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Sample records for prevalent military injury

  1. Prevalence and Patterns of Injury Sustained During Military Hand-to-Hand Combat Training (Krav-Maga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkash, Uri; Dreyfuss, Daniel; Funk, Shany; Dreyfuss, Uriel

    2017-11-01

    Krav-Maga (KM) is a unique Israeli hand-to-hand combat system, designed to teach soldiers self-defense in true-to-life situations. With the increase in military Israel Defense Force (IDF) units participating in KM training in recent years, the number of injuries incurred in KM has also increased. The purpose of our report is to describe the prevalence and pattern of these injuries. Instances of KM injury were taken from IDF patients' computerized clinical records over a 1-year period. Data pertaining to the type, location, and severity of the injury, as well as data relating to soldier's gender and age were collected from the charts. "Moderate" injury was defined as injury necessitating absence from military activity for more than 1 week; "major" injury was defined as injury necessitating surgical intervention. During the year 2014, 916 soldiers complaining of 946 traumatic injuries sustained during KM training were evaluated in IDF clinics. The vast majority of injuries (95%) occurred in male soldiers, and most injured soldiers (92%) were between the ages of 18 and 22. The upper limbs were the most frequently injured body parts, with the fingers, hands, and wrists being the most involved regions (31%) followed by the shoulder (16%). Injury severity was mild in most cases. However, 64 soldiers (6.7%) were moderately injured and major injuries necessitating surgical treatment occurred in 33 cases (3.5%). KM involves both striking and grappling elements, and we assume that injuries result from both fighting forms. With striking styles, such as boxing and kickboxing, hand and wrist are the prevalent injury locations; with grappling styles such as wrestling, strain and sprain injuries of large joints are most prevalent. Head and neck injuries, a major concern in martial arts sports, were not identified as significant problems in KM. To minimize participant injury, preventative measures should focus on improving protective equipment, especially of the hand, as well as

  2. The mechanobiology and mechanophysiology of military-related injuries

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a state-of-the-art update, as well as perspectives on future directions of research and clinical applications in the implementation of biomechanical and biophysical experimental, theoretical and computational models which are relevant to military medicine. Such experimental and modeling efforts are helpful, on the one hand, in understanding the aetiology, pathophysiology and dynamics of injury development and on the other hand in guiding the development of better equipment and protective gear or devices that should ultimately reduce the prevalence and incidence of injuries or lessen their hazardous effects. The book is useful for military-oriented biomedical engineers and medical physicists, as well as for military physiologists and other medical specialists who are interested in the science and technology implemented in modern investigations of military related injuries.

  3. Incidence of injury and physical performance adaptations during military training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Lars; Langberg, Henning; Skov-Jensen, Arne

    2003-01-01

    Strenuous physical activity, such as military training, is known to demand a high degree of physical performance and to cause overuse injuries. However, the exact relation between injury incidence and physical fitness level and the influence of military training on measures of functional...

  4. Incidence of injury and physical performance adaptations during military training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Lars; Langberg, Henning; Skov-Jensen, Arne

    2003-01-01

    Strenuous physical activity, such as military training, is known to demand a high degree of physical performance and to cause overuse injuries. However, the exact relation between injury incidence and physical fitness level and the influence of military training on measures of functional...... performance, such as intermittent endurance capacity and maximal jump performance, are not fully described....

  5. Systematic review of military motor vehicle crash-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahl, Pamela L; Jankosky, Christopher J; Thomas, Richard J; Hooper, Tomoko I

    2010-01-01

    Motor vehicle crashes account for nearly one third of U.S. military fatalities annually. The objective of this review is to summarize the published evidence on injuries due specifically to military motor vehicle (MMV) crashes. A search of 18 electronic databases identified English language publications addressing MMV crash-related injuries between 1970 and 2006 that were available to the general public. Documents limited in distribution to military or government personnel were not evaluated. Relevant articles were categorized by study design. The search identified only 13 studies related specifically to MMV crashes. Most were case reports or case series (n=8); only one could be classified as an intervention study. Nine of the studies were based solely on data from service-specific military safety centers. Few studies exist on injuries resulting from crashes of military motor vehicles. Epidemiologic studies that assess injury rates, type, severity, and risk factors are needed, followed by studies to evaluate targeted interventions and prevention strategies. Interventions currently underway should be evaluated for effectiveness, and those proven effective in the civilian community, such as graduated driver licensing, should be considered for implementation and evaluation in military populations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Statistical process control charts for monitoring military injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Anna; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Jones, Bruce H

    2017-12-01

    An essential aspect of an injury prevention process is surveillance, which quantifies and documents injury rates in populations of interest and enables monitoring of injury frequencies, rates and trends. To drive progress towards injury reduction goals, additional tools are needed. Statistical process control charts, a methodology that has not been previously applied to Army injury monitoring, capitalise on existing medical surveillance data to provide information to leadership about injury trends necessary for prevention planning and evaluation. Statistical process control Shewhart u-charts were created for 49 US Army installations using quarterly injury medical encounter rates, 2007-2015, for active duty soldiers obtained from the Defense Medical Surveillance System. Injuries were defined according to established military injury surveillance recommendations. Charts display control limits three standard deviations (SDs) above and below an installation-specific historical average rate determined using 28 data points, 2007-2013. Charts are available in Army strategic management dashboards. From 2007 to 2015, Army injury rates ranged from 1254 to 1494 unique injuries per 1000 person-years. Installation injury rates ranged from 610 to 2312 injuries per 1000 person-years. Control charts identified four installations with injury rates exceeding the upper control limits at least once during 2014-2015, rates at three installations exceeded the lower control limit at least once and 42 installations had rates that fluctuated around the historical mean. Control charts can be used to drive progress towards injury reduction goals by indicating statistically significant increases and decreases in injury rates. Future applications to military subpopulations, other health outcome metrics and chart enhancements are suggested. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Prevalence of Knee Osteoarthritis in 100 Athletically Active Veteran Soccer Players Compared With a Matched Group of 100 Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxinos, Odysseas; Karavasili, Alexandra; Delimpasis, Georgios; Stathi, Afroditi

    2016-06-01

    Although knee injuries in professional soccer (football) have been extensively studied, the prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in veteran players is not well documented. To investigate the prevalence of knee OA in retired professional soccer players in comparison with a group of athletically active military personnel. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A group of 100 veteran Greek soccer players aged 35 to 55 years (mean [±SD] age, 46.90 ± 5.9 years) were examined for knee OA and were administered the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. A matched group of 100 athletically active military personnel served as a comparison group. The sonographic prevalence of OA was significantly higher in the veteran soccer group (52%) than in the military group (33%) (n = 200; P = .010). This difference remained significant even after excluding participants with a history of knee surgery (44.1% vs 25.3%, respectively) (n = 151; P = .010). Femoral cartilage thickness was similar between the 2 groups (P = .473), while altered knee alignment had no effect on the prevalence of OA (P = .740). With the exception of perceived pain being more prevalent in the military group, there were no other statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in KOOS values. Veteran soccer players had a higher sonographic prevalence of knee OA but better pain scores than a matched group of athletically active military personnel. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Epidemiological investigation of ocular injuries related to military training and operations in Chinese army

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-he XIAO

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the epidemiological characters of ocular injuries related to military training and operations in Chinese army.Methods The data of servicemen with ocular injuries,hospitalized in 11 military evacuation hospitals from 2005-01-01 to 2009-12-31,were entered into a registration table.The data included the time and place when the injury happened,type and cause of injury,examination records,treatment,rehabilitation level,etc.All data were input into the database for statistical analysis.Results Of all the cases of ocular injuries,189(45.5% were related to military training and operations.The mean age of the 189 cases was 23.4±5.4 years,all of them were men,and soldiers accounted for 91.0% and officers accounted for 9.0%.The incidence declined in 2006 compared with that in 2005,and then rose gradually thereafter year by year.Eight patients(4.2% were complicated with bodily injuries,and 4.2% of patients had the history of eye surgery or eye disease before the ocular injury.Of the 189 cases,in 172(91.0% one eye was injured while in 17(9.0% both eyes were injured.After injury,in 35.0% of patients sight restoration to grade 1,in 20.6% to grade 2,in 13.6% to grade 3,in 25.7% to grade 4,and in 4.4% to grade 5.In 87.3% of patients injuries were due to mechanical forces and in 12.7% ocular injuries were not mechanical.Most patients with eye injury occurring in military training and operations were sent to evacuation hospital and treated timely,and good results were obtained.Conclusions Military training and operations related ocular injury is a prevalent ocular injury occurring in Chinese armed forces,and should be paid more attention in prevention.One important measure is to improve the prevention awareness of Chinese servicemen,and a detailed prevention measures should be further studied.

  9. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries Associated With Military Survival Swim Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Michael S; Mason, John S; Posner, Matthew A; Haley, Chad A

    2017-07-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are relatively common injuries associated with athletic activities and high-energy trauma. Posterolateral corner (PLC) injuries frequently accompany injury to the PCL. Diagnosis can be challenging and requires a comprehensive history and physical examination. Patients frequently report vague, nonspecific symptoms and the mechanism of injury is often useful in localizing injured structures. Two of the more common mechanisms for PCL injury include a direct blow to the proximal anterior tibia with the knee flexed, as well as a significant knee hyperextension injury. With a PCL tear, patients rarely describe an audible "pop" that is commonly reported in ACL injuries. On physical exam, a frequent finding in PCL tears is a loss of 10 to 20° of knee flexion. Although the most common clinical tests for PCL tears include the posterior drawer test, the posterior sag sign, and the quadriceps active test, there is a lack of high-quality diagnostic accuracy studies. Two cases of U.S. Military Academy Cadets who sustained PCL injuries while removing combat boots during military survival swim training are presented. The results of the clinical examination are accompanied by magnetic resonance imaging results and intraoperative arthroscopic images to highlight key findings. Both patients were evaluated and diagnosed with PCL injures within 10 days of their injuries. Each reported feeling/hearing a "pop," which is atypical in PCL tears. Both patients demonstrated a lack of active and passive knee flexion, which is a commonly reported impairment. One patient was managed nonsurgically with physical therapy and eventually returned to full duty without limitations 9 months after his injury. The other patient, who sustained a combined PCL-PLC injury, underwent a PCL reconstruction and PLC repair and reconstruction 8 weeks after his injury. He returned all training, with the exception of contact/collision sports, 9 months after surgery. Both

  10. Neck Pain in Military Helicopter Pilots: Prevalence and Associated Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oord, Marieke H. A. H.; de Loose, Veerle; Meeuwsen, Ted; Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2010-01-01

    Our aim is to estimate the self-reported one-year prevalence of neck pain in military helicopter pilots and to compare work-related, individual, and health-related factors in the pilots with (neck pain group) and without (reference group) regular or continuous neck pain. A questionnaire was

  11. Injury prevalence in young athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadne Maria dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The injuries in young athletes are becoming more frequent, due to the wade dissemination of sports and the excessive training aimed at high performance. The requirements in sports can lead to the development of pathologies and injuries that could be prevented if the young athlete's training was well oriented. We emphasize the importance of professional and competition calendar planning always seeking the recovery of the athlete. It’s also important to have knowledge of injuries, training load, the previous history of the athlete, and correction of improper movement technique.Objective: To identify the most common injuries in young athletes of different sports. Material and Methods: The study included 36 athletes, aged 12-17 years, of both sexes, the Athletics rules, futsal, swimming and volleyball. An interview that contained information about age, practice time and sport was initially applied. Then two questionnaires were applied, the first consisting of a pain distribution table by body region and the second by a pain scale and this interference in daily activities. Results:Obtained results as mean age 13.86 years. Among the participants, 66.7% reported practicing sports or other physical activities, 55.6% reported that they have suffered injury in some cases with recurrence and 50% who have had any treatment for pain.Conclusion: Based on the results we conclude the importance of knowledge about sports injury prevention strategies in young athletes as a way to ensure longevity in the sport.

  12. Complications associated with military spine injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possley, Daniel R; Blair, James A; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Lehman, Ronald A; Hsu, Joseph R

    2012-09-01

    To assess the presence of complications associated with spine injuries in the Global War on Terror. To characterize the effect of complications in and around the battlefield during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom from 2001 to 2009. Retrospective study. American servicemembers sustaining spine injury during combat. Extracted medical records of warriors identified by the Joint Theater Trauma Registry from October 2001 to December 2009. Complications were defined as unplanned medical events that required further intervention. Complications were classified as major or minor and further subdivided among groups, including surgical and nonsurgical management, mounted (in an armored vehicle) or dismounted at the time of injury, and blunt or penetrating trauma. Major complications were encountered in 55 servicemembers (9%), and 38 (6%) sustained minor complications. Forty-four percent (n=24) of those with major complications had more than one complication. Eleven servicemembers sustained three or more complications. There were five intraoperative complications, and 50 occurred in the perioperative period. Intraoperative complications included gastrointestinal injury, dural tear, and instrument malposition. Among patients who sustained complications, precipitating spinal injuries occurred primarily in combat (n=43 [78%]) and resulted from blunt (18) or penetrating (25) mechanisms. Complications occurred in 10 (3%) of those treated nonoperatively and 45 (25%) of those receiving surgery. Complications were higher in the dismounted group (80%) as compared with those who were mounted in vehicles at the time of injury (20%). Thirty-five percent (n=24) of surgically treated, dismounted, and penetrating injured servicemembers had complications. Seventeen percent (n=8) of surgically treated and blunt injured mounted servicemembers and 20% (n=13) of dismounted servicemembers had complications. Among the dismounted and nonspinal cord-injured servicemembers, both

  13. 78 FR 45283 - Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans Interest Rate for Fourth Quarter FY 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans Interest Rate for Fourth Quarter FY 2013 In... following interest rate is effective for Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans approved on or after July 19, 2013. Military Reservist Loan Program--4.000% Dated: July 19, 2013. James E. Rivera...

  14. 77 FR 46550 - Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for Fourth Quarter FY 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for Fourth Quarter FY 2012 In... following interest rate is effective for Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans approved on or after July 20, 2012. Military Reservist Loan Program 4.000% ] Dated: July 30, 2012. James E. Rivera...

  15. 77 FR 71668 - Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for First Quarter FY 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for First Quarter FY 2013 In... following interest rate is effective for Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans approved on or after November 26, 2012. Military Reservist Loan Program 4.000% Dated: November 19, 2012. James E...

  16. 78 FR 26680 - Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for Third Quarter FY 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for Third Quarter FY 2013 In... following interest rate is effective for Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans approved on or after April 26, 2013. Military Reservist Loan Program--4.000%. Dated: May 2, 2013. James E. Rivera...

  17. 77 FR 25010 - Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans Interest Rate for Third Quarter FY 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans Interest Rate for Third Quarter FY 2012 In... following interest rate is effective for Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans approved on or after April 20, 2012. Military Reservist Loan Program--4.000% Dated: April 23, 2012. Joseph P. Loddo...

  18. 78 FR 5555 - Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for Second Quarter FY 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... ADMINISTRATION Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for Second Quarter FY 2013 In... following interest rate is effective for Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans approved on or after January 18, 2013. Military Reservist Loan Program--4.000% Dated: January 18, 2013. James E. Rivera...

  19. 76 FR 44976 - Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for Fourth Quarter FY 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... No: 2011-18897] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans... Credit and Assistance Sec. 123.512, the following interest rate is effective for Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans approved on or after July 22, 2011. Military Reservist Loan Program: 4.000...

  20. 78 FR 65416 - Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans Interest Rate for First Quarter FY 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... ADMINISTRATION Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans Interest Rate for First Quarter FY 2014 In... following interest rate is effective for Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans approved on or after October 18, 2013. Military Reservist Loan Program: 4.000% Dated: October 21, 2013. James E. Rivera...

  1. 76 FR 66769 - Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for First Quarter FY 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for First Quarter FY 2012 In... following interest rate is effective for Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans approved on or after October 21, 2011. Military Reservist Loan Program--4.000%. Dated: October 19, 2011. James E...

  2. 77 FR 4854 - Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for Second Quarter FY 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... ADMINISTRATION Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans; Interest Rate for Second Quarter FY 2012 In... following interest rate is effective for Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans approved on or after January 23, 2012. Military Reservist Loan Program 4.000% January 23, 2012. James E. Rivera...

  3. Prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries among adolescent squash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries among adolescent squash players in the Western Cape. Design. A retrospective descriptive survey was conducted during the first week of May 2006. Three schools were randomly selected from a list of the top 10 schools in the. Western Cape high school ...

  4. Prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries among young squash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by young squash players in Malaysia. This study was conducted retrospectively by using. Standardized Nordic Questionnaire (NSQ) during SUKMA 2016 at Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia. The questionnaires were distributed to the ...

  5. Military gunshot wound-induced spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaca, Ridvan; Yilmaz, Bilge; Goktepe, Ahmet Salim; Yazicioglu, Kamil; Gunduz, Sukru

    2002-11-01

    Gunshot wounds are the second leading cause of spinal cord injuries in developed countries, whereas in undeveloped and developing countries, this likelihood is much more. However, the weapon and injury characteristics are very different between those two groups of countries. The aim of this study was to review our experience with gunshot wound-caused spinal cord injury during our struggle with terrorism, to examine surgical and medical complications, and to determine the difference between civilian and military gunshot wounds. One hundred five male patients (mean, 25 years of age) were examined according to completeness, spinal and nonspinal injuries, American Spinal Injury Association classification, motor and pinprick scores, surgical and nonsurgical interventions, surgical complications, and spinal cord injury-related medical complications. This study has shown that the likelihood of completeness was higher in gunshot wounds with high velocity weapons. Because of their higher wounding capacity, the difference between vertebral and neurological levels was not very different as it was on the other etiologies. Fortunately, spinal cord injury-related medical complications were less than expected.

  6. Association of Injury History and Incident Injury in Cadet Basic Military Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Kristen L.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Wolf, Susanne H.; Padua, Darin A.; Cameron, Kenneth L.; Beutler, Anthony I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the association between injury history at enrollment and incident lower extremity (LE) injury during cadet basic training among first-year military cadets. Methods Medically treated LE injuries during cadet basic training documented in the Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) were ascertained in a prospective cohort study of three large U.S. military academies from 2005–2008. Both acute injuries (ICD-9 codes in the 800–900s, including fracture, dislocations, sprains/strains) and injury-related musculoskeletal injuries (ICD-9 codes in the 700s, including inflammation and pain, joint derangement, stress fracture, sprain/strain/rupture, and dislocation) were included. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using multivariate log-binomial models stratified by gender. Results During basic training there were 1,438 medically treated acute and 1,719 musculoskeletal-related LE injuries in the 9,811 cadets. The most frequent LE injuries were sprains/strains (73.6% of acute) and inflammation and pain (89.6% of musculoskeletal-related). The overall risk of incident LE injury was 23.2% [95%CI: 22.3%, 24.0%]. Cadets with a previous history of LE injury were at increased risk for incident LE injury. This association was identical in males (RR=1.74 [1.55, 1.94]) and females (RR=1.74 [1.52, 1.99]). In site-specific analyses, strong associations between injury history and incident injury were observed for hip, knee ligament, stress fracture, and ankle sprain. Injury risk was greater (p<0.01) for females (39.1%) compared to males (18.0%). The elevated injury risk in females (RR=2.19 [2.04, 2.36]) was independent of injury history (adjusted RR=2.09 [1.95, 2.24]). Conclusion Injury history upon entry to the military is associated with incidence of LE injuries sustained during cadet basic training. Prevention programs targeted at modifiable factors in cadets with a prior history of LE injury should be considered. PMID:26765627

  7. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Improves Survival in Severely Burned Military Casualties With Acute Kidney Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Kevin K; Juncos, , Luis A; Wolf, Steven E; Mann, Elizabeth E; Renz, Evan M; White, Christopher E; Barillo, David J; Clark, Richard A; Jones, John A; Edgecombe, Harcourt P

    2007-01-01

    .... We wondered whether early use of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) changes outcomes in severely burned military casualties with predetermined criteria for acute kidney injury. Methods...

  8. The prevalence, risk factors predicting injury and the severity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No African-based studies have reported the prevalence or severity of injuries, risk factors associated with injuries or return-to-play (RTP) time. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of injuries and associated risk factors, as well as severity of injuries sustained by professional male MMA athletes competing at the Extreme ...

  9. Prevalence of psychotropic drug use in military police units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sérgio Henrique Nascente; Yonamine, Maurício; Ramos, Andrea Luciana Martins; Oliveira, Fernando Gomes Ferreira; Rodrigues, Caroline Rego; da Cunha, Luiz Carlos

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to verify the prevalence of psychoactive drug use (amphetamines, methamphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, opioids and benzodiazepines) among military police officers in the state of Goiás. Data were obtained from urine samples voluntarily provided by the officers participating in the study, who were informed of the study methods and signed a free and informed consent form. The samples were subject to screening analysis by immunochromatography (Multi-DrugOneStep Test®), with positive tests confirmed by gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and data analyzed by descriptive statistics. The results indicated the presence of the following drugs: amphetamines (0.33%), cannabinoids (0.67%) and benzodiazepines (1.34%); 97.66% showed negative results. The positive cases were distributed as follows: benzodiazepines (57.1%); cannabinoids (28.6%) and amphetamines (14.3%). In conclusion, the detection of psychoactive substances in voluntary sampling of military police officers indicates the need to implement drug testing among active military officers and preventive public policies aimed at eliminating the abusive consumption of psychotropic drugs.

  10. Injuries prevalence in elite male artistic gymnasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Batista Albuquerque GOULART

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the injuries prevalence in men elite artistic gymnasts. Twenty Brazilian senior gymnasts, aged 23.1 ± 6.5 years, 13.9 ± 5.0 years of practice and 36.5 ± 4.7 hours per week training, participated in this study. The athletes answered a morbidity questionnaire, formulated according to studies from the literature, for information on the injuries’ characteristics and circumstances. Information about the injury circumstances (gymnastic apparatus, overload training and physical exercises, the anatomic site injured, the affect biological tissue and the return to training after injury treatment were evaluated. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, absolute and relative frequencies. The training overload, and floor, pommel horse and vault were the events that presented higher injuries frequency. In relation to anatomic site, ankle, hands/fingers and shoulder were the most cited regions. The ligament, bone and articular capsule were the most affected biological tissues. In relation to gymnasts’ return to their sports activities, 56% of them reported a better condition at return, 33% reported to have returned at the same fitness level and 10% indicated that they were in a worse condition when they returned to the sports activities. The men’s artistic gymnastics injuries are related to the mechanical demands of this sport. The analysis of risk factors helps in understanding the injuries mechanisms in gymnastics, and provides relevant information that can assist in effective prevention strategies.

  11. Caustic ingestion injuries-at military hospital rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahsan, O.; Razzaq, K.; Abbas, W.; Zarrin, F.

    2015-01-01

    To study the pattern and endoscopic severity of caustic ingestion injuries presenting at Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Medical and Gastroenterology Department Military Hospital Rawalpindi from August 2012 to April 2013. Material and Methods: Patients were selected from those who presented with caustic ingestion history in Medical OPD, ER and in medical wards. After informed consent the patient underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI) Endoscopy. Endoscopic findings were recorded. Results: Out of 50 patients, 21(42%) were males and 29 (58%) were females. Ingestion was accidental in 19 (38%) and was with intent of suicide or self-harm in 31(62%) patients. Mean age was 33.2 years (SD ± 13.2). All the patients were subjected to upper GI endoscopy and findings were recorded. Endoscopic findings were grade 0 in 4 (8%), Grade 1 in 6 (12%), grade 2a in 7 (14%), grade 2b in 10 (20%), grade 3a in 6 (12%) and grade 3b in 17 (34%) patients. Conclusion: Caustic ingestion injuries were seen more in younger females with predominant cause as suicidal intent. On endoscopic examination severe corrosive injuries were more frequent. (author)

  12. Gender-Related Spinal Injury Assessment Consideration in Military Aviation Occupant Protection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whitley, P

    2001-01-01

    In determining the risk of injury in the military aviation environment, a male and female of similar height and weight have been assumed to have the same risk of vertebral injury during an escape or crash scenario...

  13. Substance use disorders in military veterans: prevalence and treatment challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeters JB

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jenni B Teeters,1,2 Cynthia L Lancaster,1,2 Delisa G Brown,3 Sudie E Back1,2 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; 2Ralph H Johnson Veterans Affairs (VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA, 3Department of Human Development and Psychoeducation, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Substance use disorders (SUDs are a significant problem among our nation’s military veterans. In the following overview, we provide information on the prevalence of SUDs among military veterans, clinical characteristics of SUDs, options for screening and evidence-based treatment, as well as relevant treatment challenges. Among psychotherapeutic approaches, behavioral interventions for the management of SUDs typically involve short-term, cognitive-behavioral therapy interventions. These interventions focus on the identification and modification of maladaptive thoughts and behaviors associated with increased craving, use, or relapse to substances. Additionally, client-centered motivational interviewing approaches focus on increasing motivation to engage in treatment and reduce substance use. A variety of pharmacotherapies have received some support in the management of SUDs, primarily to help with the reduction of craving or withdrawal symptoms. Currently approved medications as well as treatment challenges are discussed. Keywords: addiction, alcohol use disorders, drug use disorders, treatment, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy

  14. A global epidemiological survey and strategy of treatment of military ocular injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-nian ZHANG

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the current global status of military ocular injury for the purpose of improving the level of domestic epidemiological investigation,in order to improve treatment strategies,and to prevent and reduce the incidence of military ocular injury in Chinese PLA.Methods The epidemiological literature concerning military ocular injury occurring in our country and abroad in recent five years was retrieved by information research;the problems and experiences in the aspects of epidemiological survey,registry,data collection,systematic treatment and prevention of military ocular injury existed in PLA were also summarized and analyzed.Results There were currently no systematic epidemiological data about ocular injury in PLA.A few articles about epidemiological study on ocular injury showed that servicemen were the high risk population of ocular injury.Both in peacetime or wartime the ocular injury was the primary cause leading to monocular blindness of soldiers.As to the ocular injury,in 51.55% of the patients,it occurred in the military operations and work,and 30.31% in military training.The incidence of ocular injury was different in various services,for example,the incidence in the internal security forces of armed police could be as high as 78.85% due to training of martial arts and boxing and wrestling.The deficiency of microsurgery equipments and untimely evacuation were the main causes affecting prognosis during treatment course in primary military hospitals.Conclusions Military affairs,physical training,military maneuver and defense constructions are the main causes of ocular injury in servicemen,and young male soldiers are the main group for prevention and treatment for military ocular injury.More attention should be paid to the epidemiological survey of military ocular injury to find out the causes leading to ocular injury,to improve treatment strategies,to formulate feasible protective measures and then military ocular

  15. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in a brazilian military police population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Viviani-Silva; Godinho, Eliane-Lopes; Farias, Lucyana-Conceição; Marques-Silva, Luciano; Santos, Sérgio-Henrique-Sousa; Rodrigues-Neto, João-Felício; Ferreira, Raquel-Conceição; De-Paula, Alfredo-Maurício-Batista; Martins, Andréa-Maria-Eleutério-de Barros-Lima; Sena-Guimarães, André-Luiz

    2015-04-01

    Data obtained from oral health surveys are very important for identifying disease-susceptible groups and for developing dental care and prevention programs. So, the purpose of the current article was to investigate the prevalence of oral mucosa lesions (OMLs) in a population of Brazilian police. Interviews and oral cavity examinations were performed on a sample of 395 police officers who were randomly selected by the calibrated researcher. The number of individuals was obtained by a sample calculation using the finite population correction. The diagnostic criteria were based on the WHO (1997) criteria and adapted to Brazilian surveys. In total, 8.61% of the population presented some OML. Traumatic injuries and benign migratory glossitis (BMG) were the most prevalent lesions. The prevalence of potentially malignant disorders was lower than among the Brazilian population.The most prevalent lesion among the police officers was related to trauma. Patients dissatisfied with oral health had a higher risk of presenting OMLs. Key words:Mouth disease, mouth mucosa, military personnel, public health, oral pathology, oral leukoplakia.

  16. Incidence and Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injury in Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Preston J.; Gerrie, Brayden J.; Varner, Kevin E.; McCulloch, Patrick C.; Lintner, David M.; Harris, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most published studies on injuries in the ballet dancer focus on the lower extremity. The rigors of this activity require special training and care. By understanding prevalence and injury pattern to the musculoskeletal system, targeted prevention and treatment for this population can be developed. Purpose To determine the incidence and prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries in ballet. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A systematic review registered with PROSPERO was performed using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Level 1 through 4 evidence studies reporting incidence of musculoskeletal injuries in male and female ballet dancers were included, with the numbers and types of injuries extracted from each. Injury rates were recorded and calculated based on professional status, sex, and nature of injury. Incidence was defined as number of injuries sustained over a specific time. Prevalence was defined as proportion of subjects with an injury at a given point in time. Results The studies analyzed reported injury incidence or prevalence in more than 1365 amateur and 900 professional dancers. The mean age was 16.2 years among amateur and 27.0 years among professional dancers. The incidence of injury among amateur dancers was 0.99 and 1.09 injuries per 1000 dance hours in males and females, respectively; 75% of injuries were overuse, with similar rates among males and females. In professional dancers, the incidence of injury was 1.06 and 1.46 injuries per 1000 dance hours in males and females, respectively, and 64% of female injuries were overuse, compared with 50% in males (P ballet dancers is 0.97 and 1.24 injuries per 1000 dance hours, respectively. The majority are overuse in both amateur and professional dancers, with amateur ballet dancers showing a higher proportion of overuse injuries than professionals (P < .001). Male professional dancers show a higher proportion of

  17. Risk factors of military training-related injuries in recruits of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Pei-shan; Zhou, Wei

    2003-02-01

    To assess the incidence, types and risk factors of military training-related injuries in recruits of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces (CPAPF). A cohort study was made on the risk factors of injuries in 805 male recruits during the military training from December 25, 1999 to December 25, 2000. A total of 111 recruits (14%) experienced one or more injuries, and the cumulative incidence was 16.1 injuries per 100 soldiers in a year. And 77.7% of the injuries belonged to overuse injuries of the skeletal and muscular systems, the most common type of which was stress fractures. Most injuries occurred in the 3rd month of training. Univariate analysis and logistic regression analysis of possible risk factors for overuse injuries were carried out, and a number of risk factors were identified: history of agricultural labor, history of lower limb injury, flatfoot and less running exercise before entry into the army. But a suitable body mass index (BMI) was a protective factor. Examination of age, body height, smoking, body flexibility and frequency of 2-mile running revealed no significant association with the injuries. History of agricultural labor, history of lower limb injury, flatfoot, less running exercise before entry into the army and lower BMI were risk factors of the overuse injuries. In order to decrease the incidence of overuse injuries, the young people with good physical ability and shapely body type should be selected during conscription. During the training, nutrition should be improved so as to decrease the incidence of injuries.

  18. The Female Athlete Triad: Prevalence in Military Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lauder, Tamara

    1997-01-01

    The female athlete triad, otherwise known as the inter-relatedness of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis, is an area of increasing awareness in female athletes, which has not been explored in military women...

  19. The prevalence of injury in Kendo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultzel, Mark; Schultzel, Matthew; Wentz, Brock; Bernhardt, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Kendo is a Japanese martial art analogous to fencing, which is becoming increasingly popular worldwide. The large number of participants creates a need to assess injury patterns to better train them. The purpose of this study is to describe current injury rates in kendo and compare these rates to other martial arts. This retrospective study used an online questionnaire sent to 500 active members of the All United States Kendo Federation and World Kendo Federation. The questionnaire, based on the NCAA Injury Surveillance System, contains questions regarding location and type of injuries sustained during competition and practice, time lost to training, and competitor demographics. Statistical analyses between competitor demographics and injury rates are provided. Injury rates are expressed as injury rates/minute of competition or practice and by athlete exposures. 95% CIs were calculated. Responses from 307 of 500 kendo players were received (response rate = 61.4%). 41 (18%) male and 13 (16%) female participants reported injury to only one body region, while 16 (7%) men and one (1%) woman reported no injuries. 166 (74%) males and 70 (83%) females reported injuries to two or more body regions. The most common sites of injury involved the foot/ankle (65.1%), wrist/hand (53.5%) and elbow/forearm (48.8%). Most injuries occurred during practice (87.9% foot/ankle, 89.9% wrist/hand, elbow/forearm 92.2%). The most common injuries were contusions, abrasions, and sprains/strains. Injury rates were 121/1000 A-E (0.025 injuries/min) in tournaments versus 20.5/1000 A-E (0.011 injuries/min) in training. 26% of injuries resulted in time off of participation, with an average recovery time of 15 days (range = 1 day-1 year). Although more total injuries occurred in practice than in competition, there was a lower injury rate in kendo than in taekwondo and western-style fencing. This study demonstrates that kendo is a relatively safe sport compared to other martial arts sports.

  20. Prevalence of skin diseases in civilian and military population in a Turkish military hospital in the central Black Sea region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şenel, Engin; Doğruer Şenel, S; Salmanoğlu, M

    2015-06-01

    There are no epidemiological studies comparing the prevalence of skin diseases between civilian and military populations. We sought to determine and compare the prevalence of skin conditions between civilian and military populations. A total of 3382 male patients (1148 military and 2234 civilian) were retrospectively and consecutively evaluated at Merzifon Military Hospital in the central Black Sea Region of Turkey. The most frequent dermatological condition was tinea pedis (15.8%) followed by acne vulgaris, allergic contact dermatitis and alopecia areata in the military population (15.7%, 7.7% and 5.4%, respectively). Acne vulgaris, xerosis cutis and allergic contact dermatitis were the most common diagnoses in the civilian group (19.4%, 14.1% and 9.1%, respectively). The prevalence of tinea pedis, alopecia areata, pityriasis versicolor, ingrown nail (unguis incarnatus) and callus were statistically significantly higher in the military group (15.8% vs 4.4%, p<0.001; 5.4% vs 1.7%, p<0.05; 3.5% vs 0.7%, p<0.001; 3.3% vs 0.3%, p<0.001 and 4.6% vs 0.9%, p<0.001; respectively). Xerosis cutis was found to be significantly higher in the civilian group (14.1% vs 5.8%, p<0.001). Superficial fungal disease was the most prevalent disorder as in the previous literature. Preventive measures should be taken to improve the health of troops and reduce the prevalence of the common disorders such as tinea pedis, alopecia areata and callus. Troops should wear boots only when necessary in base camps. Clothing which reduces ventilation is not recommended. Depression and anxiety should be recognised and treated in soldiers with alopecia areata, as a solely dermatological approach without psychological support may reduce treatment success. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Prevalence and patterns of combat sport related maxillofacial injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Shirani, Gholamreza; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein; Ashuri, Alireza; Eshkevari, Pooyan Sadr

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to assess the prevalence, distribution, and patterns of injury among athletes engaged in combat sports and compare the prevalence, pattern, and types of oral and maxillofacial trauma in these athletes. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 male athletes engaged in four combat sports (boxing, taekwondo, kickboxing, and Muay Thai) who had sustained bodily trauma were studied; 95 subjects with at least one traumatic injury to the face requiring treatment were referre...

  2. Prevalence of Injuries during Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex R. McDonald

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian jiu-jitsu (BJJ is a martial art that focuses on groundwork, joint locks, and chokeholds. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of injuries sustained during BJJ training. A 27-question research survey was e-mailed to 166 BJJ gyms in the United States. Demographic information, belt level, weight class, training hours, competition experience, and injury prevalence data were collected. The majority of respondents were Caucasian (n = 96 males (n = 121 with an average age of 30.3 years. Overall, the most common injury locations were to the hand and fingers (n = 70, foot and toes (n = 52, and arm and elbow (n = 51. The most common medically diagnosed conditions were skin infections (n = 38, injuries to the knee (n =26, and foot and toes (n = 19. The most common non-medically diagnosed injuries occurred to the hand and fingers (n = 56, arm and elbow (n = 40, and foot and toes (n = 33. In general, athletes were more likely to sustain distal rather than proximal injuries. Athletes reported more frequent medically diagnosed injuries to the lower extremity and more frequent self-diagnosed injuries to the upper extremity. Upper extremity injuries appear to be more frequent but less severe than lower extremity injuries with the opposite being true for lower extremity injuries.

  3. Prevalence of needle-stick injuries, blood and body fluids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Health care workers are frequently exposed to needle-stick injuries, blood and body fluids in the performance of their duties. Aims and objectives: This study sought to determine the prevalence and pattern of occupational exposure to needle-stick injuries, blood and body fluid contamination among clinical and ...

  4. Prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries among adolescent squash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pital emergency departments.11 Lower-limb injuries account for the majority of the injuries sustained by squash players.11. The knee and ankle joint are reportedly the most commonly injured body regions in squash.11 The shoulder joint is the most frequently injured upper-limb region.3. Squash is a high-intensity sport that ...

  5. Systematic review of prognosis after mild traumatic brain injury in the military

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Eleanor; Cancelliere, Carol; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    SYNTHESIS: The evidence was synthesized qualitatively and presented in evidence tables. Our findings are based on 3 studies of U.S. military personnel who were deployed in Iraq or Afghanistan. We found that military personnel with MTBI report posttraumatic stress disorder and postconcussive symptoms...... that combat stress, posttraumatic stress disorder, and postconcussive symptoms affect recovery and prognosis of MTBI in military personnel. Additional high-quality research is needed to fully assess the prognosis of MTBI in military personnel.......OBJECTIVE: The World Health Organization Collaborating Centre Task Force on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) published its findings on the prognosis of MTBI in 2004. This is an update of that review with a focus on deployed military personnel. DATA SOURCES: Relevant literature published between...

  6. Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters as Predictors of Lower-Limb Overuse Injuries in Military Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmuel Springer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study objective was to determine whether spatiotemporal gait parameters could predict lower-limb overuse injuries in cohort of combat soldiers during first year of military service. Newly recruited infantry soldiers walked on a treadmill at a 15° incline with a fixed speed of 1.67 m/sec while wearing a standard military vest with a 10 kg load. Stride time variability, stride length variability, step length asymmetry, and the duration of the loading response phase of the gait cycle were measured. Injury data on 76 soldiers who did not report musculoskeletal complaints at initial screening were collected one year after recruitment. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the predictive effect of the gait parameters on lower-limb injuries. Twenty-four soldiers (31.6% had overuse injuries during the first year after recruitment. Duration of the loading response was a significant predictor of general lower-limb injury (p<0.05, as well as of foot/ankle and knee injuries (p<0.05, p<0.01, resp.. A cutoff value of less than 12.15% for loading response duration predicted knee injuries with 83% sensitivity and 67% specificity. This study demonstrates the utility of spatiotemporal gait evaluation, a simple screening tool before military training, which may help to identify individuals at risk of lower-limb overuse injuries.

  7. Prevalence of basketball-related musculoskeletal injuries among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Basketball is one of top 10 most popular sports frequently contested at University Sports of South Africa (USSA) tournaments. Basketball played at university level is an aggressive contact sport which lends itself to a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and injuries. This study documented the prevalence and causes of ...

  8. Establishing a Spinal Injury Criterion for Military Seats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapaport, Martin; Forster, Estrella; Schoenbeck, Ann; Domzalski, Leon

    1997-01-01

    .... With the evolution of crash test dummies which now exhibit great bio-fidelic performance, military researchers are considering "direct force" measurements taken within the Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD...

  9. Prevalence and patterns of combat sport related maxillofacial injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirani, Gholamreza; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein; Ashuri, Alireza; Eshkevari, Pooyan Sadr

    2010-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the prevalence, distribution, and patterns of injury among athletes engaged in combat sports and compare the prevalence, pattern, and types of oral and maxillofacial trauma in these athletes. A total of 120 male athletes engaged in four combat sports (boxing, taekwondo, kickboxing, and Muay Thai) who had sustained bodily trauma were studied; 95 subjects with at least one traumatic injury to the face requiring treatment were referred to us by the physician team. The type of injury (facial laceration, facial fractures, jaw dislocation, etc.), site of facial injury (jaw, nose, malar bone, teeth, etc.), dental injuries (tooth fracture, displacement, luxation, and avulsion), causative sport (boxing, taekwondo, kickboxing, and Muay Thai) as well as demographic data were recorded. Injuries were examined clinically and radiographically, and treated accordingly by a specialist. Treatment data and demographics were recorded for each subject. Recorded data were assessed, and χ(2), ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to statistically analyze and compare the data. Of 120 subjects, 95 male subjects (79.2%), aged 18-25 years (avg. 20 years), had at least one traumatic injury to the face requiring medical treatment. These injuries included facial laceration, bone fractures (nose, mandible, and zygoma), dental injuries (displacement, luxation, fracture, and avulsion), and mandibular dislocation which were recorded in 83 (69.2%), 55 (45.1%), 53 (44.2%), and 8 (6.7%) cases respectively. Statistically significant differences were encountered among various injuries and the sports; kickboxing caused the most maxillofacial injuries and was identified as more injurious. Tooth fractures (59.7%) were the most common dental injuries, and the nose (84.7%) was the most frequently fractured facial bone. Lacerations were more common in Thai-boxers (93.3%). Injuries were significantly greater in professional rather than amateur athletes. In this study

  10. Prevalence and patterns of combat sport related maxillofacial injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirani Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to assess the prevalence, distribution, and patterns of injury among athletes engaged in combat sports and compare the prevalence, pattern, and types of oral and maxillofacial trauma in these athletes. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 male athletes engaged in four combat sports (boxing, taekwondo, kickboxing, and Muay Thai who had sustained bodily trauma were studied; 95 subjects with at least one traumatic injury to the face requiring treatment were referred to us by the physician team. The type of injury (facial laceration, facial fractures, jaw dislocation, etc., site of facial injury (jaw, nose, malar bone, teeth, etc., dental injuries (tooth fracture, displacement, luxation, and avulsion, causative sport (boxing, taekwondo, kickboxing, and Muay Thai as well as demographic data were recorded. Injuries were examined clinically and radiographically, and treated accordingly by a specialist. Treatment data and demographics were recorded for each subject. Recorded data were assessed, and c2 , ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to statistically analyze and compare the data. Results: Of 120 subjects, 95 male subjects (79.2%, aged 18-25 years (avg. 20 years, had at least one traumatic injury to the face requiring medical treatment. These injuries included facial laceration, bone fractures (nose, mandible, and zygoma, dental injuries (displacement, luxation, fracture, and avulsion, and mandibular dislocation which were recorded in 83 (69.2%, 55 (45.1%, 53 (44.2%, and 8 (6.7% cases respectively. Statistically significant differences were encountered among various injuries and the sports; kickboxing caused the most maxillofacial injuries and was identified as more injurious. Tooth fractures (59.7% were the most common dental injuries, and the nose (84.7% was the most frequently fractured facial bone. Lacerations were more common in Thai-boxers (93.3%. Injuries were significantly greater in professional rather

  11. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Among Soldiers of the Military Police of Bahia State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Romário Teixeira Braga; D'Oliveira, Argemiro

    2014-07-01

    The mortality rate of men is generally higher than that of women, irrespective of the age group. Currently, a key concern for health care professionals is the prevalence of risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. This study aimed at assessing the prevalence of individual risk factors for cardiovascular disease as well as the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among men serving in the Military Police Corps of the state of Bahia, Brazil. This service employs mostly men, and they are known to experience high levels of occupational stress and professional victimization. We conducted a cross-sectional study among military police soldiers (n = 452) who were candidates for a military police training course in Bahia, Brazil. All candidates who attended the selection process were evaluated according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Panel III in order to assess the presence of medical disorders that could contribute to cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. The authors identified a high prevalence of hypertension (55.76%), hypertriglyceridemia (50.85%), waist circumference of >102 cm (31.76%), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (30.46%), and impaired fasting glucose (28.15%) in our subjects. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 38.54%. The authors suggest that measures should be taken to ensure that military policemen receive continued medical care, both in their professional capacity and in their personal circumstances, and that attention be focused on intervention programs. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Physical Training Injuries and Interventions for Military Recruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    asymmetrical balance per Star Excursion Balance Test performance has been associated with increased lower extremity injury risk among basketball players...Activity/Exercise/Running Before IMT Medical Factors History of Musculoskeletal Injury (esp. Ankle Sprain) — aConflicting reports concerning whether...combination of health care and fitness professionals for injury prevention , performance opti- mization, and musculoskeletal rehabilitation in IMT. At the

  13. The Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors, and Metabolic Syndrome among Iranian Military Parachutists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Khoshdel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD is rapidly increasing worldwide. Occupation-related stress such as military parachuting has been considered to be a potentially important cardiovascular risk factor. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome among military parachutists which provides a guideline to prevent catastrophic cardiovascular events. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study among 96 military parachutists in southern IR Iran; who were evaluated in the military clinic in Shiraz, Southern IR Iran. Information regarding demographic and life style were obtained from each subject. Arterial blood pressure, weight, height, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC and hip circumference (HC, fasting blood glucose, lipid profile consisting of total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglyceride were measured by standard methods. Results: The mean age of participants was 37.4±6.4 years. There were 5 (5.2% cases under treatment for cardiovascular diseases, 4 (4.2% participants were pre-diabetics and 5 (5.2% suffered from diabetes mellitus. Hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia were seen in 23 (24% and 46 (47% military parachutists respectively. Conclusions: Although war-related stressors and high intensity physical activities are associated with both acute cardiac events and cardiac risk factors, our data is in favor of lower frequency of cardiovascular risk factors among military parachutists. However, routine monitoring of military parachutists is necessary to find the cardiovascular risk factors.

  14. Sexual harassment and assault experienced by reservists during military service: prevalence and health correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Amy E; Stafford, Jane; Mahan, Clare M; Hendricks, Ann

    2008-01-01

    The current investigation identified the gender-specific prevalence of sexual harassment and assault experienced during U.S. military service and the negative mental and physical health correlates of these experiences in a sample of former reservists. We surveyed a stratified random sample of 3,946 former reservists about their experiences during military service and their current health, including depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatic symptoms, and medical conditions. Prevalence estimates and confidence intervals of sexual harassment and assault were calculated. A series of logistic regressions identified associations with health symptoms and conditions. Both men and women had a substantial prevalence of military sexual harassment and assault. As expected, higher proportions of female reservists reported sexual harassment (60.0% vs 27.2% for males) and sexual assault (13.1% vs 1.6% for males). For both men and women, these experiences were associated with deleterious mental and physical health conditions, with sexual assault demonstrating stronger associations than other types of sexual harassment in most cases. This investigation is the first to document high instances of these experiences among reservists. These data provide further evidence that experiences of sexual harassment and assault during military service have significant implications for the healthcare needs of military veterans.

  15. The Prevalence of Injury in Permanent Residences of Duzce City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla Senih Mayda

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM/BACKGROUND: Objective of this cross-sectional study is to determine the prevalence of injury and risk factors in permanent residences of Duzce. METHODS: The sample size of this study is calculated as 715 people when population of the region is 13565, injury prevalence is 20.9% taken from a study in Duzce, expected lowest frequency as 18% and in 95% confidence interval. Number of people could be reached was designed as 1170 when 300 house was visited as mean household was 3.9 people which was taken from a study carried out in this region. Data is collected in 15-30 April in the year 2006. Totally, reached sample is 767 people. Injury status, status after injury are dependant variables and age, gender, education status, profession, chronic illness, tobacco-alcohol consumption, marital status are independent variables. RESULTS: Distribution of the group as gender was male 352 (45.9%, female 415 (54. %1. Mean education year of male (4.5±1.5 year was higher than female (4.2±1.6 year (t= 2.97, p=0.03. Injury prevalence was 10.0% (n=767. Sort of injury was fall 31 people (40.2%, cut 11 (14. %3, burn 10 (13.0%. Place that injury take place was house 41 (55.4%, road 17 (23.0%, school 4 (5.4%. Lesions were; cut-wounded injury in 20 people (28.2%, rotten in 10 (14.1%, sprain in 8 (11.3%. Number of injured people was 77 and 28 (36.4% of them applied to hospital. CONCLUSION: Valid prevalance of injuries can be indicated by field studies as quarter of injured people applied to health departments. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 133-136

  16. Trends in new injuries, prevalent cases, and aging with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVivo, Michael J; Chen, Yuying

    2011-03-01

    To determine the characteristics of the newly injured and prevalent population with spinal cord injury (SCI) and assess trends over time. Prospective cohort study. SCI Model Systems and Shriners Hospital SCI units. The study population included people whose injuries occurred from 1935 to 2008 (N=45,442). The prevalent population was estimated based on those who were still alive in 2008. Losses to follow-up (approximately 10%) were excluded from the prevalent population. Not applicable. Demographic and injury characteristics, mortality, self-reported health, rehospitalization, FIM, Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique, and the Diener Satisfaction with Life Scale. Mean age at injury increased 9 years since the 1970s. Injuries caused by falls and injuries resulting in high-level tetraplegia and ventilator dependency are increasing, while neurologically complete injuries are decreasing. Discharge to a nursing home is increasing. The mean age of the prevalent population is slightly higher than that of newly injured individuals, and the percentage of incident and prevalent cases older than 60 years is the same (13%). Prevalent cases tend to be less severely injured than incident cases, and less than 5% of prevalent cases reside in nursing homes. Within the prevalent population, life satisfaction and community participation are greater among persons who are at least 30 years postinjury. These findings are a result of very high mortality rates observed after 60 years of age. Within the prevalent population, the percentage of elderly persons will not increase meaningfully. Those who reach older ages will typically have incomplete and/or lower-level injuries and will have relatively high degrees of independence and overall good health. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A prospective investigation of injury incidence and injury risk factors among Army recruits in military police training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Graham, Bria; Cobbs, Jacketta; Thompson, Diane; Steelman, Ryan; Jones, Bruce H

    2013-01-17

    United States Army military police (MP) training is a 19-week course designed to introduce new recruits to basic soldiering skills, Army values and lifestyle, and law enforcement skills and knowledge. The present investigation examined injury rates and injury risk factors in MP training. At the start of training, 1,838 male and 553 female MP recruits were administered a questionnaire containing items on date of birth, height, weight, tobacco use, prior physical activity, injury history, and menstrual history. Injuries during training were obtained from electronic medical records and the training units provided data on student graduation and attrition. Successfully graduating from the course were 94.3% of the men and 83.7% of the women. Experiencing at least one injury during training were 34.2% of the men and 66.7% of the women (risk ratio (women/men) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval = 1.79-2.13). Recruits were at higher injury risk if they reported that they were older, had smoked in the past, or had performed less frequent exercise or sports prior to MP training. Men were at higher injury risk if they reported a prior injury and women were at higher risk if they reported missing at least six menstrual cycles in the last year or had previously been pregnant. The present investigation was the first to identify injury rates and identify specific factors increasing injury risk during MP training.

  18. Maxillofacial Gunshot Injuries: A Comparison of Civilian and Military Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Carlo; Pirgousis, Phillip; Steinberg, Barry

    2016-04-01

    To compare military with civilian gunshot wounds (GSWs) in the maxillofacial region in order to establish differences in presentation, morbidity, and surgical management. A cross-sectional study design was used. The University of Florida at Jacksonville oral and maxillofacial surgery operating room census and hospital trauma registry were both reviewed to identify maxillofacial GSW cases from 2005 through 2011. Military GSW data (2005 through 2011) were obtained from the US Department of Defense (DOD). The predictor variables were civilian versus military GSW events. The outcome variables of interest included the region of the face involved, race, gender, death during admission, hospital length of stay, and number of days in the intensive care unit (ICU). Descriptive statistics were computed. The sample was divided into military maxillofacial GSWs (n = 412) and civilian maxillofacial GSWs (n = 287 treated of 2,478 presented). A significant difference was measured between study groups regarding the region of the face involved (P = .0451), gender (P ≤ .0001), and race (P ≤ .0001). No significant relationship was measured regarding deaths during admission (P = .6510) for either study group. No standard deviation values for hospital length of stay or number of ICU days were provided by the DOD. The mean hospital length of stay for the military group was within the 95% confidence interval of the civilian group findings (6.0-7.6). The mean number of ICU days for the military group was not within the civilian group's 95% confidence interval (1.9-2.9). These data showed important differences in anatomic location, gender, and race distribution of maxillofacial GSWs between military and civilian populations. Limited analysis of hospital length of stay and number of ICU days might indicate no meaningful difference in hospital length of stay, although there was a statistical difference in the number of ICU days between the 2 populations. Future research comparing

  19. Incidence of Overuse Musculoskeletal Injuries in Military Service Members With Traumatic Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Mazzone, Brittney; Eskridge, Susan; Shannon, Kaeley; Hill, Owen T

    2018-02-01

    To describe the incidence of overuse musculoskeletal injuries in service members with combat-related lower limb amputation. Retrospective cohort study. Military treatment facilities. Service members with deployment-related lower limb injury (N=791): 496 with a major lower limb amputation and 295 with a mild lower limb injury. Not applicable. The outcomes of interest were clinical diagnosis codes (International Classification of Diseases-9th Revision) associated with musculoskeletal overuse injuries of the lumbar spine, upper limb, and lower limb regions 1 year before and 1 year after injury. The overall incidence of developing at least 1 musculoskeletal overuse injury within the first year after lower limb amputation was between 59% and 68%. Service members with unilateral lower limb amputation were almost twice as likely to develop an overuse lower or upper limb injury than those with mild combat-related injury. Additionally, service members with bilateral lower limb amputation were more than twice as likely to develop a lumbar spine injury and 4 times more likely to develop an upper limb overuse injury within the first year after amputation than those with mild combat-related injury. Incidence of secondary overuse musculoskeletal injury is elevated in service members with lower limb amputation and warrants focused research efforts toward developing preventive interventions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Noncombat-related injuries or illnesses incurred by military working dogs in a combat zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Matt S; Harrell, Karyn

    2014-11-15

    To determine the most common types of noncombat-related injuries or illnesses in military working dogs in a combat zone. Retrospective descriptive study. 1,350 patient encounters with military working dogs evaluated for noncombat-related reasons. Data regarding noncombat-related veterinary visits were collected on a weekly basis from 13 forward operating bases throughout Iraq from January 2009 through August 2010. Reporting facility location, patient identification, reason for evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment were recorded, and descriptive data were summarized. The most common noncombat-related disease processes or injuries identified were related to the dermatologic system (ie, primary [inflammatory] dermatologic disease; 338/1,350 [25.0%]), soft tissue trauma (284 [21.0%]), alimentary system (231 [17.1%]), or musculoskeletal system (193 [14.3%]). Veterinary Corps officers need to be proficient not only in the management of combat-related injuries but also in the treatment of routine illnesses and injuries. Knowledge of noncombat-related diseases and injuries commonly incurred by military working dogs can be used for targeted training for individuals responsible for medical care of these animals as well as for equipment selection and protocol development.

  1. Accelerated Changes in Cortical Thickness Measurements with Age in Military Service Members with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savjani, Ricky R; Taylor, Brian A; Acion, Laura; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Jorge, Ricardo E

    2017-11-15

    Finding objective and quantifiable imaging markers of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) has proven challenging, especially in the military population. Changes in cortical thickness after injury have been reported in animals and in humans, but it is unclear how these alterations manifest in the chronic phase, and it is difficult to characterize accurately with imaging. We used cortical thickness measures derived from Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) to predict a continuous demographic variable: age. We trained four different regression models (linear regression, support vector regression, Gaussian process regression, and random forests) to predict age from healthy control brains from publicly available datasets (n = 762). We then used these models to predict brain age in military Service Members with TBI (n = 92) and military Service Members without TBI (n = 34). Our results show that all four models overpredicted age in Service Members with TBI, and the predicted age difference was significantly greater compared with military controls. These data extend previous civilian findings and show that cortical thickness measures may reveal an association of accelerated changes over time with military TBI.

  2. Prospective Tracking and Analysis of Traumatic Brain Injury in Veterans and Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona, Nytzia E; Chung, Joyce S; Poole, John H; Salerno, Rose M; Laurenson, Nancy M; Harris, Odette A

    2017-02-01

    To describe the ongoing Clinical Tracking Form (CTF) study of the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC). Prospective longitudinal study. Data at baseline and postinjury are collected on participants through interview and questionnaire, review of medical records, and periodic follow-ups throughout their lifetime. A regional DVBIC site located at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Participants (N=211; age range, 18-75y) were enrolled between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, at a regional DVBIC site. Not applicable. Injury information, functioning, and psychological health. Sixty percent of 211 participants were identified as having severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), 14% moderate TBIs, and 26% mild TBIs. Of these 211 participants, 79% sustained closed head injuries, 15% penetrating head injuries, and 6% were not reported. Comparing the severity of TBI in combat versus stateside situations, most of the mild injuries (71%) occurred in combat locations, while most of the severe injuries (62%) occurred in the United States. Among those injured in combat, blast-related TBIs (82%) greatly outnumbered non-blast-related TBIs, regardless of severity. The CTF study serves as a significant resource of data to understand the effect and outcomes of TBI in the military population. The lifelong experience of military veterans across the full spectrum of TBI and recovery will be recorded through the CTF, and will translate into more informed clinical decisions and educational efforts to guide future research pathways. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of traumadc dental Injuries among new orthodondc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of dental trauma was significantly higher in males (p<0.05) and most frequently observed In patients aged 6 to 10 years. Falls was the commonest cause of dental traumatic Injuries among the patients (37.5%). The most common type of trauma to the teeth was enamel fracture (46. 9%) followed by avulslon ...

  4. Prevalence of Occupational Accidents/Injuries among Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Health care workers (HCWs) are prone to occupational accidents and injuries such as needle pricks in the course of their day to day activities in the health care setting. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of needle sticks and other occupational exposures among HCWs in a Nigerian tertiary hospital.

  5. Prevalence and determinants of road traffic injuries in Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and determinants of road traffic injuries in Ethiopia: Based on the 2015 STEPS survey findings. Mussie Gebremichael, Mulugeta Guta, Mola Gedefaw, Alemayehu Bekele, Fassil Shiferaw, Terefe Gelibo, Theodros Getachew, Kissi Mudie, Kassahun Amenu, Atkure Defar, Habtamu Teklie, Tefera Taddele, Girum ...

  6. The Prevalence of Injuries in Professional Turkish Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaner, Faruk; Gumusdag, Hayrettin; Kartal, Alparslan; Gumus, M.; Gullu, A.; Imamoglu, O.

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the prevalence and anatomical sites of injuries in professional soccer players in one game season. Material and methods: A cohort of 510 professional male soccer players consisting of 48 goalkeepers, 194 defence players, 189 mid-field players and 79 forward players of the 1st and 2nd Turkish Professional Soccer Leagues in…

  7. Prevalence and outcomes of acute kidney injury in term neonates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The kidney is the most damaged organ in asphyxiated full-term infants. The severity of its damage is correlated with the severity of neurological damage. We determined the prevalence of perinatal asphyxia-associated acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study including 60 ...

  8. Prevalence of Oral and Maxillofacial Injuries among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1,2Department of Dentistry, University of Rwanda, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Rwanda. Prevalence of Oral and Maxillofacial ... treatment of facial bone fractures, dentoalveolar trauma, soft tissue injuries, as well as concomitant .... Only 10 (5.4%) out of 182 subjects were found to have not sustained any hard ...

  9. Compulsive sexual behavior among male military veterans: prevalence and associated clinical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip H; Potenza, Marc N; Mazure, Carolyn M; McKee, Sherry A; Park, Crystal L; Hoff, Rani A

    2014-12-01

    Compulsive sexual behavior (CSB) is highly prevalent among men, often co-occurring with psychiatric disorders and traumatic experiences. Psychiatric disorders and trauma are highly prevalent among military veterans, yet there is a paucity of research on CSB among military samples. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of and factors associated with CSB among male military veterans. Surveys were administered to veterans of Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, or New Dawn at baseline (n = 258), 3 months(n = 194), and 6 months (n = 136). Bivariate analyses and Generalized Estimating Equations were utilized to estimate associations between CSB and the following variables: psychiatric co-morbidity, childhood physical or sexual trauma, pre- and post-deployment experiences, TV/ Internet usage, and sociodemographics. Associations between CSB and specific PTSD symptom clusters were also examined. CSB was reported by 16.7% of the sample at baseline. Several variables were associated with CSB in bivariate analyses; however, only PTSD severity, childhood sexual trauma, and age remained significant in multivariable GEE models. The PTSD symptom cluster re-experiencing was most strongly associated with CSB. This exploratory study suggests that CSB is prevalent amongst veterans returning from combat and is associated with childhood trauma and PTSD, particularly re-experiencing. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms linking PTSD and CSB, define the context and severity of CSB in veterans, and examine the best ways to assess and treat CSB in VA clinical settings.

