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Sample records for prevalent anxiety disorder

  1. Depression and anxiety in multisomatoform disorder: Prevalence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Multisomatoform disorder (MSD) is characterised by ≥3 medically inexplicable, troublesome physical symptoms, together with a ≥2-year history of somatisation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders in a South African sample MSD, and to compare demographic ...

  2. Comparative Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Other Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Tyagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of comorbid eating disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD and other common anxiety disorders. Method. 179 patients from the same geographical area with a diagnosis of OCD or an anxiety disorder were divided into two groups based on their primary diagnosis. The prevalence of a comorbid eating disorder was calculated in both groups. Results. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of comorbid eating disorders between the OCD and other anxiety disorders group. Conclusions. These results suggest that the prevalence of comorbid eating disorders does not differ in anxiety disorders when compared with OCD. However, in both groups, it remains statistically higher than that of the general population.

  3. The High Prevalence of Anxiety Disorders After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Toby B; Blomstrand, Christian; Skoog, Ingmar; Linden, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies indicate that post-stroke anxiety is common and persistent. We aimed to determine whether point prevalence of anxiety after stroke is higher than in the population at large, and whether the profile of anxiety symptoms is different. This case-control study was conducted in Göteborg, Sweden, with stroke patients recruited from the Sahlgrenska University Hospital and a comparison group selected from local population health studies. We included 149 stroke survivors (assessed at 20 months post-stroke) and 745 participants from the general population matched for age and sex. A comprehensive psychiatric interview was conducted, with anxiety and depressive disorders diagnosed according to DSM-III-R criteria. Those in the stroke group were significantly more likely than those in the comparison group to have generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (27% versus 8%), phobic disorder (24% versus 8%) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (9% versus 2%). Multivariate regression indicated that being in the stroke group, female sex, and having depression were all significant independent associates of having an anxiety disorder. In terms of symptom profile, stroke survivors with GAD were significantly more likely to report vegetative disturbance than those in the comparison group with GAD but less likely to have observable muscle tension or reduced sleep. Point prevalence of anxiety disorders is markedly higher after stroke than in the general population, and this cannot be attributed to higher rates of comorbid depression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women of other races and ethnicities. 7 What causes anxiety disorders? Researchers think anxiety disorders are caused by a ... Asnaani, A… .Hofmann, S.G. (2011). Gender Differences in Anxiety Disorders: Prevalence, Course of Illness, Comorbidity and Burden of Illness . Journal of Psychiatric ...

  5. Prevalence and impact of comorbid anxiety and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Martin B

    2006-01-01

    Comorbid conditions pose a serious risk to patients with bipolar disorder, but anxiety comorbidity poses a specific hazard due to the increased negative impact of anxiety on illness course and treatment. Anxiety comorbidity appears to be highly prevalent and is associated with intensified symptoms of bipolar disorder and additional comorbid disorders, resulting in a negative impact on the patient and on the course of the illness. The presence of anxiety in bipolar patients is also associated with a lowered age at onset, hampered patient response to treatment such as lithium, increased rates of suicide and substance abuse, and decreased quality of life. Patients can experience work, family, and social impairment and be made to contend with increased health care costs and strains on family support. Studies are few and have a limited scope, and many have failed to consider the clinical significance of comorbid anxiety and bipolar disorder. Because the degree to which anxiety impacts patients with bipolar disorder is not fully known, more information is needed about the relationship between bipolar disorder and anxiety.

  6. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rachel G.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence and their negative long-term consequences, child anxiety disorders have become an important focus of interest. Whether pathological anxiety and normal fear are similar processes continues to be controversial. Comparative studies of child anxiety disorders are scarce, but there is some support for the current…

  7. The prevalence and correlates of adult separation anxiety disorder in an anxiety clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Renate

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD has been identified recently, but there is a paucity of data about its prevalence and associated characteristics amongst anxiety patients. This study assessed the prevalence and risk factor profile associated with ASAD in an anxiety clinic. Methods Clinical psychologists assigned 520 consecutive patients to DSM-IV adult anxiety subcategories using the SCID. We also measured demographic factors and reports of early separation anxiety (the Separation Anxiety Symptom Inventory and a retrospective diagnosis of childhood separation anxiety disorder. Other self-report measures included the Adult Separation Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (ASA-27, the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales (DASS-21, personality traits measured by the NEO PI-R and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. These measures were included in three models examining for overall differences and then by gender: Model 1 compared the conventional SCID anxiety subtypes (excluding PTSD and OCD because of insufficient numbers; Model 2 divided the sample into those with and without ASAD; Model 3 compared those with ASAD with the individual anxiety subtypes in the residual group. Results Patients with ASAD had elevated early separation anxiety scores but this association was unique in females only. Except for social phobia in relation to some comparisons, those with ASAD recorded more severe symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress, higher neuroticism scores, and greater levels of disability. Conclusions Patients with ASAD attending an anxiety clinic are highly symptomatic and disabled. The findings have implications for the classification, clinical identification and treatment of adult anxiety disorders.

  8. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Beena Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, ...

  9. Prevalence and Associations of Anxiety Disorders in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, K. A.; Smiley, E.; Cooper, S.-A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Anxiety disorders are known to be common in the general population. Previous studies with adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) report a prevalence of general anxiety disorder ranging from less than 2% to 17.4%. Little is known about associated factors in this population. This study investigates point prevalence of anxiety…

  10. Gender Differences in Anxiety Disorders: Prevalence, Course of Illness, Comorbidity and Burden of Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Carmen P.; Asnaani, Anu; Litz, Brett T.; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2011-01-01

    Women have consistently higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders, but less is known about how gender affects age of onset, chronicity, comorbidity, and burden of illness. Gender differences in DSM-IV anxiety disorders were examined in a large sample of adults (N = 20,013) in the United States using data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Studies (CPES). The lifetime and 12-month male:female prevalence ratios of any anxiety disorder were 1:1.7 and 1:1.79, respectively. Women had higher rates of lifetime diagnosis for each of the anxiety disorders examined, except for social anxiety disorder which showed no gender difference in prevalence. No gender differences were observed in the age of onset and chronicity of the illness. However, women with a lifetime diagnosis of an anxiety disorder were more likely than men to also be diagnosed with another anxiety disorder, bulimia nervosa, and major depressive disorder. Furthermore, anxiety disorders were associated with a greater illness burden in women than in men, particularly among European American women and to some extend also among Hispanic women. These results suggest that anxiety disorders are not only more prevalent but also more disabling in women than in men. PMID:21439576

  11. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, low educational status, family history of anxiety disorder, financial stress in family and adverse childhood experiences are risk factors for the development of anxiety disorders. If not diagnosed and managed at the earliest, paediatric anxiety disorders can cause life threatening problems in the future. Hence early and scientific management of anxiety disorders is essential. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the effective evidence based treatment for paediatric anxiety disorders.

  12. Posttyphoon prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder, major depressive disorder, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder in a Vietnamese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstadter, Ananda B; Acierno, Ron; Richardson, Lisa K; Kilpatrick, Dean G; Gros, Daniel F; Gaboury, Mario T; Tran, Trinh Luong; Trung, Lam Tu; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Tuan, Tran; Buoi, La Thi; Ha, Tran Thu; Thach, Tran Duc; Galea, Sandro

    2009-06-01

    In 2006, typhoon Xangsane disrupted a multiagency health needs study of 4,982 individuals in Vietnam. Following this disaster, 798 of the original participants were reinterviewed to determine prevalence and risk factors associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder (PD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Posttyphoon prevalences were PTSD 2.6%, MDD 5.9%, PD 9.3%, and GAD 2.2%. Of those meeting criteria for a disorder, 70% reported only one disorder, 15% had two, 14% had three, and 1% met criteria for all four disorders. Risk factors for posttyphoon psychopathology differed among disorders, but generally were related to high typhoon exposure, prior trauma exposure, and in contrast to Western populations, higher age, but not gender.

  13. Clinical assessment of DSM-IV anxiety disorders in fragile X syndrome: prevalence and characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Cordeiro, Lisa; Ballinger, Elizabeth; Hagerman, Randi; Hessl, David

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability (ID). Anxiety and social withdrawal are considered core features of the FXS phenotype, yet there is limited diagnostic evidence of the prevalence of formal anxiety disorders in FXS. This study assessed the prevalence of anxiety disorders in a sample of 58 males and 39 females with FXS (ages 5.0–33.3 years). Participants’ parents completed the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (ADIS-IV), a clinical intervi...

  14. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Therapist Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Helping Kids Cope With Stress Helping Kids Handle Worry Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Childhood Stress Anxiety Disorders Special Needs Factsheet Social Phobia Special Needs Factsheet Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) ...

  15. Gender Differences in Anxiety Disorders: Prevalence, Course of Illness, Comorbidity and Burden of Illness

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, Carmen P.; Asnaani, Anu; Litz, Brett T.; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2011-01-01

    Women have consistently higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders, but less is known about how gender affects age of onset, chronicity, comorbidity, and burden of illness. Gender differences in DSM-IV anxiety disorders were examined in a large sample of adults (N = 20,013) in the United States using data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Studies (CPES). The lifetime and 12-month male:female prevalence ratios of any anxiety disorder were 1:1.7 and 1:1.79, respectively. Women h...

  16. The utility of screen for child anxiety related emotional disorders (SCARED) as a tool for identifying children at high risk for prevalent anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, P.; Merckelbach, H.; Kindt, M.; Bögels, S.; Dreessen, L.; van Dorp, C.; Habets, A.; Rosmuller, S.; Snieder, N.

    2001-01-01

    The current study examined the utility of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) as a screening tool for the identification of children at high risk for prevalent childhood anxiety disorders. The child version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (KSCID) was used

  17. A STUDY ON THE PREVALENCE OF ANXIETY RELATED DISORDERS AMONG ADOLESCENTS IN RURAL KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric problem in school going children worldwide. OBJECTIVE This study was done to find the prevalence and risk factors for anxiety disorders in adolescents in rural Kerala. METHODS A school based survey was done among children of 10 to 13 years using SCARED anxiety scale. Specific items in the SCARED scale were used to assess panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder and school avoidance, detailed assessments of various sociodemographic variables were also done. RESULTS A total of 250 children were studied – 147 girls and 103 boys. Anxiety disorders were found to be highly prevalent in the study population (45.6% affected and girls were disproportionately more affected (53.4% vs. 40.1%, p = 0.0389. It was present among all socio-economic strata. CONCLUSION These findings call for urgent remedial measures involving the students, parents, teachers, school management, policy makers and the media.

  18. Sleep and anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Staner, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Sleep disturbances-particularly insomnia - are highly prevalent in anxiety disorders and complaints such as insomnia or nightmares have even been incorporated in some anxiety disorder definitions, such as generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. In the first part of this review, the relationship between sleep and anxiety is discussed in terms of adaptive response to stress. Recent studies suggested that the corticotropin-releasing hormone system and the locus ceruleus-a...

  19. Prevalence and risk factors of anxiety in a clinical Dutch sample of children with an autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, L.A.M.W.; Creemers, D.H.M.; Vermulst, A.A.; Granic, I.

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety is highly prevalent in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, there is inconsistency in studies investigating prevalence and risk factors of anxiety in children with ASD. Therefore, the first aim of the present study was to give an overview of the prevalence of anxiety

  20. Prevalence of Anxiety Disorders among Children and Adolescents in Iran: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Zarafshan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to conduct a review to investigate the prevalence of anxiety disorders among Iranian children and adolescents.We systematically reviewed the literature up to June 2014. We searched three Persian databases (Magiran, IranMedex and SID and three English databases: PubMed, Scopus and PsycINFO. All original studies that investigated the current prevalence of anxiety in a sample of Iranian children and adolescents were entered into the study. All studies conducted on special samples or in special settings were excluded. By searching English databases, we obtained 124 original studies. After removing duplicate papers, 120 articles remained. In the next step, we screened the articles based on their title. In sum, 95 Persian and English articles had relevant titles. After screening based on the abstract and full text, 26 studies remained. After screening based on the full text, all selected studies were qualitatively assessed by two evaluators separately.Twenty five studies were eligible and reported different types of anxiety disorders (i.e., generalized anxiety, separation anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, phobias and panic disorder. The samples varied from 81 to 2996 among studies and their age range was 5 to 18 years. These studies were conducted in different cities of Iran. SCL-90 is a frequently used questionnaire. All anxiety disorders were mostly investigated with the prevalence rates ranging from 6.8% in Saravan to 85% in Bandar Abbas. OCD was the second common study with prevalence rates ranging from 1% in Tabriz to 11.9% in Gorgan.Our findings revealed considerable amount of anxiety disorder among Iranian children and adolescents. Given the fact that anxiety disorder has negative effects on the well-being and function of individuals and can lead to severe problems, this disorder should be considered in mental health programs designed for children and adolescents.

  1. Prevalence and demographics of anxiety disorders: a snapshot from a community health centre in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Salman

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The developing world is faced with a high burden of anxiety disorders. The exact prevalence of anxiety disorders in Pakistan is not known. There is a need to develop an evidence base to aid policy development on tackling anxiety and depressive disorders in the country. This is the first pilot study to address the prevalence of anxiety disorders and their association with sociodemographic factors in Pakistan. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among people visiting Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH, a tertiary care facility in Karachi, Pakistan. The point prevalence of anxiety amongst the sample population, which comprised of patients and their attendants, excluding all health care personnel, was assessed using the validated Urdu version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. The questionnaire was administered to 423 people. Descriptive statistics were performed for mean scores and proportions. Results The mean anxiety score of the population was 5.7 ± 3.86. About 28.3% had borderline or pathological anxiety. The factors found to be independently predicted with anxiety were, female sex (odds ratio (OR = 2.14, 95% CI 1.36–3.36, p = 0.01; physical illness (OR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.06–2.64, p = 0.026; and psychiatric illness (OR = 1.176, 95% CI 1.0–3.1, p = 0.048. In the final multivariate model, female sex (adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 2, 95% CI 1.28–3.22 and physical illness (AOR = 1.56, 95% CI 0.97–2.48 were found to be significant. Conclusion Further studies via nationally representative surveys need to be undertaken to fully grasp the scope of this emerging public health issue in Pakistan.

  2. Prevalence and Comorbidity of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder Among Teacher Candidate University Students

    OpenAIRE

    AHMETOĞLU, Emine; GÖRMEZ, Vahdet; COŞKUN, Murat; ÖZTÜRK, Mücahit; COŞKUN ÖGEYİK, Muhlise

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: To investigate prevalence and comorbidity of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and social anxiety disorder (SAD) in a Turkish community sample of young adult population. University students aged 21-24 years completed a socio-demographic form developed by the study team; Adult ADD/ ADHD DSM IV- Based Diagnostic Screening and Rating Scale and Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Subjects, who scored above the cut off points in each scales, were invited for a diagnostic interv...

  3. Prevalence, structure and correlates of anxiety-depression in boys with an autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F; Andronicos, Nicholas M; Agnew, Linda L

    2016-01-01

    Comorbidity of anxiety and depression predicts impaired treatment outcomes, poor quality of life and increased suicide risk. No study has reported on a combined measure of anxiety-depression in boys with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. To explore the prevalence, underlying factor structure and relationships between anxiety-depression, physiological stress and symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). 150 boys (aged 6-18 years; IQ M=94.9, range=73-132) with an ASD plus their parents (135 mothers, 15 fathers) completed scales about the boys' anxiety and depression, and the boys provided samples of their saliva in the morning and afternoon. Parents also completed the ASD Behaviour Checklist about the boys' ASD symptoms. The two sources of ratings were not significantly different for prevalence of anxiety-depression but the factor structures varied between the parents' and boys' responses, with a four-factor solution for the boys' ratings and a three-factor solution for the parents' ratings. There were also differences in the correlations between cortisol and anxiety-depression and between ASD symptoms and anxiety depression across the boys' and parents' data. Assessment of anxiety and depression comorbidity from parents and from children with an ASD themselves could provide a valuable adjunct datum when diagnosing ASD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence and co-morbidity among anxiety disorders in a national cohort of psychiatrically referred children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Hoeyer, Mette; Dyrborg, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    The paper provides prevalence estimates of anxiety disorders as well as homotypic (e.g., other anxiety disorders) and heterotypic (e.g., mood, externalizing) co-morbidity in a national sample of children and adolescents referred to the psychiatric system in Denmark. Data were gathered from...... a database containing 83% of all youth referred from 2004 to 2007 (N=13,241). A prevalence of 5.7% of anxiety disorder was found in the sample. Homotypic co-morbidity was found in only 2.8%, whereas heterotypic co-morbidity was found in 42.9% of the cohort. A total of 73.6% had a principal anxiety disorder...... as opposed to 26.4% who had other principal diagnoses and a secondary anxiety disorder. The national database not only provides a valuable prevalence estimate of anxiety disorders in every-day non-research psychiatric settings, but also highlights the importance of applying standardized screening instruments...

  5. Sleep and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staner, Luc

    2003-09-01

    Sleep disturbances-particularly insomnia - are highly prevalent in anxiety disorders and complaints such as insomnia or nightmares have even been incorporated in some anxiety disorder definitions, such as generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. In the first part of this review, the relationship between sleep and anxiety is discussed in terms of adaptive response to stress. Recent studies suggested that the corticotropin-releasing hormone system and the locus ceruleus-autonomic nervous system may play major roles in the arousal response to stress. It has been suggested that these systems may be particularly vulnerable to prolonged or repeated stress, further leading to a dysfunctional arousal state and pathological anxiety states, Polysomnographic studies documented limited alteration of sleep in anxiety disorders. There is some indication for alteration in sleep maintenance in generalized anxiety disorder and for both sleep initiation and maintenance in panic disorder; no clear picture emerges for obsessive-compulsive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder. Finally, an unequivocal sleep architecture profile that could specifically relate to a particular anxiety disorder could not be evidenced; in contrast, conflicting results are often found for the same disorder. Discrepancies between studies could have been related to illness severity, diagnostic comorbidity, and duration of illness. A brief treatment approach for each anxiety disorder is also suggested with a special focus on sleep.

  6. SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Social phobia, also known as social anxiety disorder, is a highly prevalent disorder with significant morbidity. Patients with social phobia frequently develop co-morbid psychiatric disorders such as depression and substance abuse, and the disorder impacts significantly on social and occupational functioning.

  7. [Prevalence and risk factors of social anxiety disorder in high schools and universities in Chengdu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rong; Wu, Wel-li; Hu, Jun-mei; Qiu, Chang-jian; Wang, Qiang; Wei, Geng; Sun, Jin-hua; Yang, Chuang; Song, Ping; Ye, An-hong; Zhang, Wei

    2006-07-01

    To explore the prevalence and risk factors of social anxiety disorder (SAD) in high schools and universities in Chengdu. 2279 students in Chengdu sampled by optimum distributing delaminating grouping method were interviewed one-to-one by the trained psychiatrists according to SCID. Both the cooperated SAD patients (n=156) and the normal counterparts (NC, n=156) in the 2279 students completed Egma Minnen av Bardndosnauppforstran (EMBU), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Form Y), Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (FNE) and Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ). There were 179 SAD patients, 88 female ones and 91 male ones, in the 2279 students of the high schools and universities in Chengdu. Statistical analysis reveals that the SAD patients differ from the NC in seven aspects, i.e. growing circumstances (P = 0.049), family economical status(P = 0.000), family history of psychiatric disorder, scales of EMBU,STAI, FNE and DSQ. The total prevalence of SAD in the students of high schools and universities in Chengdu was 8.15%, the female prevalence 8.35%, and the male prevalence 7.62%. The possible risk factors were: growing up in the countryside, low family economic state, parental rearing pattern being deficient in emotional warmth, understanding, trust and encouragement but excessive in refuse, denial and overprotection, having anxiety trait, feeling fear of negative evaluation, more likely to use neurotic and immature defense mechanism while less likely to use mature defense mechanism, having positive family mental disorder history.

  8. Prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders among informal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disorders and depression among informal caregivers of mentally-ill patients attending the Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria with that of a noncaregiving population. Methods: The self-administered questionnaire consisted of the sociodemographic data and the two screening instruments - the General

  9. Prevalence of depression, anxiety, adjustment disorders, and somatoform disorders in patients with age-related macular degeneration in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob, Louis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence of depression, anxiety, adjustment disorders, and somatoform disorders in patients diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration (AMD in Germany.Methods: This study included 7,580 patients between the ages of 40 and 90 diagnosed with AMD between January 2011 and December 2014 in 1,072 primary care practices (index date. The last follow-up was in July 2016. We also included 7,580 controls without AMD, which were matched (1:1 to the AMD cases by age, sex, type of health insurance (private or statutory, physician, and Charlson comorbidity score as a generic marker of comorbidity. The outcome of the study was the prevalence of depression, anxiety, adjustment disorders, and somatoform disorders recorded in the database between the index date and the end of follow-up. Results: The mean age among subjects was 75.7 years (SD=10.1 years, 34.0% were men, and 7.8% had private health insurance coverage. The Charlson comorbidity index was 2.0 (SD=1.8. Depression was the most frequent disease (33.7% in AMD patients versus 27.3% in controls, followed by somatoform disorders (19.6% and 16.7%, adjustment disorders (14.8% and 10.5%, and anxiety disorders (11.7% and 8.2%. Depression (OR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.27–1.47, anxiety (OR=1.50, 95% CI: 1.35–1.67, adjustment disorders (OR=1.50, 95% CI: 1.36–1.65, and somatoform disorders (OR=1.22, 95% CI: 1.12–1.32 were all positively associated with AMD. Conclusion: Overall, a significant association was found between AMD and depression, anxiety, adjustment disorders, and somatoform disorders.

  10. Anxiety Disorders in Old Age: Psychiatric Comorbidities, Quality of Life, and Prevalence According to Age, Gender, and Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, Alessandra; Weber, Kerstin; Baertschi, Marc; Andreas, Sylke; Volkert, Jana; Dehoust, Maria Christina; Sehner, Susanne; Suling, Anna; Wegscheider, Karl; Ausín, Berta; Crawford, Mike J; Da Ronch, Chiara; Grassi, Luigi; Hershkovitz, Yael; Muñoz, Manuel; Quirk, Alan; Rotenstein, Ora; Santos-Olmo, Ana Belén; Shalev, Arieh; Strehle, Jens; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Schulz, Holger; Härter, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Previous estimates of the prevalence of anxiety disorders in late life vary greatly due to the lack of reliable diagnostic tools. This MentDis_ICF65+ study assessed 12-month prevalence rates of anxiety disorders and age- and gender-related differences in comorbidities, as well as impact on quality of life. The study used a cross-sectional multicenter survey. The study sample comprised 3,142 men and women aged 65 to 84 years, living in five European countries and Israel. Anxiety disorders were assessed using computer-assisted face-to-face interviews with an age-appropriate diagnostic interview (CIDI65+). The prevalence of anxiety disorders was 17.2%. Agoraphobia was the most frequent disorder (4.9%), followed by panic disorder (3.8%), animal phobia (3.5%), general anxiety disorder (3.1%), post-traumatic stress disorder (1.4%), social phobia (1.3%), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (0.8%). The prevalence rate of any anxiety disorder dropped by 40% to 47% in adults aged 75-84 years compared with those aged 65-74 years. Women were twice as likely to present with agoraphobia or general anxiety disorder as men. Only panic disorder and phobia were associated with comorbid major depression. The negative relationship with quality of life was limited to agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder. The age-appropriate CIDI65+ led to higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders in the elderly, yet to weaker associations with comorbidities and impaired quality of life compared with previous studies. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Prevalence of Anxiety and Depression Disorders in the Children of Veterans of Shiraz, Iran: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Mozafari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Objectives: This survey was conducted in order to assess the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children of the war-wounded veterans, and to compare it with the general population of Shiraz.Methods: The present study was a cross-sectional survey on a random sample of children and adolescents of 223 veteran's (25%-70% families between 12-20 years old. The control group consisted of students of 12-20 years of age. Diagnosis was made using semi-structured clinical interviews on the basis of DSM-IV, through K-SADS-PL.Results: Out of 223 veteran's families interviewed, 123 families had at least one child with one psychiatric disorder. Those children, 52 boys (15 % and 71 girls (20%, suffered from at least one of the psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of depressive disorders such as dysthymia was 2.3%, major depressive disorder 8.4%, and minor depression 5.8%. The prevalence of anxiety disorders including generalized anxiety disorder was (10.1%, separation anxiety disorder (1.4% obsessive compulsive disorder (4%, panic disorder (3.2%, post traumatic stress disorder (3.2%, social phobia (4.3% specific phobia (2% and agoraphobia was (1.4%. Conclusio: Although the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders did not significantly differ from that of control group, but more studies, and more consultative, preventive and therapeutic actions seem to be necessary for children of veterans, due to a higher prevalence of some of anxiety disorders such as generalized anxiety disorder and some depression symptoms.Keywords: Prevalence; Anxiety Disorders; Depressive Disorders; Child; Shiraz , Iran.

