without influencing properties of peripheral cardiac vagus nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Octávio Barbosa; de Sordi, Carla Cristina; da Mota, Gustavo Ribeiro; Marocolo, Moacir; Chriguer, Rosângela Soares; da Silva, Valdo José Dias

    2017-12-01

    We examined the vagal transfer function of autonomic heart rate (HR) control in anesthetized sedentary and exercise-trained Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR). To this end, male SHR and Wystar-Kyoto (WKY) rats with 48-50weeks of age-old were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SHR S , n=12) and trained (SHR T , n=14) hypertensive rats, sedentary (WKY S , n=13) and trained (WKY T , n=13) normotensive rats. The trained groups were submitted to swimming protocol for 9weeks. Blood pressure (BP), HR, HR variability (HRV), BP variability (BPV), baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac tonus were recorded in baseline conditions. Following, electric stimulation of peripheral vagus nerve was performed in anesthetized conditions. Resting bradycardia was observed in SHR T and WKY T when compared to their respective sedentary groups (pbaroreflex-mediated tachycardia values when compared to their respective sedentary counterparts (pBaroreflex bradycardic response in SHR T was higher than in SHR S (ptraining decreased BP in SHR and improved cardiovascular autonomic balance to the heart without changes in transduction properties of peripheral cardiac vagus nerve. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and carotid stiffness in adults with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

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    Novaković, Marko; Prokšelj, Katja; Starc, Vito; Jug, Borut

    2017-06-01

    Adults after surgical repair of tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) may have impaired vascular and cardiac autonomic function. Thus, we wanted to assess interrelations between heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate recovery (HRR), as parameters of cardiac autonomic function, and arterial stiffness, as a parameter of vascular function, in adults with repaired ToF as compared to healthy controls. In a case-control study of adults with repaired ToF and healthy age-matched controls we measured: 5-min HRV variability (with time and frequency domain data collected), carotid artery stiffness (through pulse-wave analysis using echo-tracking ultrasound) and post-exercise HRR (cycle ergometer exercise testing). Twenty-five patients with repaired ToF (mean age 38 ± 10 years) and 10 healthy controls (mean age 39 ± 8 years) were included. Selected HRR and HRV (time-domain) parameters, but not arterial stiffness were significantly reduced in adults after ToF repair. Moreover, a strong association between late/slow HRR (after 2, 3 and 4 min) and carotid artery stiffness was detected in ToF patients (r = -0.404, p = 0.045; r = -0.545, p = 0.005 and r = -0.545, p = 0.005, respectively), with statistical significance retained even after adjusting for age, gender, resting heart rate and β-blockers use (r = -0.393, p = 0.024 for HRR after 3 min). Autonomic cardiac function is impaired in patients with repaired ToF, and independently associated with vascular function in adults after ToF repair, but not in age-matched healthy controls. These results might help in introducing new predictors of cardiovascular morbidity in a growing population of adults after surgical repair of ToF.

  16. Utility of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability in the Context of Autonomic Disorders Characterized by Orthostatic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jacquie; Racosta, Juan M; Balint, Brittany; Kimpinski, Kurt

    2018-03-01

    The clinical significance of heart rate variability in the context of autonomic dysfunction continues to be a matter of debate. A consensus is lacking on the best heart rate variability measures for clinical purposes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of heart rate variability parameters in healthy versus autonomic dysfunction. Healthy young (n = 134), healthy older (n = 32), and patients with mild (postural tachycardia syndrome; n = 25) and severe (neurogenic orthostatic hypotension; n = 34) autonomic dysfunction were included. Time and frequency parameters during baseline, head-up tilt (HUT), and heart rate response to deep breathing (HRDB) were compared. Cardiovagal time parameters were significantly reduced during HUT in healthy young and postural tachycardia syndrome (P heart rate (HR) (61.4 ± 9.0 bpm vs. 76.8 ± 13.6 bpm; P Heart rate changes corroborated these findings. Resting HR was significantly lower in healthy older (62.6 ± 11.0 bpm vs. 70.7 ± 12.4 bpm), and [INCREMENT]HR during HRDB was significantly higher (15.9 ± 9.2 bpm vs. 3.9 ± 4.2 bpm; P heart rate variability have a greater utility than frequency parameters in clinical autonomic disorders.

  17. Current strategies for preventing renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure: a heart failure stage approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Victor Sarli; Andrade, Lúcia; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common during episodes of acute decompensated heart failure, and historical data indicate that the mean creatinine level at admission has risen in recent decades. Different mechanisms underlying this change over time have been proposed, such as demographic changes, hemodynamic and neurohumoral derangements and medical interventions. In this setting, various strategies have been proposed for the prevention of renal dysfunction with heterogeneous results. In the present article, we review and discuss the main aspects of renal dysfunction prevention according to the different stages of heart failure. PMID:23644863

  18. Effects of exercise training on autonomic dysfunction management in an experimental model of menopause and myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Lucinar J; Figueroa, Diego; Sanches, Iris C; Jorge, Luciana; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno; De Angelis, Kátia

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise training on cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in ovariectomized rats submitted to myocardial infarction. Female Wistar rats were divided into the following ovariectomized groups: sedentary ovariectomized (SO), trained ovariectomized (TO), sedentary ovariectomized infarcted (SOI), and trained ovariectomized infarcted (TOI). Trained groups were submitted to an exercise training protocol on a treadmill (8 wk). Arterial baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated by heart rate responses to arterial pressure changes, and cardiopulmonary baroreflex sensitivity was tested by bradycardic and hypotension responses to serotonin injection. Vagal and sympathetic effects were calculated by pharmacological blockade. Arterial pressure was reduced in the TO in comparison with the SO group and increased in the TOI in relation to the SOI group. Exercise training improved the baroreflex sensitivity in both the TO and TOI groups. The TOI group displayed improvement in cardiopulmonary reflex sensitivity compared with the SOI group at the 16 microg/kg serotonin dose. Exercise training enhanced the vagal effect in both the TO (45%) and TOI (46%) animals compared with the SO and SOI animals and reduced the sympathetic effect in the TOI (38%) in comparison with the SOI animals. Significant correlations were obtained between bradycardic baroreflex responses and vagal (r = -0.7, P training in ovariectomized rats submitted to myocardial infarction improves resting hemodynamic status and reflex control of the circulation, which may be due to an increase in the vagal component. This suggests a homeostatic role for exercise training in reducing the autonomic impairment of myocardial infarction in postmenopausal women.

  19. Lateral medullary infarction with cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction: an unusual presentation with review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tridu R; Decker, Barbara; Fries, Timothy J; Tunguturi, Ajay

    2018-01-24

    We report an unusual case of lateral medullary infarction presenting with orthostatic hypotension with pre-syncope without vertigo or Horner's syndrome. Case report with review of the literature. A 67-year-old man presented with pre-syncope and ataxia without vertigo. Initial brain CT and MRI were normal. Neurological evaluation revealed right-beating nystagmus with left gaze, vertical binocular diplopia, right upper-extremity dysmetria, truncal ataxia with right axial lateropulsion, and right-facial and lower extremity hypoesthesia. Bedside blood pressure measurements disclosed orthostatic hypotension. He had normal sinus rhythm on telemetry and normal ejection fraction on echocardiogram. A repeat brain MRI disclosed an acute right dorsolateral medullary infarct. Autonomic testing showed reduced heart rate variability during paced deep breathing, attenuated late phase II and phase IV overshoot on Valsalva maneuver, and a fall of 25 mmHg of blood pressure at the end of a 10-min head-up tilt with no significant change in heart rate. These results were consistent with impaired sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiovascular reflexes. He was discharged to acute rehabilitation a week later with residual right dysmetria and ataxia. Lateral medullary infarctions are usually reported as partial presentations of classical lateral medullary syndrome with accompanying unusual symptoms ranging from trigeminal neuralgias to hiccups. Pre-syncope from orthostatic hypotension is a rare presentation. In the first 3-4 days, absence of early DWI MRI findings is possible in small, dorsolateral medullary infarcts with sensory disturbances. Physicians should be aware of this presentation, as early diagnosis and optimal therapy are associated with good prognosis.

  20. How is chronic pain related to sympathetic dysfunction and autonomic dysreflexia following spinal cord injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Edgar T

    2018-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) and neuropathic pain occur after severe injury to higher levels of the spinal cord. Mechanisms underlying these problems have rarely been integrated in proposed models of spinal cord injury (SCI). Several parallels suggest significant overlap of these mechanisms, although the relationships between sympathetic function (dysregulated in AD) and nociceptive function (dysregulated in neuropathic pain) are complex. One general mechanism likely to be shared is central sensitization - enhanced responsiveness and synaptic reorganization of spinal circuits that mediate sympathetic reflexes or that process and relay pain-related information to the brain. Another is enhanced sensory input to spinal circuits caused by extensive alterations in primary sensory neurons. Both AD and SCI-induced neuropathic pain are associated with spinal sprouting of peptidergic nociceptors that might increase synaptic input to the circuits involved in AD and SCI pain. In addition, numerous nociceptors become hyperexcitable, hypersensitive to chemicals associated with injury and inflammation, and spontaneously active, greatly amplifying sensory input to sensitized spinal circuits. As discussed with the aid of a preliminary functional model, these effects are likely to have mutually reinforcing relationships with each other, and with consequences of SCI-induced interruption of descending excitatory and inhibitory influences on spinal circuits, with SCI-induced inflammation in the spinal cord and in DRGs, and with activity in sympathetic fibers within DRGs that promotes local inflammation and spontaneous activity in sensory neurons. This model suggests that interventions selectively targeting hyperactivity in C-nociceptors might be useful for treating chronic pain and AD after high SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [A case of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E with frontal lobe dysfunction as an initial symptom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masashi; Matsumoto, Yushi; Okamoto, Kensho; Okuda, Bungo; Mizuta, Ikuko; Mizuno, Toshiki

    2017-12-27

    A 49-year-old man had developed gradually personality change, gait disturbance, and hearing loss for five years. On admission, he presented with frontal release signs, stuttering, vertical gaze palsy, sensorineural deafness, muscle rigidity, ataxia, and sensory disturbance with areflexia in the lower extremities. Brain MRI demonstrated atrophy in the cerebellum and midbrain tegmentum as well as cerebral atrophy, predominantly in the frontal lobe. He was tentatively diagnosed as progressive supranuclear palsy on the basis of clinical features and imagings. On nerve conduction study, no sensory nerve action potentials were elicited in the upper and lower extremities. Details of family history revealed a hereditary sensory neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance in his relatives. Because genetic analysis showed a rare missense mutation (c.1483T>C, p.Y495H) in DNA methyltransferase 1 gene, we diagnosed him as having hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E (HSAN1E). In addition, p.M232R mutation in prion protein gene was detected. It should be kept in mind that there are some patients with HSAN1E presenting with frontal lobe dysfunction as an initial symptom and with clinical features mimicking progressive supranuclear palsy.

  2. A brief review of chronic exercise intervention to prevent autonomic nervous system changes during the aging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Brandão Wichi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aging process is associated with alterations in the cardiovascular and autonomic nervous systems. Autonomic changes related to aging involve parasympathetic and sympathetic alterations leading to a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Several studies have suggested that physical exercise is effective in preventing deleterious changes. Chronic exercise in geriatrics seems to be associated with improvement in the cardiovascular system and seems to promote a healthy lifestyle. In this review, we address the major effects of aging on the autonomic nervous system in the context of cardiovascular control. We examine the use of chronic exercise to prevent cardiovascular changes during the aging process.

  3. A Brief Review of Chronic Exercise Intervention to Prevent Autonomic Nervous System Changes During the Aging Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichi, Rogério Brandão; De Angelis, Kátia; Jones, Lia; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia

    2009-01-01

    The aging process is associated with alterations in the cardiovascular and autonomic nervous systems. Autonomic changes related to aging involve parasympathetic and sympathetic alterations leading to a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Several studies have suggested that physical exercise is effective in preventing deleterious changes. Chronic exercise in geriatrics seems to be associated with improvement in the cardiovascular system and seems to promote a healthy lifestyle. In this review, we address the major effects of aging on the autonomic nervous system in the context of cardiovascular control. We examine the use of chronic exercise to prevent cardiovascular changes during the aging process. PMID:19330253

  4. Altered Behavioral and Autonomic Pain Responses in Alzheimer’s Disease Are Associated with Dysfunctional Affective, Self-Reflective and Salience Network Resting-State Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Beach

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available While pain behaviors are increased in Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients compared to healthy seniors (HS across multiple disease stages, autonomic responses are reduced with advancing AD. To better understand the neural mechanisms underlying these phenomena, we undertook a controlled cross-sectional study examining behavioral (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia, PAINAD scores and autonomic (heart rate, HR pain responses in 24 HS and 20 AD subjects using acute pressure stimuli. Resting-state fMRI was utilized to investigate how group connectivity differences were related to altered pain responses. Pain behaviors (slope of PAINAD score change and mean PAINAD score were increased in patients vs. controls. Autonomic measures (HR change intercept and mean HR change were reduced in severe vs. mildly affected AD patients. Group functional connectivity differences associated with greater pain behavior reactivity in patients included: connectivity within a temporal limbic network (TLN and between the TLN and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC; between default mode network (DMN subcomponents; between the DMN and ventral salience network (vSN. Reduced HR responses within the AD group were associated with connectivity changes within the DMN and vSN—specifically the precuneus and vmPFC. Discriminant classification indicated HR-related connectivity within the vSN to the vmPFC best distinguished AD severity. Thus, altered behavioral and autonomic pain responses in AD reflects dysfunction of networks and structures subserving affective, self-reflective, salience and autonomic regulation.

  5. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  6. A method for preventive intervention regarding temporomandibular pain and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellie, Saghafi; Christina, Mejersjö

    2018-02-15

    Adolescent girls frequently suffer from temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and associated headache. A program aimed at informing about risk behavior for TMD symptoms, how to influence harmful habits and about general relaxation was tested. Eighty girls at two high schools, 16 years of age, with or without symptoms, were invited to the health information on two occasions and 60 girls participated. Firstly, a questionnaire regarding symptoms and oral parafunctional habits was administrated. Structured information was given about the normal anatomy and function of muscles and joints, about the occlusion, oral habits and symptoms of orofacial pain/dysfunction and headache. General relaxation was instructed and trained. At a three-month follow-up, the same questionnaire regarding symptoms as at baseline was completed. The information provided was perceived as useful and instructive. At the follow-up, 77% reported that they used what they had learned. Headache once a week or more decreased from 49% at baseline to 35% and headache 'never/rarely' changed from 11% to 25% (p = .002). Reported joint sounds had decreased by the follow-up (p = .053), as had the use of chewing gum (p = .002). A majority of the girls suggested that the information should be scheduled during school hours. Health information about the jaw system can influence risk factors for TMD symptoms and the frequency of symptoms among adolescent girls.

  7. Preventive role of exercise training in autonomic, hemodynamic, and metabolic parameters in rats under high risk of metabolic syndrome development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Silva, Ivana Cinthya; Mostarda, Cristiano; Moreira, Edson Dias; Silva, Kleiton Augusto Santos; dos Santos, Fernando; de Angelis, Kátia; Farah, Vera de Moura Azevedo; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia

    2013-03-15

    High fructose consumption contributes to metabolic syndrome incidence, whereas exercise training promotes several beneficial adaptations. In this study, we demonstrated the preventive role of exercise training in the metabolic syndrome derangements in a rat model. Wistar rats receiving fructose overload in drinking water (100 g/l) were concomitantly trained on a treadmill (FT) or kept sedentary (F) for 10 wk. Control rats treated with normal water were also submitted to exercise training (CT) or sedentarism (C). Metabolic evaluations consisted of the Lee index and glycemia and insulin tolerance test (kITT). Blood pressure (BP) was directly measured, whereas heart rate (HR) and BP variabilities were evaluated in time and frequency domains. Renal sympathetic nerve activity was also recorded. F rats presented significant alterations compared with all the other groups in insulin resistance (in mg · dl(-1) · min(-1): F: 3.4 ± 0.2; C: 4.7 ± 0.2; CT: 5.0 ± 0.5 FT: 4.6 ± 0.4), mean BP (in mmHG: F: 117 ± 2; C: 100 ± 2; CT: 98 ± 2; FT: 105 ± 2), and Lee index (in g/mm: F = 0.31 ± 0.001; C = 0.29 ± 0.001; CT = 0.27 ± 0.002; FT = 0.28 ± 0.002), confirming the metabolic syndrome diagnosis. Exercise training blunted all these derangements. Additionally, FS group presented autonomic dysfunction in relation to the others, as seen by an ≈ 50% decrease in baroreflex sensitivity and 24% in HR variability, and increases in sympathovagal balance (140%) and in renal sympathetic nerve activity (45%). These impairments were not observed in FT group, as well as in C and CT. Correlation analysis showed that both Lee index and kITT were associated with vagal impairment caused by fructose. Therefore, exercise training plays a preventive role in both autonomic and hemodynamic alterations related to the excessive fructose consumption.

  8. Does tadalafil prevent erectile dysfunction in patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Incrocci (Luca)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractA recently published paper addressed the interesting topic of prevention of erectile dysfunction (ED) with tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) in patients undergoing radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. [1]Tadalafil 5 mg or placebo was

  9. Autonomic dysfunction in mild cognitive impairment: evidence from power spectral analysis of heart rate variability in a cross-sectional case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Nicolini

    Full Text Available Mild cognitive impairment (MCI is set to become a major health problem with the exponential ageing of the world's population. The association between MCI and autonomic dysfunction, supported by indirect evidence and rich with clinical implications in terms of progression to dementia and increased risk of mortality and falls, has never been specifically demonstrated.To conduct a comprehensive assessment of autonomic function in subjects with MCI by means of power spectral analysis (PSA of heart rate variability (HRV at rest and during provocative manoeuvres.This cross-sectional study involved 80 older outpatients (aged ≥ 65 consecutively referred to a geriatric unit and diagnosed with MCI or normal cognition (controls based on neuropsychological testing. PSA was performed on 5-minute electrocardiographic recordings under three conditions--supine rest with free breathing (baseline, supine rest with paced breathing at 12 breaths/minute (parasympathetic stimulation, and active standing (orthosympathetic stimulation--with particular focus on the changes from baseline to stimulation of indices of sympathovagal balance: normalized low frequency (LFn and high frequency (HFn powers and the LF/HF ratio. Blood pressure (BP was measured at baseline and during standing. Given its exploratory nature in a clinical population the study included subjects on medications with a potential to affect HRV.There were no significant differences in HRV indices between the two groups at baseline. MCI subjects exhibited smaller physiological changes in all three HRV indices during active standing, consistently with a dysfunction of the orthosympathetic system. Systolic BP after 10 minutes of standing was lower in MCI subjects, suggesting dysautonomia-related orthostatic BP dysregulation.Our study is novel in providing evidence of autonomic dysfunction in MCI. This is associated with orthostatic BP dysregulation and the ongoing follow-up of the study population will

  10. Autonomic dysfunction independently predicts poor cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic individuals with type 2 diabetes in the DIAD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Chyun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary aim of this secondary analysis was to determine whether cardiac autonomic neuropathy independently predicted adverse cardiac outcomes in asymptomatic individuals with type 2 diabetes. Additional aims include the determination of the correlation of standard autonomic testing measures and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability, and the association of diabetes-related and cardiac risk factors with cardiac autonomic neuropathy measures. Methods: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was assessed at the study entry into the Detection of Ischemia in Asymptomatic Diabetics study, using autonomic heart rate and blood pressure testing, and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. All participants were prospectively followed for the composite clinical outcome of cardiac death, acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, or coronary revascularization. Results: Over 5 years of follow-up, 94 of 1119 (8.4% subjects developed symptomatic cardiac disease. In unadjusted bivariate analyses, abnormalities in several cardiac autonomic neuropathy tests, including lower Valsalva and Standing Heart Rate Ratios, higher resting Heart Rate, greater systolic blood pressure decrease on standing, and lower low-frequency power, were predictive of symptomatic disease. Independent predictors of poor cardiac outcome were a lower Valsalva Heart Rate Ratio, non-Black ethnicity, longer diabetes duration, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, insulin use, reported numbness in the extremities, higher pulse pressure, family history of coronary artery disease, and higher waist-to-hip ratio. Clinical factors independently associated with a lower Valsalva Heart Rate Ratio were insulin use, clinical proteinuria, higher pulse pressure, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and non-Black ethnicity. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy predicted adverse cardiac outcomes in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes without known cardiac disease. Clinical

  11. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Prevents Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Tafazzin Gene Knockdown in Cardiac Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tafazzin, a mitochondrial acyltransferase, plays an important role in cardiolipin side chain remodeling. Previous studies have shown that dysfunction of tafazzin reduces cardiolipin content, impairs mitochondrial function, and causes dilated cardiomyopathy in Barth syndrome. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the development of cardiomyopathy and are also the obligated byproducts of mitochondria. We hypothesized that tafazzin knockdown increases ROS production from mitochondria, and a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents tafazzin knockdown induced mitochondrial and cardiac dysfunction. We employed cardiac myocytes transduced with an adenovirus containing tafazzin shRNA as a model to investigate the effects of the mitochondrial antioxidant, mito-Tempo. Knocking down tafazzin decreased steady state levels of cardiolipin and increased mitochondrial ROS. Treatment of cardiac myocytes with mito-Tempo normalized tafazzin knockdown enhanced mitochondrial ROS production and cellular ATP decline. Mito-Tempo also significantly abrogated tafazzin knockdown induced cardiac hypertrophy, contractile dysfunction, and cell death. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents cardiac dysfunction induced by tafazzin gene knockdown in cardiac myocytes and suggest mito-Tempo as a potential therapeutic for Barth syndrome and other dilated cardiomyopathies resulting from mitochondrial oxidative stress.

  12. Scintigraphic differentiation between two forms of primary dysautonomia early after onset of autonomic dysfunction: value of cardiac and pulmonary iodine-123 MIBG uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, M.J.; Juengling, F.D.; Krause, T.M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg University Hospital (Germany); Braune, S. [Dept. of Neurology, Freiburg University Hospital (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    Primary dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system can be observed in patients with Parkinson's disease and those with multiple system atrophy. However, the fate of the two diseases differs considerably and leads to different strategies for patient management. Differentiation of the two diseases currently requires a combination of several clinical and electrophysiological tests. First studies of myocardial innervation using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) indicated a possible role of scintigraphy for this purpose. An increase in the pulmonary uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG has been reported in secondary dysautonomias. Whether sympathetic innervation of the lung is affected in primary dysautonomias is currently unknown. Therefore, cardiac and pulmonary uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG was studied in 21 patients with Parkinson's disease, 7 patients with multiple system atrophy and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. Thoracic images were obtained in the anterior view 4 h after intravenous injection of 185 MBq {sup 123}I-MIBG, at which time the maximum neuronal uptake is reached. All patients with Parkinson's disease had significantly lower cardiac uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG than patients with multiple system atrophy and controls. Sympathetic innervation of the lung was not affected in either disease. It is concluded that scintigraphy with {sup 123}I-MIBG appears to be a useful tool for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy early after onset of autonomic dysfunction. (orig.)

  13. Exercise Training Prevents Arterial Baroreflex Dysfunction in Rats Treated With Central Angiotensin II

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Yan-Xia; Gao, Lie; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Zheng, Hong; Liu, Dongmei; Patel, Kaushik P.; Zucker, Irving H.; Wang, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)–induced arterial baroreflex dysfunction is associated with superoxide generation in the brain. Exercise training (EX) improves baroreflex function and decreases oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases linked to elevated central Ang II. The aim of this study was to determine whether previous EX prevents baroreflex impairment caused by central administration of exogenous Ang II via an Ang II–superoxide mechanism. Four groups of rats were used: non-EX artificial cereb...

  14. Renal Dysfunction after Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery- Risk Factors and Preventive Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurab Maitra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative renal dysfunction is a relatively common and one of the serious complications of cardiac surgery. Though off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery technique avoids cardiopulmonary bypass circuit induced adverse effects on renal function, multiple other factors cause postoperative renal dysfunction in these groups of patients. Acute kidney injury is generally defined as an abrupt and sustained decrease in kidney function. There is no consen-sus on the amount of dysfunction that defines acute kidney injury, with more than 30 definitions in use in the literature today. Although serum creatinine is widely used as a marker for changes in glomerular filtration rate, the criteria used to define renal dysfunction and acute renal failure is highly variable. The variety of definitions used in clinical studies may be partly responsible for the large variations in the reported incidence. Indeed, the lack of a uniform definition for acute kidney injury is believed to be a major impediment to research in the field. To establish a uniform definition for acute kidney injury, the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative formulated the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage Kidney (RIFLE classification. RIFLE , defines three grades of increasing severity of acute kidney injury -risk (class R, injury (class I and failure (class F - and two outcome classes (loss and end-stage kidney disease. Various perioperative risk factors for postoperative renal dysfunction and failure have been identified. Among the important preoperative factors are advanced age, reduced left ventricular function, emergency surgery, preoperative use of intraaortic balloon pump, elevated preoperative serum glucose and creatinine. Most important intraoperative risk factor is the intraoperative haemodynamic instability and all the causes of postoperative low output syndrome com-prise the postoperative risk factors. The most important preventive strategies are the identification of the

  15. Autonomic dysfunction and new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction: a CARISMA substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøns, Christian; Raatikainen, Pekka; Gang, Uffe J

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases morbidity and mortality in patients with previous myocardial infarction and left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to identify patients with a high risk for new-onset AF in this population using invasive and noninvasive...

  16. The somatosensory link in fibromyalgia: functional connectivity of the primary somatosensory cortex is altered by sustained pain and is associated with clinical/autonomic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L; Cahalan, Christine M; Harris, Richard E; Beissner, Florian; Garcia, Ronald G; Kim, Hyungjun; Wasan, Ajay D; Edwards, Robert R; Napadow, Vitaly

    2015-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic functional pain syndrome characterized by widespread pain, significant pain catastrophizing, sympathovagal dysfunction, and amplified temporal summation for evoked pain. While several studies have demonstrated altered resting brain connectivity in FM, studies have not specifically probed the somatosensory system and its role in both somatic and nonsomatic FM symptoms. Our objective was to evaluate resting primary somatosensory cortex (S1) connectivity and to explore how sustained, evoked deep tissue pain modulates this connectivity. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging and electrocardiography data on FM patients and healthy controls during rest (the rest phase) and during sustained mechanical pressure-induced pain over the lower leg (the pain phase). Functional connectivity associated with different S1 subregions was calculated, while S1(leg) connectivity (representation of the leg in the primary somatosensory cortex) was contrasted between the rest phase and the pain phase and was correlated with clinically relevant measures in FM. During the rest phase, FM patients showed decreased connectivity between multiple ipsilateral and cross-hemispheric S1 subregions, which was correlated with clinical pain severity. Compared to the rest phase, the pain phase produced increased S1(leg) connectivity to the bilateral anterior insula in FM patients, but not in healthy controls. Moreover, in FM patients, sustained pain-altered S1(leg) connectivity to the anterior insula was correlated with clinical/behavioral pain measures and autonomic responses. Our study demonstrates that both somatic and nonsomatic dysfunction in FM, including clinical pain, pain catastrophizing, autonomic dysfunction, and amplified temporal summation, are closely linked with the degree to which evoked deep tissue pain alters S1 connectivity to salience/affective pain-processing regions. Additionally, diminished connectivity between S1 subregions during the rest

  17. The somatosensory link: S1 functional connectivity is altered by sustained pain and associated with clinical/autonomic dysfunction in fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L.; Cahalan, Christine M.; Harris, Richard E.; Beissner, Florian; Garcia, Ronald G.; Kim, Hyungjun; Wasan, Ajay D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic functional pain syndrome characterized by widespread pain, significant pain catastrophizing, sympathovagal dysfunction, and amplified temporal summation for evoked pain. While several studies have found altered resting brain connectivity in FM, studies have not specifically probed the somatosensory system, and its role in both somatic and non-somatic FM symptomatology. Our objective was to evaluate resting primary somatosensory cortex (S1) connectivity, and explore how sustained, evoked deep-tissue pain modulates this connectivity. Methods We acquired fMRI and electrocardiography data from FM patients and healthy controls (HC) during rest (REST) and sustained mechanical pressure pain (PAIN) over the lower leg. Functional connectivity associated with different S1 subregions was calculated, while S1leg (leg representation) connectivity was contrast between REST and PAIN, and correlated with clinically-relevant measures in FM. Results At REST, FM showed decreased connectivity between multiple ipsilateral and cross-hemispheric S1 subregions, which was correlated with clinical pain severity. PAIN, compared to REST, produced increased S1legconnectivity to bilateral anterior insula in FM, but not in HC. Moreover, in FM, sustained pain-altered S1legconnectivity to anterior insula was correlated with clinical/behavioral pain measures and autonomic responses. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that both somatic and non-somatic dysfunction in FM, including clinical pain, pain catastrophizing, autonomic dysfunction, and amplified temporal summation, are all closely linked with the degree to which evoked deep-tissue pain alters S1 connectivity to salience/affective pain processing regions. Additionally, diminished connectivity between S1 subregions at REST in FM may result from ongoing widespread clinical pain. PMID:25622796

  18. Nitro-Oleic Acid Prevents Hypoxia- and Asymmetric Dimethylarginine-Induced Pulmonary Endothelial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelka, Adolf; Ambrozova, Gabriela; Klinke, Anna; Fidlerova, Tana; Martiskova, Hana; Kuchta, Radek; Rudolph, Tanja K; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Kuchtova, Zdenka; Woodcock, Steven R; Freeman, Bruce A; Kubala, Lukas; Pekarova, Michaela

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) represents a serious health complication accompanied with hypoxic conditions, elevated levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and overall dysfunction of pulmonary vascular endothelium. Since the prevention strategies for treatment of PH remain largely unknown, our study aimed to explore the effect of nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO 2 ), an exemplary nitro-fatty acid (NO 2 -FA), in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAEC) under the influence of hypoxia or ADMA. HPAEC were treated with OA-NO 2 in the absence or presence of hypoxia and ADMA. The production of nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) was monitored using the Griess method and ELISA, respectively. The expression or activation of different proteins (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, STAT3; hypoxia inducible factor 1α, HIF-1α; endothelial nitric oxide synthase, eNOS; intercellular adhesion molecule-1, ICAM-1) was assessed by the Western blot technique. We discovered that OA-NO 2 prevents development of endothelial dysfunction induced by either hypoxia or ADMA. OA-NO 2 preserves normal cellular functions in HPAEC by increasing NO production and eNOS expression. Additionally, OA-NO 2 inhibits IL-6 production as well as ICAM-1 expression, elevated by hypoxia and ADMA. Importantly, the effect of OA-NO 2 is accompanied by prevention of STAT3 activation and HIF-1α stabilization. In summary, OA-NO 2 eliminates the manifestation of hypoxia- and ADMA-mediated endothelial dysfunction in HPAEC via the STAT3/HIF-1α cascade. Importantly, our study is bringing a new perspective on molecular mechanisms of NO 2 -FAs action in pulmonary endothelial dysfunction, which represents a causal link in progression of PH. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  19. Statins prevent cognitive impairment after sepsis by reverting neuroinflammation, and microcirculatory/endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Patricia A; Alexandre, Pedro C B; D'Avila, Joana C; Siqueira, Luciana D; Antunes, Barbara; Estato, Vanessa; Tibiriça, Eduardo V; Verdonk, Franck; Sharshar, Tarek; Chrétien, Fabrice; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Bozza, Fernando A

    2017-02-01

    Acute brain dysfunction is a frequent condition in sepsis patients and is associated with increased mortality and long-term neurocognitive consequences. Impaired memory and executive function are common findings in sepsis survivors. Although neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been associated with acute brain dysfunction and its consequences, no specific treatments are available that prevent cognitive impairment after sepsis. Experimental sepsis was induced in Swiss Webster mice by intraperitoneal injection of cecal material (5mg/kg, 500μL). Control groups (n=5/group each experiment) received 500μL of saline. Support therapy recover (saline 0.9%, 1mL and imipenem 30mg/kg) were applied (6, 24 and 48h post injection, n=5-10/group, each experiment), together or not with additive orally treatment with statins (atorvastatin/simvastatin 20mg/kg b.w.). Survival rate was monitored at 6, 24 and 48h. In a setting of experiments, animals were euthanized at 6 and 24h after induction for biochemical, immunohistochemistry and intravital analysis. Statins did not prevented mortality in septic mice, however survivors presented lower clinical score. At another setting of experiments, after 15days, mice survivors from fecal supernatant peritoneal sepsis presented cognitive dysfunction for contextual hippocampal and aversive amygdala-dependent memories, which was prevented by atorvastatin/simvastatin treatment. Systemic and brain tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and activation of microglial were lower in septic mice treated with statins. Brain lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase levels were also reduced by statins treatment. Intravital examination of the brain vessels of septic animals revealed decreased functional capillary density and increased rolling and adhesion of leukocytes, and blood flow impairment, which were reversed by treatment with statins. In addition, treatment with statins restored the cholinergic vasodilator response

  20. Prevention of paracentesis-induced circulatory dysfunction: midodrine vs albumin. A randomized pilot study.

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    Appenrodt, Beate; Wolf, Andrea; Grünhage, Frank; Trebicka, Jonel; Schepke, Michael; Rabe, Christian; Lammert, Frank; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Heller, J

    2008-08-01

    Large-volume paracentesis in patients with cirrhosis and ascites induces arterial vasodilatation and decreases effective arterial blood volume, termed paracentesis-induced circulatory dysfunction (PICD), which can be prevented by costly intravenous albumin. Vasoconstrictors, e.g. terlipressin, may also prevent PICD. The aim was to compare the less expensive vasoconstrictor midodrine, an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist, with albumin in preventing PICD. Twenty-four patients with cirrhosis and ascites were randomly assigned to be treated with either midodrine (n=11) (12.5 mg three times per day; over 2 days) or albumin (n=13) (8 g/L of removed ascites) after large-volume paracentesis. Effective arterial blood volume was assessed indirectly by measuring plasma renin and aldosterone concentration on days 0 and 6 after paracentesis; renal function and haemodynamic changes were also measured. PICD was defined as an increase in plasma renin concentration on day 6 by more than 50% of the baseline value. PICD developed in six patients of the midodrine group (60%) and in only four patients (31%) of the albumin group. Six days after paracentesis, the aldosterone concentration increased significantly in the midodrine group, but not in the albumin group. This pilot study suggests that midodrine is not as effective as albumin in preventing circulatory dysfunction after large-volume paracentesis in patients with cirrhosis and ascites.

  1. Probiotics (VSL#3 prevent endothelial dysfunction in rats with portal hypertension: role of the angiotensin system.

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    Sherzad K Rashid

    Full Text Available AIMS: Portal hypertension characterized by generalized vasodilatation with endothelial dysfunction affecting nitric oxide (NO and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH has been suggested to involve bacterial translocation and/or the angiotensin system. The possibility that ingestion of probiotics prevents endothelial dysfunction in rats following common bile duct ligation (CBDL was evaluated. METHODS: Rats received either control drinking water or the probiotic VSL#3 solution (50 billion bacteria.kg body wt⁻¹.day⁻¹ for 7 weeks. After 3 weeks, rats underwent surgery with either resection of the common bile duct or sham surgery. The reactivity of mesenteric artery rings was assessed in organ chambers, expression of proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis, oxidative stress using dihydroethidium, and plasma pro-inflammatory cytokine levels by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Both NO- and EDH-mediated relaxations to acetylcholine were reduced in the CBDL group compared to the sham group, and associated with a reduced expression of Cx37, Cx40, Cx43, IKCa and SKCa and an increased expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS. In aortic sections, increased expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, angiotensin converting enzyme, AT1 receptors and angiotensin II, and formation of ROS and peroxynitrite were observed. VSL#3 prevented the deleterious effect of CBDL on EDH-mediated relaxations, vascular expression of connexins, IKCa, SKCa and eNOS, oxidative stress, and the angiotensin system. VSL#3 prevented the CBDL-induced increased plasma TNF-α, IL-1α and MCP-1 levels. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that VSL#3 ingestion prevents endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric artery of CBDL rats, and this effect is associated with an improved vascular oxidative stress most likely by reducing bacterial translocation and the local angiotensin system.

  2. Asymptomatic ST-depression during exercise testing in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and autonomic dysfunction

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    Dmitry Nikitich Laptev

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate cardiac autonomic function as assessed by ST dynamics during and post-exercise in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.Materials and methods. The study included 71 young patients with T1DM. The patients were aged 9–18 years and had no history of macrovascular disease or renal disease, including microalbuminuria. Cardiac autonomic function was assessed using cardiovascular tests and 24-h ECG monitoring with automatic calculation of QT interval and heart rate variability parameters. Each patient underwent the physical working capacity 170 test.Results. The prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN was 30.9%. The frequency of asymptomatic ST-segment depression increased during exercise in 10 (45.5% patients with CAN (CAN+ compared with 9 (18.4% patients without CAN (CAN-; p=0.042. During the recovery period, asymptomatic ST-segment depression was present in the first minute in 8 (36.4% CAN+ patients compared with 1 (2% CAN- patient (p=0.0003 and in the second minute in 5 (22.7% CAN+ patients compared with 1 (2% CAN- patient (p=0.0095.Conclusion. Children and adolescents with T1DM and impaired autonomic function have increased prevalence of asymptomatic ST-segment depression during and post-exercise. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents with T1DM and CAN may contribute to the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality during adulthood in patients with T1DM.

  3. Aerobic training normalizes autonomic dysfunction, HMGB1 content, microglia activation and inflammation in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of SHR.

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    Masson, Gustavo Santos; Nair, Anand R; Silva Soares, Pedro Paulo; Michelini, Lisete Compagno; Francis, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Exercise training (ExT) is recommended to treat hypertension along with pharmaceutical antihypertensive therapies. Effects of ExT in hypothalamic content of high mobility box 1 (HMGB1) and microglial activation remain unknown. We examined whether ExT would decrease autonomic and cardiovascular abnormalities in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), and whether these effects were associated with decreased HMGB1 content, microglial activation, and inflammation in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and SHR underwent moderate-intensity ExT for 2 wk. After ExT, cardiovascular (heart rate and arterial pressure) and autonomic parameters (arterial pressure and heart rate variability, peripheral sympathetic activity, cardiac vagal activity, and baroreflex function) were measured in conscious and freely-moving rats through chronic arterial and venous catheterization. Cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and brain were collected for molecular and immunohistochemistry analyses of the PVN. In addition to reduced heart rate variability, decreased vagal cardiac activity and increased mean arterial pressure, heart rate, arterial pressure variability, cardiac, and vasomotor sympathetic activity, SHR had higher HMGB1 protein expression, IκB-α phosphorylation, TNF-α and IL-6 protein expression, and microglia activation in the PVN. These changes were accompanied by higher plasma and cerebrospinal fluid levels of HMGB1. The ExT + SHR group had decreased expression of HMGB1, CXCR4, SDF-1, and phosphorylation of p42/44 and IκB-α. ExT reduced microglial activation and proinflammatory cytokines content in the PVN, and improved autonomic control as well. Data suggest that training-induced downregulation of activated HMGB1/CXCR4/microglia/proinflammatory cytokines axis in the PVN of SHR is a prompt neural adaptation to counterbalance the deleterious effects of inflammation on autonomic control. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological

  4. Does tadalafil prevent erectile dysfunction in patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

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    Luca Incrocci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A recently published paper addressed the interesting topic of prevention of erectile dysfunction (ED with tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i in patients undergoing radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. [1] Tadalafil 5 mg or placebo was administered once-daily for 24 weeks in patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT or brachytherapy (BT for prostate cancer. This randomized trial did not show superior efficacy of the active drug compared with placebo 4-6 weeks after stopping the study drug. Furthermore, patients younger than 65 years did not respond significantly better than older patients.

  5. The somatic and autonomic innervation of the clitoris; preliminary evidence of sexual dysfunction after minimally invasive slings.

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    Bekker, Milou D; Hogewoning, Cornelis R C; Wallner, Chris; Elzevier, Henk W; DeRuiter, Marco C

    2012-06-01

    Vaginal sling procedures may have a negative effect on sexual function due to damage to vascular and/or neural genital structures. Even though autonomic innervation of the clitoris plays an important role in female sexual function, most studies on the neuroanatomy of the clitoris focus on the sensory function of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris (DNC). The autonomic and somatic pathways in relationship to sling surgery have up to the present not been described in detail. The aim of this study is to reinvestigate and describe the neuroanatomy of the clitoris, both somatic and autonomic, in relation to vaginal sling procedures for stress urinary incontinence. Serially sectioned and histochemically stained pelves from 11 female fetuses (10-27 weeks of gestation) were studied, and three-dimensional reconstructions of the neuroanatomy of the clitoris were prepared. Fourteen adult female hemipelves were dissected, after a tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) (7) or tension-free vaginal tape-obturator (TVT-O) (7) procedure had been performed. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction and measured distance between the clitoral nerve systems and TVT/TVT-O. The DNC originates from the pudendal nerve in the Alcock's canal and ascends to the clitoral bodies. In the dissected adult pelves, the distance of the TVT-O to the DNC had a mean of 9 mm. The cavernous nerves originate from the vaginal nervous plexus and travel the 5 and 7 o'clock positions along the urethra. There, the autonomic nerves were found to be pierced by the TVT needle. At the hilum of the clitoral bodies, the branches of the cavernous nerves medially pass/cross the DNC and travel further alongside it. Just before hooking over the glans of the clitoris, they merge with DNC. The DNC is located inferior of the pubic ramus and was not disturbed during the placement of the TVT-O. However, the autonomic innervation of the vaginal wall was disrupted by the TVT procedure, which could lead to altered lubrication

  6. Nicorandil prevents sirolimus-induced production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombus formation

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    Ken Aizawa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sirolimus (SRL is widely used to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. However, its beneficial effect is hampered by complications of thrombosis. Several studies imply that reactive oxygen species (ROS play a critical role in endothelial dysfunction and thrombus formation. The present study investigated the protective effect of nicorandil (NIC, an anti-angina agent, on SRL-associated thrombosis. In human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs, SRL stimulated ROS production, which was prevented by co-treatment with NIC. The preventive effect of NIC on ROS was abolished by 5-hydroxydecanoate but not by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. NIC also inhibited SRL-induced up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunit p22phox mRNA. Co-treatment with NIC and SRL significantly up-regulated superoxide dismutase 2. NIC treatment significantly improved SRL-induced decrease in viability of HCAECs. The functional relevance of the preventive effects of NIC on SRL-induced ROS production and impairment of endothelial viability was investigated in a mouse model of thrombosis. Pretreatment with NIC inhibited the SRL-induced acceleration of FeCl3-initiated thrombus formation and ROS production in the testicular arteries of mice. In conclusion, NIC prevented SRL-induced thrombus formation, presumably due to the reduction of ROS and to endothelial protection. The therapeutic efficacy of NIC could represent an additional option in the prevention of SRL-related thrombosis.

  7. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents Western diet-induced diastolic dysfunction in female mice.

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    Bostick, Brian; Habibi, Javad; DeMarco, Vincent G; Jia, Guanghong; Domeier, Timothy L; Lambert, Michelle D; Aroor, Annayya R; Nistala, Ravi; Bender, Shawn B; Garro, Mona; Hayden, Melvin R; Ma, Lixin; Manrique, Camila; Sowers, James R

    2015-05-01

    Overnutrition/obesity predisposes individuals, particularly women, to diastolic dysfunction (DD), an independent predictor of future cardiovascular disease. We examined whether low-dose spironolactone (Sp) prevents DD associated with consumption of a Western Diet (WD) high in fat, fructose, and sucrose. Female C57BL6J mice were fed a WD with or without Sp (1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)). After 4 mo on the WD, mice exhibited increased body weight and visceral fat, but similar blood pressures, compared with control diet-fed mice. Sp prevented the development of WD-induced DD, as indicated by decreased isovolumic relaxation time and an improvement in myocardial performance (diet-induced DD in women. Mineralocorticoid antagonism; low-dose spironolactone; aldosterone;high-fat diet; high-fructose diet; oxidative stress; inflammation; cardiac hypertrophy; myocardial compliance. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Humanin prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction in a cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion injury model.

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    Kumfu, Sirinart; Charununtakorn, Savitree T; Jaiwongkam, Thidarat; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? Myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury causes interference in the systemic circulation and damages not only the heart but also several vital organs, including the brain. Recently, a novel peptide called humanin has been shown to exert potent neuroprotective effects. However, the effect of humanin on the brain during cardiac I/R injury has not yet been investigated. What is the main finding and its importance? The I/R injury caused blood-brain barrier breakdown, increased brain oxidative stress and resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction. Only the humanin treatment before ischaemia attenuated brain mitochondrial dysfunction, but it did not prevent blood-brain barrier breakdown or brain oxidative stress. Humanin treatment during ischaemia and in the reperfusion period provided no neuroprotection. These findings indicate that humanin exerted neuroprotection during cardiac I/R injury via improved brain mitochondrial function. Myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury causes interference in the systemic circulation and damages not only the heart but also several vital organs, including the brain. Nevertheless, limited information is available regarding the effect of cardiac I/R injury on the brain, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, brain oxidative stress and mitochondrial function. Recently, a novel peptide called humanin has been shown to exert potent neuroprotective effects. However, the effect of humanin on the brain during cardiac I/R injury has not yet been investigated. Forty-two male Wistar rats were divided into the following two groups: an I/R group, which was subjected to a 30 min left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion followed by 120 min reperfusion (I/R group; n = 36); and a sham group (n = 6). The I/R group was divided into six subgroups. Each subgroup was given either vehicle or humanin analogue (84 μg kg(-1) , i.v.) at three different time points, namely before

  9. Ursolic acid protects monocytes against metabolic stress-induced priming and dysfunction by preventing the induction of Nox4

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    Sarah L. Ullevig

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: UA protects THP-1 monocytes against dysfunction by suppressing metabolic stress-induced Nox4 expression, thereby preventing the Nox4-dependent dysregulation of redox-sensitive processes, including actin turnover and MAPK-signaling, two key processes that control monocyte migration and adhesion. This study provides a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory and athero- and renoprotective properties of UA and suggests that dysfunctional blood monocytes may be primary targets of UA and related compounds.

  10. APOE Stabilization by Exercise Prevents Aging Neurovascular Dysfunction and Complement Induction.

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    Ileana Soto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the processes that lead to age-related decline of brain structures and function. Here we use RNA-seq in combination with high resolution histological analyses to show that aging leads to a significant deterioration of neurovascular structures including basement membrane reduction, pericyte loss, and astrocyte dysfunction. Neurovascular decline was sufficient to cause vascular leakage and correlated strongly with an increase in neuroinflammation including up-regulation of complement component C1QA in microglia/monocytes. Importantly, long-term aerobic exercise from midlife to old age prevented this age-related neurovascular decline, reduced C1QA+ microglia/monocytes, and increased synaptic plasticity and overall behavioral capabilities of aged mice. Concomitant with age-related neurovascular decline and complement activation, astrocytic Apoe dramatically decreased in aged mice, a decrease that was prevented by exercise. Given the role of APOE in maintaining the neurovascular unit and as an anti-inflammatory molecule, this suggests a possible link between astrocytic Apoe, age-related neurovascular dysfunction and microglia/monocyte activation. To test this, Apoe-deficient mice were exercised from midlife to old age and in contrast to wild-type (Apoe-sufficient mice, exercise had little to no effect on age-related neurovascular decline or microglia/monocyte activation in the absence of APOE. Collectively, our data shows that neurovascular structures decline with age, a process that we propose to be intimately linked to complement activation in microglia/monocytes. Exercise prevents these changes, but not in the absence of APOE, opening up new avenues for understanding the complex interactions between neurovascular and neuroinflammatory responses in aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Aldolase B knockdown prevents high glucose-induced methylglyoxal overproduction and cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

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    Jianghai Liu

    Full Text Available We used cultured endothelial cells as a model to examine whether up-regulation of aldolase B and enhanced methylglyoxal (MG formation play an important role in high glucose-induced overproduction of advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs, oxidative stress and cellular dysfunction. High glucose (25 mM incubation up-regulated mRNA levels of aldose reductase (an enzyme converting glucose to fructose and aldolase B (a key enzyme that catalyzes MG formation from fructose and enhanced MG formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and HUVEC-derived EA. hy926 cells. High glucose-increased MG production in EA. hy926 cells was completely prevented by siRNA knockdown of aldolase B, but unaffected by siRNA knockdown of aldolase A, an enzyme responsible for MG formation during glycolysis. In addition, inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 or semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase which produces MG during the metabolism of lipid and proteins, respectively, did not alter MG production. Both high glucose (25 mM and MG (30, 100 µM increased the formation of N(ε-carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL, a MG-induced AGE, oxidative stress (determined by the generation of oxidized DCF, H(2O(2, protein carbonyls and 8-oxo-dG, O-GlcNAc modification (product of the hexosamine pathway, membrane protein kinase C activity and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in EA. hy926 cells. However, the above metabolic and signaling alterations induced by high glucose were completely prevented by knockdown of aldolase B and partially by application of aminoguanidine (a MG scavenger or alagebrium (an AGEs breaker. In conclusion, efficient inhibition of aldolase B can prevent high glucose-induced overproduction of MG and related cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

  12. Tempol prevents cardiac oxidative damage and left ventricular dysfunction in the PPAR-α KO mouse.

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    Guellich, Aziz; Damy, Thibaud; Conti, Marc; Claes, Victor; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Pineau, Thierry; Lecarpentier, Yves; Coirault, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α deletion induces a profound decrease in MnSOD activity, leading to oxidative stress and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that treatment of PPAR-α knockout (KO) mice with the SOD mimetic tempol prevents the heart from pathological remodelling and preserves LV function. Twenty PPAR-α KO mice and 20 age-matched wild-type mice were randomly treated for 8 wk with vehicle or tempol in the drinking water. LV contractile parameters were determined both in vivo using echocardiography and ex vivo using papillary muscle mechanics. Translational and posttranslational modifications of myosin heavy chain protein as well as the expression and activity of major antioxidant enzymes were measured. Tempol treatment did not affect LV function in wild-type mice; however, in PPAR-α KO mice, tempol prevented the decrease in LV ejection fraction and restored the contractile parameters of papillary muscle, including maximum shortening velocity, maximum extent of shortening, and total tension. Moreover, compared with untreated PPAR-α KO mice, myosin heavy chain tyrosine nitration and anion superoxide production were markedly reduced in PPAR-α KO mice after treatment. Tempol also significantly increased glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities (~ 50%) in PPAR-α KO mice. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that treatment with the SOD mimetic tempol can prevent cardiac dysfunction in PPAR-α KO mice by reducing the oxidation of contractile proteins. In addition, we show that the beneficial effects of tempol in PPAR-α KO mice involve activation of the glutathione peroxidase/glutathione reductase system.