  10. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Different Obesity Phenotype in Iranian Male Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payab, Moloud; Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Merati, Yaser; Esteghamati, Alireza; Qorbani, Mostafa; Hematabadi, Mahboobeh; Rashidian, Hoda; Shirzad, Nooshin

    2017-03-01

    Obesity, especially when concentrated in the abdominal area, is often associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Stress, particularly occupational stress, is one of the most important factors contributing to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome components among different populations. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity as well as the criteria for metabolic syndrome and its risk factors and different obesity phenotype in a population of military personnel aged 20 to 65 years. This study is a retrospective cross-sectional study in which data are extracted from the database of a military hospital (2,200 participants). The records of participants contained information such as age, marital status, educational level, weight, height, body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, history of drug use and smoking, as well as the results of tests including lipid profile and fasting blood glucose. The Adult Treatment Panel III criteria as well as two national criteria were used to identify metabolic syndrome among participants. Data analysis was p1erformed using SPSS version 16. The average age of participants was 33.37 (7.75) years. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to Iranian cutoff was 26.6% for the waist circumference >90 cm (585 persons) and 19.6% for the waist circumference >95 cm (432 persons). The rate of metabolic syndrome was identified as 11.1% (432 cases) according to Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results of the current study identified that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among military individuals is less than other populations, but the prevalence of the syndrome is higher than other military personnel in other countries.

  11. Mental disorder prevalence among U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs outpatients with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Scott D; Mickens, Melody N; Goldberg-Looney, Lisa D; Mutchler, Brian J; Ellwood, Michael S; Castillo, Teodoro A

    2017-03-13

    Depression and other mental disorders are more prevalent among individuals living with spinal cord injury (SCI) than in the community at large, and have a strong association with quality of life. Yet little is known about the prevalence and predictors of mental disorders among U.S. military Veterans living with SCI. The primary aim of this study was to present an estimate of mental disorder point prevalence in this population. The secondary aim was to examine the relationship of mental disorders to demographics, injury characteristics, and other clinically relevant features such as impairment from mental health problems and life satisfaction. Cross-sectional. A SCI & Disorders Center at a U.S. Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Administrative and medical records of 280 Veterans who attended annual comprehensive SCI evaluations were evaluated. Demographics, injury characteristics, self-reported mental and emotional functioning (i.e. SF-8 Health Survey), and clinician-determined mental disorder diagnoses were attained. Overall, 40% of patients received at least one mental disorder diagnosis, most commonly depressive disorders (19%), posttraumatic stress disorder (12%), and substance or alcohol use disorders (11%). Several patient characteristics predicted mental disorders, including age, racial minority identity, non-traumatic SCI etiology, and incomplete (i.e. AIS D) vs. complete injury. Mental disorders were associated with greater impairment from health and mental health-related problems and less satisfaction with life. Mental disorders are common among outpatients receiving VA specialty care for SCI. These findings highlight the importance of having adequate and effective available mental health services available for Veterans with SCI.

  12. 75 FR 62439 - The Entire United States and U.S. Territories; Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ..., the Veterans Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development Act of 1999, and the Military Reservist... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12341 Disaster ZZ-00006] The Entire United States and U.S. Territories; Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loan AGENCY: U.S. Small Business...

  13. Prevalence of Hepatitis B and C in US Air Force Basic Military Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-29

    USAF/;Lt Col John G. Gancayco, MD 5 (Maj, USAF/ 6 Abstract 7 Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) can cause significant morbidity...hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections can cause significant 23 morbidity in military service members due to prolonged inflammatory damage to the liver and...excluded groups of people at higher risk of infection such as Asians, Pacific Islanders, and homeless 29 populations3 • The overall prevalence of chronic

  14. Effects and outcomes in civilian and military traumatic brain injury: similarities, differences, and forensic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberty, Greg J; Nelson, Nathaniel W; Yamada, Torrii

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a prominent public health problem in both civilian and military settings. This article discusses similarities and differences in the assessment and treatment of TBI and the attendant forensic implications. Acute care and management of moderate/severe TBI tend to be similar across environments, as is the recognition of disability status in affected individuals. By contrast, an increased focus on mild TBI in recent years has resulted in a reliance on self-report and screening measures to validate the occurrence of events leading to injury. This has complicated assessment, treatment and subsequent medicolegal proceedings. The neuropsychological literature has provided significant guidance on these difficult issues, although the complexity of disability adjudication for active duty members of the military and veterans continues to pose challenges for clinicians in evaluative and treatment contexts. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Fatal injury epidemiology among the New Zealand military forces in the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nick; Summers, Jennifer A; Baker, Michael G; Thomson, George; Harper, Glyn

    2013-11-01

    Despite the large mortality burden of First World War (WW1) on New Zealand (NZ) military forces, no analysis using modern epidemiological methods has ever been conducted. We therefore aimed to study injury-related mortality amongst NZ military forces in WW1. An electronic version of the Roll-of-Honour for NZ Expeditionary Force (NZEF) personnel was supplemented with further coding and analysed statistically. We also performed literature searches to provide context. Out of a total of 16,703 deaths occurring during the war (28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918), injury deaths predominated: 65.1% were "killed in action" (KIA), 23.4% "died of wounds" (DOW), 1.0% were other injuries (e.g. "accidents", drownings, suicides and executions), and 10.5% were other causes (mainly disease). During the course of the war, the annual mortality rate from injury (for KIA + DOW) per 10,000 NZEF personnel in the North Hemisphere peaked at 1335 in 1915 (Gallipoli campaign) and then peaked again in 1917 at 937 (largely the Battle of Passchendaele). Some of the offensive campaigns involved very high mortality peaks (e.g. 2 days with over 450 deaths per day in October 1917). Participation in First World War was by far the worst fatal injury event in New Zealand's history. Many of these injury deaths could be considered to have been preventable through: better diplomacy (to prevent the war), improved military planning to reduce failed campaigns (e.g. Gallipoli, Passchendaele), earlier use of protective equipment such as helmets, and improved healthcare services.

  16. The military's approach to traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Grimes, Jamie; Ecklund, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are common conditions. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI became prominent among US service members but the vast majority of TBI was still due to typical causes such as falls and sporting events. PTS has long been a focus of the US military mental health providers. Combat Stress Teams have been integral to forward deployed units since the beginning of the Global War on Terror. Military medical management of disease and injury follows standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) established by civilian counterparts. However, when civilian CPGs do not exist or are not applicable to the military environment, new practice standards are created. Such is the case for mild TBI. In 2009, the VA-DoD CPG for management of mild TBI/concussion was published and a system-wide clinical care program for mild TBI/concussion was introduced. This was the first large scale effort on an entire medical care system to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. In 2010, the VA-DoD CPG for management of PTSD was published. Nevertheless, both TBI and PTS are still incompletely understood. Investment in terms of money and effort has been committed by the DoD to their study. The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury are prominent examples of this effort. These are just beginnings, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always striving to provide the very best care to its military beneficiaries.

  17. Two years after injury: prevalence and early post-injury predictors of ongoing injury-related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Suzanne J; Davie, Gabrielle; Derrett, Sarah

    2017-07-01

    To determine, in a cohort with injuries classified anatomically as mainly minor or moderate and for which only 25% were hospitalised acutely, the prevalence of ongoing problems attributed by participants to their injury 2 years prior, and to examine whether three-month post-injury experiences and expectations predict such problems. Participants (N = 2231; 18-64 years at injury) were those in the Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study who completed the initial three-month and final two-year interviews. The outcome measure was whether participants reported ongoing injury-related problems at 2 years. Possible early post-injury predictors were identified from the first interview; pre-injury and injury-related potential confounders from the first interview, insurer records and hospital discharge records. Multivariable models estimated relative risks. Almost half the participants reported injury-related problems at 2 years. Participants reporting non-recovery at 3 months were more likely than those reporting recovery to have ongoing problems at 2 years, ranging from participants expecting to get better soon [adjusted RR 2.2, 95% CI (1.7,2.8)) to those expecting to never get better (aRR 3.1, 95% CI (2.4,4.0)]. Several three-month post-injury experiences also predicted ongoing problems at 2 years. Participants at highest risk included those with extreme pain [aRR 2.1, 95% CI (1.7,2.5)], and less involvement in usual activities [aRR 1.7, 95% CI (1.5,1.9)]. Findings indicate that early post-injury characteristics predict longer-term recovery among this cohort, most of who were not classified as seriously injured, and provide guidance for future studies on interventions to reduce poor outcome prevalence, particularly focussing on pain management and enabling return to independence and social participation.

  18. Hearing Loss and Tinnitus in Military Personnel with Deployment-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Stephanie J; Capó-Aponte, José E; McIlwain, D Scott; Lo, Michael; Krishnamurti, Sridhar; Staton, Roger N; Jorgensen-Wagers, Kendra

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze differences in incidence and epidemiologic risk factors for significant threshold shift (STS) and tinnitus in deployed military personnel diagnosed with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) due to either a blast exposure or nonblast head injury. A retrospective longitudinal cohort study of electronic health records of 500 military personnel (456 met inclusion criteria) diagnosed with deployment-related mTBI was completed. Chi-square tests and STS incidence rates were calculated to assess differences between blast-exposed and nonblast groups; relative risks and adjusted odds ratios of developing STS or tinnitus were calculated for risk factors. Risk factors included such characteristics as mechanism of injury, age, race, military occupational specialty, concurrent diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and nicotine use. Among blast-exposed and nonblast patients, 67% and 58%, respectively, developed STS, (P=.06); 59% and 40%, respectively, developed tinnitus (Ptinnitus. Unprotected noise exposure was associated with both STS and tinnitus. This study highlights potential risk factors for STS and tinnitus among blast-exposed and nonblast mTBI patient groups.

  19. Investigation of military training injuries in a special force corps in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang ZHAO

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the incidence, related influencing factors and predilection sites of training injuries in a special force corps for providing a basis of effective prevention of the injuries. Methods Four hundred and sixty-four officers and soldiers were randomly selected by lottery method from a special force corps in May 2011, and the training injuries as well as their related information was investigated by a questionnaire method. The medical records of the 464 subjects from May 2010 to May 2011 were reviewed. The collected data were statistically analyzed using SPSS 19.0 software. Results Of the 464 subjects, 165(35.6% never experienced injuries, and 299(64.4% were injured due to training in the last one year. A total of 505 person-time injuries occurred in 464 subjects, and the incidence of injury was 109 per 100 person-year. The major risk factors for training injuries included above average age, fondness of multiple sports, greater labor force, or higher frequency of sport exercises before enlistment, poor sleep or diet caused by training burden, and higher SCL-90 somatization score. The major protective factors comprised of higher military rank, lower-intensity training, higher education level, higher labor frequency before enlistment, higher SCL-90 phobic anxiety score, higher SCL-90 depression score, SCL-90 spirit score, and higher satisfaction degree on training program. The major sites of training injuries were lower extremities and lower back (accounting for 73.0%. Most injuries occurred below the knee (accounting for 49.0%, including the foot (6.5%, ankle (13.6%, leg(7.3% and knee (21.6%, followed by the lower back (accounting for 20.7%. Conclusions The risk factors of military training injuries involve various aspects, and continuous high intensive and highly difficult training items are the main reason of training injuries, and the lower extremities and lower back are the major locations. Psychological factors are

  20. Protective effect of Cordyceps militaris polypeptide against acute alcoholic liver injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAI Qi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the protective effect of Cordyceps militaris polypeptide against acute alcoholic liver injury in rats and related mechanism. MethodsA total of 60 Wistar rats were randomly divided into blank control group, model group, and low-, medium-, and high-dose Cordyceps militaris polypeptide groups. All rats except those in the blank control group were given 10 ml/kg 56° liquor by gavage once a day; the rats in the blank control group were given distilled water of the same dose by gavage once a day. At 1 hour after gavage with liquor, the rats in the model group and low-, medium-, and high-dose Cordyceps militaris polypeptide groups were given distilled water or Cordyceps militaris polypeptide solution (6 ml/kg by gavage. Blood samples were collected from the orbit 4 weeks later. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and level of malondialdehyde (MDA in the liver were measured for each group, and the pathological changes in the liver were observed under a light microscope. Analysis of variance was applied for comparison between multiple groups, and the SNK-q test was applied for comparison between any two groups. ResultsCompared with the model group, the low-, medium-, and high-dose Cordyceps militaris polypeptide groups showed significant reductions in the serum levels of ALT and AST and the level of MDA in the liver (all P<0.05, as well as a significant increase in the activity of SOD in the liver (all P<0.05, while these indices showed significant differences between the low-, medium-, and high-dose Cordyceps militaris polypeptide groups (all P<0.05. The liver pathological sections from the low-, medium-, and high-dose Cordyceps militaris polypeptide groups showed alleviated hepatocyte fatty degeneration and necrosis induced by alcohol under a light microscope. ConclusionCordyceps militaris polypeptide has a protective effect

  1. Tranexamic acid at the point of injury: the Israeli combined civilian and military experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Roy; Gendler, Sami; Benov, Avi; Strugo, Refael; Abramovich, Amir; Glassberg, Elon

    2014-09-01

    Accumulating evidence established the benefit of tranexamic acid (TXA) for traumatic bleeding in the hospital setting. TXA use in the field (at or near the point of injury [POI]) was described in the military setting but not in the civilian one. The current study describes the Israeli combined experience (civilian and military) of administering TXA in the field. The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) and Magen David Adom (MDA) (the national Israeli civilian emergency medical service) protocols for giving TXA at the POI are presented. We then review all trauma patients who received TXA in the field in accord with either protocol. Data were abstracted from the IDF Trauma Registry and from the MDA database. Data regarding casualties treated with TXA by the IDF Medical Corps and MDA between December 2011 and August 2013 are presented. One hundred three casualties who received TXA in the field were identified. The median age was 26.5 years, and 83 (88%) were male. The mechanism of injury was penetrating in 48 cases (51%). POI data indicate slightly higher injury severity for the group of patients treated by MDA compared with patients treated by the IDF (systolic blood pressure, 90 mm Hg vs. 110 mm Hg; Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score, 11 vs. 15; hemoglobin, 11.9 vs. 13.3; p < 0.05). On the basis of our combined data, it appears that administering TXA in the field is feasible in the civilian and the military setting. Lessons learned in military settings are applicable to civilian medical systems. Action investigations and comparison of the different protocols may further improve treatment at or near the POI. Therapeutic study, level V.

  2. A narrow bimalleolar width is a risk factor for ankle inversion injury in male military recruits: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Hannah; Nunns, Michael; House, Carol; Fallowfield, Joanne; Allsopp, Adrian; Dixon, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Ankle inversion injuries are one of the most common and burdensome injuries in athletic populations. Research that prospectively identifies characteristics associated with this injury is lacking. This prospective study compared baseline anthropometric and biomechanical gait characteristics of military recruits who sustained an ankle inversion injury during training, with those who remained injury-free. Bilateral plantar pressure and three-dimensional lower limb kinematics were recorded in 1065 male, injury-free military recruits, during barefoot running. Injuries that occurred during the 32-week recruit training programme were subsequently recorded. Data were compared between recruits who sustained an ankle inversion injury during training (n=27) and a sample (n=120) of those who completed training injury-free. A logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for this injury. A narrower bimalleolar width and an earlier peak pressure under the fifth metatarsal were predictors of ankle inversion injury. Those who sustained an ankle inversion injury also had a lower body mass, body mass index, and a smaller calf girth than those who completed training injury-free. Anthropometric and dynamic gait characteristics have been identified that may predispose recruits to an ankle inversion injury during Royal Marine recruit training, allowing identification of recruits at higher risk at the start of training. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Low fitness, low body mass and prior injury predict injury risk during military recruit training: a prospective cohort study in the British Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark; Siddall, Andrew; Bilzon, James; Thompson, Dylan; Greeves, Julie; Izard, Rachel; Stokes, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Injuries sustained by military recruits during initial training impede training progression and military readiness while increasing financial costs. This study investigated training-related injuries and injury risk factors among British Army infantry recruits. Recruits starting infantry training at the British Army Infantry Training Centre between September 2008 and March 2010 were eligible to take part. Information regarding lifestyle behaviours and injury history was collected using the Military Pre-training Questionnaire. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, physical fitness and injury (lower limb and lower back) data were obtained from Army databases. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression models were used to explore the association between time to first training injury and potential risk factors. 58% (95% CI 55% to 60%) of 1810 recruits sustained at least 1 injury during training. Overuse injuries were more common than traumatic injuries (65% and 35%, respectively). The lower leg accounted for 81% of all injuries, and non-specific soft tissue damage was the leading diagnosis (55% of all injuries). Injuries resulted in 122 (118 to 126) training days lost per 1000 person-days. Slower 2.4 km run time, low body mass, past injury and shin pain were independently associated with higher risk of any injury. There was a high incidence of overuse injuries in British Army recruits undertaking infantry training. Recruits with lower pretraining fitness levels, low body mass and past injuries were at higher risk. Faster 2.4 km run time performance and minimal body mass standards should be considered for physical entry criteria.

  4. Injuries in epilepsy: a review of its prevalence, risk factors, type of injuries and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Tellez-Zenteno

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is intense clinical research into various aspects of the medical risks relating to epilepsy, including total and cause-specific mortality, accidents and injuries in patients with epilepsy and mortality related with seizures. Seizures occurring in precarious situations and resulting in injuries are still an important concern for patients with epilepsy, their employers and their caregivers. Submersion injuries, motor vehicle accidents, burns, and head injuries are among the most feared epilepsy-related injuries. These concerns seem valid because the hallmark of epilepsy, episodic impairment of consciousness and motor control, may occur during interictal EEG epileptiform discharges, even in the absence of a clinical seizure. In addition, psychomotor comorbidity and side effects of antiepileptic drugs may contribute to the risk of injuries in patients with epilepsy. Published risk factors for injuries include the number of antiepileptic drugs, history of generalized seizures, and seizure frequency. In general, epidemiological information about incidence of injuries has been conflicting and sparse. In general, studies focusing on populations with more severe forms of epilepsy tend to report substantially higher risks of injuries than those involving less selected populations. On the other hand, studies based on non-selected populations of people with epilepsy have not shown an increased frequency of injuries in people with epilepsy compared with the general population. Some studies have shown that patients with epilepsy are more frequently admitted to the hospital following an injury. Possible explanations include: more cautious attitude of clinicians toward injuries occurring in the setting of seizures; hospitalization required because of seizures and not to the injuries themselves; and hospitalization driven by other issues, such as comorbidities, which are highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy. Potentially the high rate of

  5. 29 CFR Appendix H to Part 825 - Certification for Serious Injury or Illness of Covered Servicemenber for Military Family Leave...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification for Serious Injury or Illness of Covered Servicemenber for Military Family Leave (Form WH-385) H Appendix H to Part 825 Labor Regulations Relating to... ACT OF 1993 Pt. 825, App. H Appendix H to Part 825—Certification for Serious Injury or Illness of...

  6. Injuries and injury prevention among senior military officers at the Army War College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; McCollam, Rebecca; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Hoedebecke, Edward; Arnold, Stephanie; Craig, Steven; Barko, William

    2002-07-01

    Injuries and activities associated with injuries were extracted from a retrospective review of the medical records of officers attending the U.S. Army War College during academic years 1999 and 2000 (AY99 and AY00). In AY99, cumulative injury incidence (officers with one or more injuries) was 56%. The next year (AY00), there was command emphasis on injury reduction and education of students on injury prevention strategies. Cumulative injury incidence in AY00 was 44%, significantly lower than in AY99 (p = 0.01, risk ratio [AY99/AY99] = 1.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-1.5). Among activities that could be linked to injuries, sports were associated with 41% in AY99 and 45% in AY00. Recommendations for ongoing injury reduction include the following: (1) continued command emphasis and instruction on injury reduction techniques; (2) encouraging the use of semirigid ankle braces to reduce ankle sprains; (3) reducing the number of practice and game sessions in sports activities; (4) encouraging overrunning of second and third base in softball; (5) prohibiting contact with the center line below the net in volleyball; and (6) encouraging medical care providers to record the activity associated with each injury in the medical records.

  7. The development of military medical care for peripheral nerve injuries during World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanigan, William

    2010-05-01

    Although the clinical and electrical diagnoses and treatments of peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) had been described prior to World War I, many reports were fragmented and incomplete. Individual physicians' experiences were not extensive, and in 1914 the patient with a PNI remained a subject of medical curiosity, and was hardly a focus of comprehensive care. World War I altered these conditions; casualties with septic wounds and PNIs swamped the general hospitals. By 1915, specialized hospitals or wards were developed to care for neurological injuries. In the United Kingdom, Sir Robert Jones developed the concept of Military Orthopedic Centres, with coordinated specialized care and rehabilitation. Military appointments of neurologists and electrotherapists sharpened clinical diagnoses and examinations. Surgical techniques were introduced, then discarded or accepted as surgeons developed skills to meet the new conditions. The US Surgeon General, William Gorgas, and his consultant in neurosurgery, Charles Frazier, went a step further, with the organization of a research laboratory as well as the establishment of a Peripheral Nerve Commission and Registry. Despite these developments and good intentions, postwar follow-up for PNIs remained incomplete at best. Records were lost, personnel transferred, and patients discharged from the system. The lack of a standardized grading system seriously impaired the ability to record clinical changes and compare outcomes. Nevertheless, specialized treatment of a large number of PNIs during World War I established a foundation for comprehensive care that influenced military medical services in the next world war.

  8. Measuring Symptoms of Moral Injury in Veterans and Active Duty Military with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. Koenig

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Moral Injury Symptom Scale-Military Version (MISS-M is a 45-item measure of moral injury (MI symptoms designed to use in Veterans and Active Duty Military with PTSD. This paper reviews the psychometric properties of the MISS-M identified in a previous report, discusses the rationale for the development of the scale, and explores its possible clinical and research applications. The MISS-M consists of 10 theoretically grounded subscales that assess the psychological and spiritual/religious symptoms of MI: guilt, shame, betrayal, moral concerns, loss of meaning/purpose, difficulty forgiving, loss of trust, self-condemnation, spiritual/religious struggles, and loss of religious faith/hope. The scale has high internal reliability, high test-retest reliability, and a factor structure that can be replicated. The MISS-M correlates strongly with PTSD severity, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms, indicating convergent validity, and is relatively weakly correlated with social, spiritual, and physical health constructs, suggesting discriminant validity. The MISS-M is the first multidimensional scale that measures both the psychological and spiritual/religious symptoms of MI and is a reliable and valid measure for assessing symptom severity in clinical practice and in conducting research that examines the efficacy of treatments for MI in Veterans and Active Duty Military personnel.

  9. The prevalence of common mental disorders and PTSD in the UK military: using data from a clinical interview-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotopf Matthew

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mental health of the Armed Forces is an important issue of both academic and public interest. The aims of this study are to: a assess the prevalence and risk factors for common mental disorders and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms, during the main fighting period of the Iraq War (TELIC 1 and later deployments to Iraq or elsewhere and enlistment status (regular or reserve, and b compare the prevalence of depression, PTSD symptoms and suicidal ideation in regular and reserve UK Army personnel who deployed to Iraq with their US counterparts. Methods Participants were drawn from a large UK military health study using a standard two phase survey technique stratified by deployment status and engagement type. Participants undertook a structured telephone interview including the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ and a short measure of PTSD (Primary Care PTSD, PC-PTSD. The response rate was 76% (821 participants. Results The weighted prevalence of common mental disorders and PTSD symptoms was 27.2% and 4.8%, respectively. The most common diagnoses were alcohol abuse (18.0% and neurotic disorders (13.5%. There was no health effect of deploying for regular personnel, but an increased risk of PTSD for reservists who deployed to Iraq and other recent deployments compared to reservists who did not deploy. The prevalence of depression, PTSD symptoms and subjective poor health were similar between regular US and UK Iraq combatants. Conclusion The most common mental disorders in the UK military are alcohol abuse and neurotic disorders. The prevalence of PTSD symptoms remains low in the UK military, but reservists are at greater risk of psychiatric injury than regular personnel.

  10. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Syphilis Infections Among Military Personnel in Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    2017 Bentham Science Publishers Prevalence and Risk Factors for Human Immunodeficiency Virus ( HIV ) and Syphilis Infections Among Military Personnel...immunodeficiency virus ( HIV ) and syphilis, potentially im- pact the Republic of Sierra Leone Armed Forces (RSLAF) by reducing their effectiveness and...Mosala T. Divergent spatial patterns in the prevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus ( HIV ) and syphilis in South African pregnant women. Geospat

  11. Headache in military service members with a history of mild traumatic brain injury: A cohort study of diagnosis and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Alan G; Yerry, Juanita A; Klaric, John S; Ivins, Brian J; Scher, Ann; Choi, Young S

    2017-05-01

    Introduction Headaches after concussion are highly prevalent, relatively persistent and are being treated like primary headaches, especially migraine. Methods We studied all new patients seen between August 2008 and December 2009 assessed by a civilian headache specialist at the TBI Center at Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, NC. We report sample demographics, injuries and headache characteristics, including time from injury to headache onset, detailed descriptions and International Classification of Headache Disorders second edition primary headache diagnosis type. Results A total of 95 soldiers reported 166 headaches. The most common injury cited was a blast (53.7%). Most subjects (76.8%) recalled the onset of any headache within 7 days of injury. The most commonly diagnosed headache was a continuous type with migraine features ( n = 31 (18.7%)), followed by chronic migraine (type 1.5.1, n = 14 (8.4%)), migraine with aura (type 1.2.1, n = 10 (6.0%)), hemicrania continua (type 4.7, n = 12 (7.2%)), chronic cluster (type 3.1.2, n = 6 (3.6%)) and headaches not otherwise classifiable (type 14.1, n = 5 (3.0%)) also present. The most clinically important was a continuous headache with migraine features. Conclusion We present a series of patients seen in a military treatment facility for headache diagnosis after concussion in whom we found migraine, as well as uncommon primary headache types, at frequencies that were much higher than expected.

  12. Prevalence and Predictors of Personality Change After Severe Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2015-01-01

    often observed in patients with frontal or temporal lesions. Generally, personality changes in patients were not associated with more distress and lower HRQOL in family members; however, change in patient agreeableness was associated with lower HRQOL on the role limitations-emotional scale. Conclusions......Objectives To investigate the prevalence of personality change after severe brain injury; to identify predictors of personality change; and to investigate whether personality change is associated with distress in family members. Design A longitudinal study of personality change. Setting...... rating the patient at discharge from hospital and 1 year after injury. The SOs were also asked to complete the anxiety and depression scales of the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, rating their own emotional condition and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) as assessed by the 4 mental scales...

  13. Evaluation of military trauma system practices related to complications after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Keith; Apodaca, Amy; Spencer, Debra; Costanzo, George; Bailey, Jeffrey; Fortuna, Gerald; Blackbourne, Lorne H; Spott, Mary Ann; Eastridge, Brian J

    2012-12-01

    The Joint Theater Trauma System (JTTS) was developed with the vision that every soldier, marine, sailor, and airman injured on the battlefield would have the optimal chance for survival and maximum potential for functional recovery. In this analysis, we hypothesized that injury and complication after injury surveillance information diffusion through the JTTS, via the dissemination of clinical practice guidelines and process improvements, would be associated with improved combat casualty clinical outcomes. The current analysis was designed to profile different aspects of trauma system performance improvement, including monitoring of frequent posttraumatic complications, the assessment of an emerging complication trend, and measurement of the impact of the system interventions to identify potential practices for future performance improvement. Data captured from the Joint Theater Trauma Registry on patients admitted to military medical treatment facilities as a result of wounds incurred in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2003 to 2010 were retrospectively analyzed to determine the potential impact of complication surveillance and process improvement initiatives on clinical practice. Developed metrics demonstrated that the surveillance capacity and evidence-based quality improvement initiatives disseminated through the JTTS were associated with improved identification and mitigation of complications following battlefield injury. The Joint Trauma System enables evidence-based practice across the continuum of military trauma care. Concurrent data collection and performance improvement activities at the local and system level facilitate timely clinical intervention on identified trauma complications and the subsequent measurement of the effectiveness of those interventions. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  14. Extremity injuries sustained by the UK military in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts: 2003-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Henry; MacLeod, Kirsty; Penn-Barwell, Jowan G

    2017-07-01

    Extremity injuries predominate in warfare, however their nature, and overall burden to the individual and the health service is yet to be characterised for the UK military in the recent conflicts of Iraq and Afghanistan. We reviewed the all extremity injuries in survivors from the Joint Theatre Trauma Registry (JTTR) between 2003 and 2014. All cases recorded in the JTTR between the invasion of Iraq on the 19th March 2003 and cessation of combat operations in Afghanistan on the 27th October 2014, were examined. Casualties who were killed in action or died from their wounds were excluded. All extremity injury codes were included, capturing patients with soft tissue injuries but no fracture or amputation. Of 2348 UK combatants surviving injury in Iraq and Afghanistan, 1813 (77%) had extremity injuries; of these 205 (11%) had at least one amputation at the wrist/ankle or more proximal. Trans-tibial was the most common level of limb loss. Eighty five casualties lost 2 limbs, 83 of these (98%) lost both lower limbs and 17 lost 3 limbs. Aside from amputations, there were 1530 fractures, 501 (33%) involving the upper limb and 1029 (67%) in the lower limb and pelvis. The tibia was the most frequently fractured bone. Of the lower limb fractures, 597 (58%) were open compared with 344 (69%) in the upper limb. Total Length of Stay (LOS) following extremity injury was 24,486days or 69 years and 1 month; there were a total 2817 surgical episodes performed on extremities. Median length of stay Length of Stay (LOS) for major amputations (i.e. those at the wrist/ankle or more proximal) was 51days (IQR 30-65) with a median of 7 surgical procedures on their limbs (IQR 5-9). In casualties with fractures but no amputation, median LOS was 13days (IQR 6-25) with a median of 2 surgical procedures (IQR 1-4). Utilising a dedicated injury database, this study illustrates for the first time in the United Kingdom military population, that the extremities are involved in the vast majority of

  15. Prevalence and associated factors of burnout among military doctors in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, M.A.; Khokhar, M.M.; Haq, A.I.U.; Alvi, Z.Z.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of factors contributing to burnout among military Physicians in Lahore, Pakistan. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Lahore and CMH Lahore Medical and Dental College from March 2014 to September 2014. Methodology: Sample consisted of 133 physicians (n=66) males and n=67 females). Convenient sampling procedure was used. Mashlach Burnout Inventory (MBI) which included 22 questions was used to measure emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. The questionnaire also elicited information about socio-demographic and work characteristics. Data was entered and analyzed by using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0). Chi-square test of significance was used to see the significance of association between age, gender, duration of service in years and working hours per week. p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: On the MBI, 29 (21.8%) physicians showed high emotional exhaustion, 22 (16.6%) showed high depersonalization and 34 (25.6%) showed low personal accomplishment. Thirty-seven physicians (27.8%) were identified as experiencing a high degree of burnout (high emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and low personal accomplishment). The frequency of high degree of burnout was higher among males (36.4%) as compared to females (17.9%) and this difference was statistically borderline significant (p = 0.057). However, there was statistically significant difference (p = 0.03) of burnout between those working = 41 hours per week as compared to working = 40 hours per week. Conclusion: The prevalence of high degree of burnout in Pakistani military physicians was higher than those reported internationally. Work redesign plans as well as early assessment and intervention may be helpful in the reduction of job burnout in physicians working in military hospitals. (author)

  16. Comparative analysis of prevalence of intimate partner violence against women in military and civilian communities in Abuja, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimah, Carol Uzoamaka; Adogu, Prosper Obunikem Uche; Odeyemi, Kofoworola; Ilika, Amobi Linus

    2015-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) occurs across the world, in various cultures, and affects people across societies irrespective of economic status or gender. Most data on IPV before World Health Organization multicountry study (WHOMCS) usually came from sources other than the military. Result of this study will contribute to the existing body of knowledge and may serve as a baseline for future studies in military populations. This study compares the prevalence of the different types of IPV against women in military and civilian communities in Abuja, Nigeria. Using a multistage sampling technique, 260 women who had intimate male partners were selected from military and civilian communities of Abuja. Collected data on personal characteristics and different types of IPV experienced were analyzed to demonstrate comparison of the association between the different forms of IPV and the respondents' sociodemographic and partner characteristics in the two study populations using percentages and χ-square statistics, and P-value was assumed to be significant at ≤0.05. The prevalence of the four major types of IPV was higher among the military respondents than among civilians: controlling behavior, 37.1% versus 29.1%; emotional/psychological abuse, 42.4% versus 13.4%; physical abuse, 19.7% versus 5.9%, and sexual abuse, 9.2% versus 8.8%. Significantly more respondents from the military population (59 [45.4%]) compared to civilians (21 [19.4%]) were prevented by their partners from seeing their friends (P=0.000). The situation is reversed with regard to permission to seek health care for self, with civilians reporting a significantly higher prevalence (35 [32.4%]) than did military respondents (20 [15.4%]) (P=0.002). The military respondents were clearly at a higher risk of experiencing all the variants of emotional violence than the civilians (P=0.00). The commonest form of physical violence against women was "being slapped or having something thrown at them, that could hurt

  17. Evaluation of military helmets and roof padding on head injury potential from vertical impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, Melanie; Laing, Sheridan

    2016-10-02

    Soldiers in military vehicles subjected to underbelly blasts can sustain traumatic head and neck injuries due to a head impact with the roof. The severity of head and neck trauma can be influenced by the amount of head clearance available to the occupant as well as factors such as wearing a military helmet or the presence of padding on the interior roof. The aim of the current study was to examine the interaction between a Hybrid III headform, the helmet system, and the interior roof of the vehicle under vertical loading. Using a head impact machine and a Hybrid III headform, tests were conducted on a rigid steel plate in a number of different configurations and velocities to assess helmet shell and padding performance, to evaluate different vehicle roof padding materials, and to determine the relative injury mitigating contributions of both the helmet and the roof padding. The resultant translational head acceleration was measured and the head injury criterion (HIC) was calculated for each impact. For impacts with a helmeted headform hitting the steel plate only, which represented a common scenario in an underbelly blast event, velocities of ≤6 m/s resulted in HIC values below the FMVSS 201U threshold of 1,000, and a velocity of 7 m/s resulted in HIC values well over the threshold. Roof padding was found to reduce the peak translational head acceleration and the HIC, with rigid IMPAXX foams performing better than semirigid ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) foam. However, the head injury potential was reduced considerably more by wearing a helmet than by the addition of roof padding. The results of this study provide initial quantitative findings that provide a better understanding of helmet-roof interactions in vertical impacts and the contributions of the military helmet and roof padding to mitigating head injury potential. Findings from this study will be used to inform further testing with the future aim of developing a new minimum head clearance standard for

  18. High prevalence of chronic pituitary and target-organ hormone abnormalities after blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Wilkinson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least one year after injury, in 25-50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI, an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least one year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and

  19. Oral-Maxillofacial Injury Surveillance of U.S. Military Personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan, 2001 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchener, Timothy A; Chan, Rodney; Simecek, John W

    2017-03-01

    Cranial and oral-maxillofacial injuries accounted for 33% of military visits to in-theater (Level III) military treatment facilities for battle injuries during Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Even after years of conflict, the size and scope of oral-maxillofacial injuries in military armed conflict is still not fully understood. This study reports U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) rates of oral-maxillofacial injuries that can be used for further surveillance and research. The populations studied were military personnel deployed to Afghanistan in OEF or Iraq in OIF and Operation New Dawn (OND), who sought care at a Level III military treatment facility for one or more oral-maxillofacial injuries. Injuries were identified in the DoD Trauma Registry (DoDTR) using diagnosis codes associated with oral-maxillofacial battle and nonbattle injuries. All oral-maxillofacial injuries incurred from October 19, 2001, to June 30, 2014, were included. The Defense Manpower Data Center provided DoD troop strength numbers to serve as the study denominators. Battle injuries accounted for 80% of oral-maxillofacial injuries in OEF. There were 2,504 oral-maxillofacial injuries in OEF. The Army accounted for 1,820 (72.7%), the Marines 535 (21.3%), the Air Force 75 (3.0%), and the Navy 74 (3.0%). The oral-maxillofacial injury rates in OEF for the Army ranged from 1.10 to 4.90/1,000 person years (PY), for the Marines from 0.57 to 9.39/1,000 PY, for the Navy from 0 to 3.29/1,000 PY, and for the Air Force from 0 to 3.38/1,000 PY. The Army tended to have the highest incidence of all services in the early and latter part of the conflict, whereas Marines tended to have the highest incidence in the middle years. The Marines, Army, and Navy all had their individual highest incidences in 2009, the first year of the 2009 to 2011 OEF troop surge. Battle injuries accounted for 75% of oral-maxillofacial injuries in OIF/OND. There were 3,676 oral-maxillofacial injuries

  20. Effects of acceleration level on lumbar spine injuries in military populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Baisden, Jamie L; Pintar, Frank A; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S

    2015-06-01

    Clinical studies have indicated that thoracolumbar trauma occurs in the civilian population at its junction. In contrast, injury patterns in military populations indicate a shift to the inferior vertebral levels of the lumbar spine. Controlled studies offering an explanation for such migrations and the associated clinical biomechanics are sparse in literature. The goals of this study were to investigate the potential roles of acceleration loading on the production of injuries and their stability characteristics using a human cadaver model for applications to high-speed aircraft ejection and helicopter crashes. Biomechanical laboratory study using unembalmed human cadaver lumbar spinal columns. Thoracolumbar columns from post-mortem human surrogates were procured, x-rays taken, intervertebral joints and bony components evaluated for degeneration, and fixed using polymethylmethacrylate. The inferior end was attached to a platform via a load cell and uniaxial accelerometer. The superior end was attached to the upper metal platform via a semi-circular cylinder. The pre-flexed specimen was preloaded to simulate torso mass. The ends of the platform were connected to the vertical post of a custom-designed drop tower. The specimen was dropped inducing acceleration loading to the column. Axial force and acceleration data were gathered at high sampling rates, filtered, and peak accelerations and inertia-compensated axial forces were obtained during the loading phase. Computed tomography images were used to identify and classify injuries using the three-column concept (stable vs. unstable trauma). The mean age, total body mass, and stature of the five healthy degeneration-free specimens were 42 years, 73 kg, and 167 cm. The first two specimens subjected to peak accelerations of approximately 200 m/sec(2) were classified as belonging to high-speed aircraft ejection-type and the other three specimens subjected to greater amplitudes (347-549 m/sec(2)) were classified as

  1. Gun-shot injuries in UK military casualties - Features associated with wound severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn-Barwell, Jowan G; Sargeant, Ian D

    2016-05-01

    Surgical treatment of high-energy gun-shot wounds (GSWs) to the extremities is challenging. Recent surgical doctrine states that wound tracts from high-energy GSWs should be laid open, however the experience from previous conflicts suggests that some of these injuries can be managed more conservatively. The aim of this study is to firstly characterise the GSW injuries sustained by UK forces, and secondly test the hypothesis that the likely severity of GSWs can be predicted by features of the wound. The UK Military trauma registry was searched for cases injured by GSW in the five years between 01 January 2009 and 31 December 2013: only UK personnel were included. Clinical notes and radiographs were then reviewed. Features associated with energy transfer in extremity wounds in survivors were further examined with number of wound debridements used as a surrogate marker of wound severity. There were 450 cases who met the inclusion criteria. 96 (21%) were fatally injured, with 354 (79%) surviving their injuries. Casualties in the fatality group had a median New Injury Severity Score (NISS) of 75 (IQR 75-75), while the median NISS of the survivors was 12 (IQR 4-48) with 10 survivors having a NISS of 75. In survivors the limbs were most commonly injured (56%). 'Through and through' wounds, where the bullet passes intact through the body, were strongly associated with less requirement for debridement (pwound debridements (p=0.0002), as there was if a bullet fractured a bone (p=0.0006). More complex wounds, as indicated by the requirement for repeated debridements, are associated with injuries where the bullet does not pass straight through the body, or where a bone is fractured. Gunshot wounds should be assessed according to the likely energy transferred, extremity wounds without features of high energy transfer do not require extensive exploration. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Incidence and epidemiology of spinal cord injury within a closed American population: the United States military (2000–2009)

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenfeld, AJ; McCriskin, B.; Hsiao, M.; Burks, R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the incidence of spinal cord injury (SCI) within the population of the United States military from 2000–2009. This investigation also sought to define potential risk factors for the development of SCI.

  3. From military to civil loadings: Preliminary numerical-based thorax injury criteria investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumtcha, Aristide Awoukeng; Bodo, Michèle; Taddei, Lorenzo; Roth, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Effects of the impact of a mechanical structure on the human body are of great interest in the understanding of body trauma. Experimental tests have led to first conclusions about the dangerousness of an impact observing impact forces or displacement time history with PMHS (Post Mortem human Subjects). They have allowed providing interesting data for the development and the validation of numerical biomechanical models. These models, widely used in the framework of automotive crashworthiness, have led to the development of numerical-based injury criteria and tolerance thresholds. The aim of this process is to improve the safety of mechanical structures in interaction with the body. In a military context, investigations both at experimental and numerical level are less successfully completed. For both military and civil frameworks, the literature list a number of numerical analysis trying to propose injury mechanisms, and tolerance thresholds based on biofidelic Finite Element (FE) models of different part of the human body. However the link between both frameworks is not obvious, since lots of parameters are different: great mass impacts at relatively low velocity for civil impacts (falls, automotive crashworthiness) and low mass at very high velocity for military loadings (ballistic, blast). In this study, different accident cases were investigated, and replicated with a previously developed and validated FE model of the human thorax named Hermaphrodite Universal Biomechanical YX model (HUBYX model). These previous validations included replications of standard experimental tests often used to validate models in the context of automotive industry, experimental ballistic tests in high speed dynamic impact and also numerical replication of blast loading test ensuring its biofidelity. In order to extend the use of this model in other frameworks, some real-world accidents were reconstructed, and consequences of these loadings on the FE model were explored. These various

  4. Prevalence and injury patterns among electronic waste workers in the informal sector in Nigeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohajinwa, Chimere May; van Bodegom, Peter M; Vijver, Martina G; Olumide, Adesola O; Osibanjo, Oladele; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2017-01-01

    Despite the large volume of e-waste recycled informally, the prevalence of work-related injuries among e-waste workers is unknown. Therefore, this study assessed the prevalence, patterns and factors associated with occupational injuries among e-waste workers in the informal sector in Nigeria.

  5. Prevalence and Determinants of Fall-Related Injuries among Older Adults in Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos H. Orces

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the prevalence and determinants of fall-related injuries in the previous year among adults aged 60 years or older in Ecuador. Methods. The prevalence of fall-related injuries was estimated using cross-sectional data from the first national survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging study. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between participants' demographic characteristics and fall-related injuries. Results. Of 5,227 participants with a mean ag...

  6. Profile analyses of the Personality Assessment Inventory following military-related traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jan E; Cooper, Douglas B; Reid, Matthew W; Tate, David F; Lange, Rael T

    2015-05-01

    Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) profiles were examined in 160 U.S. service members (SMs) following mild-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants who sustained a mild TBI had significantly higher PAI scores than those with moderate-severe TBI on eight of the nine clinical scales examined. A two-step cluster analysis identified four PAI profiles, heuristically labeled "High Distress", "Moderate Distress", "Somatic Distress," and "No Distress". Postconcussive and posttraumatic stress symptom severity was highest for the High Distress group, followed by the Somatic and Moderate Distress groups, and the No Distress group. Profile groups differed in age, ethnicity, rank, and TBI severity. Findings indicate that meaningful patterns of behavioral and personality characteristics can be detected in active duty military SMs following TBI, which may prove useful in selecting the most efficacious rehabilitation strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Global prevalence and incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Anoushka Singh*, Lindsay Tetreault*, Suhkvinder Kalsi-Ryan, Aria Nouri, Michael G FehlingsToronto Western Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada  *These authors contributed equally to this paper Background: Spinal cord injury (SCI is a traumatic event that impacts a patient's physical, psychological, and social well-being and places substantial financial burden on health care systems. To determine the true impact of SCI, this systematic review aims to summarize literature reporting on either the incidence or prevalence of SCI. Methods: A systematic search was conducted using PubMed, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in process, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trial Register, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant literature published through June 2013. We sought studies that provided regional, provincial/state, or national data on the incidence of SCI or reported estimates of disease prevalence. The level of evidence of each study was rated using a scale that evaluated study design, methodology, sampling bias, and precision of estimates. Results: The initial search yielded 5,874 articles, 48 of which met the inclusion criteria. Forty-four studies estimated the incidence of SCI and nine reported the prevalence, with five discussing both. Of the incidence studies, 14 provided figures at a regional, ten at a state or provincial level and 21 at a national level. The prevalence of SCI was highest in the United States of America (906 per million and lowest in the Rhone-Alpes region, France (250 per million and Helsinki, Finland (280 per million. With respect to states and provinces in North America, the crude annual incidence of SCI was highest in Alaska (83 per million and Mississippi (77 per million and lowest in Alabama (29.4 per million, despite a large percentage of violence injuries (21.2%. Annual incidences were above 50 per million in the Hualien County in Taiwan (56.1 per million, the central Portugal

  8. Prevalence and patterns of self-reported animal-related injury among veterinarians in metropolitan Kampala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabuusu, Richard M; Keku, Emmanuel O; Kiyini, Robert; McCann, Theresa J

    2010-12-01

    To establish the prevalence, patterns and risk factors of animal-related injuries among veterinarians, self-administered questionnaires were given to 60 veterinarians practicing in metropolitan Kampala. The prevalence of animal-related injuries in metropolitan Kampala was 72% (95%CI, 57~84). Some veterinarians (34%) suffered multiple injuries with a mean and median of 2.1 and 2.0 injuries per veterinarian, respectively. Of a total of 70 self-reported animal related injuries, cattle accounted for 72%, cats for 25%, dogs for 23%, self inoculation for 15% and birds for 13%. Injuries associated with poultry did not require hospital treatment. The upper limb was the most the frequently (68%) injured anatomical body part of veterinarians, and vaccination of animals (25%) was the major activity associated with injury. Animal-related injuries are common among practicing veterinarians in metropolitan Kampala; however, they did not differ significantly based on the veterinarian's gender, experience or risk awareness.

  9. Prevalence and patterns of self-reported animal-related injury among veterinarians in metropolitan Kampala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keku, Emmanuel O.; Kiyini, Robert; McCann, Theresa J.

    2010-01-01

    To establish the prevalence, patterns and risk factors of animal-related injuries among veterinarians, self-administered questionnaires were given to 60 veterinarians practicing in metropolitan Kampala. The prevalence of animal-related injuries in metropolitan Kampala was 72% (95%CI, 57~84). Some veterinarians (34%) suffered multiple injuries with a mean and median of 2.1 and 2.0 injuries per veterinarian, respectively. Of a total of 70 self-reported animal related injuries, cattle accounted for 72%, cats for 25%, dogs for 23%, self inoculation for 15% and birds for 13%. Injuries associated with poultry did not require hospital treatment. The upper limb was the most the frequently (68%) injured anatomical body part of veterinarians, and vaccination of animals (25%) was the major activity associated with injury. Animal-related injuries are common among practicing veterinarians in metropolitan Kampala; however, they did not differ significantly based on the veterinarian's gender, experience or risk awareness. PMID:21113109

  10. Prevalence of asymptomatic chlamydial urethritis in military recruits in the Celje region, Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaza, A; Grsković, B; Plestina, S; Bozina, N; Potocnik, M; Waugh, M A

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the prevalence of asymptomatic chlamydial urethritis in military recruits in the Celje region (population 300,000), Slovenia. A first-void urine specimen was tested for Chlamydia trachomatis using the polymerase chain reaction assay. The research was supported by a questionnaire to obtain information on sexual behaviour of the participants. In the cross-sectional study from 1999 to 2001, 1272 asymptomatic recruits were included. None had received antibiotics in the previous two weeks. The mean age was 19.9 years. At the time of their first sexual experience the mean age was 16.6 years, whereas the age of their female sexual partners was 17.1 years. During their first sexual intercourse 77% of recruits used contraception (condom, diaphragm, contraceptive pill), most of those a condom (86%). The prevalence of asymptomatic chlamydial urethritis was 2.6% (95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 3.5). The mean age of those infected was 19.8 years. At the time of their first sexual experience the mean age was 16.2 years, whereas the age of their female sexual partners was 16.9 years. During their first sexual intercourse 57% of infected subjects used protection, half of which was a condom. Those who never or only occasionally used condoms were at a greater risk of being infected with C. trachomatis (adjusted odds ratio 2.04).

  11. Prevalence and incidence rate of injuries in runners at a local athletic club in Cape Town

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    C. Hendricks

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available People across the world are running on a daily basis to improvetheir health status. However, running can predispose an individual to injuryto the back and lower limb. Baseline data on prevalence, incidence rate ofinjury and aetiological factors associated with running injuries are neededby physiotherapists to develop and implement effective prevention programmesto allow optimal performance in runners. Thus, the purpose of this study wasto determine the prevalence and incidence of injuries in runners at a localathletic club.Methods: A prospective, non-experimental cohort study was conductedover a 16 week period. A sample of 50 runners completed a self-administeredquestionnaire and an injury report form recording injuries sustained during the 16 week study period. Injury prevalence andcumulative incidence was calculated as a proportion rate along with 95% confidence interval.Results: The prevalence rate of injuries was 32%. The incidence rate of injuries was 0.67 per 1000km run (95% CI: 0.41- 1.08.The most common anatomical sites for new injuries were the calf (20% and the knee (18%.Conclusions: The study found a moderate prevalence and incidence rate of injury in runners, thus the need for physiotherapyledinjury surveillance and prevention programmes have been highlighted.

  12. Risk Factors for Injuries During Military Static-Line Airborne Operations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph; Steelman, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify and analyze articles in which the authors examined risk factors for soldiers during military static-line airborne operations. Data Sources: We searched for articles in PubMed, the Defense Technical Information Center, reference lists, and other sources using the key words airborne, parachuting, parachutes, paratrooper, injuries, wounds, trauma, and musculoskeletal. Study Selection: The search identified 17 684 potential studies. Studies were included if they were written in English, involved military static-line parachute operations, recorded injuries directly from events on the landing zone or from safety or medical records, and provided data for quantitative assessment of injury risk factors. A total of 23 studies met the review criteria, and 15 were included in the meta-analysis. Data Extraction: The summary statistic obtained for each risk factor was the risk ratio, which was the ratio of the injury risk in 1 group to that of another (baseline) group. Where data were sufficient, meta-analyses were performed and heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. Data Synthesis: Risk factors for static-line parachuting injuries included night jumps, jumps with extra equipment, higher wind speeds, higher air temperatures, jumps from fixed-wing aircraft rather than balloons or helicopters, jumps onto certain types of terrain, being a female paratrooper, greater body weight, not using the parachute ankle brace, smaller parachute canopies, simultaneous exits from both sides of an aircraft, higher heat index, winds from the rear of the aircraft on exit entanglements, less experience with a particular parachute system, being an enlisted soldier rather than an officer, and jumps involving a greater number of paratroopers. Conclusions: We analyzed and summarized factors that increased the injury risk for soldiers during military static-line parachute operations. Understanding and considering these factors in risk evaluations may reduce the

  13. Prevalence of child injuries in Mbale region, Eastern Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The rate of unintentional child injuries in sub-Saharan Africa is at 53.1 per 100,000, The highest for low income regions, data on these injuries and associated factors among children in Uganda is very scanty. Most child injuries are related to the way of life in rural communities typically burns from charcoal ...

  14. Prevalence and presentation of spinal injury in patients with major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spinal injury is a major cause of morbidity, mortality and long bed occupancy in patients admitted in Mulago Hospital. Several studies have reported different incidence and presentations of spinal injury 1-4. At Mulago hospital, road traffic crushes (RTC) is one of the most common causes of these injuries5.

  15. Prevalence of Needle Stick Injuries among Healthcare Workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Needle stick injuries represent one of the most important occupational hazards to which health workers are exposed. These injuries result from accidental piercing of the skin and or mucous membranes by sharp objects. Needle stick injuries carry the risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens, especially ...

  16. Incidence and prevalence of elite male cricket injuries using updated consensus definitions

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    Orchard JW

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available John W Orchard, Alex Kountouris, Kevin Sims National Cricket Centre, Cricket Australia, Brisbane, Australia Background: T20 (Twenty20 or 20 over cricket has emerged in the last decade as the most popular form of cricket (in terms of spectator attendances. International consensus cricket definitions, first published in 2005, were updated in 2016 to better reflect the rise to prominence of T20 cricket.  Methods: Injury incidence and prevalence rates were calculated using the new international methods and units for elite senior male Australian cricketers over the past decade (season 2006–2007 to season 2015–2016 inclusive.  Results: Over the past 10 seasons, average match injury incidence, for match time-loss injuries, was 155 injuries/1,000 days of play, with the highest daily rates in 50-over cricket, followed by 20-over cricket and First-Class matches. Annual injury incidence was 64 injuries/100 players per season, and average annual injury prevalence was 12.5% (although fast bowlers averaged 20.6%, much higher than other positions. The most common injury was the hamstring strain (seasonal incidence 8.7 injuries/100 players per season. The most prevalent injury was lumbar stress fractures (1.9% of players unavailable at all times owing to these injuries, which represents 15% of all missed playing time.  Discussion: The hamstring strain has emerged from being one of the many common injuries in elite cricket a decade ago to being clearly the most common injury in the sport at the elite level. This is presumably in association with increased T20 cricket. Lumbar stress fractures in fast bowlers are still the most prevalent injury in the sport of cricket at the elite level, although these injuries are more associated with high workloads arising from the longer forms of the game. Domestic and international matches have very similar match injury incidence rates across the formats, but injury prevalence is higher in international players as

  17. Medical Efforts and Injury Patterns of Military Hospital Patients Following the 2013 Lushan Earthquake in China: A Retrospective Study

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    Peng Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate medical efforts and injury profiles of victims of the Lushan earthquake admitted to three military hospitals. This study retrospectively investigated the clinical records of 266 admitted patients evacuated from the Lushan earthquake area. The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS-2005 was used to identify the severity of each injury. Patient demographic data, complaints, diagnoses, injury types, prognosis, means of transportation, and cause of injury were all reviewed individually. The statistical analysis of the study was conducted primarily using descriptive statistics. Of the 266 patients, 213 (80.1% were admitted in the first two days. A total of 521 injury diagnoses were recorded in 266 patients. Earthquake-related injuries were primarily caused by buildings collapsing (38.4% and victims being struck by objects (33.8%; the most frequently injured anatomic sites were the lower extremities and pelvis (34.2% and surface area of the body (17.9%. Fracture (41.5% was the most frequent injury, followed by soft tissue injury (27.5%, but crush syndrome was relatively low (1.2% due to the special housing structures in the Lushan area. The most commonly used procedure was suture and dressings (33.7%, followed by open reduction and internal fixation (21.9%.The results of this study help formulate recommendations to improve future disaster relief and emergency planning in remote, isolated, and rural regions of developing countries.

  18. Medical Efforts and Injury Patterns of Military Hospital Patients Following the 2013 Lushan Earthquake in China: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peng; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Yipeng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate medical efforts and injury profiles of victims of the Lushan earthquake admitted to three military hospitals. This study retrospectively investigated the clinical records of 266 admitted patients evacuated from the Lushan earthquake area. The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS-2005) was used to identify the severity of each injury. Patient demographic data, complaints, diagnoses, injury types, prognosis, means of transportation, and cause of injury were all reviewed individually. The statistical analysis of the study was conducted primarily using descriptive statistics. Of the 266 patients, 213 (80.1%) were admitted in the first two days. A total of 521 injury diagnoses were recorded in 266 patients. Earthquake-related injuries were primarily caused by buildings collapsing (38.4%) and victims being struck by objects (33.8%); the most frequently injured anatomic sites were the lower extremities and pelvis (34.2%) and surface area of the body (17.9%). Fracture (41.5%) was the most frequent injury, followed by soft tissue injury (27.5%), but crush syndrome was relatively low (1.2%) due to the special housing structures in the Lushan area. The most commonly used procedure was suture and dressings (33.7%), followed by open reduction and internal fixation (21.9%).The results of this study help formulate recommendations to improve future disaster relief and emergency planning in remote, isolated, and rural regions of developing countries. PMID:26334286

  19. Prevalence of injuries in Wushu competition during the 1st Asian Martial Arts Games 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiemsiri, Pichet; Wanawan, Amarin

    2014-02-01

    To determine the prevalence and characteristic of injuries in Wushu Competition during the IP' Asian MartialArts Games 2009. Sixty international athletes (38 males) participating in Wushu Competition during the 1st Asian Martial Arts Games 2009. Injuries were recorded on injury report forms to document any injuries seen and treatment provided by tournament physician during competitions. The injury forms described the athlete s causes, type, site, and severity of the injuries. There were 60 international athletes the average age were 22.49 +/- 3.75 years. The prevalence ofinjuries was 228.07/ 1000 athlete exposure (AE). The prevalence in males andfemales was 161.76/1000 AE and 326.09/1000 AE, respectively. The most common injured body parts in males were lower extremities 102.94/1000 AE, followed by head and face injuries 58.82/1000 AE. The most common injured body parts in females were lower extremities 282.61/1000 AE. The most common types of injuries in males were contusions 58.82/1000 AE, concussion 29.41/1000 AE and strain-sprain 29.41/1000 AE. In females the most common type of injury were contusion 195.65/1000 AEfollowed by strain-sprain 130.43/1000 AE. The most common mechanism of injury in males werereceiving a punch 58.82/1000 AE, receiving a kick 44.12/1000 AE and delivering a kick 44.12/1000 AE. Meanwhile, in females common mechanisms were receiving a kick 152.17/1000 AE followed by delivering a kick 130.43/1000 AE. High prevalence of injuries in Wushu competition during the 1" Asian MartialArts Games 2009 revealedfemale injuries were higher than male and had a higher prevalence compared with Muay Thai or Taekwondo competitions.

  20. Lifetime prevalence of injuries in incoming division I collegiate football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarac, Nikolas; Haynes, William; Pedroza, Angela; Kaeding, Christopher; Borchers, James

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the lifetime prevalence of past injuries in incoming first year football players in a Division 1 college football team. Pre-participation questionnaires from 605 first-year football players over 20 years (1996-2015) were examined to determine the prevalence of concussions, stingers, fractures, and musculoskeletal surgeries sustained before playing at the collegiate level. Players were grouped by position: wide receiver and defensive back (WR/DB), offensive and defensive linemen (OL/DL), all other positions (OP), and unknown (UKN). Prevalence of injuries by year and position was compared using Pearson's χ 2 Test (p football injuries are on the rise. Under reporting is a significant concern as players may fear disqualification or that they are evaluated by the coaching staff based on their medical history. More research is needed to confirm lifetime injury prevalence and evaluate differences over time among football players.

  1. The prevalence of smoking and its associated factors among military personnel in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: A national study

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    Hesham I Al-Khashan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to measure the prevalence of smoking and identify its potential predictors among military personnel in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among military personnel in the five military regions of KSA between January 2009 and January 2011. The sample of 10,500 military personnel in the Saudi Armed Forces was equally divided among the five regions with a ratio 3:7 for officers and soldiers. A multistage stratified random sampling was used to recruit participants in the four services of the armed forces in the five regions. Information on sociodemographic characteristics with a detailed history of smoking was collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Bivariate analysis was used to identify the factors associated with smoking, and multiple logistic regression analysis to discover its potential predictors. Results: About 35% of the sample was current smokers, with higher rates among soldiers. The eastern region had the highest rate (43.0%, and the southern region the lowest (27.5%. Navy personnel had a higher risk of being current smokers (40.6%, and the air defense the lowest risk (31.0%. Multivariate analysis identified working in the navy, and low income as positive predictors of current smoking, while residing in the southern region, older age, years of education, being married, and having an officer rank were negative (protective factors. Conclusion: Smoking is prevalent among military personnel in KSA, with higher rates in the Navy and Air Force, among privates, younger age group, lower education and income, and divorced/widowed status. Measures should be taken to initiate programs on smoking cessation that involve changes in the environment that is likely to promote this habit.

  2. The pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other important risk factors for vertebral artery injury include facet joint dislocations and fractures of the first to the third cervical vertebral bodies. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury on CT angiography (CTA) in patients with cervical spine fractures. Method.

  3. Prevalence of low vision secondary to eye injuries in South Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study of the prevalence of low vision secondary to eye injuries in south-eastern part of Nigeria was undertaken. Data obtained from files in ten tertiary hospitals within the area showed that 394 cases of low vision due to eye injuries were found in the ten hospitals within a ten year period (1986 –2006).

  4. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Shiraz Male Wushu Players: A Cross Sectional Study

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    Farahnaz Emami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wushu is one of the martial arts that combines explosive strength and speed movements with combat techniques. Most studies to date of wushurelated injuries have been published in Chinese languages. No published studies have reported the prevalence of these injuries in Iran. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries in male wushu players in Shiraz. Methods: Male wushu athletes aged 18 to 30 years were included in this cross sectional study if they had been practicing for 2 hours per session, twice a week during the past 3 years. The athletes were recruited by convenience sampling from 30 wushu clubs in Shiraz, Iran. The sample size was 165. The study was conducted from June to September 2016. Each participant was asked to complete an information questionnaire about his musculoskeletal injuries related to wushu during the previous year. Results: About two third (65.45% of wushu players had one or more injuries during the previous year. Severe injuries were most commonly located in the head/neck and knee/tibia areas, and inflammation was more prevalent than the other types of injuries. Conclusion: Wushu players in this study reported a high prevalence of injuries affecting different parts of the body.