  12. Prevalence, demographic and clinical characteristics of body dysmorphic disorder among psychiatric outpatients with mood, anxiety or somatoform disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Job; van Rood, Yanda R; van der Wee, Nic J; den Hollander-Gijsman, Margien; van Noorden, Martijn S; Giltay, Erik J; Zitman, Frans G

    2012-09-01

    To describe the prevalence, demographic and clinical characteristics of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) compared with other psychiatric outpatients with a mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder. Outpatients referred for treatment of a mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder were routinely assessed at intake. A structured interview (MINI-Plus), observer-based and self-rating instruments were administered by an independent assessor. Among our sample of 3798 referred patients, 2947 patients were diagnosed with at least one DSM-IV mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder. Of these patients 1.8% (n = 54) met the diagnostic criteria for BDD. In comparison with other outpatients, patients with BDD were on average younger, less often married and were more often living alone. Highly prevalent comorbid diagnoses were major depression (in 46.3% of cases), social anxiety disorder (in 35.2% of cases) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (in 16.7% of cases). Furthermore, patients with BDD had higher scores on the Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S) as well as lower scores on the Short Form 36 social role functioning. BDD is frequently associated with depression, social phobia and OCD. Patients with BDD have more distress and more impaired interpersonal functioning.

  13. Post-Typhoon Prevalence of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Panic Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder in a Vietnamese Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Amstadter, Ananda B.; Acierno, Ron; Richardson, Lisa; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Gros, Daniel F.; Gaboury, Mario T.; Tran, Trinh Luong; Trung, Lam Tu; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Tuan, Tran; Buoi, La Thi; Ha, Tran Thu; Thach, Tran Duc; Galea, Sandro

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, typhoon Xangsane disrupted a multi-agency health needs study of 4,982 individuals in Vietnam. Following this disaster, 798 of the original participants were re-interviewed to determine prevalence and risk-factors associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder (PD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to the DSM-IV (APA, 1994). Post-typhoon prevalences were: PTSD 2.6%; MDD 5.9%; PD 9.3%; GAD 2.2%. Of those meeting cr...

  14. The Prevalence of Anxiety and Depression Disorders in the Children of Veterans of Shiraz, Iran: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Mozafari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: This survey was conducted in order to assess the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children of the war-wounded veterans, and to compare it with the general population of Shiraz.

    Methods: The present study was a cross-sectional survey on a random sample of children and adolescents of 223 veteran's (25%-70% families between 12-20 years old. The control group consisted of students of 12-20 years of age. Diagnosis was made using semi-structured clinical interviews on the basis of DSM-IV, through K-SADS-PL.

    Results: Out of 223 veteran's families interviewed, 123 families had at least one child with one psychiatric disorder. Those children, 52 boys (15 % and 71 girls (20%, suffered from at least one of the psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of depressive disorders such as dysthymia was 2.3%, major depressive disorder 8.4%, and minor depression 5.8%. The prevalence of anxiety disorders including generalized anxiety disorder was (10.1%, separation anxiety disorder (1.4% obsessive compulsive disorder (4%, panic disorder (3.2%, post traumatic stress disorder (3.2%, social phobia (4.3% specific phobia (2% and agoraphobia was (1.4%.

    Conclusio: Although the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders did not significantly differ from that of control group, but more studies, and more consultative, preventive and therapeutic actions seem to be necessary for children of veterans, due to a higher prevalence of some of anxiety disorders such as generalized anxiety disorder and some depression symptoms.

  15. The prevalence of major anxiety disorders in relatives of alcohol dependent men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckit, M A; Hesselbrock, V M; Tipp, J; Nurnberger, J I; Anthenelli, R M; Crowe, R R

    1995-05-01

    The relationship between alcohol dependence and lifelong major anxiety disorders is complex. The literature indicates a close association between anxiety symptoms and drinking behavior. However, it is difficult to determine whether the anxiety conditions are lifelong disorders or if they represent temporary organic conditions related to alcohol intoxication and withdrawal. One approach to understanding more about the relationships between alcohol dependence and major anxiety disorders is to observe the rate of anxiety-related diagnoses in close relatives of alcoholics. This approach evaluates whether alcoholism and major anxiety disorders might share a common genetic basis. The data presented here describe the rates of four major anxiety disorders in 591 interviewed first-degree relatives of alcohol dependent men and women. The data were gathered through face-to-face structured standardized interviews. The analyses reveal that after focusing on DSM-III-R anxiety disorders, controlling for the potential presence of temporary organic conditions in the subject and considering the impact of assortative mating in their parents, the life-time risk for panic disorder in close biological family members of alcoholics is 3.4%; for agoraphobia, 1.4%; for social phobia, 2.3%; and for obsessive-compulsive disease, 1.4%. These data do not indicate an exceptionally high rate of anxiety disorders among close relatives of alcoholics. While other mechanisms might contribute to relationship between alcoholism and major anxiety disorders, the results do not support evidence of a common genotype for the two disorders.

  16. Comorbidity of post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety in flood survivors: Prevalence and shared risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenjie; Kaminga, Atipatsa C; Tan, Hongzhuan; Wang, Jieru; Lai, Zhiwei; Wu, Xin; Xiong, Yuan; Deng, Jing; Liu, Aizhong

    2017-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety are both prevalent in trauma-related populations. However, comorbidity of these 2 psychiatric disorders has not been investigated in flood survivors. This study aimed to estimate the extent to which PTSD and anxiety co-occur in flood survivors, and identify shared risk factors for PTSD only and comorbidity of PTSD and anxiety.Individuals who experienced Dongting Lake flood in 1998 were enrolled in this study using stratified and systematic random sampling method. Information on social support, personality traits, PTSD, and anxiety was collected using self-report questionnaires. The intensity of exposure to the flood was measured by some questions. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with PTSD only and comorbidity of PTSD and anxiety.In all, 325 participants were enrolled in this study. The prevalence of PTSD, anxiety, and comorbidity of PTSD and anxiety among survivors of the 1998 Dongting Lake flood at 17-year follow-up was 9.54%, 9.23%, and 6.15%, respectively. Furthermore, 64.52% of those with PTSD had anxiety and 66.67% of those with anxiety had PTSD. Loss of relative, injury of body, damage of house, and emotional instability were shared risk factors for PTSD only and comorbidity of PTSD and anxiety, in comparison with neither PTSD nor anxiety.Post-traumatic stress disorder only and comorbidity of PTSD and anxiety are prevalent in flood survivors, and are both related to the intensity of exposure to the flood and personality traits, indicating that integrated intervention strategies of PTSD and anxiety for flood survivors are needed.

  17. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Annemieke C.; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Cnossen, Maryse C.; Olff, Miranda; van Beeck, Ed F.; Polinder, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    This review examined pre- and post-injury prevalence of, and risk factors for, anxiety disorders and depressive disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI), based on evidence from structured diagnostic interviews. A systematic literature search was conducted in EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central,

  18. Social anxiety disorder in Saudi adolescent boys: Prevalence, subtypes, and parenting style as a risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazwani, Jaafar Y; Khalil, Shamsun N; Ahmed, Razia A

    2016-01-01

    Available information on social anxiety disorder (SAD) in adolescents in Saudi Arabia is limited. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence, severity, and subtypes of SAD, and parenting style risk factors associated with SAD in the adolescent. This cross-sectional study was conducted in two secondary schools for boys in Abha, Saudi Arabia during the Academic year 2013. To collect the data, a questionnaire eliciting information on background characteristics and parenting style as well as the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Test (LSAS), for the evaluation of SAD, were used. A total of 454 students participated in the study. The age of the participants ranged between 15 and 20 years with a mean of 17.4 years. The prevalence of SAD was 11.7%. Around 36% and 11.4% of the students respectively had severe and more severe forms of SAD. Parenting style such as parental anger, criticism particularly in front of others, exaggerated protection, maltreatment and family provocation emerged as a significant risk factor for SAD. The independent predictors of SAD were a parental provocation and physical or emotional maltreatment by the parent (odds ratio [OR] = 3.97, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.90-8.31 and OR = 2.67, 95% CI: 3.17-5.19, respectively). The prevalence of SAD in secondary school students at Abha is high. Parenting style risk factors for SAD are modifiable. In this context, a national program to improve mental health in this age group is crucial.

  19. Anxiety, Mood, and Substance Use Disorders in Parents of Children with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alicia A.; Furr, Jami M.; Sood, Erica D.; Barmish, Andrea J.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Examined the prevalence of anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders in the parents of anxiety disordered (AD) children relative to children with no psychological disorder (NPD). The specificity of relationships between child and parent anxiety disorders was also investigated. Results revealed higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders in…

  20. The comparison of severity and prevalence of major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder and eating disorders before and after bariatric surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Matini, Diana; Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Pishgahroudsari, Mohadeseh; Ehtesham, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe obesity is highly co-morbid with psychiatric disorders and may have effect on the quality of life. This study aimed to compare severity and prevalence rate of depression, anxiety and eating disorders and quality of life in severe obese patients before and 6 months after the gastric bypass surgery. Methods: This was a prospective observational study which conducted at Hazarat Rasool-Akram Hospital in Tehran, 2012. Questionnaires included demographic questions, eating disorde...

  1. Treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin; Michaelis, Sophie; Wedekind, Dirk

    2017-06-01

    Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder/agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, and others) are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders, and are associated with a high burden of illness. Anxiety disorders are often underrecognized and undertreated in primary care. Treatment is indicated when a patient shows marked distress or suffers from complications resulting from the disorder. The treatment recommendations given in this article are based on guidelines, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews of randomized controlled studies. Anxiety disorders should be treated with psychological therapy, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of both. Cognitive behavioral therapy can be regarded as the psychotherapy with the highest level of evidence. First-line drugs are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Benzodiazepines are not recommended for routine use. Other treatment options include pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, buspirone, moclobemide, and others. After remission, medications should be continued for 6 to 12 months. When developing a treatment plan, efficacy, adverse effects, interactions, costs, and the preference of the patient should be considered.

  2. Social anxiety disorder in Saudi adolescent boys: Prevalence, subtypes, and parenting style as a risk factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaafar Y Ghazwani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Available information on social anxiety disorder (SAD in adolescents in Saudi Arabia is limited. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence, severity, and subtypes of SAD, and parenting style risk factors associated with SAD in the adolescent. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in two secondary schools for boys in Abha, Saudi Arabia during the Academic year 2013. To collect the data, a questionnaire eliciting information on background characteristics and parenting style as well as the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Test (LSAS, for the evaluation of SAD, were used. Results: A total of 454 students participated in the study. The age of the participants ranged between 15 and 20 years with a mean of 17.4 years. The prevalence of SAD was 11.7%. Around 36% and 11.4% of the students respectively had severe and more severe forms of SAD. Parenting style such as parental anger, criticism particularly in front of others, exaggerated protection, maltreatment and family provocation emerged as a significant risk factor for SAD. The independent predictors of SAD were a parental provocation and physical or emotional maltreatment by the parent (odds ratio [OR] = 3.97, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.90-8.31 and OR = 2.67, 95% CI: 3.17-5.19, respectively. Conclusion: The prevalence of SAD in secondary school students at Abha is high. Parenting style risk factors for SAD are modifiable. In this context, a national program to improve mental health in this age group is crucial.

  3. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or dread of what's about to happen or what might happen. While fear is the emotion we feel in the presence ... feel overwhelmed, tongue-tied, or unable to do what they need to ... amounts of anxiety, fear, nervousness, worry, or dread. Anxiety that is too ...

  4. Generalized anxiety disorder in urban China: Prevalence, awareness, and disease burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Singh, Shikha Satendra; Calhoun, Shawna; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Xiahong; Yang, Fengchi

    2018-02-21

    Limited published research has quantified the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) prevalence and its burden in China. This study aimed to fill in the knowledge gap and to evaluate the burden of GAD among adults in urban China. This study utilized existing data from the China National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS) 2012-2013. Prevalence of self-reported diagnosed and undiagnosed GAD was estimated. Diagnosed and undiagnosed GAD respondents were compared with non-anxious respondents in terms of health-related quality of life (HRQoL), resource utilization, and work productivity and activity impairment using multivariate generalized linear models. A multivariate logistic model assessed the risk factors for GAD. The prevalence of undiagnosed/diagnosed GAD was 5.3% in urban China with only 0.5% of GAD respondents reporting a diagnosis. Compared with non-anxious respondents, both diagnosed and undiagnosed GAD respondents had significantly lower HRQoL, more work productivity and activity impairment, and greater healthcare resource utilization in the past six months. Age, gender, marital status, income level, insurance status, smoking, drinking and exercise behaviors, and comorbidity burdens were significantly associated with GAD. This was a patient-reported study; data are therefore subject to recall bias. The survey was limited to respondents in urban China; therefore, these results focused on urban China and may be under- or over-estimating GAD prevalence in China. Causal inferences cannot be made given the cross-sectional nature of the study. GAD may be substantially under-diagnosed in urban China. More healthcare resources should be invested to alleviate the burden of GAD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bad dream frequency in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder: prevalence, correlates, and effect of cognitive behavioral treatment for anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadorff, Michael R; Porter, Ben; Rhoades, Howard M; Greisinger, Anthony J; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and frequency of bad dreams in older adults. A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety to enhanced usual care (EUC) assessed bad dream frequency at baseline, post treatment (3 months), and at 6, 9, 12, and 15 months. Of 227 participants (mean age = 67.4), 134 met GAD diagnostic criteria (CBT = 70, EUC = 64), with the remaining 93 serving as a comparison group. Patients with GAD had significantly more bad dreams than those without, and bad dream frequency was significantly associated with depression, anxiety, worry, and poor quality of life. CBT for anxiety significantly reduced bad dream frequency at post treatment and throughout follow up compared to EUC.

  6. Bad Dream Frequency in Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Prevalence, Correlates, and Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadorff, Michael R.; Porter, Ben; Rhoades, Howard M.; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Kunik, Mark E.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and frequency of bad dreams in older adults. A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety (CBT) to enhanced usual care (EUC), it assessed bad dream frequency at baseline, post-treatment (3 months), and 6, 9, 12 and 15 months. Of 227 participants (mean age = 67.4), 134 met GAD diagnostic criteria (CBT = 70, EUC = 64), with the remaining 93 serving as a comparison group. Patients with GAD had significantly more bad dreams than those without, and bad dream frequency was significantly associated with depression, anxiety, worry, and poor quality of life. CBT for anxiety significantly reduced bad dream frequency at post-treatment and throughout follow-up compared to EUC. PMID:23470116

  7. Prevalence of mood and anxiety disorder in self reported irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. An epidemiological population based study of women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykletun Arnstein

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is commonly regarded as a functional disorder, and is hypothesized to be associated with anxiety and depression. This evidence mainly rests on population-based studies utilising self-report screening instruments for psychopathology. Other studies applying structured clinical interviews are generally based on small clinical samples, which are vulnerable to biases. The extant evidence base for an association between IBS and psychopathology is hence not conclusive. The aim of this study was therefore to re-examine the hypothesis using population-based data and psychiatric morbidity established with a structured clinical interview. Methods Data were derived from a population-based epidemiological study (n = 1077. Anxiety and mood disorders were established using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR (SCID-I/NP and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12. Current and lifetime IBS was self-reported. Hypertension and diabetes were employed as comparison groups as they are expected to be unrelated to mental health. Results Current IBS (n = 69, 6.4% was associated with an increased likelihood of current mood and/or anxiety disorders (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.49 - 4.60. Half the population reporting a lifetime IBS diagnosis also had a lifetime mood or anxiety disorder. Exploratory analyses demonstrated an increased prevalence of IBS across most common anxiety and mood disorders, the exception being bipolar disorder. The association with IBS and symptoms load (GHQ-12 followed a curved dose response pattern. In contrast, hypertension and diabetes were consistently unrelated to psychiatric morbidity. Conclusions IBS is significantly associated with anxiety and mood disorders. This study provides indicative evidence for IBS as a disorder with a psychosomatic aspect.

  8. Prevalence of mood and anxiety disorder in self reported irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). An epidemiological population based study of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykletun, Arnstein; Jacka, Felice; Williams, Lana; Pasco, Julie; Henry, Margaret; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Kotowicz, Mark A; Berk, Michael

    2010-08-05

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is commonly regarded as a functional disorder, and is hypothesized to be associated with anxiety and depression. This evidence mainly rests on population-based studies utilising self-report screening instruments for psychopathology. Other studies applying structured clinical interviews are generally based on small clinical samples, which are vulnerable to biases. The extant evidence base for an association between IBS and psychopathology is hence not conclusive. The aim of this study was therefore to re-examine the hypothesis using population-based data and psychiatric morbidity established with a structured clinical interview. Data were derived from a population-based epidemiological study (n = 1077). Anxiety and mood disorders were established using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR (SCID-I/NP) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Current and lifetime IBS was self-reported. Hypertension and diabetes were employed as comparison groups as they are expected to be unrelated to mental health. Current IBS (n = 69, 6.4%) was associated with an increased likelihood of current mood and/or anxiety disorders (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.49 - 4.60). Half the population reporting a lifetime IBS diagnosis also had a lifetime mood or anxiety disorder. Exploratory analyses demonstrated an increased prevalence of IBS across most common anxiety and mood disorders, the exception being bipolar disorder. The association with IBS and symptoms load (GHQ-12) followed a curved dose response pattern. In contrast, hypertension and diabetes were consistently unrelated to psychiatric morbidity. IBS is significantly associated with anxiety and mood disorders. This study provides indicative evidence for IBS as a disorder with a psychosomatic aspect.

  9. Anxiety disorders: a review of current literature

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaut, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders. There is a high comorbidity between anxiety (especially generalized anxiety disorders or panic disorders) and depressive disorders or between anxiety disorders, which renders treatment more complex. Current guidelines do not recommend benzodiazepines as first-line treatments due to their potential side effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are recommended as fi...

  10. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Hardeveld, F.; de Graaf, R.; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  11. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.; Beekman, A.T.; Hardeveld, F.; Graaf, R. de; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  12. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Hardeveld, F.; Graaf, R. de; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  13. The comparison of severity and prevalence of major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder and eating disorders before and after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matini, Diana; Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Pishgahroudsari, Mohadeseh; Ehtesham, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Severe obesity is highly co-morbid with psychiatric disorders and may have effect on the quality of life. This study aimed to compare severity and prevalence rate of depression, anxiety and eating disorders and quality of life in severe obese patients before and 6 months after the gastric bypass surgery. This was a prospective observational study which conducted at Hazarat Rasool-Akram Hospital in Tehran, 2012. Questionnaires included demographic questions, eating disorder Inventory (EDI), The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) for quality of life, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) and anxiety (HRSA). Participants were interviewed two times, before surgery and six months after, to determine changes of the disorders. Patients with the history of bariatric surgery, individuals younger than 18 year old and those who disagreed to join the study were excluded. In assessing the eating disorder inventory-3rd version (EDI-3), Significant reduction in drive for thinness (DT) (p= 0.010), bulimia (B) (pphysical component summary of SF36, significantly decreased (pdisorder according to SCID (p=0.167) did not differ significantly, at this period. Although weight loss after bariatric surgery improved the physical component of quality of life, this improvement did not affect the mental aspect of life, depression and anxiety and it seems that these psychopathologies need attention and treatment in addition to weight loss treatments in patients with obesity.

  14. Social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Murray B; Stein, Dan J

    2008-03-29

    Our understanding of social anxiety disorder (also known as social phobia) has moved from rudimentary awareness that it is not merely shyness to a much more sophisticated appreciation of its prevalence, its chronic and pernicious nature, and its neurobiological underpinnings. Social anxiety disorder is the most common anxiety disorder; it has an early age of onset--by age 11 years in about 50% and by age 20 years in about 80% of individuals--and it is a risk factor for subsequent depressive illness and substance abuse. Functional neuroimaging studies point to increased activity in amygdala and insula in patients with social anxiety disorder, and genetic studies are increasingly focusing on this and other (eg, personality trait neuroticism) core phenotypes to identify risk loci. A range of effective cognitive behavioural and pharmacological treatments for children and adults now exists; the challenges lie in optimum integration and dissemination of these treatments, and learning how to help the 30-40% of patients for whom treatment does not work.

  15. Dimensions of Sexual Orientation and the Prevalence of Mood and Anxiety Disorders in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Carol J.; Hughes, Tonda L.; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We used data from a nationally representative sample to examine the associations among 3 dimensions of sexual orientation (identity, attraction, and behavior), lifetime and past-year mood and anxiety disorders, and sex. Methods. We analyzed data from wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Results. Mental health outcomes differed by sex, dimension of sexual orientation, and sexual minority group. Whereas a lesbian, gay, or bisexual identity was associated with higher odds of any mood or anxiety disorder for both men and women, women reporting only same-sex sexual partners in their lifetime had the lowest rates of most disorders. Higher odds of any lifetime mood or anxiety disorder were more consistent and pronounced among sexual minority men than among sexual minority women. Finally, bisexual behavior conferred the highest odds of any mood or anxiety disorder for both males and females. Conclusions. Findings point to mental health disparities among some, but not all, sexual minority groups and emphasize the importance of including multiple measures of sexual orientation in population-based health studies. PMID:19696380

  16. Illness anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001236.htm Illness anxiety disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) is a preoccupation that physical symptoms are ...

  17. Therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J; Biley, F C; Dolk, H

    2007-07-18

    Anxiety disorders are a common occurrence in today's society. There is interest from the community in the use of complementary therapies for anxiety disorders. This review examined the currently available evidence supporting the use of therapeutic touch in treating anxiety disorders. To examine the efficacy and adverse effects of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders. We searched the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Registers (CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References) (search date 13/01/06), the Controlled Trials website and Dissertation Abstracts International. Searches of reference lists of retrieved papers were also carried out and experts in the field were contacted. Inclusion criteria included all published and unpublished randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing therapeutic touch with sham (mimic) TT, pharmacological therapy, psychological treatment, other treatment or no treatment /waiting list. The participants included adults with an anxiety disorder defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV),the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), validated diagnostic instruments, or other validated clinician or self-report instruments. Two review authors independently applied inclusion criteria. Further information was sought from trialists where papers contained insufficient information to make a decision about eligibility. No randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders were identified. Given the high prevalence of anxiety disorders and the current paucity of evidence on therapeutic touch in this population, there is a need for well conducted randomised controlled trials to examine the effectiveness of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders.

  18. Prevalence and predictors of anxiety disorders amongst low-income pregnant women in urban South Africa: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heyningen, Thandi; Honikman, Simone; Myer, Landon; Onah, Michael N; Field, Sally; Tomlinson, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Anxiety is highly prevalent in many populations; however, the burden of anxiety disorders amongst pregnant women in low-resource settings is not well documented. We investigated the prevalence and predictors of antenatal anxiety disorders amongst low-income women living with psychosocial adversity. Pregnant women were recruited from an urban, primary level clinic in Cape Town, South Africa. The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview diagnostic interview assessed prevalence of anxiety disorders. Four self-report questionnaires measured psychosocial characteristics. Logistic regression models explored demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, psychosocial risk factors and psychiatric comorbidity as predictors for anxiety disorders. Amongst 376 participants, the prevalence of any anxiety disorder was 23%. Although 11% of all women had post-traumatic stress disorder, 18% of the total sample was diagnosed with other anxiety disorders. Multivariable analysis revealed several predictors for anxiety including a history of mental health problems (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.11; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.03-8.32), Major depressive episode (MDE) diagnosis (AOR 3.83; CI 1.99-7.31), multigravidity (AOR 2.87; CI 1.17-7.07), food insecurity (AOR 2.57; CI 1.48-4.46), unplanned and unwanted pregnancy (AOR 2.14; CI 1.11-4.15), pregnancy loss (AOR 2.10; CI 1.19-3.75) and experience of threatening life events (AOR 1.30; CI 1.04-1.57). Increased perceived social support appeared to reduce the risk for antenatal anxiety (AOR 0.95; CI 0.91-0.99). A range of antenatal anxiety disorders are prevalent amongst pregnant women living in low-resource settings. Women who experience psychosocial adversity may be exposed to multiple risk factors, which render them vulnerable to developing antenatal anxiety disorders.