  13. Garlic activates SIRT-3 to prevent cardiac oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes.

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    Sultana, Md Razia; Bagul, Pankaj K; Katare, Parameshwar B; Anwar Mohammed, Soheb; Padiya, Raju; Banerjee, Sanjay K

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac complications are major contributor in the mortality of diabetic people. Mitochondrial dysfunctioning is a crucial contributor for the cardiac complications in diabetes, and SIRT-3 remains the major mitochondrial deacetylase. We hypothesized whether garlic has any role on SIRT-3 to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic heart. Rats with developed hyperglycemia after STZ injection were divided into two groups; diabetic (Dia) and diabetic+garlic (Dia+Garl). Garlic was administered at a dose of 250mg/kg/day, orally for four weeks. An additional group was maintained to evaluate the effect of raw garlic administration on control rat heart. We have observed altered functioning of cardiac mitochondrial enzymes involved in metabolic pathways, and increased levels of cardiac ROS with decreased activity of catalase and SOD in diabetic rats. Cardiac mRNA expression of TFAM, PGC-1α, and CO1 was also altered in diabetes. In addition, reduced levels of electron transport chain complexes that observed in Dia group were normalized with garlic administration. This indicates the presence of increased oxidative stress with mitochondrial dysfunctioning in diabetic heart. We have observed reduced activity of SIRT3 and increased acetylation of MnSOD. Silencing SIRT-3 in cells also revealed the same. However, administration of garlic improved the SIRT-3 and MnSOD activity, by deacetylating MnSOD. Increased SOD activity was correlated with reduced levels of ROS in garlic-administered rat hearts. Collectively, our results provide an insight into garlic's protection to T1DM heart through activation of SIRT3-MnSOD pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tongxinluo Prevents Endothelial Dysfunction Induced by Homocysteine Thiolactone In Vivo via Suppression of Oxidative Stress

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    Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To explore whether Chinese traditional medicine, tongxinluo (TXL, exerts beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction induced by homocysteine thiolactone (HTL and to investigate the potential mechanisms. Methods and Results. Incubation of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells with HTL (1 mM for 24 hours significantly reduced cell viabilities assayed by MTT, and enhanced productions of reactive oxygen species. Pretreatment of cells with TXL (100, 200, and 400 μg/mL for 1 hour reversed these effects induced by HTL. Further, coincubation with GW9662 (0.01, 0.1 mM abolished the protective effects of TXL on HTL-treated cells. In ex vivo experiments, exposure of isolated aortic rings from rats to HTL (1 mM for 1 hour dramatically impaired acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, reduced SOD activity, and increased malondialdehyde content in aortic tissues. Preincubation of aortic rings with TXL (100, 200, and 400 μg/mL normalized the disorders induced by HTL. Importantly, all effects induced by TXL were reversed by GW9662. In vivo analysis indicated that the administration of TXL (1.0 g/kg/d remarkably suppressed oxidative stress and prevented endothelial dysfunction in rats fed with HTL (50 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks. Conclusions. TXL improves endothelial functions in rats fed with HTL, which is related to PPARγ-dependent suppression of oxidative stress.

  15. Peripheral sympathetic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease without autonomic failure is heart selective and disease specific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Junichi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Hwang, Eui-Hyo; Matsunari, Ichiro; Tonami, Norihisa; Komai, Kiyonobu; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Sakajiri, Kenichi

    2000-01-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate by means of iodine-123-labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy the peripheral sympathetic function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) without autonomic failure and in patients with related neurodegenerative diseases with parkinsonism. Seventy patients (33 men and 37 women, mean age 63±9.7 years) with parkinsonism and ten control subjects underwent MIBG scintigraphy. Of these 70 patients, 41 were diagnosed as having idiopathic PD, 9 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 6 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and 2 corticobasal degeneration (CBD); the remaining 12 were diagnosed as having neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism (P-nism) that did not meet the diagnostic criteria of any specific disease. Cardiac planar and tomographic imaging studies and subsequent whole-body imaging were performed 20 min and 3 h after the injection of 111 MBq MIBG. The early MIBG heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio in PD (1.61±0.29) was significantly lower than that in the control group (2.24±0.14, P<0.01), P-nism (2.15±0.31, P<0.01), MSA (2.08±0.31, P<0.05) and PSP (2.30±0.24, P<0.01). The delayed H/M ratio in PD (1.47±0.34) was also significantly lower than that in the control group (2.37±0.14, P<0.01), P-nism (2.13±0.38, P<0.01), PSP (2.36±0.36, P<0.01) and MSA (2.17±0.36, P<0.01). In patients with PD, early and delayed H/M ratios were significantly decreased in disease stages I, II and III (established using the Hoehn and Yahr criteria) as compared with control subjects, and there were no significant differences among the stages. Only PD showed a significantly higher washout rate (WR) than that in the control subjects (27%±8.0% vs 11%±4.2%, P<0.01). Early and delayed uptake ratios of the lung, parotid gland, thyroid gland, liver and femoral muscles in each of the patient groups were not significantly different from those in control subjects. Only the early and delayed uptake ratios of the lower leg muscles in MSA

  16. CDK5 knockdown prevents hippocampal degeneration and cognitive dysfunction produced by cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Vargas, Johana A; Múnera, Alejandro; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P

    2015-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a cerebrovascular accident and it is the most common cause of physical disabilities around the globe. Patients may present with repeated ictuses, experiencing mental consequences, such as depression and cognitive disorders. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is a kinase that is involved in neurotransmission and plasticity, but its dysregulation contributes to cognitive disorders and dementia. Gene therapy targeting CDK5 was administered to the right hippocampus of ischemic rats during transient cerebral middle artery occlusion. Physiologic parameters (blood pressure, pH, pO2, and pCO2) were measured. The CDK5 downregulation resulted in neurologic and motor improvement during the first week after ischemia. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 RNA interference (RNAi) prevented dysfunctions in learning, memory, and reversal learning at 1 month after ischemia. These observations were supported by the prevention of neuronal loss, the reduction of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunoreactivity, and a decrease in astroglial and microglia hyperreactivities and tauopathy. Additionally, CDK5 silencing led to an increase in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its Tropomyosin Receptor kinase B (TRKB) receptor, and activation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which are important targets in neuronal plasticity. Together, our findings suggest that gene therapy based on CDK5 silencing prevents cerebral ischemia-induced neurodegeneration and motor and cognitive deficits.

  17. Interference with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ in vascular smooth muscle causes baroreflex impairment and autonomic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Giulianna R; Morgan, Donald A; Ketsawatsomkron, Pimonrat; Mickle, Aaron D; Thompson, Anthony P; Cassell, Martin D; Mohapatra, Durga P; Rahmouni, Kamal; Sigmund, Curt D

    2014-09-01

    S-P467L mice expressing dominant negative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ selectively in vascular smooth muscle exhibit impaired vasodilation, augmented vasoconstriction, hypertension, and tachycardia. We hypothesized that tachycardia in S-P467L mice is a result of baroreflex dysfunction. S-P467L mice displayed increased sympathetic traffic to the heart and decreased baroreflex gain and effectiveness. Carotid arteries exhibited inward remodeling but no changes in distensibility or stress/strain. Aortic depressor nerve activity in response to increased arterial pressure was blunted in S-P467L mice. However, the arterial pressure and heart rate responses to aortic depressor nerve stimulation were unaltered in S-P467L mice, suggesting that the central and efferent limbs of the baroreflex arc remain intact. There was no transgene expression in nodose ganglion and no change in expression of the acid-sensing ion channel-2 or -3 in nodose ganglion. There was a trend toward decreased expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptor mRNA in nodose ganglion, but no difference in the immunochemical staining of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptor in the termination area of the left aortic depressor nerve in S-P467L mice. Although there was no difference in the maximal calcium response to capsaicin in cultured nodose neurons from S-P467L mice, there was decreased desensitization of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptor channels. In conclusion, S-P467L mice exhibit baroreflex dysfunction because of a defect in the afferent limb of the baroreflex arc caused by impaired vascular function, altered vascular structure, or compromised neurovascular coupling. These findings implicate vascular smooth muscle peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ as a critical determinant of neurovascular signaling. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Enterocyte-specific epidermal growth factor prevents barrier dysfunction and improves mortality in murine peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jessica A; Gan, Heng; Samocha, Alexandr J; Fox, Amy C; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-09-01

    Systemic administration of epidermal growth factor (EGF) decreases mortality in a murine model of septic peritonitis. Although EGF can have direct healing effects on the intestinal mucosa, it is unknown whether the benefits of systemic EGF in peritonitis are mediated through the intestine. Here, we demonstrate that enterocyte-specific overexpression of EGF is sufficient to prevent intestinal barrier dysfunction and improve survival in peritonitis. Transgenic FVB/N mice that overexpress EGF exclusively in enterocytes (IFABP-EGF) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to either sham laparotomy or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Intestinal permeability, expression of the tight junction proteins claudins-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -7, and -8, occludin, and zonula occludens-1; villus length; intestinal epithelial proliferation; and epithelial apoptosis were evaluated. A separate cohort of mice was followed for survival. Peritonitis induced a threefold increase in intestinal permeability in WT mice. This was associated with increased claudin-2 expression and a change in subcellular localization. Permeability decreased to basal levels in IFABP-EGF septic mice, and claudin-2 expression and localization were similar to those of sham animals. Claudin-4 expression was decreased following CLP but was not different between WT septic mice and IFABP-EGF septic mice. Peritonitis-induced decreases in villus length and proliferation and increases in apoptosis seen in WT septic mice did not occur in IFABP-EGF septic mice. IFABP-EGF mice had improved 7-day mortality compared with WT septic mice (6% vs. 64%). Since enterocyte-specific overexpression of EGF is sufficient to prevent peritonitis-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction and confers a survival advantage, the protective effects of systemic EGF in septic peritonitis appear to be mediated in an intestine-specific fashion.

  19. Differential Patterns and Determinants of Cardiac Autonomic Nerve Dysfunction during Endotoxemia and Oral Fat Load in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Dan; Strom, Alexander; Strassburger, Klaus; Nowotny, Bettina; Zahiragic, Lejla; Nowotny, Peter J; Carstensen-Kirberg, Maren; Herder, Christian; Szendroedi, Julia; Roden, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) plays an important role in regulating the metabolic homeostasis and controlling immune function. ANS alterations can be detected by reduced heart rate variability (HRV) in conditions like diabetes and sepsis. We determined the effects of experimental conditions mimicking inflammation and hyperlipidemia on HRV and heart rate (HR) in relation to the immune, metabolic, and hormonal responses resulting from these interventions. Sixteen lean healthy subjects received intravenous (i.v.) low-dose endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), i.v. fat, oral fat, and i.v. glycerol (control) for 6 hours, during which immune, metabolic, hormonal, and five HRV parameters (pNN50, RMSSD, low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) power, and LF/HF ratio) were monitored and energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity (M-value) were assessed. LPS infusion induced an increase (AUC) in HR and LF/HF ratio and decline in pNN50 and RMSSD, while oral fat resulted in elevated HR and a transient (hours 1-2) decrease in pNN50, RMSSD, and HF power. During LPS infusion, ΔIL-1ra levels and ΔIL-1ra and ΔIL-1ß gene expression correlated positively with ΔLF/HF ratio and inversely with ΔRMSSD. During oral fat intake, ΔGLP-1 tended to correlate positively with ΔHR and inversely with ΔpNN50 and ΔRMSSD. Following LPS infusion, lipid oxidation correlated positively with HR and inversely with pNN50 and RMSSD, whereas HRV was not related to M-value. In conclusion, suppression of vagal tone and sympathetic predominance during endotoxemia are linked to anti-inflammatory processes and lipid oxidation but not to insulin resistance, while weaker HRV changes in relation to the GLP-1 response are noted during oral fat load. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01054989.

  20. Differential Patterns and Determinants of Cardiac Autonomic Nerve Dysfunction during Endotoxemia and Oral Fat Load in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Ziegler

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system (ANS plays an important role in regulating the metabolic homeostasis and controlling immune function. ANS alterations can be detected by reduced heart rate variability (HRV in conditions like diabetes and sepsis. We determined the effects of experimental conditions mimicking inflammation and hyperlipidemia on HRV and heart rate (HR in relation to the immune, metabolic, and hormonal responses resulting from these interventions. Sixteen lean healthy subjects received intravenous (i.v. low-dose endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], i.v. fat, oral fat, and i.v. glycerol (control for 6 hours, during which immune, metabolic, hormonal, and five HRV parameters (pNN50, RMSSD, low-frequency (LF and high-frequency (HF power, and LF/HF ratio were monitored and energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity (M-value were assessed. LPS infusion induced an increase (AUC in HR and LF/HF ratio and decline in pNN50 and RMSSD, while oral fat resulted in elevated HR and a transient (hours 1-2 decrease in pNN50, RMSSD, and HF power. During LPS infusion, ΔIL-1ra levels and ΔIL-1ra and ΔIL-1ß gene expression correlated positively with ΔLF/HF ratio and inversely with ΔRMSSD. During oral fat intake, ΔGLP-1 tended to correlate positively with ΔHR and inversely with ΔpNN50 and ΔRMSSD. Following LPS infusion, lipid oxidation correlated positively with HR and inversely with pNN50 and RMSSD, whereas HRV was not related to M-value. In conclusion, suppression of vagal tone and sympathetic predominance during endotoxemia are linked to anti-inflammatory processes and lipid oxidation but not to insulin resistance, while weaker HRV changes in relation to the GLP-1 response are noted during oral fat load.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01054989.

  1. Swimming training prevents coronary endothelial dysfunction in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R.G. Claudio

    Full Text Available Estrogen deficiency and hypertension are considered major risk factors for the development of coronary heart disease. On the other hand, exercise training is considered an effective form to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of swimming training (SW on coronary vascular reactivity in female ovariectomized hypertensive rats are not known. We aimed to evaluate the effects of SW on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation in ovariectomized hypertensive rats. Three-month old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, n=50 were divided into four groups: sham (SH, sham plus swimming training (SSW, ovariectomized (OVX, and ovariectomized plus swimming training (OSW. The SW protocol (5 times/week, 60 min/day was conducted for 8 weeks. The vasodilatory response was measured in isolated hearts in the absence and presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME, 100 µM. Cardiac oxidative stress was evaluated in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence, while the expression of antioxidant enzymes (SOD-2 and catalase and their activities were assessed by western blotting and spectrophotometry, respectively. Vasodilation in SHR was significantly reduced by OVX, even in the presence of L-NAME, in conjunction with an increased oxidative stress. These effects were prevented by SW, and were associated with a decrease in oxidative stress. Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2 and catalase expression increased only in the OSW group. However, no significant difference was found in the activity of these enzymes. In conclusion, SW prevented the endothelial dysfunction in the coronary bed of ovariectomized SHR associated with an increase in the expression of antioxidant enzymes, and therefore may prevent coronary heart disease in hypertensive postmenopausal women.

  2. Effects of Biofeedback in Preventing Urinary Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana S. B. Perez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a biofeedback method for the strengthening of perineal muscles during the preoperative procedures for radical prostatectomy, and we evaluate this technique as a prevention measure against complications such as urinary incontinence (UI and erectile dysfunction (ED, which affect prostatectomy patients after surgery. In the experimental protocol, the patients performed specific exercises with the help of a device that provided the patient with visual biofeedback, based on a plot of the anal pressure. For the experimental protocol, we selected 20 male patients, with an average age of 64.0 years, and submitted them to ten therapeutic sessions each. A control group consisting of 32 men with an average age of 66.3 years, who were treated with the same surgical procedure but not with the preoperative procedures, also took part in the experiment. To evaluate UI and ED after the surgery in both control and experimental groups, we used two validated questionnaires—to assess UI, we used the King’s Health Questionnaire (KHQ and, for ED, we used the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5 Questionnaire. We compared the variables associated with UI and ED after the surgery for the control and experimental groups. The occurrence of UI after radical prostatectomy in the control group (100% of the patients was higher than that for the experimental group (5% of the patients, with p < 0.0001. Likewise, the occurrence of erectile dysfunction after prostatectomy in the control group (48.6% of the patients was higher than that for the experimental group (5% of the patients, with p < 0.0001. The number of nocturia events also decreased as a consequence of the intervention (p < 0.0001, as did the number of disposable underwear units for urinary incontinence (p < 0.0001. Furthermore, we compared, only for the experimental group, the anal pressure before the biofeedback intervention and after the surgery, and we

  3. Roselle supplementation prevents nicotine-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and remodelling in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Lislivia Yiang-Nee; Kamisah, Yusof; Ramalingam, Anand; Lim, Yi Cheng; Budin, Siti Balkis; Zainalabidin, Satirah

    2017-07-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) plays an important role in the initiation of cardiovascular diseases. Roselle, enriched with antioxidants, demonstrates high potential in alleviating hypertension. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of roselle supplementation of VED and remodelling in a rodent model with prolonged nicotine administration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 per group) were administered with 0.6 mg/kg nicotine for 28 days to induce VED. The rats were given either aqueous roselle (100 mg/kg) or normal saline orally 30 min prior to nicotine injection daily. One additional group of rats served as control. Thoracic aorta was isolated from rats to measure vascular reactivity, vascular remodelling and oxidative stress. Roselle significantly lowered aortic sensitivity to phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction (Endo-(+) C max = 234.5 ± 3.9%, Endo-(-) C max = 247.6 ± 5.2%) compared with untreated nicotine group (Endo-(+) C max = 264.5 ± 6.9%, Endo-(-) C max = 276.5 ± 6.8%). Roselle also improved aortic response to endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine (Endo-(+) R max = 73.2 ± 2.1%, Endo-(-) R max = 26.2 ± 0.8%) compared to nicotine group (Endo-(+) R max = 57.8 ± 1.7%, Endo-(-) R max = 20.9 ± 0.8%). In addition, roselle prevented an increase in intimal media thickness and elastic lamellae proliferation to preserve vascular architecture. Moreover, we also observed a significantly lowered degree of oxidative stress in parallel with increased antioxidant enzymes in aortic tissues of the roselle-treated group. This study demonstrated that roselle prevents VED and remodelling, and as such it has high nutraceutical value as supplement to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Lesions caused by animals in the Autonomous Province of South Tyrol in 2010: Fact-finding for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Morosetti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lesions caused by animals, in particular by dogs, are a health issue to which public opinion often reacts sensitively. To effectively manage and prevent these events, it is therefore essential to evaluate the public health impact of this phenomenon and to identify the main connected risk factors. The aim of the present survey in the Autonomous Province of Bolzano was to collect various epidemiological variables helpful in understanding the problem at local level. The incidence and impact on Health Services of human lesions by several animal species for the year 2010 is presented, as well as a more detailed analysis of dog bites, giving a profile of the victims and of the animals involved. Different factors (geographical, contextual, seasonal and relational are illustrated that can be associated with episodes where dogs react aggressively to humans. On the basis of the collected data, recommendations are given to prevent risk situations.

  5. A Fermented Whole Grain Prevents Lipopolysaccharides-Induced Dysfunction in Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Giusti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous and exogenous signals derived by the gut microbiota such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS orchestrate inflammatory responses contributing to development of the endothelial dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, bone marrow derived stem cells, promote recovery of damaged endothelium playing a pivotal role in cardiovascular repair. Since healthy nutrition improves EPCs functions, we evaluated the effect of a fermented grain, Lisosan G (LG, on early EPCs exposed to LPS. The potential protective effect of LG against LPS-induced alterations was evaluated as cell viability, adhesiveness, ROS production, gene expression, and NF-kB signaling pathway activation. Our results showed that LPS treatment did not affect EPCs viability and adhesiveness but induced endothelial alterations via activation of NF-kB signaling. LG protects EPCs from inflammation as well as from LPS-induced oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress reducing ROS levels, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defense. Moreover, LG pretreatment prevented NF-kB translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus caused by LPS exposure. In human EPCs, LPS increases ROS and upregulates proinflammatory tone, proapoptotic factors, and antioxidants. LG protects EPCs exposed to LPS reducing ROS, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defenses possibly by inhibiting NF-κB nuclear translocation.

  6. AS101 prevents diabetic nephropathy progression and mesangial cell dysfunction: regulation of the AKT downstream pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itay Israel Shemesh

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is characterized by proliferation of mesangial cells, mesangial expansion, hypertrophy and extracellular matrix accumulation. Previous data have cross-linked PKB (AKT to TGFβ induced matrix modulation. The non-toxic compound AS101 has been previously shown to favorably affect renal pathology in various animal models and inhibits AKT activity in leukemic cells. Here, we studied the pharmacological properties of AS101 against the progression of rat DN and high glucose-induced mesangial dysfunction. In-vivo administration of AS101 to Streptozotocin injected rats didn't decreased blood glucose levels but ameliorated kidney hypotrophy, proteinuria and albuminuria and downregulated cortical kidney phosphorylation of AKT, GSK3β and SMAD3. AS101 treatment of primary rat glomerular mesangial cells treated with high glucose significantly reduced their elevated proliferative ability, as assessed by XTT assay and cell cycle analysis. This reduction was associated with decreased levels of p-AKT, increased levels of PTEN and decreased p-GSK3β and p-FoxO3a expression. Pharmacological inhibition of PI3K, mTORC1 and SMAD3 decreased HG-induced collagen accumulation, while inhibition of GSK3β did not affect its elevated levels. AS101 also prevented HG-induced cell growth correlated to mTOR and (rpS6 de-phosphorylation. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of the AKT downstream pathway by AS101 has clinical potential in alleviating the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Exercise training prevents arterial baroreflex dysfunction in rats treated with central angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yan-Xia; Gao, Lie; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Zheng, Hong; Liu, Dongmei; Patel, Kaushik P; Zucker, Irving H; Wang, Wei

    2007-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced arterial baroreflex dysfunction is associated with superoxide generation in the brain. Exercise training (EX) improves baroreflex function and decreases oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases linked to elevated central Ang II. The aim of this study was to determine whether previous EX prevents baroreflex impairment caused by central administration of exogenous Ang II via an Ang II-superoxide mechanism. Four groups of rats were used: non-EX artificial cerebrospinal fluid infused, non-EX Ang II infused, EX artificial cerebrospinal fluid infused, and EX Ang II infused. Rats were treadmill trained for 3 to 4 weeks and subjected to intracerebroventricular infusion of Ang II over the last 3 days of EX. Twenty-four hours after the end of EX, the arterial baroreflex was assessed in anesthetized rats. Compared with non-EX artificial cerebrospinal fluid-infused rats, Ang II significantly decreased baroreflex sensitivity (maximum gain: 3.0+/-0.2% of maximum per millimeter of mercury versus 1.6+/-0.1% of maximum per millimeter of mercury; Pbaroreflex sensitivity and downregulated Ang II type 1 receptor and NADPH oxidase subunit protein expression in the paraventricular nucleus of Ang II-infused rats. Finally, EX decreased superoxide production in the paraventricular nucleus of Ang II-infused rats. These results indicate that EX improves arterial baroreflex function in conditions of high brain Ang II, which is mediated by the central Ang II type 1 receptor and associated with a reduction in central oxidative stress.

  8. Exercise training prevents diastolic dysfunction induced by metabolic syndrome in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Mostarda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: High fructose consumption contributes to the incidence of metabolic syndrome and, consequently, to cardiovascular outcomes. We investigated whether exercise training prevents high fructose diet-induced metabolic and cardiac morphofunctional alterations. METHODS: Wistar rats receiving fructose overload (F in drinking water (100 g/l were concomitantly trained on a treadmill (FT for 10 weeks or kept sedentary. These rats were compared with a control group (C. Obesity was evaluated by the Lee index, and glycemia and insulin tolerance tests constituted the metabolic evaluation. Blood pressure was measured directly (Windaq, 2 kHz, and echocardiography was performed to determine left ventricular morphology and function. Statistical significance was determined by one-way ANOVA, with significance set at p<0.05. RESULTS: Fructose overload induced a metabolic syndrome state, as confirmed by insulin resistance (F: 3.6 ± 0.2 vs. C: 4.5 ± 0.2 mg/dl/min, hypertension (mean blood pressure, F: 118 ± 3 vs. C: 104 ± 4 mmHg and obesity (F: 0.31±0.001 vs. C: 0.29 ± 0.001 g/mm. Interestingly, fructose overload rats also exhibited diastolic dysfunction. Exercise training performed during the period of high fructose intake eliminated all of these derangements. The improvements in metabolic parameters were correlated with the maintenance of diastolic function. CONCLUSION: The role of exercise training in the prevention of metabolic and hemodynamic parameter alterations is of great importance in decreasing the cardiac morbidity and mortality related to metabolic syndrome.

  9. Cardioprotection afforded by exercise training prior to myocardial infarction is associated with autonomic function improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Barboza, Catarina Andrade; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozi, Nicolle Martins; Mostarda, Cristiano; Figueroa, Diego; Souza, Gabriel Inacio Honorato; De Angelis, Kátia; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2014-07-14

    It has been suggested that exercise training (ET) protects against the pathological remodeling and ventricular dysfunction induced by myocardial infarction (MI). However, it remains unclear whether the positive adjustments on baroreflex and cardiac autonomic modulations promoted by ET may afford a cardioprotective mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic ET, prior to MI, on cardiac remodeling and function, as well as on baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary rats submitted to Sham surgery (C); trained rats submitted to Sham surgery (TC); sedentary rats submitted to MI (I), trained rats submitted to MI (TI). Sham and MI were performed after ET period. After surgeries, echocardiographic, hemodynamic and autonomic (baroreflex sensitivity, cardiovascular autonomic modulation) evaluations were conducted. Prior ET prevented an additional decline in exercise capacity in TI group in comparison with I. MI area was not modified by previous ET. ET was able to increase the survival and prevent additional left ventricle dysfunction in TI rats. Although changes in hemodynamic evaluations were not observed, ET prevented the decrease of baroreflex sensitivity, and autonomic dysfunction in TI animals when compared with I animals. Importantly, cardiac improvement was associated with the prevention of cardiac autonomic impairment in studied groups. Prior ET was effective in changing aerobic capacity, left ventricular morphology and function in rats undergoing MI. Furthermore, these cardioprotective effects were associated with attenuated cardiac autonomic dysfunction observed in trained rats. Although these cause-effect relationships can only be inferred, rather than confirmed, our study suggests that positive adaptations of autonomic function by ET can play a vital role in preventing changes associated with cardiovascular disease, particularly in relation to MI.

  10. [Analysis of activities of the preventive dentistry service in the Health Area 8 of the Valencia Autonomous Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llena Puy, M C; Ausina Márquez, V

    1996-02-29

    We describe and analize the activities we carried out in a surgery from a preventive dentistry unit. Longitudinal descriptive study from 1993 since 1994. Health Area 8 from the Valencian Autonomous Region. Children from 3 to 14 year-old attendant to the preventive dentistry unit's surgery (2.497). We visited 5.012 children. The highest percentage of population corresponded to the zona 4, where began at first the preventive service. The activities distribution was as follow: oral explorations and plaque control (100%), fluoride topic aplication (90.38%), diet control (36.81%), pit and fisure sealants (6.46%), profilaxis (8.71%), radiological diagnosis (6.46%), dental emergencies (2.17%). The users origin was: 38.88% school oral explorations made over 6- and 10-year-old children; 63.71% from self-request; and 16.45% sent by other health professionals. 41.42% were continuated visits. Demand of preventive dental services is very high in our health area, although incorporation of therapeutic techniques is wished by the population. This demand increase as well as the surgery is closer to the user. People from big cities are stubborn using these services from smallest villages, even having transport facilities. Children start coming to the consults between 5-6 year-old, keeping an acceptable control until 12 approximately.

  11. Cardiac autonomic testing and treating heart disease. 'A clinical perspective'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. DePace

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major health concern, affecting nearly half the middle-age population and responsible for nearly one-third of all deaths. Clinicians have several major responsibilities beyond diagnosing CHD, such as risk stratification of patients for major adverse cardiac events (MACE and treating risks, as well as the patient. This second of a two-part review series discusses treating risk factors, including autonomic dysfunction, and expected outcomes. Methods Therapies for treating cardiac mortality risks including cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN, are discussed. Results While risk factors effectively target high-risk patients, a large number of individuals who will develop complications from heart disease are not identified by current scoring systems. Many patients with heart conditions, who appear to be well-managed by traditional therapies, experience MACE. Parasympathetic and Sympathetic (P&S function testing provides more information and has the potential to further aid doctors in individualizing and titrating therapy to minimize risk. Advanced autonomic dysfunction (AAD and its more severe form cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy have been strongly associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality and are diagnosable through autonomic testing. This additional information includes patient-specific physiologic measures, such as sympathovagal balance (SB. Studies have shown that establishing and maintaining proper SB minimizes morbidity and mortality risk. Conclusions P&S testing promotes primary prevention, treating subclinical disease states, as well as secondary prevention, thereby improving patient outcomes through (1 maintaining wellness, (2 preventing symptoms and disorder and (3 treating subclinical manifestations (autonomic dysfunction, as well as (4 disease and symptoms (autonomic neuropathy.

  12. Autonomous Voltage Security Regions to Prevent Cascading Trip Faults in Wind Turbine Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niu, Tao; Guo, Qinglai; Sun, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Cascading trip faults in large-scale wind power centralized integration areas bring new challenges to the secure operation of power systems. In order to deal with the complexity of voltage security regions and the computation difficulty, this paper proposes an autonomous voltage security region...... wind farm, an AVSR is determined to guarantee the normal operation of each wind turbine generator (WTG), while in the control center, each region is designed in order to guarantee secure operation both under normal conditions and after an N-1 contingency. A real system in Northern China was used...... (AVSR) for each wind farm and the point of common coupling (PCC) substation, whose voltage can be controlled in a decoupled way. The computation of the AVSR can be completed using a stepwise search method exchanging voltage and power information between the control center and the wind farms. At each...

  13. Pharmacological interventions for preventing dry mouth and salivary gland dysfunction following radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Philip; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Hua, Fang; Worthington, Helen V

    2017-07-31

    Salivary gland dysfunction is an 'umbrella' term for the presence of either xerostomia (subjective sensation of dryness), or salivary gland hypofunction (reduction in saliva production). It is a predictable side effect of radiotherapy to the head and neck region, and is associated with a significant impairment of quality of life. A wide range of pharmacological interventions, with varying mechanisms of action, have been used for the prevention of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. To assess the effects of pharmacological interventions for the prevention of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 14 September 2016); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 8) in the Cochrane Library (searched 14 September 2016); MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 14 September 2016); Embase Ovid (1980 to 14 September 2016); CINAHL EBSCO (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; 1937 to 14 September 2016); LILACS BIREME Virtual Health Library (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information database; 1982 to 14 September 2016); Zetoc Conference Proceedings (1993 to 14 September 2016); and OpenGrey (1997 to 14 September 2016). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We included randomised controlled trials, irrespective of their language of publication or publication status. Trials included participants of all ages, ethnic origin and gender, scheduled to receive radiotherapy on its own or in addition to chemotherapy to the head and neck region. Participants could be outpatients or inpatients. We included trials comparing any pharmacological agent

  14. Polyphenol-enriched diet prevents coronary endothelial dysfunction by activating the Akt/eNOS pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilahur, Gemma; Padró, Teresa; Casaní, Laura; Mendieta, Guiomar; López, José A; Streitenberger, Sergio; Badimon, Lina

    2015-03-01

    The Mediterranean diet, rich in polyphenols, has shown to be cardioprotective. However the mechanisms involved remain unknown. We investigated whether supplementation with a pomegranate extract rich in polyphenols renders beneficial effects on coronary function in a clinically relevant experimental model and characterized the underlying mechanisms. Pigs were fed a 10-day normocholesterolemic or hypercholesterolemic diet. Half of the animals were given a supplement of 625 mg/day of a pomegranate extract (Pomanox; 200 mg punicalagins/day). Coronary responses to escalating doses of vasoactive drugs (acetylcholine, calcium ionophore, and sodium nitroprusside) and L-NG-monomethylarginine (endothelial nitric oxide-synthase inhibitor) were measured using flow Doppler. Akt/endothelial nitric oxide-synthase axis activation, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression, oxidative deoxyribonucleic acid damage in the coronary artery, and lipoprotein resistance to oxidation were evaluated. In dyslipidemic animals, Pomanox supplementation prevented diet-induced impairment of endothelial relaxation, reaching vasodilatory values comparable to normocholesterolemic animals upon stimulation with acetylcholine and/or calcium ionophore. These beneficial effects were associated with vascular Akt/endothelial nitric oxide-synthase activation and lower monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression. Pomanox supplementation reduced systemic oxidative stress (higher high-density lipoprotein-antioxidant capacity and higher low-density lipoprotein resistance to oxidation) and coronary deoxyribonucleic acid damage. Normocholesterolemic animals elicited similar drug-related vasodilation regardless of Pomanox supplementation. All animals displayed a similar vasodilatory response to sodium nitroprusside and L-NG-monomethylarginine blunted all vasorelaxation responses except for sodium nitroprusside. Pomanox supplementation hinders hyperlipemia-induced coronary endothelial dysfunction by activating

  15. Resveratrol prevents the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction in the SHR without lowering blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thandapilly, Sijo J; Wojciechowski, Peter; Behbahani, John; Louis, Xavier L; Yu, Liping; Juric, Danijel; Kopilas, Melanie A; Anderson, Hope D; Netticadan, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a compensatory enlargement of the heart in response to stress such as hypertension. It is beneficial in reducing stress placed on the heart. However, when the stress is of a chronic nature, it becomes pathological and leads to cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Current treatments for hypertension and heart failure have proven beneficial but are not highly specific and associated with side effects. Accordingly, there is an important need for alternative strategies to provide safe and effective treatment. Ten-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with resveratrol (2.5 mg/kg/day) for a period of 10 weeks. Systolic blood pressure, and cardiac structure and function were measured in all groups at different time points of resveratrol treatment. Oxidative stress was also determined in all groups after 10 weeks of resveratrol treatment. SHRs were characterized with high blood pressure and concentric hypertrophy from 15 weeks of age. Cardiac functional abnormalities were also evident in SHR from 15 weeks onwards. Resveratrol treatment significantly prevented the development of concentric hypertrophy, and systolic and diastolic dysfunction in SHR without lowering blood pressure. Resveratrol also significantly reduced the oxidative stress levels of cardiac tissue in SHR. Resveratrol treatment was beneficial in preventing the development of concentric hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction in SHR. The cardioprotective effect of resveratrol in SHR may be partially mediated by a reduction in oxidative stress. Thus, resveratrol may have potential in preventing cardiac impairment in patients with essential hypertension.

  16. Erectile dysfunction as a manifestation of urogenital autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes: epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Gagik Radikovich Galstyan; yana Grigor'evna Shwarts; Sergey Anatol'evich Dubsky; Aleksandr Evgen'evich Lepetukhin; Roman Viktorovich Rozhivanov; Dmitry Gennadievich Kurbatov

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction characterized by a significant decline in the quality of life of patients and leading to infertility and problems in social life is diagnosed in more than 40% of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM).Erectile dysfunction is the most common sexual disorder in DM patients. The article describes epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnostic and treatment of erectile dysfunction in T1DM patients.

  17. [Recent advances on pericytes in microvascular dysfunction and traditional Chinese medicine prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Liu, Jian-Xun; Guo, Hao; Ren, Jian-Xun

    2017-08-01

    Pericytesis a kind of widespread vascular mural cells embedded within the vascular basement membrane of blood microvessels, constituting the barrier of capillaries and tissue spaces together with endothelial cells. Pericytes communicate with microvascular endothelial cells through cell connections or paracrine signals, playing an important role in important physiological processes such as blood flow, vascular permeability and vascular formation. Pericytes dysfunction may participate in some microvascular dysfunction, and also mediate pathological repair process, therefore pericytes attracted more and more attention. Traditional Chinese medicine suggests that microvascular dysfunction belongs to the collaterals disease; Qi stagnation and blood stasis in collaterals result in function imbalance of internal organs. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has shown effects on pericytes in microvascular dysfunction, for example qi reinforcing blood-circulation activating medicines can reduce the damage of retinal pericytes in diabetic retinopathy. However, there are some limitations of research fields, inaccuracy of research techniques and methods, and lack of mechanism elaboration depth in the study of microvascular lesion pericytes. This paper reviewed the biological characteristics of pericytes and pericytes in microvascular dysfunction, as well as the intervention study of TCM on pericytes. The article aims to provide reference for the research of pericytes in microvascular dysfunction and the TCM study on pericytes. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  18. Prevention of airway hyperresponsiveness induced by left ventricular dysfunction in rats

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    Petak Ferenc

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effectiveness of strategies for treatment of the altered static lung volume and against the development of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR following a left ventricular dysfunction (LVD induced by myocardial ischaemia was investigated in a rat model of sustained postcapillary pulmonary hypertension. Methods Airway resistance (Raw was identified from the respiratory system input impedance (Zrs in four groups of rats. End-expiratory lung volume (EELV was determined plethysmographically, and Zrs was measured under baseline conditions and following iv infusions of 2, 6 or 18 μg/kg/min methacholine. Sham surgery was performed in the rats in Group C, while the left interventricular coronary artery was ligated and Zrs and its changes following identical methacholine challenges were reassessed in the same rats 8 weeks later, during which no treatment was applied (Group I, or the animals were treated daily with a combination of an angiotensin enzyme converter inhibitor and a diuretic (enalapril and furosemide, Group IE, or a calcium channel blocker (diltiazem, Group ID. The equivalent dose of methacholine causing a 100% increase in Raw (ED50 was determined in each group. Diastolic pulmonary arterial pressure (PapD was assessed by introducing a catheter into the pulmonary artery. Results The sustained presence of a LVD increased PapD in all groups of rats, with variable but significant elevations in Groups I (p = 0.004, ID (p = 0.013 and IE (p = 0.006. A LVD for 8 weeks induced no changes in baseline Raw but elevated the EELV independently of the treatments. In Group I, BHR consistently developed following the LVD, with a significant decrease in ED50 from 10.0 ± 2.5 to 6.9 ± 2.5 μg/kg/min (p = 0.006. The BHR was completely abolished in both Groups ID and IE, with no changes in ED50 (9.5 ± 3.6 vs. 10.7 ± 4.7, p = 0.33 and 10.6 ± 2.1 vs. 9.8 ± 3.5 μg/kg/min p = 0.56, respectively

  19. [Idiopathic autonomic neuropathy (pandysautonomia)].

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    Jankowicz, E; Drozdowski, W; Pogumirski, J

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of current literature, clinical and neuropathologic features of idiopathic autonomic neuropathy is presented. Idiopathic autonomic neuropathy is a disease characterized by acute or subacute onset, monophasic course over a period of several years, it is often preceded by an infection. The spectrum of autonomic changes ranges from cholinergic or adrenergic dysfunction to pandysautonomia, leading to heterogeneity of its clinical features. Possible sympathetic system abnormalities found in autonomic neuropathy are: poor pupillary response to light in darkness, orthostatic hypotension leading to syncope, hypotension without compensatory tachycardia, ejaculation disturbances and vasomotor instability. Possible parasympathetic dysfunctions are: salivation and lacrimation disturbances, absent pupillary constriction to light and near gaze, gastrointestinal tract immobility and impairment of gastrointestinal function, atonic bladder with large residual volume, erectile impotence. Pandysautonomia is thought to result from an immune mediated mechanism and responds well to plasmaferesis and intravenous immunoglobin therapy leading to gradual, sometimes not full, recovery. Moreover in this article we pay attention to the clinical value of many tests like cardiovascular or pharmacological studies in the diagnosis of pandysautonomia and in differentiation of pre- and postganglionic changes. In order to diagnose idiopathic autonomic neuropathy one has to rule out a large number of diseases with autonomic dysfunction e.g.: diabetes, malignant neoplasms, acute intermittent porphyria, Shy-Drager syndrome, Riley-Day's dysautonomia, Parkinson's disease, amyloidosis and others.

  20. [Construction and clinical evaluation of novel methods for detecting autoinomic dysfunction].

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    Obayashi, Konen

    2012-05-01

    The autonomic nervous system innervates every organ in the body. Since autonomic disturbances affect patient survival, an understanding of and recognition of these disturbances are important. We adopted several new methods to evaluate autonomic function accurately for detecting the onset of small-fiber neuropathy, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry, ultrasonography, 123I-MIBG scintigraphy, electrogastrography, cystometry, glucose-tolerance test, near-infrared spectrophotoscopy, blood pressure tests, and evaluation of sweating. After these examinations, we applied potential effective treatments to improve the survival and daily activity of these patients. We also evaluated the effect of liver transplantation on autonomic dysfunction of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) patients using our tools. Liver transplantation not only prevents the progression of autonomic dysfunction in these patients but also improves some autonomic symptoms in the early stage after the operation. As all domino-liver transplantation-induced amyloid neuropathies, including our cases, were of the sensory type rather than with autonomic involvement, assessment of the pain threshold by preferential stimulation of A delta fibers is a particularly useful tool for diagnosing the onset of small-fiber neuropathies in these patients in addition to autonomic testing. Analyses and comparison of patients with FAP and domino-liver-transplanted patients with autonomic, sensory and motor dysfunction may give a clue to elucidate the pathogenesis and treatment of neuropathy in FAP. As autonomic disturbances play an important role in the symptomatology of small-fiber neuropathy, liver-transplanted FAP, and domino-liver-transplanted patients, further studies of autonomic dysfunction in these patients may lead to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  1. Recent advancement to prevent the development of allergy and allergic diseases and therapeutic strategy in the perspective of barrier dysfunction.

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    Natsume, Osamu; Ohya, Yukihiro

    2018-01-01

    Therapeutic strategy in late 20th century to prevent allergic diseases was derived from a conceptual framework of allergens elimination which was as same as that of coping with them after their onset. Manifold trials were implemented; however, most of them failed to verify the effectiveness of their preventive measures. Recent advancement of epidemiological studies and cutaneous biology revealed epidermal barrier dysfunction plays a major role of allergen sensitization and development of atopic dermatitis which ignites the inception of allergy march. For this decade, therapeutic strategy to prevent the development of food allergy has been confronted with a paradigm shift from avoidance and delayed introduction of allergenic foods based on the theoretical concept to early introduction of them based on the clinical and epidemiological evidences. Especially, prevention of peanut allergy and egg allergy has been established with the highest evidence verified by randomized controlled trials, although application in clinical practice should be done with attention. This paradigm shift concerning food allergy was also due to the discovery of cutaneous sensitization risk of food allergens for an infant with eczema revealed by prospective studies. Here we have recognized the increased importance of prevention of eczema/atopic dermatitis in infancy. Two randomized controlled trials using emollients showed successful results in prevention of atopic dermatitis in infancy; however, longer term safety and prognosis including allergy march should be pursued. To establish more fundamental strategy for prevention of the development of allergy, further studies clarifying the mechanisms of interaction between barrier dysfunction and microbial milieu are needed with macroscope to understand the relationship between allergic diseases and a diversity of environmental influences. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL NERVESPARING PROSTATECTOMY

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    P. A. Karnaukh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our research is to improve the quality of life of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. With the increasing frequency of prostate cancer and determining the effectiveness of surgical treatment significantly increased the number of radical prostatectomy. Surgical treatment is definitely in much greater extent when compared to radiation treatments related to the development of impotence, erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence.The incidence of erectile dysfunction after prostatectomy ranges from 10 to 50%. Therefore, the development of new programmes for the rehabilitation of patients can improve their quality of life, due to the greater likelihood of recovery of erectile function after the operation. In our study we observed 84 patient. The incidence of erectile dysfunction was 76%. After applying one of the existing methods of stimulation: FDÈ5 inhibitors, intracavernose injections of prostaglandin, physical therapy, we were able to increase the effectiveness of treatment up to 54.8%, 40% and 70% respectively.

  3. Erectile dysfunction as a manifestation of urogenital autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes: epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options

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    Gagik Radikovich Galstyan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction characterized by a significant decline in the quality of life of patients and leading to infertility and problems in social life is diagnosed in more than 40% of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM.Erectile dysfunction is the most common sexual disorder in DM patients. The article describes epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnostic and treatment of erectile dysfunction in T1DM patients.

  4. Choice of an Infusion Agent for the Prevention of Multiple Organ Dysfunction in Acute Massive Blood Loss (Experimental Study

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    A. Yu. Yakovlev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to perform an experimental study of the effect of sterofundin isotonic on the biochemical parameters characterizing the degree of organ injury after acute massive blood loss (AMBL. Material and methods. Experiments were carried out on 36 male Wistar rats weighing 230—250 g. Hemorrhagic stroke was simulated via AMBL in a volume of 2.5 ml/100 g at a rate of 2 ml/min. An hour after AMBL, there was hypovolemia compensation within 60 minutes in a volume of 200% of the blood loss: by Ringer’s solution in a control group and by sterofundin isotonic in an experimental group. Then blood reinfu-sion was made in a volume of 70% of blood loss. The biochemical parameters of multiple organ dysfunction (glucose, lactate, urea, creatinine, bilirubin, total protein, albumin, enzymemia (aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, amylase, endotoxemia (low- and medium-molecular-weight substances in the plasma and erythrocytes, acid-base condition, electrolytes of venous blood, and animal survival were determined on days 1 and 3 following AMBL. Results. There was a reduction in the time and degree of posthemorrhagic metabolic, biochemical, and electrolyte disorders, enzymemia, and endotoxemia in the experimental animals. Conclusion. The experimental studies suggest that Ringer’s solution is inadequately effective in preventing multiple organ dysfunction due to AMBL. The malate-containing blood substitute sterofundin isotonic that is used during early therapy for AMBL exerts a marked preventive effect on the development of visceral organ injuries when multiple organ dysfunction occurs in the early and late posthemorrhagic period. The experimental findings make it possible to recommend that sterofundin isotonic should be used in intensive care of hypovolemic shock arising from AMBL. Key words: acute massive blood loss, malate, sterofun dinisotonic, lactate, endotoxemia, multiple organ

  5. Safety and efficacy of landiolol hydrochloride for prevention of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery in patients with left ventricular dysfunction: Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation After Cardiac Surgery With Landiolol Hydrochloride for Left Ventricular Dysfunction (PLATON) trial.

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    Sezai, Akira; Osaka, Shunji; Yaoita, Hiroko; Ishii, Yusuke; Arimoto, Munehito; Hata, Hiroaki; Shiono, Motomi

    2015-10-01

    We previously conducted a prospective study of landiolol hydrochloride (INN landiolol), an ultrashort-acting β-blocker, and reported that it could prevent atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery. This trial was performed to investigate the safety and efficacy of landiolol hydrochloride in patients with left ventricular dysfunction undergoing cardiac surgery. Sixty patients with a preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 35% were randomly assigned to 2 groups before cardiac surgery and then received intravenous infusion with landiolol hydrochloride (landiolol group) or without landiolol (control group). The primary end point was occurrence of atrial fibrillation as much as 1 week postoperatively. The secondary end points were blood pressure, heart rate, intensive care unit and hospital stays, ventilation time, ejection fraction, biomarkers of ischemia, and brain natriuretic peptide. Atrial fibrillation occurred in 3 patients (10%) in the landiolol group versus 12 (40%) in the control group, and its frequency was significantly lower in the landiolol group (P = .002). During the early postoperative period, levels of brain natriuretic peptide and ischemic biomarkers were significantly lower in the landiolol group than the control group. The landiolol group also had a significantly shorter hospital stay (P = .019). Intravenous infusion was not discontinued for hypotension or bradycardia in either group. Low-dose infusion of landiolol hydrochloride prevented atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery in patients with cardiac dysfunction and was safe, with no effect on blood pressure. This intravenous β-blocker seems useful for perioperative management of cardiac surgical patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Direct renin inhibition is not enough to prevent reactive oxygen species generation and vascular dysfunction in renovascular hypertension.

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    Martins-Oliveira, Alisson; Guimaraes, Danielle A; Ceron, Carla S; Rizzi, Elen; Oliveira, Diogo M M; Tirapelli, Carlos R; Casarini, Dulce E; Fernandes, Fernanda B; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2018-02-15

    Renin-angiotensin system activation promotes oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. However, no previous study has examined the effects of the renin inhibitor aliskiren, either alone or combined with angiotensin II type 1 antagonists on alterations induced by two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) hypertension. We compared the vascular effects of aliskiren (50mg/kg/day), losartan (10mg/kg/day), or both by gavage for 4 weeks in 2K1C and control rats. Treatment with losartan, aliskiren, or both exerted similar antihypertensive effects. Aliskiren lowered plasma Ang I concentrations in sham rats and in hypertensive rats treated with aliskiren or with both drugs. Aliskiren alone or combined with losartan decreased plasma angiotensin II concentrations measured by high performance liquid chromatography, whereas losartan alone had no effects. In contrast, losartan alone or combined with aliskiren abolished hypertension-induced increases in aortic angiotensin II concentrations, whereas aliskiren alone exerted no such effects. While hypertension enhanced aortic oxidative stress assessed by dihydroethidium fluorescence and by lucigenin chemiluminescence, losartan alone or combined with aliskiren, but not aliskiren alone, abolished this alteration. Hypertension impaired aortic relaxation induced by acetylcholine, and losartan alone or combined with aliskiren, but not aliskiren alone, reversed this alteration. Losartan alone or combined with aliskiren, but not aliskiren alone, increased plasma nitrite concentrations in 2K1C rats. These findings show that antihypertensive effects of aliskiren do not prevent hypertension-induced vascular oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. These findings contrast those found with losartan and suggest that renin inhibition is not enough to prevent hypertension-induced impaired redox biology and vascular dysfunction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Insights into the background of autonomic medicine.

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    Laranjo, Sérgio; Geraldes, Vera; Oliveira, Mário; Rocha, Isabel

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the physiology underlying the autonomic nervous system is pivotal for understanding autonomic dysfunction in clinical practice. Autonomic dysfunction may result from primary modifications of the autonomic nervous system or be secondary to a wide range of diseases that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Together with a detailed history and physical examination, laboratory assessment of autonomic function is essential for the analysis of various clinical conditions and the establishment of effective, personalized and precise therapeutic schemes. This review summarizes the main aspects of autonomic medicine that constitute the background of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Usefulness of classical homoeopathy for the prevention of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction: A case series

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    Jürgen Pannek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to Spinal Cord Injury (SCI, recurrent Urinary Tract Infections (UTI, is a frequently encountered clinical problem. Often, conventional preventive measures are not successful. Aims: To treat the patients of SCI suffering from recurrent UTI with classical homoeopathy as add-on to standard urologic care. Materials and Methods: After exclusion of morphological abnormalities and initiation of a standard regime for prophylaxis, all patients with a neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to SCI, with more than three symptomatic UTI/year, were offered additional homoeopathic care. Symptoms were fever, incontinence, increased spasticity, decreased bladder capacity or pain/decreased general health combined with significant bacteriuria. Descriptive statistics was used for analysis. Results: Eight patients were followed up for a median period of 15 months. Five patients remained free of UTI, whereas UTI frequency was reduced in three patients. Conclusion: Our initial experience with homoeopathic prevention of UTI as add on to standard urologic prophylactic measures is encouraging. For an evidence-based evaluation of this concept, prospective studies are required. Keys for the positive outcome of this case series are co-operation of well-qualified partners, mutual respect and the motivation to co-operate closely.

  9. Melatonin pretreatment prevents isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction by modulating sleep-wake rhythm in mice.

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    Xia, Tianjiao; Cui, Yin; Chu, Shuaishuai; Song, Jia; Qian, Yue; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Sleep plays an important role in memory processing. However, its role in anesthesia-induced cognitive dysfunction was not revealed. Our study sought to investigate the connection between the cognition decline and sleep-wake rhythm disorders after long-term isoflurane anesthesia in mice. Also, we examined the effect of exogenous melatonin pretreatment on both cognitive function and circadian rhythm. Furthermore, we discussed whether NR2B (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit)-CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein) signaling pathway was involved in this course. 2-month-old male C57/BL-6J mice were submitted to long-term anesthesia using 1% isoflurane from CT (Circadian Time) 14 to CT20. Melatonin pretreatment were conducted before anesthesia for 7 Days. Intellicage for mice and Mini-Mitter were applied to monitor spatial memory and gross motor activity which can reflect cognition and sleep-wake rhythm. Messenger RNA and protein expression of right hippocampus NR2B and CREB were examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. 6h isoflurane anesthesia led to impaired spatial memory from Day 3 to Day 10 in mice accompanied by the disruption of sleep-wake rhythm. Meanwhile, the hippocampus CREB and NR2B expression declined in step. Melatonin pretreatment ameliorated disturbed sleep-wake cycle, improved isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction, and reversed the down-regulation of CREB and NR2B expression. Our data demonstrate that sleep-wake rhythm is involved in the isoflurane-induced cognition impairment and pretreatment of melatonin has a positive effect on circadian normalization and cognition reversal. Also, NR2B-CREB signaling pathway has a critical role in this process. This study provides us a new strategy for anesthesia-induced cognitive dysfunction therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Analysis of imported malaria epidemic situation and implication for prevention and control strategy in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in 2014].