  5. Self-Injurious Behaviour in Cornelia De Lange Syndrome: 1. Prevalence and Phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C.; Sloneem, J.; Hall, S.; Arron, K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Self-injurious behaviour is frequently identified as part of the behavioural phenotype of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). We conducted a case-control study of the prevalence and phenomenology of self-injurious behaviour (SIB) in CdLS. Methods: A total of 54 participants with CdLS were compared with 46 individuals who were comparable…

  6. Neuromuscular training with injury prevention counselling to decrease the risk of acute musculoskeletal injury in young men during military service: a population-based, randomised study

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    Suni Jaana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapidly increasing number of activity-induced musculoskeletal injuries among adolescents and young adults is currently a true public health burden. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a neuromuscular training programme with injury prevention counselling is effective in preventing acute musculoskeletal injuries in young men during military service. Methods The trial design was a population-based, randomised study. Two successive cohorts of male conscripts in four companies of one brigade in the Finnish Defence Forces were first followed prospectively for one 6-month term to determine the baseline incidence of injury. After this period, two new successive cohorts in the same four companies were randomised into two groups and followed prospectively for 6 months. Military service is compulsory for about 90% of 19-year-old Finnish men annually, who comprised the cohort in this study. This randomised, controlled trial included 968 conscripts comprising 501 conscripts in the intervention group and 467 conscripts in the control group. A neuromuscular training programme was used to enhance conscripts' motor skills and body control, and an educational injury prevention programme was used to increase knowledge and awareness of acute musculoskeletal injuries. The main outcome measures were acute injuries of the lower and upper limbs. Results In the intervention groups, the risk for acute ankle injury decreased significantly compared to control groups (adjusted hazards ratio (HR = 0.34, 95% confidence interval (95% CI = 0.15 to 0.78, P = 0.011. This risk decline was observed in conscripts with low as well as moderate to high baseline fitness levels. In the latter group of conscripts, the risk of upper-extremity injuries also decreased significantly (adjusted HR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.99, P = 0.047. In addition, the intervention groups tended to have less time loss due to injuries (adjusted HR = 0.55, 95% CI 0

  7. Injury prevalence of netball players in South Africa: The need for in jury prevention

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    T. Pillay

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to establish baseline data for injury prevalence,mechanism of injury, injury severity and management of injuries in netball playersin South Africa. A cross sectional descriptive design was employed to collect databy means of a questionnaire in 2010. Participants consisted of 254 netball playerswho participated in a netball tournament. Permission was obtained from all therelevant organizations and informed consent obtained from the participants. Thegeneral injury rate was 61.8% with an injury rate of 1.9 injuries per player forthe past season. The most commonly injured structures were the ankle 37.5 % andthe knee 28.6% with the most common mechanism of injury being landing, 19% and 29% respectively. Of those whosustained injuries, 86 (44% of the injured athletes’ sustained severe injuries, 31(16% sustained moderate injuriesand 78 (40% sustained mild injuries. 67% of players reported they were able to continue with the game and 33%received medical assistance losing game and training time. The most common form of management accessed wasphysiotherapy, which accounted for 31%. It is evident that the ankle and knee injury rates amongst South Africannetball players are high in comparison to other netball playing nations. Injury surveillance is an integral part ofdeveloping preventative measures. The article lays a platform for developing these strategies against the backdrop ofits findings and comparison with other authors.

  8. Prevalence and variance of shoulder injuries in elite collegiate football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Lee D; Flanigan, David C; Norwig, John; Jost, Patrick; Bradley, James

    2005-08-01

    Shoulder injuries are the fourth most common musculoskeletal injury encountered in American football players. There is little information in the literature on the role of playing position in the type of shoulder injuries seen. There is a high prevalence of shoulder injuries in elite collegiate American football players, with type of injury varying by playing position. Cohort study (prevalence); Level of evidence, 3. A total of 336 elite collegiate American football players were invited to the National Football League Combine for physical testing and medical evaluation. Current and historical data were evaluated for the purpose of this study, and all players underwent radiographic examinations, including plain radiographs and/or magnetic resonance imaging when necessary. All shoulder pathological conditions and shoulder surgical procedures were recorded. Players were categorized by position for the analysis of position-specific trends. Of the players, 50% had a history of shoulder injuries, with a total of 226 shoulder injuries (1.3 injuries per player injured); 56 players (34%) had a total of 73 surgeries. The most common injuries were acromioclavicular separation (41%), anterior instability (20%), rotator cuff injury (12%), clavicle fracture (4%), and posterior instability (4%). The most common surgeries performed were anterior instability reconstruction (48%), Mumford/Weaver-Dunn surgery (15%), posterior instability surgery (10%), and rotator cuff surgery (10%). Shoulder injuries were more common in quarterbacks and defensive backs. Surgery was more common in linebackers or linemen. A history of anterior instability was more common in defensive players, with surgery required 76% of the time. Linemen had more rotator cuff injuries and posterior instability than players in other positions. Shoulder injuries are common injuries in elite collegiate football players, with one-third undergoing surgical procedures. There are definitive trends in the types of injuries

  9. Prevalence of Oral and Maxillofacial Injuries among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Oral and maxillofacial injuries have been shown worldwide to be a major cause of disability and orofacial deformity. The magnitude and causes of oral and maxillofacial injuries varies from one country to another or even within the same country depending on prevailing conditions such as socioeconomic, ...

  10. Prevalence of Traumatic Dental Injuries and Associated Factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest frequency of trauma in permanent teeth was observed at the age of 12 (8%). Boys experienced more dental injuries than girls, 5.9% and 3.3% (p = 0.001), respectively. The most commonly reported cause of injuries to the permanent incisors was falls (71.8%), followed by collision with objects or people (17.8%).

  11. The prevalence of intentional and unintentional injuries in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intentional and unintentional injuries were reported to be the second leading cause of Disability Adjusted Life Years in South Africa in 2000. We present household experiences of such injuries in 5 impoverished housing settlements in Johannesburg, Gauteng Province. Data for this study were extracted from the database of ...

  12. Prevalence of Traumatic Dental Injuries and Associated Factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... increased risk of dental injuries in permanent teeth were age, gender, having an incisal overjet .... to change the previously proposed methodology. .... Rate per thousand permanent incisors with traumatic dental injuries in a sample of schoolchildren,. Diyarbakır, Turkey (n = 23256 incisors). Type of tooth.

  13. Prevalence and factors associated with percutaneous injuries and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher rates of percutaneous injuries were observed among nurses (50%), during stitching (30%), and in obstetric and gynecologic department (22%). Health workers aged below 40 years were more likely to experience percutaneous injuries (OR= 3.7; 95% CI=1.08-9.13) while previous training in infection prevention was ...

  14. High prevalence of self-reported injuries and illnesses in talented female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A; Clarsen, B; Verhagen, E A L M; Stubbe, J H

    2017-01-01

    A thorough knowledge of the epidemiology and severity of injuries and illness in youth female elite sports is lacking due to the methodological challenges involved in recording them. In this study, the prevalence and incidence of injuries and illness are assessed among youth female elite athletes. Instead of solely focusing on time-loss injuries, our study included all substantial and non-substantial health problems (ie, injuries, mental problems and illnesses). Sixty young elite Dutch female athletes (age: 16.6 years (SD: 2.3), weight: 58.3 kg (SD: 15.1), height: 154.1 cm (SD: 44.2)) participating in soccer (n=23), basketball (n=22) and gymnastic (n=15) talent development programmes were prospectively followed during one season (September 2014 to April 2015). To collect health problem data, all athletes completed the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center Questionnaire on Health Problems every other week. Main outcome measures were average prevalence of injury and incidence density of injury. At any given time, 47.9% of the athletes reported an injury (95% CI 43.6% to 52.6%) and 9.1% reported an illness (95% CI 5.1 to 19.0). The average injury incidence density was 8.6 per 1000 hours of athlete exposure. The average number of self-reported injuries per athlete per season was significantly higher in soccer athletes (4.3±2.7) than in basketball athletes (2.6±2.0) (p=0.03) and not significantly higher than in the gymnastic squad. The knee and the ankle were two of the most common injury locations for all squads. Knee injuries in basketball and soccer and heel injuries in the gymnastic squad had the highest impact on sports participation. High prevalence of self-reported injuries among talented female athletes suggests that future efforts towards their prevention are warranted.

  15. Prevalence of clinically important traumatic brain injuries in children with minor blunt head trauma and isolated severe injury mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigrovic, Lise E; Lee, Lois K; Hoyle, John; Stanley, Rachel M; Gorelick, Marc H; Miskin, Michelle; Atabaki, Shireen M; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2012-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of clinically important traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) with severe injury mechanisms in children with minor blunt head trauma but with no other risk factors from the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) TBI prediction rules (defined as isolated severe injury mechanisms). Secondary analysis of a large prospective observational cohort study. Twenty-five emergency departments participating in the PECARN. Children with minor blunt head trauma and Glasgow Coma Scale scores of at least 14. Treating clinicians completed a structured data form that included injury mechanism (severity categories defined a priori). Clinically important TBIs were defined as intracranial injuries resulting in death, neurosurgical intervention, intubation for more than 24 hours, or hospital admission for at least 2 nights. We investigated the rate of clinically important TBIs in children with either severe injury mechanisms or isolated severe injury mechanisms. Of the 42,412 patients enrolled in the overall study, 42,099 (99%) had injury mechanisms recorded, and their data were included for analysis. Of all study patients, 5869 (14%) had severe injury mechanisms, and 3302 (8%) had isolated severe injury mechanisms. Overall, 367 children had clinically important TBIs (0.9%; 95% CI, 0.8%-1.0%). Of the 1327 children younger than 2 years with isolated severe injury mechanisms, 4 (0.3%; 95% CI, 0.1%-0.8%) had clinically important TBIs, as did 12 of the 1975 children 2 years or older (0.6%; 95% CI, 0.3%-1.1%). Children with isolated severe injury mechanisms are at low risk of clinically important TBI, and many do not require emergent neuroimaging.

  16. Factors affecting length of hospital stay for people with spinal cord injuries at Kanombe military hospital, Rwanda

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    PB Bwanjugu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In patients with spinal cord injuries increased length ofhospital stay is often as a result of secondary complications such as pressuresores, urinary tract infection and respiratory infection. An increased lengthof hospital stay was observed at Kanombe Military Hospital in Rwanda.The aim of this study was to determine specific factors affecting length ofhospital stay for individuals with spinal cord injuries at Kanombe MilitaryHospital in Rwanda. The records of 124 individuals with spinal cordinjuries who were discharged from the hospital between 1st January1996and 31st December 2007 were reviewed to collect data. Information collected and captured on a data gathering sheetincluded demographic data, information relating to the injury, occurrence of medical complications and length ofhospital stay. Linear regression analysis was computed in SPSS to determine factors affecting the length of stay.The necessary ethical considerations were adhered to during the implementation of the study. Current employmentstatus and the occurrence of pressure sores were significantly associated with the length of hospital stay (p=0.021 andp=0.000 respectively. A strong relationship was noted between pressure sores and length of stay (R= 0.703. There is aneed for all members of the rehabilitation team to devise and implement effective measures to prevent the developmentof pressure sores, in patients with spinal cord injuries in the study setting.

  17. Determining the Prevalence and Assessing the Severity of Injuries in Mixed Martial Arts Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Mixed martial arts (MMA) is currently the fastest growing sport in the United States and has recently surpassed boxing as the most popular full contact sport. Due to the physical nature of the sport, MMA is associated with various types of injuries. Objective The purpose of this study was aimed at identifying prevalence and assessing the severity, location, and type of injuries in MMA athletes sustained during MMA related activities in the twelve month period prior to the survey. Methods A total of fifty-five subjects between the ages of 18 to 39 participated in the study. Participants were given a two-part questionnaire to collect demographic and injury data. Results Two hundred seven injuries were reported in the study. Low belt ranks had significantly more injuries more than any other belt rank, resulting in more than two times higher injury rate. Professional fighters had significantly more injuries than amateur fighters, resulting in three times higher injury rate. The most common body region injured was the head/neck/face (38.2%), followed by the lower extremities (30.4%), upper extremities (22.7%), torso (8.2%), and groin (0.5%). Injuries to the nose (6.3%), shoulder (6.3%), and toe (6.3%) were the most common. The most common type of injury was contusions (29.4%), followed by strains (16.2%), sprains (14.9%), and abrasions (10.1%). Conclusion Injury prevention efforts should consider the prevalence and distribution of injuries and focus on reducing or preventing injuries to the head/neck/face in MMA related activities. Preventative measures should focus on improving protective equipment during training, and possible competition rule modifications to further minimize participant injury. PMID:21509103

  18. Skeletal injuries in small mammals: a multispecies assessment of prevalence and location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Ryan B.; Burke, Christopher B.; Woodman, Neal; Poland, Lily B.; Rowe, Rebecca J.

    2018-01-01

    Wild mammals are known to survive injuries that result in skeletal abnormalities. Quantifying and comparing skeletal injuries among species can provide insight into the factors that cause skeletal injuries and enable survival following an injury. We documented the prevalence and location of structural bone abnormalities in a community of 7 small mammal species inhabiting the White Mountains of New Hampshire. These species differ in locomotion type and levels of intraspecific aggression. Overall, the majority of injuries were to the ribs or caudal vertebrae. Incidence of skeletal injuries was highest in older animals, indicating that injuries accumulate over a lifetime. Compared to species with ambulatory locomotion, those with more specialized (semi-fossorial, saltatorial, and scansorial) locomotion exhibited fewer skeletal abnormalities in the arms and legs, which we hypothesize is a result of a lesser ability to survive limb injuries. Patterns of skeletal injuries in shrews (Soricidae) were consistent with intraspecific aggression, particularly in males, whereas skeletal injuries in rodents (Rodentia) were more likely accidental or resulting from interactions with predators. Our results demonstrate that both the incidence and pattern of skeletal injuries vary by species and suggest that the ability of an individual to survive a specific skeletal injury depends on its severity and location as well as the locomotor mode of the species involved.

  19. Injury-reduction effectiveness of prescribing running shoes on the basis of foot arch height: summary of military investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Trone, Daniel W; Tchandja, Juste; Jones, Bruce H

    2014-10-01

    Secondary analysis of 3 randomized controlled trials. Objective Analysis of studies that examined whether prescribing running shoes on the basis of foot arch height influenced injury risk during military basic training. Prior to 2007, running magazines and running-shoe companies suggested that imprints of the bottom of the feet (plantar shape) could be used as an indication of foot arch height and that this could be used to select individually appropriate types of running shoes. Similar studies were conducted in US Army (2168 men, 951 women), Air Force (1955 men, 718 women), and Marine Corps (840 men, 571 women) basic training. After foot examinations, recruits were randomized to either an experimental or a control group. Recruits in the experimental group selected or were assigned motion-control, stability, or cushioned shoes to match their plantar shape, which represented a low, medium, or high foot arch, respectively. The control group received a stability shoe regardless of plantar shape. Injuries during basic training were assessed from outpatient medical records. Meta-analyses that pooled results of the 3 investigations showed little difference between the experimental and control groups in the injury rate (injuries per 1000 person-days) for either men (summary rate ratio = 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.88, 1.06) or women (summary rate ratio = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.85, 1.08). When injury rates for specific types of running shoes were compared, there were no differences. Selecting running shoes based on arch height had little influence on injury risk in military basic training. Prevention, level 1b.

  20. Prevalence of occupational injury and its contributing factors among rubber tappers in Galle, Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Catherine; de Silva, Vijitha; Tharindra, Hemajith

    2016-01-01

    Background Rubber tapping involves carrying heavy loads, navigating rough terrain, and using sharp tools. However, little is known about occupational injury among this vulnerable working population. Objective To assesses the prevalence, severity, and contributing factors associated with occupational injury among Sri Lankan rubber tappers and to identify possible interventions to improve occupational safety. Methods A questionnaire was administered to 300 Sri Lankan rubber tappers. The associations between tapper characteristics and injury within the last year were examined using log-binomial regression models. Short response answers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results 300 tappers reported 594 injuries in the previous 12 months, and missed 1,080 days of work. The prevalence of one or more injuries was 49%. Factors associated with injury were being female, working an additional job, tapping with a two-handed approach, and depressive symptomology. Qualitative findings suggest three interventions to address injuries: (1) landscaping, (2) personal protective equipment, and (3) provision of eyeglasses. Conclusions Work-related injuries are common among Sri Lankan rubber tappers. These results highlight the importance of working with and including informal workers in the creation of Sri Lankan occupational health and safety regulations. We believe that the three interventions identified by respondents could help to reduce the risk of occupational injury among rubber tappers. PMID:27784205

  1. Injuries in epilepsy: a review of its prevalence, risk factors, type of injuries and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Rita; Téllez Zenteno, José F.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, there is intense clinical research into various aspects of the medical risks relating to epilepsy, including total and cause-specific mortality, accidents and injuries in patients with epilepsy and mortality related with seizures. Seizures occurring in precarious situations and resulting in injuries are still an important concern for patients with epilepsy, their employers and their caregivers. Submersion injuries, motor vehicle accidents, burns, and head injuries are among the mo...

  2. Outcomes from a US military neurology and traumatic brain injury telemedicine program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkiewicz, Ilana R; Lappan, Charles M; Neely, Edward T; Hesselbrock, Roger R; Girard, Philip D; Alphonso, Aimee L; Tsao, Jack W

    2012-09-18

    This study evaluated usage of the Army Knowledge Online (AKO) Telemedicine Consultation Program for neurology and traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases in remote overseas areas with limited access to subspecialists. We performed a descriptive analysis of quantity of consults, response times, sites where consults originated, military branches that benefitted, anatomic locations of problems, and diagnoses. This was a retrospective analysis that searched electronic databases for neurology consults from October 2006 to December 2010 and TBI consults from March 2008 to December 2010. A total of 508 consults were received for neurology, and 131 consults involved TBI. For the most part, quantity of consults increased over the years. Meanwhile, response times decreased, with a mean response time of 8 hours, 14 minutes for neurology consults and 2 hours, 44 minutes for TBI consults. Most neurology consults originated in Iraq (67.59%) followed by Afghanistan (16.84%), whereas TBI consults mainly originated from Afghanistan (40.87%) followed by Iraq (33.91%). The most common consultant diagnoses were headaches, including migraines (52.1%), for neurology cases and mild TBI/concussion (52.3%) for TBI cases. In the majority of cases, consultants recommended in-theater management. After receipt of consultant's recommendation, 84 known neurology evacuations were facilitated, and 3 known neurology evacuations were prevented. E-mail-based neurology and TBI subspecialty teleconsultation is a viable method for overseas providers in remote locations to receive expert recommendations for a range of neurologic conditions. These recommendations can facilitate medically necessary patient evacuations or prevent evacuations for which on-site care is preferable.

  3. Prevalence and clinical features of sports-related lumbosacral stress injuries in the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideto; Murakami, Mototsune; Nishizawa, Kazuya

    2017-05-01

    Stress injuries (stress fractures and stress reactions) of the lumbosacral region are one of the causes of sports-related lower back pain in young individuals. These injuries can be detected by bone marrow edema lesion on MRI. However, little is known about the prevalence and clinical features of early stage lumbosacral stress injuries. This study aimed to evaluate the epidemiology of lumbosacral stress injuries. A total of 312 patients (under 18 years of age) who complained of sports-related lower back pain that had lasted for ≥7 days underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. We reviewed patients' records retrospectively. MRI showed that 33.0% of the patients had lumbar stress injuries and 1.6% had sacral stress injuries. Lumbar stress injuries were more common in males than in females and were found in 30% of 13- to 18-year-old patients. About 50% of the patients that participated in soccer or track and field were diagnosed with lumbar stress injuries. No clinical patterns in the frequencies of sacral stress injuries were detected due to the low number of patients that suffered this type of injury. Plain radiography is rarely able to detect the early stage lesions associated with lumbosacral stress injuries, but such lesions can be detected in the caudal-ventral region of the pars interarticularis on sagittal computed tomography scans. Thirty-three percent of young patients that complained of sports-related lower back pain for ≥7 days had lumbar stress injuries, while 1.6% of them had sacral stress injuries. Clinicians should be aware of the existence of these injuries. MRI is useful for diagnosing lumbosacral stress injuries.

  4. Injuries due to firearms and air guns among U.S. military members not participating in overseas combat operations, 2002-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    During 2002-2011, active component U.S. service members sustained 4,657 firearm-related injuries in circumstances other than deployment to the wars in Iraq/Afghanistan; 35 percent of the injuries were fatal. The highest firearm-related injury rates reflected service members in law enforcement/security and combat occupations. Of fatal injuries, 28 percent and 24 percent were suicides and homicides, respectively; among service members 30 and older, 84 percent of noncombat firearm-related deaths were suicides and 14 percent were homicides. In circumstances other than war, rates of both fatal and nonfatal firearm- related injuries are much lower among military members than civilian males aged 18-44. During the period, rates of nonfatal firearm-related injuries among non-deployed military members increased sharply, peaking in 2008. The trend reflects that among U.S. civilian males aged 18-44. However, firearm-related fatality rates were stable among civilians but increased among military members. The increase in rates of firearm-related fatalities among non-deployed military members reflects the increase in rates of suicides by firearms. Rates of injuries due to BB, pellet or paintball guns also increased during the period.

  5. Work-related traumatic dental injuries: Prevalence, characteristics and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, Alessandro; Parodi, Giovanni Battista; Casali, Claudia; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Giacinti, Flavio

    2018-02-01

    The prevalence of work-related oral trauma is underestimated because minor dental injuries are often not reported in patients with several injuries in different parts of the body. In addition, little data are available regarding their characteristics. The aim of this epidemiological study was to determine the prevalence, types, and characteristics of occupational traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) in a large working community. Work-related TDIs that occurred during the period between 2011 and 2013 in the District of Genoa (Northwest of Italy, 0.86 million inhabitants) were analyzed. Patients' data were obtained from the National Institute for Insurance against Accidents at Work database. During the 2 year period, 112 TDIs (345 traumatized teeth) were recorded. The prevalence was 5.6‰ of the total amount of occupational trauma. The highest prevalence was found in the fourth and fifth decades of life (OR=3.6, P workers represented 52% of the sample, and construction/farm/factory workers and craftsmen were 48%. TDIs involved only teeth and surrounding tissue in 66% of cases, or in combination with another maxillofacial injury in 34%. They were statistically associated with construction/farm/factory workers group (Chi squared P Work-related TDIs had a low overall prevalence, and fractures were the most frequent dental injury. Age, gender, and preexisting dental treatments represented risk factors for work-related TDIs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Domestic violence against children and adolescents: prevalence of physical injuries in a southern Brazilian metropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Leidielly Aline; Dalledone, Mariana; Pizzatto, Eduardo; Zaiter, Wellington; de Souza, Juliana Feltrin; Losso, Estela Maris

    2015-01-01

    Violence against children and adolescents is a public health issue worldwide that threatens physical and mental wellbeing and causes irreparable harm. Reports on this violence are an essential way to prevent it and to protect the children and adolescents. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of physical injuries that occur in domestic environments and reported to the Child and Adolescent Protection Network. This retrospective study was conducted at the Epidemiology Center of the Municipality of Curitiba. A total of 10,483 reports for the years 2010 (5,112) and 2011 (5,371) were analyzed and from them were selected reports of physical injuries that occurred in the family environment. The children and adolescents were 0-17 years old, comprising 322 cases of physical abuse within the family in 2010. Out of these, 57.1% were male and 42.9% were female, and 58% (187) presented head and neck injuries. There were 342 reports in 2011, 49% were male and 51% were female; head and neck injuries corresponded to 65% (222) of the reported cases. The prevalence of injuries increased by 6% and head and neck injury increased by 19% between 2010 and 2011. It may be concluded that physical abuse is associated with a high prevalence of head and neck injury, which is easily observed by the health and education professionals. Notification organs should be created in Brazilian hospitals and health centers, which is essential to conduct epidemiological surveillance and appropriate policies.

  7. [Preventive and therapeutic effects of Yishen Huanji Decoction on kidney injury in rats induced by simulation of military overtraining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Chun-hua

    2008-06-01

    To observe the preventive and therapeutic effects of Yishen Huanji Decoction (YSHJD), a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on military overtraining-induced kidney injury in a rat model. Thirty SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group, untreated group and YSHJD-treated group. The military overtraining-induced kidney injury in rats was established by forcing to run on the treadmill for 8 weeks. The rats in YSHJD-treated group were administered with YSHJD at the same time. The 24-hour urines were collected every weekend for detecting the contents of urinary sediment, 24-hour urine total protein, 24-hour urine albumin and activity of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG). The blood and renal tissues were collected after 8-week training, and the levels of serum urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (SCr) were detected. Angiotensin II (Ang II) was detected by radioimmunoassay and activity of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in kidney was analyzed by chemical colorimetric method. Compared with the normal control group, after 8-week training, the contents of 24-hour urine protein, activities of NAG in urine, and the levels of BUN and SCr in rats in the untreated group and YSHJD-treated group were obviously increased (Povertraining-induced kidney injury in rats by decreasing the contents of 24-hour urine protein, BUN and SCr, and the activity of NAG, and increasing the activity of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase.

  8. Prevalence and profile of musculoskeletal injuries in ballet dancers: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Toby O; Davies, Leigh; de Medici, Akbar; Hakim, Allan; Haddad, Fares; Macgregor, Alex

    2016-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and anatomical regions which are most frequently injured in ballet dancers. Published (AMED, CiNAHL, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus, psycINFO, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library) and grey literature databases (OpenGrey, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Current Controlled Trials and the UK National Research Register Archive) were searched from their inception to 25th May 2015 for papers presenting data on injury prevalence in ballet dancers. Two reviewers independently identified all eligible papers, data extracted and critically appraised studies. Study appraisal was conducted using the CASP appraisal tool. Pooled prevalence data with 95% confidence intervals were estimated to determine period prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and anatomical regions affected. Nineteen studies were eligible, reporting 7332 injuries in 2617 ballet dancers. The evidence was moderate in quality. Period prevalence of musculoskeletal injury was 280% (95% CI: 217-343%). The most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders included: hamstring strain (51%), ankle tendinopathy (19%) and generalized low back pain (14%). No papers explored musculoskeletal disorders in retired ballet dancers. Whilst we have identified which regions and what musculoskeletal disorders are commonly seen ballet dancers. The long-term injury impact of musculoskeletal disorders in retired ballet dancers remains unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Innovative new technologies to identify and treat traumatic brain injuries: crossover technologies and approaches between military and civilian applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doarn, Charles R; McVeigh, Francis; Poropatich, Ronald

    2010-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become the signature injury of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. The use of improvised explosive devices has seen an exponential increase in both Iraq and Afghanistan. In previous conflicts prior to Iraq, survivability of such an injury was far less. Today, technological improvements in trauma care have increased an injured warfighter's chance of survival. A reduction in severe TBI has been achieved but an increase in mild or moderate TBI has been observed. The consequences of this kind of injury can be both physical and mental and can often be hidden or even misdiagnosed. The U.S. Army is interested in pursuing technological solutions for early detection and treatment of TBI to reduce its lasting impact on the warfighter. Such technological breakthroughs have benefit beyond the military, as TBI is a high probable event in nonmilitary settings as well. To gauge what technologies or methods are currently available, the U.S. Army's Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center partnered with the American Telemedicine Association to organize and conduct a discipline-specific symposium entitled "Innovative New Technologies to Identify and Treat Traumatic Brain Injuries: Crossover Technologies and Approaches Between Military and Civilian Applications." This symposium was held in Palm Springs, CA, in September 2009. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a unique opportunity for leaders from disparate organizations involved in telemedicine and related other activities to meet and explore opportunities to collaborate in new partnership models. The meeting was designed to help Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center identify opportunities to expand strategic operations and form new alliances. This report summarizes this symposium while raising awareness for collaboration into better ways of adapting and adopting technologies to address this growing health issue.

  10. Prevalence and Determinants of Fall-Related Injuries among Older Adults in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orces, Carlos H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the prevalence and determinants of fall-related injuries in the previous year among adults aged 60 years or older in Ecuador. Methods. The prevalence of fall-related injuries was estimated using cross-sectional data from the first national survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging study. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between participants' demographic characteristics and fall-related injuries. Results. Of 5,227 participants with a mean age of 72.6 years, 11.4% (95% CI, 10.3%-12.7%) reported a fall-related injury in Ecuador, representing an estimated 136,000 adults aged 60 years or older. Fall-related injuries were more frequently reported among older adults residing in the most urbanized and populated provinces of the country. After controlling for potential confounders, self-reported race as Indigenous (OR 2.2; 95% CI, 2.11-2.31), drinking alcohol regularly (OR 2.54; 95% CI, 2.46-2.63), subjects with greater number of comorbid conditions (OR 2.03; 95% CI, 1.97-2.08), and urinary incontinence (OR 1.83; 95% CI, 1.79-1.87) were factors independently associated with increased odds of sustaining fall-related injuries. Conclusions. Fall-related injuries represent a considerable burden for older adults in Ecuador. The present findings may assist public health authorities to implement fall prevention programs among subjects at higher risk for this type of injury.

  11. Prevalence and Social Correlates of Injury Among In-School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variables positively associated with the outcome of serious injury during the past 12 months in univariate analysis were current smoking, current alcohol use, excessive drinking, illicit drug use, truancy, bullied and having gone hungry, while in multivariate analysis being bullied, having gone hungry and truancy remained ...

  12. Structured interview for mild traumatic brain injury after military blast: inter-rater agreement and development of diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William C; Cifu, David X; Hudak, Anne M; Goldberg, Gary; Kunz, Richard D; Sima, Adam P

    2015-04-01

    The existing gold standard for diagnosing a suspected previous mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is clinical interview. But it is prone to bias, especially for parsing the physical versus psychological effects of traumatic combat events, and its inter-rater reliability is unknown. Several standardized TBI interview instruments have been developed for research use but have similar limitations. Therefore, we developed the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) retrospective concussion diagnostic interview, blast version (VCU rCDI-B), and undertook this cross-sectional study aiming to 1) measure agreement among clinicians' mTBI diagnosis ratings, 2) using clinician consensus develop a fully structured diagnostic algorithm, and 3) assess accuracy of this algorithm in a separate sample. Two samples (n = 66; n = 37) of individuals within 2 years of experiencing blast effects during military deployment underwent semistructured interview regarding their worst blast experience. Five highly trained TBI physicians independently reviewed and interpreted the interview content and gave blinded ratings of whether or not the experience was probably an mTBI. Paired inter-rater reliability was extremely variable, with kappa ranging from 0.194 to 0.825. In sample 1, the physician consensus prevalence of probable mTBI was 84%. Using these diagnosis ratings, an algorithm was developed and refined from the fully structured portion of the VCU rCDI-B. The final algorithm considered certain symptom patterns more specific for mTBI than others. For example, an isolated symptom of "saw stars" was deemed sufficient to indicate mTBI, whereas an isolated symptom of "dazed" was not. The accuracy of this algorithm, when applied against the actual physician consensus in sample 2, was almost perfect (correctly classified = 97%; Cohen's kappa = 0.91). In conclusion, we found that highly trained clinicians often disagree on historical blast-related mTBI determinations. A fully structured interview

  13. Prevalence and Effect of Problematic Spasticity After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Kaila A; Lipson, Rachel; Noonan, Vanessa K; Kwon, Brian K; Mills, Patricia B

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and effect of spasticity after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Prospective cohort study of the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) and retrospective review of inpatient medical charts. Quaternary trauma center, rehabilitation center, and community settings. Individuals (N=860) with a traumatic SCI between March 1, 2005, and March 31, 2014, prospectively enrolled in the Vancouver site RHSCIR were eligible for inclusion. Not applicable. Questionnaires (Penn Spasm Frequency Scale, Spinal Cord Injury Health Questionnaire) and antispasticity medication use. In 465 patients, the prevalence of spasticity at community discharge was 65%, and the prevalence of problematic spasticity (defined as discharged on antispasticity medication) was 35%. Problematic spasticity was associated with cervicothoracic neurologic level and injury severity (Pspasticity treatment (ie, problematic spasticity) was 35% at 1 year, 41% at 2 years, and 31% at 5 years postinjury. Interference with function caused by spasticity was reported by 27% of patients at 1 year, 25% at 2 years, and 20% at 5 years postinjury. Patients with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade C injuries had the highest prevalence of ongoing spasticity treatment and functional limitation. Spasticity is a highly prevalent secondary consequence of SCI, particularly in patients with severe motor incomplete cervicothoracic injuries. It is problematic in one third of all patients with SCI up to 5 years postinjury. One in 5 patients will have ongoing functional limitations related to spasticity, highlighting the importance of close community follow-up and the need for further research into spasticity management strategies. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury in patients with cervical spine fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzanah Ismail

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It is not uncommon for vertebral artery injury to occur when there are fractures through the transverse foraminae of the first to the sixth vertebral bodies. Other important risk factors for vertebral artery injury include facet joint dislocations and fractures of the first to the third cervical vertebral bodies. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury on CT angiography (CTA in patients with cervical spine fractures.Method: A retrospective review of patients who had undergone CTA of the vertebral arteries was undertaken. Reports were reviewed to determine which patients met the inclusion criteria of having had both cervical spine fractures and CTA of the vertebral arteries. Images of patients who met the inclusion criteria were analysed by a radiologist.Results: The prevalence of vertebral artery injury was 33%. Four out of the 11 patients who had vertebral artery injury, had post-traumatic spasm of the artery, with associated thrombosis or occlusion of the vessel. In terms of blunt carotid vertebral injury (BCVI grading, most of the patients sustained grade IV injuries. Four patients who had vertebral artery injury had fractures of the upper cervical vertebrae, i.e. C1 to C3. Fifteen transverse process fractures were associated with vertebral artery injury. No vertebral artery injury was detected in patients who had facet joint subluxations.Conclusion: Patients with transverse process fractures of the cervical spine and upper cervical vertebral body fractures should undergo CTA to exclude vertebral artery injury.

  15. Self-injurious behaviour in Cornelia de Lange syndrome: 1. Prevalence and phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C; Sloneem, J; Hall, S; Arron, K

    2009-07-01

    Self-injurious behaviour is frequently identified as part of the behavioural phenotype of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). We conducted a case-control study of the prevalence and phenomenology of self-injurious behaviour (SIB) in CdLS. A total of 54 participants with CdLS were compared with 46 individuals who were comparable on key variables including age, degree of intellectual disability and wheelchair use, using questionnaire and observational measures. Clinically significant self-injury was not more prevalent in the CdLS group (55.6%), nor was it different in presentation from that seen in the comparison group. Hyperactivity, stereotyped and compulsive behaviours predicted clinically significant self-injury in all participants. Hand directed, mild self-injury was more prevalent in CdLS. The results show that clinically significant self-injury may not be part of the behavioural phenotype of CdLS but a specific body target for proto-SIB is more common.

  16. Prevalence and Mental Health Correlates of Sleep Disruption Among Military Members Serving in a Combat Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    by some respon­ dents because of pride or stigma in light of military cul­ tural norms, which could undermine estimates of sleep deficit (though in...Stress Studies. 1993 Oct 25. San Antonio, Texas. 24. Cabrera OA, Hoge CW. Bliese PD, Castro CA, Messer SC: Childhood adversity and combat as predictors

  17. Low Prevalence of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Patients With Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jaysson T; Ramji, Alim F; Lyapustina, Tatyana A; Yost, Mary T; Ain, Michael C

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries and their subsequent reconstructions are common in the general population, but there has been no research regarding ACL or PCL injuries in patients with achondroplasia, the most common skeletal dysplasia. Our goals were to (1) evaluate the prevalence of ACL and PCL injuries in adolescents and adults with achondroplasia, (2) compare this prevalence with that reported for the general population, (3) determine how many patients with ACL or PCL injuries underwent ligament reconstruction as treatment, and (4) determine patient activity levels as they relate to the rate of ACL/PCL injuries and reconstructions. We reviewed medical records of 430 patients with achondroplasia seen in the senior author's clinic from 2002 through 2014. Demographic data were reviewed, as well as any documentation of ACL or PCL injury or reconstruction. We called all 430 patients by telephone, and 148 agreed to participate in our survey, whereas 1 declined. We asked these patients about their history of ACL or PCL injury or reconstruction, as well as current and past physical activity levels. No ACL or PCL injuries were found on chart review. One patient reached by telephone reported an ACL injury that did not require reconstruction. This yielded a theoretical prevalence of 3/430 (0.7%). Of the 148 patients surveyed, 43 (29%) reported low physical activity, 75 (51%) reported moderate physical activity, and 26 (17%) reported high physical activity. There was no significant difference in the rate of ACL injury when stratified by physical activity level (P=0.102). ACL and PCL injuries and reconstructions are extremely rare in patients with achondroplasia, which cannot be completely ascribed to a low level of physical activity. One possible explanation is that patients with achondroplasia, on an average, have a more anterior tibial slope compared with those without achondroplasia, which decreases the force generated

  18. Prevalence, incidence and risk factors for overuse injuries of the wrist in young athletes: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, Laura S.; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Maas, Mario; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2015-01-01

    Overuse wrist injuries can cause long-term symptoms in young athletes performing wrist-loading sports. Information on the prevalence, incidence and associated risk factors is required. We aimed to review the prevalence and incidence of overuse wrist injuries in young athletes and to identify

  19. The pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury in patients with cervical spine fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzanah Ismail

    2013-06-01

    Method: A retrospective review of patients who had undergone CTA of the vertebral arteries was undertaken. Reports were reviewed to determine which patients met the inclusion criteria of having had both cervical spine fractures and CTA of the vertebral arteries. Images of patients who met the inclusion criteria were analysed by a radiologist. Results: The prevalence of vertebral artery injury was 33%. Four out of the 11 patients who had vertebral artery injury, had post-traumatic spasm of the artery, with associated thrombosis or occlusion of the vessel. In terms of blunt carotid vertebral injury (BCVI grading, most of the patients sustained grade IV injuries. Four patients who had vertebral artery injury had fractures of the upper cervical vertebrae, i.e. C1 to C3. Fifteen transverse process fractures were associated with vertebral artery injury. No vertebral artery injury was detected in patients who had facet joint subluxations. Conclusion: Patients with transverse process fractures of the cervical spine and upper cervical vertebral body fractures should undergo CTA to exclude vertebral artery injury.

  20. Prevalence of Acute Kidney Injury in neonates admitted at a referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine prevalence of acute kidney injury and associated factors, among neonates admitted at a referral hospital. Design: Cross sectional study conducted 1 May to 31 July 2010. Setting: Harare Central Hospital, Neonatal Unit. Subjects: 270 neonates ≥ 37 weeks gestation admitted within 12 hours of birth.

  1. Prevalence and association of oral candidiasis with dysphagia in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk; Kothari, Mohit

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of oral candidiasis (OC) in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) and to evaluate the association of OC with improvement in dysphagia. Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: Individuals with ABI admitted to a rehabilitation centre were...

  2. Prevalence and association of oral candidiasis with dysphagia in individuals with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Kothari, Mohit

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of oral candidiasis (OC) in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) and to evaluate the association of OC with improvement in dysphagia. Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: Individuals with ABI admitted to rehabilitation were recruited over...

  3. Comparing Sexual Assult Survey Prevalence Rates at Military Service Academies and U.S. Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    physical harm or promised rewards, or 4) failure to obtain affirmative consent. The study also collected data on sexual harassment , stalking, and...nonconforming,” or as something not listed on the survey. This group had high rates of being victims of nonconsensual sexual contact and harassment . However...Military Service Academies and U.S. Colleges 13 13 Other Gender-Related Behaviors The AAU study provides results on sexual harassment since the

  4. The prevalence and severity of injuries in field hockey drag flickers: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Leo; Sherry, Dorianne; Loh, Wei Bing; Sjurseth, Andreas Myhre; Iyengar, Shrikant; Wild, Catherine; Rosalie, Simon

    2016-09-01

    The drag flick is the preferred method of scoring during a penalty corner in field hockey. Performing the drag flick requires a combination of strength, coordination and timing, which may increase susceptibility to injuries. However, injury prevalence in drag flickers has not previously been investigated. Therefore, this study compared the injury prevalence and severity of lower limb and lower back injuries between drag flickers and non-drag flickers in field hockey. A total of 432 local, national and international adult field hockey players (242 males, 188 females) completed an online questionnaire to retrospectively determine the 3-month prevalence and severity of ankle, knee, hip and lower back injuries. Of this group, 140 self-identified as drag flickers and 292 as non-drag flickers. The results showed that drag flickers had significantly higher prevalence of hip (OR: 1.541; 95% CI: 1.014, 2.343) and lower back injury (OR: 1.564; 95% CI: 1.034, 2.365) compared to non-drag flickers. No significant differences were observed between drag flickers and non-drag flickers in injury prevalence at the ankle and knee. There were no significant between-group differences in injury severity scores. Overall, the prevalence of hip and lower back injuries was significantly higher in drag flickers compared to non-drag flickers.

  5. Prevalence of external injuries in small cetaceans in Aruban waters, southern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksenburg, Jolanda A

    2014-01-01

    Aruba, located close to the coasts of Colombia and Venezuela, is one of the most densely populated islands in the Caribbean and supports a wide range of marine-related socio-economic activities. However, little is known about the impacts of human activities on the marine environment. Injuries in marine mammals can be used to examine interactions with human activities and identify potential threats to the survival of populations. The prevalence of external injuries and tooth rake marks were examined in Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis) (n = 179), bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) (n = 76) and false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) (n = 71) in Aruban waters using photo identification techniques. Eleven injury categories were defined and linked to either human-related activities or natural causes. All injury categories were observed. In total, 18.7% of all individuals had at least one injury. Almost half (41.7%) of the injuries could be attributed to human interactions, of which fishing gear was the most common cause (53.3%) followed by propeller hits (13.3%). Major disfigurements were observed in all three species and could be attributed to interactions with fishing gear. The results of this study indicate that fishing gear and propeller hits may pose threats to small and medium-sized cetaceans in Aruban waters. Thus, long-term monitoring of population trends is warranted. Shark-inflicted bite wounds were observed in Atlantic spotted dolphin and bottlenose dolphin. Bite wounds of cookie cutter sharks (Isistius sp.) were recorded in all three species, and include the first documented record of a cookie cutter shark bite in Atlantic spotted dolphin. This is one of the few studies which investigates the prevalence of injuries in cetaceans in the Caribbean. Further study is necessary to determine to which extent the injuries observed in Aruba affect the health and survival of local populations.

  6. Prevalence of external injuries in small cetaceans in Aruban waters, southern Caribbean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanda A Luksenburg

    Full Text Available Aruba, located close to the coasts of Colombia and Venezuela, is one of the most densely populated islands in the Caribbean and supports a wide range of marine-related socio-economic activities. However, little is known about the impacts of human activities on the marine environment. Injuries in marine mammals can be used to examine interactions with human activities and identify potential threats to the survival of populations. The prevalence of external injuries and tooth rake marks were examined in Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis (n = 179, bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus (n = 76 and false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens (n = 71 in Aruban waters using photo identification techniques. Eleven injury categories were defined and linked to either human-related activities or natural causes. All injury categories were observed. In total, 18.7% of all individuals had at least one injury. Almost half (41.7% of the injuries could be attributed to human interactions, of which fishing gear was the most common cause (53.3% followed by propeller hits (13.3%. Major disfigurements were observed in all three species and could be attributed to interactions with fishing gear. The results of this study indicate that fishing gear and propeller hits may pose threats to small and medium-sized cetaceans in Aruban waters. Thus, long-term monitoring of population trends is warranted. Shark-inflicted bite wounds were observed in Atlantic spotted dolphin and bottlenose dolphin. Bite wounds of cookie cutter sharks (Isistius sp. were recorded in all three species, and include the first documented record of a cookie cutter shark bite in Atlantic spotted dolphin. This is one of the few studies which investigates the prevalence of injuries in cetaceans in the Caribbean. Further study is necessary to determine to which extent the injuries observed in Aruba affect the health and survival of local populations.

  7. The Musculoskeletal Readiness Screening Tool-Injury Predictor for United States Military Academy Preparatory Cadets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    weight bearing ankle dorsiflexion was associated with 176 lower extremity injury .10,11,13,17 Lack of weight-bearing dorsiflexion may impair, 177...time 444 (11%), and track (10%). Injuries predominantly occurred at the knee (24%), hip 445 (15%), and ankle (14%). 446 447 448 449 450...NAJSPT. 2010;5(2):47-54. 660 10. Clanton TO, Matheny LM, Jarvis HC, Jeronimus AB. Return to play in athletes 661 following ankle injuries . Sports

  8. Rationale for Spiritually Oriented Cognitive Processing Therapy for Moral Injury in Active Duty Military and Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Harold G; Boucher, Nathan A; Oliver, Rev John P; Youssef, Nagy; Mooney, Scott R; Currier, Joseph M; Pearce, Michelle

    2017-02-01

    Wartime experiences have long been known to cause ethical conflict, guilt, self-condemnation, difficulty forgiving, loss of trust, lack of meaning and purpose, and spiritual struggles. "Moral injury" (MI) (also sometimes called "inner conflict") is the term used to capture this emotional, cognitive, and behavioral state. In this article, we provide rationale for developing and testing Spiritually Oriented Cognitive Processing Therapy, a version of standard cognitive processing therapy for the treatment of MI in active duty and veteran service members (SMs) with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms who are spiritual or religious (S/R). Many SMs have S/R beliefs that could increase vulnerability to MI. Because the injury is to deeply held moral standards and ethical values and often adversely affects spiritual beliefs and worldview, we believe that those who are S/R will respond more favorably to a therapy that directly targets this injury from a spiritually oriented perspective. An evidence-based treatment for MI in posttraumatic stress disorder that not only respects but also utilizes SMs' spiritual beliefs/behaviors may open the door to treatment for many S/R military personnel.

  9. Neuropathic pain prevalence following spinal cord injury: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, D; Fullen, B M; Stokes, D; Lennon, O

    2017-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), chronic pain is a common secondary complication with neuropathic pain (NP) cited as one of the most distressing and debilitating conditions leading to poor quality of life, depression and sleep disturbances. Neuropathic pain presenting at or below the level of injury is largely refractory to current pharmacological and physical treatments. No consensus on the prevalence of NP post SCI currently exists, hence this systematic review was undertaken. The review comprised three phases: a methodological assessment of databases [PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Cochrane Library and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro)] identifying potential papers and screening for inclusion criteria by two independent reviewers; data extraction; and finally rating of internal validity and strength of the evidence, using a published valid and reliable scale. Meta-analysis estimated pooled point prevalence rates using a random effects model. In total, 17 studies involving 2529 patients were included in the review. Overall point prevalence rates for NP were established at 53% (38.58-67.47); 19% (13.26-26.39) for at-level NP and 27% (19.89-34.61) for below-level NP, with high heterogeneity noted (I 2  = 84-93%). Prevalence rates for NP following SCI are high. Future studies should include established definitions, classification systems and assessment tools for NP at defined time points post SCI to follow the trajectory of this problem across the lifespan and include indices of sleep, mood and interference to allow for appropriate, optimal and timely NP management for each patient. WHAT DOES THIS REVIEW ADD?: This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to record pooled point prevalence of neuropathic pain post spinal cord injury at 53%. Additional pooled analysis shows that neuropathic pain is more common below the level of lesion, in patients with tetraplegia, older patients

  10. Prevalence of hypertension and associated risk factors in people with long-term spinal cord injury living in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaansen, Jacinthe J E; Douma-Haan, Yvonne; van Asbeck, Floris W A; van Koppenhagen, Casper F; de Groot, Sonja; Smit, Christof A; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Post, Marcel W M

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence of hypertension and associated risk factors in people with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to compare the prevalence of high blood pressure and/or the use of antihypertensive drugs with the prevalence in the Dutch general population. METHOD: Multicentre

  11. Prevalence of hypertension and associated risk factors in people with long-term spinal cord injury living in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaansen, Jacinthe J E; Douma-Haan, Yvonne; van Asbeck, Floris W A; van Koppenhagen, Casper F; de Groot, Sonja; Smit, Christof A; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Post, Marcel W M

    PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence of hypertension and associated risk factors in people with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to compare the prevalence of high blood pressure and/or the use of antihypertensive drugs with the prevalence in the Dutch general population. METHOD: Multicentre

  12. Prevalence and regional correlates of road traffic injury among Chinese urban residents: A 21-city population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, Ian R H; Jiang, Shuhan; Yang, Qian; Yang, Tingzhong; Yang, Xiaozhao Y; Peng, Sihui; Yu, Lingwei

    2017-08-18

    This study estimated the prevalence of road traffic injury among Chinese urban residents and examined individual and regional-level correlates. A cross-sectional multistage process was used to sample residents from 21 selected cities in China. Survey respondents reported their history of road traffic injury in the past 12 months through a community survey. Multilevel, multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify injury correlates. Based on a retrospective 12-month reporting window, road traffic injury prevalence among urban residents was 13.2%. Prevalence of road traffic injury, by type, was 8.7, 8.7, 8.5, and 7.7% in the automobile, bicycle, motorcycle, and pedestrian categories, respectively. Multilevel analysis showed that prevalence of road traffic injury was positively associated with minority status, income, and mental health disorder score at the individual level. Regionally, road traffic injury was associated with geographic location of residence and prevalence of mental health disorders. Both individual and regional-level variables were associated with road traffic injury among Chinese urban residents, a finding whose implications transcend wholesale imported generic solutions. This descriptive research demonstrates an urgent need for longitudinal studies across China on risk and protective factors, in order to inform injury etiology, surveillance, prevention, treatment, and evaluation.

  13. Incidence and epidemiology of spinal cord injury within a closed American population: the United States military (2000-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, A J; McCriskin, B; Hsiao, M; Burks, R

    2011-08-01

    Cohort study. The objective of this study was to characterize the incidence of spinal cord injury (SCI) within the population of the United States military from 2000-2009. This investigation also sought to define potential risk factors for the development of SCI. The population of the United States military from 2000-2009. The Defense Medical Epidemiology Database was queried for the years 2000-2009 using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes for SCI (806.0, 806.1, 806.2, 806.3, 806.4, 806.5, 806.8, 806.9, 952.0, 952.1, 952.2, 952.8, 952.9). The raw incidence of SCI was calculated and unadjusted incidence rates were generated for the risk factors of age, sex, race, military rank and branch of service. Adjusted incidence rate ratios were subsequently determined via multivariate Poisson regression analysis that controlled for other factors in the model and identified significant independent risk factors for SCI. Between 2000 and 2009, there were 5928 cases of SCI among a population at-risk of 13,813,333. The raw incidence of SCI within the population was 429 per million person-years. Male sex, white race, enlisted personnel and service in the Army, Navy or Marine Corps were found to be significant independent risk factors for SCI. The age groups 20-24, 25-29 and >40 were also found to be at significantly greater risk of developing the condition. This study is one of the few investigations to characterize the incidence, epidemiology and risk factors for SCI within the United States. Results presented here may represent the best-available evidence for risk factors of SCI in a large and diverse American cohort.

  14. A narrative literature review of depression following traumatic brain injury: prevalence, impact, and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juengst SB

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Shannon B Juengst,1,2 Raj G Kumar,3 Amy K Wagner3–5 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2Department of Rehabilitation Counseling, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 4Department of Neuroscience, 5Safar Center for Resuscitation Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: Depression is one of the most common conditions to emerge after traumatic brain injury (TBI, and despite its potentially serious consequences it remains undertreated. Treatment for post-traumatic depression (PTD is complicated due to the multifactorial etiology of PTD, ranging from biological pathways to psychosocial adjustment. Identifying the unique, personalized factors contributing to the development of PTD could improve long-term treatment and management for individuals with TBI. The purpose of this narrative literature review was to summarize the prevalence and impact of PTD among those with moderate to severe TBI and to discuss current challenges in its management. Overall, PTD has an estimated point prevalence of 30%, with 50% of individuals with moderate to severe TBI experiencing an episode of PTD in the first year after injury alone. PTD has significant implications for health, leading to more hospitalizations and greater caregiver burden, for participation, reducing rates of return to work and affecting social relationships, and for quality of life. PTD may develop directly or indirectly as a result of biological changes after injury, most notably post-injury inflammation, or through psychological and psychosocial factors, including pre injury personal characteristics and post-injury adjustment to disability. Current evidence for effective treatments is limited, although the strongest evidence supports antidepressants and cognitive behavioral interventions. More personalized approaches to treatment and further research into unique therapy combinations

  15. Patients with high-grade pivot-shift phenomenon are associated with higher prevalence of anterolateral ligament injury after acute anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guan-Yang; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Guan; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Xin; Xue, Zhe; Qian, Yi; Feng, Hua

    2017-04-01

    To compare the prevalence of concomitant anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury between patients with high-grade (grades II and III) pivot-shift and those with low-grade (grades 0 and I) pivot-shift phenomenon after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Sixty-eight patients with an acute ACL injury who showed high-grade (grades II and III) pivot-shift phenomenon were enrolled as the study group. They were matched in a 1:1 fashion to another 68 ACL-injured control participants who showed low-grade (grades 0 and I) pivot-shift phenomenon during the same study period. Patients were matched by age, sex, and time from injury to surgery. A standardized pivot-shift test was performed under anesthesia for all the patients. Two blinded musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans for the presence of concomitant ALL injury. The grade of an ALL injury was divided into grade 0 (normal), grade I (sprain), grade II (partial tear), and grade III (complete tear). The prevalence and the grade of concomitant ALL injury were further compared between the study group and the control group. Overall, the prevalence of concomitant ALL injury in the study group (94.1%, 64/68) was significantly higher than that in the control group [60.3%, (41/68), P < 0.05]. Specifically, there were 49 patients (49/64, 76.6%) who showed grade II/III (partial/complete tear) MRI evidence of concomitant ALL injury, which was also significantly higher than that in the control group (12/41, 29.3%). Patients with high-grade pivot-shift phenomenon showed higher prevalence of concomitant ALL injury compared to those with low-grade pivot-shift phenomenon after acute ACL injuries. Careful assessment and proper treatment of this concomitant injury should be considered especially in knees with high-grade pivot-shift phenomenon. III.

  16. Occupational Therapy Practitioners with Occupational Musculoskeletal Injuries: Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaser, Musaed Z

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors of occupational musculoskeletal injuries (OMIs) among occupational therapy practitioners over a 12-month period. A self-administered questionnaire mailed to 500 randomly selected practicing occupational therapists (OTs) and occupational therapy assistants (OTAs) living in the state of Texas. A response rate of 38 % was attained with 192 questionnaires returned. In a 12-months working period, 23 % of occupational therapy practitioners experienced musculoskeletal injuries. Muscle strain (52 %) was most reported injury and lower back (32 %) was most injured body part. Years of practicing experience (t = 2.83, p = 0.01), and age x(2)(2, N = 192) = 8.28, p = 0.02 were found as significant factors associated with injuries among OTAs. No factors were significantly associated with injuries among OTs. Patient handling was the primary factor associated with injuries. Also, minimal experience and older age were concluded as risk factors that might contribute to OMIs.

  17. The prevalence of traumatic brain injury in the homeless community in a UK city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddy, Michael; Moir, Jane Frances; Fortescue, Deborah; Chadwick, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of traumatic brain injury in a sample of homeless individuals. The researchers employed a cross-sectional survey design and contacted 12 organizations providing services for homeless individuals across a city in the UK. The sample included 100 homeless participants (75 males and 25 females) who met the inclusion criteria. A matched control group (n = 100) of individuals who were not homeless was also recruited. A questionnaire was administered to all participants to elicit information relating to history of possible traumatic brain injury. Results indicated that a significantly higher number of homeless participants (48%) reported a history of traumatic brain injury than control participants (21%). Of those homeless participants, 90% indicated they had sustained their first traumatic brain injury before they were homeless. These findings suggest that rates of traumatic brain injury are much higher among the homeless population than in the general population and that sustaining a traumatic brain injury may be a risk factor for homelessness.

  18. [Prevalence of non-fatal road traffic injuries in Mexico: results from ENSANUT 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Medina-Solís, Carlo E; Pérez-Núñez, Ricardo; Híjar-Medina, Martha; Aracena-Genao, Belkis; Hidalgo-Solórzano, Elisa; Palma-Coca, Oswaldo

    2008-01-01

    To determine non-fatal road traffic injuries (NFRTI) prevalence and its distribution in Mexico. Data from ENSANUT Survey 2006 were used. Using simple random sampling, one adult, one adolescent and one child were selected in each household, constituting a final sample of 94,197 representing an N of 102,886,482 people. The dependent variable was the prevalence of road traffic injuries (RTI) during the 12 months prior to the survey. The general accident prevalence was 6.0%; 16.7% corresponded to NFRTI. Men in the 20 to 44 age group living in urban areas and with high socioeconomic status had a higher RTI prevalence (p<0.05). Jalisco, Aguascalientes and Sonora were states with the highest prevalence of RTI, while Guerrero, Michoacan and Oaxaca were those with the lowest. NFRTI are frequent in Mexico and they are concentrated among men in productive ages in urban areas; they are associated with socioeconomic status at the individual level and with the state's development at the population level.

  19. Treatment of Social Competence in Military Veterans, Service Members, and Civilians with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    definitive evidence about the effectiveness of a group social competence intervention for people with TBI. Military Benefit: The proposed study has a...16793.bi 7 A-16793.bii 30 Rehab Institute of Michigan Scott Millis, PhD A-16793.ci 7 A-16793.cii 14 Rehab Hospital of Indiana Flora Hammond...thank Dave Mellick, MA; Scott R. Millis, PhD; James F. Malec, PhD; and Flora Hammond, MD for their thoughtful contributions to this manuscript

  20. Secondary traumatic stress among mental health providers working with the military: prevalence and its work- and exposure-related correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, Roman; Anderson, Valerie; Bock, Judith; Moore, Bret A; Peterson, Alan L; Benight, Charles C

    2013-11-01

    Our research assessed the prevalence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) among mental health providers working with military patients. We also investigated personal, work-related, and exposure-related correlates of STS. Finally, using meta-analysis, the mean level of STS symptoms in this population was compared with the mean level of these symptoms in other groups. Participants (N = 224) completed measures of indirect exposure to trauma (i.e., diversity, volume, frequency, ratio), appraisal of secondary exposure impact, direct exposure to trauma, STS, and work characteristics. The prevalence of STS was 19.2%. Personal history of trauma, complaints about having too many patients, and more negative appraisals of the impact caused by an indirect exposure to trauma were associated with higher frequency of STS symptoms. A meta-analysis showed that the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and arousal symptoms of STS was similar across various groups of professionals indirectly exposed to trauma (e.g., mental health providers, rescue workers, social workers).