  19. Cultural aspects of anxiety disorders in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambaty, Maherra; Parikh, Rajesh M

    2017-06-01

    Cultural factors have influenced the presentation, diagnoses, and treatment of anxiety disorders in India for several centuries. This review covers the antecedents, prevalence, phenomenology, and treatment modalities of anxiety disorders in the Indian cultural context. It covers the history of the depiction of anxiety in India and the concept of culture in the classification of anxiety disorders, and examines the cultural factors influencing anxiety disorders in India. We review the prevalence and phenomenology of various disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety, and phobic disorder, as well as culture-specific syndromes such as dhat and koro in India. Finally, the review examines the wide range of therapeutic modalities practiced in India, such as faith healing, psychotherapy, ayurveda, psychopharmacology, Unani medicine, homeopathy, yoga, meditation, and mindfulness. We conclude by emphasizing the significance of cultural factors in making relevant diagnoses and offering effective and holistic treatments to individuals with anxiety disorders.

  20. Prevalence and predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression, and burnout in Pakistani earthquake recovery workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehring, T.; Razik, S.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Past research has shown a substantial prevalence of emotional disorders in professionals involved in rescue and/or relief operations following natural disasters, including earthquakes. However, no published study to date has investigated whether disaster rehabilitation and reconstruction workers

  1. The prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders in indigenous people of the Americas: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisely, Steve; Alichniewicz, Karolina Katarzyna; Black, Emma B; Siskind, Dan; Spurling, Geoffrey; Toombs, Maree

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous populations are considered at higher risk of psychiatric disorder but many studies do not include direct comparisons with similar non-Indigenous controls. We undertook a meta-analysis of studies that compared the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders in Indigenous populations in the Americas with those of non-Indigenous groups with similar socio-demographic features (Registration number: CRD42015025854). A systematic search of PubMed, Medline, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, ScienceDirect, EMBASE, and article bibliographies was performed. We included comparisons of lifetime rates and prevalence of up to 12 months. We found 19 studies (n = 250, 959) from Latin America, Canada and the US. There were no differences between Indigenous and similar non-Indigenous groups in the 12-month prevalence of depressive, generalised anxiety and panic disorders. However, Indigenous people were at greater risk of PTSD. For lifetime prevalence, rates of generalised anxiety, panic and all the depressive disorders were significantly lower in Indigenous participants, whilst PTSD (on adjusted analyses) and social phobia were significantly higher. Results were similar for sub-analyses of Latin America, Canada and the US, and sensitivity analyses by study quality or setting (e.g. health, community etc.). Risk factors for psychiatric illness may therefore be a complex interaction of biological, educational, economic and socio-cultural factors that may vary between disorders. Accordingly, interventions should reflect that the association between disadvantage and psychiatric illness is rarely due to one factor. However, it is also possible that assessment tools don't accurately measure psychiatric symptoms in Indigenous populations and that further cross-cultural validation of diagnostic instruments may be needed too. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence and heritability of obsessive-compulsive spectrum and anxiety disorder symptoms: A survey of the Australian Twin Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Solà, Clara; Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Alonso, Pino; Cuadras, Daniel; Foley, Debra L; Pantelis, Christos; Pujol, Jesus; Yücel, Murat; Cardoner, Narcís; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Menchón, José M; Harrison, Ben J

    2014-06-01

    While past twin studies indicate moderate levels of heritability of "obsessive-compulsive related" and anxiety disorder symptoms, no single study has reported such estimates in the same twin population nor examined potential genetic sex differences. We assessed symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, hoarding disorder, hypochondriasis, panic disorder, social phobia and generalized anxiety disorder in 2,495 adult twins (1,468 female). Prevalence estimates for the corresponding symptom measures were determined using empirically derived cut-off scores. Twin resemblance was assessed by Pearson correlations and biometrical model-fitting analyses, incorporating sex-specific effects, using OpenMx. Prevalence estimates ranged from 1.6% in the symptoms of generalized anxiety to 16.9% for social phobia. Female twins demonstrated significantly higher prevalence rates across all domains with the exception of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Additive genetic factors accounted for a moderate proportion of the total liability to each symptom domain. Evidence suggesting qualitative genetic sex differences (i.e., distinct genetic influences between genders) was observed for body dysmorphic concern and panic symptoms, while quantitative differences were observed for hoarding and social phobia symptoms, indicating stronger heritability in females. Novel findings in this study include the observation of probable genetic sex differences in liability towards hoarding symptoms and dysmorphic concern, as well as the lack of such differences in hypochondriasis. The trend towards qualitative sex differences in panic symptoms has some intuitive appeal with regard to biological-experimental models of panic. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey A. Hofflich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Los síntomas somáticos en niños han sido asociados con trastornos de interiorización, especialmente de ansiedad. Sin embargo, pocos estudios han examinado los síntomas somáticos precisos en trastornos de ansiedad específicos. Desde este estudio cuasi-experimental se examinan el tipo y la frecuencia de síntomas somáticos en niños (n = 178; rango de edad 7–14 años con trastorno generalizado de ansiedad (TAG, fobia social (FS, ansiedad de separación (AS y sin ningún trastorno de ansiedad. Los niños y sus padres, que acudieron en busca de tratamiento, completaron una entrevista diagnóstica estructurada, los niños completaron además la Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC (March, Parker, Sullivan, Stallings, y Conners. Los niños diagnosticados con un trastorno de ansiedad informaron de síntomas somáticos más frecuentes que aquellos sin trastorno de ansiedad, pero los síntomas somáticos no difirieron entre los principales grupos de trastornos de ansiedad. Los niños con trastornos de ansiedad y depresivos comórbidos manifestaron síntomas somáticos más frecuentemente que aquellos sin trastornos comórbidos. Se discuten los resultados en términos de los síntomas somáticos como a criterios dentro del sistema diagnóstico, y b parte del proceso de evitación.

  4. Anxiety disorders: a review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaut, Florence

    2017-06-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders. There is a high comorbidity between anxiety (especially generalized anxiety disorders or panic disorders) and depressive disorders or between anxiety disorders, which renders treatment more complex. Current guidelines do not recommend benzodiazepines as first-line treatments due to their potential side effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are recommended as first-line treatments. Psychotherapy, in association with pharmacotherapy, is associated with better efficacy. Finally, a bio-psycho-social model is hypothesized in anxiety disorders.

  5. Generalised anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Christopher K; Millichamp, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Generalised anxiety disorder is characterised by persistent, excessive and difficult-to-control worry, which may be accompanied by several psychic and somatic symptoms, including suicidality. Generalized anxiety disorder is the most common psychiatric disorder in the primary care, although it is often underrecognised and undertreated. Generalized anxiety disorder is typically a chronic condition with low short- and medium-term remission rates. Clinical presentations often include depression, ...

  6. Depressive and anxiety disorders in the postpartum period: how prevalent are they and can we improve their detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Marie-Paule V; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Priest, Susan R; Reilly, Nicole; Wilhelm, Kay; Saint, Karen; Parker, Gordon

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) period prevalence and comorbidity for depression and anxiety disorder in a cohort of women assessed during the first 6-8 months postpartum and (2) to examine the benefits of combining the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) with a simple "interval symptom" question to optimize screening postpartum. Women aged over 18 (N = 1,549) were assessed during late pregnancy and reviewed at approximately 2, 4, and 6-8 months postpartum using the EPDS and an "interval symptom" question. The latter asked about any depressive symptoms in the interval since the last EPDS. Women who scored >12 on the EPDS and/or positive on the "interval symptom" question were then administered the CIDI. A further 65 randomly selected women that screened negative were also administered the CIDI. Loss to postnatal follow-up was very significant, and returns rates were inconsistent across the three postnatal time points. Almost 25% of those who screened positive did not complete a CIDI. For screen-positive status, a total of 314 (24.4%) of those that returned questionnaires (N = 1,289) screened positive at least once across the 6- to 8-month interval. Of these, 79 were lost to follow-up; thus, 235 (74.8%) completed a CIDI. In this group, 34.7% had been positive both on the EPDS and the "interval" question, 15.9% on the EPDS alone, and 49.4% on the "interval" question alone. For the CIDI diagnosis and estimated 6- to 8-month period CIDI prevalence, among those 235 women who screened positive and completed a CIDI, 67.2% met the criteria for a CIDI diagnosis, as did 16.9% of those who screened negative. The breakdown in CIDI diagnoses in the 235 women was 32.8% major depression (± anxiety disorder); 26.4% minor depression alone; and 8.1% with a primary anxiety disorder (approximately half with minor depression). Put another way, 20.4% of these women had an anxiety disorder

  7. Separation anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, M.H.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Sturmey, P.; Hersen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is the only anxiety disorder that is specific to childhood; however, SAD has hardly ever been addressed as a separate disorder in clinical trials investigating treatment outcome. So far, only parent training has been developed specifically for SAD. This particular

  8. Adjustment disorder with anxiety in old age: comparing prevalence and clinical management in primary care and mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbus, C; Hergueta, T; Duburcq, A; Saleh, A; Le Guern, M-E; Robert, P; Camus, V

    2014-05-01

    Adjustment disorder with anxiety (AjD-A) is a common cause of severe anxiety symptoms, but little is known about its prevalence in old age. This cross-sectional study examined the prevalence of AjD-A in outpatients over the age of 60 who consecutively consulted 34 general practitioners and 22 psychiatrists during a 2-week period. The diagnosis of AjD-A was obtained using the optional module for diagnostic of adjustment disorder of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). The study procedure also explored comorbid psychiatric conditions and documented recent past stressful life events, as well as social disability and current pharmacological and non-pharmacological management. Overall, 3651 consecutive subjects were screened (2937 in primary care and 714 in mental health care). The prevalence rate of AjD-A was 3.7% (n=136). Up to 39% (n=53) of AjD-A subjects had a comorbid psychiatric condition, mostly of the anxious type. The most frequently stressful life event reported to be associated with the onset of AjD-A was personal illness or health problem (29%). More than 50% of the AjD-A patients were markedly to extremely disabled by their symptoms. Compared to patients who consulted psychiatrists, patients who were seen by primary care physicians were older, had obtained lower scores at the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, benefited less frequently from non-pharmacological management and received benzodiazepines more frequently. AjD-A appears to be a significantly disabling cause of anxiety symptoms in community dwelling elderly persons, in particular those presenting personal health related problems. Improvement of early diagnosis and non-pharmacological management of AjD-A would contribute to limit risks of benzodiazepine overuse, particularly in primary care settings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The lifetime prevalence of anxiety disorders in Iceland as estimated by the US National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Líndal, E; Stefánsson, J G

    1993-07-01

    The lifetime prevalence of anxiety disorders was estimated in a study of the prevalence of mental disorders in Iceland. The survey instrument was an Icelandic translation of the US National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The cohort consisted of one half of those born in the year 1931. The participation rate was 79.3%. The overall prevalence of anxiety disorders was 44%, with phobia effecting 18%. The most common anxiety disorder was generalized anxiety, which had a prevalence of 22% and was more common among women. Simple phobia was the most common of the phobic disorders (8.8%), followed by agoraphobia without panic (3.8%), and social phobia (3.5%). The female-male ratio for anxiety disorders was 2:1. Of those with simple phobia, the most common items were a fear of heights (41%); claustrophobia (34%); being on public transportation (31%); the fear of being in crowds and speaking in front of others (28%); of being alone (24%); of insects (22%); of bad weather (21%); and of being in water (aquaphobia) (20%). In addition, 17% of the respondents listed phobias not cited in the DSM-III, and of those with the most common phobic disorder, only 9% had consulted a physician because of this condition. Post-traumatic stress disorder was found to affect women exclusively. Comorbidity shows a mean of at least 3 additional diagnoses.

  10. The epidemiology of anxiety disorders: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and an important cause of functional impairment; they constitute the most frequent menial disorders in the community. Phobias are the most common with the highest rates for simple phobia and agoraphobia. Panic disorder (PD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are less frequent (2% lifetime prevalence), and there are discordant results for social phobia (SP) (2%-16%) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (3%-30%). Th...

  11. Screening for anxiety disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ellin; Bögels, Susan Maria

    2009-10-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and have negative consequences on individual and societal level. This study examined the usefulness of screening for anxiety disorders in primary school children. More specifically, the value of the screening method to discriminate between and to predict anxiety disorders was studied. Children and their parents were selected if the children had self-reported scores on the screening questionnaire Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders-71 (SCARED-71) within the top-15% (High-anxious) or from two points below to two points above the median (Median-anxious). Of the selected children, 183 high-anxious children and their parents, and 80 median-anxious children and their parents took part in a diagnostic interview, the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule (ADIS). Of the high-anxious children, 60% had an anxiety disorder versus 23% of the median-anxious children, whereas groups did not differ on rates of dysthymia/depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The diagnoses separation anxiety disorder, social phobia and specific phobia were specifically predicted by the corresponding subscales of the screening questionnaire, while the diagnosis generalised anxiety disorder was not predicted by any of the subscales. The screening method has proven its utility for discriminating between children with and without anxiety disorders when applying the top-15% cut-off. Moreover, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, and specific phobia, all known to be prevalent and debilitating childhood anxiety disorders, can be predicted by the corresponding subscale of the screening instrument.

  12. Generalized anxiety disorder - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAD - children; Anxiety disorder - children ... The cause of GAD is unknown. Genes may play a role. Children with family members who have an anxiety disorder also may be more likely to have one. Stress may be a factor in developing GAD. Things ...

  13. Social Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Seedat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available According to epidemiological studies, rates of social anxiety disorder(SAD or social phobia range from 3% to 16% in the generalpopulation.[1,2]Social phobia and specific phobias have an earlier ageof onset than other anxiety disorders.

  14. [Violence due to Armed Conflict and Prevalence of Mood Disorders, Anxiety and Mental Problems in the Colombian Adult Population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Tamayo-Martínez, Nathalie; Buitrago, Giancarlo; Guarnizo-Herreño, Carol Cristina; Garzón-Orjuela, Nathaly; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; de Vries, Esther; Rengifo, Herney; Rodríguez, Andrea; Rincón, Carlos Javier

    2016-12-01

    Violence in Colombia has a history of over 50 years. Between 1985 and 2012 an estimated of 220,000 Colombians have died and about 6,000,000 have been displaced by violence. To describe and compare the prevalence of some problems and mental disorders in the adult population in Colombia, taking into account the characteristics of the municipality, as regards its history of violence or armed conflict. The results for adults (over 18 years) of some problems and mental disorders were taken from the ENSM-2015. The municipalities were classified according to the presence and intensity of the conflict using the classification proposed by the CERAC. Disorders were measured using CIDI-CAPI, and problems with AUDIT, modified PCL (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist). An estimate was also made of psychoactive substances consumption. A total of 10,870 people were interviewed, of whom 5,429 had not changed residence. There was had permanent conflict in 21.8% of the municipalities, 65.5% had a discontinued conflict, and only 12.7% had been pacified or had no conflict. The intensity of the conflict was reported as high by 31.8% of the people. Violent municipalities have a higher prevalence of anxiety disorders, depression, possible Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and smoking. Alcohol consumption was more common in municipalities with less intense conflict. The municipalities classified as having high levels of violence have a higher prevalence of mental disorders and the majority of the mental problems. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  15. Refractory generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Mark H

    2009-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a lifetime prevalence in the US population of about 5.7%. Typically, GAD begins in early adulthood and tends to have a chronic and persistent course. The disorder frequently presents comorbidly with other conditions, and about 90% of patients with GAD have at least 1 comorbid lifetime psychiatric disorder. Patients with GAD tend to be high users of medical services; the disorder is associated with significant physical as well as psychological symptomatology and impacts health, family relationships, and employment. Pharmacologic and psychosocial treatments are available for GAD. Different side effect profiles, speed of onset of action, and discontinuation requirements of individual drugs need to be taken into account when selecting treatment. Treatment selection should include consideration of comorbidity, psychological function, social impairment, and refractoriness, as well as the need for ongoing intervention for many individuals. Innovative treatments, including anticonvulsants, atypical antipsychotics, and others, as well as treatment targeting concomitant insomnia, may help improve outcomes for affected individuals. Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  16. Prevalence of depression, anxiety, and adjustment disorder in oncological, haematological, and palliative-care settings: a meta-analysis of 94 interview-based studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, A. J.; Chan, M.; Bhatti, H.

    2011-01-01

    and inadequate data to examine cancer type and illness duration. Interpretation Interview-defined depression and anxiety is less common in patients with cancer than previously thought, although some combination of mood disorders occurs in 30-40% of patients in hospital settings without a significant difference......Background Substantial uncertainty exists about prevalence of mood disorders in patients with cancer, including those in oncological, haematological, and palliative-care settings. We aimed to quantitatively summarise the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and adjustments disorders in these settings....... Methods We searched Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, and Web of Knowledge for studies that examined well-defined depression, anxiety, and adjustment disorder in adults with cancer in oncological, haematological, and palliative-care settings. We restricted studies to those using psychiatric interviews. Studies...

  17. The epidemiology of anxiety disorders: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and an important cause of functional impairment; they constitute the most frequent menial disorders in the community. Phobias are the most common with the highest rates for simple phobia and agoraphobia. Panic disorder (PD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are less frequent (2% lifetime prevalence), and there are discordant results for social phobia (SP) (2%-16%) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (3%-30%). These studies underline the importance of an accurate definition of disorders using unambiguous diagnostic and assessment criteria. The boundaries between anxiety disorders are often ill defined and cases may vary widely according to the definition applied. Simple phobia, agoraphobia, and GAD are more common in vmrnen, while there is no gender différence for SP, PD, and OCD, Anxiety disorders are more common in separated, divorced, and widowed subjects; their prevalence is highest in subjects aged 25 to 44 years and lowest in subjects aged >65 years. The age of onset of the different types of anxiety disorders varies widely: phobic disorders begin early in life, whereas PD occurs in young adulthood. Clinical - rather than epidemiological - studies have examined risk factors such as life events, childhood experiences, and familial factors. Anxiety disorders have a chronic and persistent course, and are frequently comorbid with other anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, and substance abuse. Anxiety disorders most frequently precede depressive disorders or substance abuse, Comorbid diagnoses may influence risk factors like functional impairment and quality of life. It remains unclear whether certain anxiety disorders (eg, PD) are risk factors for suicide. The comorbidity of anxiety disorders has important implications for assessment and treatment and the risk factors should be explored. The etiology, natural history, and outcome of these disorders need to be further addressed

  18. Generalized anxiety disorder (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalized anxiety disorder is characterized by excessive worry about 2 or more life circumstances for a period of 6 months or longer. Biological and genetic factors may combine with stress to produce psychological symptoms.

  19. DSM-IV and DSM-5 Prevalence of Social Anxiety Disorder in a Population Sample of Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Björn; Sigström, Robert; Östling, Svante; Waern, Margda; Börjesson-Hanson, Anne; Skoog, Ingmar

    2016-12-01

    To examine the prevalence of social anxiety disorders (SAD) with (DSM-IV) and without (DSM-5) the person's own assessment that the fear was unreasonable, in a population sample of older adults. Further, to determine whether clinical and sociodemographic correlates of SAD differ depending on the criteria applied. Cross-sectional. General population in Gothenburg, Sweden. A random population-based sample of 75- and 85-year olds (N = 1200) without dementia. Psychiatric research nurses carried out a semi-structured psychiatric examination including the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale. DSM-IV SAD was diagnosed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. SAD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria. The 6-month duration criterion in DSM-5 was not applied because of lack of information. Other assessments included the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), the Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA), and the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The 1-month prevalence of SAD was 2.5% (N = 30) when the unreasonable fear criterion was defined in accordance with DSM-IV and 5.1% (N = 61) when the DSM-5 criterion was applied. Clinical correlates (GAF, MADRS, and BSA) were worse in SAD cases identified by either procedure compared with all others, and ratings for those reporting unreasonable fear suggested greater (albeit nonsignificant) overall psychopathology. Shifting the judgment of how reasonable the fear was, from the individual to the clinician, doubled the prevalence of SAD. This indicates that the DSM-5 version might increase prevalence rates of SAD in the general population. Further studies strictly applying all DSM-5 criteria are needed in order to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Late-life anxiety disorders: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, J.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are a major clinical problem in late life; estimated prevalence rates vary from 6% to 10%, and the disease impact is considerable and equal to that of depression. However, anxiety disorders often remain undetected and untreated in older adults. This discrepancy may be accounted for

  1. Anxiety, psychosis and substance use: prevalence, correlates and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The current study examined anxiety in people with substance use disorder (SUD) and a psychotic disorder. It is hypothesised that: anxiety disorders (AD) would be highly prevalent (greater than 20%) in people identified as having SUD and psychotic disorders; those with comorbid AD would fair worse than those ...

  2. Social communication deficits: Specific associations with Social Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Halls, Georgia; Cooper, Peter J.; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Background\\ud Social communication deficits are prevalent amongst children with anxiety disorders; however whether they are over-represented specifically among children with Social Anxiety Disorder has not been examined. This study set out to examine social communication deficits among children with Social Anxiety Disorder in comparison to children with other forms of anxiety disorder.\\ud \\ud Methods\\ud Parents of 404 children with a diagnosed anxiety disorder completed the Social Communicati...

  3. Screening for anxiety disorders in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunevicius, A.; Staniute, M.; Brozaitiene, J.; Pop, V.J.M.; Neverauskas, J.; Bunevicius, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are prevalent and associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, studies examining screening of anxiety disorders in CAD patients are lacking. In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with

  4. The prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders – Revised (SCARED-R) yielded high levels (50–100%) for the different syndromes, with obsessive-compulsive disorder at 99.3%, just below separation anxiety and school phobia at 100%. Suicidal thoughts and plans were prevalent at 4.9–5.5%. Conclusion: Anxiety and ...

  5. Sex differences in the prevalence and detection of depressive and anxiety disorders in general health care settings - Report from the World Health Organization collaborative study on Psychological Problems in General Health Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gater, R; Tansella, M; Korten, A; Tiemens, BG; Mavreas, VG; Olatawura, MO

    Background: Understanding the relevance of biological and social factors to sex differences in the prevalence and detection of depressive and anxiety disorders has been impaired by the lack of standardized research methods across cultures. Method: Prevalence rates of depressive and anxiety disorders

  6. [Prevalence of Mood and Anxiety Disorders on People with Chronic Conditions. Results from the National Mental Health Survey in Colombia 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Nathalie Tamayo; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Ramírez, Sandra; Rodríguez, María Nelcy

    2016-12-01

    The study of mental disorders in people with chronic conditions recognises the importance of actively seeking and treating both, since chronic conditions have a higher prevalence than mental disorders and their comorbidity generates greater burden than if each one was considered separately. To measure the prevalence of mood disorders and anxiety in a Colombian population of 12 years and older and with and without different chronic conditions. The information is taken from the National Mental Health Survey 2015 in Colombia, which was an observational cross-sectional study with national representativeness for the age groups measured 12-17, 18-44, and 45 and older. Disorders measured where mood disorders and anxiety social phobia, generalised anxiety disorder, and panic disorder in the past 12 months, and several chronic conditions. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed for these conditions. The highest prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders were found in people with gastrointestinal diseases, followed by those with chronic pain, heart, and lung diseases, which corresponded to 27.1%, 13.3%, 12.2%, and 11.5%, respectively, in those between 18 and 44 years old, and 15.9%, 12.2%, 8.0%, and 7.4% of those 45 and older, respectively. This was greater than the prevalence of these mental disorders in people with no chronic condition, where the prevalence is 3.5% in the younger, and 1.1% in the older group. However, the risk of these mental disorders is higher in older people. Thus, in those with gastrointestinal diseases when compared to people of the same age without any chronic condition the prevalence is 14.9 times higher, but for the same disease in the younger group it is 7.8. These findings link chronic conditions with a higher prevalence of mental disorders, which in the present study also highlights the greater comorbidity of mood and anxiety disorders in the elderly. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier Espa

  7. Current Diagnosis and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Khalsa, Sahib S.; Cameron, Michael E.; Schiffman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health conditions. Although they are less visible than schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, they can be just as disabling. The diagnoses of anxiety disorders are being continuously revised. Both dimensional and structural diagnoses have been used in clinical treatment and research, and both methods have been proposed for the new classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-5). However, each of t...