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    Kang-Ming, Lin; Jun, Li; Yi-Chao, Yang; Shu-Jiao, Wei; Wei-Wei, Zhang; Xiang-Yang, Feng; Hai-Yan, Wei; Ya-Ming, Huang

    2016-10-26

    To analyze the epidemic characteristics of the imported malaria cases in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in 2014, so as to assess the transmission risk and explore the prevention and control strategy. The data of the malaria epidemic situation in the network direct report system of Guangxi in 2014 and the annual report of malaria epidemic situation in 14 cities were collected. The epidemiological information of the imported malaria cases was analyzed. A total of 184 malaria patients were reported in Guangxi in 2014, with a descent rate of 85.29% when compared to that in 2013 (1 251 cases), and the incidence rate was 0.35/100 000. All the cases were imported from abroad, and four species of Plasmodium were found in their blood samples. The number of falciparum malaria cases was the most (49.46%), followed by the ovale malaria cases (32.07%). All the cases were distributed in 32 counties (districts) of 11 cities, and 65.76% of them were distributed in Shanglin County. Most of the cases were male (98.37%), and those aged in 20-49 years accounted for 87.50%. The imported cases came from 14 countries of Africa (86.41%) and 2 countries of Southeast Asia (13.59%), in which, 48.37% of the cases were imported from Garner. The main occupation of the cases in abroad was gold mining work (86.96%). The cases were reported all the year around, with no obvious seasonality. The interval time of back home to attack of the patients with tertian malaria and ovale malaria was longer. Africa and Southeast Asia is the main source of imported malaria cases in Guangxi, and the migrant workers returning home may have the risk of malaria recurrence, which should be paid enough attention to.

  11. Montelukast prevents vascular endothelial dysfunction from internal combustion exhaust inhalation during exercise.

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    Rundell, Kenneth W; Steigerwald, Michelle D; Fisk, Michelle Z

    2010-08-01

    Associations between high particulate matter (PM) pollution and increased morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease have been identified. This study assessed leukotriene (LT) participation in PM-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. Ten healthy males exercised 4 times for 30 min in both high PM (550,286 +/- 42,004 particles x cm(-3)) and low PM (4571 +/- 1922 particles x cm(-3)) after ingesting placebo (PL) or 10 mg montelukast (MK; half-life 3-6 h), a leukotriene receptor antagonist. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured pre- and 30 min, 4 h, 24 h post-exercise. No basal brachial artery vascoconstriction was evident from high PM exercise. High PM blunted FMD, whereas high PM MK, low PM PL, and low PM MK demonstrated normal FMD (p < .003). Change in FMD (pre- to post-exercise) for high PM PL was different than for high PM MK, low PM PL, and low PM MK at 30 min post-exercise (p < .007). At 4 h, high PM MK FMD blunting increased (p = .1). At 24 h, high PM FMD blunting persisted (p < .05); no difference was observed between high PM PL or MK treatment, but was different that low PM PL/MK treatments (p < .05). MK blocked high PM post-exercise FMD blunting and maintained normal response, suggesting that leukotrienes are involved in PM-initiated vascular endothelial dysfunction.

  12. Midodrine versus albumin in the prevention of paracentesis-induced circulatory dysfunction in cirrhotics: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Virendra; Dheerendra, Prashant C; Singh, Baljinder; Nain, Chander K; Chawla, Divya; Sharma, Navneet; Bhalla, Ashish; Mahi, Sushil K

    2008-06-01

    Intravenous albumin has been used to prevent paracentesis-induced circulatory dysfunction (PICD) in cirrhotics; however, its use is costly and controversial. Splanchnic arterial vasodilatation is primarily responsible for PICD. There are no reports of use of midodrine in the prevention of PICD. In this pilot study, we evaluated midodrine and albumin in the prevention of PICD. Forty patients with cirrhosis underwent therapeutic paracentesis with midodrine or albumin in a randomized controlled trial at a tertiary center. Effective arterial blood volume was assessed by plasma renin activity. Plasma renin activity at baseline and at 6 days after paracentesis did not differ in the two groups (43.18 +/- 10.73 to 45.90 +/- 8.59 ng/mL/h, P= 0.273 in the albumin group and 44.44 +/- 8.44 to 41.39 +/- 10.21 ng/mL/h, P= 0.115 in the midodrine group). Two patients had an increase in plasma renin activity of more than 50% from baseline in the albumin group, and none in the midodrine group. A significant increase in 24-h urine volume and urine sodium excretion was noted in the midodrine group. Midodrine therapy was cheaper than albumin therapy. The study suggests that midodrine may be as effective as albumin in preventing PICD in cirrhotics, but at a fraction of the cost, and can be administered orally. Midodrine also resulted in an increase in 24-h urine volume and sodium excretion.

  13. [Advances in animal model and traditional Chinese medicine prevention in coronary microvascular dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Liu, Jian-Xun; Ren, Jian-Xun; Guo, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Ren

    2017-01-01

    Coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is a common mechanism for some heart disease like cardiac X syndrome and no-reflow phenomenon after percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI). With the development of medical imageology, CMD has received increased attention. Animal model of CMD is indispensable tool for the research of pathogenesis and treatment evaluation, therefor choose an appropriate animal model is the first issue to carry out CMD research. Experimental and clinical studies have shown unique effectiveness of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) in CMD therapy. Clarifying of the TCM therapeutic effect mechanisms and seeking an optimal solution of combination of traditional Chinese and western medicine will be the focus of future research. This paper reviewed the establishment and evaluation of CMD animal model, as well as the intervention study of TCM on CMD. The article aims to provide reference for the basic research of CMD and the TCM experimental study on CMD. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  14. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids regulate macrophage polarization and prevent LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Meiyan; Wu, Lujin; He, Zuowen; Zhang, Shasha; Chen, Chen; Xu, Xizhen; Wang, Peihua; Gruzdev, Artiom; Zeldin, Darryl C; Wang, Dao Wen

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages, owning tremendous phenotypic plasticity and diverse functions, were becoming the target cells in various inflammatory, metabolic and immune diseases. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase 2J2 (CYP2J2) metabolizes arachidonic acid to form epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which possess various beneficial effects on cardiovascular system. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of EETs treatment on macrophage polarization and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated CYP2J2 expression on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac dysfunction, and sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms. In vitro studies showed that EETs (1µmol/L) significantly inhibited LPS-induced M1 macrophage polarization and diminished the proinflammatory cytokines at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level; meanwhile it preserved M2 macrophage related molecules expression and upregulated anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, EETs down-regulated NF-κB activation and up-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα/γ) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression, which play important roles in regulating M1 and M2 polarization. In addition, LPS treatment in mice induced cardiac dysfunction, heart tissue damage and infiltration of M1 macrophages, as well as the increase of inflammatory cytokines in serum and heart tissue, but rAAV-mediated CYP2J2 expression increased EETs generation in heart and significantly attenuated the LPS-induced harmful effects, which mechanisms were similar as the in vitro study. Taken together, the results indicate that CYP2J2/EETs regulates macrophage polarization by attenuating NF-κB signaling pathway via PPARα/γ and HO-1 activation and its potential use in treatment of inflammatory diseases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Protective effects of [Gly14]-Humanin on beta-amyloid-induced PC12 cell death by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Liu, Tao; Wang, Wei-Xi; Xu, Jie-Hua; Yang, Peng-Bo; Lu, Hai-Xia; Sun, Qin-Ru; Hu, Hai-Tao

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of beta-amyloid (Abeta)-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and is considered as an early event in AD pathology. Humanin (HN) and its derivative, [Gly14]-Humanin (HNG), are known for their ability to suppress neuronal death induced by AD-related insults in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of HNG on Abeta(25-35)-induced toxicity and its potential mechanisms in PC12 cells. Exposure of PC12 cells to 25 microM Abeta(25-35) caused significant viability loss and cell apoptosis. In addition, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cytochrome c releases from mitochondria were also observed after Abeta(25-35) exposure. All these effects induced by Abeta(25-35) were markedly reversed by HNG. Pretreatment with 100 nM HNG 6h prior to Abeta(25-35) exposure significantly elevated cell viability, reduced Abeta(25-35)-induced cell apoptosis, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, and blocked cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Furthermore, HNG also ameliorated the Abeta(25-35)-induced Bcl-2/Bax ratio reduction and decreased caspase-3 activity in PC12 cells. These results demonstrate that HNG could attenuate Abeta(25-35)-induced PC12 cell injury and apoptosis by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, these data suggest that mitochondria are involved in the protective effect of HNG against Abeta(25-35). Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. J. Maxwell Chamberlain Memorial Paper. Early fundoplication prevents chronic allograft dysfunction in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Edward; Appel, James Z; Hartwig, Matthew G; Woreta, Hiwot; Green, Cindy; Messier, Robert; Palmer, Scott M; Davis, R Duane

    2004-10-01

    Chronic allograft dysfunction limits the long-term success of lung transplantation. Increasing evidence suggests nonimmune mediated injury such as due to reflux contributes to the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. We have previously demonstrated that fundoplication can reverse bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in some lung transplant recipients with reflux. We hypothesized that treatment of reflux with early fundoplication would prevent bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and improve survival. A retrospective analysis of 457 patients who underwent lung transplantation from April 1992 through July 2003 was conducted. Patients were stratified into four groups: no history of reflux, history of reflux, history of reflux and early (syndrome at 1 and 3 years (100%, 100%) when compared with no fundoplication in patients with reflux (96% +/- 2.5, 60% +/- 7.5; p syndrome and survival. Further research into the mechanisms and treatment of nonalloimmune mediated lung allograft injury is needed to reduce rates of chronic lung failure.

  17. Azelnidipine prevents cardiac dysfunction in streptozotocin-diabetic rats by reducing intracellular calcium accumulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis

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    Kain Vasundhara

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous evidences suggest that diabetic heart is characterized by compromised ventricular contraction and prolonged relaxation attributable to multiple causative factors including calcium accumulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therapeutic interventions to prevent calcium accumulation and oxidative stress could be therefore helpful in improving the cardiac function under diabetic condition. Methods This study was designed to examine the effect of long-acting calcium channel blocker (CCB, Azelnidipine (AZL on contractile dysfunction, intracellular calcium (Ca2+ cycling proteins, stress-activated signaling molecules and apoptosis on cardiomyocytes in diabetes. Adult male Wistar rats were made diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (IP injection of streptozotocin (STZ. Contractile functions were traced from live diabetic rats to isolated individual cardiomyocytes including peak shortening (PS, time-to-PS (TPS, time-to-relengthening (TR90, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (± dL/dt and intracellular Ca2+ fluorescence. Results Diabetic heart showed significantly depressed PS, ± dL/dt, prolonged TPS, TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ clearing and showed an elevated resting intracellular Ca2+. AZL itself exhibited little effect on myocyte mechanics but it significantly alleviated STZ-induced myocyte contractile dysfunction. Diabetes increased the levels of superoxide, enhanced expression of the cardiac damage markers like troponin I, p67phox NADPH oxidase subunit, restored the levels of the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD, calcium regulatory proteins RyR2 and SERCA2a, and suppressed the levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein. All of these STZ-induced alterations were reconciled by AZL treatment. Conclusion Collectively, the data suggest beneficial effect of AZL in diabetic cardiomyopathy via altering intracellular Ca2+ handling proteins and preventing apoptosis by its antioxidant property.

  18. Cardio-oncology: a multidisciplinary approach for detection, prevention and management of cardiac dysfunction in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Kazuko; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sekine, Ikuo

    2017-08-01

    Cardiac dysfunction that develops during or after completion of cancer therapy is a growing health concern that should be addressed in a multidisciplinary setting. Cardio-oncology is a new discipline that focuses on screening, monitoring and treating cardiovascular disease during and after cancer treatment. A baseline cardiovascular risk assessment is essential. For high-risk patients, a tailored and detailed plan for cardiovascular management throughout treatment and beyond should also be established. Anthracycline and/or trastuzumab-containing chemotherapy and chest-directed radiation therapy are well known cardiotoxic cancer therapies. Monitoring for the development of subclinical cardiotoxicity is crucial for the prevention of clinical heart failure. Detecting a decreased left ventricular ejection fraction after cancer therapy might be a late finding; therefore, earlier markers of cardiac injury are being actively explored. Abnormal myocardial strain and increased serum cardiac biomarkers (e.g. troponins and natriuretic peptides) are possible candidates for this purpose. An important method for preventing heart failure is the avoidance or minimization of the use of cardiotoxic therapies. Decisions must balance the anti-tumor efficacy of the treatment with its potential cardiotoxicity. If patients develop cardiac dysfunction or heart failure, they should be treated in accordance with established guidelines for heart failure. Cancer survivors who have been exposed to cardiotoxic cancer therapies are at high risk of developing heart failure. The management of cardiovascular risk factors and periodic screening with cardiac imaging and biomarkers should be considered in high-risk survivors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Calpain inhibition prevents amyloid-beta-induced neurodegeneration and associated behavioral dysfunction in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granic, Ivica; Nyakas, Csaba; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.; Halmy, Laszlo G.; Gross, Gerhard; Schoemaker, Hans; Moeller, Achim; Nimmrich, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (A beta) is toxic to neurons and such toxicity is - at least in part - mediated via the NMDA receptor. Calpain, a calcium dependent cystein protease, is part of the NMDA receptor-induced neurodegeneration pathway, and we previously reported that inhibition of calpain prevents

  20. Midkine gene transfer after myocardial infarction in rats prevents remodelling and ameliorates cardiac dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumida, Arihiro; Horiba, Mitsuru; Ishiguro, Hisaaki; Takenaka, Hiroharu; Ueda, Norihiro; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Opthof, Tobias; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Kodama, Itsuo

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that therapy with midkine (MK) has a protective effect in mouse models of myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia/reperfusion. The underlying mechanism was proved to be anti-apoptosis and prevention of left ventricular (LV) remodelling following angiogenesis. Here we

  1. Strategies for prevention of urinary tract infections in neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Lance L; Klausner, Adam P

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the problem of urinary tract infections (UTIs) after spinal cord injury and disorders is defined, the relationship of bladder management to UTIs is discussed, and mechanical and medical strategies for UTI prevention in spinal cord injury and disorders are described. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Lidocaine Prevents Oxidative Stress-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction of the Systemic Artery in Rats With Intermittent Periodontal Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takumi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Feng, Guo-Gang; Kazaoka, Yoshiaki; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    Periodontal inflammation causes endothelial dysfunction of the systemic artery. However, it is unknown whether the use of local anesthetics during painful dental procedures alleviates periodontal inflammation and systemic endothelial function. This study was designed to examine whether the gingival or systemic injection of lidocaine prevents oxidative stress-induced endothelial dysfunction of the systemic artery in rats with intermittent periodontal inflammation caused by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Some rats received 1500 µg LPS injections to the gingiva during a week interval from the age of 8 to 11 weeks (LPS group). Lidocaine (3 mg/kg), LPS + lidocaine (3 mg/kg), LPS + lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg), and LPS + lidocaine (3 mg/kg, IP) groups simultaneously received gingival 1.5 or 3 mg/kg or IP 3 mg/kg injection of lidocaine on the same schedule as the gingival LPS. Isolated aortas or mandibles were subjected to the evaluation of histopathologic change, isometric force recording, reactive oxygen species, and Western immunoblotting. Mean blood pressure and heart rate did not differ among the control, LPS, LPS + lidocaine (3 mg/kg), and lidocaine (3 mg/kg) groups. LPS application reduced acetylcholine (ACh, 10 to 10 mol/L)-induced relaxation (29% difference at ACh 3 × 10 mol/L, P = .01), which was restored by catalase. Gingival lidocaine (1.5 and 3 mg/kg) dose dependently prevented the endothelial dysfunction caused by LPS application (24.5%-31.1% difference at ACh 3 × 10 mol/L, P = .006 or .001, respectively). Similar to the gingival application, the IP injection of lidocaine (3 mg/kg) restored the ACh-induced dilation of isolated aortas from rats with the LPS application (27.5% difference at ACh 3 × 10 mol/L, P lidocaine (3 mg/kg), or the combination. The LPS induced a 4-fold increase in the protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in the periodontal tissue (P lidocaine (3 mg/kg) coadministration partly reduced the levels. Lidocaine application also decreased

  3. Combination of Spirulina with glycyrrhizin prevents cognitive dysfunction in aged obese rats.

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    Madhavadas, Sowmya; Subramanian, Sarada

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cognition enhancing effect of the combination of Spirulina and glycyrrhizin in monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obese aged rats. Obesity was induced in rats by administration of MSG (intraperitoneally, 4 mg/g body weight) for 14 consecutive days from day 1 after birth. Subsequently, the animals were allowed to grow for 18 months with food and water ad libitum. Hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia, leptin resistance, were monitored in these animals. Cognitive status was assessed by Barne's maze task and hippocampal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels. Further, the animals were treated with Spirulina (Sp) (oral route, 1 g/Kg body weight, for 30 days) alone or glycyrrhizin (Gly) alone (intraperitoneal route, 0.1 mg/Kg, on day 15 and day 21), or their combination (SpGly). Counting of the treatment days was done by considering first day of Sp administration as day 1. After the completion of 30 days of Spirulina treatment or 2 doses of Gly administration or the combination (SpGly) treatment, the animals were left for 3 weeks. They were then were assessed for their biochemical and cognitive changes. The combination of Sp with Gly showed a significant reduction (P < 0.0001) in glucose, cholesterol, leptin levels in the serum with improvement in cognitive functions with concomitant reduction in AChE activity in the hippocampal tissue homogenates (P < 0.0001) of the obese rats. SpGly combination has a potential role in reversing cognitive dysfunctions associated with aging and obesity.

  4. An Electerophisioligic Study Of Autonomic Nervous System In Diabetic Patients

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    Noorolahi Moghaddam H

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in diabetics can occur apart from peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and sometimes leads to complaints which may be diagnosed by electrodiagnostic methods. Moreover glycemic control of these patients may prevent such a complications."nMaterials and Methods: 30 diabetic patients were compared to the same number of age and sex-matched controls regarding to electrophysiologic findings of autonomic nervous system. Symptoms referable to autonomic disorder including nightly diarrhea, dizziness, urinary incontinence, constipation, nausea, and mouth dryness were recorded in all diabetic patients. Palmar and plantar SSR and expiration to inspiration ratio (E: I and Valsalva ratio were recorded in all diabetics and control individuals by electromyography device. In addition NCS was performed on two sensory and two motor nerves in diabetic patients."nResults: There was no relation between age of diabetics and abnormal D: I ratio, Valsalva ratio and degree of electrophysiologic autonomic impairment. Also no relation between peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment was found. Plantar SSR was absent in 80% of diabetics with orthostatic hypotension (p~ 0.019. Palmar and plantar SSR were absent in many diabetics in comparison to control group (for palmar SSR p~ 0.00 and for plantar SSR p< 0.015. There was no relation between diabetes duration since diagnosis and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment."nConclusion: According to the above mentioned findings diabetic autonomic neuropathy develops apart from peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and probably with different mechanisms. Remarkable absence of palmar SSR in diabetics with orthostatic hypotension can be due to its sympathetic origin. Absence of any relation between diabetes duration and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment can be due to late diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or no pathophysiologic relation between chronic

  5. Dysfunctional Brain Networking among Autonomic Regulatory Structures in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients at High Risk of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Luke A; Harper, Ronald M; Kumar, Rajesh; Guye, Maxime; Ogren, Jennifer A; Lhatoo, Samden D; Lemieux, Louis; Scott, Catherine A; Vos, Sjoerd B; Rani, Sandhya; Diehl, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is common among young people with epilepsy. Individuals who are at high risk of SUDEP exhibit regional brain structural and functional connectivity (FC) alterations compared with low-risk patients. However, less is known about network-based FC differences among critical cortical and subcortical autonomic regulatory brain structures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients at high risk of SUDEP. 32 TLE patients were risk-stratified according to the following clinical criteria: age of epilepsy onset, duration of epilepsy, frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and presence of nocturnal seizures, resulting in 14 high-risk and 18 low-risk cases. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) signal time courses were extracted from 11 bilateral cortical and subcortical brain regions involved in autonomic and other regulatory processes. After computing all pairwise correlations, FC matrices were analyzed using the network-based statistic. FC strength among the 11 brain regions was compared between the high- and low-risk patients. Increases and decreases in FC were sought, using high-risk > low-risk and low-risk > high-risk contrasts (with covariates age, gender, lateralization of epilepsy, and presence of hippocampal sclerosis). High-risk TLE patients showed a subnetwork with significantly reduced FC ( t  = 2.5, p  = 0.029) involving the thalamus, brain stem, anterior cingulate, putamen and amygdala, and a second subnetwork with significantly elevated FC ( t  = 2.1, p  = 0.031), which extended to medial/orbital frontal cortex, insula, hippocampus, amygdala, subcallosal cortex, brain stem, thalamus, caudate, and putamen. TLE patients at high risk of SUDEP showed widespread FC differences between key autonomic regulatory brain regions compared to those at low risk. The altered FC revealed here may help to shed light on the functional correlates of autonomic disturbances in epilepsy

  6. Inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channels ameliorates an imbalance in cardiac autonomic nerve activity and prevents lethal arrhythmias in mice with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuko; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Minami, Takeya; Yamada, Chinatsu; Shibata, Junko; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Cho, Kosai; Arai, Yuji; Yasuno, Shinji; Nishikimi, Toshio; Ueshima, Kenji; Kamakura, Shiro; Nishida, Motohiro; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Yasuo; Kimura, Takeshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2014-10-01

    Dysregulation of autonomic nervous system activity can trigger ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in patients with heart failure. N-type Ca(2+) channels (NCCs) play an important role in sympathetic nervous system activation by regulating the calcium entry that triggers release of neurotransmitters from peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals. We have investigated the ability of NCC blockade to prevent lethal arrhythmias associated with heart failure. We compared the effects of cilnidipine, a dual N- and L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, with those of nitrendipine, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, in transgenic mice expressing a cardiac-specific, dominant-negative form of neuron-restrictive silencer factor (dnNRSF-Tg). In this mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy leading to sudden arrhythmic death, cardiac structure and function did not significantly differ among the control, cilnidipine, and nitrendipine groups. However, cilnidipine dramatically reduced arrhythmias in dnNRSF-Tg mice, significantly improving their survival rate and correcting the imbalance between cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity. A β-blocker, bisoprolol, showed similar effects in these mice. Genetic titration of NCCs, achieved by crossing dnNRSF-Tg mice with mice lacking CACNA1B, which encodes the α1 subunit of NCCs, improved the survival rate. With restoration of cardiac autonomic balance, dnNRSF-Tg;CACNA1B(+/-) mice showed fewer malignant arrhythmias than dnNRSF-Tg;CACNA1B(+/+) mice. Both pharmacological blockade of NCCs and their genetic titration improved cardiac autonomic balance and prevented lethal arrhythmias in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy and sudden arrhythmic death. Our findings suggest that NCC blockade is a potentially useful approach to preventing sudden death in patients with heart failure. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Do Coffee Polyphenols Have a Preventive Action on Metabolic Syndrome Associated Endothelial Dysfunctions? An Assessment of the Current Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies from several countries have found that mortality rates associated with the metabolic syndrome are inversely associated with coffee consumption. Metabolic syndrome can lead to arteriosclerosis by endothelial dysfunction, and increases the risk for myocardial and cerebral infarction. Accordingly, it is important to understand the possible protective effects of coffee against components of the metabolic syndrome, including vascular endothelial function impairment, obesity and diabetes. Coffee contains many components, including caffeine, chlorogenic acid, diterpenes and trigonelline. Studies have found that coffee polyphenols, such as chlorogenic acids, have many health-promoting properties, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-diabetes, and antihypertensive properties. Chlorogenic acids may exert protective effects against metabolic syndrome risk through their antioxidant properties, in particular toward vascular endothelial cells, in which nitric oxide production may be enhanced, by promoting endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression. These effects indicate that coffee components may support the maintenance of normal endothelial function and play an important role in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. However, results related to coffee consumption and the metabolic syndrome are heterogeneous among studies, and the mechanisms of its functions and corresponding molecular targets remain largely elusive. This review describes the results of studies exploring the putative effects of coffee components, especially in protecting vascular endothelial function and preventing metabolic syndrome. PMID:29401716

  8. Do Coffee Polyphenols Have a Preventive Action on Metabolic Syndrome Associated Endothelial Dysfunctions? An Assessment of the Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Yamagata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies from several countries have found that mortality rates associated with the metabolic syndrome are inversely associated with coffee consumption. Metabolic syndrome can lead to arteriosclerosis by endothelial dysfunction, and increases the risk for myocardial and cerebral infarction. Accordingly, it is important to understand the possible protective effects of coffee against components of the metabolic syndrome, including vascular endothelial function impairment, obesity and diabetes. Coffee contains many components, including caffeine, chlorogenic acid, diterpenes and trigonelline. Studies have found that coffee polyphenols, such as chlorogenic acids, have many health-promoting properties, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-diabetes, and antihypertensive properties. Chlorogenic acids may exert protective effects against metabolic syndrome risk through their antioxidant properties, in particular toward vascular endothelial cells, in which nitric oxide production may be enhanced, by promoting endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression. These effects indicate that coffee components may support the maintenance of normal endothelial function and play an important role in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. However, results related to coffee consumption and the metabolic syndrome are heterogeneous among studies, and the mechanisms of its functions and corresponding molecular targets remain largely elusive. This review describes the results of studies exploring the putative effects of coffee components, especially in protecting vascular endothelial function and preventing metabolic syndrome.

  9. Do Coffee Polyphenols Have a Preventive Action on Metabolic Syndrome Associated Endothelial Dysfunctions? An Assessment of the Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Kazuo

    2018-02-04

    Epidemiologic studies from several countries have found that mortality rates associated with the metabolic syndrome are inversely associated with coffee consumption. Metabolic syndrome can lead to arteriosclerosis by endothelial dysfunction, and increases the risk for myocardial and cerebral infarction. Accordingly, it is important to understand the possible protective effects of coffee against components of the metabolic syndrome, including vascular endothelial function impairment, obesity and diabetes. Coffee contains many components, including caffeine, chlorogenic acid, diterpenes and trigonelline. Studies have found that coffee polyphenols, such as chlorogenic acids, have many health-promoting properties, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-diabetes, and antihypertensive properties. Chlorogenic acids may exert protective effects against metabolic syndrome risk through their antioxidant properties, in particular toward vascular endothelial cells, in which nitric oxide production may be enhanced, by promoting endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression. These effects indicate that coffee components may support the maintenance of normal endothelial function and play an important role in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. However, results related to coffee consumption and the metabolic syndrome are heterogeneous among studies, and the mechanisms of its functions and corresponding molecular targets remain largely elusive. This review describes the results of studies exploring the putative effects of coffee components, especially in protecting vascular endothelial function and preventing metabolic syndrome.

  10. IKKβ inhibition prevents fat-induced beta cell dysfunction in vitro and in vivo in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivovic, Aleksandar; Oprescu, Andrei I; Koulajian, Khajag; Mori, Yusaku; Eversley, Judith A; Zhang, Liling; Nino-Fong, Rodolfo; Lewis, Gary F; Donath, Marc Y; Karin, Michael; Wheeler, Michael B; Ehses, Jan; Volchuk, Allen; Chan, Catherine B; Giacca, Adria

    2017-10-01

    We have previously shown that oxidative stress plays a causal role in beta cell dysfunction induced by fat. Here, we address whether the proinflammatory kinase inhibitor of (nuclear factor) κB kinase β (IKKβ), which is activated by oxidative stress, is also implicated. Fat (oleate or olive oil) was infused intravenously in Wistar rats for 48 h with or without the IKKβ inhibitor salicylate. Thereafter, beta cell function was evaluated in vivo using hyperglycaemic clamps or ex vivo in islets isolated from fat-treated rats. We also exposed rat islets to oleate in culture, with or without salicylate and 4(2'-aminoethyl)amino-1,8-dimethylimidazo(1,2-a)quinoxaline; BMS-345541 (BMS, another inhibitor of IKKβ) and evaluated beta cell function in vitro. Furthermore, oleate was infused in mice treated with BMS and in beta cell-specific Ikkb-null mice. 48 h infusion of fat impaired beta-cell function in vivo, assessed using the disposition index (DI), in rats (saline: 1.41 ± 0.13; oleate: 0.95 ± 0.11; olive oil [OLO]: 0.87 ± 0.15; p vivo (i.e., insulin secretion, units are pmol insulin islet -1  h -1 ) in rat islets (saline: 1.51 ± 0.13; oleate: 1.03 ± 0.10; OLO: 0.91 ± 0.13; p vivo and by salicylate in rat islets ex vivo (oleate + salicylate: 1.74 ± 0.31; OLO + salicylate: 1.54 ± 0.29). In cultured islets, 48 h exposure to oleate impaired beta-cell function ([in pmol insulin islet -1  h -1 ] control: 0.66 ± 0.12; oleate: 0.23 ± 0.03; p vivo ([in pmol insulin islet -1  h -1 ] control saline: 0.16 ± 0.02; control oleate: 0.10 ± 0.02; knockout oleate: 0.17 ± 0.04; p vivo (DI: control saline: 3.86 ± 0.40; control oleate: 1.95 ± 0.29; knockout oleate: 2.96 ± 0.24; p vivo and in vivo.

  11. Deletion of ghrelin prevents aging-associated obesity and muscle dysfunction without affecting longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, Bobby; Chen, Ji-An; Patel, Shivam; Luo, Jiaohua; Splenser, Andres; Mody, Avni; Ding, Michael; Baghaie, Shiva; Anderson, Barbara; Iankova, Blaga; Halder, Tripti; Hernandez, Yamileth; Garcia, Jose M

    2017-08-01

    During aging, decreases in energy expenditure and locomotor activity lead to body weight and fat gain. Aging is also associated with decreases in muscle strength and endurance leading to functional decline. Here, we show that lifelong deletion of ghrelin prevents development of obesity associated with aging by modulating food intake and energy expenditure. Ghrelin deletion also attenuated the decrease in phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) and downstream mediators in muscle, and increased the number of type IIa (fatigue resistant, oxidative) muscle fibers, preventing the decline in muscle strength and endurance seen with aging. Longevity was not affected by ghrelin deletion. Treatment of old mice with pharmacologic doses of ghrelin increased food intake, body weight, and muscle strength in both ghrelin wild-type and knockout mice. These findings highlight the relevance of ghrelin during aging and identify a novel AMPK-dependent mechanism for ghrelin action in muscle. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Resveratrol Prevents Retinal Dysfunction by Regulating Glutamate Transporters, Glutamine Synthetase Expression and Activity in Diabetic Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kaihong; Yang, Na; Wang, Duozi; Li, Suping; Ming, Jian; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xuemei; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Yongtao

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of resveratrol (RSV) on retinal functions, glutamate transporters (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in diabetic rats retina, and on glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression in high glucose-cultured Müller cells. The electroretinogram was used to evaluate retinal functions. Müller cells cultures were prepared from 5- to 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of GLAST and GS was examined by qRT-PCR, ELISA and western-blotting. Glutamate uptake was measured as (3)H-glutamate contents of the lysates. GS activity was assessed by a spectrophotometric assay. 1- to 7-month RSV administrations (5 and 10 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated hyperglycemia and weight loss in diabetic rats. RSV administrations also significantly attenuated diabetes-induced decreases in amplitude of a-wave in rod response, decreases in amplitude of a-, and b-wave in cone and rod response and decreases in amplitude of OP2 in oscillatory potentials. 1- to 7-month RSV treatments also significantly inhibited diabetes-induced delay in OP2 implicit times in scotopic 3.0 OPS test. The down-regulated mRNA and protein expression of GLAST and GS in diabetic rats retina was prevented by RSV administrations. In high glucose-treated cultures, Müller cells' glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression were decreased significantly compared with normal control cultures. RSV (10, 20, and 30 mmol/l) significantly inhibited the HG-induced decreases in glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression (at least P < 0.05). These beneficial results suggest that RSV may be considered as a therapeutic option to prevent from diabetic retinopathy.

  13. Sodium hydrosulfide prevents myocardial dysfunction through modulation of extracellular matrix accumulation and vascular density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Li-Long; Wang, Xian-Li; Wang, Xi-Ling; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2014-12-12

    The aim was to examine the role of exogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on cardiac remodeling in post-myocardial infarction (MI) rats. MI was induced in rats by ligation of coronary artery. After treatment with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an exogenous H2S donor, 56 μM/kg·day) for 42 days, the effects of NaHS on left ventricular morphometric features, echocardiographic parameters, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), type I and type III collagen, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD34, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the border zone of infarct area were analyzed to elucidate the protective mechanisms of exogenous H2S on cardiac function and fibrosis. Forty-two days post MI, NaHS-treatment resulted in a decrease in myocardial fibrotic area in association with decreased levels of type I, type III collagen and MMP-9 and improved cardiac function. Meanwhile, NaHS administration significantly increased cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), HO-1, α-SMA, and VEGF expression. This effect was accompanied by an increase in vascular density in the border zone of infarcted myocardium. Our results provided the strong evidences that exogenous H2S prevented cardiac remodeling, at least in part, through inhibition of extracellular matrix accumulation and increase in vascular density.

  14. Sodium Hydrosulfide Prevents Myocardial Dysfunction through Modulation of Extracellular Matrix Accumulation and Vascular Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Long Pan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to examine the role of exogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S on cardiac remodeling in post-myocardial infarction (MI rats. MI was induced in rats by ligation of coronary artery. After treatment with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an exogenous H2S donor, 56 μM/kg·day for 42 days, the effects of NaHS on left ventricular morphometric features, echocardiographic parameters, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9, type I and type III collagen, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, CD34, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA in the border zone of infarct area were analyzed to elucidate the protective mechanisms of exogenous H2S on cardiac function and fibrosis. Forty-two days post MI, NaHS-treatment resulted in a decrease in myocardial fibrotic area in association with decreased levels of type I, type III collagen and MMP-9 and improved cardiac function. Meanwhile, NaHS administration significantly increased cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, HO-1, α-SMA, and VEGF expression. This effect was accompanied by an increase in vascular density in the border zone of infarcted myocardium. Our results provided the strong evidences that exogenous H2S prevented cardiac remodeling, at least in part, through inhibition of extracellular matrix accumulation and increase in vascular density.

  15. Prevention of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction utilizing a CDK inhibitor in a mouse model.

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    Katie L Martin

    Full Text Available Treatment of head and neck cancer with radiation often results in damage to surrounding normal tissues such as salivary glands. Permanent loss of function in the salivary glands often leads patients to discontinue treatment due to incapacitating side effects. It has previously been shown that IGF-1 suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis and enhances G2/M arrest leading to preservation of salivary gland function. In an effort to recapitulate the effects of IGF-1, as well as increase the likelihood of translating these findings to the clinic, the small molecule therapeutic Roscovitine, is being tested. Roscovitine is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that acts to transiently inhibit cell cycle progression and allow for DNA repair in damaged tissues.Treatment with Roscovitine prior to irradiation induced a significant increase in the percentage of cells in the G(2/M phase, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. In contrast, mice treated with radiation exhibit no differences in the percentage of cells in G(2/M when compared to unirradiated controls. Similar to previous studies utilizing IGF-1, pretreatment with Roscovitine leads to a significant up-regulation of p21 expression and a significant decrease in the number of PCNA positive cells. Radiation treatment leads to a significant increase in activated caspase-3 positive salivary acinar cells, which is suppressed by pretreatment with Roscovitine. Administration of Roscovitine prior to targeted head and neck irradiation preserves normal tissue function in mouse parotid salivary glands, both acutely and chronically, as measured by salivary output.These studies suggest that induction of transient G(2/M cell cycle arrest by Roscovitine allows for suppression of apoptosis, thus preserving normal salivary function following targeted head and neck irradiation. This could have an important clinical impact by preventing the negative side effects of radiation therapy in surrounding normal tissues.

  16. Subclinical myocardial dysfunction and cardiac autonomic dysregulation are closely associated in obese children and adolescents: the potential role of insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Cozzolino

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is increasing among children/adolescents. Subtle cardiovascular abnormalities, responsible for a higher mortality later in life, have been reported in obese children/adolescents. The aims of the study were to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic regulation, by means of spectrum analysis of R-R interval variability, and myocardial function, by means of standard and tissue Doppler echocardiography, in a group of non-hypertensive asymptomatic obese children and adolescents; furthermore, the influence of insulin resistance was tested.R-R interval variability was analyzed during both the 70° head-up tilt and 24-hour electrocardiographic holter monitoring. Spectrum analysis of R-R interval variability provided the indices of sympathetic (low frequency [LFRR] and vagal (high frequency [HFRR] modulation of the sinoatrial node. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was used to classify obese children/adolescents (n=72 as insulin resistant (n=37 and non-insulin resistant (n=35.In obese subjects: a left ventricular mass was significantly (p<0.05 increased, whereas both the e/a ratio and the e'/a' ratio were decreased; b at rest, HFRR was lower, and the LFRR/HFRR ratio was higher; c during tilting, magnitude of tilt-induced inhibition of HFRR was lower; d during 24-hour electrocardiographic holter monitoring, LFRR and the LFRR/HFRR ratio were higher, whereas HFRR was lower; e HOMA-IR inversely correlated with both the e'/a' ratio (r=-0.655; p<0.001 and the tilt-induced LFRR/HFRR ratio (r=-0.933; p<0.001; and, f the e'/a' ratio correlated with the tilt-induced LFRR/HFRR ratio (r=0.501; p<0.001. Moreover, HFRR at rest, magnitude of tilt-induced HFRR reduction, and the e'/a' ratio in insulin resistant obese children/adolescents were markedly lower when compared with the remaining subjects.Subclinical abnormalities of myocardial function and of cardiac autonomic regulation were closely associated in obese children

  17. A Canola Oil-Supplemented Diet Prevents Type I Diabetes-Caused Lipotoxicity and Renal Dysfunction in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Europa, Edgar; Ortiz-Butron, Rocio; Camargo, Estela Melendez; Esteves-Carmona, María Miriam; Oliart-Ros, Rosa Maria; Blas-Valdivia, Vanessa; Franco-Colin, Margarita

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the effect of a canola oil-supplemented diet on the metabolic state and diabetic renal function of a type I diabetes experimental model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) normoglycemic+chow diet, (2) normoglycemic+a canola oil-supplemented chow diet, (3) diabetic+chow diet, and (4) diabetic+a canola oil-supplemented chow diet. For 15 weeks, animals were fed a diet of Purina rat chow alone or supplemented with 30% canola oil. Energetic intake, water intake, body weight, and adipose tissue fat pad were measured; renal function, electrolyte balance, glomerular filtration rate, and the plasmatic concentration of free fatty acids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose were evaluated. The mesenteric, retroperitoneal, and epididymal fat pads were dissected and weighed. The kidneys were used for lipid peroxidation (LP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) quantifications. Diabetic rats fed with a canola oil-supplemented diet had higher body weights, were less hyperphagic, and their mesenteric, retroperitoneal, and epididymal fat pads weighed more than diabetic rats on an unsupplemented diet. The canola oil-supplemented diet decreased plasmatic concentrations of free fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol; showed improved osmolarity, water clearances, and creatinine depuration; and had decreased LP and ROS. A canola oil-supplemented diet decreases hyperphagia and prevents lipotoxicity and renal dysfunction in a type I diabetes mellitus model.

  18. Taurine supplementation reduces blood pressure and prevents endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in post-weaning protein-restricted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Aline R; Batista, Thiago M; Victorio, Jamaira A; Clerici, Stefano P; Delbin, Maria A; Carneiro, Everardo M; Davel, Ana P

    2014-01-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid that exerts protective effects on vascular function and structure in several models of cardiovascular diseases through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Early protein malnutrition reprograms the cardiovascular system and is linked to hypertension in adulthood. This study assessed the effects of taurine supplementation in vascular alterations induced by protein restriction in post-weaning rats. Weaned male Wistar rats were fed normal- (12%, NP) or low-protein (6%, LP) diets for 90 days. Half of the NP and LP rats concomitantly received 2.5% taurine supplementation in the drinking water (NPT and LPT, respectively). LP rats showed elevated systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure versus NP rats; taurine supplementation partially prevented this increase. There was a reduced relaxation response to acetylcholine in isolated thoracic aortic rings from the LP group that was reversed by superoxide dismutase (SOD) or apocynin incubation. Protein expression of p47phox NADPH oxidase subunit was enhanced, whereas extracellular (EC)-SOD and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation at Ser 1177 (p-eNOS) were reduced in aortas from LP rats. Furthermore, ROS production was enhanced while acetylcholine-induced NO release was reduced in aortas from the LP group. Taurine supplementation improved the relaxation response to acetylcholine and eNOS-derived NO production, increased EC-SOD and p-eNOS protein expression, as well as reduced ROS generation and p47phox expression in the aortas from LPT rats. LP rats showed an increased aortic wall/lumen ratio and taurine prevented this remodeling through a reduction in wall media thickness. Our data indicate a protective role of taurine supplementation on the high blood pressure, endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling induced by post-weaning protein restriction. The beneficial vascular effect of taurine was associated with restoration of vascular redox

  19. Taurine supplementation reduces blood pressure and prevents endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in post-weaning protein-restricted rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline R Maia

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid that exerts protective effects on vascular function and structure in several models of cardiovascular diseases through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Early protein malnutrition reprograms the cardiovascular system and is linked to hypertension in adulthood. This study assessed the effects of taurine supplementation in vascular alterations induced by protein restriction in post-weaning rats. METHODS AND RESULTS: Weaned male Wistar rats were fed normal- (12%, NP or low-protein (6%, LP diets for 90 days. Half of the NP and LP rats concomitantly received 2.5% taurine supplementation in the drinking water (NPT and LPT, respectively. LP rats showed elevated systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure versus NP rats; taurine supplementation partially prevented this increase. There was a reduced relaxation response to acetylcholine in isolated thoracic aortic rings from the LP group that was reversed by superoxide dismutase (SOD or apocynin incubation. Protein expression of p47phox NADPH oxidase subunit was enhanced, whereas extracellular (EC-SOD and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation at Ser 1177 (p-eNOS were reduced in aortas from LP rats. Furthermore, ROS production was enhanced while acetylcholine-induced NO release was reduced in aortas from the LP group. Taurine supplementation improved the relaxation response to acetylcholine and eNOS-derived NO production, increased EC-SOD and p-eNOS protein expression, as well as reduced ROS generation and p47phox expression in the aortas from LPT rats. LP rats showed an increased aortic wall/lumen ratio and taurine prevented this remodeling through a reduction in wall media thickness. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate a protective role of taurine supplementation on the high blood pressure, endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling induced by post-weaning protein restriction. The beneficial vascular effect of

  20. P2X7R antagonism after subfailure overstretch injury of blood vessels reverses vasomotor dysfunction and prevents apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weifeng; Feldman, Daniel; McCallister, Reid; Brophy, Colleen; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce

    2017-12-01

    Human saphenous vein (HSV) is harvested and prepared prior to implantation as an arterial bypass graft. Injury and the response to injury from surgical harvest and preparation trigger cascades of molecular events and contribute to graft remodeling and intimal hyperplasia. Apoptosis is an early response after implantation that contributes the development of neointimal lesions. Here, we showed that surgical harvest and preparation of HSV leads to vasomotor dysfunction, increased apoptosis and downregulation of the phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein, Niban. A model of subfailure overstretch injury in rat aorta (RA) was used to demonstrate impaired vasomotor function, increased extracellular ATP (eATP) release, and increased apoptosis following pathological vascular injury. The subfailure overstretch injury was associated with activation of p38 MAPK stress pathway and decreases in the phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Niban. Treatment of RA after overstretch injury with antagonists to purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) antagonists or P2X7R/pannexin (PanX1) complex, but not PanX1 alone, restored vasomotor function. Inhibitors to P2X7R and PanX1 reduced stretch-induced eATP release. P2X7R/PanX1 antagonism led to decrease in p38 MAPK phosphorylation, restoration of Niban phosphorylation and increases in the phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Akt in RA and reduced TNFα-stimulated caspase 3/7 activity in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. In conclusion, inhibition of P2X7R after overstretch injury restored vasomotor function and inhibited apoptosis. Treatment with P2X7R/PanX1 complex inhibitors after harvest and preparation injury of blood vessels used for bypass conduits may prevent the subsequent response to injury that lead to apoptosis and represents a novel therapeutic approach to prevent graft failure.

  1. The flavonoid compound apigenin prevents colonic inflammation and motor dysfunctions associated with high fat diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Daniela; Fornai, Matteo; Colucci, Rocchina; Pellegrini, Carolina; Tirotta, Erika; Benvenuti, Laura; Segnani, Cristina; Ippolito, Chiara; Duranti, Emiliano; Virdis, Agostino; Carpi, Sara; Nieri, Paola; Németh, Zoltán H; Pistelli, Laura; Bernardini, Nunzia; Blandizzi, Corrado; Antonioli, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Apigenin can exert beneficial actions in the prevention of obesity. However, its putative action on obesity-associated bowel motor dysfunctions is unknown. This study examined the effects of apigenin on colonic inflammatory and motor abnormalities in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed with standard diet (SD) or high-fat diet (HFD). SD or HFD mice were treated with apigenin (10 mg/Kg/day). After 8 weeks, body and epididymal fat weight, as well as cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels were evaluated. Malondialdehyde (MDA), IL-1β and IL-6 levels, and let-7f expression were also examined. Colonic infiltration by eosinophils, as well as substance P (SP) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expressions were evaluated. Motor responses elicited under blockade of NOS and tachykininergic contractions were recorded in vitro from colonic longitudinal muscle preparations. When compared to SD mice, HFD animals displayed increased body weight, epididymal fat weight and metabolic indexes. HFD mice showed increments in colonic MDA, IL-1β and IL-6 levels, as well as a decrease in let-7f expression in both colonic and epididymal tissues. HFD mice displayed an increase in colonic eosinophil infiltration. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increase in SP and iNOS expression in myenteric ganglia of HFD mice. In preparations from HFD mice, electrically evoked contractions upon NOS blockade or mediated by tachykininergic stimulation were enhanced. In HFD mice, Apigenin counteracted the increase in body and epididymal fat weight, as well as the alterations of metabolic indexes. Apigenin reduced also MDA, IL-1β and IL-6 colonic levels as well as eosinophil infiltration, SP and iNOS expression, along with a normalization of electrically evoked tachykininergic and nitrergic contractions. In addition, apigenin normalized let-7f expression in epididymal fat tissues, but not in colonic specimens. Apigenin prevents systemic metabolic alterations

  2. Superiority of zinc complex of acetylsalicylic acid to acetylsalicylic acid in preventing postischemic myocardial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Sevil; Atmanli, Ayhan; Li, Shiliang; Radovits, Tamás; Hegedűs, Peter; Barnucz, Enikő; Hirschberg, Kristóf; Loganathan, Sivakkanan; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2015-09-01

    The pathophysiology of ischemic myocardial injury involves cellular events, reactive oxygen species, and an inflammatory reaction cascade. The zinc complex of acetylsalicylic acid (Zn(ASA)2) has been found to possess higher anti-inflammatory and lower ulcerogenic activities than acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Herein, we studied the effects of both ASA and Zn(ASA)2 against acute myocardial ischemia. Rats were pretreated with ASA (75 mg/kg) or Zn(ASA)2 (100 mg/kg) orally for five consecutive days. Isoproterenol (85 mg/kg, subcutaneously [s.c.]) was applied to produce myocardial infarction. After 17-22 h, animals were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) and both electrical and mechanical parameters of cardiac function were evaluated in vivo. Myocardial histological and gene expression analyses were performed. In isoproterenol-treated rats, Zn(ASA)2 treatment normalized significantly impaired left-ventricular contractility index (Emax 2.6 ± 0.7 mmHg/µL vs. 4.6 ± 0.5 mmHg/µL, P < 0.05), increased stroke volume (30 ± 3 µL vs. 50 ± 6 µL, P < 0.05), decreased systemic vascular resistance (7.2 ± 0.7 mmHg/min/mL vs. 4.2 ± 0.5 mmHg/min/mL, P < 0.05) and reduced inflammatory infiltrate into the myocardial tissues. ECG revealed a restoration of elevated ST-segment (0.21 ± 0.03 mV vs. 0.09 ± 0.02 mV, P < 0.05) and prolonged QT-interval (79.2 ± 3.2 ms vs. 69.5 ± 2.5 ms, P < 0.05) by Zn(ASA)2. ASA treatment did not result in an improvement of these parameters. Additionally, Zn(ASA)2 significantly increased the mRNA-expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (+73 ± 15%), glutathione peroxidase 4 (+44 ± 12%), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 (+102 ± 22%). In conclusion, our data demonstrate that oral administration of zinc and ASA in the form of bis(aspirinato)zinc(II) complex is superior to ASA in preventing electrical

  3. [Comparison of different doses of escitalopram in the prevention of dementia in patients with depression and moderate cognitive dysfunction associated with chronic brain ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitkova, J V

    2015-01-01

    to compare different doses of escitalopram (cipralex) in the prevention of dementia in patients with depression and moderate cognitive dysfunction associated with chronic brain ischemia. Two groups of patients, aged 65-78 years, with chronic brain ischemia and mild or moderate depression with moderate cognitive dysfunction were treated with different doses of escitalopram: 30 patients received 5 mg daily during all treatment period; 42 patients - 5 mg daily during the first week and 10 mg from the second week of treatment. The treatment lasted for 6 months; the period of observation was 8 months. The efficacy of escitalopram is demonstrated not only for the treatment of depression associated with cognitive dysfunction in patients with chronic brain ischemia but for decrease of the risk of dementia in long-term period.