  1. Prevalence of hyoid injuries in dogs and cats undergoing computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, J D; Stokowski, S K; Clapp, K S; Werre, S R

    2017-05-01

    Fractures of the hyoid bones have been reported occasionally in dogs, but the prevalence and significance of hyoid injury in dogs and cats are unknown. In human beings, hyoid injury is rare and usually is caused by direct trauma to the greater cornu, which are analogous to the paired canine and feline thyrohyoid bones. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and morphology of hyoid bone injury detected in dogs and cats undergoing computed tomography (CT) for unrelated disease. CT studies of 293 dogs and 100 cats from 2012 to 2016 were identified and reviewed retrospectively. Hyoid fracture (total of eight bones) or luxation (total of four sites) was present in 9/293 (3.1%) dogs, but none of the cats. One dog had bilateral fractures and one dog had bilateral luxations. The most frequently fractured bone was the epihyoid bone (4/8 fractures). Fracture margins were tapered and sclerotic, consistent with chronic non-union. There was no history of trauma, dysphagia or dyspnea in 7/9 dogs with hyoid fractures. Hyoid bone injury, particularly epihyoid bone fracture, may be an incidental finding in dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Monitoring and prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome in military veterans with serious mental illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameed Ahmed M Khatana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality among patients with serious mental illness (SMI and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome--a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors--is significantly higher in these patients than in the general population. Metabolic monitoring among patients using second generation antipsychotics (SGAs--a risk factor for metabolic syndrome--has been shown to be inadequate despite the release of several guidelines. However, patients with SMI have several factors independent of medication use that predispose them to a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Our study therefore examines monitoring and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with SMI, including those not using SGAs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We retrospectively identified all patients treated at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center with diagnoses of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or bipolar disorder during 2005-2006 and obtained demographic and clinical data. Incomplete monitoring of metabolic syndrome was defined as being unable to determine the status of at least one of the syndrome components. Of the 1,401 patients included (bipolar disorder: 822; schizophrenia: 222; and schizoaffective disorder: 357, 21.4% were incompletely monitored. Only 54.8% of patients who were not prescribed SGAs and did not have previous diagnoses of hypertension or hypercholesterolemia were monitored for all metabolic syndrome components compared to 92.4% of patients who had all three of these characteristics. Among patients monitored for metabolic syndrome completely, age-adjusted prevalence of the syndrome was 48.4%, with no significant difference between the three psychiatric groups. CONCLUSIONS: Only one half of patients with SMI not using SGAs or previously diagnosed with hypertension and hypercholesterolemia were completely monitored for metabolic syndrome components compared to greater than 90% of those with these characteristics

  3. A Latent Content Analysis of Barriers and Supports to Healthcare: Perspectives From Caregivers of Service Members and Veterans With Military-Related Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Lange, Rael T; French, Louis M; Sander, Angelle M; Freedman, Jenna; Brickell, Tracey A

    2018-01-30

    To identify barriers and supports that caregivers of individuals with military-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) encounter when navigating the military healthcare system; this information will be used as the foundation of a new patient-reported outcome measure. Community. Forty-five caregivers of service members and veterans (SMV) who sustained a medically documented mild, moderate, severe, or penetrating TBI. Latent content analysis. Nine focus group discussions of barriers and supports to navigating the military healthcare system and community resources. Latent content analysis indicated that caregivers discussed barriers (66%) and supports (34%) to obtaining care within the military healthcare system and the community. Caregivers most frequently discussed SMVs' interactions with healthcare, their own interactions with healthcare, family care, and community organizations. Caregivers confront numerous challenges while pursuing healthcare services. Although much of the discussion focused on barriers and perceived unmet needs within the military healthcare system, caregivers also recognized supports within the military healthcare system and general community. Increased attention to accessibility and quality of services, as well as reducing financial burden, can lead to improved health-related quality of life for caregivers and their SMVs.

  4. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries and associated factors among preschool children in Amman, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElKarmi, Rawan Fawwaz; Hamdan, Mahmoud Anwar; Rajab, Lamis Darwish; Abu-Ghazaleh, Suha Bassam; Sonbol, Hawazen Nizar

    2015-12-01

    Dental trauma is a major public health problem. However, baseline data regarding traumatic injuries to primary teeth in Jordan are lacking. The study aimed at evaluating the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries to primary anterior teeth among preschool children in Amman (Jordan), investigating the relationship between dental trauma and associated factors, and assessing the treatment provided and treatment need. After obtaining ethical approval and parental consent, a cross-sectional population-based study examined a total of 1198 children attending 39 preschools randomly selected from different areas of Amman. Chi-square test and stepwise logistic regression modeling were used for statistical analysis. The prevalence of traumatic dental injuries was 26.4%. The upper incisors were more likely to sustain dental trauma (91.7%). No statistically significant association was established between dental trauma and any of the socio-demographic variables. The most common type of dental trauma was enamel fracture (43.1%) followed by pulp injury (39.7%). The odds ratio suggested that the risk of dental trauma was 1.89 times greater if the overjet was >3 mm, 1.93 times greater if the child had an anterior open bite, and 2.56 times greater if the child had inadequate lip coverage. Only 25.3% of children diagnosed with a TDI visited a dentist following their trauma. The prevalence of dental trauma among preschool children in Amman (Jordan) was high; therefore, it is highly recommended to plan campaigns targeting parents, children, and medical/dental care providers that stress the importance of preventing dental trauma and treating it promptly. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Prevalence and predictors of recent illness and injury among the Malaysian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramesarvathy, R; Amal, N M; Gurpreet, K; Tee, G H; Karuthan, C

    2012-05-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that injury will be the second leading cause of morbidity of disease burden worldwide by the year 2020. We conducted a community-based survey to determine the prevalence of recent illness and injury, in Malaysia. The survey was a cross sectional population-based household survey conducted using face to face interviews. The information was on self-reported recent illness and injury (SRRII) over the previous 2 weeks. This study was conducted during April - August 2006 and as a part of the third National Health and Morbidity Survey of Malaysia. A total of 56,710 respondents were interviewed with a response rate of 98.2% (55,660/56,710). The overall prevalence of combined SRRII was 23.6%; for injuries the prevalence was 3.1%. The groups with the highest SRRII were children 0-5 years old (31.2%), males (24.3%), Indians (26.9%), those with secondary education level (22.9%), those earning RM 1,000/ month (25.0%) and rural dwellers (25.5%). Age, sex, ethnicity, and locality were significantly associated with SRRII while monthly household income and educational level were marginally associated. On multivariate analysis, age, gender, race, ethnicity, education, income and locality were significantly associated with SRRII. The most common reported recent illness was related to the respiratory system (42.0%). The information obtained from this survey is useful to policy makers in the Ministry of Health to review and strengthen existing health programs.

  6. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Annemieke C.; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Cnossen, Maryse C.; Olff, Miranda; van Beeck, Ed F.; Polinder, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    This review examined pre- and post-injury prevalence of, and risk factors for, anxiety disorders and depressive disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI), based on evidence from structured diagnostic interviews. A systematic literature search was conducted in EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central,

  7. The prevalence and impact of overuse injuries in five Norwegian sports: Application of a new surveillance method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarsen, B.; Bahr, R.; Heymans, M.W.; Engedahl, M.; Midtsundstad, G.; Rosenlund, L.; Thorsen, G.; Myklebust, G.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the true extent and severity of overuse injuries in sport, largely because of methodological challenges involved in recording them. This study assessed the prevalence of overuse injuries among Norwegian athletes from five sports using a newly developed method designed

  8. Prevalence and treatment demand after traumatic dental injury in South Brazilian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Helena Silveira; Goettems, Marília Leão; Correa, Marcos Britto; Torriani, Dione Dias; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Evaluation of the frequency and need for treatment of dental trauma is critical for both planning and establishing dental services and preventive programs. This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of dental trauma, need for treatment and factors associated with dental visits after an injury. A multistage sample of children aged 8-12 years, from 20 private and public schools in Pelotas/Southern Brazil, was considered. Socioeconomic information was collected from parents, and data regarding traumatic events were obtained from the children. Clinical examinations were conducted using validated criteria. Descriptive analysis and logistic regression were used to assess the factors associated with search for treatment after injury. A total of 1210 children were included, 153 (12.6%, 95% CI 10.8-14.6) of whom suffered dental trauma, with a total of 175 traumatized teeth. The most frequently observed type of injury was enamel fracture, affecting 129 (73.7%) teeth, of which 107 did not require restorative treatment. A total of 68 (38.8%) teeth required care, of which 24 (13.7%) received treatment. Of the children who recalled the trauma, 39 (36.5%) sought treatment, which was significantly associated with both higher maternal education (OR 2.75; 95% CI 1.18-6.41) and trauma severity (OR 7.71; 95% CI 3.17-18.75). The prevalence of traumatic injuries was relatively high in this population. Although most of the traumatized teeth did not require treatment, dental care was neglected, as most of the children were not taken to a dentist for evaluation. Also, there was a considerable demand for treatment, most of them of low complexity. Special attention should be given to children whose mothers have completed fewer years of education, as the mother's level of education was an important predictor of evaluation by a dentist after injury. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990–2015

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Theo; Allen, Christine; Arora, Megha; Barber, R.M.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Brown, Alexandria; Carter, Austin; Casey, Daniel C.; Charlson, Fiona J.; Chen, Alan Z.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundNon-fatal outcomes of disease and injury increasingly detract from the ability of the world's population to live in full health, a trend largely attributable to an epidemiological transition in many countries from causes affecting children, to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) more common in adults. For the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015), we estimated the incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for diseases and injuries at t...

  10. A Systematic Process to Prioritize Prevention Activities: Sustaining Progress Toward the Reduction of Military Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    high ecause there are proven prevention strategies (e.g., voiding overtraining , conducting agility-like training, se of mouthguards)30 that could be...avoids overtraining and utilizes agility- ike training has been found to reduce physical training– elated injuries while meeting desired physical fıtness

  11. Blast-related Ear Injuries among U.S. Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Wash- ington (DC): The National Academies Press; 2009. 5. Darley DS, Kellman RM. Otologic considerations of blast injury. Disaster Med Public...Hospital, Southern Thailand. J Med Assoc Thai. 2007;90(12):2662–68. [PMID:18386718] 29. Persaud R, Hajioff D, Wareing M, Chevretton E. Otological trauma

  12. Preventing Injuries in the U.S. Military: The Process, Priorities, and Epidemiologic Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    these devices for the prevention of back injuries is not endorsed (see DOD Instruction 6055.1, DOD Safety and Occupational Health (SOH) Program, para ...Skin 7800-7899 Skin 7815 Pemphigus 78 Skin 7800-7899 Skin 7816 Psoriasis 78 Skin 7800-7899 Skin 7817 Dermatitis

  13. Evaluating the effectiveness of reasoning training in military and civilian chronic traumatic brain injury patients: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals who sustain traumatic brain injuries (TBIs often continue to experience significant impairment of cognitive functions mediated by the prefrontal cortex well into chronic stages of recovery. Traditional brain training programs that focus on improving specific skills fall short of addressing integrative functions that draw upon multiple higher-order processes critical for social and vocational integration. In the current study, we compare the effects of two short-term, intensive, group-based cognitive rehabilitation programs for individuals with chronic TBI. One program emphasizes learning about brain functions and influences on cognition, while the other program adopts a top-down approach to improve abstract reasoning abilities that are largely reliant on the prefrontal cortex. These treatment programs are evaluated in civilian and military veteran TBI populations. Methods/design One hundred individuals are being enrolled in this double-blinded clinical trial (all measures and data analyses will be conducted by blinded raters and analysts. Each individual is randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions, with each condition run in groups of five to seven individuals. The primary anticipated outcomes are improvement in abstract reasoning and everyday life functioning, measured through behavioral tasks and questionnaires, and attention modulation, as measured by functional neuroimaging. Secondary expected outcomes include improvements in the cognitive processes of working memory, attention, and inhibitory control. Discussion Results of this trial will determine whether cognitive rehabilitation aimed at teaching TBI-relevant information about the brain and cognition versus training in TBI-affected thinking abilities (e.g., memory, attention, and executive functioning can improve outcomes in chronic military and civilian TBI patient populations. It should shed light on the nature of improvements and the

  14. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries among visually impaired children attending special schools of Chhattisgarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Munot

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies on dental trauma of the normal population have been carried out in the past; however, limited data are available on dental trauma of the handicapped population, especially visually impaired children in Chhattisgarh, India. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries (TDIs in visually impaired children in relation to age, cause, and place of injury. Materials and Methods: Epidemiological study was carried out among 400 children from various special schools of visually impaired children of Chhattisgarh followed by school dental checkup camps. All the children completed a questionnaire related history of trauma, cause, and place. The prevalence of TDIs in each special child was recorded based on the Epidemiological classification of TDIs by the WHO and was modified by Andreasen et al. (2007. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 17. The level of significance was fixed at P ≤ 0.05. Association between categorical variables was done using Chi-square test. Results: The results showed that out of 400 children, 39% suffered from TDIs. Permanent maxillary central incisors were most commonly injured teeth with injuries involving enamel (53% being most frequently observed. Increased overjet and inadequate lip coverage were significantly associated with the occurrence of trauma. Conclusion: As blind children are at the risk of multiple TDI, it is necessary to create awareness, health education, and periodic screening for appropriate management.

  15. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries among visually impaired children attending special schools of Chhattisgarh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munot, Harsha; Avinash, Alok; Kashyap, Nilotpol; Baranwal, Rashmi; Kumar, Brij; Sagar, Maylavarapu Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Studies on dental trauma of the normal population have been carried out in the past; however, limited data are available on dental trauma of the handicapped population, especially visually impaired children in Chhattisgarh, India. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) in visually impaired children in relation to age, cause, and place of injury. Epidemiological study was carried out among 400 children from various special schools of visually impaired children of Chhattisgarh followed by school dental checkup camps. All the children completed a questionnaire related history of trauma, cause, and place. The prevalence of TDIs in each special child was recorded based on the Epidemiological classification of TDIs by the WHO and was modified by Andreasen et al. (2007). Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 17. The level of significance was fixed at P ≤ 0.05. Association between categorical variables was done using Chi-square test. The results showed that out of 400 children, 39% suffered from TDIs. Permanent maxillary central incisors were most commonly injured teeth with injuries involving enamel (53%) being most frequently observed. Increased overjet and inadequate lip coverage were significantly associated with the occurrence of trauma. As blind children are at the risk of multiple TDI, it is necessary to create awareness, health education, and periodic screening for appropriate management.

  16. Prevalence of primary tooth traumatic injuries among children in a large industrial centre of Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeeva, I; Sarapultseva, M; Sarapultsev, A

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the number of children seeking dental care for traumatic tooth injuries has increased substantially. This study was aimed at assessing the prevalence of primary tooth traumatic injuries (PTTI) in the paediatric populace of Ekaterinburg, a large industrial centre of the Russian Federation. Following ethical approval, an epidemiological investigation of primary dentition was conducted, evaluating 1,149 children aged 6-72 months (males 586/1,149, 51%; females 563/1,149, 49%). The average age of subjects overall was 43.9 ± 17.7 months (males 45.1 ± 17.9 months; females 42.6 ± 17.4 months). The prevalence of PTTI among paediatric residents of this region was 9.75%, with uncomplicated crown fracture (36.9%) as the chief primary dental injury. Dental visits attributable to PTTI were most frequent in the age group of 25-36 months, which clearly constitutes the period of greatest vulnerability. The findings of this study suggest that PTTI is a critical issue in children, requiring programmes that address preventive dental care and adhere to established medical treatment standards.

  17. Misuse of Prescribed Pain Medication in a Military Population-A Self-Reported Survey to Assess a Correlation With Age, Deployment, Combat Illnesses, or Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Sasha; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Varney, Shawn M; Ganem, Victoria; Zarzabal, Lee A; Potter, Jennifer S

    Opioid misuse is a growing epidemic among the civilian and military communities. Five hundred prospective, anonymous surveys were collected in the emergency department waiting room of a military tertiary care hospital over 3 weeks. Demographics, medical and military characteristics were investigated for association with opioid use. Univariate logistic models were used to characterize the probability of misuse in relation to the demographic, medical, and military-specific variables. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder were investigated within different age cohorts with adjustment for deployment. The opioid misuse rate disclosed by the subject was 31%. Subjects with TBI were less likely to misuse opioids. We found a trend among younger cohorts to have a higher likelihood for misusing opioids when diagnosed with TBI or posttraumatic stress disorder with history of deployment in the past 5 years. The most common form of misuse was using a previously prescribed medication for a new pain. Traumatic brain injury and/or enrollment in post-deployment recovery programs maybe protective against opioid misuse. Chronic opioid use among young soldiers maybe viewed as a weakness that could influence opioid misuse. Younger cohorts of active duty service members could be at higher risk for misuse. Efforts to enhance close monitoring of misuse should address these at-risk populations.

  18. Talonavicular ligament: prevalence of injury in ankle sprains, histological analysis and hypothesis of its biomechanical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dea, Miriam; L Loizou, Constantinos; Allen, Georgina M; Wilson, David J; Athanasou, Nick; Uchihara, Yoshinobu; Cooke, Paul; Cosker, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    To assess the prevalence of injury of the talonavicular ligament (TNL) in ankle sprains, its anatomy and the stability of the talonavicular joint (TNJ) before and after dividing the TNL in a cadaver. During a prospective study of 100 patients to assess the outcome of ankle injuries, we noted high incidence of TNL injuries; we will discuss here the TNL findings. Each patient had undergone ultrasound and cone beam CT examination of the ankle. Six TNLs were dissected off fresh-frozen cadaveric feet for histological analysis. In further six cadaveric feet, the stability of the TNJ was assessed by mechanical stress before and after division of the TNL; movement at the joint was assessed by measuring the distance between the talus and navicular bone [talonavicular distance (TD)] using ultrasound. The TD was measured on ten randomly selected ultrasound images by three independent observers and repeated twice by a single observer to determine the inter- and intraobserver reliability. 21% of the patients had an injury to the TNL. Histological examination demonstrated a dense connective tissue composed of bundles of collagen in parallel arrangement along the ligament length. The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the TD showed almost perfect agreement. Displacement at the TNJ after stress with the TNL intact measured 0.18 ± 0.08 cm and 0.29 ± 0.07 cm (p < 0.005) when divided. The TNL is surprisingly commonly injured in ankle sprains. Its anatomy and histology suggest a role in tensile force transmission during the windlass mechanism in gait. Advances in knowledge: Injury to the TNL is common and has not been described. Its anatomy suggests resistance to tensile forces and its injury allows excessive movement at the TNJ.

  19. The prevalence of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury (NSSI in a representative sample of the German population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul L. Plener

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI is a proposed new “condition for further study” in the DSM-5. To date no prevalence data has been available on this diagnostic entity from a representative sample of the general population. Methods A representative sample of the German population (N = 2509, mean age = 48.8 years, SD = 18.1, female 55.4 % completed the NSSI section of the German version of the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI-G. Results A history of NSSI at least once during lifetime was reported by 3.1 % of all participants, with higher lifetime prevalence rates in younger age groups. DSM-5 NSSI disorder criteria were met by 0.3 %. The most common function of NSSI was automatic negative reinforcement (e.g. to alleviate negative feelings. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting rates for the proposed NSSI category in DSM-5 from a representative sample of the general population. In comparison to findings from community samples of adolescents, adults seem to have lower lifetime prevalence rates of NSSI, thus making it necessary to emphasize prevention and treatment efforts in younger age groups.

  20. An Overview of the Use of Neurofeedback Biofeedback for the Treatment of Symptoms of Traumatic Brain Injury in Military and Civilian Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Sarah N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Neurofeedback, a type of biofeedback, is an operant conditioning treatment that has been studied for use in the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in both civilian and military populations. In this approach, users are able to see or hear representations of data related to their own physiologic responses to triggers, such as stress or distraction, in real time and, with practice, learn to alter these responses in order to reduce symptoms and/or improve performance.

  1. Prevalence of injuries in amateur street runners precuring up to 10 km

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizeth Garcia de Araújo Oliveira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared to most exercise and sports activities, street racing is highly versatile as it can be performed in a wide variety of indoor or outdoor environments, on lane or uneven terrain. Physical exercise is usually associated with the well-being of its practitioners. Many people who seek healthier lifestyle habits, such as controlling body weight and improving physical fitness, end up choosing the race as a modality. Among its various manifestations, the race is one of the modalities with many fans, both for ease in its practice, as well as for the health benefits and the low cost. To verify the prevalence of injuries in amateur street runners that cover up to 10 km. A quantitative research was carried out through a semi-structured questionnaire with open questions. Included in this study were amateur athletes who had been racing for at least three months, at least twice a week, and were 18 years of age or older. A total of 70 questionnaires were sent, of which 30 were viable. Eight participants are women and 22 are men. Most respondents do not do pre-employment pre-race work. Among men, 14 had some type of injury or sensation of pain. Among women only 4. Amateur street runners that cover up to 10 km have mostly knee injuries, being present in women the calf, thigh and ankle injuries.

  2. Combat and peacekeeping operations in relation to prevalence of mental disorders and perceived need for mental health care: findings from a large representative sample of military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, Jitender; Cox, Brian J; Afifi, Tracie O; Stein, Murray B; Belik, Shay-Lee; Meadows, Graham; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2007-07-01

    Although military personnel are trained for combat and peacekeeping operations, accumulating evidence indicates that deployment-related exposure to traumatic events is associated with mental health problems and mental health service use. To examine the relationships between combat and peacekeeping operations and the prevalence of mental disorders, self-perceived need for mental health care, mental health service use, and suicidality. Cross-sectional, population-based survey. Canadian military. A total of 8441 currently active military personnel (aged 16-54 years). The DSM-IV mental disorders (major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and alcohol dependence) were assessed using the World Mental Health version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview, a fully structured lay-administered psychiatric interview. The survey included validated measures of self-perceived need for mental health treatment, mental health service use, and suicidal ideation. Lifetime exposure to peacekeeping and combat operations and witnessing atrocities or massacres (ie, mutilated bodies or mass killings) were assessed. The prevalences of any past-year mental disorder assessed in the survey and self-perceived need for care were 14.9% and 23.2%, respectively. Most individuals meeting the criteria for a mental disorder diagnosis did not use any mental health services. Deployment to combat operations and witnessing atrocities were associated with increased prevalence of mental disorders and perceived need for care. After adjusting for the effects of exposure to combat and witnessing atrocities, deployment to peacekeeping operations was not associated with increased prevalence of mental disorders. This is the first study to use a representative sample of active military personnel to examine the relationship between deployment-related experiences and mental health problems. It provides

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury in a Military Operational Setting (Le traumatisme cranien dans un cadre militaire operationnel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Brain Injury Programs (M96) Wounded, Ill & Injured Directorate (M9) U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery 7700 Arlington Blvd. Falls Church...require their augmentation with the capabilities to perform emergency surgery and essential post-operative management. In this case, they will be often...Campus Renaissance Fakinos Base Camp, S.T.G. 1020 Mladoboleslavská 944 Renaissancelaan 30, 1000 Bruxelles Holargos, Athens PO Box 18 197 06 Praha 9

  4. The UK Military Experience of Thoracic Injury in the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Surgical intervention was largely limited to tube thor- acostomy, with few thoracotomies being performed, as patients often arrived at the hospitals in...haemorrhage and two broncho- pleural fistulas in LNs. There was significant difference between survivors and non-survivors in all approaches to the chest (right...admission for a broncho- pleural fistula on a background of massive blast lung. The Coalition soldier had sustained extensive thoraco-abdominal injuries

  5. Prevalence of anxiety following adult traumatic brain injury: A meta-analysis comparing measures, samples and postinjury intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, A J; Mathias, J L; Fairweather-Schmidt, A K

    2016-02-01

    Anxiety following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common problem; however, disparate prevalence estimates limit the clinical utility of research. The purpose of the current study was to examine how differences in methodological variables and sample characteristics impact on the prevalence of anxiety. Data from 41 studies that examined either the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) diagnoses or clinically significant "cases" of self-reported anxiety following adult, nonpenetrating TBI were analyzed, and the impact of diagnostic criteria, measure, postinjury interval and injury severity was evaluated. Overall, 11% of people were diagnosed with GAD and 37% reported clinically significant levels of anxiety following TBI. Prevalence estimates varied for different diagnostic criteria (range: 2%-19%), interview schedules (range: 2%-28%), and self-report measures (range: 36%-50%). GAD and "cases" of anxiety were most prevalent 2 to 5 years postinjury. The rates of GAD increased with injury severity (mild: 11%, severe 15%), but "cases" decreased (mild: 53%, severe: 38%), although neither difference was significant. Anxiety is common after a TBI and ongoing monitoring and treatment should be provided. Methodological and sample characteristics should be clear and well-defined, as differences across studies (e.g., how anxiety is conceptualized, which measure is used, time since injury, injury severity) impact prevalence rates. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence and severity of fatigue in adolescents and young adults with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Doser, Karoline

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence and severity of fatigue in adolescents and young adults with acquired brain injury (ABI) compared with healthy controls (HCs) and to examine associations between fatigue and gender, age and level of education. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 15......-30 year old patients with ABI and a convenience sample of 15-30 year old HCs. All participants completed the 20-item Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20). Pathological fatigue was defined as "General Fatigue" ≥12. Adjusted mean differences between groups were calculated using multivariate analysis...... had elevated scores on the "Reduced Activity" and "Mental Fatigue" subscales. Age was not associated with any of the subscale scores. CONCLUSION: Young patients with ABI had markedly higher prevalence and severity of fatigue than HCs. Age (15-30 years) was not associated with fatigue. No clear...

  7. Gender differences in the prevalence of nonsuicidal self-injury: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresin, Konrad; Schoenleber, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological research on the prevalence of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has found inconsistent results in terms of gender differences, with some studies showing a higher prevalence for women compared to men and other studies showing no difference. The goal of the current study was to use meta-analytic techniques to better conceptualize the presence and size of gender differences in the prevalence of NSSI. We also examined two factors proposed to explain gender differences in NSSI prevalence: the gender difference would be larger for clinical samples relative to community samples, and the gender difference would be larger for younger (versus older) samples. The results showed that across studies women were significantly more likely to report a history of NSSI than men. Moderator analyses showed that the gender difference was larger for clinical samples, compared to college/community samples. However, there was not a significant relation between age and effect size. Women were more likely to use some methods of NSSI (e.g., cutting) compared to men, but for other methods there was no significant difference (e.g., punching). These results increase our knowledge of NSSI and fit with a larger literature examining gender, emotion regulation, and psychopathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Osteoarthritis Prevalence in Retired National Football League Players With a History of Concussion and Lower Extremity Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynall, Robert C; Pietrosimone, Brian; Kerr, Zachary Y; Mauntel, Timothy C; Mihalik, Jason P; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2017-06-02

      Dynamic balance deficits have been described postconcussion, even after athletes return to play. Lower extremity (LE) musculoskeletal injury rates increase for up to 1 year after concussion, but the long-term musculoskeletal implications of concussion are unclear.   To (1) examine the association of concussion and LE injury histories with osteoarthritis (OA) prevalence in retired National Football League players and (2) examine the association of concussion and LE injury histories with OA prevalence in those ≤55 years of age.   Case-control study.   Survey.   We administered the Health Survey of Retired National Football League Players, which collects information about demographics, OA, LE injury, and concussion history.   Twelve discrete categories were created based on concussion and LE injury history, ranging from 0 concussions and 0 LE injuries (referent group) to 3+ concussions and 2+ LE injuries. Binomial regression analysis modeled lifetime OA prevalence. Covariates were body mass index, age at the time of the survey, and total years playing professional football.   Complete data were available for 2696 participants. Lifetime OA prevalence was smallest in the referent group (21.1%) and largest in the 3+ concussion and 2+ LE group (50.6%; 2.5 times the referent; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1, 3.1). Participants in all concussion groups (1, 2, 3+) who reported a history of 0 LE injuries had a greater OA prevalence than the referent group. When participants were stratified by age, the ≤55 years of age, 3+ concussions, and 2+ LE injuries group prevalence ratio (3.6; 95% CI = 2.7, 5.2) was larger than that of the >55 years of age, 3+ concussions, and 2+ LE injuries group (1.8; 95% CI = 1.3, 2.4) compared with the respective referent groups.   Concussion with or without a history of LE injury may be an important moderator of OA. Future researchers should seek to better understand the mechanisms that influence the association among

  9. Intentional injury in young people in Vietnam: prevalence and social correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Linh Cu; Blum, Robert W

    2011-07-01

    .7, 95% CI 1.3-5.4), ever having been a victim of intentional injury by a family member (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.1-11.5) or ever having had feelings of hopelessness (OR 6.5, 95% CI 3.3-13.6). Prevalence of violence and self-harm among Vietnamese youth is comparatively less than in Western and other Asian countries. Risk and protective factors appear similar to those found in most populations. In particular, this study indicated a possible protective effect of membership in social groups. National policy for injury prevention should include strategies to reduce violence and self-harm within this population group.

  10. Prevalence of Autonomic Dysreflexia in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury above T6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Sun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the prevalence of autonomic dysreflexia (AD using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM and the autonomic dysfunction following spinal cord injury (ADFSCI questionnaire in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI above T6. Methods. Twenty-eight patients diagnosed with SCI above T6 were enrolled. ABPM and ADFSCI were utilized to assess AD. Using ABPM, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate (HR were measured at 30-minute intervals. AD was defined as SBP 20 mmHg higher than basal SBP, and the number of AD events was counted. The ADFSCI questionnaire evaluates the severity and frequency of the AD symptoms. Results. According to the ABPM, AD occurred in 26 patients and AD events occurred 5.8±4.7 times. Average daytime and nighttime SBP were 119.9±18.8 mmHg and 123.8±21.2 mmHg, respectively, and the nighttime mean SBP appeared to be 4 mmHg higher than daytime mean SBP. These findings suggest the loss of nocturnal BP dipping in SCI patients. ADFSCI results revealed that 16 of the patients evaluated were symptomatic while 12 were asymptomatic. Conclusion. AD following SCI above T6 was highly prevalent and several patients seemed asymptomatic. These results suggest the necessity of proper diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for managing AD.

  11. Prevalence of Traumatic Dental Injuries among Contact Sport Practitioners in Northeast of Iran in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armita Rouhani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contact sports may lead to dental injures, which may often be prevented by using mouthguards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries (TDI in professional contact sport athletes and to determine the awareness regarding use of mouthguards in this group. Methods: A questionnaire containing a number of  questions regarding the demographic data of participants, experiences of trauma and their behavior after that and use of mouthguard, was distributed amongst 100 contact sport athletes. Results: eighty athletes returned the questionnaire. The age range of most of the participants (44.2%  was between 20-30  .Also most of them had been practicing in contact sports for 1 to 5 years (37.3%. 26.2% of the athletes had experienced some sort of dental trauma. There was no significant difference between the injuries in males and females (p> 0.05. Luxation injuries were the most common type of TDI (47.7%, followed by crown fractures (42.1% and avulsion (10.5%. 89.7% of athletes had already been informed about using mouthguards, however only 10.3% reported having used them. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the rate of TDI among contact sport practitioners in Iran is high; however the use of mouthguards by athletes is low. Dentists and sports authorities should promote the use of mouthguards in contact sports to decreases the risk of dental trauma and tooth loss.

  12. Cordycepin-enriched WIB-801C from Cordyceps militaris improves functional recovery by attenuating blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Youn; Choi, Hye Young; Baik, Hyung Hwan; Ju, Bong G; Kim, Won-Ki; Yune, Tae Young

    2017-05-05

    Cordyceps militaris is an ingredient of traditional Chinese medicine and have been widely used for inflammatory diseases and cancer. Cordycepin is one of the major bioactive components of Cordyceps militaris, and has been known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. In the present study, we examined whether WIB-801C, a standardized and cordycepin-enriched extract of caterpillar fungus (Cordyceps militaris), would attenuate blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption by inhibiting matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 activity, leading to improvement of functional outcomes after spinal cord injury (SCI). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to contusive SCI using a New York University (NYU) impactor, and WIB-801C (50mg/kg) was administered at 2h and 8h after injury orally and further treated once a day for indicated time points. BSCB disruption, MMP-9 activity, blood infiltration, inflammation, neuronal apoptosis, axonal loss, demyelination, and neurological deficit were evaluated. We found that WIB-801C significantly attenuated BSCB disruption by inhibiting MMP-9 expression and activation after injury. The infiltration of neutrophils at 1 d and macrophage at 5 d after SCI was also ameliorated by WIB-801C as compared with vehicle control. In addition, the expression of inflammatory cytokines and mediators such as Tnf-α, IL-1β, IL-6, Cox-2, and inos as well as chemokines such as Gro-α and Mip-2α was significantly inhibited by WIB-801C. Furthermore, WIB-801C inhibits p38MAPK activation and proNGF production in microglia after injury. These events eventually led to the inhibition of apoptotic cell death of neurons and oligodendrocytes, improved functional recovery and attenuated demyelination and axon loss after SCI. Our results suggest that WIB-801C can be used as a therapeutic agent after SCI by attenuating BSCB disruption followed inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalência de lesões em corredores de rua e fatores associados Prevalence of injuries and associated factors among street runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Akira Ferreira Hino

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar a prevalência de lesões esportivas e os fatores associados em corredores de rua por meio de um inquérito de morbidade referida. Os participantes foram selecionados por convite e por voluntariedade entre os corredores do Circuito de Ruas da Cidade de Curitiba-PR. Foram entrevistados 295 indivíduos (77,3% homens. As prevalências foram descritas de acordo com as variáveis de estudo e a regressão de Poisson foi utilizada para testar as associações (p The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of sports-related injuries and associated factors in street runners through a referred morbidity survey. Participants were selected by invitation and by volunteering among the runners from the Curitiba City Street Running Circuit during the months of September to November. 295 runners were interviewed (77.3% men. Prevalence rates were described accordingly to the study variables and Poisson regression was employed to test associations (p/ prevalence of sport injures occurred in the last six months was 28.5% (29.8% for men and 23.9% for women. Higher prevalence rates were observed among those aged from 30.1 - 45yr (32.8%; overweight/obese (35.2%; women training more than 30min/day (31.3%; and men training more than 60 min/day (34.2%. None of the variables analyzed were associated with self-reported sport injuries. The majority of injured subjects (60.5% remained less than three months away from training and those with training volume between 31 and 60 min/day were more likely to show this condition (prevalence ratio/ =/ 2.44; CI95% = 0.99-6.06; p = 0.05. It is concluded that sports injuries prevalence is observed in 1/3 of men and 1/4 of women. The variables investigated were not associated with prevalence of sport injuries in street runners and the injuries severity is associated with training volume.

  14. Time from ACL injury to reconstruction and the prevalence of additional intra-articular pathology: is patient age an important factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Robert A; Pedroza, Angela D; Donaldson, Christopher T; Flanigan, David C; Kaeding, Christopher C

    2013-09-01

    Meniscus and cartilage lesions have been reported to be prevalent during delayed reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Relatively, little work has been done exploring the influence of patient age on this relationship. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the effect of time from ACL injury to reconstruction on the prevalence of associated meniscal and chondral injury is influenced by patient age. It was hypothesized that patients in whom the time from ACL injury to reconstruction exceeds 12 weeks will exhibit an increased prevalence of medial compartment pathology relative to those reconstructed within 12 weeks of injury in patients of all ages. Data detailing time from ACL injury to reconstruction and the prevalence of intra-articular findings were obtained in 311 of 489 consecutive patients undergoing primary isolated ACL reconstruction. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether the time from ACL injury to reconstruction was time from ACL injury to reconstruction exceeded 12 weeks. The prevalence of lateral meniscal injury did not increase with increasing time ACL injury to surgery. Among patients aged 22 years and under, there was no increase in the prevalence of intra-articular pathology in any compartment in the late reconstruction group. In contrast, among patients over the age of 22, there was a significant increase in the prevalence of medial chondral injury (p = 0.042) in the late reconstruction group. The prevalence of injuries to the meniscus and articular cartilage in the medial compartment of the knee is increased with increasing time from ACL injury to reconstruction. This relationship may vary depending on patient age. Patients over the age of 22 exhibit a higher prevalence of intra-articular injury with delayed reconstruction, while no such differences are noted among younger patients. Retrospective comparative study, level III.

  15. Prevalence of Needlestick Injuries, Attitude Changes, and Prevention Practices Over 12 Years in an Urban Academic Hospital Surgery Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasak, Jessica M; Novak, Christine B; Patterson, Jennifer Megan M; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-02-01

    Needlestick injury prevalence, protection practices, and attitudes were assessed. Current medical students were compared with 2003 data to assess any changes that occurred with engineered safety feature implementation. Risk of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens is elevated in the operating room particularly with surgeons in training and nurses. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to medical students (n = 358) and Department of Surgery staff (n = 247). The survey response rate was 24.8%. Needlestick injuries were reported by 38.7% of respondents (11% high risk), and the most common cause was "careless/accidental." Needlestick injury prevalence increased from medical students to residents and fellows (100%). Thirty-three percent of injured personnel had at least one unreported injury, and the most common reason was "inconvenient/too time consuming." Needlestick injury prevalence and double-glove use in medical students did not differ from 2003, and 25% of fellows reported always wearing double gloves. The true seroconversion rate for bloodborne pathogens was underestimated or unknown. The concern for contracting a bloodborne pathogen significantly decreased (65%) compared to 2003, and there were significantly less medical students with hepatitis B vaccinations (78.3%). Level of concern for contracting a bloodborne pathogen was predictive of needlestick injury. Needlestick injury and occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens are significant hazards for surgeons and nurses. Attitudes regarding risk are changing, and the true seroconversion risk is underestimated. Educational efforts focused on needlestick injury prevalence, seroconversion rates, and double-glove perforation rates may be effective in implementing protective strategies.

  16. Prevalence and Classification of Injuries of Anterolateral Complex in Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Andrea; Monaco, Edoardo; Fabbri, Mattia; Maestri, Barbara; De Carli, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    To report on the prevalence of injuries of the lateral compartment occurring in cases of apparently isolated acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears and to present a classification system of anterolateral complex injuries based on the data obtained. Sixty patients operated on for an acute apparently isolated ACL tear, revealed by clinical examination and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging, were prospectively selected. The lateral compartment was exposed and injuries were detected. Based on the data obtained, lesions of the anterolateral complex were classified as follows: Type I: multilevel rupture with individual layers torn at different levels with macroscopic hemorrhage involving the area of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and extended to the anterolateral capsule. Type II: multilevel rupture with individual layers torn at different levels with macroscopic hemorrhage extended from the area of the ALL and capsule to the posterolateral capsule. Type III: complete transverse tear involving the area of the ALL near its insertion to the lateral tibial plateau, distal to the lateral meniscus. Type IV: bony avulsion (Segond fracture). The pivot-shift test was repeated intraoperatively after repair of lateral tears before the ACL reconstruction. Although magnetic resonance imaging was able to detect only bony injuries (Segond fracture), macroscopic tears of the lateral capsule were clearly identified at surgery in 54 of 60 patients and classified as follows: Type I: 19/60 Type II: 16/60 Type III: 13/60 Type IV: 6/60 In all cases, repair resulted in a marked reduction or apparent disappearance of the pivot-shift phenomenon. Statistical analysis showed a positive correlation between lesions of the lateral compartment, regardless of the type described, and a pivot shift graded 2 or 3. Because injuries of secondary restraints often occur in cases of acute ACL tears, recognition and repair of such lesions could be considered to help ACL reconstruction to better

  17. Prevalence and association of oral candidiasis with dysphagia in individuals with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Kothari, Mohit

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of oral candidiasis (OC) in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) and to evaluate the association of OC with improvement in dysphagia. Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: Individuals with ABI admitted to rehabilitation were recruited over...... during rehabilitation. Though non-significant, the negative trend between OC and improvement in dysphagia suggest that OC may delay rehabilitation of dysphagia....... a one-year period (n=206 (59% with dysphagia). OC-data were collected by clinical examinations and verified by cultivation/microscopy in every 3 weeks during first 10 weeks of admission. . Dysphagia improvement was defined by: 1) first positive change in food consistency, 2) initiation of at least soft...

  18. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Intraoperative Hypotension during Craniotomy for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Brown, Michelle J; Curry, Parichat; Noda, Sakura; Chesnut, Randall M.; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypotension after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with poor outcomes. However, data on intraoperative hypotension (IH) are scarce and the effect of anesthetic agents on IH is unknown. We examined the prevalence and risk factors for IH, including the effect of anesthetic agents during emergent craniotomy for isolated TBI. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients ≥ 18 years who underwent emergent craniotomy for TBI at Harborview Medical Center (level-1 trauma center) between October 2007 and January 2010. Demographic, clinical and radiographic characteristics, hemodynamic and anesthetic data were abstracted from medical and electronic anesthesia records. Hypotension was defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) craniotomy. The presence of multiple CT lesions, subdural hematoma, maximum thickness of CT lesion and longer duration of anesthesia increase the risk for IH. PMID:22504924

  19. A Virtual Reality avatar interaction (VRai) platform to assess residual executive dysfunction in active military personnel with previous mild traumatic brain injury: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Jackson, Philip L; Hébert, Luc J; Mercier, Catherine; Bouyer, Laurent J; Fecteau, Shirley; Richards, Carol L; McFadyen, Bradford J

    2017-10-01

    This proof of concept study tested the ability of a dual task walking protocol using a recently developed avatar-based virtual reality (VR) platform to detect differences between military personnel post mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and healthy controls. The VR platform coordinated motion capture, an interaction and rendering system, and a projection system to present first (participant-controlled) and third person avatars within the context of a specific military patrol scene. A divided attention task was also added. A healthy control group was compared to a group with previous mTBI (both groups comprised of six military personnel) and a repeated measures ANOVA tested for differences between conditions and groups based on recognition errors, walking speed and fluidity and obstacle clearance. The VR platform was well tolerated by both groups. Walking fluidity was degraded for the control group within the more complex navigational dual tasking involving avatars, and appeared greatest in the dual tasking with the interacting avatar. This navigational behaviour was not seen in the mTBI group. The present findings show proof of concept for using avatars, particularly more interactive avatars, to expose differences in executive functioning when applying context-specific protocols (here for the military). Implications for rehabilitation Virtual reality provides a means to control context-specific factors for assessment and intervention. Adding human interaction and agency through avatars increases the ecologic nature of the virtual environment. Avatars in the present application of the Virtual Reality avatar interaction platform appear to provide a better ability to reveal differences between trained, military personal with and without mTBI.

  20. The prevalence of Achilles and patellar tendon injuries in Australian football players beyond a time-loss definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, S I; Rio, E; Cook, J; Orchard, J W; Fortington, L V

    2018-03-23

    Little is known about the prevalence and associated of morbidity of tendon problems. With only severe cases of tendon problems missing games, players that have their training and performance impacted are not captured by traditional injury surveillance. The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of Achilles and patellar tendon problems in elite male Australian football players using the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre (OSTRC) overuse questionnaire, compared to a time-loss definition. Male athletes from 12 professional Australian football teams were invited to complete a monthly questionnaire over a 9-month period in the 2016 pre- and competitive season. The OSTRC overuse injury questionnaire was used to measure the prevalence and severity of Achilles and patellar tendon symptoms and was compared to traditional match-loss statistics. A total of 441 participants were included. Of all participants, 21.5% (95% CI: 17.9-25.6) and 25.2% (95% CI 21.3-29.4) reported Achilles or patellar tendon problems during the season, respectively. Based on the traditional match-loss definition, a combined 4.1% of participants missed games due to either Achilles or patellar tendon injury. A greater average monthly prevalence was observed during the pre-season compared to the competitive season. Achilles and patellar tendon problems are prevalent in elite male Australian football players. These injuries are not adequately captured using a traditional match-loss definition. Prevention of these injuries may be best targeted during the off- and pre-season due to higher prevalence of symptoms during the pre-season compared to during the competitive season. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Prevalence of Dental Caries and Traumatic Dental Injuries among 6- to 12-year-old Children in Bhopal City, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maran, Satish; Shashikiran, N D; Ahirwar, Pratibha; Maran, Priyanka; Raj Kannojiya, Pawan; Niranjan, Babita

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries and trauma are the most common oral health problems for many decades. There is need for prevalence data to analyze the nature of the problems and to take necessary steps in improving public health. To assess the prevalence of dental caries and traumatic dental injuries among schoolchildren of age 6 to 12 years in Bhopal city. Cross-sectional study design was selected. Universal sampling method was followed in this study. A total of 1,204 children were examined. The distribution of samples was done based on age, gender, residing area, and type of school. Data were collected and statistically evaluated under chi-square test and analysis of variance. The overall caries experience (73.17%) was found to be higher than that of traumatic injury experience (20.9%). There was age-related correlation between age and decay, missing, and filled teeth score. Since most injuries occur at home or at school, educating the individual is the key that will have a great impact on the prognosis of traumatic injuries. Also good food habits need to be instilled in children from a tender age with the help of parents, which is the ultimate solution to fight caries. Maran S, Shashikiran ND, Ahirwar P, Maran P, Kannojiya PR, Niranjan B. Prevalence of Dental Caries and Traumatic Dental Injuries among 6- to 12-year-old Children in Bhopal City, India. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017; 10(2): 172-176.

  2. Prevalence and outcomes of acute kidney injury in term neonates with perinatal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaro, Dan; Bashir, Admani; Musoke, Rachel; Wanaiana, Lucy

    2014-09-01

    The kidney is the most damaged organ in asphyxiated full-term infants. The severity of its damage is correlated with the severity of neurological damage. We determined the prevalence of perinatal asphyxia-associated acute kidney injury (AKI). We conducted a prospective cohort study including 60 full-term neonates admitted at the Kenyatta National Hospital newborn unit (NBU) in Nairobi with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) from June 2012 to November 2012. Renal function was assessed by measuring serum creatinine on day 3 of life. AKI was defined by a level of creatinine above 133 µmol/l. The degree of neurological impairment was determined daily until patient discharge, death or day 7 of life. Of the 60 infants 36.6% had HIE I, 51.6% HIE II and 11.8% HIE III. The prevalence of AKI was 11.7 %. There was a 15 fold increase risk of developing AKI in HIE III versus HIE I, p=0.034. Mortality rate in perinatal asphyxia associated AKI was 71.4 % with a 24 fold increase risk of death in neonates with AKI, p=0.001. AKI is common and associated with poorer outcomes in perinatal asphyxia. Larger studies need to be done to correlate maternal factors and perinatal asphyxia-associated AKI.

  3. Proton pump inhibitor therapy did not increase the prevalence of small-bowel injury: A propensity-matched analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Yamada

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported that the suppression of acid secretion by using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs results in dysbiosis of the small-bowel microbiota, leading to exacerbated small-bowel injuries, including erosions and ulcers. This study was designed to assess the association between PPI therapy and small-bowel lesions after adjustment for the differences in baseline characteristics between users and non-users of PPIs.We retrospectively studied patients suspected to be suffering from small-bowel diseases, who underwent capsule endoscopy between 2010 and 2013. We used propensity matching to adjust for the differences in baseline characteristics between users and non-users of PPIs. The outcomes included the prevalence of small-bowel lesions: erosion, ulcer, angioectasia, varices, and tumor.We selected 327 patient pairs for analysis after propensity matching, and found no significant differences in the prevalence of small-bowel injuries, including erosions and ulcers, between users and non-users of PPIs. Two subgroup analyses of the effect of the type of PPI and the effect of PPI therapy in users and non-users of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs indicated no significant differences in the prevalence of small-bowel injuries in these two groups.PPI therapy did not increase the prevalence of small-bowel injury, regardless of the type of PPI used and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  4. Prevalence of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders and Injuries in Occupational and Physical Therapists and Its Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himan Nazari

    2017-03-01

    Discussion: This study confirmed the rate of prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injuries in occupational and physical therapists, with wrist and lumbar being the most affected. The promotion of therapist’s knowledge about MSD and following ergonomic principles and new approaches in the treatment may lower or prevent MSD. 

  5. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Stroke, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, and Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Claire; Gemmell, Elizabeth; Kenworthy, James; Speyer, Renée

    2016-06-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common condition after stroke, Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and can cause serious complications including malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and premature mortality. Despite its high prevalence among the elderly and associated serious complications, dysphagia is often overlooked and under-diagnosed in vulnerable patient populations. This systematic review aimed to improve understanding and awareness of the prevalence of dysphagia in susceptible patient populations. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, PROSPERO, and disease-specific websites were systematically searched for studies reporting oropharyngeal dysphagia prevalence or incidence in people with stroke, PD, AD, traumatic brain injury, and community-acquired pneumonia, from the USA, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Japan, China, and regional studies. The quality of study descriptions were assessed based on STROBE guidelines. A total of 1207 publications were identified and 33 met inclusion criteria: 24 in stroke, six in PD, two in traumatic brain injury, and one in patients with traumatic brain injury. Dysphagia was reported in 8.1-80 % of stroke patients, 11-81 % of PD, 27-30 % of traumatic brain injury patients, and 91.7 % of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. No relevant studies of dysphagia in AD were identified. This review demonstrates that dysphagia is highly prevalent in these populations, and highlights discrepancies between studies, gaps in dysphagia research, and the need for better dysphagia management starting with a reliable, standardized, and validated method for oropharyngeal dysphagia identification.

  6. Prevalence and associated factors of pain in the Swiss spinal cord injury population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, R; Brinkhof, M W G; Arnet, U; Hinrichs, T; Landmann, G; Jordan, X; Béchir, M

    2017-04-01

    Population-based, cross-sectional. To determine pain prevalence and identify factors associated with chronic pain in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) living in Switzerland. Swiss SCI Cohort Study (SwiSCI). Pain characteristics were assessed using an adapted version of the International SCI Pain Basic Data Set, adding one item of the SCI Secondary Conditions Scale to address chronic pain. Pain prevalence was calculated using stratification over demographic, SCI-related and socioeconomic characteristics; odds ratios (adjusted for non-response) for determinants of severity of chronic pain were calculated using stereotype logistic regressions. Pain (in the past week) was reported by 68.9% and chronic pain by 73.5% (significant 36.9%) of all participants (N=1549; 28% female). Most frequently reported pain type was musculoskeletal (71.1%). Back/spine was the most frequently reported pain location (54.6%). Contrasting the 'significant' to the 'none/mild' category of chronic pain, adjusted odds ratios were 1.54 (95% CI: 1.18-2.01; P<0.01) for women (vs men); 6.64 (95% CI: 3.37-11.67; P<0.001) for the oldest age group 61+ (vs youngest (16-30)); 3.41 (95% CI: 2.07-5.62; P<0.001) in individuals reporting severe financial hardship (vs no financial hardship). Individuals reporting specific SCI-related health conditions were 1.41-2.92 (P<0.05) times more likely to report chronic pain as 'significant' rather than 'none/mild' compared with those without the respective condition. Pain is highly prevalent in individuals with SCI living in Switzerland. Considered at risk for chronic pain are women, older individuals and individuals with financial hardship and specific secondary health conditions. Longitudinal studies are necessary to identify predictors for the development of pain and its chronification.

  7. Prevalence of Sports Injuries Among 13- to 15-Year-Old Students in 25 Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Erica J; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the sex-specific prevalence rate of serious sports injuries in the past year among students ages 13-15 years from 25 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) globally. Data from 46,922 nationally-representative students who participated in the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) were analyzed using complex samples analysis. The GSHS defines injuries as serious when they cause at least one full day of missed school or usual activities or require clinical treatment. Students reporting more than one serious injury in the past year are asked about the single most serious injury. The proportion of students reporting at least one serious injury in the past year ranged from 15-71 % (median 44 %) among boys and 8-70 % (median 30 %) among girls. The proportion of most-serious injuries in the past year that were sports-related ranged from 25-60 % among injured boys (median 35 %) and 12-56 % among injured girls (median 24 %). The most common types of sports-related injuries were broken bones and dislocated joints, reported by 13-62 % (median 28 %) of boys with sports injuries and 10-86 % (median 25 %) of girls with sports injuries. Although the annual injury rates among early adolescents vary widely between countries, the GSHS shows that sports injuries are common globally among both male and female middle school students. Understanding global trends in the health risks for various population groups, such as adolescents, allows community health partnerships to proactively address health needs in the communities they serve.

  8. Injury Reduction Effectiveness of Prescribing Running Shoes Based on Foot Shape in Air Force Basic Military Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knapik, Joseph J; Brosch, Lorie C; Venuto, Margaret; Swedler, David I; Bullock, Steven H; Gaines, Lorraine S; Murphy, Ryan J; Canada, Sara E; Hoedebecke, Edward L; Tobler, Steven K

    2008-01-01

    In response to a request from the Military Training Task Force of the Defense Safety Oversight Council this study examined whether prescribing running shoes based on the shape of the plantar surface...

  9. Caring for our wounded warriors: A qualitative examination of health-related quality of life in caregivers of individuals with military-related traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Brickell, Tracey A.; Psych, D.; French, Louis M.; Sander, Angelle; Kratz, Anna L.; Tulsky, David S.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D.; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Kallen, Michael; Austin, Amy M.; Miner, Jennifer A.; Lange, Rael T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop a conceptual framework that captures aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for caregivers of individuals with military-related traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Qualitative data from nine focus groups composed of caregivers of wounded warriors with a medically documented TBI were analyzed. Setting Focus group participants were recruited through Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), community outreach and support groups. Participants 45 caregivers of wounded warriors who had sustained a mild, moderate, severe, or penetrating TBI. Results Qualitative frequency analysis indicated that caregivers most frequently discussed social health (44% of comments), followed by emotional (40%) and physical health (12%). Areas of discussion that were specific to this population included: anger regarding barriers to health services (for caregivers and service members), emotional suppression (putting on a brave face for others, even when things are not going well), and hypervigilance (controlling one’s behavior/environment to prevent upsetting the service member). Conclusion Caring for wounded warriors with TBI is a complex experience that positively and negatively affects HRQOL. While some aspects of HRQOL can be evaluated with existing measures, evaluation of other important components does not exist. The development of military-specific measures would help facilitate better care for these individuals. PMID:27997672

  10. White Matter Microstructural Compromise Is Associated With Cognition But Not Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Military Veterans With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, Scott F; Schiehser, Dawn M; Bondi, Mark W; Luc, Norman; Clark, Alexandra L; Jacobson, Mark W; Frank, Lawrence R; Delano-Wood, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    To investigate white matter microstructure compromise in Veterans with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its possible contribution to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology and neuropsychological functioning via diffusion tensor imaging. Thirty-eight Veterans with mild (n = 33) and moderate (n = 5) TBI and 17 military control participants without TBI completed neuropsychological testing and psychiatric screening and underwent magnetic resonance imaging an average of 4 years following their TBI event(s). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity measures were extracted from 9 white matter tracts. Compared with military control participants, TBI participants reported higher levels of PTSD symptoms and performed worse on measures of memory and psychomotor-processing speed. Traumatic brain injury was associated with lower FA in the genu of the corpus callosum and left cingulum bundle. Fractional anisotropy negatively correlated with processing speed and/or executive functions in 7 of the 8 tracts. Regional FA did not correlate with memory or PTSD symptom ratings. Results suggest that current PTSD symptoms are independent of TBI-related white matter alterations, as measured by diffusion tensor imaging. In addition, white matter microstructural compromise may contribute to reduced processing speed in our sample of participants with history of neurotrauma. Findings of the current study add insight into the factors associated with complicated recovery from mild to moderate TBI.

  11. Can Surgery Improve Neurological Function in Penetrating Spinal Injury? A Review of the Military and Civilian Literature and Treatment Recommendations for Military Neurosurgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    is to be considered only if the patient is stabilized from other life-threatening injuries, most notably abdominal, thoracic, or intracranial ... hematoma , meningitis, and local infection. If such a difference truly exists, it would not be surprising and in fact expected, but we believe that these

  12. Prevalence and characteristics of road traffic injuries among young drivers in Oman, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Reesi, Hamed; Al Maniri, Abdullah; Adawi, Samir Al; Davey, Jeremy; Armstrong, Kerry; Edwards, Jason

    2016-07-03

    Studies from different parts of the world have indicated that the impact of road traffic incidents disproportionally affects young adults. Few known studies have been forthcoming from Arabian Gulf countries. Within Oman, a high proportion of the population is under the age of 20. Coupled with the drastic increase in motorization in recent years, there is a need to understand the state of road safety among young people in Oman. The current research aimed to explore the prevalence and characteristics of road traffic injuries among young drivers aged 17-25 years. Crash data from 2009 to 2011 were extracted from the Directorate General of Traffic, Royal Oman Police (ROP) database in Oman. The data were analyzed to explore the impact of road crashes on young people (17-25 years), the characteristics of young driver crashes, and how these differ from older drivers and to identify key predictors of fatalities in young driver crashes. Overall, young people were overrepresented in injuries and fatalities within the sample time period. Though it is true that many young people in crashes were driving at the time, it was also evident that young people were often victims in a crash caused by someone else. Thus, to reduce the impact of road crashes on young people, there is a need to generally address road safety within Oman. When young drivers were involved in crashes they were predominantly male. The types of crashes these drivers have can be broadly attributed to risk taking and inexperience. Speeding and nighttime driving were the key risk factors for fatalities. The results highlight the need to address young driver safety in Oman. From these findings, the introduction of a graduated driver licensing system with nighttime driving restrictions could significantly improve young driver safety.

  13. Official position of the military TBI task force on the role of neuropsychology and rehabilitation psychology in the evaluation, management, and research of military veterans with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Michael; Pliskin, Neil; Barth, Jeffrey; Cox, David; Fink, Joseph; French, Louis; Hammeke, Thomas; Hess, David; Hopewell, Alan; Orme, Daniel; Powell, Matthew; Ruff, Ron; Schrock, Barbara; Terryberry-Spohr, Lori; Vanderploeg, Rodney; Yoash-Gantz, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This Position Statement is a summary of the literature and learning regarding current issues raised by the occurrence, treatment, and study of traumatic brain injury in military service members and veterans. The Report has been approved by the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN), Divisions 40 (Neuropsychology) and 22 (Rehabilitation Psychology) of the American Psychological Association (APA), and the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN), with the goal of providing information of relevance on an important public policy matter within their respective areas of expertise. The Report is not intended to establish guidelines or standards for the professional practice of psychology, nor has it been adopted as official policy by the American Psychological Association or any other division or subunit of APA.

  14. Prevalence, causes, and correlates of traumatic dental injuries among seven-to-twelve-year-old school children in Dera Bassi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Dua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The paper aims to present a study conducted in Dera Bassi, Mohali, India. The purpose of the study was to ascertain the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries (TDI in children of age group 7-12 years in private schools in Gulabgarh village. Material & Method : Age & sex distribution, etiological factors, risk factors and cause of injury were the parameters taken into consideration. The data collected was processed and analyzed using the SPSS statistical software program. Results : The overall prevalence of dental trauma was 14.5%, amongst the 880 subjects examined, out of which, 63.2% males and 36.4% females were found to be affected. The maxillary central incisor was found to be most commonly affected tooth (43.8%. The most common cause of injury reported was fall during playing (37.5%. Conclusion : Enamel fracture was most prevalent (50%. No risk factor was significantly higher than others; however children with Angle′s class II div 1 malocclusion exhibited greater risk factor for traumatic injuries.

  15. Differences in injury pattern and prevalence of cartilage lesions in knee and ankle joints: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Aurich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA. There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints.

  16. Prevalence of injuries and reporting of accidents among health care workers at the University Hospital of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Kurt; McGrowder, Donovan; Crawford, Tazhmoye; Alexander-Lindo, Ruby Lisa; Irving, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge, awareness and practices of health care workers towards universal precautions at the University Hospital of the West Indies. The study also examined the prevalence of injuries experienced by health care workers, as well as incidence of accidents and compliance with post-exposure prophylaxis. A cross sectional survey was conducted in September and October 2007. A 28-item self-administered questionnaire was provided to two hundred health care workers including medical doctors, medical technologists, nurses and porters to assess knowledge and practices regarding universal precautions, prevalence of injuries and incidence of accidents. Almost two-thirds (62.3%) of the respondents were aware of policies and procedures for reporting accidents while one-third (33.2%) were unsure. All nurses were aware of policies and procedures for reporting accidents, followed by medical doctors (88%) and medical technologists (61.2%). The majority (81.5%) of the respondents experienced splashes from bodily fluid. Over three-quarters of medical doctors (78%) and two-thirds of nurses (64%) reported having experienced needle stick injuries, while the incidence among medical technologists was remarkably lower (26%). The majority of the respondents (59%) experienced low accident incidence while just over one-tenth (14%) reported high incidence. Eighty four respondents reported needle stick injuries; just under two-thirds (59.5%) of this group received post-exposure treatment. The study found that majority of health care workers were aware of policies and procedures for reporting accidents. Splashes from body fluids, needle stick injuries and cuts from other objects were quite prevalent among health care workers. There is a need for monitoring systems which would provide accurate information on the magnitude of needle stick injuries and trends over time, potential risk factors, emerging new problems, and the effectiveness of interventions at The

  17. When Military Fitness Standards No Longer Apply: The High Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Recent Air Force Retirees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-27

    population, prevention efforts have largely focused on diet and exercise interventions. Prior to retirement, military service members have met fitness...central obesity , 39.8%; elevated fasting glucose, 32.4%; high blood pressure, 56.8%; low HDL-cholesterol, 33.3%; and elevated triglycerides, 42.7...particularly increased for those identified as being overweight during their active duty careers. Interventions that prevent and reduce unhealthy weight gain

  18. Prevalence of hypothalamo pituitary dysfunction in patients of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. S. Hari Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is common in young soldiers of armed forces leading to significant morbidity and mortality. We studied the prevalence of hypopituitarism following TBI and its association with trauma severity. Materials and Methods: We conducted a 12-month prospective study of 56 TBI patients for the presence of hormonal dysfunction. Hormonal parameters were estimated during the early phase (0–10 days posttraumatically and after 6 and 12 months. Dynamic testing was done when required, and the results were analyzed by appropriate statistical methods. Results: Hormonal dysfunction was seen in 39 of the 56 (70% patients at initial assessment. Persisting pituitary deficiencies are seen in 7 and 8 patients at the end of 6 months and 12 months, respectively. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, and growth hormone deficiency are the most common diagnoses. Initial severe TBI and plurihormonal involvement predicted the long-term hypopituitarism. Conclusion: Early hypopituitarism was common in severe TBI, but recovers in majority. Evaluation for the occult pituitary dysfunction is required during the rehabilitation of TBI patients.