  8. Prevalence of anxiety and depressive erectile dysfunction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primary illness is that of depression, with ED a symptom of the depressive disorder. Prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in men with erectile dysfunction. K Pankhurst, MB ChB. G Joubert, BA, MSc. P J Pretorius, MB ChB, MMed (Psych). Departments of Psychiatry and Biostatistics,. University of the Free State ...

  9. Explicit memory in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Roth, W.T.; Andrich, M.; Margraf, J.

    1999-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study selective memory bias favoring anxiety-relevant materials in patients with anxiety disorders. In the 1st experiment, 32 patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), 30 with social phobia (speaking anxiety), and 31 control participants incidentally learned

  10. Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social anxiety disorder (social phobia) Overview It's normal to feel nervous in some social situations. For example, going ... feeling of butterflies in your stomach. But in social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, everyday interactions cause ...

  11. The nature of social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, H G

    1998-01-01

    The essential feature of social anxiety disorder (social phobia) is a fear of scrutiny by other people in social or performance situations. The level of anxiety experienced by the person with social anxiety disorder is excessive, and results in substantial impairment in the sufferer's social, family, and professional life. Three distinct subtypes of the disorder have been identified: generalized social anxiety disorder, in which the individual fears a multitude of social situations; nongeneralized social anxiety disorder, in which only 2 or 3 situations are feared; and public-speaking phobia. Results from a number of studies suggest that these subtypes of social anxiety disorder may represent distinct clinical syndromes, with the generalized subtype producing the most severe disability. Despite the prevalence of social anxiety disorder and the disability it causes, this condition remains underdiagnosed, and thus undertreated, by clinicians. This review discusses the barriers that prevent people who have this disorder from seeking help, and the steps that clinicians can take to aid their recognition and treatment of the disorder. It is only by effective diagnosis and treatment that the burden of social anxiety disorder will be lifted, allowing patients to resume a normal life.

  12. Separation anxiety disorder in OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczkowski, Megan M; Goes, Fernando S; Riddle, Mark A; Grados, Marco A; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Fyer, Abby J; McCracken, James T; Rauch, Scott L; Murphy, Dennis L; Knowles, James A; Piacentini, John; Cullen, Bernadette; Rasmussen, Steven A; Geller, Daniel A; Pauls, David L; Liang, Kung-Yee; Nestadt, Gerald; Samuels, Jack F

    2011-03-01

    A history of separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is frequently reported by patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The purpose of this study was to determine if there are clinical differences between OCD-affected individuals with, versus without, a history of SAD. Using data collected during the OCD Collaborative Genetic Study, we studied 470 adult OCD participants; 80 had a history of SAD, whereas 390 did not. These two groups were compared as to onset and severity of OCD, lifetime prevalence of Axis I disorders, and number of personality disorder traits. OCD participants with a history of SAD were significantly younger than the non-SAD group (mean, 34.2 versus 42.2 years; Pphobia (OR = 1.69, CI 1.01-2.8, P<.048), after adjusting for age at interview, age at onset of OCD, and OCD severity in logistic regression models. There was a strong relationship between the number of dependent personality disorder traits and SAD (adjusted OR = 1.42, CI = 1.2-1.6, P<.001). A history of SAD is associated with anxiety disorders and dependent personality disorder traits in individuals with OCD. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Evaluating and treating anxiety disorders in medical settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball S

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders and medical illness present to the primary care physician as a common comorbidity. This article aims to review the literature on the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients presenting to primary care physicians; to address the key issues in assessing the comorbid condition; and to discuss psychological and pharmacological treatment options for patients with a comorbid anxiety disorder and medical illness. Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent within the primary care population, and these disorders significantly impact the patient′s course and outcome. Fortunately, primary care physicians have a variety of effective cognitive, behavioral and pharmacological interventions available for managing these patients with comorbid anxiety and medical illnesses.

  14. A profile of social, separation and generalized anxiety disorders in an Australian nationally representative sample of children and adolescents: Prevalence, comorbidity and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Susan H; Zubrick, Stephen R; Lawrence, David

    2017-11-01

    To examine (1) the 12-month prevalence of social anxiety disorder (SOC), separation anxiety disorder (SEP) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a large, nationally representative sample of Australian youth; (2) patterns of comorbidity between these disorders; (3) demographic and socio-environmental correlates and (4) the psychosocial impact and service use associated with each condition. Data are from the 2013/2014 Australian national, face-to-face household Young Minds Matter survey of mental health and wellbeing. Informants were parents or carers reporting on 6310, 4- to 17-year-olds (55% of eligible households). The presence of each of the three anxiety disorders was determined based on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Version IV. In the past 12 months, 6.6% of youth had experienced at least one of SOC, SEP or GAD, with rates of 2.3% for SOC, 4.3% for SEP and 2.3% for GAD. Rates did not differ by gender but were significantly higher for SOC and GAD and lower for SEP in 12- to 17-year-olds than 4- to 11-year-olds. Comorbidity between these disorders was high, although lower for SEP. Having SOC, SEP or GAD was associated with not living with both biological parents, having a parent with a mental health problem, elevated negative family events, low carer employment and peer victimization. The association with family risk factors was greater for SEP than for SOC and GAD. Although the majority of anxious youth had received professional help, this was less likely in the younger cohort. Social, separation and generalized anxiety disorders in young people are relatively common and impairing, with a high level of comorbidity. There are both commonalities and differences in socio-environmental correlates. The majority of anxious youth received some form of professional assistance, although the rate was lower among children compared to adolescents.

  15. Short sleep duration, complaints of vital exhaustion and perceived stress are prevalent among pregnant women with mood and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Chunfang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychiatric disorders have been associated with sleep disorders in men and non-pregnant women, but little is known about sleep complaints and disorders among pregnant women with psychiatric disorders. Methods A cohort of 1,332 women was interviewed during early pregnancy. We ascertained psychiatric diagnosis status and collect information about sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, vital exhaustion and perceived stress. Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results Approximately 5.1% of the cohort (n=68 reported having a physician-diagnosis of mood or anxiety disorder before interview. Compared with women without a psychiatric diagnosis, the multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI for short sleep duration in early pregnancy (≤6 hours were 1.95 (1.03-3.69. The corresponding OR (95%CI for long sleep duration (≥9 hours during early pregnancy was 1.13 (0.63-2.03. Women with psychiatric disorders had an increased risk of vital exhaustion (OR=2.41; 95%CI 1.46-4.00 and elevated perceived stress (OR=3.33; 95%CI 1.89-5.88. Observed associations were more pronounced among overweight/obese women. Conclusions Women with a psychiatric disorder were more likely to report short sleep durations, vital exhaustion and elevated perceived stress. Prospective studies are needed to more thoroughly explore factors that mediate the apparent mood/anxiety-sleep comorbidity among pregnant women.

  16. Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fear response, causing increased anxiety in social situations. Environment. Social anxiety disorder may be a learned behavior — ... harder to treat if you wait. Keep a journal. Keeping track of your personal life can help ...

  17. Anxiety and Related Disorders in Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Joe E.; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    is excessive and, in general, lasts for 6 months or longer (APA 2013 ).The National Comorbidity Survey found that lifetime prevalence rates for each anxiety disorder were lower in males compared to females: panic disorder (PD)(2.0 % in males vs. 5.0 % females), specifi c phobia (6.7 % vs. 15.7 %), social...... anxietydisorder (SAD) (11.1 % vs. 15.5 %), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)(3.6 % vs. 6.6 %) (McLean et al. 2011 ). Because each of the anxiety disorders occur approximately half as commonly in men (APA 2013 ; Blanco et al. 2014 ; Mondinet al. 2013 ; Kessler et al. 2005a ), and because the anxiety disorders...

  18. [Anxiety and cognition disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti, C S

    1998-01-01

    Anxious subjects present attentional disorders that are manifest with an increased bias towards threatening contents stimuli. In tasks derived from the Stroop task (such as emotional Stroop, a variant of the classic Stroop task) congruence between anxious themes or manifestations and stimuli content induces information processing changes leading to a slowness of response speed. In this case, results are similar to those obtained in signal detection tasks either when information is visually or auditorily presented. In anxious subjects an inconscious activation provoked by anxiogenic words is observed. Because such activation is independent from the semantic content of the words, an emotional priming has been hypothesized. Berck formulated an hypervigilance theory according to which anxiety provokes a selective distractibility regarding non pertinent stimuli. Such attentional selectivity would be responsible of a cognitive vulnerability in anxious subjects. State but not trait anxiety induces working memory performances deficit. On the bases of Baddeley's working memory framework, Eysenck proposed that anxiety uses part of the limited attentional capacity, placing the subject in a dual task situation. In that, he has to cope with pertinent information and anxiety generated information. If anxiety leads to better performance in simple tasks by recruiting motivational capacities, in tasks with high information content, anxious subjects performances are impaired. Changes in the long-term memory do not seem to fit with the theoretical models based on cognitive impairment observed in patients suffering from depressive states. Anxious subjects presented a memory bias towards anxiogenic information in implicit memory tasks. But experimental data are still too searce to describe implicit performance of anxious subjects and more systematic studies are therefore needed.

  19. Anxiety Disorders and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Christopher M; Daunis, Daniel J; Lokko, Hermioni N; Campbell, Kirsti A; Huffman, Jeff C

    2016-11-01

    Anxiety and its associated disorders are common in patients with cardiovascular disease and may significantly influence cardiac health. Anxiety disorders are associated with the onset and progression of cardiac disease, and in many instances have been linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, including mortality. Both physiologic (autonomic dysfunction, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, changes in platelet aggregation) and health behavior mechanisms may help to explain the relationships between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease. Given the associations between anxiety disorders and poor cardiac health, the timely and accurate identification and treatment of these conditions is of the utmost importance. Fortunately, pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions for the management of anxiety disorders are generally safe and effective. Further study is needed to determine whether interventions to treat anxiety disorders ultimately impact both psychiatric and cardiovascular health.

  20. Prevalence of mood and anxiety disorder in self reported irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). An epidemiological population based study of women

    OpenAIRE

    Mykletun, Arnstein; Jacka, Felice; Williams, Lana; Pasco, Julie; Henry, Margaret; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Kotowicz, Mark A.; Berk, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is commonly regarded as a functional disorder, and is hypothesized to be associated with anxiety and depression. This evidence mainly rests on population-based studies utilising self-report screening instruments for psychopathology. Other studies applying structured clinical interviews are generally based on small clinical samples, which are vulnerable to biases. The extant evidence base for an association between IBS and psychopathology is h...

  1. Social and academic functioning in adolescents with anxiety disorders: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lijster, Jasmijn M.; Dieleman, Gwen C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Dierckx, Bram; Wierenga, Milou; Verhulst, Frank C.; Legerstee, Jeroen S.

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent during adolescence. Although literature points out that anxiety symptoms are related to problems in social and academic functioning, the extent of these problems among adolescents with clinical anxiety disorders has not been systematically reviewed before.

  2. A Lifetime Prevalence of Comorbidity Between Bipolar Affective Disorder and Anxiety Disorders: A Meta-analysis of 52 Interview-based Studies of Psychiatric Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Nabavi

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Our results suggest a high rate of lifetime concurrent anxiety disorders in bipolar disorder. The diagnostic issues at the interface are particularly difficult because of the substantial symptom overlap. The treatment of co-existing conditions has clinically remained challenging.

  3. Cognitive and social predictors of generalized anxiety disorder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common. It accounts for about one out of four anxiety related clinic consultations. The prevalence of this common disorder and the associated factors in Ugandan students are unknown. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of GAD symptoms, and ...

  4. Prevalence and correlates of depression and anxiety disorder in a sample of inmates in a Nigerian prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osasona, Samuel O; Koleoso, Olaide N

    2015-01-01

    Prisoners tend to be marginalized and deprived of the rights and privileges that other citizens in the community enjoy. Their separation from families, adverse effects on health of prison environment, and the uncertainty about the future place a great psychological burden on them which can lead to the development of mental illness. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity (depression and anxiety) and the associated factors among a sample of the prison inmates. The study was descriptive and cross-sectional in design; it was conducted in a medium security prison in Benin City, Nigeria. Participants were interviewed with the Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Two hundred and fifty-two prisoners who were selected by systematic sampling techniques participated in the study and the data were analyzed using the 16th version of the SPSS with the statistical level of significance set at p anxiety symptoms respectively on the HADS. Overall, 84.5% of the respondents had at least one type of psychiatric morbidity. Age, marital status, self-reported physical and mental health, previous mental illness, imprisonment status, prison accommodation, prison meal, and health care services were found to be significantly associated with depression, anxiety or general psychiatric morbidity. Self-reported poor current mental health was the only variable that predicted all the three types of psychiatric morbidity. Prisoners in this study, and as in previous reports, had high prevalence rates of psychiatric morbidity. Thus, prisoners have a need for regular psychiatric screening and treatment. The consequences of untreated psychiatric morbidity and the need for improved health care services and infrastructure in the prison were discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. The Prevalence of Sleep disorders and Their Relationship with Anxiety and Behavioral Problems in Second Primary School Female Students in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Eshaghie Firoozabady

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sleep disorders can influence either directly or indirectly, on the family, colleagues and finally the community. In the realm of children, the most serious complications of sleep is anxiety and behavioral problems that make them prone to academic failure, family tensions and psychosocial – social trauma. Concerning the significance, outbreak of sleep disorders and its complications, the present study aimed to determine the prevalence of species of sleep disorders and its relation to anxiety and behavioral problems of female students in the second course of primary, academic year of 1394-1393 in Yazd.Materials and Methods: The method was based on the data collecting by descriptive – correlation kind. The study population consisted of all female students of second course of primary schools in Yazd in academic year of 1393-94 that according to statistics from the Office of Education of Yazd province, their number was 14,541 people. By using Cochran formula with confidence level of 95% and probable accuracy of 5%, a sample size of 259 people was identified. Sampling group was chosen by multistage clustering method and questionnaire: assessment of children s’ sleep habits (Evans, 2000, multidimensional scale of children anxiety (March, Parker, Sullivan, Staling and Conrez, 1997 and questionnaire of children s’ behavioral problems (Rutter, 1970 were used. In order to analyze data, in descriptive statistic, frequency distribution tables and central indexes and dispersion and in inferential statistic, analysis of variance and regression in analysis of hypotheses was used.

  6. Comorbidity of Social Anxiety Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Koyuncu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite high rates of reported comorbidity in patients with social anxiety disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder comorbidity was not evaluated in these studies. Studies, investigating the prevalence of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD comorbidity in social anxiety disorder are limited and little is known about it. The reason for this may be the fact that, ADHD have been seen as a childhood disease over a period of time. In the prospective studies ,it is reported that ADHD is often observed in the adulthood and effects persist . On the other hand, studies on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, higher rates of social anxiety disorder comorbidity have been reported. The presence of comorbid anxiety disorder increases the risk of impulsive feature in ADHD, causes problems in functionality, impaired compliance and resistance to the treatment. The aim of this article is to investigate the the status of social anxiety disorder and ADHD comorbidity and to discuss the hypothesis of antidepressant-associated hypomanic shift due to antidepressant treatment in social anxiety disorder patients. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(1.000: 10-21

  7. Generalized anxiety disorder: Differential diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Gratsiyevna Voznesenskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD is poorly diagnosed and inadequately treated by general practitioners. The paper considers the major diagnostic signs of GAD, its differential diagnosis, prevalence, etiology, and pathogenesis. Antidepressants from a group of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in combination with psychotherapy are the drugs of first choice.

  8. Current Diagnosis and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Khalsa, Sahib S.; Cameron, Michael E.; Schiffman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health conditions. Although they are less visible than schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, they can be just as disabling. The diagnoses of anxiety disorders are being continuously revised. Both dimensional and structural diagnoses have been used in clinical treatment and research, and both methods have been proposed for the new classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-5). However, each of these approaches has limitations. More recently, the emphasis in diagnosis has focused on neuroimaging and genetic research. This approach is based partly on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of how biology, stress, and genetics interact to shape the symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety disorders can be effectively treated with psychopharmacological and cognitive–behavioral interventions. These inter ventions have different symptom targets; thus, logical combinations of these strategies need to be further studied in order to improve future outcomes. New developments are forthcoming in the field of alternative strategies for managing anxiety and for treatment-resistant cases. Additional treatment enhancements should include the development of algorithms that can be easily used in primary care and with greater focus on managing functional impairment in patients with anxiety. PMID:23599668

  9. Pathways to anxiety-depression comorbidity: A longitudinal examination of childhood anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Courtney Benjamin; Carper, Matthew M; Kendall, Philip C; Olino, Thomas M; Marcus, Steven C; Beidas, Rinad S

    2016-10-01

    Anxiety disorders are prevalent in youth and associated with later depressive disorders. A recent model posits three distinct anxiety-depression pathways. Pathway 1 represents youth with a diathesis to anxiety that increases risk for depressive disorders; Pathway 2 describes youth with a shared anxiety-depression diathesis; and Pathway 3 consists of youth with a diathesis for depression who develop anxiety as a consequence of depression impairment. This is the first partial test of this model following cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for child anxiety. The present study included individuals (N = 66; M age = 27.23 years, SD = 3.54) treated with CBT for childhood anxiety disorders 7-19 years (M = 16.24; SD = 3.56) earlier. Information regarding anxiety (i.e., social phobia (SoP), separation anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)) and mood disorders (i.e., major depressive disorder (MDD) and dysthymic disorders) was obtained at pretreatment, posttreatment, and one or more follow-up intervals via interviews and self-reports. Evidence of pathways from SoP, SAD, and GAD to later depressive disorders was not observed. Treatment responders evidenced reduced GAD and SoP over time, although SoP was observed to have a more chronic and enduring pattern. Evidence for typically observed pathways from childhood anxiety disorders was not observed. Future research should prospectively examine if CBT treatment response disrupts commonly observed pathways. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Virtual Reality for Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Uzumcu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality is a relatively new exposure tool that uses three-dimensional computer-graphics-based technologies which allow the individual to feel as if they are physically inside the virtual environment by misleading their senses. As virtual reality studies have become popular in the field of clinical psychology in recent years, it has been observed that virtual-reality-based therapies have a wide range of application areas, especially on anxiety disorders. Studies indicate that virtual reality can be more realistic than mental imagery and can create a stronger feeling of ԰resenceԻ that it is a safer starting point compared to in vivo exposure; and that it can be applied in a more practical and controlled manner. The aim of this review is to investigate exposure studies based on virtual reality in anxiety disorders (specific phobias, panic disorder and agoraphobias, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder.

  11. Anxiety and Alcohol Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua P.; Randall, Carrie L.

    2012-01-01

    The co-occurrence of anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) is relatively common and is associated with a complex clinical presentation. Sound diagnosis and treatment planning requires that clinicians have an integrated understanding of the developmental pathways and course of this comorbidity. Moreover, standard interventions for anxiety disorders or AUDs may need to be modified and combined in targeted ways to accommodate the unique needs of people who have both disorders. Optimal combination of evidence-based treatments should be based on a comparative balance that considers the advantages and disadvantages of sequential, parallel, and integrated approaches. PMID:23584108

  12. Prevalência de transtornos depressivos e ansiosos em uma amostra ambulatorial brasileira de mulheres na menopausa Prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders in a Brazilian outpatient sample of menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André B. Veras

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência dos transtornos depressivo-ansiosos entre mulheres atendidas em um ambulatório de menopausa. METODOLOGIA: Avaliamos, através da entrevista semi-estruturada Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, 86 mulheres que encontravam-se em tratamento no ambulatório de menopausa do Instituto de Ginecologia da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. RESULTADOS: A maioria das mulheres apresentava algum diagnóstico psiquiátrico (57% sendo mais prevalentes o transtorno de ansiedade generalizada (34,9% e a depressão maior (31,4%. O grupo com algum diagnóstico foi representado por mulheres mais jovens, casadas, com menor escolaridade e história familiar para transtornos psiquiátricos. CONCLUSÃO: Observamos uma grande prevalência de transtornos mentais entre mulheres em atendimento ambulatorial na menopausa em nosso estudo, em relação às mulheres em atendimento em outros ambulatórios segundo a literatura. Há também uma alta taxa de prevalência de comorbidades (55,5% dos pacientes com algum transtorno complicadoras do transtorno primário, o que pode representar a evolução para pior prognóstico pela ausência de tratamento precoce e específico.OBJETIVE: To determine the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders in women receiving care in a menopause clinic. METHODS: Eighty-six women receiving care in the menopause clinic at Instituto de Ginecologia da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro were assessed using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. RESULTS: Most women had a psychiatric diagnosis (57%; generalized anxiety disorder (34.9% and major depression (31.4% were the most prevalent disorders. The group composed of subjects with any disorder was represented by young and married women, with lower schooling level and family history for psychiatric disorders. CONCLUSION: In our study, there was a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders in outpatient women receiving care in a

  13. Studying Anxiety Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Phobias and Anxiety Disorders Studying Anxiety Disorders Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... physical and psychological stress, and diet. 5 Major Anxiety Disorders Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) : chronic anxiety, exaggerated ...

  14. Comorbidity among the anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.; Rijken, H.; Garssen, B.; van Schaik, A.; Kraaimaat, F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the diagnoses of 120 consecutive referrals to an outpatient research program on anxiety disorders. Patients were diagnosed according to DSM-III-R criteria using a structured interview. Patterns of comorbidity among disorders were examined using two diagnostic procedures. One

  15. Suicidal Ideation in Anxiety-Disordered Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Kelly A.; Puleo, Connor M.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is mixed regarding an independent association between anxiety and suicidality in youth. Study 1 examined suicidal ideation in treatment-referred, anxiety-disordered youth (N = 312, aged 7-17). Forty-one percent of anxiety-disordered youth endorsed suicidal ideation. Anxiety disorder severity, global impairment, and current depressive…

  16. Regional Brain Volume in Depression and Anxiety Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, Marie-Jose; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van den Heuvel, Odile A.; Nielen, Marjan M. A.; Demenescu, Liliana R.; Aleman, Andre; Renken, Remco; van Buchem, Mark A.; Zitman, Frans G.; Veltman, Dick J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder are among the most prevalent and frequently co-occurring psychiatric disorders in adults and may have, at least in part, a common etiology. Objective: To identify the unique and shared neuro-anatomical profile of

  17. Regional brain volume in depression and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, Marie-José; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van den Heuvel, Odile A.; Nielen, Marjan M. A.; Demenescu, Liliana R.; Aleman, André; Renken, Remco; van Buchem, Mark A.; Zitman, Frans G.; Veltman, Dick J.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder are among the most prevalent and frequently co-occurring psychiatric disorders in adults and may have, at least in part, a common etiology. OBJECTIVE: To identify the unique and shared neuroanatomical profile of

  18. [Anxiety disorders in DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the DSM-5 appeared officially in May 2013 during the development of the 166th Annual Meetingof the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in San Francisco. The drafting process was long and complex; much of the debate became public so that the expectations were great. And it must be said that the new edition did not disappoint, as many changes were made in relation to their predecessors. In Chapter of Anxiety Disorders, which is reviewed in this article, the changes were significant. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and Stress-related disorders were excluded and new clinical pictures, such as separation anxiety disorder and selective mutism, were included. And took place was the long awaited split between panic disorder and agoraphobia, now two separate disorders.