  4. Autonomic neuropathy in Fabry disease: a prospective study using the Autonomic Symptom Profile and cardiovascular autonomic function tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegstraaten, Marieke; van Schaik, Ivo N.; Wieling, Wouter; Wijburg, Frits A.; Hollak, Carla E. M.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Fabry patients have symptoms and signs compatible with autonomic dysfunction. These symptoms and signs are considered to be due to impairment of the peripheral nervous system, but findings indicative of autonomic neuropathy in other diseases, such as orthostatic intolerance and

  5. Aging compounds western diet-associated large artery endothelial dysfunction in mice: prevention by voluntary aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesniewski, Lisa A; Zigler, Melanie L; Durrant, Jessica R; Nowlan, Molly J; Folian, Brian J; Donato, Anthony J; Seals, Douglas R

    2013-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that aging will exacerbate the negative vascular consequences of exposure to a common physiological stressor, i.e., consumption of a "western" (high fat/high sucrose) diet (WD), by inducing superoxide-associated reductions in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, and that this would be prevented by voluntary aerobic exercise. Incremental stiffness and endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) were measured in the carotid arteries of young (5.4±0.3 mo, N=20) and old (30.4±0.2 mo, N=19) male B6D2F1 mice fed normal chow (NC: 17% fat, 0% sucrose) or a western diet (40% fat, 19% sucrose) and housed in either standard cages or cages equipped with running wheels for 10-14 weeks. Incremental stiffness was higher in old NC (P<0.05) and both young (P<0.01) and old (P<0.01) WD fed mice compared with young NC mice, but WD did not further increase stiffness in the old mice. In cage control mice, maximal EDD was 17% lower in both NC fed old mice and young WD fed mice (P<0.05). Consumption of WD by old mice led to a further 20% reduction in maximal EDD (P<0.05). Incremental stiffness was 28% lower and maximal EDD was 38% greater in old WD fed mice with access to running wheels vs. old WD fed control mice (P<0.05) and not different from young NC fed controls. Wheel running also tended to improve maximal EDD (+9%, P=0.11), but not incremental stiffness in young WD fed mice. Ex vivo treatment with the superoxide scavenger TEMPOL and NO inhibitor l-NAME abolished these respective effects of age, WD and voluntary running on EDD. Ingestion of a WD induces similar degrees of endothelial dysfunction in old and young adult B6D2F1 mice, and these effects are mediated by a superoxide-dependent impairment of NO bioavailability. However, the combination of old age and WD, a common occurrence in our aging society, results in a marked, additive reduction in endothelial function. Importantly, regular voluntary aerobic exercise reduces arterial stiffness and protects against

  6. Exacerbation of myocardial dysfunction and autonomic imbalance contributes to the estrogen-dependent chronic hypotensive effect of ethanol in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Mas, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2012-03-15

    Our previous studies showed that the hypotensive effect of chronic ethanol in female rats is reduced by ovariectomy (OVX) rats and was restored after estrogen replacement (OVXE(2)). Further, in randomly cycling rats, chronic ethanol increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance and subsequently reduced myocardial contractility and blood pressure (BP). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that alterations in myocardial contractility and sympathovagal control account for the E(2) exacerbation of the hemodynamic effects of ethanol. BP, myocardial contractility (+dP/dt(max)), and spectral cardiovascular autonomic profiles were evaluated in radiotelemetered OVX, and OVXE(2) rats receiving liquid diet with or without ethanol (5%, w/v) for 13 weeks. In OVX rats, ethanol caused modest hypotension along with significant increases in +dP/dt(max) during weeks 2-5. The high-frequency (IBI(HF), 0.75-3 Hz) and low-frequency (IBI(LF), 0.25-0.75 Hz) bands of interbeat intervals were briefly increased and decreased, respectively, by ethanol. Compared with its effects in OVX rats, chronic treatment of OVXE(2) rats with ethanol elicited significantly greater and more sustained reductions in systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures and +dP/dt(max). Altered sympathovagal balance and parasympathetic overactivity were more evident in ethanol-treated OVXE(2) rats as suggested by the sustained: (i) increases in high-frequency bands of interbeat intervals (IBI(HF), 0.75-3 Hz), and (ii) decreases in low-frequency IBI bands (IBI(LF), 0.25-0.75 Hz), IBI(LF/HF) ratio and +dP/dt(max). The plasma ethanol concentration was not affected by changes in the hormonal milieu. These findings suggest that estrogen exacerbates the ethanol-evoked reductions in myocardial contractility and BP and the associated parasympathetic overactivity in female rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Autonomic neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  8. Autonomic epileptic seizures, autonomic effects of seizures, and SUDEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Brian; Bateman, Lisa; Millichap, John J; Wirrell, Elaine; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2013-03-01

    Many generalized tonic-clonic seizures are accompanied by profound autonomic changes. However, autonomic seizures and autonomic status epilepticus can also be seen with specific electroclinical syndromes (Panayiotopoulos syndrome), etiologies, and localizations. Such autonomic symptoms may impact cardiorespiratory function. While it is likely that several factors contribute to SUDEP, further study of both ictal respiratory and cardiac changes and underlying neuroanatomical mechanisms involved in autonomic seizure semiology are likely to provide important data to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of this devastating condition. This paper will review the association between autonomic symptoms and epileptic seizures and will highlight the work of three young investigators. Drs. Lisa Bateman and Brian Moseley will review their work on cardiorespiratory effects of recorded seizures and how this assists in our understanding of SUDEP. Dr. John Millichap will review autonomic seizures and autonomic dysfunctions related to childhood epilepsy and will discuss the importance of expanded research efforts in this field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Autonomous houses. Autonomous house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S. (Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-09-30

    Self-sufficiency type houses are outlined. On condition that people gain a certain amount of income in relation with the society, they self-suffice under the given environment, allowing themselves to accept a minimum of industrial products with small environmental load. Ordinary supply from outside of fossil energy and materials which depend on it is minimized. Types are classified into three: energy, energy materials and perfect self-sufficiency. A study project for environment symbiotic houses is progressing which is planned by the Ministry of Construction and Institute of Building Energy Conservation and is invested by a private company. Its target is making a house for halving an environmental load by CO{sub 2}, for the purpose of creating the environment symbiotic house which is nice to and in harmony with the global environment and human beings. As a part of the studies on energy-saving and resource conservation on houses, introduced is a plan of an autonomous house at Izu-Atagawa. The passive method and high thermal-insulation are used for air conditioning, and hot spring water for hot water supply. Electric power is generated by hydroelectric power generation using mountain streams and by solar cells. Staple food is purchased, while subsidiary food is sufficed. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Bethanechol chloride for the prevention of bladder dysfunction after radical hysterectomy in gynecologic cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchana, Tarinee; Prasartsakulchai, Chalisa

    2011-05-01

    Bethanechol chloride is considered as a treatment in patients with high postvoid residual urine (PVR). It enhances detrusor muscle contraction, resulting in higher maximum flow rate, higher detrusor pressure at maximum flow, and lower PVR. The efficacy of this agent in patients after radical hysterectomy is unclear. We aim to evaluate the efficacy of bethanechol chloride compared with placebo for the prevention of bladder dysfunction after type III radical hysterectomy. Gynecologic cancer patients who underwent type III radical hysterectomy were randomized by computer-generated schedule to assign patients in a 1:1 ratio into 2 groups. The treatment group received bethanechol chloride (Ucholine 20 mg 3 times a day on the third to seventh postoperative day), and the control group received placebo. Patients and physicians were masked to treatment allocation. The primary end point was the rate of urethral catheter removal at 1 week postoperatively. If PVR was more than 30% of voided volume, the urethral catheter was reinserted, and medication would be continued but not for more than 1 month. This study was registered as ISRCTN92687416. There were 31 patients in each group without significant difference in baseline characteristics. Twenty-one patients (67.7%) in the treatment group and 12 patients (38.7%) in the control group had the urethral catheter removed at 1 week postoperatively (P = 0.04). Median duration of urethral catheterization was shorter in the treatment group (7 and 14 days, P = 0.03). However, the PVR and the incidence of urinary tract infection at 1 month postoperatively were not significantly different. Nine patients (29%) in the treatment group had adverse events such as nausea, abdominal distension, and abdominal cramping, which was higher than the control group (1 patient, 3.2%; P = 0.01). However, no patients required any medical treatments. Bethanechol chloride decreases the duration of urethral catheterization in patients who underwent type III

  11. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaster, Manuella P; Machado, Nuno J; Silva, Henrique B; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-06-23

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function.

  12. A pilot randomized trial to prevent sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors starting adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Pragati; Brewster, Abenaa M; Baum, George P; Schover, Leslie R

    2017-08-01

    A randomized pilot trial evaluated the hypothesis that early intervention lessens sexual dysfunction in the first year on aromatase inhibitors. A secondary aim was comparing the efficacy of two vaginal moisturizers. Fifty-seven postmenopausal women with early stage breast cancer starting aromatase inhibitors were randomized to three treatment groups. All received a handout on managing sexual and other side effects. The Usual Care group received no additional therapy. The Active Treatment groups received a 6-month supply of a vaginal moisturizer (hyaluronic acid-based in Active Group-H and prebiotic in Active Group-P) and a vaginal lubricant and dilator, plus access to an educational website and phone coaching. Questionnaires completed at baseline, 6, and 12 months included the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), Menopausal Sexual Interest Questionnaire (MSIQ), Female Sexual Distress Scale-Revised (FSDS-R), and a menopausal symptom scale. Forty-nine women (86%) provided follow-up data. Mean age was 59 and 77% were non-Hispanic Caucasian. Sexual function was impaired at baseline, but remained stable over 12 months for all groups. The combined active treatment group had less dyspareunia (P = 0.07) and sexual distress (P = 0.02) at 6 months than the Usual Care group. At 6 months, the Active-H group improved significantly more than the Active-P group on FSFI total score (P = 0.04). Sexual counseling helped women maintain stable sexual function on aromatase inhibitors. Active intervention resulted in better outcomes at 6 months. This promising pilot trial suggests a need for more research on preventive counseling to maintain sexual function during aromatase inhibitor treatment.

  13. Autonomic changes in fibromyalgia: Clinical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction is one of the suggested pathophysiological mechanisms of fibromyalgia (FM). Its dysfunction may contribute to enhanced pain and other clinical problems associated with FM. Previous studies showed conflicting results regarding ANS function in FM. Some studies ...

  14. The prevention of endothelial dysfunction through endothelial cell apoptosis inhibition in a hypercholesterolemic rabbit model: the effect of L-arginine supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghjooyjavanmard Shaghayegh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of L-arginine on atherogenesis and its ability to prevent endothelial dysfunction have been studied extensively during the past years. L-arginine is a substance for nitric oxide synthesis which involves in apoptosis. Hypercholesterolemia promotes endothelial dysfunction, and it is hypothesized that L-arginine prevents endothelial dysfunction through endothelial cells apoptosis inhibition. To test this hypothesis, thirty rabbits were assigned into two groups. The control group received 1% cholesterol diet for 4 weeks, and the L-arginine group received same diets plus 3% L-arginine in drinking water. Results No significant differences were observed in cholesterol level between two groups, but the nitrite concentration in L-arginine group was significantly higher than other group (control group: 11.8 ± 1; L-arginine group: 14.7 ± 0.5 μmol/l; (p p p Conclusion The inhibition of endothelial cells apoptosis by L-arginine restores endothelial function in a model of hypercholesterolemia.

  15. Inhibition of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase increases cardiac peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha expression and fatty acid oxidation and prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced heart dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosatos, Konstantinos; Drosatos-Tampakaki, Zoi; Khan, Raffay; Homma, Shunichi; Schulze, P Christian; Zannis, Vassilis I; Goldberg, Ira J

    2011-10-21

    Septic shock results from bacterial infection and is associated with multi-organ failure, high mortality, and cardiac dysfunction. Sepsis causes both myocardial inflammation and energy depletion. We hypothesized that reduced cardiac energy production is a primary cause of ventricular dysfunction in sepsis. The JNK pathway is activated in sepsis and has also been implicated in impaired fatty acid oxidation in several tissues. Therefore, we tested whether JNK activation inhibits cardiac fatty acid oxidation and whether blocking JNK would restore fatty acid oxidation during LPS treatment. LPS treatment of C57BL/6 mice and adenovirus-mediated activation of the JNK pathway in cardiomyocytes inhibited peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α expression and fatty acid oxidation. Surprisingly, none of the adaptive responses that have been described in other types of heart failure, such as increased glucose utilization, reduced αMHC:βMHC ratio or induction of certain microRNAs, occurred in LPS-treated mice. Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a general JNK inhibitor (SP600125) increased fatty acid oxidation in mice and a cardiomyocyte-derived cell line. JNK inhibition also prevented LPS-mediated reduction in fatty acid oxidation and cardiac dysfunction. Inflammation was not alleviated in LPS-treated mice that received the JNK inhibitor. We conclude that activation of JNK signaling reduces fatty acid oxidation and prevents the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α down-regulation that occurs with LPS.

  16. Cardiovascular adaptation in people with multiple sclerosis following a twelve week exercise programme suggest deconditioning rather than autonomic dysfunction caused by the disease. Results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltham, M G; Collett, J; Izadi, H; Wade, D T; Morris, M G; Meaney, A J; Howells, K; Sackley, C; Dawes, H

    2013-12-01

    Guidelines for optimal exercise doses in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have to be established. We need to ascertain the basic physiological and perceptual response and adaptation to different exercise doses in this clinical population. The aim of this paper was to explore the response during maximal and sub-maximal exercise in people with MS prior to and following two different twelve week exercise programmes. Sub-analysis of per protocol exercise data of a two group, single blinded, randomised control trial. Multicentre (community leisure and rehabilitation centres). Participants with MS assigned to a continuous (N.=12; mean±SE age=52.3±2.08; Barthel index median & range=19&13-20) or interval (N.=9; mean±SE age=49.3±3.5; Barthel index median & range=19&18-20) exercise programme. Cardiovascular, respiratory and perceptual exercise response and adaption was measured at maximal and sub-maximal levels of physical exercise prior to and following a twelve week exercise programme, delivered at different intensities. Irrespective of the type of exercise programme followed, there was a significant increase in peak power (z=-1.98; P=0.05) and normalised oxygen uptake during unloaded cycling (z =-2.00; P=0.05). At discharge from the exercise programmes, the cardiovascular response to sub-maximal exercise had significantly changed (t(360) =-4.62; pphysical exercise following a twelve week programme is analogous to non-diseased adults. Cardiovascular adaptation in people with MS following a twelve week exercise programme suggests deconditioning rather than autonomic dysfunction caused by the disease.

  17. Implantable cardiac monitors in high-risk post-infarction patients with cardiac autonomic dysfunction and moderately reduced left ventricular ejection fraction: Design and rationale of the SMART-MI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Wolfgang; Rizas, Konstantinos D; Stülpnagel, Lukas von; Vdovin, Nikolay; Massberg, Steffen; Kääb, Stefan; Bauer, Axel

    2017-08-01

    Most deaths after myocardial infarction (MI) occur in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >35%, for whom no specific prophylactic strategies exist. Deceleration capacity (DC) of heart rate and periodic repolarization dynamics (PRD) are noninvasive electrophysiological markers depending on the vagal and sympathetic tone. The combination of abnormal DC and/or PRD identifies a new high-risk group among postinfarction patients with LVEF 36%-50%. This new high-risk group has similar characteristics with respect to prognosis and patient numbers to those of the established high-risk group identified by LVEF ≤ 35%. The SMART-MI trial is an investigator-initiated randomized prospective multicenter trial that tests the efficacy of implantable cardiac monitors (ICM) in this new high-risk group. The study will enroll approximately 1,600 survivors of acute MI with sinus rhythm and an LVEF of 35%-50% in 17 centers in Germany who will be tested for presence of cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Four hundred patients with either abnormal DC (≤2.5 ms) and/or PRD (≥5.75deg 2 ) will be randomized in a 1:1 fashion to intensive follow-up via telemonitoring using an ICM device (experimental arm) or conventional follow-up (control arm). For the ICM arm, specific treatment paths have been developed according to current guidelines. The primary end point is time to detection of predefined serious arrhythmic events during follow-up, including atrial fibrillation ≥6minutes, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (cycle length≤320 ms; ≥40 beats), atrioventricular block ≥IIb, and sustained ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. The median follow-up period is 18months with a minimum follow-up of 6months. The effect of remote monitoring on clinical outcomes will be tested as secondary outcome measure (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02594488). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevention of vascular dysfunction and arterial hypertension in mice generated by assisted reproductive technologies by addition of melatonin to culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhaj, Emrush; Pireva, Agim; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Allemann, Yves; Cerny, David; Dessen, Pierre; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs; Rimoldi, Stefano F

    2015-10-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) induce vascular dysfunction in humans and mice. In mice, ART-induced vascular dysfunction is related to epigenetic alteration of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene, resulting in decreased vascular eNOS expression and nitrite/nitrate synthesis. Melatonin is involved in epigenetic regulation, and its administration to sterile women improves the success rate of ART. We hypothesized that addition of melatonin to culture media may prevent ART-induced epigenetic and cardiovascular alterations in mice. We, therefore, assessed mesenteric-artery responses to acetylcholine and arterial blood pressure, together with DNA methylation of the eNOS gene promoter in vascular tissue and nitric oxide plasma concentration in 12-wk-old ART mice generated with and without addition of melatonin to culture media and in control mice. As expected, acetylcholine-induced mesenteric-artery dilation was impaired (P = 0.008 vs. control) and mean arterial blood pressure increased (109.5 ± 3.8 vs. 104.0 ± 4.7 mmHg, P = 0.002, ART vs. control) in ART compared with control mice. These alterations were associated with altered DNA methylation of the eNOS gene promoter (P culture media prevented eNOS dysmethylation (P = 0.005, vs. ART + vehicle), normalized nitric oxide plasma concentration (23.1 ± 14.6 μM, P = 0.002 vs. ART + vehicle) and mesentery-artery responsiveness to acetylcholine (P culture media prevents ART-induced vascular dysfunction. We speculate that this approach will also allow preventing ART-induced premature atherosclerosis in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. EPA:DHA 6:1 prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats: role of NADPH oxidase- and COX-derived oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Zahid Rasul; Silva, Grazielle C; Ribeiro, Thais Porto; León-González, Antonio J; Kassem, Mohamad; Mirajkar, Abdur; Alvi, Azhar; Abbas, Malak; Zgheel, Faraj; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Auger, Cyril

    2017-12-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid:docosahexaenoic acid (EPA:DHA) 6:1, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid formulation, has been shown to induce a sustained formation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase-derived NO, a major vasoprotective factor. This study examined whether chronic intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevents hypertension and endothelial dysfunction induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) in rats. Male Wister rats received orally corn oil or EPA:DHA 6:1 (500 mg kg -1 per day) before chronic infusion of Ang II (0.4 mg kg -1 per day). Systolic blood pressure was determined by tail cuff sphingomanometry, vascular reactivity using a myograph, oxidative stress using dihydroethidium and protein expression by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Ang II-induced hypertension was associated with reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxations of secondary branch mesenteric artery rings affecting the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)- and the NO-mediated relaxations, both of which were improved by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor VAS-2870. The Ang II treatment induced also endothelium-dependent contractile responses (EDCFs), which were abolished by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin. An increased level of vascular oxidative stress and expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p47 phox and p22 phox ), COX-1 and COX-2, endothelial NO synthase and Ang II type 1 receptors were observed in the Ang II group, whereas SK Ca and connexin 37 were downregulated. Intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevented the Ang II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction by improving both the NO- and EDH-mediated relaxations, and by reducing EDCFs and the expression of target proteins. The present findings indicate that chronic intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevented the Ang II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats, most likely by preventing NADPH oxidase- and COX-derived oxidative stress.

  20. Polyphenol-Rich Blackcurrant Juice Prevents Endothelial Dysfunction in the Mesenteric Artery of Cirrhotic Rats with Portal Hypertension: Role of Oxidative Stress and the Angiotensin System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Sherzad; Idris-Khodja, Noureddine; Auger, Cyril; Kevers, Claire; Pincemail, Joël; Alhosin, Mahmoud; Boehm, Nelly; Oswald-Mammosser, Monique; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2018-04-01

    Chronic liver diseases with portal hypertension are characterized by a progressive vasodilatation, endothelial dysfunction, and NADPH oxidase-derived vascular oxidative stress, which have been suggested to involve the angiotensin system. This study evaluated the possibility that oral intake of polyphenol-rich blackcurrant juice (PRBJ), a rich natural source of antioxidants, prevents endothelial dysfunction in a rat model of cirrhosis induced by chronic bile duct ligation (CBDL), and, if so, determined the underlying mechanism. Male Wistar rats received either control drinking water or water containing 60 mg/kg gallic acid equivalents of PRBJ for 3 weeks before undergoing surgery with CBDL or sham surgery. After 4 weeks, vascular reactivity was assessed in mesenteric artery rings using organ chambers. Both the acetylcholine-induced nitric oxide (NO)- and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)-mediated relaxations in mesenteric artery rings were significantly reduced in CBDL rats compared to sham rats. An increased level of oxidative stress and expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, COX-2, NOS, and of the vascular angiotensin system are observed in arterial sections in the CBDL group. Chronic intake of PRBJ prevented the CBDL-induced impaired EDH-mediated relaxation, oxidative stress, and expression of the different target proteins in the arterial wall. In addition, PRBJ prevented the CBDL-induced increase in the plasma level of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, and tumor necrosis factor α) and the decrease of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-4. Altogether, these observations indicate that regular ingestion of PRBJ prevents the CBDL-induced endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric artery most likely by normalizing the level of vascular oxidative stress and the angiotensin system.

  1. Autonomous search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous combinatorial search (AS) represents a new field in combinatorial problem solving. Its major standpoint and originality is that it considers that problem solvers must be capable of self-improvement operations. This is the first book dedicated to AS.

  2. Adenosine A2A receptor blockade prevents synaptotoxicity and memory dysfunction caused by beta-amyloid peptides via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, Paula M; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Cunha, Geanne M A; Silva, Carla G; Machado, Nuno J; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2009-11-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory impairment, neurochemically by accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (namely Abeta(1-42)) and morphologically by an initial loss of nerve terminals. Caffeine consumption prevents memory dysfunction in different models, which is mimicked by antagonists of adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs), which are located in synapses. Thus, we now tested whether A(2A)R blockade prevents the early Abeta(1-42)-induced synaptotoxicity and memory dysfunction and what are the underlying signaling pathways. The intracerebral administration of soluble Abeta(1-42) (2 nmol) in rats or mice caused, 2 weeks later, memory impairment (decreased performance in the Y-maze and object recognition tests) and a loss of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP-25) without overt neuronal loss, astrogliosis, or microgliosis. These were prevented by pharmacological blockade [5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH58261); 0.05 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1), i.p.; for 15 d] in rats, and genetic inactivation of A(2A)Rs in mice. Moreover, these were synaptic events since purified nerve terminals acutely exposed to Abeta(1-42) (500 nm) displayed mitochondrial dysfunction, which was prevented by A(2A)R blockade. SCH58261 (50 nm) also prevented the initial synaptotoxicity (loss of MAP-2, synaptophysin, and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity) and subsequent loss of viability of cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Abeta(1-42) (500 nm). This A(2A)R-mediated control of neurotoxicity involved the control of Abeta(1-42)-induced p38 phosphorylation and was independent from cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) pathway. Together, these results show that A(2A)Rs play a crucial role in the development of Abeta-induced synaptotoxicity leading to memory dysfunction through a p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway and provide a molecular basis for the benefits of caffeine consumption in AD.

  3. Can Valeriana officinalis root extract prevent early postoperative cognitive dysfunction after CABG surgery? A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Soghra; Alipour, Abbas; Darvishi Khezri, Hadi; Firouzian, Abolfazl; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Ghafari, Rahman; Habibi, Wali-Allah; Tahmasebi, Homeyra; Alipour, Fatemeh; Ebrahim Zadeh, Pooneh

    2015-03-01

    We hypothesized that valerian root might prevent cognitive dysfunction in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients through stimulating serotonin receptors and anti-inflammatory activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Valeriana officinalis root extract on prevention of early postoperative cognitive dysfunction after on-pump CABG surgery. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 61 patients, aged between 30 and 70 years, scheduled for elective CABG surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), were recruited into the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups who received either one valerian capsule containing 530 mg of valerian root extract (1,060 mg/daily) or placebo capsule each 12 h for 8 weeks, respectively. For all patients, cognitive brain function was evaluated before the surgery and at 10-day and 2-month follow-up by Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) test. Mean MMSE score decreased from 27.03 ± 2.02 in the preoperative period to 26.52 ± 1.82 at the 10th day and then increased to 27.45 ± 1.36 at the 60th day in the valerian group. Conversely, its variation was reduced significantly after 60 days in the placebo group, 27.37 ± 1.87 at the baseline to 24 ± 1.91 at the 10th day, and consequently slightly increased to 24.83 ± 1.66 at the 60th day. Valerian prophylaxis reduced odds of cognitive dysfunction compared to placebo group (OR = 0.108, 95 % CI 0.022-0.545). We concluded that, based on this study, the cognitive state of patients in the valerian group was better than that in the placebo group after CABG; therefore, it seems that the use of V. officinalis root extract may prevent early postoperative cognitive dysfunction after on-pump CABG surgery.

  4. Neurogenic voiding dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Petros; Apostolidis, Apostolos

    2017-05-01

    This review aims to analyze and discuss all recently published articles associated with neurogenic voiding discussion providing readers with the most updated knowledge and trigger for further research. They include the proposal of a novel classification system for the pathophysiology of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) which combines neurological defect in a distinct anatomic location, and data on bowel dysfunction, autonomic dysreflexia and urine biomarkers; review of patient-reported outcome measures in NLUTD; review of the criteria for the diagnosis of clinically significant urinary infections; novel research findings on the pathophysiology of NLUTD; and review of data on minimally and more invasive treatments. Despite the extended evidence base on NLUTD, there is a paucity of high-quality new research concerning voiding dysfunction as opposed to storage problems. The update aims to inform clinicians about new developments in clinical practice, as well as ignite discussion for further clinical and basic research in the aforementioned areas of NLUTD.

  5. Autonomic symptoms in idiopathic REM behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Oertel, Wolfgang; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-01-01

    to study the disorders of the autonomic nervous system in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, the SCOPA-AUT, was administered to all the patients and controls. The SCOPA-AUT consists of 25 items assessing the following domains: gastrointestinal, urinary, cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, pupillomotor......Patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) are at very high risk of developing neurodegenerative synucleinopathies, which are disorders with prominent autonomic dysfunction. Several studies have documented autonomic dysfunction in iRBD, but large-scale assessment of autonomic...... symptoms has never been systematically performed. Patients with polysomnography-confirmed iRBD (318 cases) and controls (137 healthy volunteers and 181 sleep center controls with sleep diagnoses other than RBD) were recruited from 13 neurological centers in 10 countries from 2008 to 2011. A validated scale...

  6. Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Mahboob; Das, Pinaki; Ghosh, Parasar; Zaman, Md Salim Uz; Boro, Madhusmita; Sadhu, Manika; Mazumdar, Ardhendu

    2015-01-01

    Objective is to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function in SLE by simple non-invasive tests. A case control study was carried out involving 18-50 yrs old previously diagnosed SLE patients and same number of age and sex-matched controls. Parasympathetic function was assessed by heart rate (HR) response to Valsalva maneuver, deep breathing and standing. Sympathetic function was evaluated by blood pressure response to standing and sustained hand-grip test (HGT). There were 50 female SLE patients. They had significantly higher minimum resting HR and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). HR variation with deep breathing, expiratory inspiratory ratio, 30:15 ratio and DBP change in response to HGT were significantly lower inpatients compared to controls. Thirty patients (60%) had at least one abnormal or two borderline test results indicating autonomic impairment of which 27 had parasympathetic dysfunction and 7 had sympathetic dysfunction. Autonomic dysfunction is common in SLE with higher prevalence of parasympathetic impairment.

  7. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    the method by applying standardized methods to measure the autonomic function based on heart rate variability (HRV) measures. 3) Based on the results, assess the validity of autonomic dysfunction as an early marker of a neurodegenerative disease. 4) Evaluate the influence of hypocretin loss in narcolepsy...... areas, which is consistent with the Braak hypothesis. In the narcolepsy patients, it was shown that a reduced HRR to arousals was primarily predicted by hypocretin deficiency in both rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-REM sleep, independent of cataplexy and other factors. The results confirm...... that hypocretin deficiency affects the autonomic nervous system of patients with narcolepsy and that the hypocretin system is important for proper heart rate modulation at rest.Furthermore, it was shown that hypocretin deficiency and cataplexy are associated with signs of destabilized sleep-wake and REM sleep...

  8. Intraoperative brief electrical stimulation (BES) for prevention of shoulder dysfunction after oncologic neck dissection: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Brittany; McNeely, Margaret; Chan, K Ming; Beaudry, Rhys; Olson, Jaret; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi; O'Connell, Daniel

    2015-05-30

    neck dissection. BES has been shown to be successful in accelerating peripheral nerve regeneration in both animal and human participants in multiple different peripheral nerves. If successful, this technique may provide an adjunctive prevention option for shoulder pain and dysfunction in HNC patients. NCT02268344: 17 October 2014.

  9. Sexual counselling for treating or preventing sexual dysfunction in women living with female genital mutilation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okomo, Uduak; Ogugbue, Miriam; Inyang, Elizabeth; Meremikwu, Martin M

    2017-02-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is the persistent or recurring decrease in sexual desire or arousal, the difficulty or inability to achieve an orgasm, and/or the feeling of pain during sexual intercourse. Impaired sexual function can occur with all types of female genital mutilation (FGM) owing to the structural changes, pain, or traumatic memories associated with the procedure. To conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized studies into the effects of sexual counseling with or without genital lubricants on the sexual function of women living with FGM. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, African Index Medicus, SCOPUS, LILACS, CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov, Pan African Clinical Trials Registry, and other databases were searched to August 2015. The reference lists of retrieved studies were checked for reports of additional studies, and lead authors contacted for additional data. Studies of girls and women living with any type of FGM who received counselling interventions for sexual dysfunction were included. No relevant studies that addressed the objective of the review were identified. Despite a comprehensive search, the authors could not find evidence of the effects of sexual counseling on the sexual function of women living with FGM. Studies assessing this intervention are needed. CRD42015024593. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in the manuscript of this article as submitted for publication.

  10. Garcinia kola seeds may prevent cognitive and motor dysfunctions in a type 1 diabetes mellitus rat model partly by mitigating neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seke Etet, Paul F; Farahna, Mohammed; Satti, Gwiria M H; Bushara, Yahia M; El-Tahir, Ahmed; Hamza, Muaawia A; Osman, Sayed Y; Dibia, Ambrose C; Vecchio, Lorella

    2017-04-15

    Background We reported recently that extracts of seeds of Garcinia kola, a plant with established hypoglycemic properties, prevented the loss of inflammation-sensible neuronal populations like Purkinje cells in a rat model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Here, we assessed G. kola extract ability to prevent the early cognitive and motor dysfunctions observed in this model. Methods Rats made diabetic by single injection of streptozotocin were treated daily with either vehicle solution (diabetic control group), insulin, or G. kola extract from the first to the 6th week post-injection. Then, cognitive and motor functions were assessed using holeboard and vertical pole behavioral tests, and animals were sacrificed. Brains were dissected out, cut, and processed for Nissl staining and immunohistochemistry. Results Hyperglycemia (209.26 %), body weight loss (-12.37 %), and T1DM-like cognitive and motor dysfunctions revealed behavioral tests in diabetic control animals were not observed in insulin and extract-treated animals. Similar, expressions of inflammation markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF), iba1 (CD68), and Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), as well as decreases of neuronal density in regions involved in cognitive and motor functions (-49.56 % motor cortex, -33.24 % medial septal nucleus, -41.8 % /-37.34 % cerebellar Purkinje /granular cell layers) were observed in diabetic controls but not in animals treated with insulin or G. kola. Conclusions Our results indicate that T1DM-like functional alterations are mediated, at least partly, by neuroinflammation and neuronal loss in this model. The prevention of the development of such alterations by early treatment with G. kola confirms the neuroprotective properties of the plant and warrant further mechanistic studies, considering the potential for human disease.

  11. Counter-Productive Counter-Terrorism. How is the dysfunctional discourse of Prevent failing to restrain radicalisation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Powell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores why the Prevent strand of the UK Government’s counter-terrorism strategy, CONTEST, is failing to achieve success in reducing radicalisation of young Muslims. By refusing to engage with extremists, and denying ‘extreme’ ideas a platform for expression, this paper will explain how the importance of cultural-linguistic epistemologies, and their role in extremism, has been overlooked. Rather than striving to understand how socio-political factors influence one’s reading of religious doctrines or interpretation of ideology, Prevent understands ideology to be the core radicalising agent, used by influential figures who can exploit the grievances of the vulnerable. The problematic repercussions of this will be addressed throughout, highlighting the various, and extensive, criticisms that Prevent has faced from academics, practitioners and commentators – primarily that it is counter-productive. The importance of the post-9/11 neoconservative paradigm in underpinning Prevent will be explained, but a Neo-Weberian approach, as a better lens through which to understand radicalisation, will be proposed, to ultimately trump the simplistic, yet currently dominant, ‘Conveyor Belt’ theory. Based on this, recommendations are made for an improved Prevent, rooted in the notion that radicalisation, extremism, or terrorism cannot be prevented, without knowing the motives, the views, and the assumptions of the radicals, the extremists, and those vulnerable to engaging with them.

  12. L-arginine is an effective medication for prevention of endothelial dysfunction, a predictor of anthracycline cardiotoxicity in patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypnyk, I; Maslova, G; Lymanets, T; Gusachenko, I

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of L-arginine in the prevention of endothelial dysfunction, which may be a predictor of anthracycline-induced myocardial injury, in patients with acute leukemia (AL) on the background of anthracycline antibiotics low cumulative doses from 100 to 200 mg/m 2 . A total of 81 adult AL patients (38 males and 43 females with the age of 16-59 years) were studied. The patients were divided into two groups: group I (n = 34), AL patients treated with chemotherapy (CT) and L-arginine hydrochloride; group II (n = 47) - AL patients treated with CT only. Cardiac evaluation and endothelial function assessment were performed at baseline and after second CT. Electrocardiography (ECG) parameters, lipid peroxidation activity, antioxidant protection and NO system state were evaluated. The bioelectric activity abnormalities of the myocardium were observed in studied patients with low cardiac risk after induction CT. In case of L-arginine administration, only minimal daily ECG changes were recorded. A significant difference in the lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense system activity in patients of groups I and II was determined. We noticed deepening of endothelial dysfunction on the background of cytostatic therapy with anthracycline antibiotics compared with baseline values in patients of group II. It was found that prophylactic L-arginine increases superoxide dismutase level and reduces the total NOS activity due to its inducible isoform. The leading factor of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity is the imbalance between free radical generation and their inactivation that leads to endothelial dysfunction development. L-arginine eliminates the prooxidant-antioxidant imbalance and improves the endothelial function.

  13. Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction is Present Without Histopathology in a Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy-2F and is Prevented after Claudin-5 Virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Milani-Nejad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMutations in several members of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex lead to skeletal and cardiomyopathies. Cardiac care for these muscular dystrophies consists of management of symptoms with standard heart medications after detection of reduced whole heart function. Recent evidence from both Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and animal models suggests that myocardial dysfunction is present before myocardial damage or deficiencies in whole heart function, and that treatment prior to heart failure symptoms may be beneficial. To determine whether this same early myocardial dysfunction is present in other muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathies, we conducted a physiological assessment of cardiac function at the tissue level in the δ-sarcoglycan null mouse model (Sgcd-/- of Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2F. Baseline cardiac contractile force measurements using ex vivo intact linear muscle preparations, were severely depressed in these mice without the presence of histopathology. Virotherapy with claudin-5 prevents the onset of cardiomyopathy in another muscular dystrophy model. After virotherapy with claudin-5, the cardiac contractile force deficits in Sgcd-/- mice are no longer significant. These studies suggest that screening Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy patients using methods that detect earlier functional changes may provide a longer therapeutic window for cardiac care.

  14. Pelvic floor exercises during and after pregnancy: a systematic review of their role in preventing pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Marie-Andrée

    2003-06-01

    To review the literature on the origin, anatomical rationale, techniques, and evidence-based effectiveness of peripartum pelvic floor exercises (PFEs) in the prevention of pelvic floor problems including urinary and anal incontinence, and prolapse. Literature was reviewed for background information. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and proceedings of scientific meetings were searched for evidence-based data. A comprehensive literature search was performed to find all studies that involved the use of antepartum and/or postpartum PFEs. For the MEDLINE (1966 to 2002) and CINAHL (1980 to 2002) searches, the following key words were used: urinary incontinence (prevention and control, rehabilitation, therapy), fecal incontinence, exercise or exercise therapy, Kegel, muscle contraction, muscle tonus, muscle development, pelvic floor, pregnancy, puerperium, puerperal disorders. For the EMBASE (1980 to 2002) search, the following key words were used: micturition disorder (prevention, rehab, disease management, therapy), fecal incontinence, labour complication, pregnancy disorder, puerperal disorder, antepartum care, pregnancy, kinesiotherapy, exercise, pelvic floor, bladder. A manual search was performed of available abstracts presented at the annual scientific meetings of the International Continence Society (1997, 1999 to 2002), American Urogynecologic Association (1997 to 1998, 2000 to 2002), and International Urogynecological Association (1997, 1999 to 2002). Twelve studies evaluating the role of antepartum PFE were found, of which 3 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PFEs for the prevention of urinary incontinence to controls were included. Twelve studies evaluating postpartum PFEs for prevention of urinary incontinence were reviewed, of which 4 RCTs were included. Five studies evaluating postpartum PFEs for the prevention of anal incontinence were reviewed, of which 4 RCTs were included. Participants in the studies were primiparous women. DATA TABULATION AND

  15. Protective Effects of Let-7b on the Expression of Occludin by Targeting P38 MAPK in Preventing Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Let-7b was dramatically reduced after a dicer knockout of mice with intestinal barrier function injuries. This paper aims to investigate the molecular mechanism of let-7b by targeting p38 MAPK in preventing intestinal barrier dysfunction. Methods: A total of 186 patients were enrolled, with 93 in the control group and 93 in the PRO group. Only 158 patients completed the entire study, whereas the others either did not meet the inclusion criteria or refused to participate. To further verify the role of let-7b, intestinal epithelial conditional knockout (IKO mice of mmu-let-7b model were established. Serum let-7b, zonulin, IL-6, and TNF-α concentrations were measured by ELISA or quantitative RT-PCR. Permeability assay was done by ussing chamber. The apoptotic cells were identified using an In Situ Cell Death Detection Kit. Protein was detected by western blot. Results: Probiotics can lower infection-related complications, as well as increase the serum and tissue let-7b levels. P38 MAPK was identified as the target of let-7b, as verified by NCM460 cells. P38 MAPK expression was increased, whereas tight-junction (TJ proteins were significantly decreased in let-7b IKO mice (both P<0.05. Negative regulation of p38 MAPK molecular signaling pathways was involved in the protective effects of let-7b on intestinal barrier function. Conclusion: Let-7b was identified as a novel diagnosis biomarker or a potential treatment target for preventing intestinal barrier dysfunction.

  16. Protective Effects of Let-7b on the Expression of Occludin by Targeting P38 MAPK in Preventing Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihua; Tian, Yinghai; Jiang, Yanqiong; Chen, Shihua; Liu, Ting; Moyer, Mary Pat; Qin, Huanlong; Zhou, Xinke

    2018-01-01

    Let-7b was dramatically reduced after a dicer knockout of mice with intestinal barrier function injuries. This paper aims to investigate the molecular mechanism of let-7b by targeting p38 MAPK in preventing intestinal barrier dysfunction. A total of 186 patients were enrolled, with 93 in the control group and 93 in the PRO group. Only 158 patients completed the entire study, whereas the others either did not meet the inclusion criteria or refused to participate. To further verify the role of let-7b, intestinal epithelial conditional knockout (IKO) mice of mmu-let-7b model were established. Serum let-7b, zonulin, IL-6, and TNF-α concentrations were measured by ELISA or quantitative RT-PCR. Permeability assay was done by ussing chamber. The apoptotic cells were identified using an In Situ Cell Death Detection Kit. Protein was detected by western blot. Probiotics can lower infection-related complications, as well as increase the serum and tissue let-7b levels. P38 MAPK was identified as the target of let-7b, as verified by NCM460 cells. P38 MAPK expression was increased, whereas tight-junction (TJ) proteins were significantly decreased in let-7b IKO mice (both P<0.05). Negative regulation of p38 MAPK molecular signaling pathways was involved in the protective effects of let-7b on intestinal barrier function. Let-7b was identified as a novel diagnosis biomarker or a potential treatment target for preventing intestinal barrier dysfunction. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Metformin as a prevention and treatment for preeclampsia: effects on soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownfoot, Fiona C; Hastie, Roxanne; Hannan, Natalie J; Cannon, Ping; Tuohey, Laura; Parry, Laura J; Senadheera, Sevvandi; Illanes, Sebastian E; Kaitu'u-Lino, Tu'uhevaha J; Tong, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with placental ischemia/hypoxia and secretion of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin into the maternal circulation. This causes widespread endothelial dysfunction that manifests clinically as hypertension and multisystem organ injury. Recently, small molecule inhibitors of hypoxic inducible factor 1α have been found to reduce soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion. However, their safety profile in pregnancy is unknown. Metformin is safe in pregnancy and is also reported to inhibit hypoxic inducible factor 1α by reducing mitochondrial electron transport chain activity. The purposes of this study were to determine (1) the effects of metformin on placental soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion, (2) to investigate whether the effects of metformin on soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion are regulated through the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and (3) to examine its effects on endothelial dysfunction, maternal blood vessel vasodilation, and angiogenesis. We performed functional (in vitro and ex vivo) experiments using primary human tissues to examine the effects of metformin on soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion from placenta, endothelial cells, and placental villous explants. We used succinate, mitochondrial complex II substrate, to examine whether the effects of metformin on soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion were mediated through the mitochondria. We also isolated mitochondria from preterm preeclamptic placentas and gestationally matched control subjects and measured mitochondrial electron transport chain activity using kinetic spectrophotometric assays. Endothelial cells or whole maternal vessels were incubated with metformin to determine whether it rescued endothelial dysfunction induced by either tumor necrosis factor-α (to endothelial cells) or placenta villous

  18. Autonomic Impairment in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Laboratory Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Anna; Klonsky, E. David; Hajcak, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Recent research suggests that emotional dysfunction in psychiatric disorders can be reflected in autonomic abnormalities. The present study examines sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic nervous system activity in individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) before, during, and following a social stressor task. Data were obtained…

  19. Autonomic manifestations of epilepsy | Asindi | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: An epileptic fit does not only manifest as bizarre motor activity but can destabilize autonomic functions. Abnormal electrical discharge originating from the cerebral cortex can spreads to involve the autonomic system thus creating a dysfunction of the sympathetic and the parasympathetic which modulate the ...

  20. Autonomic reactivity in muscle pain : clinical and experimental assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Kalezic, Nebojsa

    2006-01-01

    There are numerous indications of possible involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the genesis of chronic pain. The possibility exists that sympathetic activation is related to motor dysfunction and changes in sensory processing, which have otherwise been implicated in musculoskeletal disorders. The primary aim of the thesis has been to investigate autonomic regulation at rest and in response to laboratory tests of autonomic function in subjects suffering from chronic pain in different...

  1. [Immune dysfunction and cognitive deficit in stress and physiological aging. Part II: New approaches to cognitive disorder prevention and treatment ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukhal'skiĭ, A L; Shmarina, G V; Aleshkin, V A

    2014-01-01

    Long-term stress as well as physiological aging result in similar immunological and hormonal disturbances including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal) axis depletion, aberrant immune response (regulatory T-cells, Tregs, and T(h17)-lymphocyte accumulation) and decreased dehydroepian-drosterone synthesis both in the brain and in the adrenal glands. Since the main mechanisms of inflammation control, "prompt" (stress hormones) and "delayed" (Tregs), are broken, serum cytokine levels increase and become sufficient for blood-brain-barrier disruption. As a result peripheral cytokines penetrate into the brain where they begin to perform new functions. Structural and functional alterations of blood-brain-barrier as well as stress- (or age-) induced neuroinflammation promote influx of bone marrow derived dendritic cells and lymphocyte effectors into the brain parenchyma. Thereafter, mass intrusion ofpro-inflammatory mediators and immune cells having a lot of specific targets alters the brain work that we can observe both in humans and in animal experiments. The concept of stressful cognitive dysfunction, which is under consideration in this review, allows picking out several therapeutic targets: 1) reduction of excessive Treg accumulation; 2) supporting hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and inflammatory reaction attenuation; 3) recovery of dehydroepiandrosterone level; 4) improvement of blood-brain-barrier function.

  2. The preventive effect of tamsulosin on voiding dysfunction after prostate biopsy: a prospective, open-label, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung Jun; Jung, Seung Il; Ryu, Ji Won; Hwang, Eu Chang; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung; Kim, Jin Woong

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the association of prostate biopsy with voiding impairment and to investigate whether tamsulosin treatment given before prostate biopsy could improve voiding dysfunction after the procedure. The study included 88 consecutive patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy without prior BPH medication and were prospectively randomized. Of these 88 patients, 44 patients underwent prostate biopsy only without tamsulosin treatment and served as the control group. The remaining 44 patients were treated with tamsulosin (0.2 mg daily) beginning the day before the biopsy procedure for 7 days. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) was recorded in all patients before the procedure and on postbiopsy day 7. Maximal flow rate (Q(max)) and postvoid residual urine volume were recorded in all patients before the procedure and on postbiopsy days 1 and 7. No difference was found in baseline characteristics between the two groups. The IPSS (total, storage, and voiding symptom) was not significantly changed after biopsy in both groups. In the control group, the postvoid residual urine volume was increased on postbiopsy days 1 (P tamsulosin group, Q(max) was significantly increased on postbiopsy days 1 and 7 (P tamsulosin group, but it developed in two patients (4.5%) of the control group. The results of our study show that prostate biopsy leads to objective voiding impairment. Therefore, the use of alpha-1 blocker tamsulosin before biopsy in patients without prior BPH medication may decrease this morbidity.

  3. Linarin isolated from Buddleja officinalis prevents hydrogen peroxide-induced dysfunction in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Young Soon; Choi, Eun Mi

    2011-01-01

    The flowers and leaves buds of Buddleja officinalis MAXIM (Buddlejaceae) are used to treat eye troubles, hernia, gonorrhea and liver troubles in Asia. To elucidate the protective effects of linarin isolated from B. officinalis on the response of osteoblast to oxidative stress, osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were pre-incubated with linarin for 1h before treatment with 0.3mM H(2)O(2) for 48h, and markers of osteoblast function and oxidative damage were examined. Linarin significantly (P<0.05) increased cell survival, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, collagen content, calcium deposition, and osteocalcin secretion and decreased the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL), protein carbonyl (PCO), and malondialdehyde (MDA) of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These results demonstrate that linarin can protect osteoblasts against hydrogen peroxide-induced osteoblastic dysfunction and may exert anti-resorptive actions, at least in part, via the reduction of RANKL and oxidative damage. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of midodrine and albumin in the prevention of paracentesis-induced circulatory dysfunction in cirrhotic patients: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Hassan; ElBaz, Ahmed A; Hassan, Ahmed; Hassanin, Omayma

    2014-02-01

    In this pilot study, we compared midodrine and albumin in the prevention of paracentesis-induced circulatory dysfunction (PICD). PICD with pronounced arterial vasodilatation in cirrhotics with tense ascites can be prevented by the infusion of albumin, which is an expensive treatment modality. Various vasoconstrictors have also been used to prevent PICD, but there are few studies about the usage of midodrine. Fifty patients with cirrhosis and tense refractory ascites were randomly assigned to be treated with either midodrine (n=25) (12.5 mg 3 times/d; over 3 d) or albumin (n=25) (8 g/L of removed ascites) after a large-volume paracentesis. Effective arterial blood volume was assessed indirectly by measuring serum creatinine, serum sodium, plasma renin activity, and aldosterone concentration before and 6 days after paracentesis. Midodrine therapy was cheaper compared with albumin therapy, but serum creatinine, serum sodium, plasma renin activity, and plasma aldosterone concentration values after treatment [0.99±0.19 to 3.02±2.58 mg/dL (P=0.001), 132.36±3.2 to 130.2±4.1 mEq/L (Pmidodrine group from that in the albumin group [1.10±0.22 to 1.11±0.161 mg/dL (P=0.885), 132.2±3.524 to 131.88±3.09 mEq/L (P=0.246), 4±0.91 to 4.11±0.74 ng/mL/h (P=0.440), and 204.88±115.9 to 177.08±100.5 pg/mL (Pmidodrine group of our study died as a consequence of liver failure complicated by acute renal failure, followed by hepatic encephalopathy. Whereas in the albumin group, even among the 7 patients with HCC, no patient died or developed hepatorenal syndrome or developed hepatic encephalopathy. This pilot study suggests that midodrine is not as effective as intravenous albumin in preventing circulatory dysfunction after large-volume paracentesis in patients with cirrhosis and tense ascites, especially with HCC-positive patients.

  5. Preventing environmental enteric dysfunction through improved water, sanitation and hygiene: an opportunity for stunting reduction in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Humphrey, Jean H

    2016-05-01

    In 2011, one in every four (26%) children under 5 years of age worldwide was stunted. The realization that most stunting cannot be explained by poor diet or by diarrhoea, nor completely reversed by optimized diet and reduced diarrhoea has led to the hypothesis that a primary underlying cause of stunting is subclinical gut disease. Essentially, ingested microbes set in motion two overlapping and interacting pathways that result in linear growth impairment. Firstly, partial villous atrophy results in a reduced absorptive surface area and loss of digestive enzymes. This in turn results in maldigestion and malabsorption of much needed nutrients. Secondly, microbes and their products make the gut leaky, allowing luminal contents to translocate into systemic circulation. This creates a condition of chronic immune activation, which (i) diverts nutrient resources towards the metabolically expensive business of infection fighting rather than growth; (ii) suppresses the growth hormone-IGF axis and inhibits bone growth, leading to growth impairment; and (iii) causes further damage to the intestinal mucosa thereby exacerbating the problem. As such, the unhygienic environments in which infants and young children live and grow must contribute to, if not be the overriding cause of, this environmental enteric dysfunction. We suggest that a package of baby-WASH interventions (sanitation and water improvement, handwashing with soap, ensuring a clean play and infant feeding environment and food hygiene) that interrupt specific pathways through which feco-oral transmission occurs in the first two years of a child's life may be central to global stunting reduction efforts. © 2016 The Authors. Maternal & Child Nutrition published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Targeting prolyl-isomerase Pin1 prevents mitochondrial oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction: insights in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneni, Francesco; Costantino, Sarah; Castello, Lorenzo; Battista, Rodolfo; Capretti, Giuliana; Chiandotto, Sergio; D'Amario, Domenico; Scavone, Giuseppe; Villano, Angelo; Rustighi, Alessandra; Crea, Filippo; Pitocco, Dario; Lanza, Gaetano; Volpe, Massimo; Del Sal, Giannino; Lüscher, Thomas F; Cosentino, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes is a major driver of cardiovascular disease, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Prolyl-isomerase Pin1 recognizes specific peptide bonds and modulates function of proteins altering cellular homoeostasis. The present study investigates Pin1 role in diabetes-induced vascular disease. In human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) exposed to high glucose, up-regulation of Pin1-induced mitochondrial translocation of pro-oxidant adaptor p66(Shc) and subsequent organelle disruption. In this setting, Pin1 recognizes Ser-116 inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) leading to eNOS-caveolin-1 interaction and reduced NO availability. Pin1 also mediates hyperglycaemia-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, triggering VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and MCP-1 expression. Indeed, gene silencing of Pin1 in HAECs suppressed p66(Shc)-dependent ROS production, restored NO release and blunted NF-kB p65 nuclear translocation. Consistently, diabetic Pin1(-/-) mice were protected against mitochondrial oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular inflammation. Increased expression and activity of Pin1 were also found in peripheral blood monocytes isolated from diabetic patients when compared with age-matched healthy controls. Interestingly, enough, Pin1 up-regulation was associated with impaired flow-mediated dilation, increased urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α and plasma levels of adhesion molecules. Pin1 drives diabetic vascular disease by causing mitochondrial oxidative stress, eNOS dysregulation as well as NF-kB-induced inflammation. These findings provide molecular insights for novel mechanism-based therapeutic strategies in patients with diabetes. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Tanshinone IIA Inhibits Glutamate-Induced Oxidative Toxicity through Prevention of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Suppression of MAPK Activation in SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate excitotoxicity is associated with many neurological diseases, including cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative diseases. Tanshinone IIA, a diterpenoid naphthoquinone from Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been shown to suppress presynaptic glutamate release, but its protective mechanism against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity is lacking. Using SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, we show here that excessive glutamate exposure decreases cell viability and proliferation and increases LDH release. Pretreatment with tanshinone IIA, however, prevents the decrease in cell viability and proliferation and the increase in LDH release induced by glutamate. Tanshinone IIA also attenuates glutamate-induced oxidative stress by reducing reactive oxygen species level and malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents and by enhancing activities and protein levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase. We then show that tanshinone IIA prevents glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction by increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content and by reducing mitochondrial protein carbonyl content. Moreover, tanshinone IIA can inhibit glutamate-induced apoptosis through regulation of apoptosis-related protein expression and MAPK activation, including elevation of Bcl-2 protein level, decrease in Bax and cleaved caspase-3 levels, and suppression of JNK and p38 MAPK activation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that tanshinone IIA protects SH-SY5Y cells against glutamate toxicity by reducing oxidative stress and regulating apoptosis and MAPK pathways.