  19. [Influence of Ankle Braces on the Prevalence of Ankle Inversion Injuries in the Swiss Volleyball National League A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, J; Kneubühler, S; Rogan, S

    2016-06-01

    Ankle inversion is a common injury among volleyball players. The injury rate during a game is 2.1 times higher than during training. As a result, the preventive use of ankle braces is frequently observed in Swiss volleyball leagues. Studies have shown that ankle braces have a preventive effect on the prevalence of ankle inversion. In Switzerland there has been no investigation into the preventive use of braces and their influence on prevalence. For this reason, the goals of this study are 1) to determine when, why and by whom ankle braces are worn and 2) to evaluate the injury rate of users and non-users of ankle braces. A modified questionnaire was sent to 18 men's and women's teams of the Swiss National League A. The questionnaire included questions about injury rates and the circumstances of ankle inversion injuries. The data were statistically analysed with Microsoft Excel 2012 and SPSS Version 20. The overall response rate was 61 %, allowing data from 181 players to be analysed. 33 % (59 of 181) of the players used an ankle brace. There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of ankle inversion between users (12 injured) and non-users (8 injured) (p = 0.006). Wearing an ankle brace during training or during a game made no difference in the prevention of injuries (p = 0.356). More athletes were injured during training (n = 13) than during a game (n = 7). The results of the present study indicate that volleyball players preferably wear ankle braces to prevent injury. More than one third of the players in the study wore an ankle brace, 60 % for primary prevention and 40 % for secondary prevention due to a previous injury. The study shows that significantly more users than non-users of ankle braces were injured. This is contrary to literature. Furthermore it was shown that more injuries occur during training than during a game. This finding results from the fact that ankle braces were rarely worn during training. It is

  20. Prevalence of adolescent physical activity-related injuries in sports, leisure time, and school: the National Physical Activity Behaviour Study for children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, Anu M; Kokko, Sami; Pasanen, Kati; Leppänen, Mari; Rimpelä, Arja; Villberg, Jari; Parkkari, Jari

    2018-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of adolescent physical activity-related injuries in sports club activities, leisure time physical activity and school-based physical activity. The secondary aim was to investigate the differences in the prevalence of physical activity -related injuries between years 2014 and 2016. In addition, we set out to study the associations between age, sex and the frequency of physical activity and injury prevalence. This cross-sectional study is based on the National Physical Activity Behaviour Study for Children and Adolescents (LIITU in Finnish) conducted in years 2014 and 2016. The subjects completed an online questionnaire in the classroom during school hours. A total of 8406 subjects participated in the current study. Out of these, 49% were boys and 51% were girls. The proportions of 11-, 13-, and 15-year-olds were 35%, 34% and 31%, respectively. In the combined data for 2014 and 2016, injury prevalence was higher in sports club activities (46%, 95% CI 44.8-47.8) than in leisure time PA (30%, 95% CI, 28.5-30.5) or school-based PA (18%, 95% CI, 17.4-19.1). In leisure time PA, the injury prevalence was higher than in school-based PA. In all the three settings, injury prevalence was higher in 2016 than in 2014. Frequency of PA was associated with a higher risk for PA-related injuries in sports clubs and leisure time. With half of the subjects reporting at least one PA-related injury during the past year, results indicate that adolescent PA-related injuries are a large-scale problem. There is a worrisome rise in injury prevalence in recent years. From a public health standpoint, there is an urgent need to invest in injury prevention to reverse this trend.

  1. Characteristics and prevalence of musculoskeletal injury in professional and non-professional ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Michelle S S; Ferreira, Arthur S; Orsini, Marco; Silva, Elirez B; Felicio, Lilian R

    2016-01-19

    Ballet is a high-performance activity that requires an advanced level of technical skills. Ballet places great stress on tendons, muscles, bones, and joints and may act directly as a trigger of injury by overuse. 1) to describe the main types of injuries and affected areas related to classical ballet and 2) to compare the frequency of musculoskeletal injuries among professional and non-professional ballet dancers, considering possible gender differences among the professional dancers. A total of 110 questionnaires were answered by professional and non-professional dancers. The questionnaire contained items related to the presence of injury, the regions involved, and the mechanism of the injury. We observed a high frequency of musculoskeletal injuries, with ankle sprains accounting for 69.8% of injuries in professional dancers and 42.1% in non-professional dancers. Pirouettes were the most frequent mechanism of injury in professional dancers, accounting for 67.9% of injuries, whereas in the non-professional dancers, repetitive movement was the most common mechanism (28.1%). Ankle sprains occurred in 90% of the women's injuries, and muscle sprains occurred in 54.5% of the men's injuries. The most frequent injury location was the ankle joint in both sexes among the professional dancers, with 67.6% in women and 40.9% in men. The identification of the mechanism of injury and time of practice may contribute to better therapeutic action aimed at the proper function of the dancers' bodies and improved performance by these athletes.

  2. Is Blast Injury a Modern Phenomenon?: Early Historical Descriptions of Mining and Volcanic Traumatic Brain Injury With Relevance to Modern Terrorist Attacks and Military Warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Lauren N; Moore, David F; Okun, Michael S

    2016-03-01

    Given the recent interest in blast injury spurred by returning soldiers from overseas conflicts, we sought to research the early historical descriptions of blast injuries and their treatments. Consideration was given to specific descriptions of survivors of closed head injury and their treatment. A review of the medical and nonmedical literature was undertaken, with particular emphasis on pre-1800 descriptions of volcanic eruptions and mining accidents. Compilations of accounts of the Etna eruptions dating from 126 BC were translated into English, and early mining texts from the 1600s and 1700s were reviewed. Accumulations of flammable gases were recorded in many medieval sources and this knowledge of toxic gas which could lead to blast injury was known in the mining community by 1316. No direct attribution of injuries to blast forces was present in the historical record examined before the 1300s, although mining accounts in the 1600s detail deaths due to blast. No specific descriptions of survivors of a closed head injury were found in the mining and volcanic eruption literature. Descriptions and warnings of blast forces were commonly written about in the medieval and Renaissance mining communities. Personal narratives as early as 1316 recognize the traumatic effects of blast injury. No mining or volcanic blast descriptions before 1800 detailed severe closed head injury survivors, suggesting greater mortality than morbidity from blast injury in the premodern era. This review also uncovered that there was no historical treatment or remedy recommended to survivors of blast injury. Blast explosions resulting in injury or death were frequently described, although in simplistic terminology.

  3. Prevalence of, risk factors for, and consequences of posttraumatic stress disorder and other mental health problems in military populations deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchand, Rajeev; Rudavsky, Rena; Grant, Sean; Tanielian, Terri; Jaycox, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and related mental health problems among persons who served in the armed forces during the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, as reflected in the literature published between 2009 and 2014. One-hundred and sixteen research studies are reviewed, most of which are among non-treatment-seeking US service members or treatment-seeking US veterans. Evidence is provided for demographic, military, and deployment-related risk factors for PTSD, though most derive from cross-sectional studies and few control for combat exposure, which is a primary risk factor for mental health problems in this cohort. Evidence is also provided linking PTSD with outcomes in the following domains: physical health, suicide, housing and homelessness, employment and economic well-being, social well-being, and aggression, violence, and criminality. Also included is evidence about the prevalence of mental health service use in this cohort. In many instances, the current suite of studies replicates findings observed in civilian samples, but new findings emerge of relevance to both military and civilian populations, such as the link between PTSD and suicide. Future research should make effort to control for combat exposure and use longitudinal study designs; promising areas for investigation are in non-treatment-seeking samples of US veterans and the role of social support in preventing or mitigating mental health problems in this group.

  4. Prevalence of Self-Reported Lifetime History of Traumatic Brain Injury and Associated Disability: A Statewide Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteneck, Gale G; Cuthbert, Jeffrey P; Corrigan, John D; Bogner, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of all severities of traumatic brain injury (TBI), regardless of treatment setting, and their associated negative outcomes. A total of 2701 adult Coloradoans. A statewide, population-based, random digit-dialed telephone survey. The lifetime history of TBI was assessed by a modification of the Ohio State University TBI Identification Method; activity limitation and life satisfaction were also assessed. The distribution of self-reported lifetime injury was as follows: 19.8%, no injury; 37.7%, injury but no TBI; 36.4%, mild TBI; and 6.0%, moderate-severe TBI. Of those reporting a TBI, 23.1% were hospitalized, 38.5% were treated in an emergency department, 9.8% were treated in a physician's office, and 27.5% did not seek medical care. A clear gradient of activity limitations and low life satisfaction was seen, with the highest proportions of these negative outcomes occurring in people reporting more severe TBI and the lowest proportions in those not reporting a TBI. Approximately twice as many people reported activity limitations and low life satisfaction after nonhospitalized TBI compared with hospitalized TBI. This investigation highlights the seriousness of TBI as a public health problem and the importance of including all severities of TBI, no matter where, or if treated, in estimating the prevalence of disability co-occurring with TBI.

  5. PREVALENCE AND TYPES OF SPORTS INJURIES PRESENTING TO EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT SUEZ CANAL UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Hamed Elbaih

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inroduction: regular physical activity is essential for the prevention of various diseases and reduces the risk of premature mortality in general and coronary heart disease, hypertension, colon cancer, obesity and diabetes mellitus in particular. Aim of this study was to assess the most common sports causing injuries and to assess the types and mechanisms of these injuries. Patients and methods: The researcher examined 250 patients attending emergency departmentl. Results: The study showed that the most common type of sports involved in injury was football .The ankle was the most common affected part in the whole body . Chest contusion and back contusion were the most common types of sports injuries in head, neck and trunk. Fracture scaphoid and fissure radius were the most common sport injuries. Ankle sprain was the most common injury. The study showed that (62.7% of the studied patients who were playing football had injuries in the lower limbs. Ankle sprain was the most common sport injury that was associated with wearing football shoes . Conclusion: Ankle sprain was the most common sport injury associated with artificial grass court . Wrist sprain was the common sport injury in the upper limbs associated with artificial grass court .

  6. The nature and prevalence of injury during CrossFit training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hak, Paul Taro; Hodzovic, Emil; Hickey, Ben

    2013-11-22

    CrossFit is a constantly varied, high intensity, functional movement strength and conditioning program which has seen a huge growth in popularity around the world since its inception twelve years ago. There has been much criticism as to the potential injuries associated with CrossFit training including rhabdomyolysis and musculoskeletal injuries. However to date no evidence exists in the literature to the injures and rates sustained. The purpose of this study was to determine the injury rates and profiles of CrossFit athletes sustained during routine CrossFit training. An online questionnaire was distributed amongst international CrossFit online forums. Data collected included general demographics, training programs, injury profiles and supplement use. A total of 132 responses were collected with 97 (73.5%) having sustained an injury during CrossFit training. A total of 186 injuries were reported with 9 (7.0%) requiring surgical intervention. An injury rate of 3.1 per 1000 hours trained was calculated. No incidences of rhabdomyolysis were reported. Injury rates with CrossFit training are similar to that reported in the literature for sports such as Olympic weight-lifting, power-lifting and gymnastics and lower than competitive contact sports such as rugby union and rugby league. Shoulder and spine injuries predominate with no incidences of rhabdomyolysis obtained. To our knowledge this is the first paper in the literature detailing the injury rates and profiles with CrossFit participation.

  7. Prevalence of Traumatic Dental Injuries to Anterior Teeth of 12-Year-Old School Children in Kashmir, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ain, Tasneem S.; Lingesha Telgi, Ravishankar; Sultan, Saima; Tangade, Pradeep; Ravishankar Telgi, Chaitra; Tirth, Amit; Kumar Pal, Sumit; Gowhar, Owais; Tandon, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic dental injuries to anterior teeth are a significant public health problem, not only because their prevalence is relatively high, but also because they have considerable impact on children’s daily lives. Traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) cause physical and psychological discomfort, pain and other negative impacts, such as tendency to avoid laughing or smiling, which can affect social relationships. Objectives This study aimed to assess the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries to anterior teeth among 12-year-old school children in Kashmir, India. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in private and government schools of India among 1600 schoolchildren aged 12 years. In addition to recording of the type of trauma (using Ellis and Davey classification of fractures, 1970), over jet, Angle’s molar relation and lip competence were also recorded. The socioeconomic status and academic performance of the study subjects were registered. The data obtained were compiled systematically and then statistically analyzed. The statistical significance for the association between the traumatic injury and the variables was analyzed using the chi-square test. Logistic regression was used to identify potential risk predictors of TDIs. Results The overall prevalence of TDI to anterior teeth was found to be 9.3%. The TDI to anterior teeth in male was more than female, but the difference was statistically nonsignificant (P trauma in the present study. The highest potential risk factor for the occurrence of trauma was over jet. Academic performance was found to be significantly associated to TDI to anterior teeth, when analyzed in a multiple regression model. Conclusions It was concluded that the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries was 9.3%. Traumatic dental injuries among children exhibit complex interaction between the victims’ oral conditions and their behavior. Therefore, prevention should consider a number of characteristics such as

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) findings in adult civilian, military, and sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI): a systematic critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asken, Breton Michael; DeKosky, Steven T; Clugston, James R; Jaffee, Michael S; Bauer, Russell M

    2018-04-01

    This review seeks to summarize diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies that have evaluated structural changes attributed to the mechanisms of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in adult civilian, military, and athlete populations. Articles from 2002 to 2016 were retrieved from PubMed/MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, and Google Scholar, using a Boolean search string containing the following terms: "diffusion tensor imaging", "diffusion imaging", "DTI", "white matter", "concussion", "mild traumatic brain injury", "mTBI", "traumatic brain injury", and "TBI". We added studies not identified by this method that were found via manually-searched reference lists. We identified 86 eligible studies from English-language journals using, adult, human samples. Studies were evaluated based on duration between injury and DTI assessment, categorized as acute, subacute/chronic, remote mTBI, and repetitive brain trauma considerations. Since changes in brain structure after mTBI can also be affected by other co-occurring medical and demographic factors, we also briefly review DTI studies that have addressed socioeconomic status factors (SES), major depressive disorder (MDD), and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The review describes population-specific risks and the complications of clinical versus pathophysiological outcomes of mTBI. We had anticipated that the distinct population groups (civilian, military, and athlete) would require separate consideration, and various aspects of the study characteristics supported this. In general, study results suggested widespread but inconsistent differences in white matter diffusion metrics (primarily fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], radial diffusivity [RD], and axial diffusivity [AD]) following mTBI/concussion. Inspection of study designs and results revealed potential explanations for discrepant DTI findings, such as control group variability, analytic techniques, the manner in which regional differences were reported, and

  9. Prevalence, management and outcome of traumatic diaphragm injuries managed by the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, N; Clarke, D; Laing, G

    2017-05-01

    INTRODUCTION This audit of traumatic diaphram injury (TDI) from a busy South African trauma service reviews the spectrum of disease and highlights current approaches to these injuries. METHODS The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service (PMTS) has maintained an Electronic Surgical Registry (ESR) and a Hybrid Electronic Medical Record (HEMR) system since January 1 st 2012. RESULTS A total of 105 TDIs were identified and repaired during the study period. The mean patient age was 30 years (range 15-68 years - SD 9.7). The majority (92.4%) of patients were male (97/105). Penetrating trauma was the leading mechanism of injury (94%). 75 patients sustained a TDI from a stab wound, and the remaining 24 injuries resulted from gunshot wounds. Multiple associated injuries and high morbidity was seen with right diaphragm injury, blunt trauma, gunshot wounds and chronic diaphragmatic hernias. CONCLUSIONS TDI is a fairly uncommon injury with a local incidence of 1.6%. It presents in a spectrum from the obvious to the occult. Multiple associated injuries and high morbidity occur following blunt trauma or gunshot wounds, right diaphragm injury and chronic diaphragmatic hernias. Diagnostic laparoscopy offers a diagnostic and therapeutic tool to prevent progression of occult TDI to chronic diaphragmatic hernias.

  10. Prevalence and risk of injury in Europe by driving with alcohol, illicit drugs and medicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernhoft, Inger Marie; Hels, Tove; Lyckegaard, Allan

    2012-01-01

    and gender. The alcohol prevalence (concentrations ≥ 0.1 g/L) was much higher than the prevalence of other drugs, with highest alcohol prevalence in all three study samples in the southern and western European countries. Combined alcohol/drug use and multiple drug use were far more common in accident...

  11. Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed E. Mansour

    2013-07-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of spontaneous bacterial pleuritis in the studied group of patients with hepatic hydrothorax was 14.3%. Patients with advanced liver disease, low pleural fluid protein, or SBP are at risk for spontaneous bacterial pleuritis.

  12. Group B streptococcus serotype prevalence in reproductive-age women at a tertiary care military medical center relative to global serotype distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Julie

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group B Streptococcus (GBS serotype (Ia, Ib, II-IX correlates with pathogen virulence and clinical prognosis. Epidemiological studies of seroprevalence are an important metric for determining the proportion of serotypes in a given population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of individual GBS serotypes at Madigan Healthcare System (Madigan, the largest military tertiary healthcare facility in the Pacific Northwestern United States, and to compare seroprevalences with international locations. Methods To determine serotype distribution at Madigan, we obtained GBS isolates from standard-of-care anogenital swabs from 207 women of indeterminate gravidity between ages 18-40 during a five month interval. Serotype was determined using a recently described molecular method of polymerase chain reaction by capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps genes associated with pathogen virulence. Results Serotypes Ia, III, and V were the most prevalent (28%, 27%, and 17%, respectively. A systematic review of global GBS seroprevalence, meta-analysis, and statistical comparison revealed strikingly similar serodistibution at Madigan relative to civilian-sector populations in Canada and the United States. Serotype Ia was the only serotype consistently higher in North American populations relative to other geographic regions (p Conclusion This study establishes PCR-based serotyping as a viable strategy for GBS epidemiological surveillance. Our results suggest that GBS seroprevalence remains stable in North America over the past two decades.

  13. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries to the anterior teeth among three to thirteen-year-old school children of Tamilnadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Mohan; Reddy, Venugopal N; Ramalingam, Krishnakumar; Durai, Kaliyamoorthy Sugumaran; Rao, Prasad Arun; Prabhu, Anand

    2012-04-01

    Dental trauma has become an important attribute of dental public health. The primary requisite before actively dealing with such problems is to describe the extent, distribution, and associated variables with the specific condition. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and distribution of traumatic dental injuries (TDI) to anterior teeth among 3 to 13 years old Chidambaram school children. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data was collected through a survey form and clinical examination. A total of 3200 school children in the age group of 3-13 years were selected from 10 schools of Chidambaram, Tamilnadu. Information concerning sex, age, cause of trauma, number of injured teeth, type of the teeth, lip competence, terminal plane relationship and the molar relationship were recorded. The statistical software EPIINFO (Version 6.0) was used for statistical analysis. In the present study, P≤0.05 was considered as the level of significance. The trauma prevalence in the present study was 10.13%. Children with class I type 2 and mesial step molar relationship exhibited more number of dental injuries. Enamel fracture was the most common injury recorded. Only 3.37% of the children had undergone treatment. The high level of dental trauma and low percentage of children with trauma seeking treatment stresses the need for increased awareness in Chidambaram population.

  14. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries to the anterior teeth among three to thirteen-year-old school children of Tamilnadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Govindarajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Dental trauma has become an important attribute of dental public health. The primary requisite before actively dealing with such problems is to describe the extent, distribution, and associated variables with the specific condition. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and distribution of traumatic dental injuries (TDI to anterior teeth among 3 to 13 years old Chidambaram school children. Settings and Design : A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data was collected through a survey form and clinical examination. Materials and Methods: A total of 3200 school children in the age group of 3-13 years were selected from 10 schools of Chidambaram, Tamilnadu. Information concerning sex, age, cause of trauma, number of injured teeth, type of the teeth, lip competence, terminal plane relationship and the molar relationship were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical software EPIINFO (Version 6.0 was used for statistical analysis. In the present study, P≤0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: The trauma prevalence in the present study was 10.13%. Children with class I type 2 and mesial step molar relationship exhibited more number of dental injuries. Enamel fracture was the most common injury recorded. Only 3.37% of the children had undergone treatment. Conclusion: The high level of dental trauma and low percentage of children with trauma seeking treatment stresses the need for increased awareness in Chidambaram population.

  15. Prevalence of comorbidity and its association with traumatic brain injury and outcomes in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Dikmen, Sureyya; Temkin, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The study aims were to examine the association between age, comorbidity, and cause of injury in older adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI); and to determine which comorbidities relate to mortality, length of stay, and functional outcome at hospital discharge, controlling for initial injury severity, age, and sex. A retrospective cohort study design was used; clinical and outcome trauma registry data were obtained for 196 adults 55 and older with TBI. The majority had at least one comorbid condition (e.g., hypertension, alcohol abuse). In-hospital mortality was 31%. Among the oldest-old, motor vehicle collisions and falls were significantly associated with specific chronic diseases. Prior myocardial infarction was significantly associated with an increased risk of in-hospital death. Injury Severity Score and Glasgow Coma Scale score were predictive of discharge function, but comorbidity did not add significantly to the model. Primary TBI prevention efforts in older adults must consider the impact of comorbidity and cause of injury, particularly in the oldest-old. Alcohol abuse is common in older adults with TBI; screening should be conducted and interventions developed to prevent future injury. Future study is warranted to understand the interplay between pathophysiology of comorbid disease and injury and how to best manage rehabilitation within the context of aging. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Prevalence of hypertension and associated risk factors in people with long-term spinal cord injury living in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaansen, Jacinthe J E; Douma-Haan, Yvonne; van Asbeck, Floris W A; van Koppenhagen, Casper F; de Groot, Sonja; Smit, Christof A; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Post, Marcel W M

    2017-05-01

    To describe the prevalence of hypertension and associated risk factors in people with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to compare the prevalence of high blood pressure and/or the use of antihypertensive drugs with the prevalence in the Dutch general population. Multicentre cross-sectional study (N = 282). Hypertension was defined as a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of ≥140 mmHg and/or a diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of ≥90 mmHg after ≥2 blood pressure measurements during ≥2 doctor visits. High blood pressure was defined as a single measurement of a SBP of ≥140 mmHg and/or a DBP of ≥90 mmHg. The prevalence of hypertension was 21.5%. Significant predictors were: lesion level below C8 (T1-T6: OR =6.4, T7-L5: OR =10.1), history of hypercholesterolemia (OR =4.8), longer time since injury (OR =1.1), higher age (OR =1.1). The prevalence of high blood pressure and/or the use of antihypertensive drugs was higher in men (T1-T6 lesion: 48%; T7-L5 lesion: 57%) and women (T1-T6 lesion: 48%; T7-L5 lesion: 25%) with a SCI below C8 compared to Dutch able-bodied men (31%) and women (18%). High blood pressure is common in people with SCI. Screening for hypertension during annual checkups is recommended, especially in those with a SCI below C8. Implications for Rehabilitation High blood pressure is common in people with long-term SCI living in the Netherlands and its prevalence is higher in both men and women with a spinal cord lesion level below C8 compared with the age-matched Dutch general population. It is recommended to screen for hypertension during annual checkups in people with SCI, especially in those with a higher risk of developing hypertension, e.g. those with a spinal cord lesion level below C8 and an age of ≥45 years or a time since injury of ≥20 years. When a high blood pressure is measured in people with SCI, they should receive a further assessment of the blood pressure according to the available guidelines for the general

  17. Prevalence and injury profile in Portuguese children and adolescents according to their level of sports participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa E Silva, Lara; Fragoso, Isabel; Teles, Júlia

    2018-03-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that sports can present danger in the form of injuries. The extent of this problem calls for preventive actions based on epidemiological research. Two questionnaires (LESADO and RAPIL II) were distributed in four schools to 651 subjects aged between 10 and 18 years, involved in different levels of physical activity (PA) - recreative sports, school sports, federated sports and no sports participation (except physical education classes). Bone age was evaluated through Tanner-Whitehouse III method and anthropometric measures according to ISAK. From 247 subjects (37.9%) it was reported a sports injury during the previous six months. The most injured body areas were lower limbs (53.8%), followed by upper limbs (29.0%) and the type of injuries found was strains (33.7%), sprains (27.1%) and fractures (23.1%). The most frequent causes were direct trauma (51.9%), indirect trauma (29.5%) and overuse (12.7%). A high percentage was relapses and chronic injuries (40.9%). The OR for age group ≥16 years was 2.26 suggesting that those ≥16 years were 2.26 times more likely to have an injury than the younger subjects and concerning the PA level, school and federated sports subjects were 4.21 and 4.44 times more likely to have an injury than no sports participation subjects. Sports injuries in school age subjects were predominantly minor conditions where sprains and strains were the major injuries. They resulted mostly of trauma situations and lower and upper limbs were the most affected areas. Injury occurrence increased with age and was higher in school and federated athletes.

  18. [Smoking prevalence, nicotine dependence and effects of low cost cigarette sale among military healthcare personal in Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, Ersin; Simşek, Ziya; Kutucularoğlu, Gürkan; Metinyurt, Gürkan

    2010-01-01

    Health professionals, particularly clinicians and nurses in the community have an important role in preventing to start smoking. In our study; we aimed to determine the prevalence of cigarette smoking, nicotine dependence level and the effects of low price tobacco sale among healthcare personal in a military hospital. A questionnaire was applied to healthcare personal, which evaluates their smoking habits, nicotine dependence level with Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) and the effects of low cost cigarette sale on smoking habits. Seventy male and 46 female among 138 healthcare personals (84%) responded to the questionnaire. Mean age of participants was 33.7 ± 5.6. Among all participants, 53.4% were smoking. There was no significant difference between male and female participants in case of smoking prevalence (p> 0.05). Seven participants who started smoking regularly after they appointed to Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus explained why they started smoking as secondary to lower cigarette prices in this country. 48.3% of participants (40% of male smokers and 59.3% of female smokers) reported increased cigarette consumption as a result of low cost cigarette sales. There was a significant difference between male and female participants in case of increase in cigarette consumption (< 0.05). According to results of FTND, about 70% of participants were low and very low-dependant, and about 22% were high and very high- dependant smokers. Smoking prevalence of healthcare personal who participated in our study was higher than that reported for community and for other healthcare personal.

  19. Prevalence of Cardiac Arrhythmia Under Stress Conditions in Occupational Health Assessments of Young Military Servicemen and Servicewomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammito, Stefan; Gundlach, Nils; Böckelmann, Irina

    2016-04-01

    In health assessments of young temporary-career volunteers who are up for re-enlistment, cardiac stress tests are mandatory to detect cardiac diseases and to confirm physical fitness. So far, there is no information available regarding the extent to which this time-consuming examination contributes to the diagnosis of pathological cardiac arrhythmia in this young, preselected patient collective. In a retrospective data analysis, health assessments of 1919 temporary-career volunteers conducted between 2007 and 2012 were examined with regard to pathological findings provided by resting electrocardiograms (ECGs) and exercise ECGs. Only five subjects showed signs of heart disease during the resting ECG; none of the exercise ECGs revealed any abnormalities, even after further cardiological examinations. In health assessments of young temporary-career volunteers, the exercise ECG as a mandatory examination should be replaced by the resting ECG. In addition to avoiding unnecessary examinations and associated risks, quite a large number of working years could be saved both for medical personnel and the persons examined. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Blast injury prevalence in skeletal remains: Are there differences between Bosnian war samples and documented combat-related deaths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussault, Marie Christine; Hanson, Ian; Smith, Martin J

    2017-11-01

    Court cases at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) have seen questions raised about the recognition and causes of blast-related trauma and the relationship to human rights abuses or combat. During trials, defence teams argued that trauma was combat related and prosecutors argued that trauma was related to executions. We compared a sample of 81 cases (males between 18 and 75) from a Bosnian mass grave investigation linked to the Kravica warehouse killings to published combat-related blast injury data from World War One, Vietnam, Northern Ireland, the first Gulf War, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Afghanistan. We also compared blast fracture injuries from Bosnia to blast fracture injuries sustained in bombings of buildings in two non-combat 'civilian' examples; the Oklahoma City and Birmingham pub bombings. A Chi-squared statistic with a Holm-Bonferroni correction assessed differences between prevalence of blast-related fractures in various body regions, where data were comparable. We found statistically significant differences between the Bosnian and combat contexts. We noted differences in the prevalence of head, torso, vertebral area, and limbs trauma, with a general trend for higher levels of more widespread trauma in the Bosnian sample. We noted that the pattern of trauma in the Bosnian cases resembled the pattern from the bombing in buildings civilian contexts. Variation in trauma patterns can be attributed to the influence of protective armour; the context of the environment; and the type of munition and its injuring mechanism. Blast fracture injuries sustained in the Bosnian sample showed patterns consistent with a lack of body armour, blast effects on people standing in enclosed buildings and the use of explosive munitions. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Military personnel with self-reported ankle injuries do not demonstrate deficits in dynamic postural stability or landing kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansbach, Heather M; Lovalekar, Mita T; Abt, John P; Rafferty, Deirdre; Yount, Darcie; Sell, Timothy C

    2017-08-01

    The odds of sustaining non-contact musculoskeletal injuries are higher in Special Operations Forces operators than in infantry soldiers. The ankle is one of the most commonly injured joints, and once injured can put individuals at risk for reinjury. The purpose of this study was to determine if any differences in postural stability and landing kinematics exist between operators with a self-reported ankle injury in the past one year and uninjured controls. A total of 55 Special Operations Forces operators were included in this analysis. Comparisons were made between operators with a self-reported ankle injury within one-year of their test date (n=11) and healthy matched controls (n=44). Comparisons were also made between injured and uninjured limbs within the injured group. Dynamic postural stability and landing kinematics at the ankle, knee, and hip were assessed during a single-leg jump-landing task. Comparisons were made between groups with independent t-tests and within the injured group between limbs using paired t-tests. There were no significant differences in dynamic postural stability index or landing kinematics between the injured and uninjured groups. Anterior-posterior stability index was significantly higher on the uninjured limb compared to the injured limb within the injured group (P=0.02). Single ankle injuries sustained by operators may not lead to deficits in dynamic postural stability. Dynamic postural stability index and landing kinematics within one year after injury were either not affected by the injuries reported, or injured operators were trained back to baseline measures through rehabilitation and daily activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The incidence and prevalence of ankle sprain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Delahunt, Eamonn; Caulfield, Brian; Hertel, Jay; Ryan, John; Bleakley, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Ankle sprain is one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries, yet a contemporary review and meta-analysis of prospective epidemiological studies investigating ankle sprain does not exist. Our aim is to provide an up-to-date account of the incidence rate and prevalence period of ankle sprain injury unlimited by timeframe or context activity. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses of English articles using relevant computerised databases. Search terms included Medical Search Headings for the ankle joint, injury and epidemiology. The following inclusion criteria were used: the study must report epidemiology findings of injuries sustained in an observed sample; the study must report ankle sprain injury with either incidence rate or prevalence period among the surveyed sample, or provide sufficient data from which these figures could be calculated; the study design must be prospective. Independent extraction of articles was performed by two authors using pre-determined data fields. One-hundred and eighty-one prospective epidemiology studies from 144 separate papers were included. The average rating of all the included studies was 6.67/11, based on an adapted version of the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology) guidelines for rating observational studies. 116 studies were considered high quality and 65 were considered low quality. The main findings of the meta-analysis demonstrated a higher incidence of ankle sprain in females compared with males (13.6 vs 6.94 per 1,000 exposures), in children compared with adolescents (2.85 vs 1.94 per 1,000 exposures) and adolescents compared with adults (1.94 vs 0.72 per 1,000 exposures). The sport category with the highest incidence of ankle sprain was indoor/court sports, with a cumulative incidence rate of 7 per 1,000 exposures or 1.37 per 1,000 athlete exposures and 4.9 per 1,000 h. Low-quality studies tended to underestimate the incidence of ankle sprain when compared with

  3. An Investigation of Knee Injury Prevalence and its Mechanism among Premier League Soccer Referees in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mahdavi Mohtasham

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study highlight the importance of including special training in warm-up programs such as interval training, proprioception exercises, strength training (e.g. Nordic hamstring, flexibility training, and muscular endurance training which have been designed to prevent knee injuries. The results help to design and set-up an injury prevention program for the Referees Committee of the Iranian Football Federation.

  4. Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Darwish

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: Results indicated that dental caries prevalence among school children in Qatar has reached critical levels, and is influenced by socio-demographic factors. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth values obtained in this study were the second highest detected in the Eastern Mediterranean region.

  5. Chronic pain management in the active-duty military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, David; Cohen, Steven P.

    2012-06-01

    As in the general population, chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome affliction in active-duty military personnel. Painful conditions in military members can be categorized broadly in terms of whether they arise directly from combat injuries (gunshot, fragmentation wound, blast impact) or whether they result from non-combat injuries (sprains, herniated discs, motor vehicle accidents). Both combat-related and non-combat-related causes of pain can further be classified as either acute or chronic. Here we discuss the state of pain management as it relates to the military population in both deployed and non-deployed settings. The term non-battle injury (NBI) is commonly used to refer to those conditions not directly associated with the combat actions of war. In the history of warfare, NBI have far outstripped battle-related injuries in terms not only of morbidity, but also mortality. It was not until improvements in health care and field medicine were applied in World War I that battle-related deaths finally outnumbered those attributed to disease and pestilence. However, NBI have been the leading cause of morbidity and hospital admission in every major conflict since the Korean War. Pain remains a leading cause of presentation to military medical facilities, both in and out of theater. The absence of pain services is associated with a low return-to-duty rate among the deployed population. The most common pain complaints involve the low-back and neck, and studies have suggested that earlier treatment is associated with more significant improvement and a higher return to duty rate. It is recognized that military medicine is often at the forefront of medical innovation, and that many fields of medicine have reaped benefit from the conduct of war.

  6. Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanesse Scerri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen worldwide. Malta is one of the countries with the highest MRSA prevalence in Europe, as identified from hospital blood cultures [1]. However, community prevalence of MRSA has never previously been investigated. This study aimed at establishing the prevalence of community MRSA nasal colonization in Maltese individuals and identifying the clonal characteristics of the detected isolates. Nasal swabs were collected from 329 healthy individuals who were also asked to complete a brief questionnaire about risk factors commonly associated with MRSA carriage and infection. The swabs were transported and enriched in a nutrient broth supplemented with NaCl. The presence of MRSA was then determined by culturing on MRSA Select chromogenic agar and then confirming by several assays, including catalase, coagulase and PBP2a agglutination tests. The isolates were assayed for antibiotic susceptibilities and typed by microarray analysis to determine the clonal characteristics of each strain. The prevalence of MRSA nasal colonization in the healthy Maltese population was found to be 8.81% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.75–11.87%, much higher than that found in other studies carried out in several countries. No statistical association was found between MRSA carriage and demographics or risk factors; however, this was hindered by the small sample size. Almost all the isolates were fusidic-acid resistant. The majority were found to belong to a local endemic clone (CC5 which seems to be replacing the previously prevalent European clone UK-EMRSA-15 in the country. A new clone (CC50-MRSA-V was also characterized. The presence of such a significant community reservoir of MRSA increases the burdens already faced by the local healthcare system to control the MRSA epidemic. Colonization of MRSA in otherwise healthy individuals may represent a risk for endogenous infection and transmission to

  7. Programs Addressing Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Among U.S. Military Servicemembers and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Regulation ART Airman Resilience Training ASAM American Society of Addiction Medicine ASAP Army Substance Abuse Programs ASIST Applied Suicide...Department of Veterans Affairs VAS Visual Analog Scale VBH Virtual Behavioral Health VD Video Doctor VR virtual reality VR-GET Virtual Reality Graded...Exposure Therapy vTBI Virtual Traumatic Brain Injury VTC video teleconferencing WAQ Warrior Adventure Quest WAROPS Warrior Optimization Systems

  8. Military cold injury during the war in the Falkland Islands 1982: an evaluation of possible risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, R P

    2007-01-01

    Throughout the history of war, there have been many instances when the cold has ravaged armies more effectively than their enemies. Delineated risk factors are restricted to negro origins, previous cold injury, moderate but not heavy smoking and the possession of blood group O. No attention has been directed to the possibility that abnormal blood constituents could feasibly predispose to the development of local cold injury. This study considers this possibility and investigates the potential contribution of certain components of the circulating blood which might do so. Three groups of soldiers from two of the battalions who served during the war in the Falklands Islands in 1982 were investigated. The risk factors which were sought included the presence or absence of asymptomatic cryoglobulinaemia, abnormal total protein, albumin, individual gamma globulin or complement C3 or C4 levels, plasma hyperviscosity or evidence of chronic alcoholism manifesting as high haemoglobin, PCV, RBC, MCV or gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT). No cases of cryoglobulinaemia were isolated and there was no haematological evidence to suggest that any of those men who had developed cold injury, one year before this study was performed, had abnormal circulating proteins, plasma hyperviscosity or indicators of alcohol abuse. Individual blood groups were not incriminated as a predisposing factor although the small numbers of negroes in this series fared badly. Although this investigation has excluded a range of potential risk factors which could contribute to the development of cold injury, the problem persists. Two areas of further study are needed: the first involves research into the production of better protective clothing in the form of effective cold weather boots and gloves and the second requires the delineation of those dietary and ethnic factors which allow certain communities to adapt successfully to the cold. A review of the literature in this latter area is presented.

  9. Patient Response to an Integrated Orthotic and Rehabilitation Initiative for Traumatic Injuries for the Military Treatment Facilities (PRIORITI-MTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE July 2015 2...KEYWORDS: Dynamic Ankle Foot Orthosis, Extremity War Injuries, IDEO, rehabilitation 3. BODY Overall Progress This annual report reflects progress...mtf.org/ ) to identify potential patients. The website also houses an initial questionnaire that pre-screens participants. Respondents who screen ‘in’ as

  10. Comparison of athletic training professional preparation to the prevalence of injury occurrence in the collegiate setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Beverly Jean

    1999-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the frequency of injuries that occur to certain body areas in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes and the percentage of time teaching about the same subject areas in Athletic Training Education Programs (ATEP). Directors of Commission of Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accredited and National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) approved programs were surveyed. Randomly selected ATEP directors were interviewed by telephone to collect information on estimated teaching time, the strengths and weaknesses of their programs, and preferred teaching methods. Data were collected from the NCAA Injury Surveillance System to calculate the frequency of injury. Chi-square 'goodness-of-fit' tests were used to determine if a 'good fit' existed between injury frequency and teaching time in two categories: general body areas (head and face, upper extremity, lower extremity, spine, and abdomen and thorax) and specific body areas (head, face, upper arm and shoulder, elbow and forearm, wrist and hand, hip and pelvis, thigh, knee, lower leg, ankle and foot, cervical spine, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, abdomen, and thorax). Standardized residuals were used to assist in determining the location of statistical significance within the same two categories. The chi-square values calculated for both the general and specific body areas were greater than the critical value set at a significance level of .05 with 4 and 14 degrees of freedom respectively. Therefore, it was found that a 'good fit' does not exist between injury frequency and teaching time. The standardized residuals were calculated for each variable within the categories. One out of five general body areas and 10 out of 15 specific body areas were less than 2.00 in absolute value and were found not to contribute to the high chi-square value. Although the chi-square values showed a lack of fit between injury frequency and teaching time

  11. Is "football for all" safe for all? Cross-sectional study of disparities as determinants of 1-year injury prevalence in youth football programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Örjan Dahlström

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Football (soccer is endorsed as a health-promoting physical activity worldwide. When football programs are introduced as part of general health promotion programs, equal access and limitation of pre-participation disparities with regard to injury risk are important. The aim of this study was to explore if disparity with regard to parents' educational level, player body mass index (BMI, and self-reported health are determinants of football injury in community-based football programs, separately or in interaction with age or gender. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four community football clubs with 1230 youth players agreed to participate in the cross-sectional study during the 2006 season. The study constructs (parents' educational level, player BMI, and self-reported health were operationalized into questionnaire items. The 1-year prevalence of football injury was defined as the primary outcome measure. Data were collected via a postal survey and analyzed using a series of hierarchical statistical computations investigating associations with the primary outcome measure and interactions between the study variables. The survey was returned by 827 (67.2% youth players. The 1-year injury prevalence increased with age. For youths with parents with higher formal education, boys reported more injuries and girls reported fewer injuries than expected; for youths with lower educated parents there was a tendency towards the opposite pattern. Youths reporting injuries had higher standardized BMI compared with youths not reporting injuries. Children not reporting full health were slightly overrepresented among those reporting injuries and underrepresented for those reporting no injury. CONCLUSION: Pre-participation disparities in terms of parents' educational level, through interaction with gender, BMI, and self-reported general health are associated with increased injury risk in community-based youth football. When introduced as a general health

  12. The effect of army vest design on the occurrence of stress fractures and overuse injuries in female military recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Frankl, M; Nyska, M; Hetsroni, I; Constantini, N; Trejo, L; Bechar, R; Novak, G; Lankovsky, Z; Mann, G

    2017-08-01

    Stress fractures (SFs) occur when microdamage caused by repetitive mechanical load exceeds the biological load-bearing capacity of the bone. The study objective was to test whether a vest specifically designed and manufactured for female recruits, compared with the standard vest used on a regular basis by Border Police recruits, would reduce the incidence of SF in female Border Police recruits. Data based on reports of military personnel show that women are more likely to sustain SFs. A follow-up of 240 female Border Police infantry recruits, divided into two trial groups, was conducted from 2007 to 2009. Two different vests were evaluated-the standard special unit fighting vest, which was conventionally used by both men and women during basic training, and the new fighting vest, specially design for female body shape. No significant difference was noted in the number of SFs between the two groups which may be attributed to increased weight of the new vest. There was a lower incidence of long bone SFs which may have been due to the superior vest design. The female Border Police Infantry recruits expressed great satisfaction with the new vest. Increased effort should be invested to further reduce the weight of female combat gear, alongside efforts to improve fit and comfort. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Military Blast Injury in Iraq and Afghanistan: The Veterans Health Administration’s Polytrauma System of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    is approxi- mately 90%’’^—considerably higher than in previous conflicts. 1 he high survival rate is due mainly to improvements in helmet and body ...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 hahilitative needs. In response, the VHA estahlished the Polytrauma Sytem of Care in...more injuries sus- tained in the same incident that affect multiple body pans or or- gan systems and result in physi- cil, cognitive, ps\\’chological, or

  14. Prevalence of Substance Use among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth in Military Families: Findings from the California Healthy Kids Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pedro, Kris Tunac; Shim-Pelayo, Holly

    2018-01-05

    In addition to the challenges associated with military life, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth in military families may face stressors associated with having a stigmatized sexual orientation and/or gender identity or expression, placing them at risk of substance use. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study exploring substance use outcomes among LGBT youth in military families. This study assessed the role of military connection, LGB identity, and transgender identity on lifetime and past 30-day substance use. This study is a secondary data analysis of the 2013-2015 California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS). The study's participants (n = 634,978) were students attending middle and high schools in nearly all school districts in California. The study outcomes were lifetime and past 30-day cigarette, alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use. Chi-square tests of associations (including cross-tabulations) and multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to address the study aims. Multivariate logistic regression results indicated that military connection, LGB identity, and transgender identity were significantly associated with an increased odd of lifetime and past 30-day substance use. Compared to military non-transgender youth, military transgender youth had an increased likelihood of past 30-day cigarette use and past 30-day alcohol use. In addition, military LGB youth were 3.62 times as likely as military non-LGB youth to report past 30-day cigarette use. Conclusions/Importance: This study provides researchers with knowledge about the behavioral health of LGBT youth in military families, a vulnerable subgroup within the military-connected youth population, thus informing substance use prevention programs.

  15. Nationally representative prevalence estimates of gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men who have served in the U.S. military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Karen W; Tao, Kevin L; Peters, Philip J

    2017-01-01

    To estimate the number of men in the U.S. military who are gay, bisexual, or other men who have sex with men (MSM) to inform the development of military and other federal policies. We analyzed data from the National Surveys of Family Growth to estimate the number of U.S. men who were gay, bisexual, or MSM, and who had served in the military, compared to those who did not serve. We stratified using hierarchical categories of gay, bisexual, and other MSM to compare proportions in the military and general population. We found that 4.23% of men self-reported as gay, bisexual, or other MSM among men who served in the military, compared to 4.14% among men who had not served (p = 0.93). When stratified, we found that 0.78% self-reported as gay among men who served in the military, compared to 2.12% among men who had not served (pgay was lower in the military than in the general population. This finding might have been influenced by historical military policies related to sexual orientation.

  16. Prevalence of saphenous nerve injury after adductor-canal-blockade in patients receiving total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Maja; Jæger, Pia; Hilsted, K L

    2013-01-01

    , 76 patients could not discriminate between blunt and sharp stimulation with a needle, 81 patients could not discriminate between cold and warmth, and 82 patients displayed an altered sensation to light brush. CONCLUSION: We found no indications of saphenous nerve injury caused by the adductor...... of the saphenous nerve), as well as the anterior, posterior, lateral and infrapatellar part of the affected and contralateral lower leg. Sensory function was tested with pinprick (sharp and blunt needle), temperature discrimination (cold disinfectant swabs) and light brush. RESULTS: We included 97 patients. None...

  17. Experimental, mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury : focus on the monoamine and galanin systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kawa, Lizan

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of mortality and morbidity among civilians and servicemen alike. The spectrum of TBIs encompasses mild to severe cases, with the predominate number of TBIs being mild (mTBI). Combat-related TBI inflicted by explosive blast (bTBI) is highly prevalent among military personnel. The injurious environment caused by explosive blast includes the high-energy shock wave that dissipates energy at the boundaries of anatomical structures with distinct acoust...

  18. Prevalence of Traumatic Dental Injuries to the Permanent Anterior Teeth among 9- to 14-year-old Schoolchildren of Navi Mumbai (Kharghar-Belapur Region), India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Rahul; Agrawal, Geet

    2017-01-01

    To measure the prevalence of anterior teeth trauma in 9- to 14-year-old schoolchildren and their association with predisposing factors, such as lip competence, molar relationship, overjet, and variables, such as age, gender, and cause of trauma. Epidemiological cross-sectional study was carried out among 3,012 schoolchildren aged 9 to 14 years in Navi Mumbai (Kharghar-Belapur region). The sample size was derived using the stratified random sampling method; we picked six schools from the region. These schools had 3,000 students in the acceptable age group of the study which constituted our final sample size. All children were examined for traumatic dental injuries, and the children with positive findings were further examined for lip competence, Angle's molar relationship, and overjet. The results were statistically analyzed using cross-tabulation and Chi-square test. The prevalence of dental injuries was 7.3%, and the ratio of male to female children was found to be 1.6:1. The maximum number of traumatic dental injuries was found with class I molar relationship and overjet less than 3.5 mm in children with competent lips. Maximum number of injuries occurred in the age group of 13-14 years. The most predominant type of injury was the enamel fracture and the most common cause determined was due to fall. The present study is a collection of data on traumatic injuries to anterior teeth, which is seen very commonly in day-to-day practice. The frequency and cause of traumatic injuries to anterior teeth is important for identification of risk groups, treatment needs, and cost involved in order for establishing effective preventive measures. Hegde R, Agrawal G. Prevalence of Traumatic Dental Injuries to the Permanent Anterior Teeth among 9- to 14-year-old Schoolchildren of Navi Mumbai (Kharghar-Belapur Region), India. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(2):177-182.

  19. Familiarity and prevalence of Facebook use for social networking among individuals with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaousides, Theodore; Matsuzawa, Yuka; Lebowitz, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    To examine use of Facebook among individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to identify barriers preventing Facebook use. An online survey was developed assessing frequency and barriers to use of Facebook. The survey was distributed electronically to individuals with TBI through four state brain injury associations. Ninety-six individuals with TBI completed the survey (60% female, age range: 23-70). The relative majority of respondents (60%) reported using Facebook on a regular basis. Among those who reported not using Facebook, the most commonly reported barriers were security concerns and cognitive deficits. Approximately half of non-users indicated interest in learning to use the site, with 70% reporting that they would use it more if they were more knowledgeable about it. Both users and non-users indicated that they would be interested in receiving training to learn how to use Facebook better. Social networking sites are increasingly important in creating and maintaining social networks. A significant number of survey respondents expressed interest in further training on Facebook use. Increased use of social networking may have important implications for social integration among individuals with TBI.

  20. Use of antibiotics and the prevalence of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in patients with spinal cord injuries : An international, multi-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, S.; Santullo, P.; Hirani, S. P.; Kumar, N.; Chowdhury, J. R.; Garcia-Forcada, A.; Recio, M.; Paz, F.; Zobina, I.; Kolli, S.; Kiekens, C.; Draulans, N.; Roels, E.; Martens-Bijlsma, J.; O'Driscoll, J.; Jamous, A.; Saif, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the use of antibiotics and the extent of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD) in patients with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Aims: To record the use of antibiotics, establish the prevalence of AAD and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), and assess if there was

  1. Performance and Symptom Validity Testing as a Function of Medical Board Evaluation in U.S. Military Service Members with a History of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armistead-Jehle, Patrick; Cole, Wesley R; Stegman, Robert L

    2018-02-01

    The study was designed to replicate and extend pervious findings demonstrating the high rates of invalid neuropsychological testing in military service members (SMs) with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) assessed in the context of a medical evaluation board (MEB). Two hundred thirty-one active duty SMs (61 of which were undergoing an MEB) underwent neuropsychological assessment. Performance validity (Word Memory Test) and symptom validity (MMPI-2-RF) test data were compared across those evaluated within disability (MEB) and clinical contexts. As with previous studies, there were significantly more individuals in an MEB context that failed performance (MEB = 57%, non-MEB = 31%) and symptom validity testing (MEB = 57%, non-MEB = 22%) and performance validity testing had a notable affect on cognitive test scores. Performance and symptom validity test failure rates did not vary as a function of the reason for disability evaluation when divided into behavioral versus physical health conditions. These data are consistent with past studies, and extends those studies by including symptom validity testing and investigating the effect of reason for MEB. This and previous studies demonstrate that more than 50% of SMs seen in the context of an MEB will fail performance validity tests and over-report on symptom validity measures. These results emphasize the importance of using both performance and symptom validity testing when evaluating SMs with a history of mTBI, especially if they are being seen for disability evaluations, in order to ensure the accuracy of cognitive and psychological test data. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Prevalence and predictors of disability 24-months after injury for hospitalised and non-hospitalised participants: results from a longitudinal cohort study in New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Derrett

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Most studies investigating disability outcomes following injury have examined hospitalised patients. It is not known whether variables associated with disability outcomes are similar for injured people who are not hospitalised. AIMS: This paper compares the prevalence of disability 24 months after injury for participants in the Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study who were hospitalised and those non-hospitalised, and also seeks to identify pre-injury and injury-related predictors of disability among hospitalised and non-hospitalised participants. METHODS: Participants, aged 18-64 years, were recruited from an injury claims register managed by New Zealand's no-fault injury compensation insurer after referral by health care professionals. A wide range of pre-injury socio-demographic, health and psychosocial characteristics were collected, as well as injury-related characteristics; outcome is assessed using the WHODAS. Multivariable models estimating relative risks of disability for hospitalised and non-hospitalised participants were developed using Poisson regression methods. RESULTS: Of 2856 participants, analyses were restricted to 2184 (76% participants for whom both pre-injury and 24 month WHODAS data were available. Of these, 25% were hospitalised. In both hospitalised and non-hospitalised groups, 13% experience disability (WHODAS≥10 24 months after injury; higher than pre-injury (5%. Of 28 predictor variables, seven independently placed injured participants in the hospitalised group at increased risk of disability 24 months after injury; eight in the non-hospitalised. Only four predictors (pre-injury disability, two or more pre-injury chronic conditions, pre-injury BMI≥30 and trouble accessing healthcare services were common to both the hospitalised and non-hospitalised groups. There is some evidence to suggest that among the hospitalised group, Māori have higher risk of disability relative to non-Māori. CONCLUSIONS: At

  3. Causes and prevalence of traumatic injuries to the permanent incisors of school children aged 12 years in Jaragua do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcenes, W; Alessi, O N; Traebert, J

    2000-04-01

    To assess the causes and the prevalence of traumatic injuries to the permanent incisors of 12-year-old schoolchildren in Jaragua do Sul, Brazil. Cross-sectional survey. Public and private primary schools. 476 children of both sexes, selected by multistage sampling technique. Clinical examination of upper and lower permanent incisors. Incisal overjet, lip coverage, traumatised anterior teeth, cause of trauma. Parents' levels of education and employment status and family income. Boys experienced double the percentage of injuries compared to girls. Children with incisal overjet greater than 5 mm (P = 0.077) and inadequate lip coverage (P = 0.667) were not more likely to have experienced dental injuries. The main causes of injuries to the permanent incisors were falls (26 per cent), traffic accidents (20.5 per cent), sports (19.2 per cent), violence (16.4 per cent) and collisions with people or inanimate objects (6.8 per cent). Socio-economic measures had no significant effect on prevalence of trauma. Policy makers must take the causes of trauma into account when developing a strategy for the prevention of dental injuries. The role of violence in causing traumatic dental injuries has been underestimated.

  4. Prevalence of Lateral Meniscal Extrusion for Posterior Lateral Meniscal Root Lesion With and Without Concomitant Midbody Radial Tear in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie-Wei; Song, Guan-Yang; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Jin; Li, Yue; Feng, Hua

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of lateral meniscal extrusion for patients with posterior lateral meniscal root lesions (PLMRLs) and for those with concomitant midbody radial tears (MRTs) in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. A database of consecutive patients undergoing primary ACL reconstruction between 2011 and 2013 was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with isolated ACL injuries and those with associated PLMRLs. Patients with (1) unavailable preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans, (2) other concomitant ligamentous injuries, (3) severe degeneration or malalignment, (4) infection or tumor, or (5) history of surgery on the injured side were excluded. For patients with associated PLMRLs (study group), degree of concomitant MRTs and status of meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) were verified arthroscopically. Prevalence of lateral meniscal extrusion was compared between (1) patients in the study group and those with isolated ACL injuries and between (2) those with and without concomitant MRTs in the study group. Of the 1,021 consecutive patients, 412 met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of those, 52 (5.1%) had an associated PLMRL (study group) and another 52 were randomly chosen from the 360 isolated ACL injuries as the control group. In the study group, 33 (63.5%) were arthroscopically verified to have concomitant MRTs. Prevalence of lateral meniscal extrusion was significantly higher (P meniscal extrusion. The PLMRLs, identified in 5.1% of ACL injuries, appeared to result in lateral meniscal extrusion. Although the presence of a concomitant MRT did not further increase the prevalence of lateral meniscal extrusion in the setting of a PLMRL, surgical repair might still be necessary if a complete concomitant MRT or an absence of MFL was identified to restore normal meniscal functions. Level III, prognostic case-control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The combat burst fracture study--results of a cohort analysis of the most prevalent combat specific mechanism of major thoracolumbar spinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Brett A; Serrano, Jose A; Belmont, Philip J; Jackson, Keith L; Cameron, Brian; Neal, Chris J; Wells, Rosemary; Yeoman, Chevas; Schoenfeld, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    In 2009-2010, military physicians hypothesized that a new pattern of spinal injury had emerged, resulting from improvised explosive device assault on up-armored vehicles, associated with a high rate of point of first contact fracture and neurological injury-the combat burst fracture. We sought to determine the incidence of all thoracolumbar (TL) burst fractures and combat burst fractures in 2009-2010 as compared to two antecedent years. A screening process identified all individuals who sustained TL burst fractures in the time-period studied. Demographics, injury-specific characteristics, mechanism of injury, surgical interventions and early complications were recorded. Incidence rates were calculated for the three time periods using total deployed troop-strength and number of LRMC combat admissions as denominators. The incidences of TL burst fractures within each year group and by mechanism were compared, and clinical characteristics and process of care were described. Between 2007-2010, 65 individuals sustained a TL burst fracture. The incidence of these injuries in 2009-2010 was 2.1 per 10,000 soldier-years and accounted for 3.0 % of LRMC combat-casualty admissions, a significant increase from 0.6 % and 1.1 % in 2007-2008 and 2008-2009, respectively (p ≤ 0.001). In 2009-2010, US soldiers were 3.4-4.6 times more likely to sustain a TL burst fracture compared to 2008-2009 and 2007-2008 (p vehicle (65 %)-the combat burst fracture mechanism. Neurological deficits were present in 43 % of TL burst fractures and 1/3 were complete injuries. Spinal fixation was performed in 68 % overall and 74 % of combat burst fractures. There was a 3.4- to 4.6-fold increase in TL burst fractures in 2009-2010 compared to antecedent years. The primary driver of this phenomenon was the marked increased in combat burst fractures. Mitigating/preventing the mechanism behind this major spinal injury is a key research initiative for the US military. Level of Evidence III (Case-control).

  6. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vos, Theo; Barber, Ryan M.; Bell, Brad

    2015-01-01

    for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. Methods Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with some important refinements. Results for incidence of acute disorders and prevalence of chronic disorders......, with the notable exception of tooth pain due to permanent caries with more than 200 million incident cases in 2013. Conversely, leading chronic sequelae were largely attributable to non-communicable diseases, with prevalence estimates for asymptomatic permanent caries and tension-type headache of 2·4 billion and 1...... the age-standardised rate decreased little from 114·87 per 1000 people to 110·31 per 1000 people between 1990 and 2013. Leading causes of YLDs included low back pain and major depressive disorder among the top ten causes of YLDs in every country. YLD rates per person, by major cause groups, indicated...

  7. Records review of musculoskeletal injuries in aeromedical evacuation personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serres, Jennifer L; Fouts, Brittany L; Dukes, Susan F; Maupin, Genny M; Wade, Molly E

    2015-04-01

    Aeromedical evacuation providers care for patients during air transport. By applying standard medical practices, oftentimes developed for ground care, these practitioners perform their mission duties under additional physical stress in this unique medical environment. Awkward postures and excessive forces are common occurrences among personnel operating in this domain. Additionally, anecdotal reports highlight the risk of developing musculoskeletal injuries for these providers. Currently, there is limited research focusing on musculoskeletal injuries in aeromedical evacuation providers. To determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries and associated symptoms in aeromedical evacuation providers to understand the risk and burden of these injuries to military personnel. This study utilized a retrospective review of military medical records containing ICD-9 codes to investigate the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries within flight nurses and medical technicians compared to their non-flying counterparts from 2006 through 2011. Data were analyzed from 2013 through 2014. Although musculoskeletal injuries were identified within the test populations, results showed fewer injuries for aeromedical evacuation populations compared to non-aeromedical evacuation counterparts. One contributing factor may be a potential under-reporting of musculoskeletal injuries resulting from the fear of being placed on limited flying status. As flyers, aeromedical evacuation personnel must undergo yearly medical examinations and complete training courses that emphasize proper lifting techniques and physical requirements necessary for the safe and efficient transport of patients on various platforms. These additional requirements may create a healthy worker effect, likely contributing to lower musculoskeletal injuries. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Lifetime Prevalence and Factors Associated with Head Injury among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries: A 10/66 Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Khan

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a growing public health problem around the world, yet there is little information on the prevalence of head injury in low and middle income countries (LMICs. We utilised data collected by the 10/66 research group to investigate the lifetime prevalence of head injury in defined sites in low and middle income countries, its risk factors and its relationship with disability.We analysed data from one-phase cross-sectional surveys of all residents aged 65 years and older (n = 16430 distributed across twelve sites in eight low and middle income countries (China, Cuba, Dominican Republic, India, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru, and Puerto Rico. Self-reported cases of head injury with loss of consciousness were identified during the interview. A sensitivity analysis including data provided by informants of people with dementia was also used to estimate the impact of this information on the estimates. Prevalence ratios (PR from Poisson regressions were used to identify associated risk factors.The standardised lifetime prevalence of TBI ranged from 0.3% in China to 14.6% in rural Mexico and Venezuela. Being male (PR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.29-1.82, younger (PR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92-0.99, with lower education (PR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86-0.96, and having fewer assets (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88-0.96, was associated with a higher prevalence of TBI when pooling estimates across sites.Our analysis revealed that the prevalence of TBI in LMICs is similar to that of developed nations. Considering the growing impact of TBI on health resources in these countries, there is an urgent need for further research.

  9. Lifetime Prevalence and Factors Associated with Head Injury among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries: A 10/66 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A; Prince, M; Brayne, C; Prina, A M

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing public health problem around the world, yet there is little information on the prevalence of head injury in low and middle income countries (LMICs). We utilised data collected by the 10/66 research group to investigate the lifetime prevalence of head injury in defined sites in low and middle income countries, its risk factors and its relationship with disability. We analysed data from one-phase cross-sectional surveys of all residents aged 65 years and older (n = 16430) distributed across twelve sites in eight low and middle income countries (China, Cuba, Dominican Republic, India, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru, and Puerto Rico). Self-reported cases of head injury with loss of consciousness were identified during the interview. A sensitivity analysis including data provided by informants of people with dementia was also used to estimate the impact of this information on the estimates. Prevalence ratios (PR) from Poisson regressions were used to identify associated risk factors. The standardised lifetime prevalence of TBI ranged from 0.3% in China to 14.6% in rural Mexico and Venezuela. Being male (PR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.29-1.82), younger (PR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92-0.99), with lower education (PR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86-0.96), and having fewer assets (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88-0.96), was associated with a higher prevalence of TBI when pooling estimates across sites. Our analysis revealed that the prevalence of TBI in LMICs is similar to that of developed nations. Considering the growing impact of TBI on health resources in these countries, there is an urgent need for further research.