  19. Panic disorder, phobias, and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Waters, Allison M

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of recent empirical developments, current controversies, and areas in need of further research in relation to factors that are common as well as specific to the etiology and maintenance of panic disorder, phobias, and generalized anxiety disorder. The relative contribution of broad risk factors to these disorders is discussed, including temperament, genetics, biological influences, cognition, and familial variables. In addition, the role that specific learning experiences play in relation to each disorder is reviewed. In an overarching hierarchical model, it is proposed that generalized anxiety disorder, and to some extent panic disorder, loads most heavily on broad underlying factors, whereas specific life history contributes most strongly to circumscribed phobias.

  20. Meditation therapy for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisanaprakornkit, T; Krisanaprakornkit, W; Piyavhatkul, N; Laopaiboon, M

    2006-01-25

    Anxiety disorders are characterised by long term worry, tension, nervousness, fidgeting and symptoms of autonomic system hyperactivity. Meditation is an age-old self regulatory strategy which is gaining more interest in mental health and psychiatry. Meditation can reduce arousal state and may ameliorate anxiety symptoms in various anxiety conditions. To investigate the effectiveness of meditation therapy in treating anxiety disorders Electronic databases searched include CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References, complementary and alternative medicine specific databases, Science Citation Index, Health Services/Technology Assessment Text database, and grey literature databases. Conference proceedings, book chapters and references were checked. Study authors and experts from religious/spiritual organisations were contacted. Types of studies: Randomised controlled trials. patients with a diagnosis of anxiety disorders, with or without another comorbid psychiatric condition. Types of interventions: concentrative meditation or mindfulness meditation. Comparison conditions: one or combination of 1) pharmacological therapy 2) other psychological treatment 3) other methods of meditation 4) no intervention or waiting list. Types of outcome: 1) improvement in clinical anxiety scale 2) improvement in anxiety level specified by triallists, or global improvement 3) acceptability of treatment, adverse effects 4) dropout. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers using a pre-designed data collection form. Any disagreements were discussed with a third reviewer, and the authors of the studies were contacted for further information. Two randomised controlled studies were eligible for inclusion in the review. Both studies were of moderate quality and used active control comparisons (another type of meditation, relaxation, biofeedback). Anti-anxiety drugs were used as standard treatment. The duration of trials ranged from 3 months (12 weeks) to 18 weeks. In one study

  1. Anxiety in individuals with ASD: Prevalence, phenomenology, etiology, assessment, and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Bögels, S.M.; Magiati, I.; Perrin, S.; Patel, V.B.; Preedy, V.R.; Martin, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    ndividuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience high levels of anxiety symptomatology with an estimated prevalence rate of anxiety disorders as high as 40 %. It is likely that anxiety is prominent in individuals with ASD throughout the life-span and that factors such as age, IQ, and ASD

  2. Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Men, Mental Health, Seniors, WomenTags: Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Anxiety, counseling, ... Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental ... Childbirth Women Men Seniors In The News Your Health Resources Healthcare ...

  3. Anxiety Disorders: Types, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatable. If you think you have an anxiety disorder, talk to your doctor. Sometimes a physical evaluation is advisable to determine whether a person's anxiety is associated with a physical illness. If anxiety is diagnosed, the pattern of co- ...

  4. Cognitive hypnotherapy for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, William L

    2012-04-01

    Cognitive hypnotherapy, also known as cognitive-behavioral hypnotherapy (CBH), is applied to the treatment of anxiety disorders. Specific techniques are described and illustrated. The research on CBH is discussed. CBH seems to be at least as effective as behavior therapy (BT) and cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) treatments that employ imagery and relaxation techniques for anxiety disorders. However, more research is needed because of the lack of adequate studies comparing CBH with BT and CBT. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are offered.

  5. Nicotine Modulation of Fear Memories and Anxiety: Implications for Learning and Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are a group of crippling mental diseases affecting millions of Americans with a 30% lifetime prevalence and costs associated with healthcare of $42.3 billion. While anxiety disorders show high levels of co-morbidity with smoking (45.3% vs. 22.5% in healthy individuals), anxiety disorders are also more common among the smoking population (22% vs. 11.1% in the non-smoking population). Moreover, there is clear evidence that smoking modulates symptom severity in patients with anxiety disorders. In order to better understand this relationship, several animal paradigms are used to model several key symptoms of anxiety disorders; these include fear conditioning and measures of anxiety. Studies clearly demonstrate that nicotine mediates acquisition and extinction of fear as well as anxiety through the modulation of specific subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brain regions involved in emotion processing such as the hippocampus. However, the direction of nicotine’s effects on these behaviors is determined by several factors that include the length of administration, hippocampus-dependency of the fear learning task, and source of anxiety (novelty-driven vs. social anxiety). Overall, the studies reviewed here suggest that nicotine alters behaviors related to fear and anxiety and that nicotine contributes to the development, maintenance, and reoccurrence of anxiety disorders. PMID:26231942

  6. Generalized anxiety disorder: comorbidity, comparative biology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J; Ballenger, James C; Sheehan, David; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2002-12-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a severe and chronic anxiety disorder characterized by uncontrollable worrying and somatic anxiety (tension, insomnia and hypervigilance). It is a common condition, with lifetime prevalence rates for DSM-IV GAD in the general population of approx. 5-6% being reported. In addition, like other anxiety disorders, GAD also shows comorbidity with depression and most of the other anxiety disorders. This article reviews data on the prevalence of GAD, its comorbidity with depression, and its social and economic impact. Proposed neurobiological mechanisms for GAD are discussed, since an understanding of these may help in the development of future therapies. Finally, current pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options for GAD are reviewed, with particular attention being paid to published clinical-trial data.

  7. Psychological treatments for depression and anxiety disorders in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Depression and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent world- wide.1 On a global scale, approximately 150 million people suffer from a major depressive disorder at any moment, and almost a million commit suicide each year.2 These common mental disorders are associated with a significantly impaired.

  8. Self-help interventions for anxiety disorders: An overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Schuurmans, J.

    2007-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and are associated with a marked impairment in quality of life and a huge economic cost to society. Unfortunately, a considerable number of people who struggle with anxiety do not seek or receive adequate treatment. Self-help interventions have been proposed to

  9. Recurrence of anxiety disorders and its predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Willemijn D.; Batelaan, Neeltje M.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.; Penninx, Brenda; Smit, Johannes H.; van Oppen, Patricia

    Background: The chronic course of anxiety disorders and its high burden of disease are partly due to the recurrence of anxiety disorders after remission. However, knowledge about recurrence rates and predictors of recurrence is scarce. This article reports on recurrence rates of anxiety disorders

  10. Recurrence of anxiety disorders and its predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, W.D.; Batelaan, N.M.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Smit, J.H.; van Oppen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The chronic course of anxiety disorders and its high burden of disease are partly due to the recurrence of anxiety disorders after remission. However, knowledge about recurrence rates and predictors of recurrence is scarce. This article reports on recurrence rates of anxiety disorders

  11. The Impact of Caregiving on the Development of Major Depressive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Markey, Eve Jane

    2015-01-01

    Providing care for a relative is associated with psychological distress and a higher prevalence of psychological disorders. This study investigated the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders among the caregiving population. The study was based on data drawn from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES). Binary logistic regressions were conducted to examine these associations and to identify factors influencing the development of depressive and anxiety disorders. The a...

  12. Major depressive and anxiety disorders in visually impaired older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa, Hilde P A; Comijs, Hannie C; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van Rens, Ger H M B; van Nispen, Ruth M A

    2015-01-20

    We assessed the prevalence of subthreshold depression and anxiety, and major depressive, dysthymic, and anxiety disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, and general anxiety disorder) in visually impaired older adults and compared these estimates with those of normally sighted peers. Cross-sectional data were analyzed based on telephone interviews with visually impaired older adults aged ≥ 60 years (n = 615) with a visual acuity of ≥ 0.30 logMAR (20/40 Snellen) in the best eye from outpatient low vision rehabilitation centers, and face-to-face interviews with community-dwelling normally sighted peers (n = 1232). To determine prevalence rates, the normally sighted population was weighted on sex and age to fit the visually impaired population. Logistic regression analyses were used to compare the populations and to correct for confounders. The prevalence of major depressive disorder (5.4%) and anxiety disorders (7.5%), as well as the prevalence of subthreshold depression (32.2%) and subthreshold anxiety (15.6%), were significantly higher in visually impaired older adults compared to their normally sighted peers (P visually impaired older adults. This study shows that depression and anxiety are major public health problems in visually impaired older adults. Research on psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic interventions to improve depression and anxiety in this population is warranted. (http://www.trialregister.nl number, NTR3296.). Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  13. Prevalence and association of self-reported anxiety, pain, and oral parafunctional habits with temporomandibular disorders in Japanese children and adolescents: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karibe, Hiroyuki; Shimazu, Kisaki; Okamoto, Ayuko; Kawakami, Tomomi; Kato, Yuichi; Warita-Naoi, Sachie

    2015-01-21

    Associations between temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and psychological variables, pain conditions, and daily activities have been reported more commonly in middle-aged individuals than in children. However, to determine factor-specific preventive programs for TMD, it is important to evaluate the associations between multiple factors and TMD symptoms during childhood. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between TMD symptoms and other orofacial pain conditions, daily activities, and trait anxiety in a population-based cross-sectional survey of Japanese children and adolescents. A total of 1,415 subjects (11-15 years old) self-reported their TMD symptoms, headache, neck pain, and toothache, and completed questionnaire scales that assessed 15 daily activities. Trait anxiety was assessed using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children-Trait (STAIC-T) scale. Subjects were dichotomized into a TMD group or control group, based on whether they reported at least 1 TMD symptom: the TMD group (≥1 TMD symptom, n = 182) and the control group (no TMD symptoms, n = 1,233). Data were analyzed using the chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The prevalence rates for headache and neck pain were significantly higher in the TMD group than in the control group (44.0% vs. 24.7% and 54.4% vs. 30.0%, respectively; both P < 0.001). The odds ratios for TMD symptoms in subjects with neck pain and frequent diurnal clenching were 2.08 (P < 0.001) and 3.69 (P = 0.011), respectively. Moreover, high STAIC-T scores were weakly associated with TMD symptoms. In this young Japanese population, TMD symptoms were associated with other orofacial pain conditions, particularly neck pain, although they were only weakly associated with trait anxiety. Diurnal clenching was strongly associated with TMD symptoms. Health professionals should carefully consider these factors when developing appropriate management strategies for TMD in children

  14. A systematic review of anxiety prevalence in adults within primary care and community settings in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chin Hoong; Sultan Shah, Zia U Bakt; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Lin, Tzi Quen; Majeed, Zainab Abdul; Chan, Chun Wai

    2016-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are common mental health disorders with significant impact on the individual as well as burden on the country as a whole. A systematic review of databases, reference lists, internet sources, and input from content experts revealed 42 studies that documented the prevalence of anxiety symptoms or disorders. 12 of these studies specifically evaluated anxiety disorders. 4 studies looked at the prevalence of anxiety disorders in the general population, whilst the remainder focused on selected population groups: university students (4 studies); substance abuse (3 studies); and victims of abuse (1 study). Studies in the general population showed that the prevalence of generalised anxiety disorder was 0.4-5.6%, mixed anxiety and depression were 3-5%, panic without agoraphobia 0.4%, phobia unspecified 0.5-%, and anxiety not-otherwise-specified 0.3-6.5%. We found significant variability in anxiety disorders in the studies in selected population groups. The variability could also have been affected by methodological factors within each study. This study provides a broad overview of the prevalence of anxiety disorders in Malaysia. More research is required to develop diagnostic instruments that are validated for local use and comparable with international standards. Reliable prevalence estimates are lacking within certain groups, e.g. those in rural, indigenous, migrant population groups and those exposed to natural disasters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Social anxiety disorder and stuttering: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverach, Lisa; Rapee, Ronald M

    2014-06-01

    Anxiety is one of the most widely observed and extensively studied psychological concomitants of stuttering. Research conducted prior to the turn of the century produced evidence of heightened anxiety in people who stutter, yet findings were inconsistent and ambiguous. Failure to detect a clear and systematic relationship between anxiety and stuttering was attributed to methodological flaws, including use of small sample sizes and unidimensional measures of anxiety. More recent research, however, has generated far less equivocal findings when using social anxiety questionnaires and psychiatric diagnostic assessments in larger samples of people who stutter. In particular, a growing body of research has demonstrated an alarmingly high rate of social anxiety disorder among adults who stutter. Social anxiety disorder is a prevalent and chronic anxiety disorder characterised by significant fear of humiliation, embarrassment, and negative evaluation in social or performance-based situations. In light of the debilitating nature of social anxiety disorder, and the impact of stuttering on quality of life and personal functioning, collaboration between speech pathologists and psychologists is required to develop and implement comprehensive assessment and treatment programmes for social anxiety among people who stutter. This comprehensive approach has the potential to improve quality of life and engagement in everyday activities for people who stutter. Determining the prevalence of social anxiety disorder among children and adolescents who stutter is a critical line of future research. Further studies are also required to confirm the efficacy of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in treating social anxiety disorder in stuttering. The reader will be able to: (a) describe the nature and course of social anxiety disorder; (b) outline previous research regarding anxiety and stuttering, including features of social anxiety disorder; (c) summarise research findings regarding the

  16. Psychotherapy for Anxiety in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-30

    Autism Spectrum Disorders; Autism; Asperger's Syndrome; Pervasive Developmental Disability - Not Otherwise Specified; Obsessive-compulsive Disorder; Social Phobia; Generalized Anxiety Disorder; Specific Phobia; Separation Anxiety Disorder

  17. Social communication deficits: Specific associations with Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, Georgia; Cooper, Peter J; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-02-01

    Social communication deficits are prevalent amongst children with anxiety disorders; however whether they are over-represented specifically among children with Social Anxiety Disorder has not been examined. This study set out to examine social communication deficits among children with Social Anxiety Disorder in comparison to children with other forms of anxiety disorder. Parents of 404 children with a diagnosed anxiety disorder completed the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ; Rutter, M., Bailey, A., Lord, C., 2003. The Social Communication Questionnaire - Manual. Western Psychological Services, Los Angeles, CA). Children with a diagnosis of Social Anxiety Disorder (n=262) and anxious children without Social Anxiety Disorder (n=142) were compared on SCQ total and subscale scores and the frequency of participants scoring above clinical cut-offs. Children with Social Anxiety Disorder scored significantly higher than anxious children without Social Anxiety Disorder on the SCQ total (t(352)=4.85, p<.001, d=.55, r=.27), Reciprocal Social Interaction (t(351)=4.73, p<.001, d=.55, r=.27), communication (t(344)=3.62, p<.001, d=.43, r=.21) and repetitive, restrictive and stereotyped behaviors subscales (t(353)=3.15, p=.002, d=.37, r=.18). Furthermore, children with Social Anxiety Disorder were three times more likely to score above clinical cut-offs. The participants were a relatively affluent group of predominantly non-minority status. The social communication difficulties measure relied on parental report which could be influenced by extraneous factors. Treatments for Social Anxiety Disorder may benefit from a specific focus on developing social communication skills. Future research using objective assessments of underlying social communication skills is required. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Pharmacotherapy for social phobia, generalised anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, G C; Ferdinand, R F

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychiatric disorders during childhood. They are often persistent and are associated with a number of negative outcomes. Therefore, effective treatment is required. To present an overview of placebo-controlled studies of pharmacotherapy for social phobia, generalised anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder in children an adolescents and to determine which medication is the most effective. The literature was reviewed using Pubmed. Nine randomised double-blind studies on the efficacy of pharmacotherapy for generalised anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder and social phobia were found. Tricyclic antidepressants were not more effective than placebo. Studies on benzodiazepines showed that the effect of these drugs was not superior to that of placebo either. Studies of the efficacy of ssris, however, proved that they were superior to placebo. SSRIS are the drugs of first choice for the treatment of social phobias, separation anxiety disorder and generalised anxiety disorder in children and adolescents. There is strong evidence that ssris are effective for the treatment of these anxiety disorders; the standardised effect size varies between medium and large.

  19. Antisocial personality disorder and anxiety disorder: a diagnostic variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coid, Jeremy; Ullrich, Simone

    2010-06-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) with co-morbid anxiety disorder may be a variant of ASPD with different etiology and treatment requirements. We investigated diagnostic co-morbidity, ASPD criteria, and anxiety/affective symptoms of ASPD/anxiety disorder. Weighted analyses were carried out using survey data from a representative British household sample. ASPD/anxiety disorder demonstrated differing patterns of antisocial criteria, co-morbidity with clinical syndromes, psychotic symptoms, and other personality disorders compared to ASPD alone. ASPD criteria demonstrated specific associations with CIS-R scores of anxiety and affective symptoms. Findings suggest ASPD/anxiety disorder is a variant of ASPD, determined by symptoms of anxiety. Although co-morbid anxiety and affective symptoms are the same as in anxiety disorder alone, associations with psychotic symptoms require further investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of the DSM-5 and ICD-10: panic and other anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin

    2017-10-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental disorders and are associated with substantial healthcare costs and a high burden of disease. In this article, changes in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (the DSM-5) with respect to panic disorder/agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobias, and selective mutism are compared with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system.

  1. Cognitive coping in anxiety-disordered adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Garnefski, Nadia; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated differences in cognitive coping strategies between anxiety-disordered and non-anxious adolescents. In addition, the interaction effect with gender as well as differences between specific anxiety diagnoses was examined. A clinical sample of 159 anxiety-disordered

  2. The 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV, DSM-V, and ICD-10 among nondemented 75-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johan; Östling, Svante; Waern, Margda; Karlsson, Björn; Sigström, Robert; Guo, Xinxin; Skoog, Ingmar

    2012-11-01

    To examine the 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), and the overlap between these criteria, in a population sample of 75-year-olds. We also aimed to examine comorbidity between GAD and other psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression. During 2005-2006, a comprehensive semistructured psychiatric interview was conducted by trained nurses in a representative population sample of 75-year-olds without dementia in Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 777; 299 men and 478 women). All psychiatric diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV. GAD was also diagnosed according to ICD-10 and DSM-V. The 1-month prevalence of GAD was 4.1% (N = 32) according to DSM-IV, 4.5% (N = 35) according to DSM-V, and 3.7% (N = 29) according to ICD-10. Only 46.9% of those with DSM-IV GAD fulfilled ICD-10 criteria, and only 51.7% and 44.8% of those with ICD-10 GAD fulfilled DSM-IV/V criteria. Instead, 84.4% and 74.3% of those with DSM-IV/V GAD and 89.7% of those with ICD-10 GAD had depression. Also other psychiatric diagnoses were common in those with ICD-10 and DSM-IV GAD. Only a small minority with GAD, irrespective of criteria, had no other comorbid psychiatric disorder. ICD-10 GAD was related to an increased mortality rate. While GAD was common in 75-year-olds, DSM-IV/V and ICD-10 captured different individuals. Current definitions of GAD may comprise two different expressions of the disease. There was greater congruence between GAD in either classification system and depression than between DSM-IV/V GAD and ICD-10 GAD, emphasizing the close link between these entities. 2012 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

  3. History of childhood abuse in panic disorder, social phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safren, Steven A; Gershuny, Beth S; Marzol, Patricia; Otto, Michael W; Pollack, Mark H

    2002-07-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of self-reported childhood physical or sexual abuse in a sample of adult patients presenting for treatment of panic disorder, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder. Regardless of the presence of comorbid anxiety disorders or comorbid depression, patients with panic disorder had significantly higher rates of past childhood physical or sexual abuse than patients with social phobia. Patients with generalized anxiety disorder had intermediate rates of past physical or sexual abuse that were not significantly different from the other two diagnostic groups. Anxiety disorder patients with a history of childhood abuse were also more likely to have comorbid major depression than those without. These findings are discussed in terms of biological and behavioral factors that may influence the development of anxiety disorders after the experience of a traumatic event.

  4. [Anxiety in eating disorders: a comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Pinto, Natalia; Cano Vindel, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Scientific literature shows that anxiety is an important factor in eating disorders. The aim of this case-control study was to compare the anxiety manifestations obtained by means of the Anxiety Situations and Responses Inventory of in a clinical sample of 74 females (46, anorexia nervosa; 28, bulimia) to those obtained by a control group (130 girls without disorders). The between-group ANOVA results showed higher anxiety scores in the clinical group with a medium effect size for the anxiety trait, finding a flat profile (within-group ANOVA) for the three response systems (cognitive, physiological and motor) and the four specific anxiety traits (test, interpersonal, phobic, and daily life situations). Moreover, high scores in anxiety involved a greater risk of being diagnosed with an eating disorder in the 8 bivariate comparisons. The estimations were more precise for cognitive anxiety and for the specific interpersonal anxiety trait.

  5. Nutritional supplements in Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Mónica; Rodríguez-Legorburu, Isabel; López-Ibor Alcocer, María I

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, a direct relation between the occurrence of anxiety disorders, sleep disturbances, and mood disorders has been observed as a consequence of poor or inadequate diet. Eating habits in Western societies have greatly changed in recent decades, with an increase in the consumption of foods low in vitamin and mineral content, high in caloric value, and rapidly prepared and easily consumed. It may be that the new lifestyles that directly affect family organization and planning interfere with following a proper diet. However, with increasing frequency, especially among young adults, there is interest in healthy and balanced nutrition, as well as learning culinary techniques. We reviewed the literature for this study, and describe the concept of anxiety and its existence in relation to dietary disorders, as well as alternatives for the treatment of these symptoms. The characteristics of these disorders and their impact on patients are analyzed. The information used in this work was obtained mainly from PubMed, PsycARTICLES, PsycCRITIQUES, and PsycINFO. It was retrieved using the keywords “mental health”, “nutrition”, “diet”, “phytotherapy”, “natural alternatives”, “anxiety”, “mood”, and “sleep disturbance”.

  6. Epidemiology of anxiety disorders : From surveys to nosology and back

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Dan J; Scott, Kate M; de Jonge, Peter; Kessler, Ronald C

    On the basis of epidemiological survey findings, anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental disorders around the world and are associated with significant comorbidity and morbidity. Such surveys rely on advances in psychiatric nosology and may also contribute usefully to revisions of the

  7. Prevalência de transtornos depressivos e de ansiedade em pacientes obesos submetidos à cirurgia bariátrica Prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders in obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Astolfi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A obesidade mórbida está relacionada a muitos transtornos psiquiátricos e possui como opção terapêutica a cirurgia bariátrica. Objetivo: caracterizar a prevalência de transtornos depressivos e de ansiedade em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia bariátrica no Hospital Universitário Regional de Maringá e do Centro de Cirurgia de Obesidade de Maringá. Métodos: o estudo foi realizado com 50 pacientes obesos mórbidos submetidos à Cirurgia Bariátrica em diferentes períodos: pré-operatório, um mês de pós-operatório, três meses de pós-operatório e seis meses de pós-operatório. A avaliação do Transtorno Depressivo foi realizada pela aplicação do Inventário de Depressão de Beck, sendo outro instrumento utilizado neste trabalho a Escala Hospitalar de Ansiedade e Depressão (HAD. Resultados: a prevalência de quadros sugestivos de ansiedade foi: 40% (20 pacientes no pré-operatório, 18% no primeiro mês pós-operatório, 8% no terceiro mês pós-operatório e 14% no sexto mês pós-operatório. Quadros sugestivos de depressão foram encontrados em: 26% (13 pacientes no pré-operatório, 10% no primeiro mês pós-operatório e no terceiro mês pós-operatório e 8% no sexto mês pós-operatório. Conclusão: Os níveis de Ansiedade foram altos no pré-operatório, diminuíram no 1º e 3º mês pós-operatório e voltaram a subir no sexto mês, atingindo níveis mais altos que no terceiro mês.Morbid obesity is associated to several psychiatric disorders and bariatric surgery is a therapeutic option. Current research characterizes the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders in patients who underwent bariatric surgery at the Regional Hospital of Maringá and at the Obesity Surgery Center of Maringá, Maringá PR Brazil. Study was undertaken with 50 morbid obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery and comprised different periods, namely, pre-surgery, one month after surgery, three months after surgery and six months

  8. Bipolar disorder with comorbid anxiety disorders: impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome in cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychoeducation

    OpenAIRE

    Hawke, Lisa D; Velyvis, Vytas; Parikh, Sagar V

    2013-01-01

    Background Comorbid anxiety disorders are extremely prevalent in bipolar disorder (BD) and have substantial impact on the course of illness. Limited evidence regarding treatment factors has led to a renewal of research efforts examining both the impact of treatments on comorbid anxiety and the impact of comorbid anxiety on treatments. The current study examines the impact of comorbid anxiety disorders on response to two psychosocial interventions for BD. Methods A sample of 204 patients with ...