  8. Public Health, Ethics, and Autonomous Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleetwood, Janet

    2017-04-01

    With the potential to save nearly 30 000 lives per year in the United States, autonomous vehicles portend the most significant advance in auto safety history by shifting the focus from minimization of postcrash injury to collision prevention. I have delineated the important public health implications of autonomous vehicles and provided a brief analysis of a critically important ethical issue inherent in autonomous vehicle design. The broad expertise, ethical principles, and values of public health should be brought to bear on a wide range of issues pertaining to autonomous vehicles.

  9. N-acetylcysteine prevents HIV gp 120-related damage of human cultured astrocytes: correlation with glutamine synthase dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Nicola

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV envelope gp 120 glycoprotein is released during active HIV infection of brain macrophages thereby generating inflammation and oxidative stress which contribute to the development of the AIDS-Dementia Complex (ADC. Gp120 has also been found capable to generate excitotoxic effect on brain tissue via enhancement of glutamatergic neurotransmission, leading to neuronal and astroglial damage, though the mechanism is still to be better understood. Here we investigated on the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, on gp120-induced damage in human cultured astroglial cells and the possible contribution of gp120-related reacting oxygen species (ROS in the imbalanced activity of glutamine synthase (GS, the enzyme that metabolizes glutamate into glutamine within astroglial cells playing a neuroprotective role in brain disorders. Results Incubation of Lipari human cultured astroglial cells with gp 120 (0.1–10 nM produced a significant reduction of astroglial cell viability and apoptosis as evaluated by TUNEL reaction and flow cytometric analysis (FACS. This effect was accompanied by lipid peroxidation as detected by means of malondialdehyde assay (MDA. In addition, gp 120 reduced both glutamine concentration in astroglial cell supernatants and GS expression as detected by immunocytochemistry and western blotting analysis. Pre-treatment of cells with NAC (0.5–5 mM, dose-dependently antagonised astroglial apoptotic cell death induced by gp 120, an effect accompanied by significant attenuation of MDA accumulation. Furthermore, both effects were closely associated with a significant recovery of glutamine levels in cell supernatants and by GS expression, thus suggesting that overproduction of free radicals might contribute in gp 120-related dysfunction of GS in astroglial cells. Conclusion In conclusion, the present experiments demonstrate that gp 120 is toxic to astroglial cells, an effect accompanied by lipid peroxidation and by altered

  10. Evaluating Autonomous Ground-Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    Evaluating Autonomous Ground-Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Anthony Finn; Adam Jacoff; Mike...these metrics against the detailed choreography of the challenge to prevent teams ‘gaming’ the result (i.e. devising technical solutions that were

  11. Nicorandil prevents endothelial dysfunction due to antioxidative effects via normalisation of NADPH oxidase and nitric oxide synthase in streptozotocin diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serizawa Ken-ichi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicorandil, an anti-angina agent, reportedly improves outcomes even in angina patients with diabetes. However, the precise mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of nicorandil on diabetic patients has not been examined. We investigated the protective effect of nicorandil on endothelial function in diabetic rats because endothelial dysfunction is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in diabetes. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks old were intraperitoneally injected with streptozotocin (STZ, 40 mg/kg, once a day for 3 days to induce diabetes. Nicorandil (15 mg/kg/day and tempol (20 mg/kg/day, superoxide dismutase mimetic were administered in drinking water for one week, starting 3 weeks after STZ injection. Endothelial function was evaluated by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD in the femoral arteries of anaesthetised rats. Cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs were treated with high glucose (35.6 mM, 24 h and reactive oxygen species (ROS production with or without L-NAME (300 μM, apocynin (100 μM or nicorandil (100 μM was measured using fluorescent probes. Results Endothelial function as evaluated by FMD was significantly reduced in diabetic as compared with normal rats (diabetes, 9.7 ± 1.4%; normal, 19.5 ± 1.7%; n = 6-7. There was a 2.4-fold increase in p47phox expression, a subunit of NADPH oxidase, and a 1.8-fold increase in total eNOS expression in diabetic rat femoral arteries. Nicorandil and tempol significantly improved FMD in diabetic rats (nicorandil, 17.7 ± 2.6%; tempol, 13.3 ± 1.4%; n = 6. Nicorandil significantly inhibited the increased expressions of p47phox and total eNOS in diabetic rat femoral arteries. Furthermore, nicorandil significantly inhibited the decreased expression of GTP cyclohydrolase I and the decreased dimer/monomer ratio of eNOS. ROS production in HCAECs was increased by high-glucose treatment, which was prevented by L-NAME and nicorandil

  12. pCramoll and rCramoll as New Preventive Agents against the Oxidative Dysfunction Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Cláudio Nascimento da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in the induction of cell death and is associated with various pathologic disorders; therefore, the search for natural products that attenuate the effects produced by oxidant agents is greatly increased. Here, the protective effects of native lectin from Cratylia mollis seeds (pCramoll and recombinant Cramoll 1 (rCramoll against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in Vero cells were evaluated. Both lectins significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent way. The maximum protective effects were 96.85±15.59% (rCramoll and 59.48±23.44% (pCramoll. The Live/Dead analysis showed a reduction in the percentage of dead cells from 65.04±3.29% (H2O2 to 39.77±2.93% (pCramoll and 13.90±9.01% (rCramoll. The deleterious effects of H2O2 on cell proliferation were reduced to 10.83% (pCramoll and 24.17% (rCramoll. Lectins treatment attenuated the excessive superoxide production, the collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the lysosomal and DNA damage in H2O2-treated cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that pCramoll and rCramoll blocked H2O2-induced cytotoxicity through decreasing reactive oxygen species, restoring the mitochondrial potential, preventing the lysosomal damage and DNA fragmentation, and thus promoting cell survival and proliferation.

  13. Hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, liver damage and dysfunction in alloxan-induced diabetic rat are prevented by Spirulina supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargouri, Manel; Magné, Christian; El Feki, Abdelfattah

    2016-11-01

    Medicinal plants have long been used against life-threatening diseases including diabetes, with more or less success. Some of these plants have been shown to possess antioxidant activities, which could help improving diabetes inconveniences. In that context, we investigated the effects of spirulina supplementation on alloxan-induced diabetic rats, hypothesizing that co-administration of spirulina with rat diet could ameliorate diabetes complications and provide as benefits as the common antidiabetic insulin. Following alloxan treatment, male Wistar rats were fed daily with 5% spirulina-enriched diet or treated with insulin (0.5 IU/rat) for 21 days. Both spirulina and insulin treatments of diabetic rats resulted in a significant reduction in fasting blood glucose and an increase of glycogen level. Spirulina supplementation also impeded loss of body weight and ameliorated hepatic toxicity indices, i.e. alkaline phosphatases and transaminases activities, bilirubin levels and lipid peroxidation. Besides, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased in the serum. Moreover, diabetic rats fed with spirulina exhibited sig changes in antioxidant enzyme activities in the liver (ie, decrease in superoxide dismutase and increase in catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities). The beneficial effects of spirulina or insulin were confirmed by histological study of the liver of diabetic rats. Overall, this study indicates that treatment with spirulina decreased hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in diabetic rats, this amelioration being even more pronounced than that provided by insulin injection. Therefore, administration of this alga would be very helpful in the prevention of diabetic complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bowel Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to PCF? Featured Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Bowel Dysfunction The broad term of bowel dysfunction includes ... immodium) can be used to help with loose bowel movements. Increasing fiber intake through whole grains, ... mission 82% Join the fight against prostate ...

  15. Modulation of methylmercury uptake by methionine: Prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction in rat liver slices by a mimicry mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Daniel Henrique; Puntel, Robson Luiz; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Bohrer, Denise; Rocha, Joao Batista T.; Vargas Barbosa, Nilda B. de

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an ubiquitous environmental pollutant which is transported into the mammalian cells when present as the methylmercury-cysteine conjugate (MeHg-Cys). With special emphasis on hepatic cells, due to their particular propensity to accumulate an appreciable amount of Hg after exposure to MeHg, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of methionine (Met) on Hg uptake, reactive species (RS) formation, oxygen consumption and mitochondrial function/cellular viability in both liver slices and mitochondria isolated from these slices, after exposure to MeHg or the MeHg-Cys complex. The liver slices were pre-treated with Met (250 μM) 15 min before being exposed to MeHg (25 μM) or MeHg-Cys (25 μM each) for 30 min at 37 o C. The treatment with MeHg caused a significant increase in the Hg concentration in both liver slices and mitochondria isolated from liver slices. Moreover, the Hg uptake was higher in the group exposed to the MeHg-Cys complex. In the DCF (dichlorofluorescein) assay, the exposure to MeHg and MeHg-Cys produced a significant increase in DFC reactive species (DFC-RS) formation only in the mitochondria isolated from liver slices. As observed with Hg uptake, DFC-RS levels were significantly higher in the mitochondria treated with the MeHg-Cys complex compared to MeHg alone. MeHg exposure also caused a marked decrease in the oxygen consumption of liver slices when compared to the control group, and this effect was more pronounced in the liver slices treated with the MeHg-Cys complex. Similarly, the loss of mitochondrial activity/cell viability was greater in liver slices exposed to the MeHg-Cys complex when compared to slices treated only with MeHg. In all studied parameters, Met pre-treatment was effective in preventing the MeHg- and/or MeHg-Cys-induced toxicity in both liver slices and mitochondria. Part of the protection afforded by Met against MeHg may be related to a direct interaction with MeHg or to the competition of Met with

  16. Evaluation of cardiac autonomic function in overweight males: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Debasish Das; Himel Mondal

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim: Cardiovascular autonomic function tests (CAFTs) are non-invasive tests that can assess both sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic functions. Autonomic dysfunction may be considered as a risk factor for obesity and vice versa. For measurement of obesity, body mass index (BMI) is a simple, valid and inexpensive method. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of obesity based on BMI criteria on autonomic nervous system based on CAFT in young adult males. Met...

  17. Preventive effects of blueberry extract on behavioral and biochemical dysfunctions in rats submitted to a model of manic behavior induced by ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debom, Gabriela; Gazal, Marta; Soares, Mayara Sandrielly Pereira; do Couto, Carlus Augustu Tavares; Mattos, Bruna; Lencina, Claiton; Kaster, Manuella Pinto; Ghisleni, Gabriele Codenonzi; Tavares, Rejane; Braganhol, Elizandra; Chaves, Vitor Clasen; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Stefanello, Francieli; Spanevello, Roselia Maria

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects of blueberry extract on oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters in a model of mania induced by ketamine administration in rats. Male rats were pretreated with blueberry extract (200mg/kg, once a day for 14days), lithium chloride (45mg/kg, mood stabilizer used as a positive control, twice a day for 14days), or vehicle. Between the 8th and 14th days, rats also received an injection of ketamine (25mg/kg) or vehicle. In the 15th day, thirty minutes after ketamine administration the hyperlocomotion of the animals was assessed in the open - field apparatus. Immediately after the behavioral analysis brain and blood were collected for biochemical determinations. ketamine treatment induced hyperlocomotion and oxidative damage in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum such as an increase in lipid peroxidation and a decrease in the antioxidant enzymes activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase e glutatione peroxidase). Ketamine administration also increased the IL-6 levels in serum in rats. Pretreatment of rats with blueberry extract or lithium prevented the hyperlocomotion, pro - oxidant effects and inflammation induced by ketamine. Our findings suggest that blueberry consumption has a neuroprotective potential against behavioral and biochemical dysfunctions induced in a preclinical model that mimic some aspects of the manic behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Curcumin inhibition of JNKs prevents dopaminergic neuronal loss in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease through suppressing mitochondria dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Jing

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Curcumin,a natural polyphenol obtained from turmeric,has been implicated to be neuroprotective in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders although the mechanism remains poorly understood. The results of our recent experiments indicated that curcumin could protect dopaminergic neurons from apoptosis in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease (PD. The death of dopaminergic neurons and the loss of dopaminergic axon in the striatum were significantly suppressed by curcumin in MPTP mouse model. Further studies showed that curcumin inhibited JNKs hyperphosphorylation induced by MPTP treatment. JNKs phosphorylation can cause translocation of Bax to mitochondria and the release of cytochrome c which both ultimately contribute to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. These pro-apoptosis effect can be diminished by curcumin. Our experiments demonstrated that curcumin can prevent nigrostriatal degeneration by inhibiting the dysfunction of mitochondrial through suppressing hyperphosphorylation of JNKs induced by MPTP. Our results suggested that JNKs/mitochondria pathway may be a novel target in the treatment of PD patients.

  19. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction: 14 years after MADIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franqui-Rivera, Hilton; Sotomonte, Juan C

    2011-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the most common cause of death among patients with heart failure and left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) have been shown to be the single most effective therapy for primary prevention of SCD in patients with heart failure. The superiority of this therapy was clearly established for patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy by large clinical trials, such as the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial (MADIT), Multicenter Unsustained Tachycardia Trial (MUSTT), and MADIT-II studies. On the other hand, there was much debate on whether these results could be extrapolated for patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy until the Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure Trial (SCD-HeFT) demonstrated a significant benefit of this therapy. Given the high costs of this therapy and the limited resources allocated to health care multiple studies have attempted to identify patients at higher risk of suffering SCD, who in theory will benefit the most out of this therapy. However, these studies have not established a reliable way to predict which patients will receive a direct survival benefit from ICD therapy. Until we are capable of further defining which patients will derive the absolute highest benefit from an ICD, we must rely on the information available from published trials and adhere to current clinical practice guidelines regarding this pressing issue.

  20. Anatomy and physiology of the clitoris, vestibular bulbs, and labia minora with a review of the female orgasm and the prevention of female sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppo, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    This review, with 21 figures and 1 video, aims to clarify some important aspects of the anatomy and physiology of the female erectile organs (triggers of orgasm), which are important for the prevention of female sexual dysfunction. The clitoris is the homologue of the male's glans and corpora cavernosa, and erection is reached in three phases: latent, turgid, and rigid. The vestibular bulbs cause "vaginal" orgasmic contractions, through the rhythmic contraction of the bulbocavernosus muscles. Because of the engorgement with blood during sexual arousal, the labia minora become turgid, doubling or tripling in thickness. The corpus spongiosum of the female urethra becomes congested during sexual arousal; therefore, male erection equals erection of the female erectile organs. The correct anatomical term to describe the erectile tissues responsible for female orgasm is the female penis. Vaginal orgasm and the G-spot do not exist. These claims are found in numerous articles that have been written by Addiego F, Whipple B, Jannini E, Buisson O, O'Connell H, Brody S, Ostrzenski A, and others, have no scientific basis. Orgasm is an intense sensation of pleasure achieved by stimulation of erogenous zones. Women do not have a refractory period after each orgasm and can, therefore, experience multiple orgasms. Clitoral sexual response and the female orgasm are not affected by aging. Sexologists should define having sex/love making when orgasm occurs for both partners with or without vaginal intercourse. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Combined aliskiren and L-arginine treatment has antihypertensive effects and prevents vascular endothelial dysfunction in a model of renovascular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.H. Santuzzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II is a key player in the pathogenesis of renovascular hypertension, a condition associated with endothelial dysfunction. We investigated aliskiren (ALSK and L-arginine treatment both alone and in combination on blood pressure (BP, and vascular reactivity in aortic rings. Hypertension was induced in 40 male Wistar rats by clipping the left renal artery. Animals were divided into Sham, 2-kidney, 1-clip (2K1C hypertension, 2K1C+ALSK (ALSK, 2K1C+L-arginine (L-arg, and 2K1C+ALSK+L-arginine (ALSK+L-arg treatment groups. For 4 weeks, BP was monitored and endothelium-dependent and independent vasoconstriction and relaxation were assessed in aortic rings. ALSK+L-arg reduced BP and the contractile response to phenylephrine and improved acetylcholine relaxation. Endothelium removal and incubation with N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME increased the response to phenylephrine in all groups, but the effect was greater in the ALSK+L-arg group. Losartan reduced the contractile response in all groups, apocynin reduced the contractile response in the 2K1C, ALSK and ALSK+L-arg groups, and incubation with superoxide dismutase reduced the phenylephrine response in the 2K1C and ALSK groups. eNOS expression increased in the 2K1C and L-arg groups, and iNOS was increased significantly only in the 2K1C group compared with other groups. AT1 expression increased in the 2K1C compared with the Sham, ALSK and ALSK+L-arg groups, AT2 expression increased in the ALSK+L-arg group compared with the Sham and L-arg groups, and gp91phox decreased in the ALSK+L-arg group compared with the 2K1C and ALSK groups. In conclusion, combined ALSK+L-arg was effective in reducing BP and preventing endothelial dysfunction in aortic rings of 2K1C hypertensive rats. The responsible mechanisms appear to be related to the modulation of the local renin-angiotensin system, which is associated with a reduction in endothelial oxidative stress.

  2. Effect of exercise training and detraining in autonomic modulation and cardiorespiratory fitness in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias Reis, Andréa; Silva Garcia, João B; Rodrigues Diniz, Renata; Silva-Filho, Antonio C; Dias, Carlos J; Leite, Richard D; Mostarda, Cristiano

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Heart rate variability (HRV) has attracted scientific community attention in different pathologies, becoming thus an ultimate importance tool in both clinical and research setting, being a good predictor of cardiac events and mortality risk and also used in physical exercise and sports in general. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 12 weeks of exercise training and six weeks of detraining in cardiorespiratory capacity, and autonomic modulation in breast cancer patients. The sample was composed of 18 females (9 controls and 9 exercised), (aged 30-60 years). The HRV in the time and frequency domain was performed using an electrocardiogram before, after 12 weeks of the session of exercise training and after six weeks of detraining. Shapiro-Wilk and Mann-Whitney tests were made. No significant changes in time domain were found. In the frequency domain, 12 weeks of exercise training promote a decrease in LF (nu) and decrease in HF (nu) Index. The exercise training period promoted a decrease in LF/HF. The autonomic data returned to baseline levels after the detraining period. However, cardiorespiratory capacity remained increased after the detraining period. These data demonstrated that exercise training can be used to prevent autonomic dysfunction in breast cancer patients, but detraining promotes loss of all autonomic benefits.

  3. Erectile Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rigid. Medications The oral medications for erectile dysfunction, sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), and vardenafil (Levitra), relax the muscles ... to begin working; the erection helping effects of sildenafil and vardenafil last for about 8 hours and ...

  4. Prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in Asian Indian patients with fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit Nanaiah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It was formerly believed that since fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD is a secondary form of diabetes, specific diabetic complications were uncommon. This is no longer considered to be true. Our objective was to study the prevalence and pattern of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN in patients with FCPD. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study on consecutive male patients with FCPD was performed. Using an automated CAN System Analyzer, heart rate response to deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, standing and blood pressure response to standing were measured. The standard Ewing′s criteria were used to define normal, borderline, and abnormal values. Prevalence rates were calculated and the patients were defined to have normal autonomic function, parasympathetic, sympathetic, and combined dysfunction. Results: The prevalence of CAN in this study population was 63.3%. Isolated parasympathetic dysfunction (42.3% was the most common abnormality. Combined sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction was noted in 13.3% of patients. Isolated borderline dysfunction was noted among 13.3% of patients. CAN was detected in six patients with a duration of diabetes of less than 1 year after diagnosis. Patients with autonomic dysfunction were found to have a lower body mass index (BMI and low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol when compared to those with normal autonomic functions, which was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The prevalence of abnormal cardiac autonomic function is as high as 63.3% in the present study population which warrants regular screening of patients with FCPD for autonomic dysfunction. Patients with FCPD and autonomic dysfunction were found to have a lower BMI and lower LDL-cholesterol, which may be indicators of malnutrition in the group with autonomic dysfunction. Whether this malnutrition contributes to autonomic dysfunction needs further exploration.

  5. Laryngeal Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hull, James H; Backer, Vibeke; Gibson, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The larynx is one of the most highly innervated organs in humans and serves a number of vitally important, complex, and highly evolved biological functions. On a day-to-day basis, the larynx functions autonomously, addressing several roles including airway protection, swallowing, and phonation...

  6. [Autonomic peripheral neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David; Cauquil, Cecile; Lozeron, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms of dysautonomic disturbances are varied and mostly acquired. They can result from lesions of sympathetic or parasympathetic vegetative fibers located in the peripheral contingent, or in the somatic contingent by demyelination or axonal loss; or more rarely by cellular bodies in the sympathetic or parasympathetic ganglia. Several chronic peripheral neuropathies can be associated with dysautonomia. Only some causes need to be known because they can be clinically significant. Dysautonomia may be seen during chronic acquired neuropathies but also acute or subacute ones. The most frequent cause in the world is the dysautonomia of the diabetes; it affects all the systems; the cardiovascular dysfunction has an impact on the prognosis for survival when it is severe. Hereditary autonomic neuropathies are rare; they can declare themselves very early during the Riley-Day syndrome or very late during amyloid polyneuropathies due to transthyretin gene mutation. The diagnosis can be confirmed by molecular biology. The dysautonomia is frequent and often severe. These neuropathies justify symptomatic treatment to improve quality of life. For some of them, a specific treatment can be proposed to treat the causal affection to try to stop the progression of the disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Role of Ocimum basilicum L. in prevention of ischemia and reperfusion-induced cerebral damage, and motor dysfunctions in mice brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Kundan Singh; Arora, Shruti; Shri, Richa

    2011-10-11

    The genus Ocimum (Lamiaceae) has a long history of use as culinary and medicinal herbs. Many species are used for their antioxidant and neuroprotective activity in various parts of the world. Ocimum basilicum Linn. has been used traditionally for the treatment of anxiety, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, headaches, nerve pain, as anticonvulsant and anti-inflammatory, and used in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The present study is designed to investigate the effect of ethyl acetate extract of Ocimum basilicum leaves on ischemia and reperfusion-induced cerebral damage, and motor dysfunctions in mice. Global cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 15 min followed by reperfusion for 24h. Cerebral infarct size was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. The concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) content was determined by colorimetric assay. Short-term memory was evaluated using elevated plus-maze. Inclined beam walking was employed to assess motor coordination. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by reperfusion produced significant increase in cerebral infarct size and lipid peroxidation (TBARS), and reduced GSH content, and impaired short-term memory and motor coordination. Pre-treatment with standardized ethyl acetate extract of Ocimum basilicum (100 and 200mg/kg, p.o.) markedly reduced cerebral infarct size and lipid peroxidation, restored GSH content, and attenuated impairment in short-term memory and motor coordination. The results of the study suggest that Ocimum basilicum could be useful clinically in the prevention of stroke. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Resveratrol prevents oxidative stress-induced senescence and proliferative dysfunction by activating the AMPK-FOXO3 cascade in cultured primary human keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Ido

    Full Text Available The aging process is perceived as resulting from a combination of intrinsic factors such as changes in intracellular signaling and extrinsic factors, most notably environmental stressors. In skin, the relationship between intrinsic changes and keratinocyte function is not clearly understood. Previously, we found that increasing the activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK suppressed senescence in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-treated human primary keratinocytes, a model of oxidative stress-induced cellular aging. Using this model in the present study, we observed that resveratrol, an agent that increases the activities of both AMPK and sirtuins, ameliorated two age-associated phenotypes: cellular senescence and proliferative dysfunction. In addition, we found that treatment of keratinocytes with Ex527, a specific inhibitor of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1, attenuated the ability of resveratrol to suppress senescence. In keeping with the latter observation, we noted that compared to non-senescent keratinocytes, senescent cells lacked SIRT1. In addition to these effects on H2O2-induced senescence, resveratrol also prevented the H2O2-induced decrease in proliferation (as indicated by 3H-thymidine incorporation in the presence of insulin. This effect was abrogated by inhibition of AMPK but not SIRT1. Compared to endothelium, we found that human keratinocytes expressed relatively high levels of Forkhead box O3 (FOXO3, a downstream target of both AMPK and SIRT1. Treatment of keratinocytes with resveratrol transactivated FOXO3 and increased the expression of its target genes including catalase. Resveratrol's effects on both senescence and proliferation disappeared when FOXO3 was knocked down. Finally, we performed an exploratory study which showed that skin from humans over 50 years old had lower AMPK activity than skin from individuals under age 20. Collectively, these findings suggest that the effects of resveratrol on keratinocyte senescence and proliferation

  9. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use is not associated with erectile dysfunction risk: results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Darshan P; Schenk, Jeannette M; Darke, Amy; Myers, Jeremy B; Brant, William O; Hotaling, James M

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the associations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use with risk of erectile dysfunction (ED), considering the indications for NSAID use. We analysed data from 4 726 men in the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) without evidence of ED at baseline. Incident ED was defined as mild/moderate (decrease in normal function) or severe (absence of function). Proportional hazards models were used to estimate the covariate-adjusted associations of NSAID-related medical conditions and time-dependent NSAID use with ED risk. Arthritis (hazard ratio [HR] 1.56), chronic musculoskeletal pain (HR 1.35), general musculoskeletal complaints (HR 1.36), headaches (HR 1.44), sciatica (HR 1.50) and atherosclerotic disease (HR 1.60) were all significantly associated with an increased risk of mild/moderate ED, while only general musculoskeletal complaints (HR 1.22), headaches (HR 1.47) and atherosclerotic disease (HR 1.60) were associated with an increased risk of severe ED. Non-aspirin NSAID use was associated with an increased risk of mild/moderate ED (HR 1.16; P = 0.02) and aspirin use was associated with an increased risk of severe ED (HR 1.16; P = 0.03, respectively). The associations of NSAID use with ED risk were attenuated after controlling for indications for NSAID use. The modest associations of NSAID use with ED risk in the present cohort were probably attributable to confounding indications for NSAID use. NSAID use was not associated with ED risk. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Comparative efficacy of amiodarone with ivabradin combination or amiodarone with bisoprolol combination in the prevention of atrial fibrillation recurrence in pa- tients with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Adamyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of use of amiodarone with ivabradine combination or amiodarone with bisoprolol combination in the prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF recurrence in patients (pts with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD after conversion to sinus rhythm. Material and methods. 65 patients (40 males, 25 females aged 53±8 years with persistent AF and LVDD were included into the study and randomized into 3 groups to receive ivabradine and amiodarone (22 pts, bisoprolol and amiodarone (22 pts or amiodarone alone (21 pts. Left atrium (LA volume indices, LA longitudinal strain rate (LASR in systole, LV mass index, mean heart rate (HR, 24-hour HR variability and the incidence of AF by 96 h ECG monitoring were measured after the titration period, and after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Results. After 6 months of follow-up group 1 revealed significantly lower maximum LA volume index (21.3±2.4 vs 25.2±3.0 and 28.7±3.6 ml/m2 in the 2nd and control groups, respectively, P-wave LA volume index (15.3±3.5 versus 18.1±3.8 and 20.4±4.0 ml/m2 in the 2nd and control groups, respectively, and LA systolic volume index (7.3±1.2 versus 9.4±1.6 and 9.6±1.7 ml/m2 in 2nd and control groups, respectively. The incidence of side effects in group 1 was significantly less than that in group 2 and was not different compared with control group. Conclusion. Ivabradine and amiodarone combination provides better prevention of AF recurrence and less side-effects in pts with LVDD and persistent AF after sinus rhythm restoration as compared with bisoprolol and amiodarone combination, it also reduces LA maximum, conduit and systolic volumes, and increases LASR.

  11. The role of autonomic testing in syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Pearl K; Gibbons, Christopher H

    2014-09-01

    Syncope is a common presenting complaint in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. The main goals in the clinical evaluation of syncope are to identify an underlying etiology, to stratify risk and to guide plans for therapeutic intervention. Testing begins with an initial electrocardiogram to screen for any cardiac rhythm abnormalities. Heart rate variability to paced breathing provides a standard measure of cardiac parasympathetic function and offers clues towards an autonomic cause of syncope. A Valsalva maneuver is used to evaluate for parasympathetic dysfunction through the Valsalva ratio. In addition, sympathetic adrenergic function is assessed through evaluation of blood pressure response during the Valsalva maneuver. Abnormalities to the Valsalva maneuver can suggest clues towards an autonomic cause of syncope. Head-up tilt table testing is an important part of the autonomic evaluation of patients with syncope, and can be diagnostic for many disorders that result in syncope including orthostatic hypotension, neurally mediated syncope, postural tachycardia syndrome or delayed orthostatic hypotension. Autonomic function testing provides a safe and controlled environment for evaluation of patients, and plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis of syncope, particularly in challenging cases. While the initial clinical evaluation of syncope involves a detailed history and physical examination; in situations where the diagnosis is unknown, the addition of autonomic testing is complementary and can lead to identification of autonomic causes of syncope. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating the autonomic nervous system in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wan-Ju; Shu, Chih-Hung; Chou, Kun-Ta; Wang, Yi-Fen; Hsu, Yen-Bin; Ho, Ching-Yin; Lan, Ming-Ying

    2013-06-01

    The pathogenesis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) remains unclear. It is linked to but distinct from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which has been shown to be related to disturbed autonomic regulation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether autonomic dysfunction also plays a role in the pathogenesis of LPR. Case-control study. Tertiary care center. Seventeen patients with LPR and 19 healthy controls, aged between 19 and 50 years, were enrolled in the study. The patients were diagnosed with LPR if they had a reflux symptom index (RSI) ≥ 13 and a reflux finding score (RFS) ≥ 7. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis was used to assess autonomic function. Anxiety and depression levels measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) were also conducted. In HRV analysis, high frequency (HF) represents the parasympathetic activity of the autonomic nervous system, whereas low frequency (LF) represents the total autonomic activity. There were no significant differences in the LF power and HF power between the 2 groups. However, significantly lower HF% (P = .003) and a higher LF/HF ratio (P = .012) were found in patients with LPR, who demonstrated poor autonomic modulation and higher sympathetic activity. Anxiety was also frequently observed in the patient group. The study suggests that autonomic dysfunction seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of LPR. The potential beneficial effect of autonomic nervous system modulation as a therapeutic modality for LPR merits further investigation.

  13. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  14. Menopause and autonomic control of heart

    OpenAIRE

    Arunima Chaudhuri; Nirmala G Borade

    2012-01-01

    Menopause is associated with decreased heart rate variability, which is due to reduced parasympathetic or increased sympathetic outflow to the heart. Acute myocardial infarction may be accompanied by decreased heart rate variability. The causes of autonomic dysfunction in postmenopausal women may be multi-factorial i.e., dyslipidemia, increased body fat percentage, aging and loss of female sex hormones. The cardiac vagotonic and sympatholytic effects of estrogen can explain, at least in part,...

  15. Erectile Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cut out alcohol. Excess alcohol can contribute to erectile dysfunction. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for men older than age 65, and up to two drinks ...

  16. Endothelial dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Yaylalı, Yalın Tolga; Küçükaslan, Mete

    2011-01-01

    Endothelium is a multi-functional cluster of cells within the vascular system consisting of a single layer ofsquamous epithelium. Physiologically, endothelium performs various arrangement and protection functions.However, when these functions are disturbed toward derangement, endothelium also mediates pathologicalfunctions with negative effects on the body. Endothelial dysfunction is mediated by several mediators (nitricoxide, endothelins, prostaglandins, angiotensin 2, etc). Endothelial dysf...

  17. Autonomic Nervous System in Paralympic Athletes with Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Matthias; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2018-05-01

    Individuals sustaining a spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently suffer from sensorimotor and autonomic impairment. Damage to the autonomic nervous system results in cardiovascular, respiratory, bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunctions, as well as temperature dysregulation. These complications not only impede quality of life, but also affect athletic performance of individuals with SCI. This article summarizes existing evidence on how damage to the spinal cord affects the autonomic nervous system and impacts the performance in athletes with SCI. Also discussed are frequently used performance-enhancing strategies, with a special focus on their legal aspect and implication on the athletes' health. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of glucose ingestion on autonomic and cardiovascular measures during rest and mental challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Synowski, S.J.; Kop, W.J.; Warwick, Z.S.; Waldstein, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background High levels of dietary sugar consumption may result in dysregulated glucose metabolism and lead to elevated cardiovascular disease risk via autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular dysfunction. Altered cardiovascular function can be examined using perturbation tasks such as mental

  19. Bladder, Bowel, and Sexual Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Sakakibara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency, bowel dysfunction (constipation, and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction (also called “pelvic organ” dysfunctions are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD. In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and “prokinetic” drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life.

  20. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  1. R1 autonomic nervous system in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Dagmara; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rapid loss of kidney function resulting in accumulation of end metabolic products and associated abnormalities in fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis. The pathophysiology of AKI is complex and multifactorial involving numerous vascular, tubular and inflammatory pathways. Neurohumoral activation with heightened activity of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system play a critical role in this scenario. Inflammation and/or local renal ischaemia are underlying mechanisms triggering renal tissue hypoxia and resultant renal microcirculation dysfunction; a common feature of AKI occurring in numerous clinical conditions leading to a high morbidity and mortality rate. The contribution of renal nerves to the pathogenesis of AKI has been extensively demonstrated in a series of experimental models over the past decades. While this has led to better knowledge of the pathogenesis of human AKI, therapeutic approaches to improve patient outcomes are scarce. Restoration of autonomic regulatory function with vagal nerve stimulation resulting in anti-inflammatory effects and modulation of centrally-mediated mechanisms could be of clinical relevance. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that a therapeutic splenic ultrasound approach may prevent AKI via activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. This review briefly summarizes renal nerve anatomy, basic insights into neural control of renal function in the physiological state and the involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the pathophysiology of AKI chiefly due to sepsis, cardiopulmonary bypass and ischaemia/reperfusion experimental model. Finally, potentially preventive experimental pre-clinical approaches for the treatment of AKI aimed at sympathetic inhibition and/or parasympathetic stimulation are presented. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Autonomous Mission Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Autonomous Mission Operations project will develop understanding of the impacts of increasing communication time delays on mission operations and develop...

  3. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  4. Semi-Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — VisionThe Semi-Autonomous Systems Lab focuses on developing a comprehensive framework for semi-autonomous coordination of networked robotic systems. Semi-autonomous...

  5. Executive Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Stephens, Melanie L.; Possin, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Executive functions represent a constellation of cognitive abilities that drive goal-oriented behavior and are critical to the ability to adapt to an ever-changing world. This article provides a clinically oriented approach to classifying, localizing, diagnosing, and treating disorders of executive function, which are pervasive in clinical practice. Recent Findings: Executive functions can be split into four distinct components: working memory, inhibition, set shifting, and fluency. These components may be differentially affected in individual patients and act together to guide higher-order cognitive constructs such as planning and organization. Specific bedside and neuropsychological tests can be applied to evaluate components of executive function. While dysexecutive syndromes were first described in patients with frontal lesions, intact executive functioning relies on distributed neural networks that include not only the prefrontal cortex, but also the parietal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Executive dysfunction arises from injury to any of these regions, their white matter connections, or neurotransmitter systems. Dysexecutive symptoms therefore occur in most neurodegenerative diseases and in many other neurologic, psychiatric, and systemic illnesses. Management approaches are patient specific and should focus on treatment of the underlying cause in parallel with maximizing patient function and safety via occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Summary: Executive dysfunction is extremely common in patients with neurologic disorders. Diagnosis and treatment hinge on familiarity with the clinical components and neuroanatomic correlates of these complex, high-order cognitive processes. PMID:26039846

  6. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eVerrotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population.

  7. Testing for autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1984-01-01

    of the disease, and may be nonspecific. A number of recently developed quantifiable and reproducible autonomic nerve function tests are reviewed, with emphasis on the physiological basis of the tests and on practical applicability. Finally, diagnostic criteria, based on autonomic nerve function tests...

  8. Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on Autonomic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Basiago

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of the development of deep brain stimulation (DBS into a well-established therapy for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia, its utility as a potential treatment for autonomic dysfunction has emerged. Dysfunction of autonomic processes is common in neurological diseases. Depending on the specific target in the brain, DBS has been shown to raise or lower blood pressure, normalize the baroreflex, to alter the caliber of bronchioles, and eliminate hyperhidrosis, all through modulation of the sympathetic nervous system. It has also been shown to improve cortical control of the bladder, directly induce or inhibit the micturition reflex, and to improve deglutition and gastric emptying. In this review, we will attempt to summarize the relevant available studies describing these effects of DBS on autonomic function, which vary greatly in character and magnitude with respect to stimulation target.

  9. 17β-Estradiol prevents cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction by estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism in astrocytes following oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiabin; Duckles, Sue P.; Weiss, John H.; Li, Xuejun; Krause, Diana N.

    2012-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) has been shown to protect against ischemic brain injury, yet its targets and the mechanisms are unclear. E2 may exert multiple regulatory actions on astrocytes that may greatly contribute to its ability to protect the brain. Mitochondria are recognized to play central roles in the development of injury during ischemia. Increasing evidence indicates that mitochondrial mechanisms are critically involved in E2-mediated protection. In this study, the effect of E2 and the role of mitochondria were evaluated in primary cultures of astrocytes subjected to an ischemia-like condition of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/reperfusion. We showed that E2 treatment significantly protects against OGD/reperfusion-induced cell death as determined by cell viability, apoptosis and lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The protective effects of E2 on astrocytic survival were blocked by an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist (ICI 182,780), and were mimicked by an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist selective for ERα (PPT), but not by an ER agonist selective for ERβ (DPN). OGD/reperfusion provoked mitochondria dysfunction as manifested by an increase of cellular reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and depletion of ATP. E2 pretreatment significantly inhibited OGD/reperfusion-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and this effect was also blocked by ICI 182,780. Therefore, we concluded that E2 provides direct protection to astrocytes from ischemic injury by an ER-dependent mechanism, highlighting an important role for ERα. Estrogen protects against mitochondria dysfunction at the early phase of ischemic injury. However, overall implications for protection against brain ischemia and its complex sequelae await further exploration. PMID:22554613

  10. 17β-Estradiol prevents cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction by an estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism in astrocytes after oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiabin; Duckles, Sue P; Weiss, John H; Li, Xuejun; Krause, Diana N

    17β-Estradiol (E2) has been shown to protect against ischemic brain injury, yet its targets and the mechanisms are unclear. E2 may exert multiple regulatory actions on astrocytes that may greatly contribute to its ability to protect the brain. Mitochondria are recognized as playing central roles in the development of injury during ischemia. Increasing evidence indicates that mitochondrial mechanisms are critically involved in E2-mediated protection. In this study, the effects of E2 and the role of mitochondria were evaluated in primary cultures of astrocytes subjected to an ischemia-like condition of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/reperfusion. We showed that E2 treatment significantly protects against OGD/reperfusion-induced cell death as determined by cell viability, apoptosis, and lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The protective effects of E2 on astrocytic survival were blocked by an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist (ICI-182,780) and were mimicked by an ER agonist selective for ERα (PPT), but not by an ER agonist selective for ERβ (DPN). OGD/reperfusion provoked mitochondrial dysfunction as manifested by an increase in cellular reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and depletion of ATP. E2 pretreatment significantly inhibited OGD/reperfusion-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and this effect was also blocked by ICI-182,780. Therefore, we conclude that E2 provides direct protection to astrocytes from ischemic injury by an ER-dependent mechanism, highlighting an important role for ERα. Estrogen protects against mitochondrial dysfunction at the early phase of ischemic injury. However, overall implications for protection against brain ischemia and its complex sequelae await further exploration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of G-protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Prevents the Dysfunctional Cardiac Substrate Metabolism in Fatty Acid Synthase Transgenic Mice*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Alla, Joshua; Graemer, Muriel; Fu, Xuebin; Quitterer, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of myocardial fatty acid substrate metabolism is characteristic of late-stage heart failure and has limited treatment options. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) could counteract the disturbed substrate metabolism of late-stage heart failure. The heart failure-like substrate metabolism was reproduced in a novel transgenic model of myocardium-specific expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), the major palmitate-synthesizing enzyme. The increased fatty acid utilization of FASN transgenic neonatal cardiomyocytes rapidly switched to a heart failure phenotype in an adult-like lipogenic milieu. Similarly, adult FASN transgenic mice developed signs of heart failure. The development of disturbed substrate utilization of FASN transgenic cardiomyocytes and signs of heart failure were retarded by the transgenic expression of GRKInh, a peptide inhibitor of GRK2. Cardioprotective GRK2 inhibition required an intact ERK axis, which blunted the induction of cardiotoxic transcripts, in part by enhanced serine 273 phosphorylation of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ). Conversely, the dual-specific GRK2 and ERK cascade inhibitor, RKIP (Raf kinase inhibitor protein), triggered dysfunctional cardiomyocyte energetics and the expression of heart failure-promoting Pparg-regulated genes. Thus, GRK2 inhibition is a novel approach that targets the dysfunctional substrate metabolism of the failing heart. PMID:26670611

  12. Inhibition of G-protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Prevents the Dysfunctional Cardiac Substrate Metabolism in Fatty Acid Synthase Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Alla, Joshua; Graemer, Muriel; Fu, Xuebin; Quitterer, Ursula

    2016-02-05

    Impairment of myocardial fatty acid substrate metabolism is characteristic of late-stage heart failure and has limited treatment options. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) could counteract the disturbed substrate metabolism of late-stage heart failure. The heart failure-like substrate metabolism was reproduced in a novel transgenic model of myocardium-specific expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), the major palmitate-synthesizing enzyme. The increased fatty acid utilization of FASN transgenic neonatal cardiomyocytes rapidly switched to a heart failure phenotype in an adult-like lipogenic milieu. Similarly, adult FASN transgenic mice developed signs of heart failure. The development of disturbed substrate utilization of FASN transgenic cardiomyocytes and signs of heart failure were retarded by the transgenic expression of GRKInh, a peptide inhibitor of GRK2. Cardioprotective GRK2 inhibition required an intact ERK axis, which blunted the induction of cardiotoxic transcripts, in part by enhanced serine 273 phosphorylation of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ). Conversely, the dual-specific GRK2 and ERK cascade inhibitor, RKIP (Raf kinase inhibitor protein), triggered dysfunctional cardiomyocyte energetics and the expression of heart failure-promoting Pparg-regulated genes. Thus, GRK2 inhibition is a novel approach that targets the dysfunctional substrate metabolism of the failing heart. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Left-Insular Damage, Autonomic Instability and Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacuey, Nuria; Zonjy, Bilal; Theerannaew, Wanchat; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Sahadevan, Jayakumar; Lhatoo, Samden D.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the only two sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) cases from 320 prospectively recruited patients in the three-year Prevention and Risk Identification of SUDEP Mortality (PRISM) Project. Both patients had surgically refractory epilepsy, evidence of left insular damage following previous temporal/temporo-insular resections, and progressive changes in Heart Rate Variability (HRV) in monitored evaluations prior to death. Insular damage is known to cause autonomic dysfunction and increased mortality in acute stroke. This report suggests a possible role for the insula in the pathogenesis of SUDEP. The presence of intrinsic insular lesions or acquired insular damage in refractory epilepsy patients may be an additional risk factor for SUDEP. PMID:26797084

  14. Obesity, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iantorno, M; Campia, U; Di Daniele, N; Nistico, S; Forleo, G B; Cardillo, C; Tesauro, M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in obese individuals. Obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to originate from disruption in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, impair vascular homeostasis and lead to endothelial dysfunction. An altered endothelial cell phenotype and endothelial dysfunction are common among all obesity-related complications. A crucial aspect of endothelial dysfunction is reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. A systemic pro-inflammatory state in combination with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and activation of the renin angiotensin system are systemic disturbances in obese individuals that contribute independently and synergistically to decreasing NO bioavailability. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines are locally produced by perivascular fat and act through a paracrine mechanism to independently contribute to endothelial dysfunction and smooth muscle cell dysfunction and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in obese individuals. The promising discovery that obesity-induced vascular dysfunction is, at least in part, reversible, with weight loss strategies and drugs that promote vascular health, has not been sufficiently proved to prevent the cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. In this review we discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying inflammation and vascular damage in obese patients.

  15. Menopause and autonomic control of heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunima Chaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is associated with decreased heart rate variability, which is due to reduced parasympathetic or increased sympathetic outflow to the heart. Acute myocardial infarction may be accompanied by decreased heart rate variability. The causes of autonomic dysfunction in postmenopausal women may be multi-factorial i.e., dyslipidemia, increased body fat percentage, aging and loss of female sex hormones. The cardiac vagotonic and sympatholytic effects of estrogen can explain, at least in part, why premenopausal women compared with postmenopausal women have a lower coronary heart disease incidence and mortality rate.

  16. Autonomous Systems and Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Autonomous Systems and Operations (ASO) project will develop an understanding of the impacts of increasing communication time delays on mission operations,...

  17. Autonomous Systems: Habitat Automation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Habitat Automation Project Element within the Autonomous Systems Project is developing software to automate the automation of habitats and other spacecraft. This...

  18. Autonomous Propellant Loading Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Autonomous Propellant Loading (APL) project consists of three activities. The first is to develop software that will automatically control loading of...

  19. Prevention of cardiac dysfunction, kidney fibrosis and lipid metabolic alterations in l-NAME hypertensive rats by sinapic acid--Role of HMG-CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silambarasan, Thangarasu; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Raja, Boobalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-04-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of sinapic acid, a bioactive phenolic acid on high blood pressure associated cardiac dysfunction, kidney fibrosis and lipid alterations in N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) induced hypertensive rats. Sinapic acid was administered to rats orally at a dosage of 40 mg/kg everyday for a period of 4 weeks. Sinapic acid treatment significantly decreased mean arterial pressure, left ventricular end diastolic pressure, organ weights (liver and kidney), lipid peroxidation products in tissues (liver and kidney), activities of hepatic marker enzymes and the levels of renal function markers in serum of l-NAME rats. Sinapic acid treatment also significantly increased the level of plasma nitric oxide metabolites, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in tissues of l-NAME rats. Tissue damage was assessed by histopathological examination. Alterations in plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, level of plasma lipoproteins and tissue lipids were corrected by sinapic acid treatment in l-NAME rats. Sinapic acid treatment significantly decreased the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in plasma and liver, whereas the activity of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase was significantly increased in the plasma of hypertensive rats. Docking result showed the interaction between sinapic acid and HMG-CoA reductase. Sinapic acid has shown best ligand binding energy of -5.5 kcal/M. Moreover, in chick embryo model, sinapic acid improved vessel density on chorioallantoic membrane. These results of the present study concludes that sinapic acid acts as a protective agent against hypertension associated cardiac dysfunction, kidney fibrosis and lipid alterations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Highly Autonomous Systems Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, Richard; Rasmussen, Robert; Man, Guy; Patel, Keyur

    1998-01-01

    Researchers and technology developers from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), other government agencies, academia, and industry recently met in Pasadena, California, to take stock of past and current work and future challenges in the application of AI to highly autonomous systems. The meeting was catalyzed by new opportunities in developing autonomous spacecraft for NASA and was in part a celebration of the fictional birth year of the HAL-9000 computer.