  10. Military laser weapons: current controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, B; Wong, T Y

    2001-09-01

    Military laser weapons systems are becoming indispensable in most modern armies. These lasers have undergone many stages of development, and have outpaced research on eye protection measures, which continue to have inherent limitations. Eye injuries caused by military lasers are increasingly reported, leading to speculation that these would become an important cause of blinding in modern conflicts. As part of the effort to ban inhumane weapons, international laws have been passed to restrict the proliferation of such blinding weapons. However, there are controversies concerning the interpretation, implementation and effectiveness of these laws. The ophthalmic community can play a greater role in highlighting ocular morbidity from military lasers, and in preventing their further proliferation.

  11. The Prevalence of Needlestick and Sharps Injuries among Health Care Workers in Hamadan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Hashemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Needlestick and sharps injuries (NSSIs is an important occupational risk among health care workers (HCWs; and it is an important cause of transmission of blood-borne pathogens to this population. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of NSSI among HCWs in the teaching hospitals in Hamadan. Materials & Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 700 HCWs between 2009 and 2010. A questionnaire was designed for data collection. Questionnaires were distributed in 5 hospitals to collect self-reported NSSI in the past 12- months. Results: The rate of accidental NSSI was 24.1% for one year prior the study. Totally, 83.6% of the participants had a full vaccination course against hepatitis B. The majority of NSSIs occurred in the 30-34 age group (33.3% and most of them were female. Also, 48.5% of NSSIs were during blood sampling or IV catheter insertion.Conclusion: Developing appropriate educational programs regarding prophylactic tasks, disposal of medical wastes, and using safe needle devices can reduce the risk of NSSIs among HCWs. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4:41-46

  12. Chronic Hypopituitarism Associated with Increased Postconcussive Symptoms Is Prevalent after Blast-Induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Undurti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent injury sustained by US service members deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan is mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI, or concussion, by far most often caused by blast waves from improvised explosive devices or other explosive ordnance. TBI from all causes gives rise to chronic neuroendocrine disorders with an estimated prevalence of 25–50%. The current study expands upon our earlier finding that chronic pituitary gland dysfunction occurs with a similarly high frequency after blast-related concussions. We measured circulating hormone levels and accessed demographic and testing data from two groups of male veterans with hazardous duty experience in Iraq or Afghanistan. Veterans in the mTBI group had experienced one or more blast-related concussion. Members of the deployment control (DC group encountered similar deployment conditions but had no history of blast-related mTBI. 12 of 39 (31% of the mTBI participants and 3 of 20 (15% veterans in the DC group screened positive for one or more neuroendocrine disorders. Positive screens for growth hormone deficiency occurred most often. Analysis of responses on self-report questionnaires revealed main effects of both mTBI and hypopituitarism on postconcussive and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms. Symptoms associated with pituitary dysfunction overlap considerably with those of PTSD. They include cognitive deficiencies, mood and anxiety disorders, sleep problems, diminished quality of life, deleterious changes in metabolism and body composition, and increased cardiovascular mortality. When such symptoms are due to hypopituitarism, they may be alleviated by hormone replacement. These findings suggest consideration of routine post-deployment neuroendocrine screening of service members and veterans who have experienced blast-related mTBI and are reporting postconcussive symptoms.

  13. Prevalence and Reporting of Needle Stick Injuries: A Survey of Surgery Team Members in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatony, Alireza; Abdi, Alireza; Jafari, Faranak; Vafaei, Kamran

    2015-08-19

    Surgeons are one of the groups, most highly exposed to the risk of needle stick injuries at work. The present study aims to determine the prevalence and reporting of needle stick injuries during the first 6 months of 2012, in faculty surgeons affiliated to the Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. In a cross-sectional descriptive-analytical survey, 29 surgeons were studied based on the census method. A reliable and valid questionnaire was used as a research instrument to collect the data. Data was analyzed using SPSS v.16 and based on descriptive and inferential statistics. Among 29 recruited surgeons, 5 (17.2%) had needle stick injuries during the 6 months, only one of whom had followed the established guidelines about reporting and following treatment. The most common instrument causing injury was the suture needle (60%). Significant differences were found in both groups of the injured and non-injured in term of gender (X(2)=5.612, P= 0.003), and number of patients (Z= 2.40, P=0.016) and daily working hours (Z=2.85, P=0.04). In relation to the relatively high prevalence of needle stick injuries among the surgeons and their lack of reporting, it is suggested that the Safety Guidelines in the operating room are carefully observed. Moreover, safer and lower risk surgical Instruments should be used.

  14. Prevalence of key care indicators of pressure injuries, incontinence, malnutrition, and falls among older adults living in nursing homes in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carryer, Jenny; Weststrate, Jan; Yeung, Polly; Rodgers, Vivien; Towers, Andy; Jones, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Pressure injuries, incontinence, malnutrition, and falls are important indicators of the quality of care in healthcare settings, particularly among older people, but there is limited information on their prevalence in New Zealand (NZ). The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of these four problems among older people in nursing home facilities. The cross-sectional study was an analysis of data collected on a single day for the 2016 National Care Indicators Programme-New Zealand (NCIP-NZ). The sample included 276 people ages 65 and older who were residents in 13 nursing home facilities in a geographically diverse area of central NZ. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Prevalence rates in these nursing home settings was pressure injuries 8%; urinary incontinence 57%; fecal incontinence 26%; malnutrition 20%, and falls 13%, of which half resulted in injuries. As people age, complex health issues can lead to increasing care dependency and more debilitating and costly health problems. Measuring the prevalence of basic care problems in NZ healthcare organizations and contributing to a NZ database can enable monitoring of the effectiveness of national and international guidelines. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Military Strategy vs. Military Doctrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The article argues that while doctrine represents the more scientific side of warfare, strategy represents the artistic side. Existing doctrine will almost never meet the requirements for winning the next war; it is through the artistic application of generic peacetime doctrine to the specific st...... strategic and operational context, using doctrine as building blocks for a context specific military strategy, that the military commander outwits and defeats or coerces the adversary and achieves the military objectives....

  16. A systematic review of prognosis after mild traumatic brain injury in the military. Results of the International Collaboration on MTBI Prognosis (ICoMP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Eleanor; Cancelliere, Carol; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    : The evidence was synthesized qualitatively and presented in evidence tables. Results: The findings are based on three studies of US military personnel who were deployed in Iraq or Afghanistan. It was found that military personnel with MTBI report PTSD and post-concussive symptoms. In addition, reporting...... of post-concussive symptoms differed based on the levels of combat stress the individuals experienced. The evidence suggests a slight decline in neurocognitive function post-MTBI, but this decline was in the normal range of brain functioning. Conclusions: This study found limited evidence that combat...... stress, PTSD and post-concussive symptoms affect recovery and prognosis of MTBI in military personnel. Additional high quality research is needed to fully assess the prognosis of MTBI in military personnel....

  17. Preliminary examination of the impact of traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder on self-regulated learning and academic achievement among military service members enrolled in postsecondary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Bryan M; Vroman, Kerryellen

    2014-01-01

    Delineate the effects of self-reported traumatic brain injury (TBI) or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on self-regulated learning and academic achievement for university-enrolled military Service members. Students (N = 192) from 8 regionally diverse universities, representing an estimated 6% of Service members enrolled across schools. Public universities that are members of the Servicemember Opportunity College consortium. Cross-sectional study evaluating the relationships between self-reported TBI, PTSD, and self-regulated learning variables and their contribution to academic achievement. Self-report of military service; symptoms of TBI and PTSD; self-regulation strategies including effort, time/environment regulation, and academic self-efficacy; and grade point average (GPA). There was no effect of self-reported TBI or PTSD on GPA, effort regulation, or time/environment regulation strategies; however, participants with TBI or PTSD reported significantly lower academic self-efficacy. Multiple regression analysis revealed self-efficacy was the strongest predictor of GPA among all participants, followed by military rank. The sample consisted of high achieving students responsive to a university administrator, which raises the possibility of sampling bias. Because of the low recruitment rate for this study and lack of published research on this subject, replicating the results is necessary before drawing generalizable conclusions about the population.

  18. A systematic review of prognosis after mild traumatic brain injury in the military. Results of the International Collaboration on MTBI Prognosis (ICoMP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Eleanor; Cancelliere, Carol; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    of bias were accepted. Two independent reviewers critically appraised eligible studies using a modification of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria. Data extraction: The reviewers independently extracted data from eligible studies and produced evidence tables. Data synthesis...... stress, PTSD and post-concussive symptoms affect recovery and prognosis of MTBI in military personnel. Additional high quality research is needed to fully assess the prognosis of MTBI in military personnel....

  19. Prevalence of Self-Reported Work-Related Injuries and Their Association with Psychological Symptoms in General Working Population of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Pei-Hua; Cheng, Yawen

    2017-06-01

    Objectives This study investigated the prevalence of self-reported work-related injuries across occupational groups and examined their association with the risk of psychological symptoms in general working population of Taiwan. Methods Data from a national survey conducted in 2013 of a representative sample of general working people of Taiwan was analyzed, consisting of 12,528 male and 8396 female workers aged 25~65 years. Information about work-related injuries including work-related disease occurred over the previous 12 months prior to the survey was obtained by a standardized questionnaire. The presence of psychological symptoms was assessed by the Brief Symptom Rating Scale (BSRS). Also obtained were participants' socio-demographic characteristics, working hours, job control, psychological job demands, physical job demands and job insecurity. Results Over a year, 14.91 % of male and 11.53 % of female working people had experienced work-related injuries. Workers with lower educational level, manual workers, the self-employed as well as employers of small enterprise were at higher risks for work-related injuries. Findings from multivariate logistic regression analyses with adjustment of gender, age, working hours and psychosocial work conditions showed that employees with experiences of work-related injuries over the past year were at a substantially higher risk for psychological symptoms (OR = 2.42) as compared to employees who had no experiences of work-related injuries. Conclusion A sizable proportion of workers are affected by work-related injuries and these workers are at higher risk for psychological symptoms. The psychosocial consequences of work-related injuries deserve further investigation and interventions.

  20. Prevalence and socio-demographic correlates for serious injury among adolescents participating in the Djibouti 2007 Global School-based Health Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudatsikira Emmanuel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health and injury are neglected public health issues especially in low-income nations. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates for serious injury in the last 12 months. Findings The study used data of the 2007 Djibouti Global School-based Health Survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to establish associations. Of the 1, 777 respondents, 61.1% (63.2% males and 57.8% females reported having sustained serious injury (SSI. Compared to participants who were not bullied, those who reported being bullied 3-9 days per month were more likely to have sustained serious injury in the last 12 months (AOR = 1.27; 95% CI [1.06, 1.52] for 3-5 days of bullying victimization per month, and AOR = 3.19; 95% CI [2.28, 4.47] for 6-9 days per month. Adolescents who were engaged in physical fighting were 47% (AOR = 1.47, 95% CI [1.40, 1.55] more likely to have sustained serious injury compared to those who were not engaged in the fighting. Meanwhile, adolescents who used substances (cigarettes, other forms of tobacco or drugs were 30% (AOR = 1.30, 95% CI [1.19, 1.42] more likely to have sustained serious injury compared to those who did not use substances. Conclusions Serious injury is common among adolescents in Djibouti, and we suggest that health workers attending to injured adolescents explore the patients' psycho-social environment. Further, we suggest longitudinal studies where reduction of substance use and bullying may be assessed if they have an impact in reducing serious injury among adolescents.

  1. Is a history of work-related low back injury associated with prevalent low back pain and depression in the general population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy J David

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the role of prior occupational low back injury in future episodes of low back pain and disability in the general population. We conducted a study to determine if a lifetime history of work-related low back injury is associated with prevalent severity-graded low back pain, depressive symptoms, or both, in the general population. Methods We used data from the Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey – a population-based cross-sectional survey mailed to a random, stratified sample of 2,184 Saskatchewan adults 20 to 69 years of age in 1995. Information on the main independent variable was gathered by asking respondents whether they had ever injured their low back at work. Our outcomes, the 6-month period prevalence of severity-graded low back pain and depressive symptoms during the past week, were measured with valid and reliable questionnaires. The associations between prior work-related low back injury and our outcomes were estimated through multinomial and binary multivariable logistic regression with adjustment for age, gender, and other important covariates. Results Fifty-five percent of the eligible population participated. Of the 1,086 participants who responded to the question about the main independent variable, 38.0% reported a history of work-related low back injury. A history of work-related low back injury was positively associated with low intensity/low disability low back pain (OR, 3.66; 95%CI, 2.48–5.42, with high intensity/low disability low back pain (OR, 4.03; 95%CI, 2.41–6.76, and with high disability low back pain (OR, 6.76; 95%CI, 3.80–12.01. No association was found between a history of work-related low back injury and depression (OR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.55–1.30. Conclusion Our analysis shows an association between past occupational low back injury and increasing severity of prevalent low back pain, but not depression. These results suggest that past work-related low back injury

  2. [Prevalence and functions of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors in a sample of Spanish adolescents assessed in mental health outpatient departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz de Neira, Mónica; García-Nieto, Rebeca; de León-Martinez, Victoria; Pérez Fominaya, Margarita; Baca-García, Enrique; Carballo, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal and self-injurious behaviors in adolescents are a major public health concern. However, the prevalence of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors in Spanish outpatient adolescents is unknown. A total of 267 adolescents between 11 and 18 year old were recruited from the Child and Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatric Services, Jiménez Díaz Foundation (Madrid, Spain) from November 1st 2011 to October 31st 2012. All participants were administered the Spanish version of the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Inventory, which is a structured interview that assesses the presence, frequency, and characteristics of suicidal ideation, suicide plans, suicide gestures, suicide attempts, and non-suicidal self-injury. One-fifth (20.6%) of adolescents reported having had suicidal ideation at least once during their lifetime. Similarly, 2.2% reported suicide plans, 9.4% reported suicide gesture, 4.5% attempted suicide, and 21.7% reported non-suicidal self-injury, at least once during their lifetime. Of the whole sample, 47.6% of adolescents reported at least one of the studied thoughts or behaviors in their lifetime. Among them, 47.2% reported 2 or more of these thoughts or behaviors. Regarding the reported function of each type of thoughts and behaviors examined, most were performed for emotional regulation purposes, except in the case of suicide gestures (performed for the purposes of social reinforcement). The high prevalence and high comorbidity of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors, together with the known risk of transition among them, underline the need of a systematic and routine assessment of these thoughts and behaviors in adolescents assessed in mental health departments. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Unemployment in the United States after traumatic brain injury for working-age individuals: prevalence and associated factors 2 years postinjury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Jeffrey P; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia; Corrigan, John D; Bell, Jeneita M; Haarbauer-Krupa, Juliet K; Miller, A Cate

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of unemployment and part-time employment in the United States for working-age individuals completing rehabilitation for a primary diagnosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) between 2001 and 2010. Secondary data analysis. Acute inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Patients aged 16 to 60 years at injury who completed inpatient rehabilitation for TBI between 2001 and 2010. Unemployment; Part-time employment. The prevalence of unemployment for persons in the selected cohort was 60.4% at 2-year postinjury. Prevalence of unemployment at 2-year postinjury was significantly associated with the majority of categories of age group, race, gender, marital status, primary inpatient rehabilitation payment source, education, preinjury vocational status, length of stay, and Disability Rating Scale. The direction of association for the majority of these variables complement previous research in this area, with only Hispanic ethnicity and the FIM Cognitive subscale demonstrating disparate findings. For those employed at 2-year postinjury, the prevalence of part-time employment was 35.0%. The model of prevalence for part-time employment at 2-year postinjury was less robust, with significant relationships with some categorical components of age group, gender, marital status, primary payment source, preinjury vocational status, and Disability Rating Scale. The prevalence of unemployment for patients completing inpatient rehabilitation for TBI was substantial (60.4%). The majority of factors found to associate with 2 years' unemployment were complementary of previously published research; however, these were often smaller in magnitude than previous reports. The prevalence of part-time employment was also an issue for this cohort and included 35.0% of all employed individuals. In regard to the determination of factors associated with part-time employment, additional analyses that include more fine-grained factors associated with employment, including physical

  4. Which US States Pose the Greatest Threats to Military Readiness and Public Health? Public Health Policy Implications for a Cross-sectional Investigation of Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Body Mass Index, and Injuries Among US Army Recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Daniel B; Grieve, George L; Clennin, Morgan N; McLain, Alexander C; Whitsel, Laurie P; Beets, Michael W; Hauret, Keith G; Jones, Bruce H; Sarzynski, Mark A

    2018-01-09

    Many states in the southern region of the United States are recognized for higher rates of obesity, physical inactivity, and chronic disease. These states are therefore recognized for their disproportionate public health burden. The purpose of this study was to investigate state-level distributions of cardiorespiratory fitness, body mass index (BMI), and injuries among US Army recruits in order to determine whether or not certain states may also pose disproportionate threats to military readiness and national security. Sex-specific state-level values for injuries and fitness among 165 584 Army recruits were determined. Next, the relationship between median cardiorespiratory fitness and injury incidence at the state level was examined using Spearman correlations. Finally, multivariable Poisson regression models stratified by sex examined state-level associations between fitness and injury incidence, while controlling for BMI, and other covariates. Cardiorespiratory fitness and training-related injury incidence. A cluster of 10 states from the south and southeastern regions (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas) produced male or female recruits who were significantly less fit and/or more likely to become injured than recruits from other US states. Compared with the "most fit states," the incidence of injuries increased by 22% (95% CI, 17-28; P fit states," respectively. The impact of policies, systems, and environments on physical activity behavior, and subsequently fitness and health, has been clearly established. Advocacy efforts aimed at active living policies, systems, and environmental changes to improve population health often fail. However, advocating for active living policies to improve national security may prove more promising, particularly with legislators. Results from this study demonstrate how certain states, previously identified for their disproportionate public health

  5. Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury: a Bayesian random-effects meta-analysis on the cognitive outcomes of concussion among military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Justin E; Areshenkoff, Corson N; Duggan, Emily C; Garcia-Barrera, Mauricio A

    2014-12-01

    Throughout their careers, many soldiers experience repeated blasts exposures from improvised explosive devices, which often involve head injury. Consequentially, blast-related mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) has become prevalent in modern conflicts, often occuring co-morbidly with psychiatric illness (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD]). In turn, a growing body of research has begun to explore the cognitive and psychiatric sequelae of blast-related mTBI. The current meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the chronic effects of blast-related mTBI on cognitive performance. A systematic review identified 9 studies reporting 12 samples meeting eligibility criteria. A Bayesian random-effects meta-analysis was conducted with cognitive construct and PTSD symptoms explored as moderators. The overall posterior mean effect size and Highest Density Interval (HDI) came to d = -0.12 [-0.21, -0.04], with executive function (-0.16 [-0.31, 0.00]), verbal delayed memory (-0.19 [-0.44, 0.06]) and processing speed (-0.11 [-0.26, 0.01]) presenting as the most sensitive cognitive domains to blast-related mTBI. When dividing executive function into diverse sub-constructs (i.e., working memory, inhibition, set-shifting), set-shifting presented the largest effect size (-0.33 [-0.55, -0.05]). PTSD symptoms did not predict cognitive effects sizes, β PTSD  = -0.02 [-0.23, 0.20]. The results indicate a subtle, but chronic cognitive impairment following mTBI, especially in set-shifting, a relevant aspect of executive attention. These findings are consistent with past meta-analyses on multiple mTBI and correspond with past neuroimaging research on the cognitive correlates of white matter damage common in mTBI. However, all studies had cross-sectional designs, which resulted in universally low quality ratings and limited the conclusions inferable from this meta-analysis.

  6. 13 CFR 123.509 - What can't you use Military Reservist EIDL funds for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans § 123.509 What can't you use Military Reservist EIDL funds for? Your small business can not use Military Reservist EIDL funds... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What can't you use Military...

  7. 13 CFR 123.512 - What is the interest rate on a Military Reservist EIDL?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Military Reservist EIDL? 123.512 Section 123.512 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans § 123.512 What is the interest rate on a Military Reservist EIDL? The interest rate on a Military Reservist EIDL will be 4...

  8. Military Vortices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lovell, D

    2003-01-01

    .... This topic area will not be considered further in this paper, but results from current research indicate that military organizations should derive large potential benefits from this technology when it reaches maturity...

  9. The prevalence of crown injuries to frontal teeth at schoolchildren aged 6 to 14 and their effects on the periodontal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascălu, Ionela Teodora; Manolea, Horia Octavian; Coleş, Evantia; Dăguci, Constantin; Bătăiosu, Marilena; Andrei, Cristina Maria; Ţuculină, Mihaela Jana; Diaconu, Oana Andreea; Dăguci, LuminiŢa

    2016-01-01

    The research aims at emphasizing the interrelation between the social impact and the self-esteem of schoolchildren with dental crown fractures in the frontal group. Dental traumatic injuries are frequently met to schoolchildren, therefore, the prevention and interception of traumatic pathology within parents, teachers and children is more than necessary. Our statistical study intends to determine the prevalence of dental trauma to southwestern Romanian schoolchildren aged 6 to 14. The survey included a number of 1684 schoolchildren attending public schools, randomly chosen. Data were collected from October 2012 to December 2013. Clinical examination was conducted to assess the dental traumatic injuries. Age and gender distribution, etiological factors, risk factors and the cause of injuries were the parameters taken into consideration. The data collected was processed and analyzed using the SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) statistical software. The overall prevalence of dental trauma was 4.63% amongst the subjects examined. The maxillary central incisor was the most commonly affected tooth (85.19% in boys and 97.87% in girls). We observed a significant statistical difference in the number of children with one, two or three fractured teeth from the urban and rural areas. The percentage of schoolchildren with crown fractures that we examined was of 3.09% in the urban area and 1.54% in the rural area. The traumatic injuries of the maxillary upper teeth were most prevalent. Since the dental trauma of incisors has a strong impact on the quality of life of children and their families, health preventive policies are needed in order to avoid psychological implications on the lifelong existence of children affected.

  10. Online Reporting of Military Sexual Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ann W; Lee, Wendy J; Carretta, Carrie M

    2016-04-01

    Case finding and treatment of military sexual trauma (MST) remains a serious problem in military and veteran populations as well as in the civilian population. This report provides descriptive examples, with statistics, of persons serving in the military or while living/working on a military base when they experienced unwanted sex. Males, more than females, never disclosed MST before online survey, had more physical injuries as a result and reported chronic disturbing thoughts of the experience. Undisclosed and unreported intrafamilial childhood sexual experiences were cited before an MST by some respondents. Interprofessional collaboration is recommended between military nurse practitioners and behavioral health clinicians as well as innovative strategies using telecommunication and online counseling. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Prevalence and factors associated with percutaneous injuries and splash exposures among health-care workers in a provincial hospital, Kenya, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaisi, Everline Muhonja; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Wanzala, Peter; Omolo, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Accidental occupational exposure of healthcare workers to blood and body fluids after skin injury or mucous membrane contact constitutes a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Such pathogens include Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV). We conducted a study to determine the prevalence and associated factors for percutaneous injuries and splash exposures among health-care workers in Rift Valley provincial hospital. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out from October to November 2010. Self reported incidents, circumstances surrounding occupational exposure and post-exposure management were sought by use of interviewer administered questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate and multiple logistic regression (forward stepwise procedure) analyses were performed. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results Twenty five percent of health-care workers interviewed (N = 305) reported having been exposed to blood and body fluids in the preceding 12 months. Percutaneous injuries were reported by 19% (n = 305) and splash to mucous membrane by 7.2%. Higher rates of percutaneous injuries were observed among nurses (50%), during stitching (30%), and in obstetric and gynecologic department (22%). Health workers aged below 40 years were more likely to experience percutaneous injuries (OR= 3.7; 95% CI = 1.08-9.13) while previous training in infection prevention was protective (OR= 0.52; 95% CI = 0.03-0.90). Forty eight percent (n = 83) reported the incidents with 20% (n = 83) taking PEP against HIV. Conclusion Percutaneous injuries and splashes are common in Rift Valley Provincial hospital. Preventive measures remain inadequate. Health institutions should have policies, institute surveillance for occupational risks and enhance training of health care workers. PMID:23504245

  12. A reversed gender pattern? A meta-analysis of gender differences in the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injurious behaviour among Chinese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A reversed gender pattern has been observed in the suicide rate in China compared to elsewhere. Like suicidal behaviour, non-suicidal self-injurious (NSSI behaviour is a health-risk behaviour. We examined whether a reversed gender pattern existed in the prevalence of NSSI. Methods Online literature databases were searched for English and Chinese articles on NSSI behaviours among the Chinese. A meta-analysis with a random-effects model and a subgroup analysis were used to estimate the odds ratios of gender differences in NSSI prevalence among Chinese adolescents including college students, middle school students, and clinical samples, as well as rural, urban, and Hong Kong middle school students. Results There was a male bias in NSSI prevalence among college students (OR = 1.56, 95% CI = [1.30, 1.87], p  0.1. The NSSI prevalence among middle school students had a female bias in the rural (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = [0.47, 0.72], p  0.1 among middle school students. Conclusions Our analysis indicated the existence of specific gender and age patterns in NSSI prevalence among Chinese adolescents. The sample type, age, and the areas that have different gender norms and culture could partly explain this pattern.

  13. Stress fractures in military training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jofre, M.J.; Sierralta, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    During military training, the incidence of overuse injuries like stress fractures increase. The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of bone scan in a military population with clinical suspected stress fractures or periostitis. Material and methods: A three-year retrospective analysis was made on patients who were clinically diagnosed with stress fractures at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department. Thirty-seven patients were studied (mean age 23. +/- 8 y.o; 31 males), 28 cases of which (76%) had tibial stress syndrome. Other localizations were lumbar spine, femoral, fibular, tarsal or metatarsal. Bone scintigraphy was performed injecting 1036 MBq of Tc99m-MDP i.v. Whole body images and lateral projections of lower extremities were done. Results: Bone scan in tibial syndrome was positive for 23 cases (82%), 65% of them were bilateral and 13% also had femoral injuries. X-rays were done in 10 cases and were all negative. In other localizations, the bone scans were negative, but demonstrated other degenerative lesions. All stress fractures were conservatively treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and suspension of physical activity. Conclusions: Bone scan is a reliable confirmatory tool for tibial stress syndrome diagnosis. In addition, it helps to determine both the severity and extension of the injury as well as support the indication of rest in the military population

  14. A reversed gender pattern? A meta-analysis of gender differences in the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injurious behaviour among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueyan; Feldman, Marcus W

    2017-07-28

    A reversed gender pattern has been observed in the suicide rate in China compared to elsewhere. Like suicidal behaviour, non-suicidal self-injurious (NSSI) behaviour is a health-risk behaviour. We examined whether a reversed gender pattern existed in the prevalence of NSSI. Online literature databases were searched for English and Chinese articles on NSSI behaviours among the Chinese. A meta-analysis with a random-effects model and a subgroup analysis were used to estimate the odds ratios of gender differences in NSSI prevalence among Chinese adolescents including college students, middle school students, and clinical samples, as well as rural, urban, and Hong Kong middle school students. There was a male bias in NSSI prevalence among college students (OR = 1.56, 95% CI = [1.30, 1.87], p gender difference among clinical samples (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = [0.41, 1.89], p > 0.1). The NSSI prevalence among middle school students had a female bias in the rural (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = [0.47, 0.72], p gender difference in NSSI prevalence in the Hong Kong areas being greater than in rural areas. No gender difference in NSSI prevalence was found in urban areas (OR = 1.01, 95% CI = [0.84, 1.22], p > 0.1) among middle school students. Our analysis indicated the existence of specific gender and age patterns in NSSI prevalence among Chinese adolescents. The sample type, age, and the areas that have different gender norms and culture could partly explain this pattern.

  15. Prevalence, Causes and Comparison of Lower Extremities Injuries of Elite Male Athletes in Handball, Football and Basketball

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Nikbakht; Rouhollah Ranjbar; Alireza Amani

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology research, particularly in sport is one of the essential tools to identify injuries and strategies for the prevention of sports injuries can be designed and formulated by specifying them. The present study is practical in terms of objective and it is descriptive-field and retrospective in terms of data collection. The statistical population of this research consists of all male athletes in handball, basketball and football in Khuzestan province. The statistical sample consists of ...

  16. Military radiobiology: A perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.I.; Conklin, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Acute medical consequences affecting military personnel fall into two major classes: early events affecting performance and later more lethal events associated with single and combined injuries. If cells survive the radiation insult, they have the capability for repair. But the patient must survive fluid loss, infection, and bleeding defects until this can occur. Although no one can ever eliminate the incomprehensible destruction of human life associated with the use of nuclear weapons, significant medical advances can be achieved that will increase the performance and recovery of persons exposed to these weapons. Furthermore, these medical advances will go far toward improving the life and functioning of persons undergoing radiotherapy, trauma, accidental exposures, or a variety of other clinical situations. In the near future, the military battlefield will move into another dimension - space. Once outside the geomagnetic shield of the earth, military prsonnel will be exposed to a formidable array of new radiations. Among the new radiations will be high solar energy, solar particles and flares, and heavy nuclei from galactic cosmic arrays. Associated stresses will be microgravity, vibration, and isolation. To protect man in these new environments will truly challenge our ingenuity. This book looks at various medical consequences we face as a result of nuclear energy

  17. Burns and military clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  18. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Correlates of Anxiety at 1 Year After Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Tessa; Fann, Jesse R; Chervoneva, Inna; Juengst, Shannon B; Rosenthal, Joseph A; Krellman, Jason W; Dreer, Laura E; Kroenke, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    To determine at 1 year after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury the (1) rate of clinically significant anxiety; (2) rates of specific symptoms of anxiety; (3) risk factors for anxiety; and (4) associations of anxiety with other 1-year outcomes, including participation and quality of life. Prospective longitudinal observational study. Inpatient rehabilitation centers, with data capture at injury and 1-year follow-up. Persons with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury who were enrolled in the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems database (N=1838). Not applicable. The 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire (9-item screen for depression), FIM, Participation Assessment with Recombined Tools-Objective, and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Clinically significant anxiety was reported by 21% of the participants. Of these, >80% reported interference with daily activities, with the most common symptoms being excessive worry and irritability. A common pattern was comorbid anxiety and depression, with smaller proportions reporting either disorder alone. Anxiety had large effect sizes with respect to life satisfaction and cognitive disability and medium to small effect sizes relative to societal participation and self-care. Middle age, black race, lower socioeconomic status, preinjury mental health treatment, and at least 1 traumatic brain injury prior to the index injury were all risk factors for later anxiety. Anxiety should be screened, fully evaluated, and treated after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. Worry and irritability might be treated with pharmacologic agents or relatively simple behavioral interventions, which should be further researched in this population. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spinal injuries in United States military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan: an epidemiological investigation involving 7877 combat casualties from 2005 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Laughlin, Matthew D; McCriskin, Brendan J; Bader, Julia O; Waterman, Brian R; Belmont, Philip J

    2013-09-15

    Retrospective analysis of a prospective data set. Determine the incidence and epidemiology of combat-related spinal injuries for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Recent studies have identified a marked increase in the rate of combat-related spine trauma among casualties in Afghanistan and Iraq. Limitations in these previous works, however, limit their capacity for generalization. A manual search of casualty records stored in the Department of Defense Trauma Registry was performed for the years 2005 to 2009. Demographic information, nature of spinal wounding, injury mechanism, concomitant injuries, year, and location of injury were recorded for all soldiers identified as having sustained combat-related spine trauma. Incidence rates were constructed by comparing the frequencies of spine casualties against defense manpower deployment data. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to identify statistically significant factors associated with spinal injury. In the years 2005 to 2009, 872 (11.1%) casualties with spine injuries were identified among a total of 7877 combat wounded. The mean age of spine casualties was 26.6 years. Spine fractures were the most common injury morphology, comprising 83% of all spinal wounds. The incidence of combat-related spinal trauma was 4.4 per 10,000, whereas that of spine fractures was 4.0 per 10,000. Spinal cord injuries occurred at a rate of 4.0 per 100,000. Spinal cord injuries were most likely to occur in Afghanistan (incident rate ratio: 1.96; 95% confidence interval: 1.68-2.28), among Army personnel (incident rate ratio: 16.85; 95% confidence interval: 8.39-33.84), and in the year 2007 (incident rate ratio: 1.90; 95% confidence interval: 1.55-2.32). Spinal injuries from gunshot were significantly more likely to occur in Iraq (17%) than in Afghanistan (10%, P = 0.02). The incidence of spine trauma in modern warfare exceeds reported rates from earlier conflicts. The study design and population size may enhance the capacity for

  20. Prevalence of sport injuries during the 53th Regional Games in Franca (SP, Brazil Prevalência de lesões esportivas durante os 53os Jogos Regionais em Franca (SP, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Veiga Quemelo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to perform a survey about the prevalence, type and location of the injuries occurred in athletes of different modalities during the 53th Regional Games held in 2009. A total of 182 injured athletes being treated at the physical therapy clinic were included. Physical Therapy evaluation was performed to determine the anatomic location and type of injury, as well the sport modality. The results showed that mean age, height, weight and BMI were 23 years (±5.9, 1.73 m (±0.11, 71 kg (±14.22 and 24 kg/m² (±4 respectively. Proportionality to the number of athletes, handball athletes presented with higher number of injuries (4.25%, followed by indoor soccer players (3.7%, basketball (2.48%, volleyball (1.72% and soccer (1.63%. The most common type of injury were sprains with 29.7% of cases (n=54 and mostly from soccer players; followed by contracture - 26.9% (n=49, mostly from basketball players; and contusion -25.8% (n=47, mostly from handball and indoor soccer players. The type of injury showed a significant association with the sports modality (p=0.0016. The lower limbs accounted for 71.4% of all injuries including knee (23.1%, ankle (18.1%, thigh (17.0%, leg (10.4% and spine (9.9%. Preventive actions to avoid athletes' injury should be implemented in order to reduce the number of injuries in sports competitions such as in the Regional Games.O objetivo do presente estudo foi investigar a prevalência, tipo e localização anatômica das lesões nos atletas durante os 53os Jogos Regionais de 2009. No total, 182 atletas participaram do estudo. A avaliação fisioterápica incluiu dados como local e tipo de lesão e modalidade esportiva. Os resultados mostraram que a média de idade, altura, peso e IMC foram respectivamente 23 anos (±5,9, 1,73 m (±0,11, 71 kg (±14,22 e 24 kg/m² (±4. Proporcionalmente ao número de atletas, o handball foi a modalidade esportiva que apresentou maior número de lesões (4

  1. Prevalence evaluation of ocular injuries of different kinds as zygomatic fractures consequences in patients referring to department of oral and maxillofacial surgery, Shariati Hospital (Oct 2004-Oct 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Hashemi H.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Zygomatic fractures are common among oral and maxillofacial problems and ocular injuries are of great importance, the prevalence of ocular problems following zygomatic fractures in Iran is not clear so we performed this study to evaluate this problem in patients referring to Shariati Hospital. "nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, we evaluated the patients who referred to department of oral and maxillofacial surgery of Shariati hospital for ocular complains following zygomatic fractures. The evaluation was performed both clinically and historically. "nResults: 115 patients were examined (87 males and 28 females with the mean age of 26 for males and 32 for females. The prevalence of ocular injuries were as follows: subconjunctival ecchymosis: 23.07% for males and 21.05% for females. Displacement of palpebral fissure: 26.5% for males and 27.6% for females. Unequal papillary levels: 18.37% for males and 15.78% for females. Diplopia: 8.9% for males and 10.5% for females. Enophthalmos: 23.1% for males and 25% for females. "nConclusion: It is strongly recommended to refer patients with zygomatic fracture for an ophthalmologic consultation.

  2. The impact of deployment and traumatic brain injury on the health and behavior of children of US military service members and veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickell, Tracey A; French, Louis M; Lippa, Sara M; Lange, Rael T

    2017-11-01

    This study examined the impact of service member/veteran (SMV) combat deployment and traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the health and behavior of his or her children. Participants were 104 female spouse caregivers of US SMVs who had sustained a mild, severe, or penetrating TBI. Participants completed the Children's Health and Behavior Questionnaire (CHBQ; r = .758 to .881) that evaluates school grades, behavior, medical health, emotional health, and social participation: (a) prior to the first combat deployment, (b) in the month prior to the TBI, (c) within 2 years after the TBI, and (d) 2 or more years after the TBI. A substantial number of children experienced a decline in health and behavior following the TBI (41.7%-79.1%). Of those who declined (a) 68.8%-75.5% declined within the first 2 years post-injury, followed by improvement or stabilization; (b) 6.7%-15.6% declined only after 2 or more years post-injury; (c) 15.6%-25.0% declined within the first 2 years post-injury and then again 2 or more years post-injury; and (d) 16.9%-26.5% experienced a decline as a result of deployment, followed by an additional decline after the SMV's TBI. Services are required for children of SMVs following TBI and deployment, particularly children at risk for poor outcome.

  3. Prevalência de transtornos mentais comuns em jovens brasileiros recém-incorporados ao Serviço Militar Obrigatório e fatores associados Prevalence of common mental disorders in recently-drafted young Brazilians to mandatory military service and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Cristina Xavier Martins

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A saúde mental de militares das Forças Armadas é uma área de investigação ainda pouco explorada no Brasil. O presente estudo teve por objetivo estimar a prevalência de transtornos mentais comuns (TMC e identificar os fatores a estes associados em jovens brasileiros recém-incorporados ao serviço militar obrigatório: os recrutas. A população de estudo foi composta de 78 jovens adultos do sexo masculino. A ocorrência de TMC (variável dependente foi avaliada por meio do General Health Questionnaire, versão 12 itens (GHQ-12. Para estimar as associações entre TMC e as variáveis independentes foram utilizados o teste χ²(Qui-quadradoe a regressão logística. Os resultados mostraram uma prevalência de TMC de 43,6% (IC 95% 33,14 - 54,64. As razões de prevalência de TMC mostraram-se entre 4 e 5 vezes maiores entre os que apresentavam distúrbios do sono, sendo que estes se mostraram como único fator associado a TMC. Estes resultados parecem indicar que as situações vivenciadas pelos recrutas em seu ambiente de trabalho podem estar associadas com TMC de forma causal. Outros estudos, com desenho longitudinal, são necessários para que tal efeito seja confirmado.The mental health of the military enlisted in the Armed Forces is an as yet area little explored of research in Brazil. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMD and associated factors among recently-drafted young Brazilians to mandatory military service: the recruits. A total of 78 young adults participated in the study. The incidence of CMD (dependent variable were evaluated by the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12. The tests ?² (chi-squared and logistic regression were used to estimate the associations between CMD and independent variables. The results showed a prevalence of CMD de 43.6% (CI 95% 33.14 to 54.64. The CMD prevalence ratios were from 4 to 5 times higher among those who reported sleep disturbances, which was

  4. Comparison of DSM-5 and proposed ICD-11 criteria for PTSD with DSM-IV and ICD-10: changes in PTSD prevalence in military personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Annika; Köhler, Kai; Ehring, Thomas; Knaevelsrud, Christine; Kober, Louisa; Krüger-Gottschalk, Antje; Schäfer, Ingo; Schellong, Julia; Wesemann, Ulrich; Rau, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Recently, changes have been introduced to the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Objectives:This study investigated the effect of the diagnostic changes made from DSM-IV to DSM-5 and from ICD-10 to the proposed ICD-11. The concordance of provisional PTSD prevalence between the diagnostic criteria was examined in a convenience sample of 100 members of the German Armed Forces. Method: Based on questionnaire measurements, provisional PTSD prevalence was assessed according to DSM-IV, DSM-5, ICD-10, and proposed ICD-11 criteria. Consistency of the diagnostic status across the diagnostic systems was statistically evaluated. Results: Provisional PTSD prevalence was the same for DSM-IV and DSM-5 (both 56%) and comparable under DSM-5 versus ICD-11 proposal (48%). Agreement between DSM-IV and DSM-5, and between DSM-5 and the proposed ICD-11, was high (both p DSM-5, and proposed ICD-11. This supports the assumption of a set of PTSD core symptoms as suggested in the ICD-11 proposal, when at the same time a satisfactory concordance between ICD-11 proposal and DSM was given. The finding of increased provisional PTSD prevalence under ICD-11 proposal in contrast to ICD-10 can be of guidance for future epidemiological research on PTSD prevalence, especially concerning further investigations on the impact, appropriateness, and usefulness of the time criterion included in ICD-10 versus the consequences of its deletion as proposed for ICD-11. PMID:29163862

  5. Comparison of DSM-5 and proposed ICD-11 criteria for PTSD with DSM-IV and ICD-10: changes in PTSD prevalence in military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Annika; Köhler, Kai; Ehring, Thomas; Knaevelsrud, Christine; Kober, Louisa; Krüger-Gottschalk, Antje; Schäfer, Ingo; Schellong, Julia; Wesemann, Ulrich; Rau, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recently, changes have been introduced to the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Objectives: This study investigated the effect of the diagnostic changes made from DSM-IV to DSM-5 and from ICD-10 to the proposed ICD-11. The concordance of provisional PTSD prevalence between the diagnostic criteria was examined in a convenience sample of 100 members of the German Armed Forces. Method: Based on questionnaire measurements, provisional PTSD prevalence was assessed according to DSM-IV, DSM-5, ICD-10, and proposed ICD-11 criteria. Consistency of the diagnostic status across the diagnostic systems was statistically evaluated. Results: Provisional PTSD prevalence was the same for DSM-IV and DSM-5 (both 56%) and comparable under DSM-5 versus ICD-11 proposal (48%). Agreement between DSM-IV and DSM-5, and between DSM-5 and the proposed ICD-11, was high (both p  DSM-IV, DSM-5, and proposed ICD-11. This supports the assumption of a set of PTSD core symptoms as suggested in the ICD-11 proposal, when at the same time a satisfactory concordance between ICD-11 proposal and DSM was given. The finding of increased provisional PTSD prevalence under ICD-11 proposal in contrast to ICD-10 can be of guidance for future epidemiological research on PTSD prevalence, especially concerning further investigations on the impact, appropriateness, and usefulness of the time criterion included in ICD-10 versus the consequences of its deletion as proposed for ICD-11.

  6. Risks for Vascular Injury During Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Prevalence of a Medial Loop of Vertebral Artery and Internal Carotid Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakao, Norimitsu; Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Nishimura, Manabu; Riew, K Daniel; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Imagama, Shiro; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Murotani, Kenta; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2016-02-01

    Observational study using a retrospective single-institute database. To investigate the prevalence of a medial loop (ML) of the vertebral artery (VA) and internal carotid artery (ICA), which might be an anatomical risk factor for arterial injury in anterior cervical surgeries. Anterior cervical spine surgeries are generally considered to be safe and effective. VA injury is one of the most serious complications during anterior procedures. Several articles have reported this complication, which might be because of the anomalous course of VA at V2 segment. The prevalence and anatomical features of those high-risk cases were, however, not investigated. Consecutive Japanese subjects, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) or computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for reasons other than evaluation of cervical artery disease from November 2011 to October 2012 in our institution, were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included poor images, past surgery, and endovascular intervention of cervical spine and its vessels. The definition of ML was set as the course of VA and ICA extended medially inside the uncovertebral joint. We also investigated whether those anomalous courses were detectable by plain CT. A total of 1251 subjects with age ranging from 14 to 93 years with a mean of 56.1 years were surveyed. Among them, 1054 subjects were eligible and the others were excluded. A total of 421 subjects were male, and 633 were female. There were 10 cases (1%) with an ML of the VA, and 2 (0.2%) cases with a medial loop of internal carotid artery. Five of the 10 cases with a medial loop of vertebral artery were aberrant into the vertebral body, which were detectable by plain CT. Importantly, the other five cases could not be seen on the CT. One percent of all subjects showed higher anatomical risk for VA and ICA injury during anterior surgery, half of which were undetectable by plain CT. Preoperative evaluation for vascular anatomy may be necessary for safer surgical

  7. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990–2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Theo; Allen, Christine; Arora, Megha; Barber, R.M.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Brown, Alexandria; Carter, Austin; Casey, Daniel C.; Charlson, Fiona J.; Chen, Alan Z.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2016-01-01


    Background

    Non-fatal outcomes of disease and injury increasingly detract from the ability of the world's population to live in full health, a trend largely attributable to an epidemiological transition in many countries from causes affecting children, to non-communicable diseases

  8. Military Periodicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    Frances Roedy Global Defense Roport (Q) Defense Research International, Inc. 1905 Kalorama Rd., #3 Washington, D.C. 20009 Telephone: (202) 232-8426...Benning, Georgia 31905 Telephone: (404) 544-4951 AUTOVON 784-4951 Editor: CPT Michael D. Bollinger $10.00 -"- r r •~ "• • • • Military Chaplains...Joffre 75700 Paris, France Telephone: 555-92-30 Editor-in-Chief: Contre-Amiral 0. Sevaistre Fr. 75 Europaische Wehrkunde (M) (Formerly

  9. Prevalence of the middle mesial canal in non surgical root canal treated mandibular first and second molars in a local military population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    dental denture. Implants are highly successful but a patient may still succumb to implant failure. Fixed partial denture preparations can cause an...Army Post Graduate Dental School Douglas D. Lancaster, COL, DC 3 August 2016 Prevalence of the middle mesial canal in non-surgical root canal...Methods: 7000 dental records were reviewed for non-surgical root canals performed from October 1970 to October 2015. The data collected included

  10. The Prevalence of Accidental Needle Stick Injury and their Reporting among Healthcare Workers in Orthopaedic Wards in General Hospital Melaka, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accidental needle-stick injuries (NSIs are a hazard for health-care workers and general public health. Orthopaedic surgeons may be more prone to NSIs due to the prevalence of bone spikes in the operative field and the use of sharp orthopaedic instruments such as drills, saws and wires. A hospital-based cross sectional study was conducted in the orthopedic wards of Melaka General Hospital. The prevalence of NSIs was 32 (20.9% and majority of it occurred during assisting in operation theatre 13(37.4%. Among them six (18.8% were specialist, 12(37.5% medical officer, 10 (31.2% house officer and four staff nurses (12.5%. Among the respondents 142 (92.8% had been immunized against Hepatitis B and 148 (96.7% participants had knowledge regarding universal precaution. The incidence of NSI among health care workers at orthopaedics ward was not any higher in comparison with the similar studies and it was found out that the prevalence was more in junior doctors compared with specialist and staff nurses and it was statistically significant.

  11. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990-2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas Clement

    2016-01-01

    incidence and prevalence by age, sex, cause, year, and geography with a wide range of updated and standardised analytical procedures. Improvements from GBD 2013 included the addition of new data sources, updates to literature reviews for 85 causes, and the identification and inclusion of additional studies...... published up to November, 2015, to expand the database used for estimation of non-fatal outcomes to 60 900 unique data sources. Prevalence and incidence by cause and sequelae were determined with DisMod-MR 2.1, an improved version of the DisMod-MR Bayesian meta-regression tool first developed for GBD 2010......, educational attainment, and fertility (the Socio-demographic Index [SDI]) and used it to compare observed patterns of health loss to the expected pattern for countries or locations with similar SDI scores. FINDINGS: We generated 9·3 billion estimates from the various combinations of prevalence, incidence...

  12. Period prevalence, risk factors and consequent injuries of falling among the Saudi elderly living in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almegbel, Faisal Yousef; Alotaibi, Ibrahim Muthyib; Alhusain, Faisal Ahmed; Masuadi, Emad M; Al Sulami, Salma Lafyan; Aloushan, Amairah Fahad; Almuqbil, Bashayer Ibrahim

    2018-01-10

    Approximately 28% to 35% of people aged 65 and over fall each year. The consequent injuries of falls are considered a major public health problem. Falls account for more than half of injury-related hospitalisations among old people. The aim of this study was to measure a 1-year period prevalence of falling among old people in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In addition, this study described the most common risk factors and consequent injuries of falls. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in Riyadh, using a convenient sampling. The targeted population were Saudi citizens who were 60 years or above. Over a 6-month period, 1182 individuals were sampled (545 men and 637 women). The 1-year prevalence of falling among old Saudis (>=60 years) was 49.9%. Our results show that 74% of the participants who experienced falls had postfall injuries. Old participants who were uneducated and those with middle school certification were associated with falls (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.72; 95% CI 1.15 to 2.56, aOR 1.81; 95% CI 1.15 to 2.85, respectively). Those who live in rented houses had a higher risk of falls. Interestingly, having a caregiver was significantly associated with more falls (aOR 1.39; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.79). However, not using any medications was significantly related to fewer falls. In addition, old individuals using walking aids were more likely to fall than those who did not. Participants who mentioned 'not having stressors were associated with less frequent falls (aOR 0.62; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.97). Cerebrovascular accidents were strongly associated with falls with an estimated OR of 2.75 (95% CI 1.18 to 6.43). Moreover, osteoporosis, poor vision and back pain were found to be predictors for falls among the elderly. 49.9% of elderly Saudis had experienced one or more falls during a 12-month period. Several preventable risk factors could be addressed by routine geriatric assessment. Research on the impact of these risk factors is needed. © Article author(s) (or their

  13. Traumatic Dental Injuries Prevalence and their Impact on Self-esteem among Adolescents in India: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Nikita; Singh, Simarpreet; Mathur, Anmol; Makkar, Diljot Kaur; Aggarwal, Vikram Pal; Sharma, Anshika; Kaur, Puneet

    2017-08-01

    Adolescents are mostly injured during sport activities, traffic accidents and some forms of violence which may lead to traumatic injuries. Traumatic injuries not only pose a health risk worldwide but are also regarded among serious social problems. Poor oral health has been related to poor social relationships that affect the ability to learn and grow which may lead to reduced self-esteem. This study was conducted to compare self-esteem of adolescents with and without anterior Traumatic Dental Injury (TDI). A population based comparative study was conducted among 10 to 17 years old adolescents from November 2014 to January 2016. The study sample comprised of 424 controls and 212 cases with 2:1 control-to-case ratio that were selected by four examiners along with a gold standard examiner. TDI was recorded using Ellis classification and self-esteem was recorded using Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). For comparing self-esteem of cases and controls according to RSES questions, t-test is used. Odds ratio (OR) was utilized to assess and compare the self-esteem according to high and low esteem in cases and controls. Ellis Class I, Ellis Class II and Ellis Class III fractures were observed in 53.3%, 33.49% and 13.20% of cases, respectively. The maxillary arch was the most affected (72.48%) and on the hierarchy of causes, this study found that on most occasions dental injuries were caused by sports (40.09%). The total mean score of RSES in cases (23.16) and in controls (24.43) was also statistically significant (pself-esteem of adolescents in a positive direction and help them in becoming socially competent adults.

  14. Potential North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) for Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury: A Consortium of Military, Veterans Administration, and Civilian Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    A hrs. A min. A AM A PM A PO NG PO* - Oral NG** - Nasogastric tube ...Appendices 11 4 W81XWJ-07-1-0361 Annual Report June 12, 2008 INTRODUCTION: In order to conduct clinical trials that are capable of indicating ...One-year STASCIS results indicating that patients who receive decompression surgery ឈh post-injury show improved neurological recovery and fewer

  15. Non-suicidal self-injury in Mexican young adults: Prevalence, associations with suicidal behavior and psychiatric disorders, and DSM-5 proposed diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjet, Corina; González-Herrera, Irene; Castro-Silva, Everardo; Méndez, Enrique; Borges, Guilherme; Casanova, Leticia; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena

    2017-06-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) may lead to scarring, infection, accidental death and psychological distress. Little is known about NSSI in the general population of young adults in developing countries like Mexico. The current study examined the prevalence of any NSSI and each type of NSSI, the prevalence of meeting DSM-5 proposed criteria, and finally the association of NSSI with socio-demographic variables, suicidal behavior and psychiatric disorders. This study was conducted in a community sample of 1071 young adults between 19 and 26 years of age residents of Mexico City. The lifetime prevalence of NSSI was 18.56% with females having 87% greater odds. The 12-month prevalence was 3.19%. Only 0.22% of the total sample and 6.96% of those that self-injured in the past 12 months met full criteria proposed by DSM-5, in part due to the lack of reported impairment; 39.99% of those that self-injured reported impairment. Suicidal behavior commonly co-occurred with NSSI. All lifetime anxiety, mood, disruptive behavior and substance use disorders were associated with greater risk for lifetime NSSI whereas only 12-month depression and substance use disorder was associated with greater risk of 12-month NSSI. The cross-sectional nature of the study precludes conclusions of causality and directionality and the study excluded institutionalized and homeless young adults. NSSI is a concerning problem in young adults from Mexico City due to the important associations with all types of psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior. Because many who self-injure do not perceive impairment, they are unlikely to seek treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Methodological issues associated with collecting sensitive information over the telephone--experience from an Australian non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anne W; Martin, Graham; Dal Grande, Eleonora; Swannell, Sarah; Fullerton, Simon; Hazell, Philip; Harrison, James E

    2011-02-17

    Collecting population data on sensitive issues such as non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is problematic. Case note audits or hospital/clinic based presentations only record severe cases and do not distinguish between suicidal and non-suicidal intent. Community surveys have largely been limited to school and university students, resulting in little much needed population-based data on NSSI. Collecting these data via a large scale population survey presents challenges to survey methodologists. This paper addresses the methodological issues associated with collecting this type of data via CATI. An Australia-wide population survey was funded by the Australian Government to determine prevalence estimates of NSSI and associations, predictors, relationships to suicide attempts and suicide ideation, and outcomes. Computer assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) on a random sample of the Australian population aged 10+ years of age from randomly selected households, was undertaken. Overall, from 31,216 eligible households, 12,006 interviews were undertaken (response rate 38.5%). The 4-week prevalence of NSSI was 1.1% (95% ci 0.9-1.3%) and lifetime prevalence was 8.1% (95% ci 7.6-8.6).Methodological concerns and challenges in regard to collection of these data included extensive interviewer training and post interview counselling. Ethical considerations, especially with children as young as 10 years of age being asked sensitive questions, were addressed prior to data collection. The solution required a large amount of information to be sent to each selected household prior to the telephone interview which contributed to a lower than expected response rate. Non-coverage error caused by the population of interest being highly mobile, homeless or institutionalised was also a suspected issue in this low prevalence condition. In many circumstances the numbers missing from the sampling frame are small enough to not cause worry, especially when compared with the population as a whole

  17. Methodological issues associated with collecting sensitive information over the telephone - experience from an Australian non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI prevalence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fullerton Simon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collecting population data on sensitive issues such as non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI is problematic. Case note audits or hospital/clinic based presentations only record severe cases and do not distinguish between suicidal and non-suicidal intent. Community surveys have largely been limited to school and university students, resulting in little much needed population-based data on NSSI. Collecting these data via a large scale population survey presents challenges to survey methodologists. This paper addresses the methodological issues associated with collecting this type of data via CATI. Methods An Australia-wide population survey was funded by the Australian Government to determine prevalence estimates of NSSI and associations, predictors, relationships to suicide attempts and suicide ideation, and outcomes. Computer assisted telephone interviewing (CATI on a random sample of the Australian population aged 10+ years of age from randomly selected households, was undertaken. Results Overall, from 31,216 eligible households, 12,006 interviews were undertaken (response rate 38.5%. The 4-week prevalence of NSSI was 1.1% (95% ci 0.9-1.3% and lifetime prevalence was 8.1% (95% ci 7.6-8.6. Methodological concerns and challenges in regard to collection of these data included extensive interviewer training and post interview counselling. Ethical considerations, especially with children as young as 10 years of age being asked sensitive questions, were addressed prior to data collection. The solution required a large amount of information to be sent to each selected household prior to the telephone interview which contributed to a lower than expected response rate. Non-coverage error caused by the population of interest being highly mobile, homeless or institutionalised was also a suspected issue in this low prevalence condition. In many circumstances the numbers missing from the sampling frame are small enough to not cause worry

  18. 13 CFR 123.508 - How can you use Military Reservist EIDL funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How can you use Military Reservist EIDL funds? 123.508 Section 123.508 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans § 123.508 How can you use Military...

  19. 13 CFR 123.506 - How much can you borrow under the Military Reservist EIDL Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Military Reservist EIDL Program? 123.506 Section 123.506 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans § 123.506 How much can you borrow under the Military Reservist EIDL Program? You can borrow an amount equal to the substantial...

  20. The DSM-5 nonsuicidal self-injury disorder among incoming college students: Prevalence and associations with 12-month mental disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekens, Glenn; Hasking, Penelope; Claes, Laurence; Mortier, Philippe; Auerbach, Randy P; Boyes, Mark; Cuijpers, Pim; Demyttenaere, Koen; Green, Jennifer G; Kessler, Ronald C; Nock, Matthew K; Bruffaerts, Ronny

    2018-04-26

    Approximately one in five college students report a history of nonsuicidal self-injury. However, it is unclear how many students meet criteria for the recently proposed DSM-5 nonsuicidal self-injury disorder (NSSI-D). In this study, we used full NSSI-D criteria to identify those students most in need of clinical care. Using data from the Leuven College Surveys (n = 4,565), we examined the 12-month prevalence of DSM-5 NSSI-D in a large and representative sample of incoming college students. We also explored the optimal frequency threshold as a function of interference in functioning due to NSSI, and examined comorbidity patterns with other 12-month mental disorders (i.e., major depressive disorder, broad mania, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and alcohol dependence) and suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STB). Twelve-month NSSI-D prevalence was 0.8% and more common among females (1.1%) than males (0.4%). The proposed 5+ diagnostic threshold was confirmed as yielding highest discrimination between threshold and subthreshold cases in terms of distress or disability due to NSSI. A dose-response relationship was observed for NSSI recency-severity (i.e., 12-month NSSI-D, subthreshold 12-month NSSI-D, past NSSI, no history of NSSI) with number of 12-month mental disorders and STB. NSSI-D occurred without comorbid disorders for one in five individuals, and remained associated with severe role impairment when controlling for the number of comorbid disorders. These findings offer preliminary evidence that DSM-5 NSSI-D is uncommon among incoming college students, but may help to improve the deployment of targeted resource allocation to those most in need of services. More work examining the validity of NSSI-D is required. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Prevalence and determinants of work related injuries among small and medium scale industry workers in Bahir Dar Town, north west Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Getnet Abebe; Salgedo, Waju Beyene; Lemu, Yohannes Kebede

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and determinants of work-related injuries among small and medium scale industrial workers in Bahir Dar town, northwest Ethiopia. Cross sectional comparative study design was used. Purposive sampling method was used to choose the specific Kebele 14 of the study area, for its relatively high number of industries. The study units were stratified into small and medium scale industries. All workers who were available at the time of interview were included in the study. A pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect data. Data was analyzed using SPSS for windows 16.0. A total of 328 and 655 workers from small and medium-scale industries respectively participated in the study. Seven hundred sixty nine (78.2%) were males. Three hundred thirty six workers (34.2%) reported that they had experienced work-related injuries. Sex, monthly salary, age, work experience and use of personal protective equipment were found to be different in the small and medium industries (P industries need to focus on training and installing safer work environment and Further studies with large-scale coverage and prospective study designs are warranted.

  2. Prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury and distinct groups of self-injurers in a community sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somer, Oya; Bildik, Tezan; Kabukçu-Başay, Bürge; Güngör, Duygu; Başay, Ömer; Farmer, Richard F

    2015-07-01

    Adolescence is an important developmental period for the first onset of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), a behavior known to be associated with elevated suicide risk. Little is currently known, however, about NSSI among adolescents. The primary objectives of this research were to establish the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a representative sample of Turkish high school students and to identify and describe distinct subgroups of self-injurers. A total of 1656 of 1676 eligible students (98.8 % participation rate) from 18 schools were surveyed during the 2010-2011 academic year. Questionnaires were administered that assessed prior engagement in a variety of self-injurious behaviors, current psychiatric symptoms, suicide-related risk factors, and participation in health-risk behaviors. Latent class analysis (LCA) methods were used to identify distinct groups of self-injurers. Almost one-third of the sample (N = 519) endorsed some previous engagement in NSSI behaviors. In LCA analyses restricted to youth with prior histories of NSSI, four distinct classes were identified characterized by: (1) low rates of NSSI behaviors (29 %); (2) high rates of self-battery (32 %); (3) high rates of self-cutting (19 %); and (4) high rates of multiple NSSI behaviors (19 %). These classes were further distinguished by current psychiatric symptoms, suicide risk factors, and other health-risk behaviors. Findings from the present study indicate that NSSI is a common form of behavior among adolescent youth. There is, however, considerable heterogeneity among those with NSSI histories, with about 40 % at particularly high risk for ongoing distress, future acts of intentional self-harm, and suicidal behavior.