  9. Anxiety Disorders and Depression in Older Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Hek (Karin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAnxiety disorders and depression are common and complex disorders. Despite decades of research, their etiology is largely unknown. Study of the occurrence and determinants, i.e. the epidemiology of anxiety disorders and depression, helps unravel their etiology. This thesis examines the

  10. The Prevalence of Dental Anxiety and Validation of the Modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , not much work has been documented on dental anxiety. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of dental anxiety and determine the reliability and validity of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) in screening for ...

  11. Dual Cognitive and Biological Correlates of Anxiety in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollocks, Matthew J.; Pickles, Andrew; Howlin, Patricia; Simonoff, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Young people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a high prevalence (~40 %) of anxiety disorders compared to their non-ASD peers. It is unclear whether cognitive and biological processes associated with anxiety in ASD are analogous to anxiety in typically developing (TD) populations. In this study 55 boys with ASD (34 with a co-occurring…

  12. Treating nonspecific anxiety and anxiety disorders in patients with bipolar disorder: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Dunlop, Boadie W

    2011-01-01

    To review the evidence for treating anxiety in patients with bipolar disorder. A literature search from 1950 to week 1 of August 2009 was conducted via OVID and the National Institutes of Health's clinical trials online databases. Search terms included anxiety, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, social anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, specific phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and treatment. Reference lists of identified articles were also searched. Fourteen treatment studies that included patients with bipolar disorder with either a syndrome-defined anxiety disorder or nonspecific anxiety were selected. Sample size, bipolar disorder subtype, comorbid anxiety disorders, baseline anxiety, treatment interventions, and outcome measurements were extracted. The majority of studies focus on treating anxiety disorders and nonspecific anxiety occurring during bipolar mood episodes. Studies of syndrome-defined anxiety disorders reveal that risperidone monotherapy did not separate from placebo and that olanzapine was superior to lamotrigine when used to augment lithium treatment. A study using open-label divalproex sodium and an uncontrolled study of group cognitive-behavioral therapy both suggest some benefit from these treatments in patients with bipolar disorder with panic disorder. Studies of nonspecific anxiety reveal some benefit for divalproex, quetiapine, olanzapine, and olanzapine-fluoxetine combination. Weaker evidence supports the use of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, and observational studies suggest potential efficacy for gabapentin and valproate. Nonspecific anxiety symptoms occurring during a mood episode improve with treatment of the mood disturbance, though divalproex may be the mood stabilizer of choice for anxious patients with bipolar disorder. Given their reduced risk for manic induction and episode cycling, psychotherapy, benzodiazepines, and certain atypical antipsychotics

  13. Culture and the anxiety disorders: recommendations for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Hinton, Devon E; Laria, Amaro J; Patterson, Elissa H; Hofmann, Stefan G; Craske, Michelle G; Stein, Dan J; Asnaani, Anu; Liao, Betty

    2010-02-01

    The anxiety disorders specified in the fourth edition, text revision, of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV-TR) are identified universally in human societies, and also show substantial cultural particularities in prevalence and symptomatology. Possible explanations for the observed epidemiological variability include lack of measurement equivalence, true differences in prevalence, and limited validity or precision of diagnostic criteria. One central question is whether, through inadvertent "over-specification" of disorders, the post-DSM-III nosology has missed related but somewhat different presentations of the same disorder because they do not exactly fit specified criteria sets. This review canvases the mental health literature for evidence of cross-cultural limitations in DSM-IV-TR anxiety disorder criteria. Searches were conducted of the mental health literature, particularly since 1994, regarding cultural or race/ethnicity-related factors that might limit the universal applicability of the diagnostic criteria for six anxiety disorders. Possible mismatches between the DSM criteria and the local phenomenology of the disorder in specific cultural contexts were found for three anxiety disorders in particular. These involve the unexpectedness and 10-minute crescendo criteria in Panic Disorder; the definition of social anxiety and social reference group in Social Anxiety Disorder; and the priority given to psychological symptoms of worry in Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Limited evidence was found throughout, particularly in terms of neurobiological markers, genetic risk factors, treatment response, and other DSM-V validators that could help clarify the cross-cultural applicability of criteria. On the basis of the available data, options and preliminary recommendations for DSM-V are put forth that should be further evaluated and tested.

  14. Processing bias in children with separation anxiety disorder, social phobia and generalised anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindt, M.; Bögels, S.M.; Morren, M.

    2003-01-01

    The present study examined processing bias in children suffering from anxiety disorders. Processing bias was assessed using of the emotional Stroop task in clinically referred children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SP), and/or generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and normal

  15. Treatment of borderline personality disorder and co-occurring anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenstein, Helen R.

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among individuals with borderline personality disorder, with comorbidity rates of up to 90%. Anxiety disorders have been found to reduce the likelihood of achieving remission from borderline personality disorder over time and to increase the risk of suicide and self-injury in this population. Evidence-based treatments for borderline personality disorder have not sufficiently focused on targeting anxiety disorders, and their effects on these disorders are either limited or unknown. Conversely, evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders typically exclude suicidal, self-injuring, and seriously comorbid patients, thereby limiting their generalizability to individuals with borderline personality disorder. To address these limitations, recent research has begun to emerge focused on developing and evaluating treatments for individuals with co-occurring borderline personality disorder and anxiety disorders, specifically posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with promising initial results. However, there is a need for additional research in this area, particularly studies evaluating the treatment of anxiety disorders among high-risk and complex borderline personality disorder patients. PMID:23710329

  16. Biological markers of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Eduard; Nutt, David

    2017-06-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent and highly disabling mental health condition; however, there is still much to learn with regard to pertinent biomarkers, as well as diagnosis, made more difficult by the marked and common overlap of GAD with affective and anxiety disorders. Recently, intensive research efforts have focused on GAD, applying neuroimaging, genetic, and blood-based approaches toward discovery of pathogenetic and treatment-related biomarkers. In this paper, we review the large amount of available data, and we focus in particular on evidence from neuroimaging, genetic, and neurochemical measurements in GAD in order to better understand potential biomarkers involved in its etiology and treatment. Overall, the majority of these studies have produced results that are solitary findings, sometimes inconsistent and not clearly replicable. For these reasons, they have not yet been translated into clinical practice. Therefore, further research efforts are needed to distinguish GAD from other mental disorders and to provide new biological insights into its pathogenesis and treatment.

  17. Increased mortality among people with anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sandra M; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole

    2016-01-01

    : To assess mortality risk in people with anxiety disorders. METHOD: We used nationwide Danish register data to conduct a prospective cohort study with over 30 million person-years of follow-up. RESULTS: In total, 1066 (2.1%) people with anxiety disorders died during an average follow-up of 9.7 years....... The risk of death by natural and unnatural causes was significantly higher among individuals with anxiety disorders (natural mortality rate ratio (MRR) = 1.39, 95% CI 1.28-1.51; unnatural MRR = 2.46, 95% CI 2.20-2.73) compared with the general population. Of those who died from unnatural causes, 16.5% had......BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders and depression are the most common mental disorders worldwide and have a striking impact on global disease burden. Although depression has consistently been found to increase mortality; the role of anxiety disorders in predicting mortality risk is unclear. AIMS...

  18. A Functional Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 1 (VMAT1) Gene Variant Is Associated with Affect and the Prevalence of Anxiety, Affective, and Alcohol Use Disorders in a Longitudinal Population-Representative Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaht, Mariliis; Kiive, Evelyn; Veidebaum, Toomas; Harro, Jaanus

    2016-07-01

    Inter-individual differences in the monoaminergic systems have been shown to moderate the risk for a lifetime history of anxiety, affective, and alcohol use disorders. A common single nucleotide polymorphism in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 gene (VMAT1 rs1390938 G/A; Thr136Ile) has been reported as functional in vitro and associated with bipolar disorder and anxiety. We aimed at assessing the association between the VMAT1 genotype, affect, and affect-related psychiatric disorders in a longitudinal population-representative study. We used the database of the Estonian Children Personality Behaviour and Health Study (beginning in 1998). Cohorts of initially 9- (recalled at ages 15 and 18 years, n=579) and 15- (recalled at ages 18 and 25 years; n=654) year-old children provided self-reports on impulsivity, anxiety, depressiveness, neuroticism, and alcohol use. In addition, psychiatric assessment based on DSM-IV was carried out in the older cohort at age 25 years. Subjects homozygous for the less prevalent A (136Ile) allele reported lower maladaptive impulsivity, state and trait anxiety, depressiveness, and neuroticism and were less likely to have been diagnosed with an affective, anxiety, and/or alcohol use disorder by young adulthood. While in the younger cohort alcohol use started at younger age, this birth cohort effect was dependent on genotype: only G allele carriers and in particular the GG homozygotes started alcohol use earlier. VMAT1 rs1390938/Thr136Ile is associated with mood, personality, and alcohol use in the general population. Subjects homozygous for the "hyperfunction" allele (AA; Ile/Ile) appear to be more resilient to these disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  19. Autonomic arousal in childhood anxiety disorders: Associations with state anxiety and social anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkozei, Anna; Creswell, Cathy; Cooper, Peter J.; Allen, John J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychophysiological theories suggest that individuals with anxiety disorders may evidence inflexibility in their autonomic activity at rest and when responding to stressors. In addition, theories of social anxiety disorder, in particular, highlight the importance of physical symptoms. Research on autonomic activity in childhood (social) anxiety disorders, however, is scarce and has produced inconsistent findings, possibly because of methodological limitations. Method The present study aimed to account for limitations of previous studies and measured respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and heart rate (HR) using Actiheart heart rate monitors and software (Version 4) during rest and in response to a social and a non-social stressor in 60 anxious (30 socially anxious and 30 ‘other’ anxious), and 30 nonanxious sex-and age-matched 7–12 year olds. In addition, the effect of state anxiety during the tasks was explored. Results No group differences at rest or in response to stress were found. Importantly, however, with increases in state anxiety, all children, regardless of their anxiety diagnoses showed less autonomic responding (i.e., less change in HR and RSA from baseline in response to task) and took longer to recover once the stressor had passed. Limitations This study focused primarily on parasympathetic arousal and lacked measures of sympathetic arousal. Conclusion The findings suggest that childhood anxiety disorders may not be characterized by inflexible autonomic responding, and that previous findings to the contrary may have been the result of differences in subjective anxiety between anxious and nonanxious groups during the tasks, rather than a function of chronic autonomic dysregulation. PMID:25590763

  20. [Psychophysiological characteristics of panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, S A; Posokhov, S I; Kovrov, G V; Katenko, S V

    2013-01-01

    We studied 34 patients with panic disorder, 32 patients with generalized anxiety disorder and 29 healthy controls using clinical-neurological, psychometric, neuropsychological and neurophysiological (auditory event-related potentials) methods. Patients were characterized by pronounced autonomic dysfunctions, a higher level of anxiety and depression as well as cognitive function disturbances in the form of impairment of short-term memory and directed attention in comparison with healthy controls. Patients with generalized anxiety disorder differed from patients with panic disorder by the higher level of anxiety, greater degree of depression and more expressed disturbances of short-term memory and directed attention. Compared to controls, patients with generalized anxiety disorder had lower P300 amplitudes while the latter was higher in patients with panic disorders. It is concluded that recording of event-related potentials may be used as an additional method of differential diagnosis of these types of anxiety disorders.

  1. Sleep disturbance in generalized anxiety disorder and its treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Jaime M.; Monti, Daniel

    2000-06-01

    Sleep laboratory and epidemiological studies indicate that insomnia is a frequent finding in patients with psychiatric disorders. In this respect, insomnia associated with a major depression or an anxiety disorder, mainly generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), is the most prevalent diagnosis. According to available evidence, the sleep disturbance associated with mild-to-moderate GAD is a sleep-maintenance insomnia, and to a lesser extent a sleep-onset insomnia. Insomnia associated with mild-to-moderate GAD generally responds to psychological treatments and anxiolytic benzodiazepines. Moreover, concomitant administration of hypnotic medication can be contemplated in patients with severe GAD.

  2. The Age of Onset of Anxiety Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijster, Jasmijn M. de; Dierckx, Bram; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Zieldorff, Carola; Dieleman, Gwen C.; Legerstee, Jeroen S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to estimate the age of onset (AOO) for all anxiety disorders and for specific subtypes. Gender differences in the AOO of anxiety disorders were examined, as were the influence of study characteristics on reported AOOs. Seven electronic databases were searched up to October 2014,

  3. Negative autobiographical memories in social anxiety disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    OToole, Mia Skytte; Watson, Lynn Ann; Rosenberg, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Empirical interest in mental imagery in social anxiety disorder (SAD) has grown over the past years but still little is known about the specificity to SAD. The present study therefore examines negative autobiographical memories in participants with social anxiety disorder...

  4. Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Farah S; Dobson, Eric T; Strawn, Jeffrey R

    2016-06-01

    The last decade has seen considerable advances in the treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents and a considerable expansion of the evidence base for psychopharmacologic in this population. The extant data suggest that, for fear-based anxiety disorders ( e.g. , generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia/social anxiety disorder, and separation anxiety disorder), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) are well tolerated and offer considerable benefit. However, the salutary effects of SSRIs and SSNRIs in pediatric anxiety disorders are consistently amplified by the addition of psychotherapy, particularly in individuals with social anxiety disorder. Additionally, several key demographic and clinical factors, including male sex, non-minority status, and better family functioning and younger age predict greater symptomatic improvement in youth with fear-based anxiety disorders. Thus, current data suggest that in addition to several forms of psychotherapy, including cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), SSRIs and SSNRIs are efficacious in the treatment of these conditions in youth and that CBT + an SSRI may be associated with greater improvement than would be expected with either treatment as monotherapy. Finally, given that some children and adolescents may exhibit partial response to current pharmacotherapies, benzodiazepines, anti-histamines and other agents may have adjunctive roles, despite a lack of data in terms of large, randomized controlled trials.

  5. Social Anxiety Disorder: More Than Just Shyness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a counselor to talk about ways to cope with my fears. I refuse to use alcohol to escape my fears and I’m on my way to feeling better.” What is social anxiety disorder? Social anxiety disorder is a common type ...

  6. Depressive and anxiety disorders and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis Findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldenrijk, Adrie; Vogelzangs, Nicole; van Hout, Hein P. J.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Diamant, Michaela; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Objective: Current evidence regarding the association between psychopathology and subclinical atherosclerosis show inconsistent results. The present study examined whether subclinical atherosclerosis was more prevalent in a large cohort of persons with depressive or anxiety disorders as compared to

  7. Treating Anxiety Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Phobias and Anxiety Disorders Treating Anxiety Disorders Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Anxiety disorders are generally treated with medication, specific types ...

  8. Disordered Gambling Prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Glenn W.; Jessen, Lasse J.; Lau, Morten

    2018-01-01

    of detectable risk with these corrections, since gambling behavior is positively correlated with the decision to participate in gambling surveys. We also find that imposing a threshold gambling history leads to underestimation of the prevalence of gambling problems.......We study Danish adult gambling behavior with an emphasis on discovering patterns relevant to public health forecasting and economic welfare assessment of policy. Methodological innovations include measurement of formative in addition to reflective constructs, estimation of prospective risk...... for developing gambling disorder rather than risk of being falsely negatively diagnosed, analysis with attention to sample weights and correction for sample selection bias, estimation of the impact of trigger questions on prevalence estimates and sample characteristics, and distinguishing between total...

  9. Improving Treatment Response for Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ege, Sarah; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying psychopat......Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying...... psychopathology of paediatric anxiety disorders indicate possibilities for improving treatment response. Using a critical review of recent theoretical, empirical and academic literature, the paper examines the role of information-processing biases in paediatric anxiety disorders, the extent to which CBT targets...... in improving response to CBT for paediatric anxiety disorders. Many important questions remain to be answered....

  10. Psychobiology of anxiety disorders and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J

    2008-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is currently classified as an anxiety disorder. However, there is growing interest in the concept of an obsessive-compulsive spectrum of disorders (OCSDs). The relationship between anxiety disorders and OCSDs has been questioned. The psychobiology of anxiety disorders and OCSDs is briefly reviewed in this article. While there appear to be several distinct contrasts in the underlying psychobiology of these conditions, there is also evidence of overlapping mechanisms. In addition, there are crucial gaps in our current database, confounding nosological decision-making. Conceptualizing various anxiety disorders and putative OCSDs as lying within a broader spectrum of emotional disorders may be useful. However, clinicians must also recognize that individual anxiety and obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions, including disorders characterized by body-focused repetitive behaviors, have distinct psychobiological underpinnings and require different treatment approaches.

  11. examining the relationship between anxiety disorders and depression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    esteem/feelings of worthlessness. Functional impairment occurs and the disorder is not better explained by substance use, general medical condi- tions or other mental illness. An equal mixture of anxiety and depressive symptoms occurs and the condition is particularly prevalent in primary care and mental health outpatient ...

  12. Fluvoxamine in the treatment of anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Irons, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Fluvoxamine is a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that has proved effective in large double-blind, randomized, controlled trials involving patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and panic disorder. Improvements have also been demonstrated in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as those with a range of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders including binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, pathological gambling, and bod...

  13. Clinical relevance of comorbidity in anxiety disorders : A report from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeijer-Sevink, Mieke Klein; Batelaan, Neeltje M.; van Megen, Harold J. G. M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Cath, Danielle C.; van den Hout, Marcel A.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

    Background: To study the clinical relevance of type of comorbidity and number of comorbid disorders in anxiety disorders. Four groups were compared according to sociodemographic-, vulnerability- and clinical factors: single anxiety disorder, anxiety-anxiety comorbidity, anxiety-depressive

  14. Clinical relevance of comorbidity in anxiety disorders: A report from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hofmeijer-Sevink, M.; Batelaan, N.M.; van Megen, H.J.G.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Cath, D.C.; van Hout, M.A.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To study the clinical relevance of type of comorbidity and number of comorbid disorders in anxiety disorders. Four groups were compared according to sociodemographic-, vulnerability- and clinical factors: single anxiety disorder, anxiety-anxiety comorbidity, anxiety-depressive

  15. The prevalence of mental disorders among children, adolescents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Objective: To provide estimates of the prevalence of selected mental disorders in the Western Cape, based on the consensus achieved by a working group .... generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder, and 5.0% .... South Africa. • Barnard EJ, Gagiano CA, Joubert G. Patients with chronic mental illness.

  16. Obsessive beliefs in generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guliz Senormanci

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that obsessive beliefs are not specific for OCD, may also play a role in occurence of other anxiety disorders and depression. In these studies, anxiety disorders were evaluated together, with mixed samples of anxiety disorders. Obsessive beliefs are assessed in a sample of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD and compared with healthy control group. The current study compared 119 patients with GAD and 137 healthy controls. Written informed consent was provided and Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire-44 (OBQ-44, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7 scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDE, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were administered to each participant. Total scores and subscale scores for OBQ-44 in the GAD group were found to be significantly higher the control group (p0,05 except ‘perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty’ subscale (p=0,000. According to of our study, ‘perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty’ continues to be statistically significant when state anxiety, trait anxiety and depression levels were controlled respectively. The ‘perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty’ may contribute to development and persistence of GAD symptoms and evaluation and development of approaches to change these beliefs may improve results of cognitive behavioral therapy in GAD patients. [JCBPR 2017; 6(3.000: 115-122

  17. Incidence and risk patterns of anxiety and depressive disorders and categorization of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesdo, Katja; Pine, Daniel S; Lieb, Roselind; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the diagnostic categorization of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). To examine the incidence, comorbidity, and risk patterns for anxiety and depressive disorders and to test whether developmental features of GAD more strongly support a view of this condition as a depressive as opposed to an anxiety disorder. Face-to-face, 10-year prospective longitudinal and family study with as many as 4 assessment waves. The DSM-IV Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview was administered by clinically trained interviewers. Munich, Germany. A community sample of 3021 individuals aged 14 to 24 years at baseline and 21 to 34 years at last follow-up. Cumulative incidence of GAD, other anxiety disorders (specific phobias, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder), and depressive disorders (major depressive disorder, and dysthymia). Longitudinal associations between GAD and depressive disorders are not stronger than those between GAD and anxiety disorders or between other anxiety and depressive disorders. Survival analyses reveal that the factors associated with GAD overlap more strongly with those specific to anxiety disorders than those specific to depressive disorders. In addition, GAD differs from anxiety and depressive disorders with regard to family climate and personality profiles. Anxiety and depressive disorders appear to differ with regard to risk constellations and temporal longitudinal patterns, and GAD is a heterogeneous disorder that is, overall, more closely related to other anxiety disorders than to depressive disorders. More work is needed to elucidate the potentially unique aspects of pathways and mechanisms involved in the etiopathogenesis of GAD. Grouping GAD with depressive disorders, as suggested by cross-sectional features and diagnostic comorbidity patterns, minimizes the importance of longitudinal data on risk factors and symptom trajectories.

  18. Behavioral genetics of affective and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domschke, Katharina; Reif, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    As shown by clinical genetic studies, affective and anxiety disorders are complex genetic disorders with genetic and environmental factors interactively determining their respective pathomechanism. Advances in molecular genetic techniques including linkage studies, association studies, and genome-wide association studies allow for the detailed dissection of the genetic influence on the development of these disorders. Besides the molecular genetic investigation of categorical entities according to standardized diagnostic criteria, intermediate phenotypes comprising neurobiological or neuropsychological traits (e.g., neuronal correlates of emotional processing) that are linked to the disease of interest and that are heritable, have been proposed to be closer to the underlying genotype than the overall disease phenotype. These intermediate phenotypes are dimensional and more precisely defined than the categorical disease phenotype, and therefore have attracted much interest in the genetic investigation of affective and anxiety disorders. Given the complex genetic nature of affective and anxiety disorders with an interaction of multiple risk genes and environmental influences, the interplay of genetic factors with environmental factors is investigated by means of gene-environment interaction (GxE) studies. Pharmacogenetic studies aid in the dissection of the genetically influenced heterogeneity of psychotropic drug response and may contribute to the development of a more individualized treatment of affective and anxiety disorders. Finally, there is some evidence for genetic factors potentially shared between affective and anxiety disorders pointing to a possible overlapping phenotype between anxiety disorders and depression.

  19. Heterogeneity in development of adolescent anxiety disorder symptoms in an 8-year longitudinal community study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelemans, S.A.; Hale, W.W.; Branje, S.J.T.; Raaijmakers, Q.A.W.; Frijns, T.; van Lier, P.A.C.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we prospectively examined developmental trajectories of five anxiety disorder symptom dimensions (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, school anxiety, separation anxiety disorder, and social anxiety disorder) from early to late adolescence in a community sample of 239

  20. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misri, Shaila; Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%-10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%-10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother-infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum.