  1. Autonomous Intersection Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    and analyzing my algorithms for correctness and rigor. Third, Tarun Nimmagadda, for creating the first mixed simulation using my simulator. In addition...Agent Systems, 10(2):131–164, March 2005. [Beeson et al., 2008] Patrick Beeson, Jack O’Quin, Bartley Gillan, Tarun Nimma- gadda, Mickey Ristroph, David...autonomous vehicles at intersections. IEEE Intelligent Systems, 13(3):82–86, May 1998. [Nimmagadda, 2009] Tarun Nimmagadda. Building an autonomous ground

  2. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  3. Neurovascular and Autonomic Dysfunction Associated with Gulf War Illness Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    reports from multiple laboratories of disturbances in mAChR expression in the CNS after exposure to chlorpyrifos, PB and other agents, in various...bloodstream, they compete for entry into hepatic pathways that ultimately process them to inactive metabolites. Because there are often multiple...represents a distinction between the sensory and motor manifestations of exposure to GWI chemicals. Summary and Conclusions DEET

  4. Neurovascular and Autonomic Dysfunction Associated with Gulf War Illness Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland, 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for Public ...years in which we have used this GWI model, rate of movement has been the most consistent measure of persistent and delayed deficits that appear...A). Exclusion of PB from the exposure set significantly altered the pattern of behavioral outcomes. In the absence of PB, ambulation deficits

  5. The treatment of autonomic dysfunction in tetanus | Maryke Spruyt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment prevents glucocorticoid-induced glucose intolerance and islet-cell dysfunction in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raalte, D.H.; van Genugten, R.E.; Linssen, M.M.L.; Ouwens, D.M.; Diamant, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Glucocorticoids (GCs) are regarded as diabetogenic because they impair insulin sensitivity and islet-cell function. This study assessed whether treatment with the glucagon-like peptide receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA) exenatide (EXE) could prevent GC-induced glucose intolerance. RESEARCH

  7. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system processing of autonomic function involves a network of regions throughout the brain which can be visualized and measured with neuroimaging techniques, notably functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The development of fMRI procedures has both confirmed and extended earlier findings from animal models, and human stroke and lesion studies. Assessments with fMRI can elucidate interactions between different central sites in regulating normal autonomic patterning, and demonstrate how disturbed systems can interact to produce aberrant regulation during autonomic challenges. Understanding autonomic dysfunction in various illnesses reveals mechanisms that potentially lead to interventions in the impairments. The objectives here are to: 1 describe the fMRI neuroimaging methodology for assessment of autonomic neural control, 2 outline the widespread, lateralized distribution of function in autonomic sites in the normal brain which includes structures from the neocortex through the medulla and cerebellum, 3 illustrate the importance of the time course of neural changes when coordinating responses, and how those patterns are impacted in conditions of sleep-disordered breathing, and 4 highlight opportunities for future research studies with emerging methodologies. Methodological considerations specific to autonomic testing include timing of challenges relative to the underlying fMRI signal, spatial resolution sufficient to identify autonomic brainstem nuclei, blood pressure and blood oxygenation influences on the fMRI signal, and the sustained timing, often measured in minutes of challenge periods and recovery. Key findings include the lateralized nature of autonomic organization, which is reminiscent of asymmetric motor, sensory and language pathways. Testing brain function during autonomic challenges demonstrate closely-integrated timing of responses in connected brain areas during autonomic challenges, and the involvement with

  8. SLP-2 interacts with Parkin in mitochondria and prevents mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkin-deficient human iPSC-derived neurons and Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Alessandra; Kalvakuri, Sreehari; Rakovic, Aleksandar; Foco, Luisa; Guida, Marianna; Schwienbacher, Christine; Serafin, Alice; Rudolph, Franziska; Trilck, Michaela; Grünewald, Anne; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Wegner, Florian; Giorgio, Valentina; Lavdas, Alexandros A; Bodmer, Rolf; Pramstaller, Peter P; Klein, Christine; Hicks, Andrew A; Pichler, Irene; Seibler, Philip

    2017-07-01

    Mutations in the Parkin gene (PARK2) have been linked to a recessive form of Parkinson's disease (PD) characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity have been observed in the substantia nigra of PD patients, and loss of Parkin results in the reduction of complex I activity shown in various cell and animal models. Using co-immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays on endogenous proteins, we demonstrate that Parkin interacts with mitochondrial Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2), which also binds the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin and functions in the assembly of respiratory chain proteins. SH-SY5Y cells with a stable knockdown of Parkin or SLP-2, as well as induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from Parkin mutation carriers, showed decreased complex I activity and altered mitochondrial network morphology. Importantly, induced expression of SLP-2 corrected for these mitochondrial alterations caused by reduced Parkin function in these cells. In-vivo Drosophila studies showed a genetic interaction of Parkin and SLP-2, and further, tissue-specific or global overexpression of SLP-2 transgenes rescued parkin mutant phenotypes, in particular loss of dopaminergic neurons, mitochondrial network structure, reduced ATP production, and flight and motor dysfunction. The physical and genetic interaction between Parkin and SLP-2 and the compensatory potential of SLP-2 suggest a functional epistatic relationship to Parkin and a protective role of SLP-2 in neurons. This finding places further emphasis on the significance of Parkin for the maintenance of mitochondrial function in neurons and provides a novel target for therapeutic strategies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Autonomous surveillance for biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdak, Raja; Elfes, Alberto; Kusy, Branislav; Tews, Ashley; Hu, Wen; Hernandez, Emili; Kottege, Navinda; Sikka, Pavan

    2015-04-01

    The global movement of people and goods has increased the risk of biosecurity threats and their potential to incur large economic, social, and environmental costs. Conventional manual biosecurity surveillance methods are limited by their scalability in space and time. This article focuses on autonomous surveillance systems, comprising sensor networks, robots, and intelligent algorithms, and their applicability to biosecurity threats. We discuss the spatial and temporal attributes of autonomous surveillance technologies and map them to three broad categories of biosecurity threat: (i) vector-borne diseases; (ii) plant pests; and (iii) aquatic pests. Our discussion reveals a broad range of opportunities to serve biosecurity needs through autonomous surveillance. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with peripheral nervous system lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podnar, Simon; Vodušek, David B

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction in peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders is larger than in comparable control populations. This is particularly true for polyneuropathies with autonomic nervous system involvement, and for localized lesions with LUT innervation. LUT symptoms may be the guide to the diagnosis of processes localized in the lumbosacral spinal canal (as in cauda equina syndrome), and in the pelvis. Typical LUT dysfunctions (LUTD) caused by PNS involvement include bladder and sphincter hypoactivity with poor emptying, and incontinence. Paradoxically, bladder overactivity may also occur in pure PNS lesions. The acute cauda equina syndrome is an emergency requiring magnetic resonance imaging and surgery; in chronic neurogenic LUTD due to PNS involvement, the diagnosis of the lesion may be clarified by clinical neurophysiologic testing. Other important causes of neurogenic LUT dysfunction are perineoabdominal and pelvic surgeries. Surgeons are devising nerve-sparing techniques to prevent such major and often persistent complications in patients who are otherwise cured of the underlying disease. LUTD significantly affects the quality of life in patients and may lead to recurring urinary infections and upper urinary tract involvement. Thorough assessment of LUT function by urodynamics may be necessary in patients who are not improved by simple conservative measures. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardiac sympathetic innervation assessed with (123)I-MIBG retains prognostic utility in diabetic patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction evaluated for primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, P; Fabregat-Andrés, Ó; Cozar-Santiago, P; Sánchez-Jurado, R; Estornell-Erill, J; Valle-Muñoz, A; Quesada-Dorador, A; Payá-Serrano, R; Ferrer-Rebolleda, J; Ridocci-Soriano, F

    2016-01-01

    Scintigraphy with iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) is a non-invasive tool for the assessment of cardiac sympathetic innervation (CSI) that has proven to be an independent predictor of survival. Recent studies have shown that diabetic patients with heart failure (HF) have a higher deterioration in CSI. It is unknown if (123)I-MIBG has the same predictive value for diabetic and non-diabetic patients with advanced HF. An analysis is performed to determine whether CSI with (123)I-MIBG retains prognostic utility in diabetic patients with HF, evaluated for a primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Seventy-eight consecutive HF patients (48 diabetic) evaluated for primary prevention ICD implantation were prospectively enrolled and underwent (123)I-MIBG to assess CSI (heart-to-mediastinum ratio - HMR). A Cox proportional hazards multivariate analysis was used to determine the influence of (123)I-MIBG images for prediction of cardiac events in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. The primary end-point was a composite of arrhythmic event, cardiac death, or admission due to HF. During a mean follow-up of 19.5 [9.3-29.3] months, the primary end-point occurred in 24 (31%) patients. Late HMR was significantly lower in diabetic patients (1.30 vs. 1.41, p=0.014). Late HMR≤1.30 was an independent predictor of cardiac events in diabetic (hazard ratio 4.53; p=0.012) and non-diabetic patients (hazard ratio 12.31; p=0.023). Diabetic patients with HF evaluated for primary prevention ICD show a higher deterioration in CSI than non-diabetics; nevertheless (123)I-MIBG imaging retained prognostic utility for both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  12. Cycling and erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Šibli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: For many years medical studies have implicated bicycle riding is causing erectile dysfunction (ED in association with higher perineal pressure. This review focuses upon epidemiological studies assesing the impact of cycling on ED, pathogenesis of ED in cyclists  as well as on research considering changes of perineal pressure, hemodynamics, and nerve conduction when cycling. Investigestors were also interested in different saddle sizes, materials and geometry and also in the impact of saddle and riders position on changes to the perineum. Research on female cyclists is very limited but indicates similar genitourinary disorders as in male cyclists. We also review  research on preventative and therapeutic options regarding bicycle riding and ED.

  13. ACE2-mediated reduction of oxidative stress in the central nervous system is associated with improvement of autonomic function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing Xia

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress in the central nervous system mediates the increase in sympathetic tone that precedes the development of hypertension. We hypothesized that by transforming Angiotensin-II (AngII into Ang-(1-7, ACE2 might reduce AngII-mediated oxidative stress in the brain and prevent autonomic dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, a relationship between ACE2 and oxidative stress was first confirmed in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro2A cells treated with AngII and infected with Ad-hACE2. ACE2 overexpression resulted in a reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS formation. In vivo, ACE2 knockout (ACE2(-/y mice and non-transgenic (NT littermates were infused with AngII (10 days and infected with Ad-hACE2 in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN. Baseline blood pressure (BP, AngII and brain ROS levels were not different between young mice (12 weeks. However, cardiac sympathetic tone, brain NADPH oxidase and SOD activities were significantly increased in ACE2(-/y. Post infusion, plasma and brain AngII levels were also significantly higher in ACE2(-/y, although BP was similarly increased in both genotypes. ROS formation in the PVN and RVLM was significantly higher in ACE2(-/y mice following AngII infusion. Similar phenotypes, i.e. increased oxidative stress, exacerbated dysautonomia and hypertension, were also observed on baseline in mature ACE2(-/y mice (48 weeks. ACE2 gene therapy to the PVN reduced AngII-mediated increase in NADPH oxidase activity and normalized cardiac dysautonomia in ACE2(-/y mice. Altogether, these data indicate that ACE2 gene deletion promotes age-dependent oxidative stress, autonomic dysfunction and hypertension, while PVN-targeted ACE2 gene therapy decreases ROS formation via NADPH oxidase inhibition and improves autonomic function. Accordingly, ACE2 could represent a new target for the treatment of hypertension-associated dysautonomia and oxidative stress.

  14. Autonomic neuropathy-in its many guises-as the initial manifestation of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Jill R

    2017-04-01

    Autonomic disorders have previously been described in association with the antiphospholipid syndrome. The present study aimed to determine the clinical phenotype of patients in whom autonomic dysfunction was the initial manifestation of the antiphospholipid syndrome and to evaluate for autonomic neuropathy in these patients. This was a retrospective study of 22 patients evaluated at the University of Colorado who were found to have a disorder of the autonomic nervous system as the initial manifestation of antiphospholipid syndrome. All patients had persistent antiphospholipid antibody positivity and all patients who underwent skin biopsy were found to have reduced sweat gland nerve fiber density suggestive of an autonomic neuropathy. All patients underwent an extensive evaluation to rule out other causes for their autonomic dysfunction. Patients presented with multiple different autonomic disorders, including postural tachycardia syndrome, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and complex regional pain syndrome. Despite most having low-titer IgM antiphospholipid antibodies, 13 of the 22 patients (59%) suffered one or more thrombotic event, but pregnancy morbidity was minimal. Prothrombin-associated antibodies were helpful in confirming the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome. We conclude that autonomic neuropathy may occur in association with antiphospholipid antibodies and may be the initial manifestation of the syndrome. Increased awareness of this association is important, because it is associated with a significant thrombotic risk and a high degree of disability. In addition, anecdotal experience has suggested that antithrombotic therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy may result in significant clinical improvement in these patients.

  15. Trial Protocol: Home-based exercise programs to prevent falls and upper limb dysfunction among community-dwelling older people: study protocol for the BEST (Balance Exercise Strength Training) at Home randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Amanda; Furber, Susan; Tiedemann, Anne; Ginn, Karen; van den Dolder, Paul; Howard, Kirsten; Bauman, Adrian; Chittenden, Catherine; Franco, Lisa; Kershaw, Michelle; Sherrington, Catherine

    2018-04-01

    Falling when older is a major public health issue. There is compelling evidence to show that specific exercise programs can reduce the risk and rate of falls in community-dwelling older people. Another major health issue for older people living in the community is upper limb dysfunction, including shoulder pain. Home-based exercise programs appeal to some older people, due to their convenience. This trial aims to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a home-based lower limb exercise program compared with a home-based upper limb exercise program to prevent falls and upper limb dysfunction among community-dwelling people aged 65+ years. Randomised, controlled trial. A total of 576 community-dwelling people will be recruited from the Illawarra and Shoalhaven regions of New South Wales, Australia. Participants will be randomised to either a home-based lower limb exercise intervention or a home-based upper limb exercise intervention. The lower limb program is designed to improve balance and strength in the lower limbs. The upper limb program is designed to improve upper limb strength and mobility. Participants will attend three group-based instruction sessions to learn and progress the exercises, and will be instructed to perform the exercises three times per week at home for 12 months. The two primary outcomes will be fall rates, recorded with monthly calendars for a 12-month period, and upper limb dysfunction, measured with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire. Secondary outcomes will include: lower limb strength and balance; shoulder strength and mobility; physical activity; quality of life; attitudes to exercise; proportion of fallers; fear of falling; and health and community service use. The cost-effectiveness of both exercise programs from a health and community service provider perspective will be evaluated. Negative binomial regression models will be used to estimate the between-group difference in fall rates. Modified

  16. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be reversible or progressive. Anatomy of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system is the part of ... organs they connect with. Function of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system controls internal body processes ...

  17. Autonomic skin responses in females with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Bach, Flemming W.; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    Fabry disease is a genetic lysosomal disorder with dysfunction of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A causing accumulation of glycolipids in multiple organs including the nervous system and with neuropathy as a prominent manifestation. Neurological symptoms include pain and autonomic...... dysfunction. This study examined peripheral autonomic nerve function in 19 female patients with Fabry disease and 19 sex and age-matched controls by measuring (1) sweat production following acetylcholine challenge; (2) the sympathetically mediated vasoconstrictor responses to inspiratory gasp, stress......, and the cold pressor test; and (3) cutaneous blood flow following capsaicin. The vasoconstrictor response to inspiratory gasp was increased in Fabry patients compared to controls (p = 0.03), while the response to cold and mental stress did not change. Female patients with Fabry disease had a reduced sweat...

  18. The pattern of autonomic tone disorder and its correction in children with overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Morozov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system dysregulation is one of the leading components in the pathogenesis of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. These disorders lead to diverse changes in the functions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems with disordered release of mediators (norepinephrine, acetylcholine, hormones of the adrenal cortex and other endocrine glands, a number of biologically active substances (polypeptides, prostaglandins, as well as to the impaired sensitivity of vascular a- and p-adrenoceptors. Children with dysuria concurrently develop visceral, CNS, and circulatory system dysfunctions and metabolic disturbances. The paper describes the clinical trial of children with overactive bladder, which demonstrates the autonomic tone in these patients (и=44. The findings point to the important involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the pathogenesis of the disease and provide a rationale for the incorporation of vegetotropic drugs normalizing the autonomic nervous system into the combination therapy of overactive bladder.

  19. Autonomous Forest Fire Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Breuers, M.; Cremer, F.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Roos, M.; Schutte, K.; Vries, J.S. de

    1998-01-01

    Forest fire detection is a very important issue in the pre-suppression process. Timely detection allows the suppression units to reach the fire in its initial stages and this will reduce the suppression costs considerably. The autonomous forest fire detection principle is based on temporal contrast

  20. Towards autonomous vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We are moving towards an age of autonomous vehicles. Cycles of innovation initiated in the public and private sectors : have led one into another since the 1990s; and out of these efforts have sprung a variety of Advanced Driver Assistance : Systems ...

  1. Experimental Autonomous Vehicle Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Andersen, Nils Axel

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the requirements for and a prototype configuration of a software architecture for control of an experimental autonomous vehicle. The test bed nature of the system is emphasised in the choice of architecture making re-configurability, data logging and extendability simple...

  2. ADAM: ADaptive Autonomous Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, Daan C.; Nijenhuis, Lucas F.J.; Bakkers, André; Vervoort, Wiek

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a part of the development of an adaptive autonomous machine that is able to move in an unknown world extract knowledge out of the perceived data, has the possibility to reason, and finally has the capability to exchange experiences and knowledge with other agents. The agent is

  3. A breath of fresh air: a quality-improvement study comparing an air-circulating technique versus conventional technique to prevent nasogastric tube dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani Hani, Murad; Ihim, Ikenna; Harps, Joyce; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Nasogastric tubes are an important component of care in patients with gastrointestinal obstructions. However, they are prone to malfunction despite conventional flushing techniques, with potentially severe consequences. There is no widely accepted, gold-standard way to ensure that a nasogastric tube succeeds in maintaining an empty stomach following flushing. We have developed a flushing technique to better ensure successful tube function. We compared this technique to conventional flushing both in vitro (using a plastic stomach model) and in vivo (in a pig model), and we provide a didactic video. The mean gastric residual volume following our novel flushing technique is nearly 25-fold lower than following conventional flushing (13 mL vs. 330 mL). Our simple technique is more effective than conventional techniques in maintaining nasogastric tube function and therefore should prevent dangerous vomiting and aspiration pneumonia better than conventional techniques.

  4. Autonomic nervous system function in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrich, J; Schmitz, T; Saft, C; Postert, T; Kraus, P; Epplen, J T; Przuntek, H; Agelink, M W

    2002-06-01

    To investigate whether Huntington's disease (HD) affects autonomic nervous system (ANS) functioning. Twenty patients with HD who had positive genetic test results underwent standardised ANS function tests including sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) of the hands and feet, measurements of heart rate variability (HRV), both during five minutes of resting and deep respiration, and an orthostatic blood pressure test. Patients were classified according to the motor subscale of the unified Huntington's disease rating scale (UHDRS; mean (SD) score 26.4 (13.6)) and divided into two subgroups: UHDRS or =25 points (mid stages, M-HD). Autonomic indices were compared with those obtained for a group of well matched healthy controls (n=60). Overall, patients showed lower HRV indices than controls. Multivariate analysis with the independent factor of "group" (controls, E-HD, M-HD) showed a significant group effect on both the high frequency power (F=4.32, p=0.017) and the coefficient of variation (F=4.23, p=0.018), indicating a significant reduction in vagal modulation in the M-HD group. There was a shift in autonomic neurocardiac balance towards sympathetic predominance in the M-HD group compared with controls (F=2.89, p=0.062). Moreover, we found an inverse correlation between the severity of clinical HD symptoms (assessed by the UHDRS) and the modulation of cardiovagal activity (p=0.028). Vagal dysregulation was present in two patients; one of them also showed a pathological blood pressure test and a latency prolongation in the SSRs of the hands. Two other patients had pathologically reduced SSR amplitudes. Only patients of the M-HD group were affected. Autonomic dysfunction is present even in the middle stages of HD and affects both the sympathetic and parasympathetic branch of the ANS.

  5. Depressed cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Carlos Alberto de; Brito Junior, Helio Lima de; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Oliveira, Felipe Gomes de; Casali, Thais Gomes; Bignoto, Tiago Costa; Fernandes, Natalia Maria da Silva; Beraldo, Antonio Fernando de Castro Alves; Paula, Rogério Baumgratz de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A dysfunctional autonomic nervous system (ANS) has also been recognized as an important mechanism contributing to the poor outcome in CKD patients, with several studies reporting a reduction in heart rate variability (HRV). Objective: Evaluate the sympathovagal balance in patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, patients with CKD stages 3, 4 and 5 not yet on dialysis (CKD group) and age-matched healthy subjects (CON...

  6. Altered balance in the autonomic nervous system in schizophrenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B M; Mehlsen, J; Behnke, K

    1988-01-01

    .05). Heart-rate response to inspiration was greater in non-medicated schizophrenics compared to normal subjects (P less than 0.05), whereas no difference was found between medicated and non-medicated schizophrenics. The results show that the balance in the autonomic nervous system is altered in schizophrenic...... patients with a hyperexcitability in both the sympathetic and the parasympathetic division. Our study has thus indicated a dysfunction in the autonomic nervous system per se and the previous interpretations of attentional orienting responses in schizophrenia is questioned. Medication with neuroleptics......The aim of the present study was to evaluate the autonomic nervous function in schizophrenic patients. Twenty-eight patients (29 +/- 6 years) diagnosed as schizophrenics and in stable medication were included, together with ten schizophrenic patients (25 +/- 5 years) who were unmedicated. Eleven...

  7. Autonomic evaluation of hepatitis C virus infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Mattos Coutinho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are few studies reporting the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and disautonomia. We have evaluated the autonomic cardiovascular function in 12 patients with sensory small-fiber polyneuropathy infected by HCV. The mean age was 49±13 years old. The mean infection time was 9.6 years in six (50% patients. Thermal and pinprick hypoesthesia was observed in distal legs in all patients. Autonomic symptoms were referred by eight (66.7% patients. Among patients with abnormal autonomic cardiovascular test, five (41.7% showed abnormal results in two or more tests. Valsalva maneuver was abnormal in seven (58.3% patients. We can consider that there is an association of both parasympathetic and sympathetic efferent cardiovascular dysfunction in this group of patients.

  8. Using dynamic pupillometry as a simple screening tool to detect autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Giselle L; Marques, Jefferson L B; Gandhi, Rajiv A; Heller, Simon R; Schneider, Fábio K; Tesfaye, Solomon; Gamba, Humberto R

    2010-06-17

    Autonomic neuropathy is a common and serious complication of diabetes. Early detection is essential to enable appropriate interventional therapy and management. Dynamic pupillometry has been proposed as a simpler and more sensitive tool to detect subclinical autonomic dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate pupil responsiveness in diabetic subjects with and without cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) using dynamic pupillometry in two sets of experiments. During the first experiment, one flash was administered and the pupil response was recorded for 3 s. In the second experiment, 25 flashes at 1-s interval were administered and the pupil response was recorded for 30 s. Several time and pupil-iris radius-related parameters were computed from the acquired data. A total of 24 diabetic subjects (16 without and 8 with CAN) and 16 healthy volunteers took part in the study. Our results show that diabetic subjects with and without CAN have sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction, evidenced by diminished amplitude reflexes and significant smaller pupil radius. It suggests that pupillary autonomic dysfunction occurs before a more generalized involvement of the autonomic nervous system, and this could be used to detect early autonomic dysfunction. Dynamic pupillometry provides a simple, inexpensive, and noninvasive tool to screen high-risk diabetic patients for diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

  9. Using dynamic pupillometry as a simple screening tool to detect autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Fábio K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autonomic neuropathy is a common and serious complication of diabetes. Early detection is essential to enable appropriate interventional therapy and management. Dynamic pupillometry has been proposed as a simpler and more sensitive tool to detect subclinical autonomic dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate pupil responsiveness in diabetic subjects with and without cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN using dynamic pupillometry in two sets of experiments. Methods During the first experiment, one flash was administered and the pupil response was recorded for 3 s. In the second experiment, 25 flashes at 1-s interval were administered and the pupil response was recorded for 30 s. Several time and pupil-iris radius-related parameters were computed from the acquired data. A total of 24 diabetic subjects (16 without and 8 with CAN and 16 healthy volunteers took part in the study. Results Our results show that diabetic subjects with and without CAN have sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction, evidenced by diminished amplitude reflexes and significant smaller pupil radius. It suggests that pupillary autonomic dysfunction occurs before a more generalized involvement of the autonomic nervous system, and this could be used to detect early autonomic dysfunction. Conclusions Dynamic pupillometry provides a simple, inexpensive, and noninvasive tool to screen high-risk diabetic patients for diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

  10. Influence of hydrotherapy on clinical and cardiac autonomic function in migraine patients

    OpenAIRE

    M U Sujan; M Raghavendra Rao; Ravikiran Kisan; Hulegar A Abhishekh; Atchayaram Nalini; Trichur R Raju; T N Sathyaprabha

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure (a hot arm and foot bath with ice massage to head) in migraine pati...

  11. Chronic Adolescent Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Treatment of Male Mice Leads to Long-Term Cognitive and Behavioral Dysfunction, Which Are Prevented by Concurrent Cannabidiol Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michelle; Mills, Sierra; Winstone, Joanna; Leishman, Emma; Wager-Miller, Jim; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The high prevalence of adolescent cannabis use, the association between this use and later psychiatric disease, and increased access to high-potency cannabis highlight the need for a better understanding of the long-term effects of adolescent cannabis use on cognitive and behavioral outcomes. Furthermore, increasing Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in high-potency cannabis is accompanied by a decrease in cannabidiol (CBD), thus an understanding of the interactions between CBD and THC in the neurodevelopmental effects of THC is also important. The current study examined the immediate and long-term behavioral consequences of THC, CBD, and their combination in a mouse model of adolescent cannabis use. Materials and Methods: Male CD1 mice received daily injections of THC (3 mg/kg), CBD (3 mg/kg), CBD+THC (3 mg/kg each), vehicle, or remained undisturbed in their home cage (no handling/injections), either during adolescence (postnatal day [PND] 28-48) or during early adulthood (PND 69-89). Animals were then evaluated with a battery of behavioral tests 1 day after drug treatment, and again after 42 drug-free days. The tests included the following: open field (day 1), novel object recognition (NOR; day 2), marble burying (day 3), elevated plus maze (EPM; day 4), and Nestlet shredding (day 5). Results: Chronic administration of THC during adolescence led to immediate and long-term impairments in object recognition/working memory, as measured by the NOR task. In contrast, adult administration of THC caused immediate, but not long term, impairment of object/working memory. Adolescent chronic exposure to THC increased repetitive and compulsive-like behaviors, as measured by the Nestlet shredding task. Chronic administration of THC, either during adolescence or during adulthood, led to a delayed increase in anxiety as measured by the EPM. All THC-induced behavioral abnormalities were prevented by the coadministration of CBD+THC, whereas CBD alone did not

  12. Female Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medically as female sexual dysfunction. Many women experience problems with sexual function at some point. Female sexual dysfunction can occur at any stage of life. It can be lifelong or be acquired later in life. It can ...

  13. Maintenance of membrane organization in the aging mouse brain as the determining factor for preventing receptor dysfunction and for improving response to anti-Alzheimer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Julie; Thomas, Mélanie H; Gregory-Pauron, Lynn; Pinçon, Anthony; Lanhers, Marie-Claire; Corbier, Catherine; Claudepierre, Thomas; Yen, Frances T; Oster, Thierry; Malaplate-Armand, Catherine

    2017-06-01

    Although a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the "aging" parameter is not systematically considered in preclinical validation of anti-AD drugs. To explore how aging affects neuronal reactivity to anti-AD agents, the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)-associated pathway was chosen as a model. Comparison of the neuroprotective properties of CNTF in 6- and 18-month old mice revealed that CNTF resistance in the older animals is associated with the exclusion of the CNTF-receptor subunits from rafts and their subsequent dispersion to non-raft cortical membrane domains. This age-dependent membrane remodeling prevented both the formation of active CNTF-receptor complexes and the activation of prosurvival STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways, demonstrating that age-altered membranes impaired the reactivity of potential therapeutic targets. CNTF-receptor distribution and CNTF signaling responses were improved in older mice receiving dietary docosahexaenoic acid, with CNTF-receptor functionality being similar to those of younger mice, pointing toward dietary intervention as a promising adjuvant strategy to maintain functional neuronal membranes, thus allowing the associated receptors to respond appropriately to anti-AD agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Postanesthetic temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    OpenAIRE

    Knibbe, M. A.; Carter, J. B.; Frokjer, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Internal derangements, myofascial pain dysfunction, and chronic dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are three common sequelae resulting from mandibular trauma. Etiologic factors include prolonged dental and otolaryngologic procedures, and intraoperative use of the laryngoscope and bronchoscope. Three cases are reported to document postanesthetic TMJ dysfunction arising from normal preoperative joints. Four types of TMJ dysfunction are discussed: anterior meniscus dislocation with...

  15. Diabetes and sexual dysfunction: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiorino MI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maria Ida Maiorino,1 Giuseppe Bellastella,1 Katherine Esposito2 1Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Geriatric Sciences, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy Abstract: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in nearly all countries. It has been associated with sexual dysfunction, both in males and in females. Diabetes is an established risk factor for sexual dysfunction in men, as a threefold increased risk of erectile dysfunction was documented in diabetic men, as compared with nondiabetic men. Among women, evidence regarding the association between diabetes and sexual dysfunction are less conclusive, although most studies have reported a higher prevalence of female sexual dysfunction in diabetic women as compared with nondiabetic women. Female sexual function appears to be more related to social and psychological components than to the physiological consequence of diabetes. Hyperglycemia, which is a main determinant of vascular and microvascular diabetic complications, may participate in the pathogenetic mechanisms of sexual dysfunction in diabetes. Moreover, diabetic people may present several clinical conditions, including hypertension, overweight and obesity, metabolic syndrome, cigarette smoking, and atherogenic dyslipidemia, which are themselves risk factors for sexual dysfunction, both in men and in women. The adoption of healthy lifestyles may reduce insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress – all of which are desirable achievements in diabetic patients. Improved well-being may further contribute to reduce and prevent sexual dysfunction in both sexes. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, diabetes complications, erectile dysfunction, female sexual dysfunction, lifestyle changes

  16. "AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    HASELKORN, FLORENCE

    PREVENTION AS FUNCTION, VALUE ISSUE, CONCEPTUAL SHORTCOMING, AND PRACTICE IS DISCUSSED AND RELATED TO EDUCATIONAL TASK. PREVENTION AS FUNCTION IS GENERATED BY OUR VALUE PREMISES. IN SEEKING TO PREVENT SOME FORMS OF SOCIAL DYSFUNCTION, WE MAY BE PERPETUATING OTHERS. THE CONCEPT OF PREVENTION IS AMBIGUOUS. CRUCIAL CONCEPTUAL ISSUES INCLUDE THE…

  17. Autonomous Robot Retrieval System

    OpenAIRE

    Ahern, S.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile robots are increasingly being deployed in environments hazardous to humans. However, many of these robots require remote control operation or are tethered, requiring the human operator to remain within a potentially hazardous radius of the area of operation. To resolve this issue an Autonomous Robot Retrieval System (ARRS) utilising Open RatSLAM based on the Lego NXT 2.0 robotics platform is proposed but could not be implemented due to memory limitations of the hardware. An occupancy g...

  18. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  19. Role of the functional status of the autonomic nervous system in the clinical course of purulent meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zadiraka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purulent meningitis is defined by high indices of sickness and lethality rates, a great risk of cerebral and extracerebral complications development, steady residual consequences formation. During neuroinfections, the state of adaptation mechanisms, which is characterized by exhaustion of regulatory systems with the development of decompensation, plays a crucial part. Heart rate variability clearly reflects the degree of regulatory system tension caused by the influence of both physiological and pathological factors. Research aim: to increase the autonomic dysfunction diagnostics efficiency for patients suffering from purulent meningitis in the disease dynamics based on the complex of clinical evidence and functional status of autonomic nervous system. Materials and methods. There were 60 patients with purulent meningitis under medical observation. Wein’s questionnaire was used for the detection of clinical presentations of autonomic dysfunction. Functional status of autonomic nervous system was diagnosed using the method of computer-based cardiointervalometry. The screening group was formed of 20 healthy individuals. Research findings and theirs discussion. Cerebral meningeal symptom was dominant among the patients suffering from purulent meningitis at the peak of the disease. At hospitalization every fifth person (23,3% had the objective evidence of autonomic dysfunction in the form of a postural tremor of upper limbs and eyelids. The analysis of autonomic nervous system parameters functional status among the patients suffering from purulent meningitis at the peak of disease showed heart rate variability decrease in the main branches of autonomic regulation and the presence of autonomic imbalance towards vagotonia. Since the second week, clinical signs of autonomic dysfunction prevailed in the dynamics of patients suffering from purulent meningitis in the course of standard treatment, which was proved by Wein’s survey of the patients. The

  20. Exercise and the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Levine, Benjamin D

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays a crucial role in the cardiovascular response to acute (dynamic) exercise in animals and humans. During exercise, oxygen uptake is a function of the triple-product of heart rate and stroke volume (i.e., cardiac output) and arterial-mixed venous oxygen difference (the Fick principle). The degree to which each of the variables can increase determines maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max). Both "central command" and "the exercise pressor reflex" are important in determining the cardiovascular response and the resetting of the arterial baroreflex during exercise to precisely match systemic oxygen delivery with metabolic demand. In general, patients with autonomic disorders have low levels of V˙O2max, indicating reduced physical fitness and exercise capacity. Moreover, the vast majority of the patients have blunted or abnormal cardiovascular response to exercise, especially during maximal exercise. There is now convincing evidence that some of the protective and therapeutic effects of chronic exercise training are related to the impact on the autonomic nervous system. Additionally, training induced improvement in vascular function, blood volume expansion, cardiac remodeling, insulin resistance and renal-adrenal function may also contribute to the protection and treatment of cardiovascular, metabolic and autonomic disorders. Exercise training also improves mental health, helps to prevent depression, and promotes or maintains positive self-esteem. Moderate-intensity exercise at least 30 minutes per day and at least 5 days per week is recommended for the vast majority of people. Supervised exercise training is preferable to maximize function capacity, and may be particularly important for patients with autonomic disorders. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Maladaptive autonomic regulation in PTSD accelerates physiological aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B Williamson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A core manifestation of posttraumatic stress disorder is a disconnection between physiological state and psychological and behavior processes necessary to adequately respond to environmental demands. Patients with PTSD experience oscillations in autonomic states that support either fight and flight behaviors or withdrawal, immobilization, and dissociation without an intervening calm state that would provide opportunities for positive social interactions. This defensive autonomic disposition is adaptive in dangerous and life threatening situations, but in the context of every-day life may lead to significant psychosocial distress and deteriorating social relationships. The perpetuation of these maladaptive autonomic responses, may contribute to the development of comorbid mental health issues such as depression, loneliness, and hostility that further modify the nature of cardiovascular behavior in the context of internal and external stressors. Over time, changes in autonomic, endocrine, and immune function contribute to deteriorating health, which is potently expressed in brain dysfunction and cardiovascular health. In this theoretical review paper, we review the literature on the chronic health effects of post-traumatic stress disorder. We discuss the brain networks underlying post-traumatic stress disorder in the context of autonomic efferent and afferent contributions and how disruption of these networks leads to poor health outcomes. Finally, we discuss treatments based on our theoretical model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

  2. Chagas' disease and the involvement of the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Ademir Batista

    2003-06-01

    Chagas' disease is a major endemic disease in Latin America and a great cause for concern due to its high incidence: it afflicts 16 to 18 million individuals and places over 90 million people at risk of infection. At present, five mechanisms can be proposed to explain the pathogenesis of chronic Chagas cardiopathy: 1. direct lesion of the tissue by Trypanosoma cruzi; 2. dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (neurogenic concept); 3. microvascular disease; 4. immunologic reaction; 5. alterations in the extracellular matrix. The neurogenic concept is the most attractive explanation for the pathogenesis of chronic Chagas cardiopathy through the involvement of the autonomic nervous system, an issue that has been prominent ever since Chagas first initiated research in the field. Köberle, in his pioneering studies on the role of the autonomic nervous system in Chagas patients in the 1950s, adopted the technique of neuron counts, whereby he registered a reduction in parasympathetic nerve cells, and thus considered Chagas cardiopathy a "parasympathetic reduction" with predominance of the sympathetic. In the 1960s, systematic studies on autonomic function, organized by Professor Dalmo Amorim, were initiated in the School of Medicine in Ribeirão Preto. Several aspects of cardiac autonomic control were later described independently by teams in Brazil (Ribeirão Preto and Brasília), Argentina (Cordoba) and Venezuela (Mérida). In general, the studies performed in Ribeirăo Preto by Amorim and Marin Neto and in Brasília by Junqueira Jr. reflected the functional involvement of the parasympathetic system, while the studies performed in Córdoba were linked with the view of cardiovascular sympathetic dysfunction. In Brazil, the involvement of the sympathetic system, with relation to the functional aspect of sympathetic denervation, is well characterized by Marin Neto through the assessment of heart rate using the tilt test in both Chagas and control groups. Further

  3. Dysautonomia in prodromal α-synucleinopathy: peripheral versus central autonomic degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, C; Guenther, A; Schwab, M; Schultze, T; Nowack, S; Hoyer, D; Ehrhardt, J; Witte, O W; Mayer, G; Rupprecht, S

    2016-05-01

    There is an urgent need for early predictive markers for the course of disease in prodromal α-synucleinopathies such as idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder. Autonomic cardiac/vascular dysfunction is a prominent feature in advanced α-synucleinopathies, but its diagnostic value as an early neurodegenerative marker remains unclear. The latter may be complicated since synuclein-mediated neurodegeneration may involve central and peripheral components of the autonomic nervous system. The diagnostic value of autonomic symptoms and central and peripheral autonomic markers of blood pressure and heart rate regulation were prospectively evaluated in 20 subjects with idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder and 20 age-matched healthy controls. Although subjects with REM sleep behaviour disorder showed no clinical autonomic symptoms, blood pressure (P ≤ 0.035) and heart rate response (P ≤ 0.065) were slightly diminished during orthostatic challenge. Autonomic dysregulation was distinctively reflected in lower resting heart rate (all components, P ≤ 0.05) and blood pressure variability (low frequency component, P ≤ 0.024) indicating peripheral cardiac/vascular denervation. In contrast, baroreflex sensitivity and central cardiac autonomic outflow (sympathovagal balance) were well preserved indicating intact central autonomic regulation. Heart rate variability [very low frequency component, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) 0.80, P ≤ 0.001] and blood pressure variability (low frequency component ROC AUC 0.73, P ≤ 0.01) but not baroreflex sensitivity and sympathovagal balance showed an excellent diagnostic accuracy in identifying subjects with REM sleep behaviour disorder and healthy controls. Cardiac/vascular dysfunction in prodromal α-synucleinopathy arises from peripheral rather than from central autonomic degeneration. Autonomic indices encoded in heart rate and blood pressure variability are precise

  4. Oral health and erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijendra P Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ample evidence strongly supports the fact that periodontal disease is a major risk factor for various systemic diseases namely cardio-vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, etc. Recently, investigators focussed on exploring the link between chronic periodontitis (CP and erectile dysfunction (ED by contributing to the endothelial dysfunction. Both the diseases share common risk factors. Various studies conducted in different parts of the world in recent years reported the evidence linking this relationship as well as improvement in ED with periodontal treatment. Systemic exposure to the periodontal pathogen and periodontal infection-induced systemic inflammation was thought to associate with these conditions. The objective of this review was to highlight the evidence of the link between CP and ED and the importance of oral health in preventing the systemic conditions.

  5. Functional profiles of SCN9A variants in dorsal root ganglion neurons and superior cervical ganglion neurons correlate with autonomic symptoms in small fibre neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, C.; Hoeijmakers, J.G.; Liu, S.; Gerrits, M.M.; te Morsche, R.H.; Lauria, G.; Dib-Hajj, S.D.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Faber, C.G.; Merkies, I.S.; Waxman, S.G.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with small fibre neuropathy typically manifest pain in distal extremities and severe autonomic dysfunction. However, occasionally patients present with minimal autonomic symptoms. The basis for this phenotypic difference is not understood. Sodium channel Na(v)1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene,

  6. Autonomous Medical Care for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Polk, J. D.; Hines, John W.; Nall, Marsha M.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of Autonomous Medical Care (AMC) is to ensure a healthy, well-performing crew which is a primary need for exploration. The end result of this effort will be the requirements and design for medical systems for the CEV, lunar operations, and Martian operations as well as a ground-based crew health optimization plan. Without such systems, we increase the risk of medical events occurring during a mission and we risk being unable to deal with contingencies of illness and injury, potentially threatening mission success. AMC has two major components: 1) pre-flight crew health optimization and 2) in-flight medical care. The goal of pre-flight crew health optimization is to reduce the risk of illness occurring during a mission by primary prevention and prophylactic measures. In-flight autonomous medical care is the capability to provide medical care during a mission with little or no real-time support from Earth. Crew medical officers or other crew members provide routine medical care as well as medical care to ill or injured crew members using resources available in their location. Ground support becomes telemedical consultation on-board systems/people collect relevant data for ground support to review. The AMC system provides capabilities to incorporate new procedures and training and advice as required. The on-board resources in an autonomous system should be as intelligent and integrated as is feasible, but autonomous does not mean that no human will be involved. The medical field is changing rapidly, and so a challenge is to determine which items to pursue now, which to leverage other efforts (e.g. military), and which to wait for commercial forces to mature. Given that what is used for the CEV or the Moon will likely be updated before going to Mars, a critical piece of the system design will be an architecture that provides for easy incorporation of new technologies into the system. Another challenge is to determine the level of care to provide for each

  7. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent ...

  8. Autonomic Fuselet Specification and Composition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mills, Peter H

    2006-01-01

    A framework for autonomic fuselet business logic development was developed, using semantic web services and workflow technologies to specify fuselet information needs, to define an executable workflow...

  9. Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment for developing and evaluating intelligent software for both actual and simulated autonomous vehicles. Laboratory computers provide...

  10. Postanesthetic temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, M. A.; Carter, J. B.; Frokjer, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Internal derangements, myofascial pain dysfunction, and chronic dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are three common sequelae resulting from mandibular trauma. Etiologic factors include prolonged dental and otolaryngologic procedures, and intraoperative use of the laryngoscope and bronchoscope. Three cases are reported to document postanesthetic TMJ dysfunction arising from normal preoperative joints. Four types of TMJ dysfunction are discussed: anterior meniscus dislocation with reduction, anterior meniscus dislocation without reduction, dislocation/subluxation of the mandibular condyle, and myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome. Preoperative screening of mandibular function is recommended in identifying patients as either normal or having potential TMJ dysfunction. Failure to recognize postoperative TMJ dysfunction can lead to long-term symptoms that are difficult to alleviate. Litigation is a common sequel in these cases. Images Figure 3 PMID:2604053

  11. Morally autonomous practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P A

    1998-12-01

    The structures and contexts within which nurses work results in the moral agency and moral autonomy of the nurse being compromised. This claim results from a confusion of (1) the concept of autonomy with those of freedom and independence; and (2) a confusion of the notion of moral autonomy with that of autonomous professional practice. The drawing of appropriate distinctions allows clarification of the relevant concepts. It also underlines the responsibility of practitioners to recognize the moral dimension of their practice, and the moral implications of their actions, as they attempt to meet the health care needs of their patients and develop practice professionally.

  12. Lost among the trees? The autonomic nervous system and paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Corinne A

    2014-06-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) has been strikingly neglected in Western medicine. Despite its profound importance for regulation, adjustment and coordination of body systems, it lacks priority in training and practice and receives scant attention in numerous major textbooks. The ANS is integral to manifestations of illness, underlying familiar physical and psychological symptoms. When ANS activity is itself dysfunctional, usual indicators of acute illness may prove deceptive. Recognising the relevance of the ANS can involve seeing the familiar through fresh eyes, challenging assumptions in clinical assessment and in approaches to practice. Its importance extends from physical and psychological well-being to parenting and safeguarding, public services and the functioning of society. Exploration of its role in conditions ranging from neurological, gastrointestinal and connective tissue disorders, diabetes and chronic fatigue syndrome, to autism, behavioural and mental health difficulties may open therapeutic avenues. The ANS offers a mechanism for so-called functional illnesses and illustrates the importance of recognising that 'stress' takes many forms, physical, psychological and environmental, desirable and otherwise. Evidence of intrauterine and post-natal programming of ANS reactivity suggests that neonatal care and safeguarding practice may offer preventive opportunity, as may greater understanding of epigenetic change of ANS activity through, for example, accidental or psychological trauma or infection. The aim of this article is to accelerate recognition of the importance of the ANS throughout paediatrics, and of the potential physical and psychological cost of neglecting it. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Primary graft dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward; Christie, Jason D

    2013-06-01

    Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is a syndrome encompassing a spectrum of mild to severe lung injury that occurs within the first 72 hours after lung transplantation. PGD is characterized by pulmonary edema with diffuse alveolar damage that manifests clinically as progressive hypoxemia with radiographic pulmonary infiltrates. In recent years, new knowledge has been generated on risks and mechanisms of PGD. Following ischemia and reperfusion, inflammatory and immunological injury-repair responses appear to be key controlling mechanisms. In addition, PGD has a significant impact on short- and long-term outcomes; therefore, the choice of donor organ is impacted by this potential adverse consequence. Improved methods of reducing PGD risk and efforts to safely expand the pool are being developed. Ex vivo lung perfusion is a strategy that may improve risk assessment and become a promising platform to implement treatment interventions to prevent PGD. This review details recent updates in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular and genetic biomarkers, and state-of-the-art technical developments affecting PGD. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Burden of Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balon, Richard

    2017-01-02

    Similar to the burden of other diseases, the burden of sexual dysfunction has not been systematically studied. However, there is growing evidence of various burdens (e.g., economic, symptomatic, humanistic) among patients suffering from sexual dysfunctions. The burden of sexual dysfunction has been studied a bit more often in men, namely the burden of erectile dysfunction (ED), premature ejaculation (PE) and testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS). Erectile dysfunction is frequently associated with chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and depression. These conditions could go undiagnosed, and ED could be a marker of those diseases. The only available report from the United Kingdom estimated the total economic burden of ED at £53 million annually in terms of direct costs and lost productivity. The burden of PE includes significant psychological distress: anxiety, depression, lack of sexual confidence, poor self-esteem, impaired quality of life, and interpersonal difficulties. Some suggest that increase in female sexual dysfunction is associated with partner's PE, in addition to significant interpersonal difficulties. The burden of TDS includes depression, sexual dysfunction, mild cognitive impairment, and osteoporosis. One UK estimate of the economic burden of female sexual dysfunctions demonstrated that the average cost per patient was higher than the per annum cost of ED. There are no data on burden of paraphilic disorders. The burden of sexual dysfunctions is underappreciated and not well studied, yet it is significant for both the patients and the society.

  15. Iatrogenic causes of salivary gland dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, M.M.; Izutsu, K.T.

    1987-01-01

    Saliva is important for maintaining oral health and function. There are instances when medical therapy is intended to decrease salivary flow, such as during general anesthesia, but most instances of iatrogenic salivary gland dysfunction represent untoward or unavoidable side-effects. The clinical expression of the salivary dysfunction can range from very minor transient alteration in saliva flow to a total loss of salivary function. The most common forms of therapy that interfere with salivation are drug therapies, cancer therapies (radiation or chemotherapy), and surgical therapy. These therapies can affect salivation by a number of different mechanisms that include: disruption of autonomic nerve function related to salivation, interference with acinar or ductal cell functions related to salivation, cytotoxicity, indirect effects (vasoconstriction/dilation, fluid and electrolyte balance, etc.), and physical trauma to salivary glands and nerves. A wide variety of drugs is capable of increasing or decreasing salivary flow by mimicking autonomic nervous system actions or by directly acting on cellular processes necessary for salivation: drugs can also indirectly affect salivation by altering fluid and electrolyte balance or by affecting blood flow to the glands. Ionizing radiation can cause permanent damage to salivary glands, damage that is manifest as acinar cell destruction with subsequent atrophy and fibrosis of the glands. Cancer chemotherapy can cause changes in salivation, but the changes are usually much less severe and only transient. Finally, surgical and traumatic injuries interfere with salivation because of either disruption of gland innervation or gross physical damage (or removal) of glandular tissue (including ducts)

  16. Towards autonomous vehicular clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Olariu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dawn of the 21st century has seen a growing interest in vehicular networking and its myriad potential applications. The initial view of practitioners and researchers was that radio-equipped vehicles could keep the drivers informed about potential safety risks and increase their awareness of road conditions. The view then expanded to include access to the Internet and associated services. This position paper proposes and promotes a novel and more comprehensive vision namely, that advances in vehicular networks, embedded devices and cloud computing will enable the formation of autonomous clouds of vehicular computing, communication, sensing, power and physical resources. Hence, we coin the term, autonomous vehicular clouds (AVCs. A key feature distinguishing AVCs from conventional cloud computing is that mobile AVC resources can be pooled dynamically to serve authorized users and to enable autonomy in real-time service sharing and management on terrestrial, aerial, or aquatic pathways or theaters of operations. In addition to general-purpose AVCs, we also envision the emergence of specialized AVCs such as mobile analytics laboratories. Furthermore, we envision that the integration of AVCs with ubiquitous smart infrastructures including intelligent transportation systems, smart cities and smart electric power grids will have an enormous societal impact enabling ubiquitous utility cyber-physical services at the right place, right time and with right-sized resources.

  17. Autonomous Formation Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  18. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... process. Autonomic disorders may be reversible or progressive. Anatomy of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous ... with acetylcholine and placed on the legs and forearm. Then, the volume of sweat is measured to ...

  19. Behavioural domain knowledge transfer for autonomous agents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosman, Benjamin S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available , and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series, 13-15 November 2014 Behavioural Domain Knowledge Transfer for Autonomous Agents Benjamin Rosman Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems Modelling and Digital Science Council...

  20. Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, George T.; Carey, Robin J.; Kapushion, Blanche M.

    2016-01-01

    "Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book" includes activities and strategies to support the development of autonomous learners. More than 40 activities are included, all geared to the emotional, social, cognitive, and physical development of students. Teachers may use these activities and strategies with the entire class, small groups, or…

  1. Association between Diastolic Dysfunction with Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Females ob/ob Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Michelle; Conti, Filipe F.; Dias, Danielle da Silva; dos Santos, Fernando; Machi, Jacqueline F.; Palomino, Zaira; Casarini, Dulce E.; Rodrigues, Bruno; De Angelis, Kátia; Irigoyen, Maria-Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate autonomic and cardiovascular function, as well as inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in ob/ob female mice. Methods: Metabolic parameters, cardiac function, arterial pressure (AP), autonomic, hormonal, inflammatory, and oxidative stress markers were evaluated in 12-weeks female wild-type (WT group) and ob/ob mice (OB group). Results: OB animals showed increased body weight, blood glucose, and triglyceride levels, along with glucose intolerance, when compared to WT animals. Ejection fraction (EF) and AP were similar between groups; however, the OB group presented diastolic dysfunction, as well as an impairment on myocardial performance index. Moreover, the OB group exhibited important autonomic dysfunction and baroreflex sensitivity impairment, when compared to WT group. OB group showed increased Angiotensin II levels in heart and renal tissues; decreased adiponectin and increased inflammatory markers in adipose tissue and spleen. Additionally, OB mice presented a higher damage to proteins and lipoperoxidation and lower activity of antioxidant enzymes in kidney and heart. Correlations were found between autonomic dysfunction with angiotensin II and inflammatory mediators, as well as between inflammation and oxidative stress. Conclusions: Our results showed that female adult ob/ob mice presented discrete diastolic dysfunction accompanied by autonomic disorder, which is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in these animals. PMID:28878683

  2. Association between Diastolic Dysfunction with Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Females ob/ob Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Sartori

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate autonomic and cardiovascular function, as well as inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in ob/ob female mice.Methods: Metabolic parameters, cardiac function, arterial pressure (AP, autonomic, hormonal, inflammatory, and oxidative stress markers were evaluated in 12-weeks female wild-type (WT group and ob/ob mice (OB group.Results: OB animals showed increased body weight, blood glucose, and triglyceride levels, along with glucose intolerance, when compared to WT animals. Ejection fraction (EF and AP were similar between groups; however, the OB group presented diastolic dysfunction, as well as an impairment on myocardial performance index. Moreover, the OB group exhibited important autonomic dysfunction and baroreflex sensitivity impairment, when compared to WT group. OB group showed increased Angiotensin II levels in heart and renal tissues; decreased adiponectin and increased inflammatory markers in adipose tissue and spleen. Additionally, OB mice presented a higher damage to proteins and lipoperoxidation and lower activity of antioxidant enzymes in kidney and heart. Correlations were found between autonomic dysfunction with angiotensin II and inflammatory mediators, as well as between inflammation and oxidative stress.Conclusions: Our results showed that female adult ob/ob mice presented discrete diastolic dysfunction accompanied by autonomic disorder, which is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in these animals.

  3. The usual treatment of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Álvarez, Mónica

    2013-10-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection, tearing, and rhinorrhea (SUNCT). Conventional pharmacological therapy can be successful in the majority of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias patients. Most cluster headache attacks respond to 100% oxygen inhalation, or 6 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan. Nasal spray of sumatriptan (20 mg) or zolmitriptan (5 mg) are recommended as second choice. The bouts can be brought under control by a short course of corticosteroids (oral prednisone: 60-100 mg/day, or intravenous methylprednisolone: 250-500 mg/day, for 5 days, followed by tapering off the dosage), or by long-term prophylaxis with verapamil (at least 240 mg/day). Alternative long-term preventive medications include lithium carbonate (800-1600 mg/day), methylergonovine (0.4-1.2 mg/day), and topiramate (100-200 mg/day). As a rule, paroxysmal hemicrania responds to preventive treatment with indomethacin (75-150 mg/day). A short course of intravenous lidocaine (1-4 mg/kg/hour) can reduce the flow of attacks during exacerbations of SUNCT. Lamotrigine (100-300 mg/day) is the preventive drug of choice for SUNCT. Gabapentin (800-2700 mg/day), topiramate (50-300 mg/day), and carbamazepine (200-1600 mg/day) may be of help. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  4. Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... men older than 75 years of age. Is erectile dysfunction just a part of old age? ED doesn’t have to be a part of getting older. It’s true that as you get older, you may need more ... Symptoms of erectile dysfunction The primary symptom of ED is not ...

  5. Loneliness and Sexual Dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1987-01-01

    Argues that sexual dysfunctions result from early childhood experiences which were originally nonsexual in nature. Contends that psychological difficulties centered around problems of loneliness tend to generate certain sexual dysfunctions. Extends and explores suggestion that genesis of sexual conflicts is in nonsexual infant separation anxiety…

  6. Motorcycling as a Risk Factor for Erectile Dysfunction: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: It is concluded that motorcyclists, physicians and policy makers need to know the inherent danger in motorcycle operation with respect to erectile dysfunction, with a view to working out appropriate intervention and prevention strategies. Keywords: Erectile Dysfunction, Motorcycling, Family Physician.