  3. Prevalence of acute kidney injury in intensive care units: the "COrte de prevalencia de disFunción RenAl y DEpuración en críticos" point-prevalence multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Gutiérrez, Manuel E; Seller-Pérez, Gemma; Sánchez-Izquierdo-Riera, José A; Maynar-Moliner, Javier

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to measure the point prevalence of kidney dysfunction (KD) in the intensive care setting. A point-prevalence, single-day, prospective study was conducted. Of 919 patients present in 42 Intensive care units (ICUs) for 2 specific days (September 2009 and March 2010), 832 cases were included. Mild KD was defined as a measured creatinine clearance of 90 to 60 mL min(-1) 1.73 m(-2), and severe KD was defined as a creatinine clearance less than 60 mL min(-1) 1.73 m(-2). Prevalence of mild KD was 15.9/100 patients/d (13.5-18.5), and severe KD was 42.4/100 patients/d (39.1-45.8). We considered as having a low probability of experiencing KD those patients without chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury network stage 0, and a serum creatinine less than 1.2 mg/dL, but among them (557 patients), 18.1% (15.2%-21.6%) had mild KD and 24.2% (20.9%-28%) had severe KD. ICU mortality was 10.6% (7.81%-14.4%) for patients without dysfunction, 16.6% (11.2%-24%) for patients with mild KD, and 29.7% (25.2%-34.7%; Ppatients with severe KD, with a relative risk for severe KD vs no KD of 2.54 (1.90-3.40). In 54.3% patients, at least 1 renal insult was reported. One nephrotoxic drug was administered to 34.4% and 2 or more to 14.9% patients, with a lower frequency among those with chronic kidney disease (30.6% vs 50.8%; Ppatients admitted to the ICU showed some derangement in kidney function. More than 25% of patients not fulfilling the KD criteria by serum creatinine or acute kidney injury network showed, in fact, a severe KD, and this finding was associated with higher mortality. More than 50% of the patients admitted to the ICU were subjected to at least 1 renal insult. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Terror attacks increases the risk of vascular injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitan eHeldenberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Extensive literature exists about military trauma as opposed to the very limited literature regarding terror-related civilian trauma. However, terror-related vascular trauma (VT, as a unique type of injury, is yet to be addressed.Methods: A retrospective analysis of the Israeli National Trauma Registry was performed. All patients in the registry from 09/2000 to 12/2005 were included. The subgroup of patients with documented vascular trauma (VT (N=1,545 was analyzedand further subdivided into those suffering from Terror-related Vascular Trauma (TVT and Non-Terror related Vascular Trauma (NTVT. Both groups were analyzed according to mechanism of trauma, type and severity of injury and treatment.Results: Out of 2,446 terror related trauma admissions 243 sustained TVT (9.9% compared to 1302 VT patients from Non Terror trauma (1.1%. TVT injuries tend to be more complex and most patients were operated on. ICU admissions and hospitallength of stay was higher in the TVT group. Penetrating trauma was the prominent cause of injury among the TVT group. TVT group had a higher proportion of patients with severe injuries (ISS>16 and mortality. Thorax injuries were more frequent in the TVT group. Extremity injuries were the most prevalent vascular injuries in both groups; however NTVT group had more upper extremity injuries, while the TVT group had significantly more lower extremity injuries.Conclusion: Vascular injuries are remarkably more common among terror attack victims than among non-terror trauma victims and the injuries of terror casualties tend to be more complex. The presence of a vascular surgeon will ensure a comprehensive clinical care.

  5. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, T.; Barber, R.M.; Bell, B.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities

  6. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990-2013 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Theo; Barber, Ryan M.; Bell, Brad; Bertozzi-Villa, Amelia; Biryukov, Stan; Bolliger, Ian; Charlson, Fiona; Davis, Adrian; Degenhardt, Louisa; Dicker, Daniel; Duan, Leilei; Erskine, Holly; Feigin, Valery L.; Ferrari, Alize J.; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Fleming, Thomas; Graetz, Nicholas; Guinovart, Caterina; Haagsma, Juanita; Hansen, Gillian M.; Hanson, Sarah Wulf; Heuton, Kyle R.; Higashi, Hideki; Kassebaum, Nicholas; Kyu, Hmwe; Laurie, Evan; Liang, Xiofeng; Lofgren, Katherine; Lozano, Rafael; MacIntyre, Michael F.; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Naghavi, Mohsen; Nguyen, Grant; Odell, Shaun; Ortblad, Katrina; Roberts, David Allen; Roth, Gregory A.; Sandar, Logan; Serina, Peter T.; Stanaway, Jeffrey D.; Steiner, Caitlyn; Thomas, Bernadette; Vollset, Stein Emil; Whiteford, Harvey; Wolock, Timothy M.; Ye, Pengpeng; Zhou, Maigeng; Avila, Marco A.; Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Hoek, Hans W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities

  7. Non-suicidal self-injury in patients with eating disorders: prevalence, forms, functions, and body image correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Sandra; Marco, Jos H; Cañabate, Montse

    2018-04-12

    More than one third of patients with eating disorders report NSSI. Moreover, negative attitudes and feelings toward the body, body dissatisfaction, and body image disturbances have been linked to NSSI in community and clinical samples. However, there is a lack of studies exploring NSSI frequency and functions and the specific relationship between multidimensional body image dimensions and NSSI in eating disorder patients. First, we explored the frequency, types, and functions of NSSI in a sample of 226 Spanish female participants with eating disorders (ED). Second, we explored differences in NSSI and body image depending on the ED restrictive-purgative subtype; and third, we explored differences in body dissatisfaction, body image orientation, and body investment in eating disorder patients without NSSI (n = 144), with NSSI in their lifetime (n = 19), and (b) with NSSI in the previous year (n = 63). Of the overall sample, 37.1% (n = 89) had a history of self-injury during their lifetime, and 27.1% (n = 65) had self-injured in the previous year. Among the types of ongoing NSSI, the most frequent were banging (64.6%) and cutting (56.9%). Restrictive vs purgative patients differed on NSSI lifetime, Appearance Evaluation, Body Areas Satisfaction, Body Protection and Feelings and Attitudes toward the Body. Moreover, significant differences were found on Appearance Evaluation, Body Areas Satisfaction, Positive Feelings and Attitudes towards the Body, Body Protection, and Comfort with physical contact, between participants without a history of self-injury and both NSSI groups. Body dissatisfaction and body investment have been found to be variables related to NSSI. Thus, the present study highlights the importance of working on body image in ED patients to reduce the frequency of NSSI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence, risk factors, clinical course, and outcome of acute kidney injury in Chinese intensive care units: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ying; Jiang, Li; Xu, Yuan; Qian, Chuan-yun; Li, Shu-sheng; Qin, Tie-he; Chen, Er-zhen; Lin, Jian-dong; Ai, Yu-hang; Wu, Da-wei; Wang, Yu-shan; Sun, Ren-hua; Hu, Zhen-jie; Cao, Xiang-yuan; Zhou, Fa-chun; He, Zhen-yang; Zhou, Li-hua; An, You-zhong; Kang, Yan; Ma, Xiao-chun; Yu, Xiang-you; Zhao, Ming-yan; Xi, Xiu-ming; DU, Bin

    2013-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) has been recognized as a major healthcare problem affecting millions of patients worldwide. However, epidemiologic data concerning AKI in China are still lacking. The objectives of this study were to characterize AKI defined by RIFLE criteria, assess the association with hospital mortality, and evaluate the impact of AKI in the context of other risk factors. This prospective multicenter observational study enrolled 3,063 consecutive patients from 1 July 2009 to 31 August 2009 in 22 ICUs across mainland China. We excluded patients who were admitted for less than 24 hours (n = 1623), younger than 18 years (n = 127), receiving chronic hemodialysis (n = 29), receiving renal transplantation (n = 1) and unknown reasons (n = 28). There were 1255 patients in the final analysis. AKI was diagnosed and classified according to RIFLE criteria. There were 396 patients (31.6%) who had AKI, with RIFLE maximum class R, I, and F in 126 (10.0%), 91 (7.3%), and 179 (14.3%) patients, respectively. Renal function deteriorated in 206 patients (16.4%). In comparison with non AKI patients, patients in the risk class on ICU admission were more likely to progress to the injury class (odds ratio (OR) 3.564, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.706 - 7.443, P = 0.001], while patients in the risk class (OR 5.215, 95% CI 2.798-9.719, P patients in Chinese ICUs. In comparison with non-AKI patients, patients with RIFLE class R or class I on ICU admission were more susceptibility to progression to class I or class F. The RIFLE criteria were robust and correlated well with clinical deterioration and mortality.

  9. The prevalence of traumatic dental injuries to permanent anterior teeth and its relation with predisposing risk factors among 8-13 years school children of Vadodara city: An epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M C Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: dental trauma is an irreversible pathology that after occurrence is characterized by life-long debilitating effects. The objectives of this study were to measure the prevalence of anterior teeth fracture and their association with predisposing factors such as lip coverage, molar relationship, overjet, and variables such as age, sex, cause, and place of trauma. Materials and Methods: an epidemiological cross-sectional study was carried out among 3708 school children aged 8-13 years in the Vadodara city. All children completed a questionnaire related to history of trauma to their anterior teeth after which they were examined for lip competence, Angle′s molar relationship amount of overjet and nature of trauma sustained. The results were statistically analyzed using the prevalence test, Chi-square test, and Mantel-Haenszel Common Odds Ratio. Results: the prevalence of traumatic injuries was 8.79% and the ratio of boys: girl′s was 1.28:1. Inadequate lip coverage group sustained about five times more injuries than the adequate lip coverage group (P = 0.000, OR= 5.407. The maximum traumatic injuries were seen in children having Angle Class II Div 1 molar relationship and/or overjet greater than 5.5 mm and was statistically significant (P<0.05. Maximum number of injuries occurred at 9 years of age. The most predominant injuries were enamel fractures, the most common place for occurrence was home and fall against object, the most frequent cause. Conclusion: the prevalence of dental injuries in the Vadodara city is high and it has a great potential to be considered as an emerging public health problem.

  10. Prevalence of traumatic brain injury and epilepsy among prisoners in France: Results of the Fleury TBI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, E; Watier, L; Fix, M; Weiss, J J; Chevignard, M; Pradat-Diehl, P

    2016-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of TBI and epilepsy in a French prison population and to study variables known to be associated with TBI. The second aim was to compare prisoners with and without a history of TBI. All offenders (females, males and juveniles) admitted consecutively to Fleury-Mérogis prison over a period of 3 months were included in the study. During the admission procedure, offenders were interviewed by healthcare staff using a self-reported questionnaire. In all, 1221 prisoners were included. The rates of TBI and epilepsy were high, with a prevalence of 30.6% and 5.9%, respectively. Psychiatric care, anxiolytic and antidepressant treatment, use of alcohol and cannabis were all significantly higher among offenders with a history of TBI. Moreover, the number of times in custody and the total time spent in jail over the preceding 5 years were significantly higher among offenders with a history of TBI. These results provide further evidence that specific measures need to be developed such as, first of all, screening for TBI upon arrival in prison.

  11. What is the prevalence of senior-athlete rotator cuff injuries and are they associated with pain and dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Patrick J; Prasad, Amitesh; Francis, Kimberly A

    2014-08-01

    Older individuals with rotator cuff injuries may have difficulties not only with activities of daily living, but also with sports activities. (1) How frequent and severe are rotator cuff abnormalities, as identified by ultrasound, in senior athletes? (2) To what degree does the severity of ultrasound-identified rotator cuff pathology correlate with pain and shoulder dysfunction? We assessed pain and shoulder function in 141 elite athletes older than 60 years of age (median age, 70 years; range 60-84) at the Senior Olympics who volunteered to participate. An ultrasound evaluation of the rotator cuff of the dominant shoulder was performed by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist in all of these elite athletes. We then determined the relationship between ultrasound findings and shoulder pain and shoulder function as assessed with the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. There were 20 shoulders with a normal cuff (14.2% [20 of 141], of which 5% [one of 20] were painful), 23 with tendinosis (16.3% [23 of 141], of which 30% [six of 20] were painful), 68 with a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear (48.2% [68 of 141], of which 32% [20 of 63] were painful), and 30 with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (21.3% [30 of 141], of which 25% [seven of 28] were painful). Only 5% of athletes (one of 20) with a normal cuff on ultrasound evaluation reported shoulder pain, whereas 30% of athletes (33 of 111) with any degree of rotator cuff damage on ultrasound evaluation reported shoulder pain, This resulted in an odds ratio of 8.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-62.5). The proportion of patients who had pain was not different in those with different severities of rotator cuff pathology. Neither the ASES nor the DASH was different in those with different severities. The frequency of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in senior athletes was 21.3% (30 of 141). Pain was a predictor of rotator cuff injury but not of its

  12. The Prevalence of Traumatic Brain Injury Among People With Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugo, Gregory J; Krassenbaum, Sarah; Donley, Sachiko; Corrigan, John D; Bogner, Jennifer; Drake, Robert E

    To estimate the rate and severity of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among people with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders and to compare demographic, diagnostic, and institutionalization differences between those who screen positive or negative. Outpatient community mental health center in Washington, District of Columbia. A total of 295 people with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders enrolled in a prospective study of integrated treatment of substance abuse. Cross-sectional baseline assessment. The Ohio State University TBI Identification Method. Standardized measures assessed psychiatric diagnoses, symptom severity, current and lifetime substance use, and history of institutionalization. Eighty percent screened positive for TBI, and 25% reported at least 1 moderate or severe TBI. TBI was associated with current alcohol use and psychiatric symptom severity and with lifetime institutionalization and homelessness. It was more common among participants with posttraumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Men (vs women) and participants with psychotic disorders (vs those with mood disorders) had an earlier age of first TBI with loss of consciousness. TBI is common among people with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. Repeated and serious TBIs are common in this population. Failure to detect TBI in people with co-occurring disorders who are seeking integrated treatment could lead to misdiagnosis and inappropriately targeted treatment and rehabilitation.

  13. Military service and crime: new evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, David L; Oh, Sehun; Salas-Wright, Christopher P; Vaughn, Michael G; King, Erika

    2017-05-01

    Evidence indicates that a substantial proportion of military personnel are involved in high-risk and antisocial behaviors that place them at jeopardy for criminal justice system involvement. However, prior research on military service and crime has disproportionately focused on veterans from the Vietnam War era (1955-1975), and has tended to focus on either current or former military members. This study employed data from a population-based study (i.e., National Study on Drug Use and Health [NSDUH] between 2002 and 2014). It systematically examines the prevalence of self-reported antisocial behaviors, criminal justice system involvement, and substance abuse among the US civilian population and military service members, including reservists (n = 2206) and those who reported having been separated or retired from military service (n = 20,551). These factors are further examined across the developmental spectrum of adulthood (ages 18-34, 35-49, and 50-64). Results showed that military members were more prone to lifetime arrests and overall substance misuse. However, additional findings emerged suggesting that, while the military population overall seems to be positively associated with higher criminal activity than that found in the civilian population, these findings were based on a specific subgroup of the veteran population. This subgroup is comprised of individuals who likely did not fit in with the military culture and were discharged from the military early in their careers. Additional research on identifying this subgroup of military members is encouraged to better concentrate on prevention and treatment measures.

  14. Assessing the Impact of Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms on the Resting-State Default Mode Network in a Military Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Dominic E; Bellgowan, Julie A Frost; French, Louis M; Wolf, Jonathan; Oakes, Terrence R; Mielke, Jeannine; Sham, Elyssa B; Liu, Wei; Riedy, Gerard

    2017-05-01

    The relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and chronic symptoms of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is difficult to discern and poorly understood. An accurate differential diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of mTBI and PTSD are challenging due to significant symptom overlap and the absence of clearly established biomarkers. The objective of this work is to examine how post-traumatic stress influences task-free default mode network in chronic mTBI subjects. Control subjects (N = 44) were compared with chronic mTBI subjects with low (N = 58, PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version [PCL-C] total network of brain regions involved with emotional regulation and memory coding, rather than a fear-related response. Taken together, the results suggest these regions form a network that could be a target for future research pertaining to PTSD and chronic mTBI. Furthermore, the use of clinical measures, task-based imaging studies, or multimodal imaging could help further elucidate specific neural correlates of PTSS and mTBI.

  15. Prevalence and handedness correlates of traumatic injuries to the permanent incisors in 13-17-year-old adolescents in Erzurum, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canakci, Varol; Akgül, H Murat; Akgül, Nilgün; Canakci, Cenk Fatih

    2003-10-01

    The objectives of the present study were to explore the relationship between dental trauma and handedness, and to assess the prevalence of traumatic injuries to the permanent incisors of 13-17-year-old patients, seeking treatment for various dental conditions in Erzurum, Turkey. A questionnaire focusing on handedness was administered to these patients. Handedness was assessed by the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory (Oldfield, 1971). Hand preference was divided into two classes for convenience in data analysis: (i) right-handers (GSc from 80 to 100); and (ii) left-handers (GSc from -80 to -100). This study included the 13-17-year-old group patients who had GSc as described above. Thus, the present study was carried out on 2180 (1252 male and 928 female, with a mean age of 14.9 years) out of 2392 patients. The clinical examinations and radiographic assessments were performed in full-designed dental chairs. Preliminary analysis showed no differences in rates of handedness with respect to sex and age. Overall, 10.4% of the patients were left-handers. A total of 292 (13.4%) of 2180 patients examined had one or more traumatized permanent incisors. The proportion of dental trauma was significantly higher in males than in females, 17.41% in males as compared to 7.97% in females; and ratio of the affected males to females was about 2.18. Sex difference in the prevalence of traumatized permanent incisors was statistically significant (P fight as the second most frequent cause of trauma (24%), followed by sports injury (18.8%). Trauma resulting from collisions and traffic accidents were accounted as 13.7 and 11.3% of all cases, respectively. The other causes were 4.5%. In conclusion, the present study suggests that left-handed adolescents have more frequent permanent incisor tooth trauma than right-handed adolescents. Left-handedness, therefore, appears to be a risk factor for trauma in 13-17-year-old adolescents.

  16. Virtual reality paced serial assessment test for neuropsychological assessment of a military cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Thomas D; Courtney, Christopher; Rizzo, Albert A; Armstrong, Christina; Edwards, Joseph; Reger, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The assessment and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a difficult challenge for the DoD medical health system. Clinical neuropsychologists are being asked to make statements regarding a soldier's functional skills, ability to return to active duty, and competence in tasks of community living. Given the increasing prevalence of blast injuries to the head, and the fact that many brain injuries may have no external marker of injury, there is need for researching innovative assessment methods in detecting blast-related brain injury. To address these issues, two virtual reality-based Paced Auditory/Visual Serial Addition Tests (PA/VSAT) were developed that involve the participant being immersed in a Virtual Middle Eastern City as serial addition stimuli are presented. This study is an initial validation of the VRPASAT and VRPVSAT as assessments of neurocognitive functioning. When compared to the paper-and-pencil version of the test, as well as the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics, the VRPASAT and VRPVSAT appear to have enhanced capacity for providing an indication of a participant's performance while immersed in a military relevant simulation.

  17. Review of military and civilian trauma registries : Does consensus matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Thijs T C F; de Graaf, Johan; Huizinga, Eelco P; Champion, Howard R; Hoencamp, Rigo; Leenen, Luke P H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Structural collection of data from combat injuries is important to improve provided care and the outcome of (combat) casualties. Trauma registries are used in civilian and military health care systems for systematic administration of injury data. However, these registries often use

  18. The prevalence of symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among soldiers with amputation of a limb or spinal injury: a report from a rehabilitation centre in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyasinghe, N L; de Zoysa, P; Bandara, K M K C; Bartholameuz, N A; Bandara, J M U J

    2012-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder has been identified as one of the most commonly occurring mental illnesses in combatants. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among soldiers who had undergone amputation of a lower or an upper limb or sustained a spinal cord injury in the battlefield, and to compare the prevalence among these categories. The research presented seeks to increase the awareness of this condition among those treating war casualties so that appropriate treatment choices could be made to address them. The study was carried out in 2009 at a rehabilitation centre for combatants of war. Data were collected from 96 male army veterans between the ages of 18-49 years using a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the Impact of Event Scale and the PTSD symptom scale. Soldiers with injuries sustained at least four weeks prior to the study were selected by a convenience sampling technique. Soldiers with multiple injuries, head injuries or those diagnosed with psychiatric disorders were excluded. The results revealed that 41.7% of the study population was compatible with the diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Within the three groups, 42.5% of the lower limb amputees, 33.3% of the upper limb amputees and 45.7% of the participants with spinal cord injury had symptoms compatible with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. There was no difference between the prevalence among the different injury categories considered. This study highlights the need to pay more attention in providing psychological care as a part of the overall health management of injured combatants. Early preparation of soldiers for stressors of war and screening for and proper management of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder will improve the overall outcome of rehabilitation.

  19. Prevalência de hipertensão arterial em militares jovens e fatores associados Prevalencia de hipertensión arterial en militares jóvenes y factores asociados Prevalence of arterial hypertension in young military personnel and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Wenzel

    2009-10-01

    hipertensión fueron: > 140mmHg para presión sistólica y > 90mmHg para presión diastólica. Las variables estudiadas incluyeron factores de riesgo y de protección para hipertensión, como características de comportamiento y nutricionales. Para análisis de las asociaciones, se utilizó regresión linear generalizada múltiple, con familia binomial y ligación logarítmica, obteniéndose tasas de prevalencia con intervalo de 90% de confianza y selección jerarquizada de las variables. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia de hipertensión arterial fue de 22% (IC 90%: 21;29. En el modelo final de la regresión múltiple se verificó prevalencia de hipertensión 68% mayor entre los exfumadores con relación a los no fumadores (IC 90%: 1,13;2,50. Entre los individuos con sobrepeso (índice de masa corporal - IMC de 25 a 29 Kg/m2 y con obesidad (IMC>29kg/m2 las prevalencias fueron, respectivamente, 75% (IC 90%: 1,23;2,50 y 178% (IC 90%: 1,82;4,25 mayores que entre los eutróficos. Entre los que practicaban actividad física regular, comparado a los que no practicaban, la prevalencia fue 52% menor (IC 90%: 0,30;0,90. CONCLUSIONES: Ser exfumador y tener sobrepeso u obesidad fueron situaciones de riesgo para hipertensión, mientras que la práctica regular de actividad física fue factor de protección en militares jóvenes.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of arterial hypertension among young military personnel and associated factors. METHODS: Cross-sectional study carried out with a sample of 380 male military personnel aged 19 to 35 years of a Brazilian Air Force unit in the city of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2000 and 2001. The cut-off points for hypertension were: > 140mmHg for systolic pressure and > 90mmHg for diastolic pressure. The studied variables included risk and protective factors for hypertension, such as behavioral and nutritional characteristics. For association analysis, generalized linear model multiple regression was used, with binomial family and

  20. A survey of the prevalence of stereotypy, self-injury and aggression in children and young adults with Cri du Chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, M S Ross; Cornish, K

    2002-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and frequency of stereotypy, self-injurious behaviour (SIB), and aggression in children and adults with Cri du Chat syndrome (CCS), and to investigate the relationship between SIB, aggressive behaviour and stereotypy in these individuals. Sixty-six families of children and adults diagnosed with CCS completed the Behaviour Problems Inventory. Additional information relating to gender, chronological age, type of school/post-school occupation and medication was also included in the survey. Stereotyped behaviour was reported for 82% of subjects, more than half the sample displaying it on a daily basis. The occurrence percentage of 15 topographies of SIB suggested that head banging, hitting the head against body parts, self-biting and rumination are the most frequently occurring behaviours in CCS. Aggressive behaviour was reported for 88%, with a statistically significant negative correlation between age and the number of aggressive behaviours reported. The present findings suggest that specific types of stereotypy and SIB are observed frequently in CCS.

  1. [Unintentional injuries in childhood and adolescence: current prevalence, determinants, and trends: results of the KiGGS study: first follow-up (KiGGS Wave 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saß, Anke-Christine; Poethko-Müller, C; Rommel, A

    2014-07-01

    In Germany and worldwide, unintentional injuries (UI) are a major health threat for children and adolescents. The first follow-up of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS Wave 1, 2009-2012) continued the national UI monitoring that started with the KiGGS baseline study (2003-2006). The present analysis provides updated information and for the first time gives indications on time trends. KiGGS Wave 1 is a combined nationwide cross-sectional and longitudinal survey by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) providing information about 12,368 participating children and adolescents (0-17 years old; response rates: 38.8% first time invited, 72.9% reinvited). Parents were asked about their children's UI and poisonings via telephone interviews. Information on UI is available for 11,665 children and adolescents (1-17 years old). The 12-month prevalence rate and 95% confidence interval were calculated, and KiGGS Wave 1 was compared with the KiGGS baseline study. The Rao-Scott chi-square test corrected over the F distribution was used to test for the statistical significance of subgroup differences and trend effects. Within the previous 12 months, 15.5% of all children and adolescents aged 1-17 years were medically treated for UI. UI were significantly more prevalent among boys (17.0%) than among girls (14.0%), and 3.4% of the subjects had more than one accident leading to UI. One in eight children and adolescents who suffered UI stayed in hospital (12.3%) for inpatient treatment for at least one night. The home, childcare and educational institutions, and sports facilities/playgrounds were the predominant accident locations. Compared to the baseline study, neither the overall prevalence of UI nor the gender- and age-specific patterns changed significantly. Since a large proportion of UI is avoidable, knowledge of high-risk subgroups and accident locations is of particular use for prevention. KiGGS Wave 1 makes an important

  2. China's Military Potential

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wortzel, Larry

    1998-01-01

    The People's Republic of China (PRC) is seen by many as an economic powerhouse with the world's largest standing military that has the potential to translate economic power into the military sphere...

  3. Price of military uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical results about optimum strategy of use of military uranium confirmed by systems approach accounts are received. The numerical value of the system approach price of the highly enriched military uranium also is given

  4. Military Psychology for Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, Adelaide

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available African Military Psychology community. Twenty-two years into democracy, this book Military psychology for Africa brings ‘wholeness’ for African soldiers, their families, psychological scientists, university scholars and practitioners. The scope...

  5. 13 CFR 123.510 - What if you don't use your Military Reservist EIDL funds as authorized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Military Reservist EIDL funds as authorized? 123.510 Section 123.510 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans § 123.510 What if you don't use your Military Reservist EIDL funds as authorized? If your small business does not...

  6. Bone stress injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, M.J.; Pihlajamaeki, H.K.; Ahovuo, J.A. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-05-01

    Bone stress injuries are due to cyclical overuse of the bone. They are relatively common in athletes and military recruits but also among otherwise healthy people who have recently started new or intensive physical activity. Diagnosis of bone stress injuries is based on the patient's history of increased physical activity and on imaging findings. The general symptom of a bone stress injury is stress-related pain. Bone stress injuries are difficult to diagnose based only on a clinical examination because the clinical symptoms may vary depending on the phase of the pathophysiological spectrum in the bone stress injury. Imaging studies are needed to ensure an early and exact diagnosis, because if the diagnosis is not delayed most bone stress injuries heal well without complications.

  7. Economic opportunities from military remediation sites in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The number of base closures occurring nationwide has created an urgent need to develop new and innovative technologies for cleaning up toxic contamination. Traditional methods for characterizing and remediating contamination at military installations, and elsewhere, have not resulted in timely, efficient and cost-effective cleanups. Past industrial and waste management practices conducted at California bases have resulted in contamination of the soil and ground water by a variety of chemical contaminants. Cleaning solvents and fuel wastes are the most prevalent contamination found at military installations. However, other less common types of contamination may also be present in significant quantities at specific bases. Environmental contamination resulting from leaking underground fuel tanks is also prevalent at California military installations. Common fuels present at military bases include gasoline diesel, bunker fuel, and JP-4 and JP-5 jet fuels. The California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) is actively involved in efforts to encourage the development of new environmental technologies, especially at closing military installations

  8. Musculoskeletal Health and Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    involving the lateral ankle . • Ankle sprains represent 21 to 53% and 17 to 29% of all basketball and soccer injuries respectively. • Ankle sprains...Musculoskeletal Health and Injury Prevention Francis G. O’Connor, MD, MPH Patricia A. Deuster, PhD, MPH Department of Military and Emergency...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Musculoskeletal Health and Injury Prevention 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  9. National Military Family Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Take Action Volunteer Mark Your Calendar Donate Twitter Facebook Instagram Donate Appreciating Military Families: Meet the Wilsons This ... MilitaryFamily.org © 2017 - National Military Family Association Twitter Facebook Pinterest Instagram Charity Navigator Four Star Charity GuideStar Exchange Better ...

  10. Experiences of military CRNAs with service personnel who are emerging from general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John Tyler; Pokorny, Marie E

    2012-08-01

    We conducted this qualitative study to understand the experiences of military Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) working with service personnel who have traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and are emerging from general anesthesia. This study is important because there are no studies in the literature that describe the experiences of anesthetists working with patients with these specific problems. The leading questions were: "Out of all the anesthesia cases both abroad and stateside (post 9/11/2001), have you noticed service members wake from general anesthesia (not utilizing total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA), in a state of delirium? If so, can you tell me your experiences and thought processes as to why it was occurring?" Five themes emerged: (1) Emergence delirium (ED) exists and to a much higher degree in the military than in the general population. (2) ED was much more prevalent in the younger military population. (3) TIVA was a superior anesthetic for patients thought to have TBI and/or PTSD. (4) Talking to all patients suspected of having TBI and/or PTSD before surgery and on emergence was vital for a smooth emergence. (5) There is something profound happening in regard to ketamine and PTSD and TBI.

  11. Effectiveness of computerized oculomotor vision screening in a military population: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capó-Aponte, José E; Tarbett, Aaron K; Urosevich, Thomas G; Temme, Leonard A; Sanghera, Navjit K; Kalich, Melvyn E

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of oculomotor dysfunctions associated with blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in warfighters has increased as a consequence of recent conflicts. This study evaluated the effectiveness of computerized oculomotor vision screening (COVS) in a military population. Oculomotor functions were assessed with COVS and by conventional methods in 20 U.S. military personnel with and 20 without mTBI. The validity of COVS was determined by Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman method or the kappa coefficient. The repeatability of the COVS was assessed with the coefficient of repeatability or the kappa coefficient. The results showed that COVS had high sensitivity and specificity for screening near oculomotor functions. Overall, the COVS showed excellent validity and repeatability for assessing near lateral and vertical phorias, Worth 4 Dot, and fixation, as well as pursuit and saccadic eye movements. Despite the strong Pearson correlation, the Bland-Altman analysis identified minor to moderate discrepancies for both positive and negative fusional vergence and their associated recovery as well as for the monocular accommodative facility measurements. This study demonstrated that non-eye-care professionals may be able to use the COVS as a tool to efficiently screen oculomotor functions in a military population with or without mTBI.

  12. Young Australians’ Attitudes to the Military and Military Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Wadham

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available What are young Australians’ understandings of, and attitudes to, the military and military service? This article describes a pilot study of 320 young Australian university students’ attitudes to the military and military service during a time when Australia was engaged in the Afghanistan war. The main purpose of this study was to develop a survey instrument for further work in researching civil–military relations in Australia. Civil–military relations describe the complex set of relationships between the civil and military spheres. The role of the military, the relationship between the state and the military, the division of labor between civilian and military entities, foreign policy, and knowledge of military service are some of the fields that constitute a study of civil–military relations. This article reports on beliefs about, and attitudes to the specificities of military service and responses to the broader field of civil–military relations.

  13. Penetrating eye injury in war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, J W; Valdez, J; Hemady, R K; Steidl, S M; Bourke, D L

    1999-11-01

    The percentage of penetrating eye injuries in war has increased significantly in this century compared with the total number of combat injuries. With the increasing use of fragmentation weapons and possibly laser weapons on the battle-field in the future, the rate of eye injuries may exceed the 13% of the total military injuries found in Operations Desert Storm/Shield. During the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988), eye injuries revealed that retained foreign bodies and posterior segment injuries have an improved prognosis in future military ophthalmic surgery as a result of modern diagnostic and treatment modalities. Compared with the increasing penetrating eye injuries on the battlefield, advances in ophthalmic surgery are insignificant. Eye armor, such as visors that flip up and down and protect the eyes from laser injury, needs to be developed. Similar eye protection is being developed in civilian sportswear. Penetrating eye injury in the civilian sector is becoming much closer to the military model and is now comparable for several reasons.

  14. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-22

    Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with some important refinements. Results for incidence of acute disorders and prevalence of chronic disorders are new additions to the analysis. Key improvements include expansion to the cause and sequelae list, updated systematic reviews, use of detailed injury codes, improvements to the Bayesian meta-regression method (DisMod-MR), and use of severity splits for various causes. An index of data representativeness, showing data availability, was calculated for each cause and impairment during three periods globally and at the country level for 2013. In total, 35 620 distinct sources of data were used and documented to calculated estimates for 301 diseases and injuries and 2337 sequelae. The comorbidity simulation provides estimates for the number of sequelae, concurrently, by individuals by country, year, age, and sex. Disability weights were updated with the addition of new population-based survey data from four countries. Disease and injury were highly prevalent; only a small fraction of individuals had no sequelae. Comorbidity rose substantially with age and in absolute terms from 1990 to 2013. Incidence of acute sequelae were predominantly infectious diseases and short-term injuries, with over 2 billion cases of upper respiratory infections and diarrhoeal disease episodes in 2013, with the notable exception of tooth pain due to permanent caries with more than 200 million incident cases in 2013. Conversely, leading chronic sequelae were largely attributable to non-communicable diseases, with

  15. Prevalence, risk factors and disability associated with fall-related injury in older adults in low- and middle-incomecountries: results from the WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart Williams, Jennifer; Kowal, Paul; Hestekin, Heather; O'Driscoll, Tristan; Peltzer, Karl; Yawson, Alfred; Biritwum, Richard; Maximova, Tamara; Salinas Rodríguez, Aarón; Manrique Espinoza, Betty; Wu, Fan; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam; Chatterji, Somnath

    2015-06-23

    In 2010 falls were responsible for approximately 80 % of disability stemming from unintentional injuries excluding traffic accidents in adults 50 years and over. Falls are becoming a major public health problem in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where populations are ageing rapidly. Nationally representative standardized data collected from adults aged 50 years and over participating in the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation and South Africa are analysed. The aims are to identify the prevalence of, and risk factors for, past-year fall-related injury and to assess associations between fall-related injury and disability. Regression methods are used to identify risk factors and association between fall-related injury and disability. Disability was measured using the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule Version 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0). The prevalence of past-year fall-related injuries ranged from 6.6 % in India to 1.0 % in South Africa and was 4.0 % across the pooled countries. The proportion of all past-year injuries that were fall-related ranged from 73.3 % in the Russian Federation to 44.4 % in Ghana. Across the six countries this was 65.7 %. In the multivariable logistic regression, the odds of past-year fall-related injury were significantly higher for: women (OR: 1.27; 95 % CI: 0.99,1.62); respondents who lived in rural areas (OR: 1.36; 95 % CI: 1.06,1.75); those with depression (OR: 1.43; 95 % CI: 1.01,2.02); respondents who reported severe or extreme problems sleeping (OR: 1.54; 95 % CI: 1.15,2.08); and those who reported two or more (compared with no) chronic conditions (OR: 2.15; 95 % CI: 1.45,3.19). Poor cognition was also a significant risk factor for fall-related injury. The association between fall-related injury and the WHODAS measure of disability was highly significant (Prisk factors for falls in older adults in this group of LMICs. Clinicians and

  16. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ducheine, P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, complementing our knowledge and understanding of the kinetic prevalence. Paradoxically, non-kinetic targeting is not recognized as a separate concept: kinetic and non-kinetic are intertwined facets of targeting. Kinetic tar...

  17. Is High-Intensity Functional Training (HIFT)/CrossFit Safe for Military Fitness Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Walker S C; Haddock, Christopher K; Heinrich, Katie M; Jahnke, Sara A; Jitnarin, Nattinee; Batchelor, David B

    2016-07-01

    High-intensity functional training (HIFT) is a promising fitness paradigm that gained popularity among military populations. Rather than biasing workouts toward maximizing fitness domains such as aerobic endurance, HIFT workouts are designed to promote general physical preparedness. HIFT programs have proliferated as a result of concerns about the relevance of traditional physical training (PT), which historically focused on aerobic condition via running. Other concerns about traditional PT include: (1) the relevance of service fitness tests given current combat demands, (2) the perception that military PT is geared toward passing service fitness tests, and (3) that training for combat requires more than just aerobic endurance. Despite its' popularity in the military, concerns have been raised about HIFT's injury potential, leading to some approaches being labeled as "extreme conditioning programs" by several military and civilian experts. Given HIFT programs' popularity in the military and concerns about injury, a review of data on HIFT injury potential is needed to inform military policy. The purpose of this review is to: (1) provide an overview of scientific methods used to appropriately compare injury rates among fitness activities and (2) evaluate scientific data regarding HIFT injury risk compared to traditional military PT and other accepted fitness activities. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. Living in Tension: Secularism and Christianity in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    homosexual persons to serve in the military. This project seeks to analyze the growing tension that is created by the move to increased...person to be promoted to higher levels of responsibility and leadership within the military structure. All Soldiers have equal opportunity to serve and...practice any or no religion without fear of coercion, discrimination , or injury, is one of the great hallmarks of American society and government. One

  19. [Application and research of acupuncture in military].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Li, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Hong-Yun; Li, Wei-Hong; Zhou, Shuang; Zhou, Qing-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture has remarkable effects of pain relieving and functional restoration on injuries of soft tissue and joint due to military training. As more and more attention has been attached to the impact of psychological states and biorhythm disorder on the fighting ability of military staff, acupuncture has found its place in treating chronic fatigue, combat stress reaction, traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder as well as regulating circadian rhythms. The therapeutic effect of acupuncture in military training-related physical damage and psychological trauma has already been proved by numerous clinical practices and researches. It is held that using acupuncture as an alternative could not only save medical resources, but also enhance the fighting ability of the army. However, the current clinical studies is facing the problem of limited sample size. Therefore, randomized controlled trials in large scale and multiple centers should be further carried out toward military staff, so as to provide more speaking evidences to the prevention and treatment of physical and psychological diseases.

  20. International Military Education and Multinational Military Cooperation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moskos, Charles

    2004-01-01

    .... This report is based on interviews with international officers (IOs) at American war, command and staff colleges in each of the services who participate in International Military and Education and Training (IMET...

  1. Early Acute Kidney Injury in Military Casualties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    assuming a glomerular filtration rate of 75 mL/min per 1.73 m2.25 The lower value of this estimated creatinine or the admission creatinine was used as...baseline, and a baseline creatinine was derived from either a back-calculated value (assuming a glomerular filtration rate of 75 mL/min) or the admission...creatinine values in the modification of diet in renal disease study equation for estimating glomerular filtration rate. Ann Intern Med. 2006;145:247Y254. 26

  2. Neck Injury in Advanced Military Aircraft Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    and computerized tonsegraphic radiography (CT), then dissected. Table 2 provideq the maximum moment axial force and shear force applied to the...rontti a 60 1 des accidents rorporeils. Ia fr~q~ionce do leemiens dii ciii tntfu 5imbe rang (10,2 %) sprhs lea members inf~riours 134 X), le thorax 031...mesure: - isongle maximum de flexion ds Is Ci~te par rapport as thorax - l’acciliratioe anguasire ds Ia Cite I- 15itease augulaire de It Ctke -le IlIC

  3. About Military Sexual Trauma

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  4. Vedr.: Military capacity building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Josefine Kühnel; Struwe, Lars Bangert

    2013-01-01

    Military capacity building has increasingly become an integral part of Danish defence. Military capacity is a new way of thinking Danish defence and poses a new set of challenges and opportunities for the Danish military and the Political leadership. On the 12th of december, PhD. Candidate Josefine...... Kühnel Larsen and researcher Lars Bangert Struwe of CMS had organized a seminar in collaboration with Royal Danish Defense Colleg and the East African Security Governance Network. The seminar focused on some of the risks involved in Military capacity building and how these risks are dealt with from...

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  6. The Military's Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Vedby

    militaries and explore what kind of strategies can overcome this gap between input and output. Instead of focusing on military strategy, Mikkel Vedby Rasmussen seeks to draw on the ideas of business strategy to assess alternative business cases - reforming military HR to combat instability in the 'Global......If the military were a business, would you buy shares? Over recent years, Western armed forces, particularly the US, have been costing more yet achieving less. At the same time, austerity measures are reducing defence budgets. This book uses defence data to examine the workings of modern Western...

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  10. The Military's Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Vedby

    If the military were a business, would you buy shares? Over recent years, Western armed forces, particularly the US, have been costing more yet achieving less. At the same time, austerity measures are reducing defence budgets. This book uses defence data to examine the workings of modern Western...... militaries and explore what kind of strategies can overcome this gap between input and output. Instead of focusing on military strategy, Mikkel Vedby Rasmussen seeks to draw on the ideas of business strategy to assess alternative business cases - reforming military HR to combat instability in the 'Global...

  11. Penetrating brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achyut Prashad Sharma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past 20 years, there has been an increase in the incidence of head injuries caused by gunshot wounds.  Penetrating brain injury is a traumatic brain injury caused by high-velocity projectiles or low-velocity sharp objects. A wound in which the projectile breaches the cranium but does not exit is referred as a penetrating wound, and an injury in which the projectile passes entirely through the head, leaving both entrance  and exit wounds, is referred to as a perforating wound. A large number of these patients who survive their initial wounding will nevertheless expire shortly after admission to the hospital. Until the introduction of aseptic surgery in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, penetrating missile injuries of the brain were almost universally fatal. We have learned a great deal about gunshot wounds and their management from military experience gained during times of war, when a large number of firearm-related casualties are treated in a short period of time. Newly designed protective body armor has reduced the incidence of penetrating brain injuries significantly. Many of the victims in the vicinity of a cased explosive or an improvised explosive device will incur injuries by fragments. Blast injury is a common mechanism of traumatic brain injury among soldiers serving in war zone. Each war has had different lessons to teach. World War I for example, proved the efficacy of vigorous surgical intervention. During World War II, the importance of initial dural repair and antibiotic medication was first, debated, then acknowledged, and finally, universally accepted. The incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury has increased substantially in recent military conflicts. Blast-induced neurotrauma is the term given to describe an injury to the brain that occurs after exposure to a blast. Resent conflict has exposed military personnel to sophisticated explosive devices generating blast overpressure that results in

  12. Prevalencia de accidentes de tránsito no fatales en México: resultados de la ENSANUT 2006 Prevalence of non-fatal road traffic injuries in Mexico: results from ENSANUT 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Ávila-Burgos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la prevalencia y distribución de los accidentes de tránsito no fatales (ATNF en México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se utilizaron datos de la ENSANUT 2006. En los hogares visitados se seleccionó a un adulto, un adolescente y un niño, hasta conformar una muestra de 94197 sujetos que representa a la N de 102 886 482 individuos. La variable dependiente fue la prevalencia de ATNF en los 12 meses anteriores a la encuesta. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia de accidentes (de tránsito o no fue de 6.0% y de esa cifra 16.7% correspondió a ATNF. Los hombres del grupo de 20 a 44 años, los habitantes de áreas urbanas y los de mejor nivel socioeconómico (NSE presentaron mayor prevalencia (pOBJECTIVE: To determine non-fatal road traffic injuries (NFRTI prevalence and its distribution in Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data from ENSANUT Survey 2006 were used. Using simple random sampling, one adult, one adolescent and one child were selected in each household, constituting a final sample of 94 197 representing an N of 102 886 482 people. The dependent variable was the prevalence of road traffic injuries (RTI during the 12 months prior to the survey. RESULTS: The general accident prevalence was 6.0%; 16.7% corresponded to NFRTI. Men in the 20 to 44 age group living in urban areas and with high socioeconomic status had a higher RTI prevalence (p<0.05. Jalisco, Aguascalientes and Sonora were states with the highest prevalence of RTI, while Guerrero, Michoacan and Oaxaca were those with the lowest. CONCLUSIONS: NFRTI are frequent in Mexico and they are concentrated among men in productive ages in urban areas; they are associated with socioeconomic status at the individual level and with the state's development at the population level.

  13. Prevalence and predictive factors of post-traumatic hypopituitarism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M; Juul, A; Poulsgaard, L

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence and predictive factors of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI).......To estimate the prevalence and predictive factors of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI)....

  14. [New approaches to assessment of military personnel health status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivashchenko, P P; Ivanov, V V; Grigor'ev, S G; Baranovskiĭ, A M

    2013-05-01

    For the first time were suggested some indices such as the index of ratio of one unit's (higher/highest formation) hospitalization, lost worktime, discharge and mortality to the primary morbidity for one military unit and the same index of ratio to the same criteria for the group of military unit. The mentioned peculiarities are intended for impartial and comprehensive estimation of Armed Forces of the Russian Federation military personnel health status and medical units (establishments) activity. These indices include as criteria of diseases prevalence, morbidity, hospitalization, discharge and mortality characteristics. Employment of the new tools provides the possibility of the military health care system analysis by means of such health status components as military labor character peculiarities of medical support, as well as medical service forces and resources availability in the Army, Navy and Air Force.

  15. Military and Political Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey I. Podberyozkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Military-political issues is an important area of research work at MGIMO. The difference in this direction from the classical international specialization is that it is at the intersection of several disciplines: military science, military-technical and military-industrial as well as International Relations. A specialist in military and political issues should not only be an expert in the field of international relations and diplomacy, but also have a deep knowledge of military-technical issues to understand the basic trends in the development of scientific and technological progress and its impact on the balance of forces in the world. Global changes in the balance of power and the nature of the conflict, the emergence of new types of weapons are changing the basic methods and approaches to the art of war, which requires a science-based perspective on problem solving and multi-disciplinary approach in achieving the goals. Military and political studies allow us to understand how the development of military technology and military organization of the state affected by the political situation in the world, the national security of the country and its place in the system of international relations. Military-political research has been developing at MGIMO for a few decades. It laid down the basis for a scientific school of political-military studies. Its founding fathers were such prominent scholars of international affairs, as I.G. Usachyov, A.D. Nikonov, A.G. Arbatov, V.G. Baranovsky, V.M. Kulagin, A.N. Nikitin and other well-known experts. Their work covers a wide range of military and political issues, including the topics of arms control and disarmament, international, and especially European security, military policy, NATO, the Western military-political doctrines and their practical application. Now the lead in the development of this research at MGIMO has taken Center for Military-Political Studies, which became a concentration of relevant

  16. Is High Intensity Functional Training (HIFT)/CrossFit® Safe for Military Fitness Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Walker S.C.; Haddock, Christopher K.; Heinrich, Katie M.; Jahnke, Sara A.; Jitnarin, Nattinee; Batchelor, David B.

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity functional training (HIFT) is a promising fitness paradigm that gained popularity among military populations. Rather than biasing workouts toward maximizing fitness domains such as aerobic endurance, HIFT workouts are designed to promote general physical preparedness. HIFT programs have proliferated due to concerns about the relevance of traditional physical training (PT), which historically focused on aerobic condition via running. Other concerns about traditional PT include: 1) the relevance of service fitness tests given current combat demands; 2) the perception that military PT is geared toward passing service fitness tests; and 3) that training for combat requires more than just aerobic endurance. Despite its’ popularity in the military, concerns have been raised about HIFT’s injury potential, leading to some approaches being labeled as “extreme conditioning programs” by several military and civilian experts. Given HIFT programs’ popularity in the military and concerns about injury, a review of data on HIFT injury potential is needed to inform military policy. The purpose of this review is to: 1) provide an overview of scientific methods used to appropriately compare injury rates among fitness activities; and 2) evaluate scientific data regarding HIFT injury risk compared to traditional military PT and other accepted fitness activities PMID:27391615

  17. Perspectives on Aerobic and Strength Influences on Military Physical Readiness: Report of an International Military Physiology Roundtable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Karl E; Knapik, Joseph J; Häkkinen, Keijo; Baumgartner, Neal; Groeller, Herbert; Taylor, Nigel A S; Duarte, Antonio F A; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Jones, Bruce H; Kraemer, William J; Nindl, Bradley C

    2015-11-01

    Physical fitness training of military recruits is an enduring focus of armies. This is important for safe and effective performance of general tasks that anyone may have to perform in a military setting as well as preparation for more specialized training in specific job specialties. Decades of studies on occupationally specific physical requirements have characterized the dual aerobic and strength demands of typical military tasks; however, scientifically founded strategies to prepare recruits with a good mix of these 2 physiologically opposing capabilities have not been well established. High levels of aerobic training can compromise resistance training gains and increase injury rates. Resistance training requires a greater commitment of time and resources as well as a greater understanding of the science to produce true strength gains that may be beneficial to military performance. These are critical issues for modern armies with increased demands for well-prepared soldiers and fewer injury losses. The actual physical requirements tied to metrics of success in military jobs are also under renewed examination as women are increasingly integrated into military jobs previously performed only by men. At the third International Congress on Soldiers' Physical Performance, a roundtable of 10 physiologists with military expertise presented comparative perspectives on aerobic and strength training. These topics included the physiological basis of training benefits, how to train effectively, how to measure training effectiveness, considerations for the integration of women, and the big perspective. Key discussion points centered on (a) the significance of findings from research on integrated training, (b) strategies for effective strength development, and (c) injury reduction in training as well as the benefits of improved fitness to injury reduction across the force.

  18. Ex-professional association footballers have an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis of the hip compared with age matched controls despite not having sustained notable hip injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Shepard, G; Banks, A; Ryan, W

    2003-01-01

    Method: A questionnaire was sent to the 92 football league and premiership managers to assess the prevalence of OA of various joints. The prevalence of OA of the hip in those managers that were ex-professional footballers was assessed. Radiographic controls were obtained and used to assess the prevalence of OA of the hip in the general population. The results of the two groups were compared statistically using χ2 tabulation.

  19. Ocular injuries and eye care seeking patterns following injuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The work environment of cocoa farmers exposes them to several ocular hazards that predispose them to eye diseases and injuries. However, the extent of ocular injuries and health seeking patterns following these injuries are unknown among cocoa farmers in Ghana. Objectives: To determine the prevalence ...

  20. Iraqi Military Academies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nodar Z. Mossaki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the system of training of officers in military academies in Iraq – in Zakho, Qalacholan, ar-Rustamiyah and an-Nasiriyah. The author describes the history of creation, process of evolution, challenges and features of training in these colleges. Particular attention paid to military academies in the territory of Iraqi Kurdistan, which actually do not obey the central government of Iraq, however, have the highest level of training. Currently, Iraq's military academies operate on the basis of the NATO standards. Iraqi military academies paid miuch attention to the specifics of the military and political situation in Iraq – counterinsurgency and counterterrorism operations, patrolling cities, fighting in an urban environment etc. Significant place in the curriculum take the courses contributing to the formation of pro-Western sentiment.

  1. Moral injury: A new challenge for complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Marek S; Connery, April L; Bishop, Todd M; Bryan, Craig J; Drescher, Kent D; Currier, Joseph M; Pigeon, Wilfred R

    2016-02-01

    Moral injury represents an emerging clinical construct recognized as a source of morbidity in current and former military personnel. Finding effective ways to support those affected by moral injury remains a challenge for both biomedical and complementary and alternative medicine. This paper introduces the concept of moral injury and suggests two complementary and alternative medicine, pastoral care and mindfulness, which may prove useful in supporting military personnel thought to be dealing with moral injury. Research strategies for developing an evidence-base for applying these, and other, complementary and alternative medicine modalities to moral injury are discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Concussion in the Military: an Evidence-Base Review of mTBI in US Military Personnel Focused on Posttraumatic Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Matthew D; Grimes, Jamie; Ling, Geoffrey

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as an alteration in brain function caused by an external force. Mild TBI or concussion is now well recognized to be a risk of military service as well as participation in athletic sports such as football. Posttraumatic headache (PTH) is the most common symptom after mTBI in US service members. PTH most commonly presents with migraine-like headache features. The following is an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, prognosis, complications, and treatment of mTBI and associated comorbidities with a focus on PTH. There is a particular emphasis on emerging evidence-based clinical practice. One important medical consequence of the recognition that mTBI is a highly prevalent among military service members is that the Department of Defense (DoD) is dedicating significant financial and intellectual resources to better understanding and developing treatments for TBI. The identification of the importance of TBI among the US military population has had the added benefit of increasing awareness of this condition among civilian populations, particularly those engaged in both professional and youth sports. The NIH and NSF are also supporting important TBI research. President Obama's Brain Initiative is also providing additional impetus for these efforts. Unfortunately, the understanding of the acute and chronic effects of mTBI on the brain remains limited. Gratefully, there is hope that through innovative research, there will be advances in elucidating the underlying pathophysiology, which will lead to clinical and prognostic indicators, ultimately resulting in new treatment options for this very complicated set of disorders.

  3. [The educational program for modern military surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, C; Gutcke, A; Klein, B; Rauhut, F; Friemert, B; Kollig, E W; Weller, N; Lieber, A

    2010-02-01

    Casualties in military conflict produce patterns of injuries that are not seen in routine surgical practice at home. In an era of increasing surgical sub-specialization the deployed surgeon needs to acquire and maintain a wide range of skills from a variety of surgical specialties. Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have become the modus operandi for terrorists and in the current global security situation these tactics can be equally employed against civilian targets. Therefore, knowledge and training in the management of these injuries are relevant to both military and civilian surgeons. To create this kind of military surgeon the so-called "DUO-plus" model for the training of surgical officers (specialization general surgery plus a second specialization either in visceral surgery or orthopedics/trauma surgery) has been developed in the Joint Medical Service of the German Bundeswehr. Other relevant skills, such as emergency neurotraumatology, battlefield surgery with integrated oral and craniomaxillofacial surgery and emergency gynecology, are integrated into this concept and will be taught in courses. Log books will be kept in accordance with the training curricula. On successful completion of the program medical officers will be officially appointed as Medical Officer "Einsatzchirurg" by their commanding officers for a maximum of 5 years and it will be necessary to renew it after this period. These refresher programs will require participation in visiting physicians programs in the complementary surgical disciplines in order to retain the essential specific skills.

  4. Mortality of first world war military personnel: comparison of two military cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nick; Clement, Christine; Summers, Jennifer A; Bannister, John; Harper, Glyn

    2014-12-16

    To identify the impact of the first world war on the lifespan of participating military personnel (including in veterans who survived the war). Comparison of two cohorts of military personnel, followed to death. Military personnel leaving New Zealand to participate in the first world war. From a dataset of the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces, we randomly selected participants who embarked on troopships in 1914 and a comparison non-combat cohort who departed on troopships in late 1918 (350 in each group). Lifespan based on dates of birth and death from a range of sources (such as individual military files and an official database of birth and death records). A quarter of the 1914 cohort died during the war, with deaths from injury predominating (94%) over deaths from disease (6%). This cohort had a significantly shorter lifespan than the late 1918 "non-combat" cohort, with median ages of death being 65.9 versus 74.2, respectively (a difference of 8.3 years shown also in Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log rank Pfirst world war in 1914 from New Zealand lost around eight years of life (relative to a comparable military cohort). In the postwar period they continued to have an increased risk of premature death. © Wilson et al 2014.

  5. Physiological and psychological fatigue in extreme conditions: the military example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sharon R; McAuliffe, Caitlin L; Durussel, David; Pasquina, Paul F

    2010-05-01

    The extreme conditions causing fatigue in military service members in combat and combat training deserve special consideration. The collective effects of severe exertion, limited caloric intake, and sleep deprivation, combined with the inherent stressors of combat, lead to both physiological and psychological fatigue that may significantly impair performance. Studies of combat training have revealed a myriad of endocrine, cognitive, and neurological changes that occur as a result of exposure to extreme conditions. Further contributory effects of multiple military deployments, post-traumatic stress disorder, and traumatic brain injury may also influence both the susceptibility to and expression of fatigue states. Further research is needed to explore these effects to enhance military readiness and performance as well as prevent injuries. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalência, necessidade de tratamento e fatores predisponentes do traumatismo na dentição permanente de escolares de 11 a 13 anos de idade Prevalence, treatment needs, and predisposing factors for traumatic injuries to permanent dentition in 11-13-year-old schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Traebert

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou determinar a prevalência do traumatismo dentário na dentição permanente e observar associações com fatores predisponentes. Foi realizado um estudo transversal com escolares de 11 a 13 anos de Biguaçu, Santa Catarina, Brasil. Os exames foram realizados por um cirurgião-dentista utilizando os mesmos critérios do Children's Dental Health Survey do Reino Unido. Foram observados tipo de dano, tratamento providenciado e necessidade, overjet incisal, adequabilidade da cobertura labial, idade, sexo e nível de educação dos pais. Foram examinadas 2.260 crianças e as prevalências encontradas foram: 10,4%, 10,6% e 11,2% aos 11, 12 e 13 anos, respectivamente. A necessidade de tratamento foi de 6,3 incisivos por mil examinados. Escolares do sexo masculino e com overjetmaior que 5mm tiveram mais traumatismo dentário do que escolares do sexo feminino e com overjetincisal até 5mm. Cobertura labial inadequada e nível de educação dos pais não estiveram estatisticamente associados com o traumatismo dentário. Concluiu-se que ser do sexo masculino ou ter um overjetincisal maior do que 5mm aumenta a chance de sofrer traumatismo dentário.The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of traumatic injuries to the permanent incisors and the association with clinical predisposing factors and parents' schooling. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with schoolchildren aged 11 to 13 years in Biguaçu, Brazil. Dental examinations were conducted by a dentist, and the criteria for traumatic dental injuries used in the children's dental health survey in the United Kingdom were adopted. the study recorded the type of damage sustained, treatment performed or needed, the size of incisal overjet, and whether lip coverage was adequate. Socio-demographic data included sex, age, and parents' level of schooling. a total of 2,260 children were examined, and prevalence rates were 10.4%, 10.6%, and 11.2% in 11, 12, and 13-year

  7. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... is Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) [for posttraumatic stress disorder]? - Duration: 2:01. Veterans Health Administration 27,844 ...

  8. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... Veterans Health Administration 2,027 views 25:30 Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

  9. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... Veterans Health Administration 2,027 views 25:30 Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

  10. The Military Cooperation Group

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renzi, Jr, Alfred E

    2006-01-01

    .... This thesis will describe a structure to assist with both those needs. The premise is that an expanded and improved network of US Military Groups is the weapon of choice for the war on terror, and beyond...

  11. Transforming Military Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weiss, Bartholomew W

    2006-01-01

    ... a catastrophic event in another part. Consequentially, the United States must transform its military instrument of power to defeat its enemies and show its alliance with friends to defeat this adverse aspect of globalization...

  12. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... MST. http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/msthom... Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  13. Incidence and Time to Return to Training for Stress Fractures during Military Basic Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Wood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, little is known about the length of time required to rehabilitate patients from stress fractures and their return to preinjury level of physical activity. Previous studies have looked at the return to sport in athletes, in a general population, where rehabilitation is not as controlled as within a captive military population. In this study, a longitudinal prospective epidemiological database was assessed to determine the incidence of stress fractures and the time taken to rehabilitate recruits to preinjury stage of training. Findings demonstrated a background prevalence of 5% stress fractures in Royal Marine training; femoral and tibial stress fractures take 21.1 weeks to return to training with metatarsal stress fractures being the most common injury taking 12.2 weeks. Rehabilitation from stress fractures accounts for 814 weeks of recruit rehabilitation time per annum. Stress fracture incidence is still common in military training; despite this stress fracture recovery times remain constant and represent a significant interruption in training. It takes on average 5 weeks after exercise specific training has restarted to reenter training at a preinjury level, regardless of which bone has a stress fracture. Further research into their prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation is required to help reduce these burdens.