  1. Comorbid Social Anxiety Disorder in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Brenna B.; White, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Social anxiety symptoms are common among cognitively unimpaired youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Few studies have investigated the co-occurrence of social anxiety disorder (SAD) in adults with ASD, although identification may aid access to effective treatments and inform our scientific efforts to parse heterogeneity. In this preliminary…

  2. Anxiety and depression in Nepal: prevalence, comorbidity and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risal, Ajay; Manandhar, Kedar; Linde, Mattias; Steiner, Timothy J; Holen, Are

    2016-04-14

    Anxiety and depression are two important contributors to the global burden of disease. In many developing countries, including Nepal, their prevalences are yet to be assessed. A nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted among a representative sample of Nepalese adults aged 18-65 years (N = 2100), selected by multistage random cluster sampling and interviewed at home during unannounced visits. The validated questionnaires included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), to detect cases of anxiety (HADS-A), depression (HADS-D) and comorbid anxiety and depression (HADS-cAD), the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised Short Form-Neuroticism (EPQRS-N), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life 8-question scale (WHOQOL-8). Logistic regression analyses were used to explore associations of caseness with four groups of variables: demographic, domicile, substance use, and behavioural and health. Age- and gender-adjusted point prevalences of HADS-A, HADS-D and HADS-cAD were 16.1, 4.2 and 5.9% respectively. In a multivariate model, HADS-A was positively associated with urban residence (AOR = 1.82; p urban residence (AOR = 2.37; p = 0.001), living at altitude ≥2000 m (AOR = 2.32; p = 0.002) and neuroticism (AOR = 1.26; p mental health conditions in Nepal, and major contributors to public ill health, being very highly prevalent, comorbid and associated with psychosocial burden. They are also linked to the unique topography, habitation and social structure of the country. High prevalence coupled with the disabling nature of these disorders establishes their health-care priority and their importance in national health policy.

  3. Prevalence and predictive factors of dental anxiety in Brazilian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Ricardo Wathson Feitosa; de Carvalho Bezerra Falcão, Paulo Germano; de Luna Campos, Gustavo José; de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio; do Egito Vasconcelos, Belmiro Cavalcanti; da Silva Pereira, Maria Auxiliadora

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and predicitve factors of dental anxiety among Brazilian adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 340 Brazilian adolescents, done between 2005 and 2010. Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale and an objective questionnaire were used to determine the degree of dental anxiety. The prevalence of moderate to severe dental anxiety was approximately 18%. Dental anxiety was correlated with the following factors: gender (Pdental pain (P=.002). Dental fear and anxiety in Brazilian adolescents are associated with lack of economic resources, negligence of oral health, low educational level, female gender, and younger age.

  4. Social and academic functioning in adolescents with anxiety disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lijster, Jasmijn M; Dieleman, Gwen C; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Dierckx, Bram; Wierenga, Milou; Verhulst, Frank C; Legerstee, Jeroen S

    2018-04-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent during adolescence. Although literature points out that anxiety symptoms are related to problems in social and academic functioning, the extent of these problems among adolescents with clinical anxiety disorders has not been systematically reviewed before. Electronic databases were searched up to October 2017, with keywords representing anxiety disorders, adolescents, and social or academic functioning. The inclusion criteria were studies with a sample of adolescents (10-19 years) with anxiety disorders that provided data regarding their social or academic functioning. 3431 studies were examined, of which 19 met the inclusion criteria. Adolescents with anxiety disorders had a lower social competence relative to their healthy peers. They reported more negativity within interpersonal relationships, higher levels of loneliness, and victimization. Most adolescents with anxiety disorders felt impaired at school, however, findings of their average school results, compared to peers, were mixed. In addition, they had a higher risk for school refusal and entered higher education less often. Impairments in social and academic functioning differed across type and the number of anxiety disorders. Most studies examined social phobia or anxiety disorders in general and methodological approaches varied widely between studies. This systematic review indicates that adolescents with anxiety disorders experience a range of significant problems in both social and academic functioning. These findings suggest that the assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders in adolescence should focus on improving functioning across domains. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Lifetime anxiety disorder and current anxiety symptoms associated with hastened depressive recurrence in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saloni; Kim, Jane P; Park, Dong Yeon; Kim, Hyun; Yuen, Laura D; Do, Dennis; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Hooshmand, Farnaz; Miller, Shefali; Wang, Po W; Ketter, Terence A

    2017-09-01

    To assess differential relationships between lifetime anxiety disorder/current anxiety symptoms and longitudinal depressive severity in bipolar disorder (BD). Stanford BD Clinic outpatients enrolled during 2000-2011 were assessed with the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for BD (STEP-BD) Affective Disorders Evaluation and followed with the STEP-BD Clinical Monitoring Form while receiving naturalistic treatment for up to two years. Baseline unfavorable illness characteristics/current mood symptoms and times to depressive recurrence/recovery were compared in patients with versus without lifetime anxiety disorder/current anxiety symptoms. Among 105 currently recovered patients, lifetime anxiety disorder was significantly associated with 10/27 (37.0%) demographic/other unfavorable illness characteristics/current mood symptoms/current psychotropics, hastened depressive recurrence (driven by earlier onset age), and a significantly (> two-fold) higher Kaplan-Meier estimated depressive recurrence rate, whereas current anxiety symptoms were significantly associated with 10/27 (37.0%) demographic/other unfavorable illness characteristics/current mood symptoms/current psychotropics and hastened depressive recurrence (driven by lifetime anxiety disorder), but only a numerically higher Kaplan-Meier estimated depressive recurrence rate. In contrast, among 153 currently depressed patients, lifetime anxiety disorder/current anxiety symptoms were not significantly associated with time to depressive recovery or depressive recovery rate. American tertiary BD clinic referral sample, open naturalistic treatment. Research is needed regarding differential relationships between lifetime anxiety disorder and current anxiety symptoms and hastened/delayed depressive recurrence/recovery - specifically whether lifetime anxiety disorder versus current anxiety symptoms has marginally more robust association with hastened depressive recurrence, and whether both have marginally more robust

  6. What do childhood anxiety disorders predict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Antje; Egger, Helen L; Erkanli, Alaattin; Jane Costello, E; Foley, Debra L; Angold, Adrian

    2007-12-01

    Few longitudinal studies of child and adolescent psychopathology have examined the links between specific childhood anxiety disorders and adolescent psychiatric disorder. In this paper we test the predictive specificity of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), overanxious disorder (OAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and social phobia. Data come from the Great Smoky Mountains Study (GSMS). A representative population sample of children--ages 9, 11, and 13 years at intake--was followed to age 19. Diagnoses of both childhood (before age 13 years) and adolescent psychiatric disorders (age 13 to 19 years) were available from 906 participants. Childhood SAD predicted adolescent SAD, whereas OAD was associated with later OAD, panic attacks, depression and conduct disorder (CD). GAD was related only to CD. Social phobia in childhood was associated with adolescent OAD, social phobia, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Anxiety disorders in childhood are predictors of a range of psychiatric disorders in adolescence. It appears that children meriting a well-defined diagnosis are missed by the current rules for the diagnosis of GAD. Future studies should examine whether OAD deserves reconsideration as a nosological entity.

  7. Anxiety and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: Developmental Issues and Implications for DSM-V

    OpenAIRE

    Beesdo, Katja; Knappe, Susanne; Pine, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes findings on the epidemiology and etiology of anxiety disorders among children and adolescents including separation anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder, also highlighting critical aspects of diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Childhood and adolescence is the core risk phase for the development of anxiety symptoms and syndromes, ranging from transient mild symptoms to full-blown anxiety disorde...

  8. Are Anxiety and Depression the Same Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue of co-morbidity in Anxiety and Depression as disorders leads to questions about the integrity of their present taxonomies in mental health diagnostics. At face value the two appear to have discrete differences, yet nonetheless demonstrate a high co-morbidity rate and shared symptoms implying pathological similarities rather than that of chance. Reviewing evidence from behavioural, neural, and biological sources that elaborate on the aspects of these two constructs, helps to illustrate the nature of these apparent differences and similarities. Integrating evidence from the anxiety and depression literature with the pathological process best illustrated by the burnout theory, alongside with support from the neurobiology of anxiety and stress, presents a proposition of a basic and natural anxiety pathology that when excessive, may result in the symptoms psychology has come to know as representative of anxiety and depressive disorders.

  9. The Pathogenesis of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Considerations from a Developmental Psychopathology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muris, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychiatric problems in children and adolescents. The present article summarizes the main evidence that has accumulated on the pathogenesis of childhood anxiety disorders during the past two decades. Various risk and vulnerability factors (e.g., genetics, behavioral inhibition, disgust sensitivity,…

  10. Co-morbid anxiety disorders in patients with schizophrenia in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anxiety disorders occur commonly in schizophrenia but are often overlooked by psychiatrists. Their presence may compound the challenges faced by these patients and may contribute to poor outcome. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of anxiety disorders among the ...

  11. Academic Impairment and Impact of Treatments among Youth with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nail, Jennifer E.; Christofferson, Jennifer; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Drake, Kelly; Kendall, Philip C.; McCracken, James T.; Birmaher, Boris; Walkup, John T.; Compton, Scott N.; Keeton, Courtney; Sakolsky, Dara

    2015-01-01

    Background: Global academic difficulties have often been reported in youth with anxiety disorders, however, little is known about the specific academic deficits in this population. Objective: To (a) evaluate the prevalence of seven specific academic impairments in children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, (b) determine whether these…

  12. How do we treat generalized anxiety disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latas Milan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In addition to significant prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD and related consequences, it seems that this disorder has not been studied sufficiently in Serbia. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the understanding of psychopathology and the adequate treatment of patients with GAD by psychiatrists in Serbia. Methods. The study comprised 84 doctors - psychiatrists and neuropsychiatrists who were engaged in treatment of patients with GAD. Anonymous survey was used as the basic instrument, which collected information about the socio-demographic and professional data, experience in treating GAD and understanding psychopathology of GAD, as well as the first and the second choice therapy for patients with GAD. Results. The majority of psychiatrists (62.2% indicated the symptoms of distress/tension and slightly lower percent (36.6% designated the symptoms of worry/anxiety as the key symptoms of GAD when it was diagnosed. The results showed that almost all patients (96.5% had been treated with benzodiazepines before coming to psychiatrists. Most psychiatrists preferred the use of SSRI/SNRI antidepressants (76.2%, usually in combination with benzodiazepines (71.4% for the treatment of patients with GAD; however, if these doctors got GAD, the preference of benzodiazepine use would be significantly lesser (45.2% than for the treatment of their patients. Preference for the use of SSRI/SNRI antidepressants was significantly more frequent in physicians with completed residency. Conclusion. The understanding of psychopathology and treatment practice for patients with GAD in this sample of psychiatrists in Serbia is mostly consistent with the current trends for GAD treatment.

  13. The prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with or without hyperhidrosis (HH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Rayeheh; Zhou, Pingyu; Liu, Yudan; Huang, Yuanshen; Phillips, Arlie; Lee, Tim K; Su, Mingwan; Yang, Sen; Kalia, Sunil; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhou, Youwen

    2016-12-01

    There are conflicting data about the correlation between hyperhidrosis (HH) and anxiety and depression. We sought to determine the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with or without HH. We examined 2017 consecutive dermatology outpatients from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, and Shanghai, China, using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scales for anxiety and depression assessments. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate if the impact of HH on anxiety and depression is dependent on demographic factors and diagnoses of the patients' presenting skin conditions. The prevalence of anxiety and depression was 21.3% and 27.2% in patients with HH, respectively, and 7.5% and 9.7% in patients without HH, respectively (P value <.001 for both). There were positive correlations between HH severity and the prevalence of anxiety and depression. Multivariable analysis showed that HH-associated increase in anxiety and depression prevalence is independent of demographic factors and presenting skin conditions. The data from the questionnaires relied on the accuracy of patients' self-reports. Both single variant and multivariable analyses showed a significant association between HH and the prevalence of anxiety and depression in a HH severity-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interpretation and expectations among mothers of children with anxiety disorders: associations with maternal anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Faith; Cooper, Peter J; Phil, D; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-02-01

    Models of the development and maintenance of childhood anxiety suggest an important role for parent cognitions: that is, negative expectations of children's coping abilities lead to parenting behaviors that maintain child anxiety. The primary aims of the current study were to (1) compare expectations of child vulnerability and coping among mothers of children with anxiety disorders on the basis of whether or not mothers also had a current anxiety disorder, and (2) examine the degree to which the association between maternal anxiety disorder status and child coping expectations was mediated by how mothers interpreted ambiguous material that referred to their own experience. The association between interpretations of threat, negative emotion, and control was assessed using hypothetical ambiguous scenarios in a sample of 271 anxious and nonanxious mothers of 7- to 12-year-old children with an anxiety disorder. Mothers also rated their expectations when presented with real life challenge tasks. There was a significant association between maternal anxiety disorder status and negative expectations of child coping behaviors. Mothers’ self-referent interpretations were found to mediate this relationship. Responses to ambiguous hypothetical scenarios correlated significantly with responses to real life challenge tasks. Treatments for childhood anxiety disorders in the context of parental anxiety disorders may benefit from the inclusion of a component to directly address parental cognitions. Some inconsistencies were found when comparing maternal expectations in response to hypothetical scenarios with real life challenges. This should be addressed in future research.

  15. Adult separation anxiety disorder in the DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bögels, S.M.; Knappe, S.; Clark, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike other DSM-IV anxiety disorders, separation anxiety disorder (SAD) has been considered a disorder that typically begins in childhood, and could be diagnosed only in adults "if onset is before 18." Moreover, SAD is the only DSM-IV anxiety disorder placed under "Disorders Usually First Diagnosed

  16. Examining sex and gender differences in anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte Mølgaard

    2015-01-01

    ), specific phobia (SP), social anxiety disorder (SAD), generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD and PTSD), although the latter three are technically no longer categorised as anxiety disorders according to DSM-5. This chapter...

  17. [Anxiety disorders: which psychotherapy for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, A; Fydrich, T

    2018-03-01

    According to the Federal Healthcare Survey (Bundesgesundheitssurvey), approximately 15% of the German population fulfil the diagnostic criteria for at least one anxiety disorder within (any) 1 year. Women are affected approximately twice as often as men. The study by the Robert Koch Institute included the systematic assessment of panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder and specific phobias; therefore, the question for both those affected and the treating therapist is "anxiety disorders: which psychotherapy for whom?" is of great clinical and healthcare political importance. We therefore review the available literature for answering three more specific questions: 1) what are the most suitable forms of psychotherapy, 2) which psychotherapy is most promising for an individual patient and diagnosis (differential evaluation of indications) and 3) what is the best approach to nonresponse or avoidance of the treatment offered? National and international guidelines agree that cognitive behavioral therapy is the psychotherapy of first choice in most patients with anxiety disorders. In cases of nonresponse or lack of availability of the appropriate therapy, psychodynamic therapy or pharmacotherapy can also be recommended. For individualized treatment recommendations we do not have empirical evidence. Also, no evidence-based (individual) recommendations are available for non-responders;however, there are some preferred strategies based on a clinical consensus.

  18. Childrearing style of anxiety-disordered parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhout, Ingeborg; Markus, Monica; Hoogendijk, Thea; Borst, Sophie; Maingay, Ragna; Spinhoven, Philip; van Dyck, Richard; Boer, Frits

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated whether anxiety-disordered (AD) parents differ in their childrearing style from non-disordered parents. A clinical sample of 36 AD parents with children aged 6-18 was compared with a normal control sample of 36 parents. Childrearing was assessed through parent report and

  19. Prevalence of anxiety and depression among medical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Depression and anxiety in the community are considered as specific indicator for mental status of a person and various studies have documented anxiety and depression among medical and pharmaceutical students. Objective: In this study, the prevalence of anxiety and depression was measured among ...

  20. Prevalence, associated factors and predictors of anxiety: a community survey in Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader Maideen, Siti Fatimah; Mohd Sidik, Sherina; Rampal, Lekhraj; Mukhtar, Firdaus

    2015-10-24

    Anxiety is the most common mental health disorders in the general population. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of anxiety, its associated factors and the predictors of anxiety among adults in the community of Selangor, Malaysia. A cross sectional study was carried out in three districts in Selangor, Malaysia. The inclusion criteria of this study were Malaysian citizens, adults aged 18 years and above, and living in the selected living quarters based on the list provided by the Department of Statistics Malaysia (DOS). Participants completed a set of questionnaires, including the validated Malay version of Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD 7) to detect anxiety. Of the 2512 participants who were approached, 1556 of them participated in the study (61.90%). Based on the cut-off point of 8 and above in the GAD-7, the prevalence of anxiety was 8.2%. Based on the initial multiple logistic regression analysis, the predictors of anxiety were depression, serious problems at work, domestic violence and high perceived stress. When reanalyzed again after removing depression, low self-esteem and high perceived stress, six predictors that were identified are cancer, serious problems at work, domestic violence, unhappy relationship with family, non-organizational religious activity and intrinsic religiosity. This study reports the prevalence of anxiety among adults in the community of Selangor, Malaysia and also the magnitude of the associations between various factors and anxiety.

  1. Separation Anxiety Disorder in Children: Disorder-Specific Responses to Experimental Separation from the Mother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossowsky, Joe; Wilhelm, Frank H.; Roth, Walton T.; Schneider, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders in childhood and is predictive of adult anxiety disorders, especially panic disorder. However, the disorder has seldom been studied and the attempt to distinguish SAD from other anxiety disorders with regard to psychophysiology has not been made. We expected…

  2. Prevalence and psychosocial factors of anxiety and depression in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueboonthavatchai, Peeraphon

    2007-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. It is seen as a terrifying disease due to a high mortality rate, its impacts on self-image, and the sexual relationship. Many patients experience psychological reactions, and may have psychiatric morbidities, especially anxiety and depressive disorders. Although anxiety and depressive disorders are common in breast cancer and worsen the disease course and treatment outcomes, these psychiatric disorders are ignored and left untreated. Understanding these common psychiatric disorders and associated psychosocial factors can help to plan for treatment and may result in more treatment success. The present study was aimed to identify the prevalence and associated psychosocial factors of anxiety and depressive disorders in breast cancer patients. The psychosocial factors in the present study focused on social support, family relationship and functioning, and problem and conflict solving. Three hundred female breast cancer patients, aged above 18 years old from the Surgical Outpatient Department, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, were recruited into the study from December 2006 to May 2007. All samples completed five questionnaires; 1) Demographic data and history form, 2) Thai Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Thai HADS), 3) Social Support Questionnaire, 4) Family Relationship and Functioning Questionnaire, 5) Problem and Conflict Solving Questionnaire. The prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders was reported in percentage. The association between psychosocial, demographic, and clinical factors and anxiety and depression was analyzed by ANOVA test (for continuous data) and chi-square test (for categorical data). Logistic regression was performed to identify the potential predictors of anxiety and depression. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The prevalence of anxiety disorder was 16.0%, and that of anxiety symptoms was 19.0%. The prevalence of depressive disorder was 9

  3. Treatment of anxiety disorders by psychiatrists from the American Psychiatric Practice Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Sorsdahl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent in the United States, and if untreated, result in a number of negative outcomes. This study aimed to investigate psychiatrists' current treatment practices for patients with anxiety disorders in the United States. Methods: Psychiatrist-reported data from the 1997 and 1999 American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education Practice Research Network (PRN Study of Psychiatric Patients and Treatments (SPPT were examined, focusing on patients diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Information related to diagnostic and clinical features and treatments provided were obtained. Results: Anxiety disorders remain underdiagnosed and undertreated, since only 11.4% of the sample received a principal diagnosis of an anxiety disorder in a real world setting. Posttraumatic stress disorder was associated with particularly high comorbidity and disability, and social anxiety disorder was relatively rarely diagnosed and treated. Although combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy was commonly used to treat anxiety disorders, anxiolytics were more commonly prescribed than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. Conclusions: These data provide a picture of diagnosis and practice patterns across a range of psychiatric settings and suggest that anxiety disorders, despite being among the most prevalent of psychiatric disorders remain underdiagnosed and undertreated particularly in respect of the use of psychotherapeutic interventions.

  4. Treatment of comorbid anxiety disorders and personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntz, A.; Emmelkamp, P.; Ehring, T.

    2014-01-01

    For a long time the diagnosis of personality disorder was associated with therapeutic pessimism: People with these problems were viewed as untreatable, due to fundamental character complications. Failures of anxiety disorder treatment tended to be labeled as "personality disorder". There is little

  5. The hyperventilation syndrome in panic disorder, agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.; Garssen, B.; Rijken, H.; Kraaimaat, F.

    1989-01-01

    The symptom complex of panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder suggests an etiological role for hyperventilation. The present study investigates the overlap between DSM-III-R panic disorder, panic disorder with agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder with hyperventilation syndrome

  6. The Impact of Caregiving on the Development of Major Depressive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Jane Markey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Providing care for a relative is associated with psychological distress and a higher prevalence of psychological disorders. This study investigated the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders among the caregiving population. The study was based on data drawn from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES. Binary logistic regressions were conducted to examine these associations and to identify factors influencing the development of depressive and anxiety disorders. The analysis indicated that respondents providing care for a relative were at a higher risk of developing a psychological disorder. A number of socio-demographic variables were identified as increasing the risk of developing a psychological disorder such as being younger, female and divorced. The findings highlight the importance of support and interventions for family caregivers.

  7. Diminished autonomic neurocardiac function in patients with generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kyungwook Kim,1 Seul Lee,2 Jong-Hoon Kim1–3 1Gachon University School of Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Gil Medical Center, Gachon University School of Medicine, Gachon University, 3Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University, Incheon, Republic of Korea Background: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD is a chronic and highly prevalent disorder that is characterized by a number of autonomic nervous system symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the linear and nonlinear complexity measures of heart rate variability (HRV, measuring autonomic regulation, and to evaluate the relationship between HRV parameters and the severity of anxiety, in medication-free patients with GAD. Methods: Assessments of linear and nonlinear complexity measures of HRV were performed in 42 medication-free patients with GAD and 50 healthy control subjects. In addition, the severity of anxiety symptoms was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory. The values of the HRV measures of the groups were compared, and the correlations between the HRV measures and the severity of anxiety symptoms were assessed. Results: The GAD group showed significantly lower standard deviation of RR intervals and the square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal sinus intervals values compared to the control group (P<0.01. The approximate entropy value, which is a nonlinear complexity indicator, was also significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (P<0.01. In correlation analysis, there were no significant correlations between HRV parameters and the severity of anxiety symptoms. Conclusion: The present study indicates that GAD is significantly associated with reduced HRV, suggesting that autonomic neurocardiac integrity is substantially impaired in patients with GAD. Future prospective studies are required to investigate the effects of pharmacological or non-pharmacological treatment on

  8. Comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression: results of a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, D C; van Zelst, W H; Schoevers, R A; Comijs, H C; Voshaar, R C Oude

    2015-07-01

    Comorbid anxiety disorders are common in late-life depression and negatively impact treatment outcome. This study aimed to examine personality characteristics as well as early and recent life-events as possible determinants of comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression, taking previously examined determinants into account. Using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 2.0), we established comorbid anxiety disorders (social phobia (SP), panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and agoraphobia (AGO)) in 350 patients (aged ≥60 years) suffering from a major depressive disorder according to DSM-IV-TR criteria within the past six months. Adjusted for age, sex, and level of education, we first examined previously identified determinants of anxious depression: depression severity, suicidality, partner status, loneliness, chronic diseases, and gait speed in multiple logistic regression models. Subsequently, associations were explored with the big five personality characteristics as well as early and recent life-events. First, multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted with the presence of any anxiety disorder (yes/no) as dependent variable, where after analyses were repeated for each anxiety disorder, separately. In our sample, the prevalence rate of comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression was 38.6%. Determinants of comorbid anxiety disorders were a lower age, female sex, less education, higher depression severity, early traumatization, neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness. Nonetheless, determinants differed across the specific anxiety disorders and lumping all anxiety disorder together masked some determinants (education, personality). Our findings stress the need to examine determinants of comorbid anxiety disorder for specific anxiety disorders separately, enabling the development of targeted interventions within subgroups of depressed patients.

  9. Prevalence of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glynis Byrne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients are not routinely screened for depression and anxiety despite knowledge of an increased prevalence in people with chronic disease and negative effects on quality of life. Methods. Prevalence of anxiety and depression was assessed in IBD outpatients through retrospective chart review. The presence of anxiety and/or depression was determined using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 self-report questionnaires or by diagnosis through psychiatric interview. Patient demographics, disease characteristics, and medication information were also collected. Multivariable analysis was used to determine associations between patient factors and depression and anxiety. Results. 327 patient charts were reviewed. Rates of depression and anxiety were found to be 25.8% and 21.2%, with 30.3% of patients suffering from depression and/or anxiety. Disease activity was found to be significantly associated with depression and/or anxiety (p=0.01. Females were more likely to have anxiety (p=0.01. Conclusion. A significant proportion of IBD patients suffer from depression and/or anxiety. The rates of these mental illnesses would justify screening and referral for psychiatric treatment in clinics treating this population. Patients with active disease are particularly at risk for anxiety and depression.