  7. Gastrointestinal dysfunction in idiopathic Parkinsonism: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Salari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, gastrointestinal (GI dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease (PD are well-recognized problems and are known to be the initial symptoms in the pathological process that eventually results in PD. Many types of PD-associated GI dysfunctions have been identified, including weight loss, nausea, hypersalivation, dysphagia, dyspepsia, abdominal pain, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, constipation, defecatory dysfunction, and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. These symptoms can influence on other PD symptoms and are the second most significant predictor of the quality of life of these patients. Recognition of GI symptoms requires vigilance on the part of clinicians. Health-care providers should routinely ask direct questions about GI symptoms during office visits so that efforts can be directed at appropriate management of these distressing manifestations. Multiple system atrophy (MSA and progressive supranuclear palsy are two forms of neurodegenerative Parkinsonism. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunctions such as GI dysfunction are common in patients with parkinsonian disorders. Despite recent progress in the recognition of GI dysfunctions, there are a few reviews on the management of GI dysfunction and GI symptoms in idiopathic Parkinsonism. In this review, the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and treatment of each GI symptom in PD, MSA, and prostate-specific antigen will be discussed.

  8. Does conversion and prevention of atrial fibrillation enhance survival in patients with left ventricular dysfunction? Evidence from the Danish Investigations of Arrhythmia and Mortality ON Dofetilide/(DIAMOND) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Brendorp, Bente; Elming, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia in patients with left ventricular dysfunction associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The present study investigated the potential of dofetilide to restore and maintain sinus rhythm in patients with left ventricular dysfunction......, which might reduce mortality and hospitalizations. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the Danish Investigations of Arrhythmia and Mortality ON Dofetilide (DIAMOND) studies, 506 patients were in atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter (AFl) at baseline. Over the course of study, cardioversion occurred in 148 (59...

  9. Research Institute for Autonomous Precision Guided Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogacki, John R

    2007-01-01

    ... vehicles, cooperative flight of autonomous aerial vehicles using GPS and vision information, cooperative and sharing of information in search missions involving multiple autonomous agents, multi-scale...

  10. Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System (EAHMS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For supporting NASA's Robotics, Tele-Robotics and Autonomous Systems Roadmap, we are proposing the "Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System" (EAHMS) for...

  11. The Importance of Autonomous Regulation for Students' Successful Translation of Intentions into Behavior Change via Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dian Sheng; Lippke, Sonia; Liu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity has a high prevention potential in adolescents. This study investigated the relations between physical activity and intention, autonomous regulation, and planning. We hypothesized that planning mediates the relationship between intention and behavior and that this mediation should depend on the level of autonomous regulation. Stratified randomization sampling method was administered to assemble a sample of N = 534 students among two schools in China. To test the hypothesis, autonomous regulation, intention, and physical activity were assessed at baseline as well as planning and follow-up physical activity four weeks after the pretest. A moderated mediation model confirmed that planning mediated the intention-behavior relation with the effect of planning being moderated by autonomous regulation. Study results demonstrated that autonomous regulation facilitated the translation of intention into behavior change via planning. To promote physical activity among adolescents, interventions targeting planning and autonomous regulation might facilitate successful translation of intentions into behavior change.

  12. The Importance of Autonomous Regulation for Students' Successful Translation of Intentions into Behavior Change via Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Sheng Cao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity has a high prevention potential in adolescents. This study investigated the relations between physical activity and intention, autonomous regulation, and planning. We hypothesized that planning mediates the relationship between intention and behavior and that this mediation should depend on the level of autonomous regulation. Stratified randomization sampling method was administered to assemble a sample of =534 students among two schools in China. To test the hypothesis, autonomous regulation, intention, and physical activity were assessed at baseline as well as planning and follow-up physical activity four weeks after the pretest. A moderated mediation model confirmed that planning mediated the intention-behavior relation with the effect of planning being moderated by autonomous regulation. Study results demonstrated that autonomous regulation facilitated the translation of intention into behavior change via planning. To promote physical activity among adolescents, interventions targeting planning and autonomous regulation might facilitate successful translation of intentions into behavior change.

  13. Autonomous Martian flying rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    A remotely programmable, autonomous flying rover is proposed to extensively survey the Martian surface environment. A Mach .3, solar powered, modified flying wing could cover roughly a 2000 mile range during Martian daylight hours. Multiple craft launched from an orbiting mother ship could provide near-global coverage. Each craft is envisioned to fly at about 1 km above the surface and measure atmospheric composition, pressure and temperature, map surface topography, and remotely penetrate the near subsurface looking for water (ice) and perhaps evidence of life. Data collected are relayed to Earth via the orbiting mother ship. Near surface guidance and control capability is an adaptation of current cruise missile technology. A solar powered aircraft designed to fly in the low temperature, low density, carbon dioxide Martian atmosphere near the surface appears feasible.

  14. Autonomous component carrier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Pedersen, Klaus; Mogensen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    management and efficient system operation. Due to the expected large number of user-deployed cells, centralized network planning becomes unpractical and new scalable alternatives must be sought. In this article, we propose a fully distributed and scalable solution to the interference management problem......Low-power base stations such as e.g. Femto-cells are one of the candidates for high data rate provisioning in local areas, such as residences, apartment complexes, business offices and outdoor hotspot scenarios. Unfortunately, the benefits are not without new challenges in terms of interference...... in local areas, basing our study case on LTE-Advanced. We present extensive network simulation results to demonstrate that a simple and robust interference management scheme, called autonomous component carrier selection allows each cell to select the most attractive frequency configuration; improving...

  15. Small fiber dysfunction in patients with Wilson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis A. Gondim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients with Wilson’s disease (WD may develop a wide variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms, but there are few reports of autonomic dysfunction. Here, we described evidence of small fiber and/or autonomic dysfunction in 4 patients with WD and levodopa-responsive parkinsonism. Method: We reviewed the charts of 4 patients with WD who underwent evaluation for the presence of neuromuscular dysfunction and water-induced skin wrinkling test (SWT. Results: Two men and 2 women (33±3.5 years with WD were evaluated. They all had parkinsonism at some point during their disease course. Parkinsonism on patient 4 almost completely subsided with treatment of WD. Two patients had significant sensory and 2 significant autonomic complaints, including syncopal spells. NCS/EMG was normal in all but SWT was abnormal in half of them (mean 4-digit wrinkling of 0.25 and 1. Discussion: A subset of patients with WD exhibit evidence of abnormal skin wrinkling test (small fiber neuropathy.

  16. Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi AR Hadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hadi AR Hadi, Jassim Al SuwaidiDepartment of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hamad General Hospital – Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, State of Qatar; Department of Cardioscience, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, UAEAbstract: Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even in the presence of intensive glycemic control. Substantial clinical and experimental evidence suggest that both diabetes and insulin resistance cause a combination of endothelial dysfunctions, which may diminish the anti-atherogenic role of the vascular endothelium. Both insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction appear to precede the development of overt hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, in patients with diabetes or insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction may be a critical early target for preventing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Microalbuminuria is now considered to be an atherosclerotic risk factor and predicts future cardiovascular disease risk in diabetic patients, in elderly patients, as well as in the general population. It has been implicated as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature cardiovascular mortality for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as for patients with essential hypertension. A complete biochemical understanding of the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia causes vascular functional and structural changes associated with the diabetic milieu still eludes us. In recent years, the numerous biochemical and metabolic pathways postulated to have a causal role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease have been distilled into several unifying hypotheses. The role of chronic hyperglycemia in the development of diabetic microvascular complications and in neuropathy has been clearly established. However, the biochemical or cellular links between elevated blood glucose levels, and the vascular lesions remain

  17. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Surfactant dysfunction Surfactant dysfunction Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  18. [Lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, F; Roumeguère, T

    2015-12-01

    Radical hysterectomy is associated with a significant amount of urinary functional complications and a negative impact on quality of life. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the neurological etiology of lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy and to establish an optimal postoperative management strategy. We performed a comprehensive overview using the following terms: "radical hysterectomy" and "urologic diseases etiology" or "urologic disease prevention and control". The reported incidence of lower urinary tract dysfunction after radical hysterectomy varies from 12 to 85%. Several animal and clinical urodynamic studies corroborate the neurologic etiology of the dysfunction. Lower urinary tract dysfunction is a common postoperative finding (70-85%) but spontaneous recovery is to be expected within 6-12 months after surgery. The most frequent long term sequela is stress urinary incontinence (40% of cases) and its management is complex and challenging. Postoperative refractory overactive bladder and bladder underactivity can be treated by neuromodulation of sacral roots and superior hypogastric plexus, respectively. In the absence of good clinical predictors, preoperative urodynamic examinations could have a role in understanding the pathophysiology of the dysfunction before such interventions. The pathophysiology of lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy is multifactorial. Its management is complex and should be multidisciplinary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Pattern of erectile dysfunction in Jeddah city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Helali, N S; Abolfotouh, M A; Ghanem, H M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the demographic features of erectile dysfunction patients attending different specialized clinics in Jeddah city, and to identify possible risk factors associated with erectile dysfunction problem. All newly erectile dysfunction patients (n=388) who attended 6 andrology and urology clinics within a period of 3 months were subjected to a modified structural interview questionnaire to collect demographic data and risk factors for erectile dysfunction. The study revealed the following results among erectile dysfunction patients; Saudi patients constituted (81%). The age ranged from 20-86 years with mean age of 43.23+12.56 years, 73% were married with one wife, 23.5% married with two wives, and 8% were single. About one-half (43%) were less than secondary education level. Retired patients constituted (13%) of all patients. Lack of exercise was the most frequent risk factor among 82% of patients, followed by smoking (56%), use of regular medication (44%), diabetes (30%), hypertension (15%), history of pelvic surgery (14%) alcoholism (13%), and drug addict (8%). Erectile dysfunction is a problem of not only old age but also of middle and young age. This might be attributed to the high frequency of some risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug addiction. This finding may reflect the necessity for construction of prevention strategies.

  20. Diastolic dysfunction characterizes cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush O. Somani

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: Present study shows that although diastolic dysfunction is a frequent event in cirrhosis, it is usually of mild degree and does not correlate with severity of liver dysfunction. There are no significant differences in echocardiographic parameters between alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis. HRS is not correlated to diastolic dysfunction in cirrhotic patients. There is no difference in survival at one year between patients with or without diastolic dysfunction. Diastolic dysfunction in cirrhosis is unrelated to circulatory dysfunction, ascites and HRS.

  1. Role of Exercise Training on Autonomic Changes and Inflammatory Profile Induced by Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Bruno; Lira, Fabio S.; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M.; Rocha, Juraci A.; Caperuto, Erico C.; De Angelis, Kátia; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular autonomic imbalance in patients after myocardial infarction (MI) provides a significant increase in mortality rate, and seems to precede metabolic, hormonal, and immunological changes. Moreover, the reduction in the parasympathetic function has been associated with inflammatory response in different pathological conditions. Over the years, most of the studies have indicated the exercise training (ET) as an important nonpharmacological tool in the management of autonomic dysfunction and reduction in inflammatory profile after a myocardial infarction. In this work, we reviewed the effects of ET on autonomic imbalance after MI, and its consequences, particularly, in the post-MI inflammatory profile. Clinical and experimental evidence regarding relationship between alterations in autonomic regulation and local or systemic inflammation response after MI were also discussed. PMID:25045212

  2. Role of Exercise Training on Autonomic Changes and Inflammatory Profile Induced by Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular autonomic imbalance in patients after myocardial infarction (MI provides a significant increase in mortality rate, and seems to precede metabolic, hormonal, and immunological changes. Moreover, the reduction in the parasympathetic function has been associated with inflammatory response in different pathological conditions. Over the years, most of the studies have indicated the exercise training (ET as an important nonpharmacological tool in the management of autonomic dysfunction and reduction in inflammatory profile after a myocardial infarction. In this work, we reviewed the effects of ET on autonomic imbalance after MI, and its consequences, particularly, in the post-MI inflammatory profile. Clinical and experimental evidence regarding relationship between alterations in autonomic regulation and local or systemic inflammation response after MI were also discussed.

  3. Reversible microvascular dysfunction coupled with persistent myocardial dysfunction: implications for post‐infarct left ventricular remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiuto, Leonarda; Gabrielli, Francesca A; Lombardo, Antonella; Torre, Giuseppe La; Scarà, Antonio; Rebuzzi, Antonio G; Crea, Filippo

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that microvascular dysfunction after myocardial infarction is a dynamic phenomenon. Aims To evaluate the implications of dynamic changes in microvascular dysfunction on contractile recovery and left ventricular remodelling, and to identify the ideal timing of assessment of such microvascular dysfunction. Methods and results In 39 patients with a first myocardial infarction who underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention, microvascular dysfunction was studied by myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) at 24 h, 1 week and 3 months after the procedure. Real‐time MCE was performed by contrast pulse sequencing and intravenous Sonovue. 14 patients exhibited left ventricular remodelling at 3 months (>20% increase in left ventricular end‐diastolic volume, group B), whereas 25 did not (group A). Microvascular dysfunction was similar in the two groups at 24 h and improved in group A only, being significantly better than that of group B at 1 week (p<0.05) and 3 months (p<0.005). Improvement in microvascular dysfunction was not associated with improvement in wall motion in the same segments. With multivariate analysis including all echocardiographic variables, microvascular dysfunction at 1 week was found to be the only independent predictor of left ventricular remodelling (p<0.01). With a cut‐off value of 1.4, 1‐week microvascular dysfunction predicts left ventricular remodelling with sensitivity and specificity of 73%. Conclusions Improvement in microvascular dysfunction occurs early after myocardial infarction, although it is not associated with a parallel improvement in wall motion but is beneficial in preventing left ventricular remodelling. Accordingly, 1‐week microvascular dysfunction is a powerful and independent predictor of left ventricular remodelling. PMID:16980514

  4. Vocal cord dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, James; Deckert, Linda

    2010-01-15

    Vocal cord dysfunction involves inappropriate vocal cord motion that produces partial airway obstruction. Patients may present with respiratory distress that is often mistakenly diagnosed as asthma. Exercise, psychological conditions, airborne irritants, rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or use of certain medications may trigger vocal cord dysfunction. The differential diagnosis includes asthma, angioedema, vocal cord tumors, and vocal cord paralysis. Pulmonary function testing with a flow-volume loop and flexible laryngoscopy are valuable diagnostic tests for confirming vocal cord dysfunction. Treatment of acute episodes includes reassurance, breathing instruction, and use of a helium and oxygen mixture (heliox). Long-term management strategies include treatment for symptom triggers and speech therapy.

  5. Cybersecurity for aerospace autonomous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    High profile breaches have occurred across numerous information systems. One area where attacks are particularly problematic is autonomous control systems. This paper considers the aerospace information system, focusing on elements that interact with autonomous control systems (e.g., onboard UAVs). It discusses the trust placed in the autonomous systems and supporting systems (e.g., navigational aids) and how this trust can be validated. Approaches to remotely detect the UAV compromise, without relying on the onboard software (on a potentially compromised system) as part of the process are discussed. How different levels of autonomy (task-based, goal-based, mission-based) impact this remote characterization is considered.

  6. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  7. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sexual Dysfunction in Urogynaecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.E. Roos (Anne-Marie)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__abstract__ This thesis is dedicated to enhance understanding of sexual dysfunction in the field of urogynaecology, focussing on the prevalence of sexual problems in urogynaecology clinics, the clinical attention of the urogynaecologist to female sexual dyfunction, the impact

  9. HIV and thyroid dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Alan A; Bhangoo, Amrit

    2013-06-01

    Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) are associated with dysfunction of many endocrine organs and their axis. HIV infectivity leads to altered metabolism, poor oral intake and increased prevalence of weight loss and wasting which may have a role in thyroid dysfunction. Overt thyroid dysfunction occurs at similar rates as the general population while subclinical disease such as nonthyroidal illness (sick euthyroid syndrome), subclinical hypothyroidism and isolated low T4 levels are more frequent. Moreover, HAART therapy can complicate thyroid function further through drug interactions and the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). In this review we report the common thyroid dysfunctions associated with HIV before and after HAART therapy. We discuss presentation, diagnostic work up, treatment and follow up in each condition.

  10. Autonomic Function Impairment and Brain Perfusion Deficit in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Che Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAutonomic disorders have been recognized as important Parkinson’s disease (PD components. Some vulnerable structures are related to the central autonomic network and have also been linked to autonomic function alterations. The aims of the study are to evaluate the severity of the autonomic dysfunction and the cortical hypoperfusion using arterial spin labeling (ASL MRI. And then, possible relationships of significant between-group differences in perfusion pattern to clinical variables and autonomic functions were examined to determine the pharmaceutical effects of dopaminergic treatment on cerebral blood flow (CBF in patients with PD.MethodsBrain ASL MRI was carried out in 20 patients with PD (6 men and 14 women, mean age: 63.3 ± 6.4 years and 22 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers to assess whole-brain CBF and the effects of dopaminergic therapy on perfusion. All subjects underwent a standardized evaluation of cardiovagal and adrenergic function including a deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, and 5-min head-up tilt test. Perfusion MRI data were acquired on a 3.0 T scanner with a pulsed continuous ASL technique. The CBF, autonomic parameters, and clinical data were analyzed after adjusting for age and sex.ResultsPatients exhibited a decline in autonomic function (rapid heart rate in response to deep breathing, low baroreflex sensitivity, high systolic and diastolic pressure, and altered tilting test response, widespread low CBF, and robust response to dopaminergic therapy. Lower perfusion in the middle frontal gyrus was associated with increased clinical disease severity (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale I score, P < 0.001. Lower perfusion in autonomic control areas, such as the frontal lobe and insula, were significantly associated with autonomic impairment (P < 0.001.ConclusionsOur study indicates that PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that changes the perfusion of central nervous system

  11. Cranial Autonomic Symptoms in Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cranial autonomic symptoms (CAS in patients with migraine and cluster headaches (CH were characterized and compared in a prospective study of consecutive patients attending a headache clinic at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.

  12. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors...

  13. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes

  14. Is paramecium swimming autonomic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Toplosky, Norman; Hansen, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We seek to explore if the swimming of paramecium has an underlying autonomic mechanism. Such robotic elements may be useful in capturing the disturbance field in an environment in real time. Experimental evidence is emerging that motion control neurons of other animals may be present in paramecium as well. The limit cycle determined using analog simulation of the coupled nonlinear oscillators of olivo-cerebellar dynamics (ieee joe 33, 563-578, 2008) agrees with the tracks of the cilium of a biological paramecium. A 4-motor apparatus has been built that reproduces the kinematics of the cilium motion. The motion of the biological cilium has been analyzed and compared with the results of the finite element modeling of forces on a cilium. The modeling equates applied torque at the base of the cilium with drag, the cilium stiffness being phase dependent. A low friction pendulum apparatus with a multiplicity of electromagnetic actuators is being built for verifying the maps of the attractor basin computed using the olivo-cerebellar dynamics for different initial conditions. Sponsored by ONR 33.

  15. Autonomous Energy Grids: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, Benjamin D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bernstein, Andrey [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Yingchen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hodge, Brian S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-04

    With much higher levels of distributed energy resources - variable generation, energy storage, and controllable loads just to mention a few - being deployed into power systems, the data deluge from pervasive metering of energy grids, and the shaping of multi-level ancillary-service markets, current frameworks to monitoring, controlling, and optimizing large-scale energy systems are becoming increasingly inadequate. This position paper outlines the concept of 'Autonomous Energy Grids' (AEGs) - systems that are supported by a scalable, reconfigurable, and self-organizing information and control infrastructure, can be extremely secure and resilient (self-healing), and self-optimize themselves in real-time for economic and reliable performance while systematically integrating energy in all forms. AEGs rely on scalable, self-configuring cellular building blocks that ensure that each 'cell' can self-optimize when isolated from a larger grid as well as partaking in the optimal operation of a larger grid when interconnected. To realize this vision, this paper describes the concepts and key research directions in the broad domains of optimization theory, control theory, big-data analytics, and complex system modeling that will be necessary to realize the AEG vision.

  16. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  17. Autonomous power system: Integrated scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) project at NASA Lewis Research Center is designed to demonstrate the abilities of integrated intelligent diagnosis, control and scheduling techniques to space power distribution hardware. The project consists of three elements: the Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) for fault diagnosis, isolation, and recovery (FDIR), the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler (AIPS) to determine system configuration, and power hardware (Brassboard) to simulate a space-based power system. Faults can be introduced into the Brassboard and in turn, be diagnosed and corrected by APEX and AIPS. The Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler controls the execution of loads attached to the Brassboard. Each load must be executed in a manner that efficiently utilizes available power and satisfies all load, resource, and temporal constraints. In the case of a fault situation on the Brassboard, AIPS dynamically modifies the existing schedule in order to resume efficient operation conditions. A database is kept of the power demand, temporal modifiers, priority of each load, and the power level of each source. AIPS uses a set of heuristic rules to assign start times and resources to each load based on load and resource constraints. A simple improvement engine based upon these heuristics is also available to improve the schedule efficiency. This paper describes the operation of the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler as a single entity, as well as its integration with APEX and the Brassboard. Future plans are discussed for the growth of the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler.

  18. Olfactory dysfunction and cardiovascular dysautonomia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Hisayoshi; Toyoda, Chizuko; Yogo, Makiko; Mochio, Soichiro

    2010-06-01

    Several studies have reported that olfactory dysfunction is an early neuropathological manifestation of Parkinson's disease (PD). Reduced cardiac meta-iodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) uptake may be one of the earliest signs of PD. We studied the relation of olfactory dysfunction to cardiovascular dysautonomia in patients with PD. The study group comprised 66 patients with PD (70.5 years) and 26 controls (70.3 years) for olfactory assessment, 21 controls (72.1 years) for cardiac (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy and heart rate variability (HRV), assessed using the coefficient of variation for RR intervals (HRV), and 23 controls (69.2 years) for orthostatic blood pressure response. Olfactory function was assessed by the odor stick identification test Japan (OSIT-J), and cardiovascular autonomic function was evaluated by (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy of the heart, the fall in orthostatic blood pressure, and HRV. Patients with PD had a significantly lower OSIT-J score than did the controls (4.1 +/- 3.0 vs. 9.9 +/- 1.7, p = 0.001). The OSIT-J score was unrelated to variables other than gender, including age, disease duration, motor score on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale, score on the mini-mental state examination, motor phenotype, visual hallucinations, and dopaminergic medication on multiple regression and logistic regression analyses. The OSIT-J score was related to the heart/mediastinum ratio of cardiac (123)I-MIBG uptake, the fall in orthostatic blood pressure, and HRV, after adjustment for other clinical variables. Olfactory dysfunction in PD was, thus, significantly related to both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction, as well as vascular sympathetic dysfunction. As non-motor symptoms of PD, olfactory dysfunction and autonomic network failure appear to be closely related in PD.

  19. Predictors of Erectile Dysfunction in Men with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Referred to a Tertiary Healthcare Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theophilus Ugwu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The frequency of erectile dysfunction (ED complicating diabetes mellitus (DM is reportedly high. However, its risk factors have not been well studied. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study of 160 male type 2 DM adults, aged 30–70 years, attending a tertiary healthcare clinic. Demographic and relevant clinical information was documented. Erectile function was assessed using an abridged version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5. All subjects were evaluated for central obesity, glycemic control, peripheral arterial disease (PAD, autonomic neuropathy, dyslipidemia, and testosterone deficiency. Results. 152 (95% patients with a mean age of 60.3 ± 8.8 years completed the study. 71.1% had varying degrees of ED, while 58.3% suffered from a moderate-to-severe form. Independent predictors of ED [presented as adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval] were longer duration of DM, 1.14 (1.02–1.28, PAD, 3.87 (1.28–11.67, autonomic neuropathy, 3.51 (1.82–6.79, poor glycemic control, 7.12 (2.49–20.37, and testosterone deficiency, 6.63 (2.61–16.83. Conclusion. The prevalence of ED and its severe forms was high in this patient population. Poor glycemic control and testosterone deficiency were the strongest risk factors for ED, making it possibly a preventable condition.

  20. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  1. Diverse autonomic regulation of pupillary function and the cardiovascular system during alcohol withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Thomas; Hoyme, Johannes; Schulz, Steffen; Weißenfels, Markus; Voss, Andreas; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Previous research indicated the complexity of autonomic dysfunction during acute alcohol withdrawal. This study aimed to investigate the pupillary light reflex as an indicator of midbrain and brainstem regulatory systems in relation to cardiovascular autonomic function. Thirty male patients were included in the study. They were investigated during acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome and 24h later during clomethiazole treatment and compared to healthy controls. Parameters of pupillary light reflex of both eyes as well as heart rate variability, blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) were studied. We observed significantly reduced sympathetic (small diameter, e.g., left eye: 5.00 in patients vs. 5.91 mm in controls) and vagal modulation (e.g., prolonged latencies, left eye: 0.28 vs. 0.26 ms) regarding both pupils during acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Cardiovascular parameters showed reduced vagal modulation (e.g., b-slope of BRS: 7. 57 vs. 13.59 ms/mm Hg) and mixed results for sympathetic influence. After 24h, autonomic dysfunction improved significantly, both for the pupils (e.g., left diameter: 5.38 mm) and the heart (e.g., b-slope of BRS: 9.34 ms/mm Hg). While parameters obtained from the pupil correlated with cardiac autonomic function (e.g, BRS and left diameter: r=0.564) in healthy controls, no such pattern was observed in patients. Results obtained from the pupil during acute alcohol withdrawal do not simply mirror autonomic dysfunction regarding the heart. Pupillary and cardiovascular changes after 24h indicate state dependencies of the results. The findings are discussed with respect to autonomic mechanisms and potentially involved brain regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Autonomic symptoms in idiopathic REM behavior disorder: a multicentre case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Oertel, Wolfgang; Dauvilliers, Yves; Postuma, Ronald B; Marelli, Sara; Iranzo, Alex; Arnulf, Isabelle; Högl, Birgit; Birgit, Högl; Manni, Raffaele; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Fantini, Maria-Livia; Puligheddu, Monica; Jennum, Poul; Sonka, Karel; Santamaria, Joan; Zucconi, Marco; Rancoita, Paola M V; Leu-Semenescu, Smeranda; Frauscher, Birgit; Terzaghi, Michele; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Unger, Marcus; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Desautels, Alex; Wolfson, Christina; Pelletier, Amélie; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2014-06-01

    Patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) are at very high risk of developing neurodegenerative synucleinopathies, which are disorders with prominent autonomic dysfunction. Several studies have documented autonomic dysfunction in iRBD, but large-scale assessment of autonomic symptoms has never been systematically performed. Patients with polysomnography-confirmed iRBD (318 cases) and controls (137 healthy volunteers and 181 sleep center controls with sleep diagnoses other than RBD) were recruited from 13 neurological centers in 10 countries from 2008 to 2011. A validated scale to study the disorders of the autonomic nervous system in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, the SCOPA-AUT, was administered to all the patients and controls. The SCOPA-AUT consists of 25 items assessing the following domains: gastrointestinal, urinary, cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, pupillomotor, and sexual dysfunction. Our results show that compared to control subjects with a similar overall age and sex distribution, patients with iRBD experience significantly more problems with gastrointestinal, urinary, and cardiovascular functioning. The most prominent differences in severity of autonomic symptoms between our iRBD patients and controls emerged in the gastrointestinal domain. Interestingly, it has been reported that an altered gastrointestinal motility can predate the motor phase of PD. The cardiovascular domain SCOPA-AUT score in our study in iRBD patients was intermediate with respect to the scores reported in PD patients by other authors. Our findings underline the importance of collecting data on autonomic symptoms in iRBD. These data may be used in prospective studies for evaluating the risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Effects of hypothermia and rewarming on cardiovascular autonomic control in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrichs, Erik Sveberg; Håheim, Brage; Kondratiev, Timofei; Traasdahl, Erik; Tveita, Torkjel

    2017-12-21

    Rewarming from accidental hypothermia is associated with cardiovascular dysfunction that complicates rewarming and contributes to a high mortality rate. We investigated autonomic cardiovascular control, as well as the separate effects of cooling, hypothermia and rewarming on hemodynamic function, aiming to provide knowledge of the pathophysiology causing such complications in these patients. A rat model designed for circulatory studies during cooling, hypothermia (15{degree sign}C) and rewarming was used. Spectral analysis of diastolic arterial pressure and heart rate allowed assessment of the autonomic nervous system. Hemodynamic variables were monitored using a conductance catheter in the left ventricle and a pressure transducer connected to the left femoral artery. Sympathetic cardiovascular control was reduced after rewarming. Stroke volume (SV) increased during cooling, but decreased during stable hypothermia and did not normalize during rewarming. Despite autonomic dysfunction, total peripheral resistance increased during cooling and did not normalize after rewarming. The present data show that sympathetic cardiovascular control is reduced by hypothermia and rewarming. A simultaneous systolic dysfunction is seen in rewarmed animals, caused by reduced filling of the left ventricle and impaired contractile function, in presence of normal diastolic function. These findings show that dysfunction of the efferent sympathetic nervous system could be instrumental in development of rewarming shock.

  4. Compact autonomous navigation system (CANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y. C.; Ying, L.; Xiong, K.; Cheng, H. Y.; Qiao, G. D.

    2017-11-01

    Autonomous navigation of Satellite and constellation has series of benefits, such as to reduce operation cost and ground station workload, to avoid the event of crises of war and natural disaster, to increase spacecraft autonomy, and so on. Autonomous navigation satellite is independent of ground station support. Many systems are developed for autonomous navigation of satellite in the past 20 years. Along them American MANS (Microcosm Autonomous Navigation System) [1] of Microcosm Inc. and ERADS [2] [3] (Earth Reference Attitude Determination System) of Honeywell Inc. are well known. The systems anticipate a series of good features of autonomous navigation and aim low cost, integrated structure, low power consumption and compact layout. The ERADS is an integrated small 3-axis attitude sensor system with low cost and small volume. It has the Earth center measurement accuracy higher than the common IR sensor because the detected ultraviolet radiation zone of the atmosphere has a brightness gradient larger than that of the IR zone. But the ERADS is still a complex system because it has to eliminate many problems such as making of the sapphire sphere lens, birefringence effect of sapphire, high precision image transfer optical fiber flattener, ultraviolet intensifier noise, and so on. The marginal sphere FOV of the sphere lens of the ERADS is used to star imaging that may be bring some disadvantages., i.e. , the image energy and attitude measurements accuracy may be reduced due to the tilt image acceptance end of the fiber flattener in the FOV. Besides Japan, Germany and Russia developed visible earth sensor for GEO [4] [5]. Do we have a way to develop a cheaper/easier and more accurate autonomous navigation system that can be used to all LEO spacecraft, especially, to LEO small and micro satellites? To return this problem we provide a new type of the system—CANS (Compact Autonomous Navigation System) [6].

  5. Voiding dysfunction - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sripathi V

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In a child who is toilet trained the sudden onset of daytime wetting with frequency or urgency is alarming to the parents. Initially this subject was subdivided into a number of descriptive clinical conditions which led to a lot of confusion in recognition and management. Subsequently, the term elimination dysfunction was coined by Stephen Koff to emphasise the association between recurrent urinary infection, wetting, constipation and bladder overactivity. From a urodynamic point of view, in voiding dysfunction, there is either detrusor overactivity during bladder filling or dyssynergic action between the detrusor and the external sphincter during voiding. Identifying a given condition as a ′filling phase dysfunction′ or ′voiding phase dysfunction′ helps to provide appropriate therapy. Objective clinical criteria should be used to define voiding dysfunction. These include bladder wall thickening, large capacity bladder and infrequent voiding, bladder trabeculation and spinning top deformity of the urethra and a clinically demonstrated Vincent′s curtsy. The recognition and treatment of constipation is central to the adequate treatment of voiding dysfunction. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimuation for the treatment of detrusor overactivity, biofeedback with uroflow EMG to correct dyssynergic voiding, and behavioral therapy all serve to correct voiding dysfunction in its early stages. In established neurogenic bladder disease the use of Botulinum Toxin A injections into the detrusor or the external sphincter may help in restoring continence especially in those refractory to drug therapy. However in those children in whom the upper tracts are threatened, augmentation of the bladder may still be needed.

  6. Assessment of autonomic function after acute spinal cord injury using heart rate variability analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmqvist, Lasse; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Bartholdy, Kim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in severe dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. C1-C8 SCI affects the supraspinal control to the heart, T1-T5 SCI affects the spinal sympathetic outflow to the heart, and T6-T12 SCI leaves sympathetic control to the heart intact. Heart rate....... CONCLUSIONS: The rise in SDANN in the incomplete C1-T5 patients could be due to spontaneous functional recovery caused by synaptic plasticity or remodelling of damaged axons. That the autonomic nervous system function differs between C1-C8, T1-T5 and T6-T12 patients suggest that the sympathovagal balance...

  7. [A role of the autonomic nervous system in cerebro-cardiac disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basantsova, N Yu; Tibekina, L M; Shishkin, A N

    The authors consider anatomical/physiological characteristics and a role of different autonomic CNS regions, including insula cortex, amygdala complex, anterior cingulate cortex, ventral medial prefrontal cortex, hypothalamus and epiphysis, involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity. The damage of these structures, e.g., due to the acute disturbance of cerebral blood circulation, led to arrhythmia, including fatal arrhythmia, in previously intact myocardium; systolic and diastolic dysfunction, ischemic changes considered in the frames of cerebro-cardial syndrome. On the cellular level, the disturbance of autonomic regulation resulted in catechol amine excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and free radical myocardium injury.

  8. Sepsis and myocardial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Deczka Morsch

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis and septic shock are prevalent in the intensive care setting,accounting for more than 40% of mortality in this scenario. Theappropriate management and recognition of sepsis-inducedmyocardial dysfunction are paramount for its proper treatmentand probably impact mortality rates. The objective of this articleis to review its definition, pathophysiologic mechanisms, possibletreatments and current research on the subject according to acritical view.Cellular signaling involved in myocardial depression is not fullyunderstood. Disturbances in calcium homeostasis,cardiodepressant circulating factors, inflammatory mediators,nitric oxide and apoptosis act as synergistic pathways that leadto severely depressed cardiac function. The diagnosis ofmyocardial dysfunction during sepsis carries a worse prognosisand increased mortality.Myocardial dysfunction plays an important role in morbidity andmortality rate of critically ill patients. Current research in thisarea will continue to evolve; we will, therefore, soon have moreinsights into potential novel therapies that can change its mortalityrates.

  9. Autonomous Landing on Moving Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Mendoza Chavez, Gilberto

    2016-08-01

    This thesis investigates autonomous landing of a micro air vehicle (MAV) on a nonstationary ground platform. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs) are becoming every day more ubiquitous. Nonetheless, many applications still require specialized human pilots or supervisors. Current research is focusing on augmenting the scope of tasks that these vehicles are able to accomplish autonomously. Precise autonomous landing on moving platforms is essential for self-deployment and recovery of MAVs, but it remains a challenging task for both autonomous and piloted vehicles. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a widely used and effective scheme to control constrained systems. One of its variants, output-feedback tube-based MPC, ensures robust stability for systems with bounded disturbances under system state reconstruction. This thesis proposes a MAV control strategy based on this variant of MPC to perform rapid and precise autonomous landing on moving targets whose nominal (uncommitted) trajectory and velocity are slowly varying. The proposed approach is demonstrated on an experimental setup.

  10. Postinjury Inflammation and Organ Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauaia, Angela; Moore, Frederick A; Moore, Ernest E

    2017-01-01

    The development of organ dysfunction (OD) is related to the intensity and balance between trauma-induced simultaneous, opposite inflammatory responses. Early proinflammation via innate immune system activation may cause early OD, whereas antiinflammation, via inhibition of the adaptive immune system and apoptosis, may induce immunoparalysis, impaired healing, infections, and late OD. Patients discharged with low-level OD may develop the persistent inflammation-immunosuppression catabolism syndrome. Although the incidence of multiple organ failure has decreased over time, it remains morbid, lethal, and resource intensive. However, single OD, especially acute lung injury, remains frequent. Treatment is limited, and prevention remains the mainstay strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. TRPM8 mechanism of autonomic nerve response to cold in respiratory airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cong-Yi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breathing cold air without proper temperature exchange can induce strong respiratory autonomic responses including cough, airway constriction and mucosal secretion, and can exacerbate existing asthma conditions and even directly trigger an asthma attack. Vagal afferent fiber is thought to be involved in the cold-induced respiratory responses through autonomic nerve reflex. However, molecular mechanisms by which vagal afferent fibers are excited by cold remain unknown. Using retrograde labeling, immunostaining, calcium imaging, and electrophysiological recordings, here we show that a subpopulation of airway vagal afferent nerves express TRPM8 receptors and that activation of TRPM8 receptors by cold excites these airway autonomic nerves. Thus activation of TRPM8 receptors may provoke autonomic nerve reflex to increase airway resistance. This putative autonomic response may be associated with cold-induced exacerbation of asthma and other pulmonary disorders, making TRPM8 receptors a possible target for prevention of cold-associated respiratory disorders.

  12. Perspective: Autonomic care systems for hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J; Dong, Chunming; Rhodes, Nancy M; McNeill, Diana B; Adams, Martha B; Gilliss, Catherine L; Cuffe, Michael S; Califf, Robert M; Peterson, Eric D; Lubarsky, David A

    2009-12-01

    With advancements of medical technology and improved diagnostic and treatment options, children with severe birth defects who would otherwise have no chance of surviving post birth survive to go home every day. The average lifespan in the United States has increased substantially over the last century. These successes and many other medical breakthroughs in managing complex illnesses, particularly in frail, elderly patients, have resulted in an increasing percentage of patients with comorbidities. This, coupled with a policy change by Medicare (i.e., Medicare will no longer reimburse hospitals for costs associated with treating preventable errors and injuries that a patient acquires while in the hospital), creates an enormous challenge to health care providers. To meet the challenge, the authors propose a new model of health care--the autonomic care system (ACS)--a concept derived from the intensive care unit and the autonomic computing initiative in the computer industry. Using wound care as an example, the authors examine the necessity, feasibility, design, and challenges related to ACS. Specifically, they discuss the role of the human operator, the potential combination of ACS and existing hospital information technology (e.g., electronic medical records and computerized provider order entry), and the costs associated with ACS. ACS may serve as a roadmap to revamp the health care system, bringing down the barriers among different specialties and improving the quality of care for each problem for all hospitalized patients.

  13. Small Autonomous Aircraft Servo Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Small air vehicles offer challenging power, weight, and volume constraints when considering implementation of system health monitoring technologies. In order to develop a testbed for monitoring the health and integrity of control surface servos and linkages, the Autonomous Aircraft Servo Health Monitoring system has been designed for small Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) platforms to detect problematic behavior from servos and the air craft structures they control, This system will serve to verify the structural integrity of an aircraft's servos and linkages and thereby, through early detection of a problematic situation, minimize the chances of an aircraft accident. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University's rotary-winged UAV has an Airborne Power management unit that is responsible for regulating, distributing, and monitoring the power supplied to the UAV's avionics. The current sensing technology utilized by the Airborne Power Management system is also the basis for the Servo Health system. The Servo Health system measures the current draw of the servos while the servos are in Motion in order to quantify the servo health. During a preflight check, deviations from a known baseline behavior can be logged and their causes found upon closer inspection of the aircraft. The erratic behavior nay include binding as a result of dirt buildup or backlash caused by looseness in the mechanical linkages. Moreover, the Servo Health system will allow elusive problems to be identified and preventative measures taken to avoid unnecessary hazardous conditions in small autonomous aircraft.

  14. Transient erectile dysfunction associated with intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadonikolakis, Anastasios S; Vekris, Marios D; Kostas, John P; Korompilias, Anastasios V; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2002-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction occurs rarely after botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) intramuscular injections. We report a case of a 23-year-old man with spastic diplegia who had transient erectile dysfunction after intramuscular injection of BTX-A (total dosage, 300 IU, body weight 95 kg) in both hamstring muscles. Some investigators believe that the local spread of the toxin is responsible for autonomic dysfunction, while others believe that the transportation of the toxin to the spinal cord via retrograde flow or via the blood flow after entering the circulation are possible mechanisms of neurologic side effects. On the basis of our case, a retrograde axoplasmic flow to the spinal cord could probably occur because the spinal cord level of hamstring muscles is close to spinal cord levels responsible for erection control.

  15. Impact of yoga in a case of vocal cord dysfunction with dysautonomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozina Wadhwania

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year-old female with a past medical history of gastroesophageal reflux disease presented with shortness of breath induced by exercise and certain odors. She reported the symptoms of autonomic dysfunction including fatigue, chest pain, lightheadedness, headaches, numbness/tingling in the arms and legs, and exercise intolerance. Vital signs were significant for orthostatic intolerance. Volume flow loop in the pulmonary function tests showed a flattening of the inspiratory portion characteristic of vocal cord dysfunction. Laryngoscopy showed dyskinesia of the left vocal cord, especially after exercise. Multifactorial approach was used including increased fluid intake and breathing exercises. After 6 weeks of breathing and isometric exercises, the patient reported improvement in dyspnea after exercise. This case report demonstrates the therapeutic role of breathing and isometric exercises in the management of vocal cord and autonomic dysfunction.

  16. Impact of yoga in a case of vocal cord dysfunction with dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwania, Rozina

    2017-01-01

    A 23-year-old female with a past medical history of gastroesophageal reflux disease presented with shortness of breath induced by exercise and certain odors. She reported the symptoms of autonomic dysfunction including fatigue, chest pain, lightheadedness, headaches, numbness/tingling in the arms and legs, and exercise intolerance. Vital signs were significant for orthostatic intolerance. Volume flow loop in the pulmonary function tests showed a flattening of the inspiratory portion characteristic of vocal cord dysfunction. Laryngoscopy showed dyskinesia of the left vocal cord, especially after exercise. Multifactorial approach was used including increased fluid intake and breathing exercises. After 6 weeks of breathing and isometric exercises, the patient reported improvement in dyspnea after exercise. This case report demonstrates the therapeutic role of breathing and isometric exercises in the management of vocal cord and autonomic dysfunction.

  17. The Bering Autonomous Target Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz; Betto, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    An autonomous asteroid target detection and tracking method has been developed. The method features near omnidirectionality and focus on high speed operations and completeness of search of the near space rather than the traditional faint object search methods, employed presently at the larger...... telescopes. The method has proven robust in operation and is well suited for use onboard spacecraft. As development target for the method and the associated instrumentation the asteroid research mission Bering has been used. Onboard a spacecraft, the autonomous detection is centered around the fully...

  18. Political accountability and autonomous weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Igoe Walsh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous weapons would have the capacity to select and attack targets without direct human input. One important objection to the introduction of such weapons is that they will make it more difficult to identify and hold accountable those responsible for undesirable outcomes such as mission failures and civilian casualties. I hypothesize that individuals can modify their attribution of responsibility in predicable ways to accommodate this new technology. The results of a survey experiment are consistent with this; subjects continue to find responsible and hold accountable political and military leaders when autonomous weapons are used, but also attribute responsibility to the designers and programmers of such weapons.

  19. Autonomic Regulation of Splanchnic Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Fraser

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the autonomic nervous system in circulatory regulation of the splanchnic organs (stomach, small intestine, colon, liver, pancreas and spleen is reviewed. In general, the sympathetic nervous system is primarily involved in vasoconstriction, while the parasympathetic contributes to vasodilation. Vasoconstriction in the splanchnic circulation appears to be mediated by alpha-2 receptors and vasodilation by activation of primary afferent nerves with subsequent release of vasodilatory peptides, or by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. As well, an important function of the autonomic nervous system is to provide a mechanism by which splanchnic vascular reserve can be mobilized during stress to maintain overall cardiovascular homeostasis.

  20. Structural Discrimination and Autonomous Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hin-Yan

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the potential for structural discrimination to be woven into the fabric of autonomous vehicle developments, which remain underexplored and undiscussed. The prospect for structural discrimination arises as a result of the coordinated modes of autonomous vehicle behaviour...... discrimination looms with the possibility of crash optimisation impulses in which a protective shield is cast over those individuals in which society may have a vested interest in prioritising or safeguarding. A stark dystopian scenario is introduced to sketch the contours whereby personal beacons signal...

  1. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy: Risk factors, diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serhiyenko, Victoria A; Serhiyenko, Alexandr A

    2018-01-01

    dysfunction; prevention and treatment of thrombosis; in severe cases-treatment of OH. The promising methods include prescription of prostacyclin analogues, thromboxane A2 blockers and drugs that contribute into strengthening and/or normalization of Na+, K+-ATPase (phosphodiesterase inhibitor), ALA, dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA), ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs), and the simultaneous prescription of ALA, ω-3 PUFAs and DGLA, but the future investigations are needed. Development of OH is associated with severe or advanced CAN and prescription of nonpharmacological and pharmacological, in the foreground midodrine and fludrocortisone acetate, treatment methods are necessary. PMID:29359025

  2. Hypertension and sexual dysfunction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review Article: Hypertension and sexual dysfunction. 117. Vol 54 No 2. S Afr Fam Pract 2012. Introduction. Hypertension is a major independent cardiovascular risk factor, and also a marker of survival risk. Quality of life during the treatment of hypertension is an important health issue, as one in every five treated patients ...

  3. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to talk, chew, and yawn. For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that travels through the face, jaw, ...

  4. Postirradiation cardiovascular dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.N.; Cockerham, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    Cardiovascular dysfunction may be defined as the inability of any element of the cardiovascular system to perform adequately upon demand, leading to inadequate performance and nutritive insufficiency of various parts of the body. Exposure to supralethal doses of radiation (accidental and therapeutic) has been show to induce significant alterations in cardiovascular function in man. These findings indicate that, after irradiation, cardiovascular function is a major determinant of continued performance and even survival. For the two persons who received massive radiation doses (45 and 88 Gy, respectively) in criticality accidents, the inability to maintain systematic arterial blood pressure (AP) was the immediate cause of death. In a study of cancer patients given partial-body irradiation, two acute lethalities were attributed to myocardial infarction after an acute hypotensive episode during the first few hours postexposure. Although radiation-induced cardiovascular dysfunction has been observed in many species, its severity, duration, and even etiology may vary with the species, level of exposure, and dose rate. For this reason, our consideration of the effects of radiation on cardiovascular performance is limited to the circulatory derangements that occur in rat, dog, and monkey after supralethal doses and lead to radiation-induced cardiovascular dysfunction in these experimental models. The authors consider other recent data as they pertain to the etiology of cardiovascular dysfunction in irradiated animals

  5. Female sexual dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Wåhlin-Jacobsen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a controversial condition, which has prompted much debate regarding its aetiology, components, and even its existence. Our inability to work together as clinicians, psychologists, patients, and advocates hinders our understanding of FSD, and we will only improve...

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction in epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Kunz, W.S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 35-40 ISSN 1567-7249 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR GA309/08/0292 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : epilepsy * mitochondrial dysfunction * neurodegeneration Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.025, year: 2012

  7. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Anni, H.; Dráber, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2013), s. 216-227 ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : gliomas * mitochondrial dysfunction * microtubule proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.883, year: 2013

  8. Laryngeal Dysfunction: Assessment and Management for the Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, James H; Backer, Vibeke; Gibson, Peter G; Fowler, Stephen J

    2016-11-01

    The larynx is one of the most highly innervated organs in humans and serves a number of vitally important, complex, and highly evolved biological functions. On a day-to-day basis, the larynx functions autonomously, addressing several roles including airway protection, swallowing, and phonation. In some situations the larynx appears to adopt a functional state that could be considered maladaptive or "dysfunctional." This laryngeal dysfunction can underpin and account for a number of respiratory symptoms that otherwise appear incongruous with a clinical disease state and/or contribute to the development of symptoms that appear "refractory" to treatment. These include conditions associated with a heightened tendency for inappropriate laryngeal closure (e.g., inducible laryngeal obstruction), voice disturbance, and chronic cough. Recognition of laryngeal dysfunction is important to deliver targeted treatment and failure to recognize the condition can lead to repeated use of inappropriate treatment. Diagnosis is not straightforward, however, and many patients appear to present with symptoms attributable to laryngeal dysfunction, but in whom the diagnosis has been overlooked in clinical work-up for some time. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in the field of laryngeal dysfunction, with a focus on pragmatic clinical assessment and management.

  9. Bicycle riding and erectile dysfunction: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Frank; Goldstein, Irwin; Korda, Joanna Beate

    2010-07-01

    For many years, reports in the literature have implicated bicycle riding as causing increased risk of erectile dysfunction (ED). Perineal compression during cycling has been associated with the development of sexual complications. To review current literature on the rationale for ED from bicycle riding and outcome of bicycle riding on erectile function and to present available research on preventative measures specifically regarding bicycle riding. A systematic comprehensive literature review. There is a significant relationship between cycling-induced perineal compression leading to vascular, endothelial, and neurogenic dysfunction in men and the development of ED. Research on female bicyclists is very limited but indicates the same impairment as in male bicyclists. Preventative measures including use of a properly fitted bicycle, a riding style with a suitable seat position and an appropriate bicycle seat can help prevent impairment of erectile function. There is a need for further research on safe bicycle and bicycle seat design and investigations that address the underlying mechanisms leading to cycling-related sexual dysfunction in both male and female bicyclists.

  10. Integrating Autonomous Load Controllers in Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglass, Philip James

    these drawbacks, two mitigation strategies are proposed, each of which add valuable services in addition to preventing the above mentioned problems. The first strategy to address time constraints is to operate a synchronous power system at off-nominal frequencies in discrete domains, thus limiting unintended...... and analysis have revealed potential drawbacks of high penetrations of autonomous frequency-sensitive loads: time constraints on the underlying processes which reduce the frequency response, and violations of voltage constraints in the distribution systems arising from synchronized loads. Addressing...... state changes of frequency-sensitive loads. The effect of operating in discrete frequency domains is to dispatch frequency-sensitive loads. Large synchronous machines can only change their frequency setpoint slowly, greatly limiting the rate of change of dispatch symbols. However, energy sources...

  11. Connected and autonomous vehicles 2040 vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) commissioned a one-year project, Connected and Autonomous : Vehicles 2040 Vision, with researchers at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) to assess the implications of connected and : autonomous ve...

  12. Energy homeostasis, autonomic activity and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, AJW; Balkan, B; Nyakas, C; vanDijk, G; Steffens, AB; Bohus, B

    1995-01-01

    Obesity is often accompanied by alterations in both sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic functions. The present paper summarizes the results of a number of studies designed to investigate autonomic functioning in normal, genetically, and experimentally obese rats, Particular emphasis is given

  13. Curcumin attenuates surgery-induced cognitive dysfunction in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang; Chen, Huixin; Huang, Chunhui; Gu, Xinmei; Wang, Jialing; Xu, Dilin; Yu, Xin; Shuai, Chu; Chen, Liping; Li, Shun; Xu, Yiguo; Gao, Tao; Ye, Mingrui; Su, Wei; Liu, Haixiong; Zhang, Jinrong; Wang, Chuang; Chen, Junping; Wang, Qinwen; Cui, Wei

    2017-06-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with elderly patients undergoing surgery. However, pharmacological treatments for POCD are limited. In this study, we found that curcumin, an active compound derived from Curcuma longa, ameliorated the cognitive dysfunction following abdominal surgery in aged mice. Further, curcumin prevented surgery-induced anti-oxidant enzyme activity. Curcumin also increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-positive area and expression of pAkt in the brain, suggesting that curcumin activated BDNF signaling in aged mice. Furthermore, curcumin neutralized cholinergic dysfunction involving choline acetyltransferase expression induced by surgery. These results strongly suggested that curcumin prevented cognitive impairments via multiple targets, possibly by increasing the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes, activation of BDNF signaling, and neutralization of cholinergic dysfunction, concurrently. Based on these novel findings, curcumin might be a potential agent in POCD prophylaxis and treatment.