  14. Managing Military Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Managing Military Readiness by Laura J. Junor STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVES 23 Center for Strategic Research Institute for National Strategic Studies...Marine Corps) Managing Military Readiness Institute for National Strategic Studies Strategic Perspectives, No. 23 Series Editor: Laura J. Junor National...discussion is a basic tenet of production theory , it had not been commonly applied to readiness management until recently. The important point here is that

  15. Soviet Union, Military Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-08

    officers in the field of military art but also to contribute to the mastery of effective forms and methods of training and educating personnel of units...into account the latest achievements of military thought, and high competence in questions of tactics and operational art are the foremost qualities...first time, and the new embroidery had to be interspersed with the old canvas. In spite of everything they decided to continue the experiment. 84

  16. Military Working Dog Procurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-14

    1998 and 1999 showed that the Europeans did not have an advantage in the selection of their dogs . Officials of the 341st TRS offered two possible...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited MILITARY WORKING DOG PROCUREMENTS Report No. D-2000-102 March 14...A . Report Title: Military Working Dog Procurements B. DATE Report Downloaded From the Internet: 03/28/99 C. Report’s Point of Contact: (Name

  17. High voltage electrical injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjua, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To highlight the devastating nature and consequences of high voltage electrical injuries and to stress the need for its prevention. Design: It was a retrospective study. Place and duration of study: The study was conducted at Army Burn Centre, Combined Military Hospital Kharian Cantonment, between January 1,1998 to December 31, 2000. Subjects and Methods: All the patients reporting to Army Burn Centre with high voltage electrical injuries were included in the study. The epidemiology of these injuries were studied along with the pattern of their management and outcome in terms of mortality and morbidity. Results: Of all the patients admitted to the Army Burn Center, 5.94% were affected with electrical injuries. They were predominantly males in a ratio of 9.75:1 and mostly in the 3rd and 4th decades of their lives. Seventy percent of these injuries were injuries were work-related and 75% had associated surface burns. There was significant mortality rate of 18.6% and a limb amputation rate of 80% along with professional disability rate of 91% rendering it a highly morbid condition. Conclusion: This study stresses the necessity to educate the general public with regard to the devastating nature of high voltage electrical injury and highlight the importance of prevention. (author)

  18. Musculoskeletal, biomechanical, and physiological gender differences in the US military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Katelyn F; Keenan, Karen A; Sell, Timothy C; Abt, John P; Nagai, Takashi; Deluzio, Jennifer; McGrail, Mark; Lephart, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    The repeal of the Direct Ground Combat Assignment Rule has renewed focus on examining performance capabilities of female military personnel and their ability to occupy previously restricted military occupational specialties. Previous research has revealed female Soldiers suffer a greater proportion of musculoskeletal injuries compared to males, including a significantly higher proportion of lower extremity, knee, and overuse injuries. Potential differences may also exist in musculoskeletal, biomechanical, and physiological characteristics between male and female Soldiers requiring implementation of gender-specific training in order to mitigate injury risk and enhance performance. To examine differences in musculoskeletal, biomechanical, and physiological characteristics in male and female Soldiers. A total of 406 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Soldiers (348 male; 58 female) participated. Subjects underwent testing for flexibility, isokinetic and isometric strength (percent body weight), single-leg balance, lower body biomechanics during a stop jump and drop landing, body composition, anaerobic power/capacity, and aerobic capacity. Independent t tests assessed between-group comparisons. Women demonstrated significantly greater flexibility (Pphysiological characteristics. Sex-specific interventions may aid in improving such characteristics to optimize physical readiness and decrease the injury risk during gender-neutral training, and decreasing between-sex variability in performance characteristics may result in enhanced overall unit readiness. Identification of sex-specific differences in injury patterns and characteristics should facilitate adjustments in training in order for both sexes to meet the gender-neutral occupational demands for physically demanding military occupational specialties.

  19. Military Blast Exposure and Chronic Neurodegeneration: Summary of Working Groups and Expert Panel Findings and Recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brix, K.A.; Brody, D.L.; Grimes, J.B.; Yitzhak, A.; Agoston, D.; Aldag, M.; Armstrong, R.; Arun, P.; Audette, M.; Babcock, D.; Balaban, C.; Banton, R.; Bellgowan, P.; Borkholder, D.; Broglio, S.; Brokaw, E.; Cantu, R.; Carr, W.; Chapman, S.; Cmarik, J.; Colder, B.; Colombe, J.; Cook, D.; Cozzarelli, T.; Da Silva, U.O.; Daphalapurkar, N.; Dardzinski, B.; DeGraba, T.; DeMar, J.; DeWitt, D.; Dickstein, D.; Duckworth, J.; Elder, G.; Fazel-Rezai, R.; Fine, M.; Fiskum, G.; Fournier, A.; Ganpule, S.; Gill, J.; Glenn, J.F.; Greene, C.; Greig, N.; Haering, C.; Harrington, J.; Hein, A.; Helmick, K.; Hicks, R.; Hinds, S.; Hoffman, S.; Horkayne-Szakaly, I.; Iacono, D.; Ishii, E.; Jones, R.V.; Karami, G.; Krawczyk, D.; Labutta, R.; Latta, R.; Lattimore, T.; Leggieri, M.; Leonessa, F.; Lin, A.; Ling, G.; Long, M.; Lu, K.P.; Panker, S.M.; McCabe, J.; Merkle, A.; Montenigro, P.; Mueller, G.P.; Ng, L.; Nigam, S.; O'Donnell, J.; Okonkwo, D.; Pauli, I.; Perl, D.; Peskind, E.; Pfister, B.; Philippens, M.; Piehler, T.; Proctor, J.; Przekwas, A.; Qashu, F.; Raskind, M.; Razumovsky, A.; Reifman, J.; Reyes, P.; Rigby, P.; Risling, M.; Robinson, M.; Rooks, T.; Rosen, C.; Rosseau, G.; Sammons-Jackson, W.; Santago, A.; Shoge, R.; Sours, C.; Stone, J.; Templin, M.; Tepe, V.; Thielen, P.; Thomas, M.; Timmes, T.; Tortella, F.; Tucker, L.; Tweedie, D.; Hamm, D.V.; Christie Vu, B.; Wang, Y.; West, T.; Wilde, E.; Willis, A.; Wu, J.; Zai, L.; Zander, N.; Zheng, J.; Ziejewski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The potential relationship between chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and head injuries such as blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important area of study, particularly for military and contact sports populations, yet little is known about this relationship. To address this topic,

  20. A postal survey of data in general practice on the prevalence of Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) in patients aged 18-65 in one county in the west of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Finnerty, Fionnuala

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Very little is known about the prevalence of acquired brain injury (ABI) in Ireland. ABI prevalence has previously been obtained from Belgian general practitioners using a postal survey. We attempted to ascertain the prevalence of ABI in County Mayo through a postal survey of all general practitioners in the county.The specific objectives of this project were to:1. identify whether general practitioners are a. aware of patients with ABI aged 18-65 in their practices b. able to provide prevalence data on ABI in patients aged 18-65 c. able to provide data on age, gender and patient diagnosis 2. analyse prevalence of ABI from any available data from general practitioners. METHODS: A pilot postal survey was performed initially in order to assess the feasibility of the study. It was established that general practitioners did have the necessary information required to complete the questionnaire. A main postal survey was then undertaken. A postal questionnaire was administered to all general practices in County Mayo in the west of Ireland (n = 59). The response rate was 32.2% (n = 19). RESULTS: General practitioners who replied on behalf of their practice could provide data on patient age, gender and diagnosis. In the nineteen practices, there were 57 patients with ABI. The age-specific prevalence of ABI in the area surveyed was estimated at 183.7 per 100,000. The mean patient population per practice was 2,833 (SD = 950). There were found to be significantly more patients with ABI in rural areas than urban areas (p = 0.006). There were also significant differences in the ages of patients in the different ABI categories. Patients whose ABI was of traumatic origin were significantly younger than those patients with ABI of haemorrhagic origin (p = 0.002). CONCLUSION: Although this is a small-scale study, we have ascertained that general practitioners do have data on patients with ABI. Also, some prevalence data now exist where none was available before. These can

  1. Identification of Abuse and Health Consequences for Military and Civilian Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the prevalence of intimate partner violence and health consequences in civilian and active duty military women in the same geographic area using telephone survey and a case...

  2. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 328 diseases and injuries for 195 countries, 1990–2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard Iburg, Kim

    2017-01-01

    of YLDs for all causes combined decreased between 1990 and 2016 by 2·7% (95% UI 2·3–3·1). Despite mostly stagnant age-standardised rates, the absolute number of YLDs from non-communicable diseases has been growing rapidly across all SDI quintiles, partly because of population growth, but also the ageing......Background As mortality rates decline, life expectancy increases, and populations age, non-fatal outcomes of diseases and injuries are becoming a larger component of the global burden of disease. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 (GBD 2016) provides...... of populations. The largest absolute increases in total numbers of YLDs globally were between the ages of 40 and 69 years. Age-standardised YLD rates for all conditions combined were 10·4% (95% UI 9·0–11·8) higher in women than in men. Iron-deficiency anaemia, migraine, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias...

  3. Selling petroleum to the military

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uscher, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    This article examines what petroleum products and services the US military buys, the contracts awarded to Asian and European refiners for supplies outside the USA, and military specifications and test methods including the specifications of JP-8 battlefield fuel and the JP-8+100 additive package for military aircraft. The way in which the military buys petroleum products is described, and details are given of the types of military contracts, the bidding on Defense Energy Support Center (DESC) petroleum contracts, the performance of military petroleum contracts, socio-economic programmes, the Prompt Payment Act requiring contractors to be paid promptly, and procedures for claims and disputes

  4. The prevalence and impact of age and gender on rehabilitation outcomes in spinal cord injury in India: a retrospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equebal, A; Anwer, S; Kumar, R

    2013-05-01

    Retrospective, 1 year case series. To analyze the relationship between gender, age, injury-related variables and rehabilitation outcomes in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Tertiary Rehabilitation Center, Inpatient rehabilitation unit, India. The data from a series of SCI cases were analyzed. Each case was followed from admission into the hospital until their discharge. Patients were described according to age, gender, etiology of SCI, neurological classification, medical complications, American spinal injury association (ASIA) classification, length of rehabilitation stay and spinal cord independence measure (SCIM). Forty-seven new SCI cases, 37 (78.7%) male and 10 (21.3%) female patients, were reported over a 1-year period during 2009-2010. Male patients were younger than the female ones, but the difference was not statistically significant. There was no statistically significant relationship between age or gender, and the following SCI variables: ASIA classification, neurological classification, SCI complications and length of stay (P>0.05). Traumatic etiology and Pott's disease was found be related with gender (PSCIM score at admission or discharge (P>0.05). Age and gender are not significantly related to outcomes of rehabilitation or characteristics of SCI in this sample. Further research is needed to confirm the generalizability of these findings and to identify which factors contribute more strongly to SCI rehabilitation outcomes.

  5. Can We Train Military Surgeons in a Civilian Trauma Center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, H; Kong, V Y; Oosthuizen, G V; Bruce, J L; Bekker, W; Laing, G L; Clarke, D L

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the trauma workload and operative exposure in a major South African trauma center and provide a comparison with contemporary experience from major military conflict. All patients admitted to the PMTS following trauma were identified from the HEMR. Basic demographic data including mechanism of injury and body region injured were reviewed. All operative procedures were categorized. The total operative volume was compared with those available from contemporary literature documenting experience from military conflict in Afghanistan. Operative volume was converted to number of cases per year for comparison. During the 4-year study period, 11,548 patients were admitted to our trauma center. Eighty-four percent were male and the mean age was 29 years. There were 4974 cases of penetrating trauma, of which 3820 (77%) were stab wounds (SWs), 1006 (20%) gunshot wounds (GSWs) and the remaining 148 (3%) were animal injuries. There were 6574 cases of blunt trauma. The mechanism of injuries was as follows: assaults 2956, road traffic accidents 2674, falls 664, hangings 67, animal injuries 42, sports injury 29 and other injuries 142. A total of 4207 operations were performed. The volumes per year were equivalent to those reported from the military surgical literature. South Africa has sufficient burden of trauma to train combat surgeons. Each index case as identified from the military surgery literature has a sufficient volume in our center. Based on our work load, a 6-month rotation should be sufficient to provide exposure to almost all the major traumatic conditions likely to be encountered on the modern battlefield.

  6. An Operational Statistical Analysis of United States Marine Corps Civilian Employee Injury Tracking Process and Injury Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rascon, Carlos G

    2008-01-01

    Organizations within the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Labor (DoL) report safety metrics that quantify DoD civilian employee injury incident rates and lost work time for all military services...

  7. Post-Polio Syndrome as a Model for Musculo-Tendinous Overuse Syndromes in Military and Civilian Populations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keenan, Mary

    1999-01-01

    .... The muscle weakness experienced by many polio survivors puts this population in a unique position to serve as an accelerated model for the same weakness-overuse-injury cycle experienced by military recruits...

  8. 13 CFR 123.501 - Under what circumstances is your business eligible to be considered for a Military Reservist...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Military Reservist EIDL if: (a) It is a small business as defined in 13 CFR part 121 when the essential... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Under what circumstances is your business eligible to be considered for a Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loan? 123.501 Section...

  9. Metabolic Syndrome in Military Aircrew Using a Candidate Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjiv; Chandrashekar, A M; Singh, Vishal

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the Indian population varies from 31.6 to 41.1%. Indians, without being conventionally obese, but inherently insulin resistant, have higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Since military aircrew, belonging to the same ethnic pool, may reflect similar prevalence of MetS as the general Indian populace, this study was undertaken to find the prevalence of MetS among Indian military aircrew using one candidate definition. In this cross sectional descriptive study, 210 military aircrew voluntarily participated. Besides demographic and lifestyle related details, their anthropometric measurements, including height, weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, and skin fold thickness were recorded. Body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio were deduced from the recorded measurements. Resting heart rate and blood pressure were recorded and appropriate laboratory investigations were undertaken. Prevalence of MetS, as per chosen definition, was 33.3% (N = 70), which had moderate, fair, and slight agreement with NCEP ATP III (k = 0.43), IDF (k = 0.27), and WHO (k = 0.15) definitions, respectively. Decadal prevalence of MetS was found to be highest in the fourth decade (46.8%), followed by the third decade (41.3%). Reported prevalence of MetS highlights an urgent need to define preventive strategies to minimize loss of trained manpower among military aircrew. Flight surgeons have an important role to play to educate aircrew about modifying their lifestyle to reduce morbidity and mortality among themselves in the future. Sharma S, Chandrashekar AM, Singh V. Metabolic syndrome in military aircrew using a candidate definition. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(9):790-794.

  10. Thermoregulatory modeling use and application in the military workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Miyo; Berglund, Larry G; Xu, Xiaojiang

    2014-05-01

    Thermoregulatory models have been used in the military to quantify probabilities of individuals' thermal-related illness/injury. The uses of the models have diversified over the past decade. This paper revisits an overall view of selected thermoregulatory models used in the U.S. military and provides examples of actual practical military applications: 1) the latest military vehicle designed with armor and blast/bulletproof windows was assessed to predict crews' thermal strains levels inside vehicles under hot environment (air temperature [Ta]: 29-43 °C, dew point: 13 °C); 2) a military working dog (MWD) model was developed by modifying existing human thermoregulatory models with canine physical appearance and physiological mechanisms; 3) thermal tolerance range of individuals from a large military group (n = 100) exposed to 35 °C/40% relative humidity were examined using thermoregulatory modeling and multivariate statistical analyses. Model simulation results assist in the decisions for the strategic planning and preventions of heat stress. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Laser eye injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkana, Y; Belkin, M

    2000-01-01

    Laser instruments are used in many spheres of human activity, including medicine, industry, laboratory research, entertainment, and, notably, the military. This widespread use of lasers has resulted in many accidental injuries. Injuries are almost always retinal, because of the concentration of visible and near-infrared radiation on the retina. The retina is therefore the body tissue most vulnerable to laser radiation. The nature and severity of this type of retinal injury is determined by multiple laser-related and eye-related factors, the most important being the duration and amount of energy delivered and the retinal location of the lesion. The clinical course of significant retinal laser injuries is characterized by sudden loss of vision, often followed by marked improvement over a few weeks, and occasionally severe late complications. Medical and surgical treatment is limited. Laser devices hazardous to the human eye are currently in widespread use by armed forces. Furthermore, lasers may be employed specifically for visual incapacitation on future battlefields. Adherence to safety practices effectively prevents accidental laser-induced ocular injuries. However, there is no practical way to prevent injuries that are maliciously inflicted, as expected from laser weapons.

  12. Enlisting in the Military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Beaver

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Given that enlistment in the U.S. military is completely voluntary, there has been a great deal of interest in identifying the various factors that might explain why some people join the military, whereas others do not. The current study expanded on this line of literature by estimating the extent to which genetic and environmental factors explained variance in the liability for lifetime participation in the military. Analysis of twin pairs drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health revealed that 82% of the variance was the result of genetic factors, 18% of the variance was the result of nonshared environmental factors, and none of the variance was accounted for by shared environmental factors. In light of a number of limitations, replication studies are needed to determine the robustness of these findings and whether they are generalizable to other samples and populations.

  13. Military Strategy Of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Zaitsev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the evolution of military strategy of the Republic of India and key factors that influences its development. New Delhi keeps an eye on the balance of power in South Asia to create favorable conditions for its economic and social development, yet the remaining threats and new challenges still undermine the security and stability in India. The ambitions of China aspiring to power in Asia-Pacific region, combined with its immense military build-up and territorial disputes, cause disturbance in New Delhi. The remaining tensions between India and Pakistan also cause often border skirmishes and medium-scale conflicts. Close relations between China and Pakistan, labeled as “all-weather friendship”, are a source of major concern for India. The fact that both Beijing and Islamabad wield nuclear weapons means that without effective mechanisms of nuclear deterrence any military conflict may turn into a full-scale nuclear war. Terrorist activities and insurgency in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir and in the North-Eastern regions of the country, along with maritime piracy and illicit drug trafficking contribute to the complicated nature of the challenges to the Indian security. Indian military strategy is considered as a combination of the army doctrine, maritime doctrine and nuclear doctrine. The Indian political and military leadership wants to meet the challenges of changing geopolitical environment and thus continuously adapts its strategy. However, there is still a gap between theory and practice: Indian armed forces lack the capacity to implement the declared goals because of bulky bureaucratic system, outdated military equipment and insufficient level of command and control. The government needs to mobilize political will and administrative resources to upgrade its defense sector to counter its security threats and challenges.

  14. Injuries in Cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardiwala, Dinshaw N; Rao, Nandan N; Varshney, Ankit V

    Cricket is a popular global sport that requires a combination of physical fitness, skill, and strategy. Although a noncontact sport, overuse and impact injuries are common since players engage in a wide range of physical activities, including running, throwing, batting, bowling, catching, and diving. Significant or match time-loss injuries are defined as those that either prevent a player from being fully available for selection in a major match, or during a major match, cause a player to be unable to bat, bowl, or keep wicket when required by either the rules or the team's captain. This review describes the various region-wise injuries sustained in cricket along with their epidemiology, biomechanics, treatment, and prevention. Data were collected from peer-reviewed articles (obtained via PubMed search) published through November 2016 that involved the medical, biomechanical, and epidemiological aspects of cricket injuries. Clinical review. Level 4. Cricket was one of the first sports to publish recommended methods for injury surveillance in 2005 from England, South Africa, Australia, the West Indies, and India. While the incidence of injuries is about the same, the prevalence of injuries has increased due to game format changes, increasing number of matches played, and decreased rest between matches. Bowling (41.3%), fielding, and wicket keeping (28.6%) account for most injuries. Acute injuries are most common (64%-76%), followed by acute-on-chronic (16%-22.8%) and chronic ones (8%-22%). The most common modern-day cricket injury is hamstring strain, and the most severe is lumbar stress fracture in young fast bowlers. With improved understanding of the scientific and medical aspects of cricket, along with advances in surgical and nonsurgical treatment techniques, the time to return to play has shortened considerably. While the prevalence of cricket injuries has increased, their severity has decreased over the past decades.

  15. Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, Francisco José; de la Cuadra, Crótida; Guillén, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite overuse injuries being previously described as the most frequent in ballet, there are no studies on professional dancers providing the specific clinical diagnoses or type of injury based on the discipline. Hypothesis Overuse injuries are the most frequent injuries in ballet, with differences in the type and frequency of injuries based on discipline. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study performed between January 1, 2005, and October 10, 2010, on injuries occurring in professional dancers from leading Spanish dance companies who practiced disciplines such as classical, neoclassical, contemporary, and Spanish ballet. Data, including type of injury, were obtained from specialized medical services at the Trauma Service, Fremap, Madrid, Spain. Results A total of 486 injuries were evaluated, a significant number of which were overuse disorders (P ballet (82.60%). Injuries were more frequent among female dancers (75.90%) and classical ballet (83.60%). A statistically significant prevalence of patellofemoral pain syndrome was found in the classical discipline (P = .007). Injuries of the adductor muscles of the thigh (P = .001) and of the low back facet (P = .02) in the Spanish ballet discipline and lateral snapping hip (P = .02) in classical and Spanish ballet disciplines were significant. Conclusion Overuse injuries were the most frequent injuries among the professional dancers included in this study. The prevalence of injuries was greater for the most technically demanding discipline (classical ballet) as well as for women. Patellofemoral pain syndrome was the most prevalent overuse injury, followed by Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy, and mechanical low back pain. Clinical Relevance Specific clinical diagnoses and injury-based differences between the disciplines are a key factor in ballet. PMID:26665100

  16. Epidemiology of mild traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Raquel C; Yaffe, Kristine

    2015-05-01

    Every year an estimated 42 million people worldwide suffer a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or concussion. More severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-established risk factor for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, large epidemiological studies have additionally identified MTBI as a risk factor for dementia. The role of MTBI in risk of PD or ALS is less well established. Repetitive MTBI and repetitive sub-concussive head trauma have been linked to increased risk for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a unique neurodegenerative tauopathy first described in boxers but more recently described in a variety of contact sport athletes, military veterans, and civilians exposed to repetitive MTBI. Studies of repetitive MTBI and CTE have been limited by referral bias, lack of consensus clinical criteria for CTE, challenges of quantifying MTBI exposure, and potential for confounding. The prevalence of CTE is unknown and the amount of MTBI or sub-concussive trauma exposure necessary to produce CTE is unclear. This review will summarize the current literature regarding the epidemiology of MTBI, post-TBI dementia and Parkinson's disease, and CTE while highlighting methodological challenges and critical future directions of research in this field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Traumatic Brain Injury. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in the injured war fighter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elterman, Joel; Zonies, David; Stewart, Ian; Fang, Raymond; Schreiber, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a recognized complication of traumatic injury. The correlation of an elevated creatine kinase (CK) level and the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) has been studied in the civilian population. We sought to review the prevalence of rhabdomyolysis in injured war fighters and determine if peak CK levels correlate with AKI. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted at a US military treatment facility from January to November 2010. Inclusion criteria were active duty patients transported after explosive, penetrating, or blunt injury. Patients with burns or non-trauma-related admissions were excluded. Rhabdomyolysis was defined as a CK level greater than 5,000 U/L. AKI was defined using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes classification. Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to determine the significance for continuous data. Correlations were determined using Spearman's ρ. Significance was set at p Rhabdomyolysis developed in 79 patients (24.8%). The median peak CK for all patients was 4,178 U/L and ranged from 208 U/L to 120,000 U/L. Stage 1, 2, and 3 AKI developed in 56 (17.6%), 3 (0.9%), and 7 (2.2%) patients, respectively. There was a weak but statistically significant correlation between peak CK and AKI (r = 0.26, p rhabdomyolysis in combat casualties and would allow for standardized comparisons in future work. Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III.

  18. Current military laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flinchbaugh, D.E.

    1975-08-01

    Several important military applications with the predominant laser type used are reviewed. Most of these lasers are infrared lasers of one sort or another. Airborne tactical programs utilizing laser designator/illuminators are pictorially summarized, including range finding, target seeking, designation, tracking, reconnaissance, and surveillance. A typical designator optical system configuration is presented and discussed. Examples of operational laser systems are given. It is seen that many of the laser applications in the civilian community have either direct or indirect analogs in the military field. A self-contained HF/DF chemical laser weapon that recirculates its by-products is examined.

  19. Autonomous military robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief reveals the latest techniques in computer vision and machine learning on robots that are designed as accurate and efficient military snipers. Militaries around the world are investigating this technology to simplify the time, cost and safety measures necessary for training human snipers. These robots are developed by combining crucial aspects of computer science research areas including image processing, robotic kinematics and learning algorithms. The authors explain how a new humanoid robot, the iCub, uses high-speed cameras and computer vision algorithms to track the objec

  20. Military wheeled vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Wheeled vehicles are used in militaries around the world every single day. Readers will learn that wheeled vehicles in the military are not just for getting from place-to-place, but can also act as necessary protection for soldiers travelling through dangerous areas. Big full-bleed photographs, new glossary terms, and a close up look at a vehicle will keep readers wanting more! Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Kids Jumbo is an imprint of Abdo Kids, a division of ABDO.

  1. Military Intervention in South America,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    size and com- position of the armed forces, and the traditional role of the 3 military in the political system. A third approach to military intervention...Structure and Military Intervention in Latin America," Archives Europeenes de Sociologie , 1I (Spring, 1961), 62-81; Ernest A. Duff and John F. McCamant

  2. Syria’s Military Capabilities and Options for Military Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pradhan-Blach, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    This background paper does not endorse any military action towards Syria. The document does not reflect or express any official Danish policy or a position of the University of Copenhagen or the Centre for Military Studies. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe military capabilities...... and options in order to provide a factual background for the ongoing discussion on possible military intervention in the Syrian conflict and Denmark’s possible participation in such an intervention. The paper is primarily based on the Military Balance published by the International Institute for Strategic...

  3. Russia’s Military Economy and Military Security in 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Vasily Zatsepin; Vitaly Tsymbal

    2008-01-01

    The development of the RF military economy in 2007 was mainly determined by the economic and political factors typical of the Russian economy as a whole and also by the necessity to carry on a struggle against terrorist bands. At the same time, the military economy was to a certain extent influenced (at least conceptually) by the military-political declarations and unfriendly intentions on the part of NATO and the USA, as well as by the requirements of military and military-technological coop...

  4. Investigation of Self-Reported Musculoskeletal Injuries on Post-Deployment Health Assessment Forms for Aeromedical Evacuation Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouts, Brittany L; Serres, Jennifer L; Dukes, Susan F; Maupin, Genny M; Wade, Molly E; Pohlman, Daniel M

    2015-12-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs) are a concern for the military community because of medical expenses, possible disability, and separation from the military. This study investigated the prevalence of MSIs in deployed aeromedical evacuation (AE) populations reported on Post-Deployment Health Assessment (PDHA) forms. A secondary aim was to examine the relationship between the occurrence of self-reported MSIs on PDHAs and a subsequent medical diagnosis. Flight nurses (Air Force Specialty Code [AFSC] 46F) and AE technicians (AETs) (AFSC 4N0 with a flight duty badge) who completed a PDHA during 2008-2010 were investigated. Data from the test population were compared with a control group of deployed ground-based counterparts. During this time period, 1,366 and 1,959 PDHAs were completed by the AE nursing and AET groups, respectively. At least 1 MSI was reported by 18% of AE nurse and 19% of AET compared with 23% of non-AE nurse and 25% of non-AET PDHAs. Of these individuals with reported MSIs, 35% and 44% of AE nurse and AET PDHAs, respectively, had a diagnosis matching their MSIs. Identifying the prevalence of MSIs in the unique AE environment can lead to the development of preventative and ergonomic solutions, minimizing the risk of MSIs and improving mission success. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. An appraisal of the prevalence and attributes of traumatic dental injuries in the permanent anterior teeth among 7–14-Year-Old school children of North East Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopal Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, associated risk factors, characteristics, and pattern of traumatic dental injuries (TDIs in the permanent anterior teeth among school children of North East Delhi area. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was done in 3000 school-going children aged 7–14 years. Materials and Methods: A detailed case history and clinical examination were performed on the entire sample population. TDIs were recorded according to Andreasen's epidemiological classification of TDIs including World Health Organization codes. Statistical Analysis Used: For finding the independent association of the significant variables with outcome, multivariable logistic regression analysis was used. Results: A prevalence of 10.7% was observed in the sample being studied. Dental trauma was significantly (P < 0.05 associated with male gender, and high statistical significance (P < 0.001 was noted with age, participation in sports, lip seal, and overjet. Fall of the child while playing by himself/herself was the most common cause; afternoon and schools were the most common time and place of occurrence of TDIs, respectively. Single tooth enamel fractures in the left maxillary central incisors were most commonly seen. Adhesive restorations were the most frequent form of treatment required. Conclusions: Organizing studies addressing the prevention and treatment needs of TDIs and educational programs aimed toward parents and school teachers are of paramount importance. Furthermore, recognizing the tremendous treatment negligence is extremely critical to adequately analyze indifference of the people toward dental trauma and its consequences.

  6. Role 2 military hospitals: results of a new trauma care concept on 170 casualties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünlü, A; Cetinkaya, R A; Ege, T; Ozmen, P; Hurmeric, V; Ozer, M T; Petrone, P

    2015-04-01

    In recent military conflicts, military surgeons encounter more high-energy injuries associated with explosives. Advances in the field care and shorter evacuation time increased survival. However, casualties still incur severe injuries especially to the extremities. We present wound patterns, anatomical distribution and severity of injuries in a Role 2 hospital. Two years data have been retrospectively reviewed. Only explosives and firearms injuries were included in the study. Patient profile, admission details, mechanism of injury, AIS anatomical locations, ISS, surgical and medical treatments have been analyzed. Data revealed 170 male casualties. IEDs and GSW accounted for 133 (78%) and 37 (22%) casualties, respectively. An average of 1.8 IED and 1.2 GSW anatomical locations were exposed to injuries. Regardless of the mechanism, injuries were most commonly located in the extremities. IEDs caused significantly higher soft tissue injuries. Explosives do not necessarily cause more severe injuries than firearms. However, fragments create multiple, complicated soft tissue injuries which constitute more than half of the injuries. Timely wound debridement and excision of contaminated tissue are crucial to manage extremity soft tissue injuries. Casualty care should be assessed within the context of the capabilities present at a hospital and the cause, type and severity of the wounds. The NATO description of Role 2 care only requires an integrated surgical team for damage control surgery with limited diagnostic and infrastructural capabilities.

  7. Uk Armed Forces unintentional firearm injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, T; Rushforth, G

    2009-03-01

    To report on the incidence of unintentional firearm discharge and injury across the UK Armed Forces and present several cases of this wounding phenomenon. Munitions Incidents and Defects (MID) Cell data on UK Military Negligent Discharges and unintentional firearm injuries from 01 Jan 03 to 31 Dec 07 was categorised according to cause of injury, wound, service affiliation, incident context and weapon type. The injuries of three patients are described. Over the 5 year period there were 1158 Unintentional firearm discharges, forty three (4%) of which resulted in injury. Fifty five military personnel sustained unintentional firearm injuries during the review period, more than half of which were gunshot wounds and this included one fatality. The Regular Army suffers an average of 7.7 unintentional firearm injuries per 100 000 Regular Army person years. Unintentional firearm injury is well recognised across the civilian and police sectors worldwide. Despite the recent tempo of high grade training and operations that currently engage UK Armed Forces this form of injury remains uncommon. We hope to facilitate discussion with the chain of command to manage the risk of these injuries.

  8. LANGUAGE IN MILITARY SERVICE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dictionary in 1954, the product of the Military. Language Board (Krygstaalraad). During World War II the men in the forces con- tinued the development of the two official lan- ... words and terms reflecting typical South African conditions: Sonfontein (solar still), pantserbreek- granate (armour-piercing squash head shells),.

  9. The Military's Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Vedby

    South' or utilising new technologies to overcome the prohibitive costs of current systems. Analysing the philosophical, strategic and budgetary underpinnings of these alternatives, he concludes that a more radical break from current military organisational practices is needed which would allow them...

  10. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... views 4:50 Prolonged Exposure for PTSD - Duration: 2:45. Veterans Health Administration 53,436 views 2: ...

  11. Selected WDM Military Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-28

    Photonic Networks BACKGROUND IP ATM (QOS) SONET SONET WDM 200420011998 WDM IP w/ MPLS 10Gb Ethernet WDM LAN / MAN IP Along with Ethernet technology, WDM...technology will become prominent in Metro Area Networking (MAN) and Local Area Networking (LAN) topologies. ---------------------------- Military...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE, DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED Research and Development – Components – Applications, e.g., CWDM Ethernet ; optical packet

  12. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... MST. http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/msthom... Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  13. The Transgender Military Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Dietert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been studies that focus on the experiences of the gay and lesbian population serving in the United States military, few have focused on the experience of active duty transgender service members. Transgender individuals transgress the binary conception of gender by deviating from societal gender norms associated with assigned sex at birth. The Department of Defense has set policies and standards that reflect a binary conception of gender, with a focus on conformity. We argue that able-bodied gender variant service personnel are just as capable of serving their country as anyone else. Because of the repercussions associated with active duty transgender military personnel, our sample is small and involves nine clandestine service members and two international service members who wanted to share their stories from a different perspective. Snowball sampling was aimed at finding current active duty and reserve transgender service members. Using a combination of telephone interviews and questionnaires, data were collected from active duty transgender service personnel throughout the United States and two from international militaries that allow transgender people to serve. Data collection focused on the overall experiences of the participants along with questions regarding workplace discrimination, suggestions for policy changes, and their views about the overturn of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. Our findings add to a growing source of information about the transgender military experience in the U.S. armed forces and the importance of overturning discriminatory workplace policies that negatively impact transgender service members.

  14. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-20

    Democratic Revolution in Ethiopia"] [Excerpts] On 12 September 1974, a Volkswagen escorted by military vehicles left the gates of the Imperial...time. ,. The question that comes up is how long will the KRASNAYA ZVEZDA delivery to Kamchatka be treated so scandalously ? 12511 CSO:1801/14 48

  15. Resilience among Military Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors present their approach to understanding resilience among military connected young people, and they discuss some of the gaps in their knowledge. They begin by defining resilience, and then present a theoretical model of how young people demonstrate resilient functioning. Next they consider some of the research on…

  16. The Military Instructor's Handbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøstedt, Peter; Grønlund, Thomas

    The Military Instructor's handbook was written for the basic professional training of instructors in the danish defence. The book describes the work of instructors and their areas of responsibility, and it offers guidance and direction on how to plan, conduct and evaluate learning activities...

  17. Injury pattern of suicide bomb attacks in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, M M A; Nasreen, G; Malik, S A

    2012-04-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze the pattern of injuries, hospital care, and outcome of the victims of suicide bomb attacks in Pakistan. This prospective, cohort study was conducted at the Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi during the last 3 years. Seriously injured patients in the "immediate category" were resuscitated in the emergency operation theater adjacent to the emergency room and, after resuscitation, the patients were transferred to the main operation theaters, where consultant surgeons were available. During the study period, 1,296 terrorist victims presented to the emergency department and (86.9%) were admitted, with a mean hospital stay of 8.2 ± 2.1 days. The majority of patients arrived by ambulance (91%) and only 38 (3%) were evacuated by air. Penetrating splinter injuries were the most prevalent (87%), and 29% patients also had associated injuries. Open bone fractures were found in 48% and 42% had injured hollow and solid viscous. Overall, 33% of patients had thoracic injuries and neuro-trauma was observed in 16% of the study population. Deafness was a feature in 33% patients, 121 had to undergo limb amputations, and mortality remained in 7% of patients. Most of the problems encountered were logistic in nature. Early evacuation of the victims remains pivotal in saving lives. The major causes of death in peripheral patients was hypovolemic shock, sepsis, and hypothermia. Mortality and morbidity can be enhanced by ample fluid resuscitation, tetanus prophylaxis, and proficient first aid at the site of injury.

  18. Consequences of Making Weight: A Review of Eating Disorder Symptoms and Diagnoses in the United States Military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodell, Lindsay; Forney, Katherine Jean; Keel, Pamela; Gutierrez, Peter; Joiner, Thomas E

    2014-12-01

    Eating disorders are serious psychiatric illnesses associated with health problems. Such problems may compromise military performance, highlighting the need to establish the level of eating pathology that exists in military samples. This article qualitatively reviews prevalence estimates of eating disorder symptoms and diagnoses in military samples, providing nonmilitary estimates for context. Findings suggest that eating disorder symptoms are prevalent in cadets and active duty service members, especially when using self-report measures. The increased salience of weight in the military and increased exposure to trauma may influence risk for eating disorders. Alternatively, individuals at risk for eating disorders may self-select into the military. Overall, this review suggests that eating disorder symptoms are common in military samples and that further research is warranted.

  19. Post-deployment family violence among UK military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Jamie; Jones, Margaret; Somaini, Greta; Hull, Lisa; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T; MacManus, Deirdre

    2017-12-19

    Research into violence among military personnel has not differentiated between stranger- and family-directed violence. While military factors (combat exposure and post-deployment mental health problems) are risk factors for general violence, there has been limited research on their impact on violence within the family environment. This study aims to compare the prevalence of family-directed and stranger-directed violence among a deployed sample of UK military personnel and to explore risk factors associated with both family- and stranger-directed violence. This study utilised data from a large cohort study which collected information by questionnaire from a representative sample of randomly selected deployed UK military personnel (n = 6711). The prevalence of family violence immediately following return from deployment was 3.6% and 7.8% for stranger violence. Family violence was significantly associated with having left service, while stranger violence was associated with younger age, male gender, being single, having a history of antisocial behaviour as well as having left service. Deployment in a combat role was significantly associated with both family and stranger violence after adjustment for confounders [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.92 (1.25-2.94), p = 0.003 and aOR = 1.77 (1.31-2.40), p violence both inside and outside the family environment and should be considered in violence reduction programmes for military personnel. Further research using a validated measurement tool for family violence would improve comparability with other research.

  20. Dismounted Complex Blast Injury. Report of the Army Dismounted Complex Blast Injury Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-18

    military aircraft. The SG chartered the Army Pain Manage- ment Task Force in August 2009 to make recommendations for a comprehensive pain management...phantom limb pain . This approach along with access to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) interventions, such as acupuncture and meditation...triple limb amputations. The severity of these injuries presents new challenges to the medical and military communities to prevent, protect, mitigate

  1. Sexual Harassment and Assault in the U.S. Military: A Review of Policy and Research Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stander, Valerie A; Thomsen, Cynthia J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing concern regarding the problem of sexual violence in the military. Because sexual harassment and assault are more closely intertwined in the military than in most civilian contexts, the military context affords a unique opportunity to study the interrelationships between these two types of sexual violence. In this review, we briefly summarize existing research on military sexual trauma prevalence rates, effects on victims, and risk factors, as well as prevention and response programs in the military context. In each of these topic areas, we emphasize issues unique to the complex interplay between sexual harassment and assault in the military and make recommendations for future research. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injury among U.S. Army behavioral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Lonnie S

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the knowledge and misconceptions about traumatic brain injury (TBI) held by behavioral health care professionals providing services to an active-duty military population. Active duty U.S. Army psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and psychiatric nurses from locations across the Department of Defense, and behavioral health professionals from a major military hospital (N = 181) were surveyed on 19 common myths and misconceptions about TBI (Gouvier, Prestholdt, & Warner, 1988). Eight new items were added to the survey to more specifically assess misconceptions pertaining to mild TBI (mTBI). Mean percentages for the subcomponents of the questionnaire suggested that responses were generally accurate for general information about brain damage (83.61% correct) but less accurate for unconsciousness (45.81%), amnesia or memory loss (53%), and recovery items (64.8%). The total percent correct was 51% on the new mTBI items with a sizable minority of the sample viewing mTBI as being associated with lengthier recovery and poorer outcome than what has been indicated by recent research. Overall, misconceptions, particularly about mTBI, are prevalent among U.S. Army behavioral health providers. These findings raise concern about the dissemination of TBI information to health care professionals in the U.S. Army and to military personnel who may not be receiving accurate information about TBI recovery. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. MORAL INJURY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Mildred

    2017-12-01

    The devastating effect on the self of moral injury, often a core component of trauma, occurring when one's actions have profoundly violated one's code of ethics, when one has been a victim of such violation, or when one has been a passive witness, has been extensively explored as it has occurred in veterans of the wars in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. Two examples illustrate its prevalence in civilian life. The literature shows violation of expected empathy from and for others, inherent in our nature, is more devastating than violation of the ethical code of our culture or sub-culture, adherence to which becomes urgent as our need emerges to belong to the culture or subculture of which we are a part, values which often contradict our innate sense of "what is right."

  4. Prevalence, circumstances and consequences of non-fatal road traffi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence, circumstances and consequences of non-fatal road traffi c injuries and other bodily injuries among older people in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia ... injury, while younger age, residing in a rural area, hazardous or harmful alcohol use and having a sleeping problem were associated with other bodily injury.

  5. [Hypertension morbidity in contract military personnel serving in the Eastern Military District according to dynamic monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonaskov, O V; Davidovich, I M; Zubkov, O V; Talapov, S V

    2015-02-01

    The authors researched the changes in the prevalence of hypertension and major risk factors (overweight, obesity, smoking and high cholesterol) in men of young age--officers of the Eastern Military District during the five-year dynamic observation (2009-2014). 1043 servicemen were selected for the survey. 96.5% of selected servicemen or 1011 people agreed to take part in the survey, the average age was from 25 to 45 years. It was found that among young men the prevalence of hypertension decreased to 24.4%; this result is lower than in the group of civilian population of the same age. It was also found that commitment to healthy lifestyle has increased and the prevalence of the most common risk factors (overweight and obesity, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, alcohol consumption) has decreased but in comparison with the civil population prevalence of modifiable risk factors remains high. The study showed that during the reform of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation and the inherent strength of military labour remains high, which can not but affect the health officers, 95.5% identified hypertensive patients in our study, young men 35 years with 1st stage of the disease.

  6. Military veteran mortality following a survived suicide attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conigliaro Joseph

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a global public health problem. Recently in the U.S., much attention has been given to preventing suicide and other premature mortality in veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. A strong predictor of suicide is a past suicide attempt, and suicide attempters have multiple physical and mental comorbidities that put them at risk for additional causes of death. We examined mortality among U.S. military veterans after hospitalization for attempted suicide. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted with all military veterans receiving inpatient treatment during 1993-1998 at United States Veterans Affairs (VA medical facilities following a suicide attempt. Deaths occurring during 1993-2002, the most recent available year at the time, were identified through VA Beneficiary and Records Locator System data and National Death Index data. Mortality data for the general U.S. adult population were also obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics. Comparisons within the veteran cohort, between genders, and against the U.S. population were conducted with descriptive statistics and standardized mortality ratios. The actuarial method was used estimate the proportion of veterans in the cohort we expect would have survived through 2002 had they experienced the same rate of death that occurred over the study period in the U.S. population having the age and sex characteristics. Results During 1993-1998, 10,163 veterans were treated and discharged at a VA medical center after a suicide attempt (mean age = 44 years; 91% male. There was a high prevalence of diagnosed alcohol disorder or abuse (31.8%, drug dependence or abuse (21.8%, psychoses (21.2%, depression (18.5%, and hypertension (14.2%. A total of 1,836 (18.1% veterans died during follow up (2,941.4/100,000 person years. The cumulative survival probability after 10 years was 78.0% (95% CI = 72.9, 83.1. Hence the 10-year cumulative mortality risk was 22

  7. Comparison of elective lumbar discectomy outcomes between civilians and military personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzanegan, G.; Mohebbi, H.A.; Moharamzad, Y.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the results of discectomy surgery for lumbar disc herniation in military personnel and compare it with civilians. One-hundred and seventeen military patients (54 subjects as combat forces and 63 as office personnel) and 115 civilians, who underwent discectomy surgery were included. In a mean duration of 50.8 months, the ability to return to full duty and resolution of complaints were assessed and satisfaction was measured using a Visual Analog Scale. Inability to return to previous duty was significantly higher in military personnel compared to civilians (p = 0.002); and in combat forces compared to office personnel (p 0.05). Surgical intervention had relatively poor outcomes in military personnel, specifically in combat forces. Prevention of injury to back region should be considered in military training programs and in case of presence of disc herniation related symptoms, efforts should be made to save patients effective function by conservation and medical therapies. (author)

  8. "Einsatzchirurgie"--experiences of German military surgeons in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Christian; Hauer, Thorsten; Huschitt, Niels; Palm, Hans-Georg

    2011-04-01

    In 2010, the world witnessed 32 wars and other armed conflicts. Epidemiological analyses of mechanisms and patterns of injury of soldiers sent into these conflicts can be utilised to identify the surgical expertise that is required in a combat setting providing important parameters to adjust medical infrastructure and training requirements for future Military Surgeons. Today in 2011, the German Bundeswehr runs a combat support hospital (role 3) in Mazar-e-Sharif in Northern Afghanistan providing a multidisciplinary capability profile. Furthermore, there are two role 2 medical treatment facilities (rescue centres) in Kunduz and Feyzabad for life-saving procedures and damage control operations in order to enable rapid evacuation to a higher level of care. Epidemiological analyses of injury patterns and mechanisms have shown that 2,299 soldiers of the coalition forces have been killed in Afghanistan until January 15, 2011. Of these, 21.4% died in non-hostile action (2010). The leading causes of injury were explosive devices (up to 60%) followed by gunshot wounds. Chest or abdominal injuries (40%) and traumatic brain injuries (35%) were the main causes of death for soldiers killed in action. The analysis of all surgical procedures performed in Northern Afghanistan demonstrates that most of the patients who underwent surgery until 2009 were local civilians. Most of these operations involved osteosynthesis and soft tissue debridement. Due to the recently aggravated tactical situation within the theatre, a significant increase of mass casualty situations and combat-related injuries was noticed. The casualties in this military conflict present with injury patterns that are not seen in routine surgical practice at home. In an era of increasing surgical sub-specialisation, the deployed military surgeon needs to acquire and maintain a wide range of skills including a variety of surgical fields. In order to create this kind of military surgeon, the so-called DUO plus model for

  9. Eating disorders in military and veteran men and women: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Brooke A; Mitchell, Karen S

    2015-12-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) have serious consequences for psychological and physical health. They have high mortality rates and are among the most costly disorders to treat. However, EDs remain understudied in military and veteran populations. The aim of this review was to examine prevalence estimates and associated symptomatology of EDs among military and veteran men and women and to identify factors that may put these individuals at risk for the development of an ED for the purposes of improving detection, intervention, and treatment. A thorough literature review was conducted using the databases PsycINFO and PubMed. All articles with a focus on EDs in military/veteran samples were considered. Studies reveal high prevalence estimates of EDs among military/veteran men and women. Unique features of military life may increase the risk for development of an ED, including: military sexual trauma, strict weight and physical fitness requirements, and combat exposure. A history of trauma was common in individuals diagnosed with an ED in military and veteran samples. The high rates of EDs among military and veteran samples underscore the importance of further research, as well as the importance of screening and intervention efforts, in these understudied populations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pediatric acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  11. Physical injuries, contractures and rigidity of skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenyi-Both, A.L.; Korenyi-Both, I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors condensed their knowledge of physical injuries of skeletal muscle, particularly injuries caused by mechanical energy, atmospheric pressure, radiation, extremes of temperature and electricity. The possible perils, outcomes and consequences are discussed. Special attention is given to the military medical projections.

  12. Physical injuries, contractures and rigidity of skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenyi-Both, A.L.; Korenyi-Both, I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors condensed their knowledge of physical injuries of skeletal muscle, particularly injuries caused by mechanical energy, atmospheric pressure, radiation, extremes of temperature and electricity. The possible perils, outcomes and consequences are discussed. Special attention is given to the military medical projections

  13. Outcomes following military traumatic cardiorespiratory arrest: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarmey, Nicholas T; Park, Claire L; Bartels, Oliver J; Konig, Thomas C; Mahoney, Peter F; Mellor, Adrian J

    2011-09-01

    To determine the characteristics of military traumatic cardiorespiratory arrest (TCRA), and to identify factors associated with successful resuscitation. Data was collected prospectively for adult casualties suffering TCRA presenting to a military field hospital in Helmand Province, Afghanistan between 29 November 2009 and 13 June 2010. Data was available for 52 patients meeting the inclusion criteria. The mean age (range) was 25 (18-36) years. The principal mechanism of injury was improvised explosive device (IED) explosion, the lower limbs were the most common sites of injury and exsanguination was the most common cause of arrest. Fourteen (27%) patients exhibited ROSC and four (8%) survived to discharge. All survivors achieved a good neurological recovery by Glasgow Outcome Scale. Three survivors had arrested due to exsanguination and one had arrested due to pericardial tamponade. All survivors had arrested after commencing transport to hospital and the longest duration of arrest associated with survival was 24 min. All survivors demonstrated PEA rhythms on ECG during arrest. When performed, 6/24 patients had ultrasound evidence of cardiac activity during arrest; all six with cardiac activity subsequently exhibited ROSC and two survived to hospital discharge. Overall rates of survival from military TCRA were similar to published civilian data, despite military TCRA victims presenting with high Injury Severity Scores and exsanguination due to blast and fragmentation injuries. Factors associated with successful resuscitation included arrest beginning after transport to hospital, the presence of electrical activity on ECG, and the presence of cardiac movement on ultrasound examination. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. From killer machines to doctrines and swarms; or why ethics of military robotics is not (necessarily) about robots.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Ethical reflections on military robotics can be enriched by a better understanding of the nature and role of these technologies and by putting robotics into context in various ways. Discussing a range of ethical questions, this paper challenges the prevalent assumptions that military robotics is

  15. Addressing Sequelae of Trauma and Interpersonal Violence in Military Children: A Review of the Literature and Case Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Carole L.; Brown, Elissa J.; Okwara, Leonore

    2011-01-01

    Research has documented increases in child maltreatment at times when caregivers are deployed and rates have increased among military families since 2002, despite remaining stable among civilian families. Military youth also are susceptible to traumatic events that are nonmilitary related. Despite the prevalence of various forms of trauma exposure…

  16. Psychostimulants and military operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyahu, Uri; Berlin, Shai; Hadad, Eran; Heled, Yuval; Moran, Daniel S

    2007-04-01

    Sleep-deprived individuals appear to have decreased psychological and physical capabilities. Studies have shown how major psychological aspects, such as alertness, complex mental performance, and memory, are strongly affected by sleep deprivation. Military use of psychostimulants dates back many years, especially in units that operate over long hours and deprive soldiers of sleep. During prolonged military operations, pilots are regularly kept awake for hours and days without fulfilling their biological sleep requirements. This consequently affects their natural circadian rhythm. This article deals with both the benefits and the side effects of two kinds of psychostimulants, namely, dextroamphetamine, which is more popular and is most widely used, and modafinil, which is a relatively newer type. There is growing evidence that modafinil has fewer side effects, in comparison with its predecessor dextroamphetamine, while still maintaining all of the latter's beneficial characteristics.

  17. Military amphibious vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Amphibious vehicles are necessary for militaries that need to get men and supplies from sea to shoreline. Readers will learn about the different kinds of amphibious vehicles and how they move over water and land! Big full-bleed photographs, new glossary terms, and a close up look at a vehicle will keep readers wanting more! Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Kids Jumbo is an imprint of Abdo Kids, a division of ABDO.

  18. Slowing Military Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    subjective. More objective measurements, such as statistics on youth crime, teenage pregnancy , drug use, literacy, and educational achievement...SLOWING MILITARY CHANGE Zhivan J. Alach October 2008 This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code...those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the New Zealand Defence Force, the New Zealand Government , the

  19. Acupuncture in Military Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Soldiers and family members, and to reduce excessive use, or supplement judicious use of pain medications. The Acupuncture in Modern Medicine336 Army ... acupuncture . Acupuncture in Military Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.5772/55146 331 3. A Holistic approach to pain Complementary and integrative (CI...medical care. More than other CI therapies, acupuncture has undergone a significant integration particularly as a complement to traditional pain manage

  20. Military Hybrid Vehicle Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    III Composite 4.3% Integrated starter generator for engine shut down, regenerative braking and avoidance of inefficient engine operation [28]. FMTV...eliminating the inefficiencies associated with idling, vehicle braking and low engine speed part load efficiency, many improvements can be realized...batteries or delivering power back into an electrical grid . Additionally, new military vehicles are demanding an excess of 100kW, which can only be

  1. Military Effectiveness: A Reappraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    policy of recruiting units on a national basis, with the old Germanic nations of Württemberg, Bavaria, Saxony , and especially Prussia all sending their...the landed nobility or the recent relevant tactical experience of the combat officer. From a synthesis of the two approaches emerges a picture of...complete picture of overall military effectiveness. One must address the interrelationship between the four levels of war. Without this aspect, one can

  2. Measuring secondary traumatic stress symptoms in military spouses with the posttraumatic stress disorder checklist military version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornestad, Andrea G; Schweinle, Amy; Elhai, Jon D

    2014-12-01

    Little research to date has examined secondary traumatic stress symptoms in spouses of military veterans. This study investigated the presence and severity of posttraumatic stress symptoms in a sample of 227 Army National Guard veterans and secondary traumatic stress symptoms among their spouses. The veterans completed the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist Military Version (PCL-M) (Weathers et al., 1993) to determine the probable prevalence rate of posttraumatic stress symptoms. A modified version of the PCL-M was used to assess secondary traumatic stress symptoms in the spouses. A confirmatory factor analysis showed that the modified version of the PCL-M used to assess secondary traumatic stress symptoms in spouses fits using the same four-factor PTSD structure as the PCL-M for veterans. This study provides initial evidence on the underlying symptom structure of secondary traumatic stress symptoms among spouses of traumatic event victims.

  3. [Civilian-military coordination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montravel, G

    2002-01-01

    Current humanitarian emergencies create complex, mutidimensional situations that stimulate simultaneous responses from a wide variety of sources including governments, non-governmental organizations (NGO), United Nations agencies, and private individuals. As a result, it has become essential to establish a coherent framework in which each actor can contribute promptly and effectively to the overall effort. This is the role of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Regardless of the circumstances and level of coordination, cooperation and collaboration between humanitarian and military personnel, it is necessary to bear in mind their objectives. The purpose of humanitarian action is to reduce human suffering. The purpose of military intervention is to stop warfare. The author of this article will discuss the three major obstacles to civilian-military coordination (strategic, tactical, and operational). Operations cannot be conducted smoothly and differences cannot be ironed out without mutual respect between the two parties, an explicit definition of their respective duties and responsibilities, a clear understanding of their cultural differences, and the presence of an organization and facilities for coordination and arbitrage by a neutral referee.

  4. Triage in military settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, E; Pasquier, P; Hoffmann, C; Barbier, O; Boutonnet, M; Salvadori, A; Jarrassier, A; Renner, J; Malgras, B; Mérat, S

    2017-02-01

    Triage, a medical term derived from the French word "trier", is the practical process of sorting casualties to rationally allocate limited resources. In combat settings with limited medical resources and long transportation times, triage is challenging since the objectives are to avoid overcrowding medical treatment facilities while saving a maximum of soldiers and to get as many of them back into action as possible. The new face of modern warfare, asymmetric and non-conventional, has led to the integrative evolution of triage into the theatre of operations. This article defines different triage scores and algorithms currently implemented in military settings. The discrepancies associated with these military triage systems are highlighted. The assessment of combat casualty severity requires several scores and each nation adopts different systems for triage on the battlefield with the same aim of quickly identifying those combat casualties requiring lifesaving and damage control resuscitation procedures. Other areas of interest for triage in military settings are discussed, including predicting the need for massive transfusion, haemodynamic parameters and ultrasound exploration. Copyright © 2016 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  6. Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  7. The effectiveness of neuromuscular warm-up strategies, that require no additional equipment, for preventing lower limb injuries during sports participation: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Katherine

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower limb injuries in sport are increasingly prevalent and responsible for large economic as well as personal burdens. In this review we seek to determine which easily implemented functional neuromuscular warm-up strategies are effective in preventing lower limb injuries during sports participation and in which sporting groups they are effective. Methods Seven electronic databases were searched from inception to January 2012 for studies investigating neuromuscular warm-up strategies and injury prevention. The quality of each included study was evaluated using a modified version of the van Tulder scale. Data were extracted from each study and used to calculate the risk of injury following application of each evaluated strategy. Results Nine studies were identified including six randomized controlled trials (RCT and three controlled clinical trials (CCT. Heterogeneity in study design and warm-up strategies prevented pooling of results. Two studies investigated male and female participants, while the remaining seven investigated women only. Risk Ratio (RR statistics indicated 'The 11+' prevention strategy significantly reduces overall (RR 0.67, confidence interval (CI 0.54 to 0.84 and overuse (RR 0.45, CI 0.28 to 0.71 lower limb injuries as well as knee (RR 0.48, CI 0.32 to 0.72 injuries among young amateur female footballers. The 'Knee Injury Prevention Program' (KIPP significantly reduced the risk of noncontact lower limb (RR 0.5, CI 0.33 to 0.76 and overuse (RR 0.44, CI 0.22 to 0.86 injuries in young amateur female football and basketball players. The 'Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance' (PEP strategy reduces the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries (RR 0.18, CI 0.08 to 0.42. The 'HarmoKnee' programme reduces the risk of knee injuries (RR 0.22, CI 0.06 to 0.76 in teenage female footballers. The 'Anterior Knee Pain Prevention Training Programme' (AKP PTP significantly reduces the incidence of anterior

  8. The effectiveness of neuromuscular warm-up strategies, that require no additional equipment, for preventing lower limb injuries during sports participation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Katherine; Barton, Christian; Malliaras, Peter; Morrissey, Dylan

    2012-07-19

    Lower limb injuries in sport are increasingly prevalent and responsible for large economic as well as personal burdens. In this review we seek to determine which easily implemented functional neuromuscular warm-up strategies are effective in preventing lower limb injuries during sports participation and in which sporting groups they are effective. Seven electronic databases were searched from inception to January 2012 for studies investigating neuromuscular warm-up strategies and injury prevention. The quality of each included study was evaluated using a modified version of the van Tulder scale. Data were extracted from each study and used to calculate the risk of injury following application of each evaluated strategy. Nine studies were identified including six randomized controlled trials (RCT) and three controlled clinical trials (CCT). Heterogeneity in study design and warm-up strategies prevented pooling of results. Two studies investigated male and female participants, while the remaining seven investigated women only. Risk Ratio (RR) statistics indicated 'The 11+' prevention strategy significantly reduces overall (RR 0.67, confidence interval (CI) 0.54 to 0.84) and overuse (RR 0.45, CI 0.28 to 0.71) lower limb injuries as well as knee (RR 0.48, CI 0.32 to 0.72) injuries among young amateur female footballers. The 'Knee Injury Prevention Program' (KIPP) significantly reduced the risk of noncontact lower limb (RR 0.5, CI 0.33 to 0.76) and overuse (RR 0.44, CI 0.22 to 0.86) injuries in young amateur female football and basketball players. The 'Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance' (PEP) strategy reduces the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries (RR 0.18, CI 0.08 to 0.42). The 'HarmoKnee' programme reduces the risk of knee injuries (RR 0.22, CI 0.06 to 0.76) in teenage female footballers. The 'Anterior Knee Pain Prevention Training Programme' (AKP PTP) significantly reduces the incidence of anterior knee pain (RR 0.27, CI 0.14 to 0.54) in

  9. Civil military operations in Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho, Carlos Eduardo Paladines.

    2003-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. Civil Military Operations (CMO) has often been blamed for the politicization of the armed forces and a loss of civilian control. This thesis confronts this traditional approach and argues that CMO need not lead to these outcomes. It introduces democratic civilian control of the armed forces, a well-established military mission, and civilian and military expertise as the basic requirements for the application of CMO. If the requirement...

  10. Measures of morally injurious experiences: A quantitative comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Steven L; Irene Harris, J

    2018-03-28

    A recent body of literature has examined the psychological effects of perpetrating or failing to prevent acts that violate one's sense of right and wrong. The objective of this study was to examine and compare correlations between the two most widely used instruments measuring this construct in a sample of military veterans and relevant psychosocial variables. Individuals (N = 182) who reported military combat experience completed the Moral Injury Events Scale and the Moral Injury Questionnaire-Military Version, along with measures of combat exposure, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, alcohol concerns, anger, guilt, and shame. Results indicate similar correlations between the morally injurious experiences instruments and negative psychosocial variables, but different correlations with combat exposure. Implications for further research in the conceptualization and treatment of morally injurious experiences are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Spinal column injuries among Americans in the global war on terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, James A; Patzkowski, Jeanne C; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Cross Rivera, Jessica D; Grenier, Eric S; Lehman, Ronald A; Hsu, Joseph R

    2012-09-19

    While combat spinal injuries have been documented since the fourth century BC, a comprehensive analysis of such injuries has not been performed for any American military conflict. Recent literature has suggested that spinal injuries account for substantial disability in wounded service members. The Joint Theater Trauma Registry was queried to identify all American military personnel who sustained injuries to the back, spinal column, and/or spinal cord in Iraq or Afghanistan from October 2001 to December 2009. Spinal injuries were categorized according to anatomic location, neurological involvement, mechanism of injury, and concomitant wounds. Of 10,979 evacuated combat casualties, 598 (5.45%) sustained 2101 spinal injuries. Explosions accounted for 56% of spinal injuries, motor vehicle collisions for 29%, and gunshots for 15%. Ninety-two percent of all injuries were fractures, with transverse process, compression, and burst fractures the most common. Spinal cord injuries were present in 17% (104) of the 598 patients. Concomitant injuries frequently occurred in the abdomen, chest, head, and face. The incidence of spine trauma sustained by military personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan is higher than that reported for previous conflicts, and the nature of these injuries may be similar to those in severely injured civilians. Further research into optimal management and rehabilitation is critical for military service members and severely injured civilians with spine trauma.