  14. Dietary calcium supplementation in adult rats reverts brown adipose tissue dysfunction programmed by postnatal early overfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Ellen Paula Santos; Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Oliveira, Elaine; Guarda, Deysla Sabino; Figueiredo, Mariana Sarto; Quitete, Fernanda Torres; Calvino, Camila; Miranda, Rosiane Aparecida; Mathias, Paulo Cezar Freitas; Manhães, Alex Christian; Lisboa, Patricia Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) dysfunction is associated with obesity and its comorbidities, such as hypertension, and the improvement of BAT function seems important for obesity management. Here we investigated the effects of dietary calcium supplementation on BAT autonomic nerve activity, sympathoadrenal function and cardiovascular parameters in adult obese rats that were raised in small litters (SL group). Three days after birth, SL litters were adjusted to three pups to induce early overfeeding. The control group remained with 10 pups/litter until weaning (NL group). At PN120, the SL group was randomly divided into the following: rats fed with standard chow (SL) and rats fed with dietary calcium carbonate supplementation (SL-Ca, 10g/kg chow). Animals were killed either at PN120 or PN180. At both ages, SL rats had higher BAT autonomic nervous system activity, mass and adipocyte area, as well as increased heart rate and blood pressure (systolic and diastolic); 2 months of calcium supplementation normalized these parameters. At PN180 only, UCP1 and TRβ1 in BAT were decreased in SL rats. These changes were also prevented by calcium treatment. Also at PN180, the SL group presented higher tyrosine hydroxylase and adrenal catecholamine contents, as well as lower hypothalamic POMC and MC4R contents. Calcium supplementation did not revert these alterations. Thus, we demonstrated that dietary calcium supplementation was able to improve cardiovascular parameters and BAT thermogenesis capacity in adult animals that were early overfed during lactation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. CORRECTION OF PSYCHO-AUTONOMIC DISORDERS IN WOMEN WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION DURING POSTMENOPAUSAL PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Semenkova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess an efficacy of adaptol in women with arterial hypertension (HT during postmenopausal period.Material and methods. Postmenopausal women (n=60 with HT were examined. Patients of the active group (n=30 received adaptol 500 mg BID during 2 months additionally to basic antihypertensive therapy with enalapril and hydrochlorothiazide (Renipril HT. Patients of control group (n=30 received only basic therapy. Clinical conditions, anxiety level, autonomic dysfunction, quality of life (QoL were estimated.Results. Addition of adaptol to the antihypertensive therapy improved one’s well-being and QoL, reduced anxiety level and autonomic dysfunction.Conclusions. Some advantages of therapy including adaptol were found in postmenopausal women with HT.

  16. [Autonomic nervous system alteration in multiple sclerosis patients with urinary symptoms. Clinical, urodynamic and cardiovascular study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarenco, G; Raibaut, P; Hubeaux, K; Jousse, M; Sheikh Ismaël, S; Lapeyre, E

    2013-12-01

    To assess symptoms related to autonomic nervous system alteration in a population of patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS) and presenting with urinary symptoms. We investigated 65 patients (mean age 47.5 years) suffering from MS, and presenting with urological dysfunction by means of symptom scores, urodynamic investigation, cardiovascular autonomic function tests (orthostatic hypotension testing, Valsalva test, deep breath test, cold pressor test) and sympathetic skin responses. Forty-five (69%) patients suffered from overactive bladder, 48 (73%) from voiding dysfunction, 14 (21%) from urinary retention and 13 (20%) from fecal incontinence. Urodynamic investigation demonstrated overactive detrusor in 46 (70%) cases, and underactive detrusor in four (6%) cases. Twenty-five (38%) patients had dysautonomia without correlation neither with clinical or urodynamic data, nor gravity of multiple sclerosis (EDSS). In this series, the prevalence of dysautonomia was high in patients suffering from MS and presenting with urinary disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Autonomic and inflammatory consequences of posttraumatic stress disorder and the link to cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudey, Chevelle; Park, Jeanie; Wiaderkiewicz, Jan; Kobayashi, Ihori; Mellman, Thomas A; Marvar, Paul J

    2015-08-15

    Stress- and anxiety-related disorders are on the rise in both military and general populations. Over the next decade, it is predicted that treatment of these conditions, in particular, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), along with its associated long-term comorbidities, will challenge the health care system. Multiple organ systems are adversely affected by PTSD, and PTSD is linked to cancer, arthritis, digestive disease, and cardiovascular disease. Evidence for a strong link between PTSD and cardiovascular disease is compelling, and this review describes current clinical data linking PTSD to cardiovascular disease, via inflammation, autonomic dysfunction, and the renin-angiotensin system. Recent clinical and preclinical evidence regarding the role of the renin-angiotensin system in the extinction of fear memory and relevance in PTSD-related immune and autonomic dysfunction is also addressed. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Hazard Map for Autonomous Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels

    This dissertation describes the work performed in the area of using image analysis in the process of landing a spacecraft autonomously and safely on the surface of the Moon. This is suggested to be done using a Hazard Map. The correspondence problem between several Hazard Maps are investigated...

  19. Computing architecture for autonomous microgrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-09-29

    A computing architecture that facilitates autonomously controlling operations of a microgrid is described herein. A microgrid network includes numerous computing devices that execute intelligent agents, each of which is assigned to a particular entity (load, source, storage device, or switch) in the microgrid. The intelligent agents can execute in accordance with predefined protocols to collectively perform computations that facilitate uninterrupted control of the .

  20. Dysfunctions in public psychiatric bureaucracies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, L R

    1988-03-01

    The author describes common dysfunctions in public psychiatric organizations according to the model of bureaucracy articulated by Max Weber. Dysfunctions are divided into the categories of goal displacement, outside interference, unclear authority structure and hierarchy, and informal relations in the work place. The author emphasizes the bureaucratic nature of public psychiatry and the need for mental health professionals to understand the dysfunctions of the organizations in which they work, including the impact of these dysfunctions on the provision of quality care.

  1. Autonomous Duffing-Holmes Type Chaotic Oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamaševičius, A.; Bumelienė, S.; Kirvaitis, R.

    2009-01-01

    We have designed and built a novel Duffing type autonomous 3rd-order chaotic oscillator. In comparison with the common non-autonomous DuffingHolmes type oscillator the autonomous circuit has an internal positive feedback loop instead of an external periodic drive source. In addition...

  2. CAAD: Computer Architecture for Autonomous Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shaoshan; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Zhe; Gaudiot, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    We describe the computing tasks involved in autonomous driving, examine existing autonomous driving computing platform implementations. To enable autonomous driving, the computing stack needs to simultaneously provide high performance, low power consumption, and low thermal dissipation, at low cost. We discuss possible approaches to design computing platforms that will meet these needs.

  3. Parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction, as identified by pupil light reflex, and its possible connection to hearing impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yang; Zekveld, Adriana A.; Naylor, Graham; Ohlenforst, Barbara; Jansma, Elise P.; Lorens, Artur; Lunner, Thomas; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2016-01-01

    Context\\ud Although the pupil light reflex has been widely used as a clinical diagnostic tool for autonomic nervous system dysfunction, there is no systematic review available to summarize the evidence that the pupil light reflex is a sensitive method to detect parasympathetic dysfunction. Meanwhile, the relationship between parasympathetic functioning and hearing impairment is relatively unknown.\\ud \\ud Objectives\\ud To 1) review the evidence for the pupil light reflex being a sensitive meth...

  4. Evaluation of autonomic nervous system function in children with overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Aysegul Dogan; Gursoy, Azize Esra; Goknar, Nilufer; Uzuner, Selcuk; Ozkaya, Emin; Erenberk, Ufuk; Vehapoglu, Aysel; Dundaroz, Mehmet Rusen; Oktem, Faruk

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the autonomic nervous system activity in children with overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. Included in the study were 40 children with overactive bladder and 28 healthy controls. Autonomic tests were performed on all participants, including heart rate interval variation (RRIV), heart rate response to valsalva maneuver, and sympathetic skin response (SSR). Mean valsalva rates in the overactive bladder and control groups were 1.53 ± 0.29 and 1.30 ± 0.18, respectively, a statistically significant difference (P  0.05). This study demonstrated a parasympathetic hyperactivity in children with OAB, results suggesting a dysfunction in their autonomic nervous systems. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:673-676, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hormonal and cardiovascular reflex assessment in a female patient with pure autonomic failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Heno Ferreira

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 72-year-old female with pure autonomic failure, a rare entity, whose diagnosis of autonomic dysfunction was determined with a series of complementary tests. For approximately 2 years, the patient has been experiencing dizziness and a tendency to fall, a significant weight loss, generalized weakness, dysphagia, intestinal constipation, blurred vision, dry mouth, and changes in her voice. She underwent clinical assessment and laboratory tests (biochemical tests, chest X-ray, digestive endoscopy, colonoscopy, chest computed tomography, abdomen and pelvis computed tomography, abdominal ultrasound, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Measurements of catecholamine and plasmatic renin activity were performed at rest and after physical exercise. Finally the patient underwent physiological and pharmacological autonomic tests that better diagnosed dysautonomia.

  6. Cardiac autonomic modulation induced by doxorubicin in a rodent model of colorectal cancer and the influence of fullerenol pretreatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejka Potočnik

    Full Text Available The very effective anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX is known to have cardiotoxic side effects, which could be accompanied by autonomic modulation. Autonomic disbalance might even be an initiating mechanism underlying DOX-induced cardiotoxicity and can be studied noninvasively by the analysis of heart rate variability (HRV. A number of strategies have been assessed to predict chemotherapy-induced cardiac dysfunction while HRV, a potential detecting tool, has not yet been tested. Thus, we aimed to determine the effect of DOX treatment on HRV in a rat model of colorectal cancer. While pretreatment with fullerenol (Frl acts protectively on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, we aimed to test the effect of Frl pretreatment on DOX-induced HRV alterations. After the induction of colorectal cancer, adult male Wistar rats were treated with saline (n = 7, DOX (1.5 mg/kg per week, n = 7 or DOX after pretreatment with Frl (25 mg/kg per week, n = 7 for three weeks (cumulative DOX dose 4.5 mg/kg. One week after treatment rats were anaesthetized, standard ECG was measured and HRV was analyzed in time and frequency domain. During autopsy the intestines and hearts were gathered for biochemical analysis and histopathological examination. DOX treatment significantly decreased parasympathetically mediated high-frequency component (p<0.05 and increased the low-frequency component of HRV (p<0.05, resulting in an increased LF/HF ratio (p<0.05 in cancerous rats. When pretreated with Frl, DOX-induced HRV alterations were prevented: the high-frequency component of HRV increased (p<0.01, the low-frequency decreased (p<0.01, LF/HF ratio decreased consequently (p<0.01 compared to DOX only treatment. In all DOX-treated animals, disbalance of oxidative status in heart tissue and early myocardial lesions were found and were significantly reduced in rats receiving Frl pretreatment. Autonomic modulation accompanied the development of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity in rat model of colorectal

  7. Diaphragm Dysfunction in Mechanically Ventilated Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dot, Irene; Pérez-Teran, Purificación; Samper, Manuel-Andrés; Masclans, Joan-Ramon

    2017-03-01

    Muscle involvement is found in most critical patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Diaphragmatic muscle alteration, initially included in this category, has been differentiated in recent years, and a specific type of muscular dysfunction has been shown to occur in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. We found this muscle dysfunction to appear in this subgroup of patients shortly after the start of mechanical ventilation, observing it to be mainly associated with certain control modes, and also with sepsis and/or multi-organ failure. Although the specific etiology of process is unknown, the muscle presents oxidative stress and mitochondrial changes. These cause changes in protein turnover, resulting in atrophy and impaired contractility, and leading to impaired functionality. The term 'ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction' was first coined by Vassilakopoulos et al. in 2004, and this phenomenon, along with injury cause by over-distention of the lung and barotrauma, represents a challenge in the daily life of ventilated patients. Diaphragmatic dysfunction affects prognosis by delaying extubation, prolonging hospital stay, and impairing the quality of life of these patients in the years following hospital discharge. Ultrasound, a non-invasive technique that is readily available in most ICUs, could be used to diagnose this condition promptly, thus preventing delays in starting rehabilitation and positively influencing prognosis in these patients. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. [Thyroid dysfunction and amiodarone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jandira; Carvalho, Patrícia; Molina, M Auxiliadora; Rebelo, Marta; Dias, Patrícia; Vieira, José Diniz; Costa, José M Nascimento

    2013-02-01

    Although most patients remain clinically euthyroid, some develop amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism (HPEAI) or hypothyroidism (HPOAI). The authors present a retrospective analysis of ten patients with amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction. Six patients were female and mean amiodarone intake was 17.7 months. HPOIA was more common (six patients). From all the patients with HPEAI, two had type 2, one had type 1, and one had type 3 hyperthyroidism. Symptoms suggestive of thyroid dysfunction occurred in five patients, most of them with HPOAI. In HPEAI, the most frequent symptom was exacerbation of arrhythmia (three patients). Discontinuation of amiodarone and treatment with levothyroxine was chosen in 83.3% of the HPOAI cases, while thyonamide treatment with corticosteroids and without amiodarone was the option in 75% of the HPEAI cases. There were three deaths, all in patients with HPEAI. HPEAI is potentially fatal. The clinical picture may be vague, so the thyroid monitoring is mandatory.

  9. Autonomic nervous system and lipid metabolism: findings in anxious-depressive spectrum and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistorio, Elisabetta; Luca, Maria; Luca, Antonina; Messina, Vincenzo; Calandra, Carmela

    2011-10-28

    To correlate lipid metabolism and autonomic dysfunction with anxious-depressive spectrum and eating disorders. To propose the lipid index (LI) as a new possible biomarker. 95 patients and 60 controls were enrolled from the University Psychiatry Unit of Catania and from general practitioners (GPs). The patients were divided into four pathological groups: Anxiety, Depression, Anxious-Depressive Disorder and Eating Disorders [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) official/appendix criteria]. The levels of the cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoproteins A and B were determined. The LI, for each subject, was obtained through a mathematical operation on the values of the cholesterol and triglycerides levels compared with the maximum cut-off of the general population. The autonomic functioning was tested with Ewing battery tests. Particularly, the correlation between heart rate variability (HRV) and lipid metabolism has been investigated. Pathological and control groups, compared among each other, presented some peculiarities in the lipid metabolism and the autonomic dysfunction scores. In addition, a statistically significant correlation has been found between HRV and lipid metabolism. Lipid metabolism and autonomic functioning seem to be related to the discussed psychiatric disorders. LI, in addition, could represent a new possible biomarker to be considered.

  10. Autonomic nervous system and lipid metabolism: findings in anxious-depressive spectrum and eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messina Vincenzo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To correlate lipid metabolism and autonomic dysfunction with anxious-depressive spectrum and eating disorders. To propose the lipid index (LI as a new possible biomarker. Methods 95 patients and 60 controls were enrolled from the University Psychiatry Unit of Catania and from general practitioners (GPs. The patients were divided into four pathological groups: Anxiety, Depression, Anxious-Depressive Disorder and Eating Disorders [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR official/appendix criteria]. The levels of the cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoproteins A and B were determined. The LI, for each subject, was obtained through a mathematical operation on the values of the cholesterol and triglycerides levels compared with the maximum cut-off of the general population. The autonomic functioning was tested with Ewing battery tests. Particularly, the correlation between heart rate variability (HRV and lipid metabolism has been investigated. Results Pathological and control groups, compared among each other, presented some peculiarities in the lipid metabolism and the autonomic dysfunction scores. In addition, a statistically significant correlation has been found between HRV and lipid metabolism. Conclusions Lipid metabolism and autonomic functioning seem to be related to the discussed psychiatric disorders. LI, in addition, could represent a new possible biomarker to be considered.

  11. Baicalein Prevents 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in SH-SY5Y Cells via Inhibition of Mitochondrial Oxidation and Up-Regulation of DJ-1 Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Hua Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA neurons at the substantia nigra. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the mechanism of cell damage in Parkinson’s disease (PD. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA is a dopamine analog which specifically damages dopaminergic neurons. Baicalein has been previously reported to have potential in the treatment of PD. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of action of baicalein against 6-OHDA injury in SH-SY5Y cells. The results showed that baicalein significantly alleviated alterations of mitochondrial redox activity and mitochondrial membrane potential induced by 6-OHDA in a dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y cells compared with vehicle group. Futhermore, baicalein decreased the production of ROS and upregulated the DJ-1 protein expression in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, baicalein also inhibited ROS production and lipid peroxidation (IC50 = 6.32 ± 0.03 μM in rat brain mitochondia. In summary, the underlying mechanisms of baicalein against 6-OHDA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction may involve inhibition of mitochondrial oxidation and upregulation of DJ-1 protein expression.

  12. Analysis of Heart Rate Variability and Cardiac Autonomic Nerve Remodeling in Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Jiang, Y-H; Jiang, P; Lin, H-Q; Yang, J-L; Ma, D-f; Wang, X; Yang, C-H

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with both cardiovascular and autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) can be used to monitor changes in response to autonomic innervation and stimulation of the heart. In this study, conducted in a rat model of diabetes, HRV and changes in associated neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors in the right atrium (RA) were monitored. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg) in male Wistar rats, and HRV data were collected for 10 weeks by telemetry. Time and frequency domains of HRV data were analyzed using established metrics. The levels of various neural enzymes in the RA were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence to characterize autonomic nerve remodeling. Insulin and methycobal were used to block the effects of STZ. HRV parameters reflecting parasympathetic tone (SDNN, RMSSD and HF domains) sharply decreased in the first 3 weeks after STZ administration; measures of sympathetic tone (SDANN) increased. After a series of adjustments, cardiac autonomic nerve innervation reached a new equilibrium, with a dominance of sympathetic tone. RA levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) increased, and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) decreased, indicating autonomic nerve remodeling. Levels of growth associated protein-43 (GAP43) and nerve growth factor (NGF) increased during the period of diabetes-induced cardiac-nerve damage; however, the level of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) decreased. The physical condition and indexes of rats were normalized in different degree after administration of the insulin and methycobal, but not completely recovered. STZ-induced diabetes was associated with cardiac autonomic nerve dysfunction at both the organ and molecular levels. Parasympathetic nerves exhibited severe damage and/or weak recovery; remodeling of sympathetic nerves predominated during 10-weeks of STZ-induced diabetes. © Georg Thieme Verlag

  13. The Role of the Autonomic Nervous System in the Pathophysiology of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Guarino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions globally and represents a major cause of comorbidities, mostly related to cardiovascular disease. The autonomic nervous system (ANS dysfunction has a two-way relationship with obesity. Indeed, alterations of the ANS might be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity, acting on different pathways. On the other hand, the excess weight induces ANS dysfunction, which may be involved in the haemodynamic and metabolic alterations that increase the cardiovascular risk of obese individuals, i.e., hypertension, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. This article will review current evidence about the role of the ANS in short-term and long-term regulation of energy homeostasis. Furthermore, an increased sympathetic activity has been demonstrated in obese patients, particularly in the muscle vasculature and in the kidneys, possibily contributing to increased cardiovascular risk. Selective leptin resistance, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, hyperinsulinemia and low ghrelin levels are possible mechanisms underlying sympathetic activation in obesity. Weight loss is able to reverse metabolic and autonomic alterations associated with obesity. Given the crucial role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathophysiology of obesity and its cardiovascular complications, vagal nerve modulation and sympathetic inhibition may serve as therapeutic targets in this condition.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Aline Haas; Costa, Ana Beatriz; Engel, Jéssica Della Giustina; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza

    2018-01-01

    Obesity leads to various changes in the body. Among them, the existing inflammatory process may lead to an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, in turn, can trigger mitochondrial changes, which is called mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, excess nutrients supply (as it commonly is the case with obesity) can overwhelm the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain, causing a mitochondrial dysfunction, and lead to a higher ROS formation. This increase in ROS production by the respiratory chain may also cause oxidative stress, which may exacerbate the inflammatory process in obesity. All these intracellular changes can lead to cellular apoptosis. These processes have been described in obesity as occurring mainly in peripheral tissues. However, some studies have already shown that obesity is also associated with changes in the central nervous system (CNS), with alterations in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and in cerebral structures such as hypothalamus and hippocampus. In this sense, this review presents a general view about mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity, including related alterations, such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis, and focusing on the whole organism, covering alterations in peripheral tissues, BBB, and CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Walter S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Working on the ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations) project I have had the opportunity to add functionality to the physics simulation software known as KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), create a new application allowing WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) creation of KATE schematic files and begin a preliminary design and implementation of a new subsystem that will provide vision services on the IHM (Integrated Health Management) bus. The functionality I added to KATE over the past few months includes a dynamic visual representation of the fluid height in a pipe based on number of gallons of fluid in the pipe and implementing the IHM bus connection within KATE. I also fixed a broken feature in the system called the Browser Display, implemented many bug fixes and made changes to the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

  16. Autonomic computing enabled cooperative networked design

    CERN Document Server

    Wodczak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the concept of autonomic computing driven cooperative networked system design from an architectural perspective. As such it leverages and capitalises on the relevant advancements in both the realms of autonomic computing and networking by welding them closely together. In particular, a multi-faceted Autonomic Cooperative System Architectural Model is defined which incorporates the notion of Autonomic Cooperative Behaviour being orchestrated by the Autonomic Cooperative Networking Protocol of a cross-layer nature. The overall proposed solution not only advocates for the inc

  17. Sexual and urinary dysfunction following laparoscopic total mesorectal excision in male patients: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak George

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Even with the use of nerve-sparing techniques, there is a risk of bladder and sexual dysfunction after total mesorectal excision (TME. Laparoscopic TME is believed to improve this autonomic nerve dysfunction, but this is not demonstrated conclusively in the literature. In Indian patients generally, the stage at which the patients present is late and presumably the risk of autonomic nerve injury is more; however, there is no published data in this respect. Materials and Methods: This prospective study in male patients who underwent laparoscopic TME evaluated the bladder and sexual dysfunction using objective standardised scores, measuring residual urine and post-voided volume. The International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS and International Index of Erectile Function score were used respectively to assess the bladder and sexual dysfunction preoperatively at 1, 3, 6 months and at 1 year. Results: Mean age of the study group was 58 years. After laparoscopic TME in male patients, the moderate to severe bladder dysfunction (IPSS <8 is observed in 20.4% of patients at 3 months, and at mean follow-up of 9.2 months, it was seen only in 2.9%. There is more bladder and sexual dysfunction in low rectal tumours compared to mid-rectal tumours. At 3 months, 75% had sexual dysfunction, 55% at median follow-up of the group at 9.2 months. Conclusion: After laparoscopic TME, bladder dysfunction is seen in one-fifth of the patients, which recovers in the next 6 months to 1 year. Sexual dysfunction is observed in 75% of patients immediately after TME which improves to 55% over 9.2 months.

  18. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  19. Heart rate responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by structural alterations and dysfunction in central autonomic regulatory regions, which may impair dynamic and static cardiovascular regulation, and contribute to other syndrome pathologies. Characterizing cardiovascular responses to autonomic challenges may provide insights into central nervous system impairments, including contributions by sex, since structural alterations are enhanced in OSA females over males. The objective was to assess heart rate responses in OSA versus healthy control subjects to autonomic challenges, and, separately, characterize female and male patterns. We studied 94 subjects, including 37 newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (6 female, age mean ± std: 52.1 ± 8.1 years; 31 male aged 54.3 ± 8.4 years, and 57 healthy control subjects (20 female, 50.5 ± 8.1 years; 37 male, 45.6 ± 9.2 years. We measured instantaneous heart rate with pulse oximetry during cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. All challenges elicited significant heart rate differences between OSA and control groups during and after challenges (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. In post-hoc analyses, OSA females showed greater impairments than OSA males, which included: for cold pressor, lower initial increase (OSA vs. control: 9.5 vs. 7.3 bpm in females, 7.6 vs. 3.7 bpm in males, OSA delay to initial peak (2.5 s females/0.9 s males, slower mid-challenge rate-of-increase (OSA vs. control: -0.11 vs. 0.09 bpm/s in females, 0.03 vs. 0.06 bpm/s in males; for hand grip, lower initial peak (OSA vs. control: 2.6 vs. 4.6 bpm in females, 5.3 vs. 6.0 bpm in males; for Valsalva maneuver, lower Valsalva ratio (OSA vs. control: 1.14 vs. 1.30 in females, 1.29 vs. 1.34 in males, and OSA delay during phase II (0.68 s females/1.31 s males. Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset, and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in

  20. Autonomous Agents as Artistic Collaborators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadish, David

    In this paper, I ask whether it is possible to exert creative direction on the emergence of large scale patterns from the actions of autonomous or semi-autonomous actors. As an artist and an engineer, I undertake installations and projects with an intent to create, to make art or innovative...... structures. At the same time, one of my artistic interests is in ceding a great deal of creative control to a cluster of robotic actors, in the process interrogating the lack of control that we, as a species, exert over the world. Here, I explore this idea in the context of an ongoing project called...... which innovations at large (galactic systems) and small (DNA) scales emerged were happy accidents of physics and chemistry. This raises the fundamental questions that my work explores, interrogating the relationship between the creativity of emergent processes on the micro- and macro- scales...

  1. Health, autonomic financing and transferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cantarero Prieto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper has as objective to study the whole relative problem to the autonomous communities and regional heath care expenditure financing in Spain. This article has a dual purpose. First, the financing of the current health care attendance is approached in the Spanish regions passing magazine to its possible variants and we observe that the balance of our system is clearly inclined towards the side of the integration in the general pattern of financing («Fiscal Room» with specific conditions («Mixed System». Secondly, we examine the new situation in the mark of health care and its corresponding financing in the new model approved in 2001, in terms of the effects of tax assignment on autonomous communities.

  2. Autonomously managed high power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, D.J.; Bechtel, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The need for autonomous power management capabilities will increase as the power levels of spacecraft increase into the multi-100 kW range. The quantity of labor intensive ground and crew support consumed by the 9 kW Skylab cannot be afforded in support of a 75-300 kW Space Station or high power earth orbital and interplanetary spacecraft. Marshall Space Flight Center is managing a program to develop necessary technologies for high power system autonomous management. To date a reference electrical power system and automation approaches have been defined. A test facility for evaluation and verification of management algorithms and hardware has been designed with the first of the three power channel capability nearing completion

  3. Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilshøj, Mads; Bøgh, Simon; Nielsen, Oluf Skov

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper investiga......Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper......; sustainability, configuration, adaptation, autonomy, positioning, manipulation and grasping, robot-robot interaction, human-robot interaction, process quality, dependability, and physical properties. Findings - The concise yet comprehensive review provides both researchers (academia) and practitioners (industry...... Manipulation (AIMM)....

  4. Autonomic computing meets SCADA security

    OpenAIRE

    Nazir, S; Patel, S; Patel, D

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 IEEE. National assets such as transportation networks, large manufacturing, business and health facilities, power generation, and distribution networks are critical infrastructures. The cyber threats to these infrastructures have increasingly become more sophisticated, extensive and numerous. Cyber security conventional measures have proved useful in the past but increasing sophistication of attacks dictates the need for newer measures. The autonomic computing paradigm mimics the auton...

  5. Semi autonomous mine detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas Few; Roelof Versteeg; Herman Herman

    2010-04-01

    CMMAD is a risk reduction effort for the AMDS program. As part of CMMAD, multiple instances of semi autonomous robotic mine detection systems were created. Each instance consists of a robotic vehicle equipped with sensors required for navigation and marking, a countermine sensors and a number of integrated software packages which provide for real time processing of the countermine sensor data as well as integrated control of the robotic vehicle, the sensor actuator and the sensor. These systems were used to investigate critical interest functions (CIF) related to countermine robotic systems. To address the autonomy CIF, the INL developed RIK was extended to allow for interaction with a mine sensor processing code (MSPC). In limited field testing this system performed well in detecting, marking and avoiding both AT and AP mines. Based on the results of the CMMAD investigation we conclude that autonomous robotic mine detection is feasible. In addition, CMMAD contributed critical technical advances with regard to sensing, data processing and sensor manipulation, which will advance the performance of future fieldable systems. As a result, no substantial technical barriers exist which preclude – from an autonomous robotic perspective – the rapid development and deployment of fieldable systems.

  6. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko eNagai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in Epilepsy and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS. In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g. syncope, or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP. Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of epileptic seizures is largely overlooked. Emotional stimuli such as anxiety and stress are potent causes of seizures and tic activity in TS, respectively. This manuscript will describe a possible neural mechanism by which afferent autonomic projections linked to cognition and behaviour influence central nervous system thalamo-cortical regulation, which appears to be an important means for controlling both seizure and tic activity. It also summarizes the link between the integrity of the default mode network and autonomic regulation in patients with epilepsy as well as the link between impaired motor control and autonomic regulation in patients with TS. Two neurological conditions; epilepsy and TS were chosen, as seizures and tics represent parameters that can be easily measured to investigate influences of autonomic functions. The EDA biofeedback approach is anticipated

  7. Diastolic dysfunction in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Wiese, Signe Skovgaard; Halgreen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    stiffness of the cirrhotic heart may decrease the compliance and result in DD. The prevalence of DD in cirrhotic patients averages about 50 %. It can be evaluated by transmitral Doppler echocardiography, tissue Doppler echocardiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. There seems to be a relation...... between DD and the severity of liver dysfunction and the presence of ascites. After liver transplantation, DD worsens the prognosis and increases the risk of graft rejection, but DD improves after few months. Insertion of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt increases left ventricular diastolic...

  8. A STUDY ON CARDIOVASCULAR AUTONOMIC FUNCTIONS IN CAREGIVERS OF STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghouse Mubarak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stroke (cerebrovascular accident is an important cause of disability in countries like India and longterm care of these bedridden patients is usually undertaken by the family members. A caregiver is a person who takes responsibility for those who cannot completely care for themselves. Taking care of a chronically ill member in the family usually causes stress to the caregiver causing disturbances in the autonomic function. Thus, the present study is undertaken to find out the effect of longterm caregiving on cardiovascular autonomic functions in a caregiver. MATERIALS AND METHODS 57 caregivers of post-stroke bedridden patients, both male and female, were included in this longitudinal study. Parasympathetic activity was assessed by observing the heart rate changes to immediate standing from lying down position, heart rate changes during deep breathing and heart rate changes during Valsalva manoeuvre. Sympathetic activity was assessed by observing blood pressure changes on immediate standing from lying down position and blood pressure changes during sustained hand grip. RESULTS The results of the present study showed statistically significant decrease in Valsalva ratio, decrease in the heart rate following deep breathing and statistically significant increase in systolic blood pressure in response to immediate standing suggestive of autonomic imbalance. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that longterm caregiving is accompanied by dysfunction of the cardiac autonomic nervous system, and these individuals are more prone to autonomic neuropathy.

  9. Osteopontin and osteoprotegerin levels in type 2 diabetes and their association with cardiovascular autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maser, Raelene E; Lenhard, M James; Pohlig, Ryan T; Balagopal, P Babu

    2016-04-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) are bone metabolism biomarkers potentially associated with nerve function. We evaluated the association of cardiovascular autonomic nerve function, OPN, and OPG in 50 individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). RR-variation during deep breathing (i.e., mean circular resultant (MCR) and expiration/inspiration (E/I) ratio) was used to assess parasympathetic nerve function. Participants' demographics, HbA1c, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), BMI, HOMA-IR, calcium, parathyroid hormone, creatinine, OPN, and OPG were determined. Using stepwise multiple linear regression analysis with MCR or E/I ratio as the dependent variable, OPN was independently associated with reduced autonomic function. A previous report showed a significant association of cardiovascular autonomic function with age, 25(OH)D insufficiency, and the interaction of age×25(OH)D insufficiency. Here we report a novel association for OPN and its interaction with age indicating that for those who are younger, elevated OPN levels are related to a greater loss of autonomic function (MCR model R2=0.598, p<0.001; E/I model R2=0.594, p<0.001). Our results suggest that OPN is associated with reduced parasympathetic function, particularly in younger individuals with T2DM. Further studies are needed to determine if OPN is neuroprotective, involved in the pathogenesis of autonomic dysfunction, or a bystander. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy, estimated cardiovascular risk, and circadian blood pressure pattern in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas-Cerrato, Jose; Hermida, Ramon Carmelo; Cabezas-Agricola, Jose Manuel; Ayala, Diana Elva

    2009-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate potential factors involved in the disruption of the circadian blood pressure (BP) pattern in diabetes mellitus, as well as the relation between BP, cardiac autonomic neuropathy, and estimated cardiovascular risk. We studied 101 diabetic patients (58% with type 2 diabetes; 59% men), age 21-65 yrs, evaluated by 48 h BP monitoring. We performed three autonomic tests in a single session: deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, and standing up from a seated position. Patients were classified according to the number of abnormal tests and their 10 yr risk of coronary heart disease or stroke. The prevalence of non-dipping 24 h patterning ranged from 47.6% in type 1 to 42.4% in type 2 diabetes. The awake/asleep ratio of systolic BP (SBP) was comparable between patients with or without abnormal autonomic tests. Pulse pressure (PP) was significantly higher in patients with > or =1 abnormal autonomic test (p risk of coronary heart disease (p Patients with higher stroke-risk had higher SBP but lower diastolic BP, and thus an elevated ambulatory PP by 9 mmHg, compared to those with lower risk (p diabetes mellitus. The most significant finding from this study is the high ambulatory PP found in patients with either cardiac autonomic dysfunction or high risk for coronary heart disease or stroke. After correcting for age, this elevated PP level emerged as the main cardiovascular risk factor in diabetes mellitus.

  11. Continuous Cardiac Autonomic and Hemodynamic Responses to Isometric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Katrina A; Wiles, Jonathan D; Coleman, Damian D; Sharma, Rajan; Oʼdriscoll, Jamie M

    2017-08-01

    Elevated arterial blood pressure (BP) is associated with autonomic dysfunction and impaired hemodynamic control mechanisms. Isometric exercise (IE) training has been demonstrated effective at reducing BP; however, the continuous cardiovascular responses during IE are underinvestigated. We hypothesized that reflex autonomic cardiovascular control is an important mediator in reducing BP. To test our hypothesis, we investigated continuous cardiac autonomic modulation and baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) in response to IE. Twenty-five prehypertensive participants performed a single IE wall squat training session. Total power spectral density (PSD) of HR variability (HRV) and associated low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) power spectral components were recorded in absolute (ms) and normalized units (nu) before, during, and after an IE session. HR was recorded via electrocardiography and BRS via the sequence method. Continuous BP was recorded via the vascular unloading technique and stroke volume via impedance cardiography. Total peripheral resistance was calculated according to Ohm's law. During IE, there were significant reductions in HRV (P < 0.05) and BRS (P < 0.05) and significant increases in HR (P < 0.001), systolic, diastolic, and mean BP (all P < 0.001). In recovery from IE, HRV (P < 0.001), HFnu (P < 0.001), and BRS (P < 0.001) significantly increased with a significant decrease in LFnu (P < 0.001) and LF:HF ratio (P < 0.001), indicative of predominant parasympathetic over sympathetic activity. This autonomic response was associated with a significant reduction in systolic (23.2 ± 18.1 mm Hg, P < 0.001), diastolic (18.7 ± 16.9 mm Hg, P < 0.001), and mean (15.8 ± 15.5 mm Hg, P < 0.001) BP, below baseline and a significant reduction in total peripheral resistance (P < 0.001). A single IE session is associated with improved cardiac autonomic modulation and hemodynamic cardiovascular control in prehypertensive males. These acute responses may be

  12. Erectile dysfunction and type 2 diabetes mellitus in northern Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.; Anwar, E.; Ali, S.S.; Ali, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of erectile dysfunction in married male Type-2 diabetic patients. Methods: The cross-sectional observational study was carried out at the Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases Unit Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar, from July 2011 to Apr 2012, comprising 217 male married Type-2 diabetic patients. Serum samples were assayed for blood glucose, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin A1c. Body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio was calculated. Erectile dysfunction was assessed by Sexual Health Inventory for Men questionnaire. SPSS 18 was used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 217 patients were initially interviewed. The mean age was 43.1+-8.160 years. The frequency of drectile dysfunction increased with age, duration of patients and increased body mass index. Overall, 6 (2.8%) patients had no erectile dysfunction, 37 (17.1%) had mild, 82 (37.8%) mild to moderate; 47 (21.7%) moderate; and 45 (20.7%) severe. Higher HbA1c levels and atherogenic dyslipidaemia were associated with erectile dysfunction. Conclusion: Poor glycaemic control was associated with increased erectile dysfunction risk. Duration of diabetes, older age, increased body mass index are associated with increased incidence of the condition in patients with diabetes. Intensive lifestyle changes in the beginning can add to the better management of Type-2 diabetes and prevention of erectile dysfunction. (author)

  13. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: KSC Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrading, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    The KSC Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20+ years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in. the system, As part.of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display ofthe entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledgebase, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  14. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrading, J. Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20 years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in the system. As part of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display of the entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledge base, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  15. Managing female sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buster, John E

    2013-10-01

    Female sexual dysfunctions (FSDs) range from short-term aggravations to major emotional disturbances adversely affecting family and workplace. This review highlights diagnosis and management of the four most widely diagnosed FSDs. It initially focuses on hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) as a driving force at the heart of all other FSDs; nothing happens without sexual desire. Successful resolution of HSDD frequently facilitates resolution of other disorders. Central to understanding HSDD is the impact of aging female sexual endocrinology and its effect on both prevalence and expression patterns of FSD. Advances in this field have enabled introduction of some the most effective treatments yet described for HSDD. Sexual arousal disorder, though commonly affected by the same factors as HSDD, is heavily associated with psychotropic drugs and mood elevators. Orgasmic disorder is frequently the downstream result of other sexual dysfunctions, particularly HSDD, or the result of a major psychosexual trauma. Successful management of the underlying disorder often resolves orgasmic disorder. Sexual pain disorder is frequently the result of a gynecologic disorder, such as endometriosis, that can be substantially managed through successful treatment of that disorder. This article ends with the article's most important note: how to initiate the conversation. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Speech disorder prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladis Fornaris-Méndez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Language therapy has trafficked from a medical focus until a preventive focus. However, difficulties are evidenced in the development of this last task, because he is devoted bigger space to the correction of the disorders of the language. Because the speech disorders is the dysfunction with more frequently appearance, acquires special importance the preventive work that is developed to avoid its appearance. Speech education since early age of the childhood makes work easier for prevent the appearance of speech disorders in the children. The present work has as objective to offer different activities for the prevention of the speech disorders.

  17. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomax M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitch Lomax Department of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK Abstract: The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition. Keywords: exercise, aquatic athletes, bronchoconstriction

  18. Client attributions for sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichten, C S; Spector, I; Libman, E

    1988-01-01

    This investigation examined attributions for sexual dysfunctions made by 63 individuals and 21 of their partners who presented at a sex therapy service for the following problems: erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, and female orgasmic dysfunctions. All participants completed measures of marital adjustment, locus of control, depression and a questionnaire which assessed: attributions of responsibility for the sexual problem, perceived control over sexual functioning, distress, effort made to improve the sexual relationship, and expectations about the efficacy of sex therapy for the problem. Results indicate that both identified patients and their partners, regardless of the dysfunction, blamed the sexual problem on the "dysfunctional individual" rather than on the circumstances or the partner. With respect to the partners, husbands of women with orgasmic dysfunction were more likely to blame themselves than the circumstances, while the opposite was true for wives of males with erectile difficulties. Individuals experiencing the dysfunction perceived themselves and their partners as having little, but equal control over the identified patient's sexuality. Correlational analyses indicate that in identified patients, the better the quality of the marital relationship, the greater the self-blame and the lower the partner blame. Those with happy marriages also made greater efforts to improve their sexual relationship and had higher expectations of success with therapy. The implications of the results for research on the role of attributions in sexual dysfunction and for assessment of cognitive factors in sexually dysfunctional individuals and their partners is discussed.

  19. Towards the Development of Autonomous Ferries

    OpenAIRE

    Bitar, Glenn Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Autonomous ships is at the moment a heavily researched topic in the maritime industry. Development to introduce autonomous ferries in the Norwegian fjords is under way. This thesis is a study of technical and formal challenges related to autonomous ferries. The thesis goes into topics such as industrial control systems for ships, path planning and collision avoidance algorithms, as well as automatic docking. Additionally, information and statistics regarding ferry activities in Norway are pre...

  20. The Human Element and Autonomous Ships

    OpenAIRE

    Sauli Ahvenjärvi

    2016-01-01

    The autonomous ship technology has become a “hot” topic in the discussion about more efficient, environmentally friendly and safer sea transportation solutions. The time is becoming mature for the introduction of commercially sensible solutions for unmanned and fully autonomous cargo and passenger ships. Safety will be the most interesting and important aspect in this development. The utilization of the autonomous ship technology will have many effects on the safety, both positive and negativ...

  1. Autonomous Exploration Using an Information Gain Metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    navigation goals, serving to drive an autonomous system. By continually moving to these navigation goals and taking measurements, the system works to...ARL-TR-7638 ● MAR 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Autonomous Exploration Using an Information Gain Metric by Nicholas C Fung...Laboratory Autonomous Exploration Using an Information Gain Metric by Nicholas C Fung, Jason M Gregory, and John G Rogers Computational and

  2. DARTS: Deceiving Autonomous Cars with Toxic Signs

    OpenAIRE

    Sitawarin, Chawin; Bhagoji, Arjun Nitin; Mosenia, Arsalan; Chiang, Mung; Mittal, Prateek

    2018-01-01

    Sign recognition is an integral part of autonomous cars. Any misclassification of traffic signs can potentially lead to a multitude of disastrous consequences, ranging from a life-threatening accident to a large-scale interruption of transportation services relying on autonomous cars. In this paper, we propose and examine realistic security attacks against sign recognition systems for Deceiving Autonomous caRs with Toxic Signs (we call the proposed attacks DARTS). Leveraging the concept of ad...

  3. Design of an Autonomous Forklift Using Kinect

    OpenAIRE

    Abdellatif Mohamed; Shoeir Metwali; Talaat Omar; Gabalah Mahmoud; Elbably Mohamed; Saleh Saleh

    2018-01-01

    Material handling is a necessary, but expensive activity in factories. Autonomous robot technology can help reduce the cost and relax humans from the exhaustive job of driving forklifts. In this paper, we describe the mechatronics design and implementation of an autonomous forklift. The robot can perceive the 3D dynamic world and can plan its motion autonomously to lift materials from a source to target locations. Dynamic map of the world is built using data from a Microsoft Kinect head and r...

  4. Implementing a Cloud Platform for Autonomous Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shaoshan; Tang, Jie; Wang, Chao; Wang, Quan; Gaudiot, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Autonomous driving clouds provide essential services to support autonomous vehicles. Today these services include but not limited to distributed simulation tests for new algorithm deployment, offline deep learning model training, and High-Definition (HD) map generation. These services require infrastructure support including distributed computing, distributed storage, as well as heterogeneous computing. In this paper, we present the details of how we implement a unified autonomous driving clo...

  5. Autonomous Control of Space Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, John

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear reactors to support future robotic and manned missions impose new and innovative technological requirements for their control and protection instrumentation. Long-duration surface missions necessitate reliable autonomous operation, and manned missions impose added requirements for failsafe reactor protection. There is a need for an advanced instrumentation and control system for space-nuclear reactors that addresses both aspects of autonomous operation and safety. The Reactor Instrumentation and Control System (RICS) consists of two functionally independent systems: the Reactor Protection System (RPS) and the Supervision and Control System (SCS). Through these two systems, the RICS both supervises and controls a nuclear reactor during normal operational states, as well as monitors the operation of the reactor and, upon sensing a system anomaly, automatically takes the appropriate actions to prevent an unsafe or potentially unsafe condition from occurring. The RPS encompasses all electrical and mechanical devices and circuitry, from sensors to actuation device output terminals. The SCS contains a comprehensive data acquisition system to measure continuously different groups of variables consisting of primary measurement elements, transmitters, or conditioning modules. These reactor control variables can be categorized into two groups: those directly related to the behavior of the core (known as nuclear variables) and those related to secondary systems (known as process variables). Reliable closed-loop reactor control is achieved by processing the acquired variables and actuating the appropriate device drivers to maintain the reactor in a safe operating state. The SCS must prevent a deviation from the reactor nominal conditions by managing limitation functions in order to avoid RPS actions. The RICS has four identical redundancies that comply with physical separation, electrical isolation, and functional independence. This architecture complies with the

  6. [Sexual dysfunctions linked with prostatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouprêt, M; Seisen, T; De La Taille, A; Desgrandchamps, F

    2012-06-01

    The lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) are linked to erectile dysfunction (ED). The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of prostatic diseases on ED. Data on the influence of BPH and PCa on ED have been explored in Medline and Embase using the MeSH keywords: benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate cancer, prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy; androgen deprivation therapy; erectile dysfunction. The articles were selected based on their methodology, relevance, date and language of publication. The rate of ED in patients with BPH ranged from 30 to 70 %. The LUTS were an independent risk factor of ED. The pathophysiology linking BPH to ED has not been elucidated but seems to involve the path of Nitric Oxide - cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate (cGMP-No.), the RhoA - Rho - Kinase (ROCK) signal, the sympathetic autonomic nervous system and pelvic atherosclerosis. The rate of ED after radical prostatectomy (RP) ranged from 60 to 89 %. The bilateral preservation of neurovascular bundels improved these results. Risk factors of ED after RP were age, PSA levels, pretreatment erectile function and surgical technique. The rate of ED after prostate external beam radiotherapy ranged from 6 to 84 %. Risk factors of ED after external beam radiotherapy were age, pretreatment erectile function and association of androgen deprivation therapy. The rate of ED with androgen deprivation therapy was 85 %. Risk factors of ED with androgen deprivation therapy were age > 70 years, diabetes and pretreatment erectile function. Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy was associated with better results on erectile function than continue androgen deprivation therapy. ED is responsible for a decrease of elderly patients life quality already affected by urinary symptoms and prostate disease progression. The development of drugs effective on both ED and BPH or PCa symptoms is then full of

  7. [Using autonomous electrostimulation device Erektron in treating female overactive bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarin, G Yu; Shelyakina, O V; Fedorenko, V N; Alekseeva, A V; Vilgelmi, I A

    2016-11-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is one of the most common syndromes of lower urinary tract dysfunction. Besides standard therapy using anticholinergic medications, comprehensive management of overactive bladder includes physiotherapy. To test the clinical effectiveness and safety of autonomous electrostimulation device "Erektron" in treating OAB in women. The study was conducted at the Urology and Gynecology Clinic of the Innovative Medical Technology Center between 25.04.2014 and 30.01.2015. It included 20 women with newly diagnosed OAB both with and without urinary urgency incontinence or urinary stress incontinence. The patients were divided into 2 groups. All patients were treated with the first line anticholinergic agent solifenacin 5 mg daily. In patients of group 1, anticholinergic therapy was administered concurrently with intravaginal electrostimulation using "Erektron" device. In both groups, the treatment resulted in positive results, but a more pronounced improvement was found in group 1 patients with mixed incontinence. Autonomous electrostimulation device MT-RV "Erektron" can be used in comprehensive management of patients with OAB, including those with stress urinary incontinence.

  8. The relationship between erythrocyte membrane fatty acid levels and cardiac autonomic function in obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Gulgun; Kursat, Fidanci Muzaffer; Ahmet, Tas; Alparslan, Genc Fatih; Omer, Gunes; Sertoglu, Erdem; Erkan, Sarı; Ediz, Yesilkaya; Turker, Turker; Ayhan, Kılıc

    Childhood obesity is a worldwide health concern. Studies have shown autonomic dysfunction in obese children. The exact mechanism of this dysfunction is still unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between erythrocyte membrane fatty acid (EMFA) levels and cardiac autonomic function in obese children using heart rate variability (HRV). A total of 48 obese and 32 healthy children were included in this case-control study. Anthropometric and biochemical data, HRV indices, and EMFA levels in both groups were compared statistically. HRV parameters including standard deviation of normal-to-normal R-R intervals (NN), root mean square of successive differences, the number of pairs of successive NNs that differ by >50 ms (NN50), the proportion of NN50 divided by the total number of NNs, high-frequency power, and low-frequency power were lower in obese children compared to controls, implying parasympathetic impairment. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid levels were lower in the obese group (p<0.001 and p=0.012, respectively). In correlation analysis, in the obese group, body mass index standard deviation and linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein levels showed a linear correlation with one or more HRV parameter, and age, eicosapentaenoic acid, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure correlated with mean heart rate. In linear regression analysis, age, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, body mass index standard deviation, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein were related to HRV parameters, implying an effect on cardiac autonomic function. There is impairment of cardiac autonomic function in obese children. It appears that levels of EMFAs such as linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid play a role in the regulation of cardiac autonomic function in obese children. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa

  9. When do the symptoms of autonomic nervous system malfunction appear in patients with Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luka, Silvio R; Svetel, Marina; Pekmezović, Tatjana; Milovanović, Branislav; Kostić, Vladimir S

    2014-04-01

    Dysautonomia appears in almost all patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in a certain stage of their condition. The aim of our study was to detect the development and type of autonomic disorders, find out the factors affecting their manifestation by analyzing the potential association with demographic variables related to clinical presentation, as well as the symptoms of the disease in a PD patient cohort. The patients with PD treated at the Clinic of Neurology in Belgrade during a 2-year period, divided into 3 groups were studied: 25 de novo patients, 25 patients already treated and had no long-term levodopa therapy-related complications and 22 patients treated with levodopa who manifested levodopa-induced motor complications. Simultaneously, 35 healthy control subjects, matched by age and sex, were also analyzed. Autonomic nervous system malfunction was defined by Ewing diagnostic criteria. The tests, indicators of sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, were significantly different in the PD patients as compared with the controls, suggesting the failure of both systems. However, it was shown, in the selected groups of patients, that the malfunction of both systems was present in two treated groups of PD patients, while de novo group manifested only sympathetic dysfunction. For this reason, the complete autonomic neuropathy was diagnosed only in the treated PD patients, while de novo patients were defined as those with the isolated sympathetic dysfunction. The patients with the complete autonomic neuropathy differed from the subjects without such neuropathy in higher cumulative and motor unified Parkinson's disease rating score (UPDRS) (p nervous system disturbances among PD patients from the near onset of disease, with a predominant sympathetic nervous system involvement. The patients who developed complete autonomic neuropathy (both sympathetic and parasympathetic) were individuals with considerable level of functional failure, more severe clinical

  10. HRVanalysis: a free software for analyzing cardiac autonomic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Pichot

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the pioneering studies of the 1960s, heart rate variability (HRV has become an increasingly used non-invasive tool for examining cardiac autonomic functions and dysfunctions in various populations and conditions. Many calculation methods have been developed to address these issues, each with their strengths and weaknesses. Although its interpretation may remain difficult, this technique provides, from a non-invasive approach, reliable physiological information that was previously inaccessible, in many fields including death and health prediction, training and overtraining, cardiac and respiratory rehabilitation, sleep-disordered breathing, large cohort follow-ups, children’s autonomic status, anesthesia, or neurophysiological studies. In this context, we developed HRVanalysis, a software to analyse HRV, used and improved for over 20 years and, thus, designed to meet laboratory requirements. The main strength of HRVanalysis is its wide application scope. In addition to standard analysis over short and long periods of RR intervals, the software allows time-frequency analysis using wavelet transform as well as analysis of