  10. Mental Health Comorbidity in MS: Depression, Anxiety, and Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Aaron P; Alschuler, Kevin N; Hughes, Abbey J; Beier, Meghan; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sloan, Alicia P; Ehde, Dawn M

    2016-12-01

    Among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), mental health comorbidities play a significant role in contributing to secondary disability and detracting from quality of life. This review examines current evidence surrounding three mental health issues of particular relevance to MS: depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. We review what is known of the prevalence, correlates, screening mechanisms, and current treatment of each issue and provide recommendations for future areas of research.

  11. Transtornos de ansiedade: um estudo de prevalência e comorbidade com tabagismo em um ambulatório de psiquiatria Anxiety disorders: a study of the prevalence and comorbidity with smoking in a psychiatric outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Lunardi Munaretti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Este estudo tem por objetivo investigar a presença de transtornos de ansiedade e tabagismo entre pacientes atendidos em um ambulatório de psiquiatria. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se um estudo transversal em um ambulatório de psiquiatria em Porto Alegre, no qual se aplicou SCID-I em 84 pacientes, para examinar a ocorrência de transtornos de ansiedade e dependência à nicotina; também se utilizou o Teste de Fagerström para identificar o grau de dependência nicotínica. Excluíram-se pacientes com esquizofrenia, outros transtornos psicóticos e retardo mental. RESULTADOS: Verificou-se freqüência de 75% para os transtornos de ansiedade, sendo mais freqüentes fobia específica e transtorno de ansiedade generalizada (TAG com 26,2% cada um. Tabagistas representaram 21,43% da amostra, e a maior parte destes obteve escore leve para o grau de dependência. Constatou-se associação entre ter TAG e ser tabagista, e a chance dos pacientes com TAG fumarem é 5,2 vezes em relação aos que não têm esse transtorno de ansiedade. CONCLUSÕES: Os transtornos de ansiedade têm uma freqüência elevada entre pacientes ambulatoriais, sendo importante sua identificação. A freqüência de tabagismo entre pacientes com transtorno de ansiedade é alta, apresentando importante associação com TAG, e por isso deve também ser foco de atenção no tratamento desses pacientes.OBJETIVES: This study was aimed at investigating the presence of anxiety disorders and tobacco use among psychiatric outpatients. METHODS: A transversal study was carried out in which SCID-I was administered to 84 psychiatric outpatients in Porto Alegre, in order to determine the occurrence of anxiety disorders and nicotine dependence; in addition, Fagerström's test was used to identify the degree of nicotine dependence. Exclusion criteria were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia or presenting other psychotic disorders and mental retardation. RESULTS: Anxiety disorders were found in

  12. [Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy of comorbid anxiety disorders and alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, S S

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders commonly co-occur with substance use disorders. It is known that alcohol-dependent patients are at greater risk of a relapse if they have a comorbid anxiety disorder. There is a lot of literature reporting on the efficacy of treatments that target anxiety or alcohol addiction separately but less research has examined treatments that address these disorders when they co-occur. Anxiety treatment for alcohol-dependent patients with a co-occuring anxiety disorder can alleviate anxiety symptoms but has no significant effect on the outcomes of alcohol treatment. Efficient combinations of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy can improve outcomes of comorbid disorders.

  13. Positive thinking in anxiety disordered children reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogendoorn, Sanne M; Prins, Pier J M; Vervoort, Leentje; Wolters, Lidewij H; Nauta, Maaike H; Hartman, Catharina A; Moorlag, Harma; de Haan, Else; Boer, Frits

    2012-01-01

    Negatively valenced thoughts are assumed to play a central role in the development and maintenance of anxiety. However, the role of positive thoughts in anxiety is rather unclear. In the current study we examined the role of negative and positive self-statements in the anxiety level of anxious and non-anxious children. Participants were 139 anxiety disordered children and 293 non-anxious children (8-18 years). Compared to non-anxious children, anxious children reported more negative thoughts, less positive thoughts and lower State of Mind (SOM) ratios (ratio of positive to negative thoughts). Negative thoughts and SOM ratios were the strongest predictors of anxiety level in anxious children; whereas both negative and positive thoughts were the strongest predictors of anxiety level in non-anxious children. To conclude, a lack of positive thoughts might be more than just an epiphenomenon of anxiety level and might deserve a place in the cognitive model of anxiety. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Generalized anxiety disorder: practical assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavan, Michael G; Elsasser, Gary; Barone, Eugene J

    2009-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder is common among patients in primary care. Affected patients experience excessive chronic anxiety and worry about events and activities, such as their health, family, work, and finances. The anxiety and worry are difficult to control and often lead to physiologic symptoms, including fatigue, muscle tension, restlessness, and other somatic complaints. Other psychiatric problems (e.g., depression) and nonpsychiatric factors (e.g., endocrine disorders, medication adverse effects, withdrawal) must be considered in patients with possible generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy and the first-line pharmacologic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, are effective treatments. However, evidence suggests that the effects of cognitive behavior therapy may be more durable. Although complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been used, their effectiveness has not been proven in generalized anxiety disorder. Selection of the most appropriate treatment should be based on patient preference, treatment success history, and other factors that could affect adherence and subsequent effectiveness. Copyright (c) 2009 American Academy of Family Physicians.

  15. [Bipolar disorders and comorbid anxiety: prognostic impact and therapeutic challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazard, F; Ferreri, F

    2013-02-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the main psychiatric conditions co-occuring with bipolar disorders. Many clinical and epidemiological studies have found much higher prevalence rates of generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder in bipolar patients than in the general population, regardless of age. In the National Comorbidity Survey for instance, the diagnosis of at least one anxiety disorder was made for nearly 90% of bipolar subjects. Several issues arise from this high comorbidity, such as the way anxiety disorders alter the course and prognosis of the mood disorder, and challenge typical therapeutic strategies. This article reviews data on clinical and therapeutical significance of such comorbidity. Many studies point out the poorer outcome for bipolar patients with co-occurring anxiety symptoms: apart from the alarming increase of suicidal ideas and suicide attempts, authors have found a shorter duration of euthymia, more comorbid addictions, mixed states and rapid cycling, and lower response to treatments. This is the reason why monitoring the suicidal risk in those bipolar patients with co-occurring anxiety disorders is of critical importance. From a physiopathological standpoint, the precise links between both pathologies remains unclear. The frequency of this comorbidity and its significance on long term prognosis stands in sharp contrast with the very few therapeutic studies conducted in this indication so far. Pharmacological approaches are strongly limited by the risk of mood switching under antidepressants and drug dependence on anxiolytics such as benzodiazepines. Nevertheless, there is emerging evidence of the interest of atypical antipsychotics such as olanzapine and mood stabilisers such as lamotrigine to control anxiety symptoms in bipolar patients. There is weaker evidence for other molecules. Taking into account other therapeutic approaches than the pharmacological

  16. [Anxiety disorders in type 1 neurofibromatosis: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih-Romdhane, F; Othman, S; Sahnoun, C; Helayem, S; Abbes, Z; Bouden, A

    2015-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also known as Von Recklinghausen disease, is one of the most frequent human genetic diseases, with a prevalence of one case in 3000 births, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, and a high rate of new mutations. NF1 has markedly variable clinical expression, with manifestations ranging from mild lesions to several complications and functional impairment. The complications are age-specific. Psychiatric disorders are more frequent in NF1 than in the general population, especially in children. They include dysthymia, depressive mood, anxiety, and personality disorders. Bipolar mood disorders or schizophrenia are rather rare. The majority of studies have focused on physical health and neurocognitive function in NF1, whereas psychiatric disorders associated with this disease remain unclear and poorly documented. This report is based on a clinical case and discusses the relationship between neurofibromatosis type 1 and psychiatric disorders, particularly anxiety disorders. This case concerns a 13-year-old girl, the first child of healthy and non-consanguineous parents. The patient's history showed normal psychomotor and psychoaffective development. Her father and paternal grandmother had isolated café-au-lait spots. In June 2013, a subcutaneous mass appeared in her right thigh. She consulted a neurologist and was explored. The physical examination revealed signs of NF1. She had café-au-lait spots on the trunk and extremities, and a neurofibroma in the right thigh. Bilateral ophthalmic examination revealed multiple Lish nodules. After 1 month, a psychiatric consultation was requested for sad mood and night terrors. Obsessive compulsive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were diagnosed according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition. The current psychiatric literature does not provide full explanations of anxiety symptoms associated with NF1. Some authors have tried to explain

  17. Depression and anxiety among patients with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and other depressive/anxiety disorders in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Lieh; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Chen, I-Ming; Ma, Huei-Mei; Lee, Ming-Tzu; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Gau, Shur-Fen

    2016-07-30

    The aim of this study is to compare the severity of depression and anxiety in individuals with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, other depressive/anxiety disorders, and healthy controls in a Han Chinese population. According to the DSM-IV-TR-based diagnostic interviews, we recruited 152 subjects with somatoform disorders (SG), 56 with panic disorder (PG), 85 with other depressive/anxiety disorders (OG), and 179 without any psychiatric disorder (NG). The four groups reported on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) for depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively. Correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were used to determine the effects of demographic factors and psychiatric diagnoses on depressive and anxiety symptoms separately. BDI-II scores were not significantly different in SG, PG, and OG but were higher than NG. SG and PG had the highest BAI scores, whereas NG had the lowest. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that the associated factors for BDI-II were gender, residential location, somatoform disorders, panic disorder, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas BAI was significantly associated with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and MDD. Our results strongly suggest the inclusion of clinical assessment of depressive and anxious symptoms in patients with somatoform disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychological Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder Improves Body Dysmorphic Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Angela; Sawyer, Alice T.; Aderka, Idan M.; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2013-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder are considered nosologically distinct disorders In contrast, some cognitive models suggest that social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder share similar cognitive maintenance factors. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of psychological treatments for social anxiety disorder on body dysmorphic disorder concerns. In Study 1, we found that 12 weekly group sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy led to significant decre...

  19. Prevalence of Comorbidity Behavioral Disorders in Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Sattari

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion The prevalence of inventory disorders in the three types of ADHD varied according to age and sex. Statistically significant differences were observed between the three types of ADHD, confrontational disorder (4000.0, and anxiety (0.02.

  20. University students' understanding of social anxiety disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Miyake, Yoshie; Okamoto, Yuri; Jinnin, Ran; Yashiki, Hisako; Uchino, Teiji; Isobe, Noriko; Takata, Jun; Kojima, Nanae; Nihonmatsu, Misato; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki; Hiyama, Toru; Yoshihara, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder is an important cause of psychosocial morbidity in adolescents and young adults. Problems in adolescents and young adults with social anxiety disorder would be a topic in recent years in campus mental health. We examined the opinion of social anxiety disorder on university students. We found that many students felt anxiety in various social scenes, and some students were worried about their anxiety. Most of the students understood the importance of mental treatment for...

  1. The Prevalence of Dental Anxiety in Dental Practice Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Angela M; Giblin, Lori; Boyd, Linda D

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental anxiety and missed dental appointments due to dental anxiety among patients within three types of private dental offices. Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study utilized the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS). The MDAS consists of five questions to assess dental anxiety. Demographics and an open-ended question about missed dental appointments due to dental anxiety were included. Linear and logistic regression models were used to analyze anxiety scores as related to gender and age. Participants' responses to the open-ended question were compiled according to themes. Results: Three hundred and eight (n=308) dental patients participated in the study. Using the MDAS cut-off scores of 15 and 19, the prevalence estimates of moderate to high and high dental anxiety within the total study population was 19% and 6.82% respectively. Females had an MDAS score 2.12 times higher than males (pdental appointment due to dental anxiety. Five common themes were coded as the source of dental anxiety: fear of dental experience, previous negative dental experience, cost of treatment, gag reflex, and fear of bad news. Conclusions: Moderate to high dental anxiety was present in 19% of the population sampled. Awareness of patients' dental anxiety level and the utilization of anxiety reducing measures during treatment may encourage routine care. Copyright © 2017 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  2. Nightmares: from anxiety symptom to sleep disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoormaker, Victor I; Schredl, Michael; van den Bout, Jan

    2006-02-01

    The DSM-IV-TR definition of nightmares-extremely frightening dreams from which the person wakes up directly-is unnecessarily narrow. Other emotions (anger, grief) have also been reported in nightmares, and direct awakening from a bad dream seems to be unrelated to increased distress. In addition, assessment of nightmares is problematic. Polysomnographic recordings have an ameliorating effect on nightmare frequency, retrospective measurements tend to underestimate nightmare frequency, and persons with frequent nightmares may feel reluctant to fill out (daily) prospective measurements. For studying nightmares, it is necessary to distinguish idiopathic nightmares from posttraumatic nightmares, which are part of a posttraumatic stress reaction or disorder that may result from experiencing a traumatic event. Both types of nightmares have been associated with an elevated level of periodic limb movements, although only posttraumatic nightmares seem to be related to more and longer nocturnal awakenings. Nightmares have also been repeatedly associated with the general level of psychopathology, or the so-called personality factor neuroticism. Nightmare distress, the impact on daily functioning caused by nightmares, may function as a mediating variable. Several studies in the last decades have shown that nightmares can be treated with several cognitive-behavioral techniques. The cognitive-restructuring technique imagery rehearsal therapy is the treatment of choice for nightmares, although a randomized controlled trial with an attention control-group has not yet been carried out. Nightmares are more than a symptom of a larger (anxiety) syndrome and need to be viewed from a sleep medicine perspective: nightmares are a highly prevalent and separate sleep disorder that can and should receive specific treatment.

  3. Voxel-based morphometry multi-center mega-analysis of brain structure in social anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bas-Hoogendam, Janna Marie; van Steenbergen, Henk; Pannekoek, J. Nienke; Fouche, Jean-Paul; Lochner, Christine; Hattingh, Coenraad J.; Cremers, Henk R.; Furmark, Tomas; Mansson, Kristoffer N. T.; Frick, Andreas; Engman, Jonas; Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard; Fredrikson, Mats; Straube, Thomas; Peterburs, Jutta; Klumpp, Heide; Phanp, K. Luan; Roelofs, Karin; Veltman, Dick J.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Stein, Dan J.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a prevalent and disabling mental disorder, associated with significant psychiatric comorbidity. Previous research on structural brain alterations associated with SAD has yielded inconsistent results concerning the direction of the changes in graymatter (GM) in

  4. Cost-effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological interventions for generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzenroeder, Louise; Donnelly, Marie; Haby, Michelle M; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Rossell, Ruth; Carter, Rob; Andrews, Gavin; Vos, Theo

    2004-08-01

    To assess from a health sector perspective the incremental cost-effectiveness of interventions for generalized anxiety disorder (cognitive behavioural therapy [CBT] and serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors [SNRIs]) and panic disorder (CBT, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs] and tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs]). The health benefit is measured as a reduction in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), based on effect size calculations from meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials. An assessment on second stage filter criteria ("equity", "strength of evidence", "feasibility" and "acceptability to stakeholders") is also undertaken to incorporate additional factors that impact on resource allocation decisions. Costs and benefits are calculated for a period of one year for the eligible population (prevalent cases of generalized anxiety disorder/panic disorder identified in the National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing, extrapolated to the Australian population in the year 2000 for those aged 18 years and older). Simulation modelling techniques are used to present 95% uncertainty intervals (UI) around the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Compared to current practice, CBT by a psychologist on a public salary is the most cost-effective intervention for both generalized anxiety disorder (A$6900/DALY saved; 95% UI A$4000 to A$12 000) and panic disorder (A$6800/DALY saved; 95% UI A$2900 to A$15 000). Cognitive behavioural therapy results in a greater total health benefit than the drug interventions for both anxiety disorders, although equity and feasibility concerns for CBT interventions are also greater. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the most effective and cost-effective intervention for generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder. However, its implementation would require policy change to enable more widespread access to a sufficient number of trained therapists for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  5. Do Anxiety Disorders Play a Role in Adolescent Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Robert E; Duong, Hao T

    2016-08-01

    There have been few prospective studies on the association between anxiety disorders and adolescent obesity; none examine potential reciprocal effects. The purpose of this paper is to examine the prospective association between anxiety disorders and obesity among adolescents. Using data from a two-wave, prospective study of 3134 adolescents, we examined reciprocal effects between body weight and DSM-IV anxiety disorders. Weight status did not increase future risk of anxiety disorders nor did anxiety disorders at baseline increase risk of future obesity in the overall sample. Stratifying by gender revealed an increased risk of overweight and obesity in males with anxiety disorders, but not for females. Major depression did not mediate these associations. Similar to prospective studies of depression, it appears anxiety disorders may increase risk of obesity. However, more research is needed on the role of psychopathology in adolescent obesity, in particular anxiety disorders and possible moderators (such as gender) and mediators.

  6. Relationship between social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, A.; Hofmann, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are two separate, but conceptually overlapping nosological entities. In this review, we examine similarities between SAD and BDD in comorbidity, phenomenology, cognitive biases, treatment outcome, and cross-cultural aspects. Our review

  7. Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Separation Anxiety Disorder Across Countries in the World Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silove, Derrick; Alonso, Jordi; Bromet, Evelyn; Gruber, Mike; Sampson, Nancy; Scott, Kate; Andrade, Laura; Benjet, Corina; de Almeida, Jose Miguel Caldas; De Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Fiestas, Fabian; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; He, Yanling; Karam, Elie; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Murphy, Sam; Villa-Posada, Jose; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The age-at-onset criterion for separation anxiety disorder was removed in DSM-5, making it timely to examine the epidemiology of separation anxiety disorder as a disorder with onsets spanning the life course, using cross-country data. Method The sample included 38,993 adults in 18 countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health Surveys. The WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess a range of DSM-IV disorders that included an expanded definition of separation anxiety disorder allowing onsets in adulthood. Analyses focused on prevalence, age at onset, comorbidity, predictors of onset and persistence, and separation anxiety-related role impairment. Results Lifetime separation anxiety disorder prevalence averaged 4.8% across countries (interquartile range [25th–75th percentiles]=1.4%–6.4%), with 43.1% of lifetime onsets occurring after age 18. Significant time-lagged associations were found between earlier separation anxiety disorder and subsequent onset of internalizing and externalizing DSM-IV disorders and conversely between these disorders and subsequent onset of separation anxiety disorder. Other consistently significant predictors of lifetime separation anxiety disorder included female gender, retrospectively reported childhood adversities, and lifetime traumatic events. These predictors were largely comparable for separation anxiety disorder onsets in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood and across country income groups. Twelve-month separation anxiety disorder prevalence was considerably lower than lifetime prevalence (1.0% of the total sample; interquartile range=0.2%–1.2%). Severe separation anxiety-related 12-month role impairment was significantly more common in the presence (42.4%) than absence (18.3%) of 12-month comorbidity. Conclusions Separation anxiety disorder is a common and highly comorbid disorder that can have onset across the lifespan. Childhood adversity and lifetime trauma are

  8. Screening for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with your daily life Having more than one illness at the same time can make it difficult to diagnose and treat the different conditions. Depression and substance abuse are among the conditions that occasionally complicate anxiety disorders. Yes No Have you experienced changes in sleeping ...

  9. Thorax deformity, joint hypermobility and anxiety disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulsun, M.; Dumlu, K.; Erbas, M.; Yilmaz, Mehmet B.; Pinar, M.; Tonbul, M.; Celik, C.; Ozdemir, B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the association between thorax deformities, panic disorder and joint hypermobility. The study includes 52 males diagnosed with thorax deformity, and 40 healthy male controls without thorax deformity, in Tatvan Bitlis and Isparta, Turkey. The study was carried out from 2004 to 2006. The teleradiographic and thoracic lateral images of the subjects were evaluated to obtain the Beighton scores; subjects psychiatric conditions were evaluated using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-1), and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) was applied in order to determine the anxiety levels. Both the subjects and controls were compared in sociodemographic, anxiety levels and joint mobility levels. In addition, males with joint hypermobility and thorax deformity were compared to the group with thorax deformity without joint hypermobility. A significant difference in HAM-A scores was found between the groups with thorax deformity and without. In addition, 21 subjects with thorax deformity met the joint hypermobility criteria in the group with thorax deformity and 7 subjects without thorax deformity met the joint hypermobility criteria in the group without thorax deformity, according to Beighton scoring. The Beighton score of subjects with thorax deformity were significantly different from those of the group without deformity. Additionally, anxiety scores of the males with thorax deformity and joint hypermobility were found higher than males with thorax deformity without joint hypermobility. Anxiety disorders, particularly panic disorder, have a significantly higher distribution in males subjects with thorax deformity compared to the healthy control group. In addition, the anxiety level of males with thorax deformity and joint hypermobility is higher than males with thorax deformity without joint hypermobility. (author)

  10. Clinical epidemiology of commonly occurring anxiety disorders : insights into the phenomenology and course of anxiety disorders from the Leiden Routine Outcome Monitoring Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schat, A.

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders as a group are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders. Although they have been studied extensively, previous research has focussed primarily on members of the general population, or on participants in clinical trials. As both groups may differ substantially from patients who are

  11. Generalized anxiety disorder: is there any specific symptom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravelli, Carlo; Castellini, Giovanni; Benni, Laura; Brugnera, Andrea; Landi, Monica; Lo Sauro, Carolina; Pietrini, Francesco; Rotella, Francesco; Ricca, Valdo

    2012-11-01

    The main aim of the present research was to evaluate the coherence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) psychopathological pattern, the robustness of its diagnostic criteria, and the clinical utility of considering this disorder as a discrete condition rather than assigning it a dimensional value. The study was designed in a purely naturalistic setting and carried out using a community sample; data from the Sesto Fiorentino Study were reanalyzed. Of the 105 subjects who satisfied the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for the diagnosis of GAD, only 18 (17.1%) had no other comorbid DSM-IV disorder. The most frequent comorbid condition was major depressive disorder (70.4 %). Only 2 of the GAD diagnostic symptoms (excessive worry and muscle tension) showed a specific association with the diagnosis itself, whereas the others, such as feeling wound up, tense, or restless, concentration problems, and fatigue, were found to be more prevalent in major depressive disorder than in GAD. Our study demonstrates that GAD, as defined by DSM-IV criteria, shows a substantial overlap with other DSM-IV diagnoses (especially with mood disorders) in the general population. Furthermore, GAD symptoms are frequent in all other disorders included in the mood/anxiety spectrum. Finally, none of the GAD symptoms, apart from muscle tension, distinguished GAD from patients without GAD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of anxiety among women attending a primary care clinic in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Sherina Mohd; Arroll, Bruce; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity

    2011-06-01

    This is the first study investigating anxiety among women attending a primary care clinic in Malaysia. The objective was to determine the factors associated with anxiety among these women. This cross-sectional study was conducted in a government-funded primary care clinic in Malaysia. Consecutive female patients attending the clinic during the data-collection period were invited to participate in the study. Participants were given self-administered questionnaires, which included the validated Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire (GAD-7) Malay version to detect anxiety. Of the 1023 patients who were invited, 895 agreed to participate (response rate 87.5%). The prevalence of anxiety in this study was 7.8%, based on the GAD-7 (score ≥8). Multiple logistic regression analysis found that certain stressful life events and the emotional aspect of domestic violence were significantly associated with anxiety (Pdomestic violence, need to be addressed and managed appropriately.

  13. Anxiety Sensitivity and the Anxiety Disorders: A Meta-Analytic Review and Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B.

    2009-01-01

    There has been significant interest in the role of anxiety sensitivity (AS) in the anxiety disorders. In this meta-analysis, we empirically evaluate differences in AS between anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and nonclinical controls. A total of 38 published studies (N = 20,146) were included in the analysis. The results yielded a large effect…

  14. Psychiatric aspects of pediatric epilepsy: Focus on anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujita Kumar Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric co-morbidities are commonly seen with pediatric epilepsy, which can be in the form of cognitive deficits like - inattention and intellectual disability, motor disturbances like - hyperactivity, emotional disturbances like - depression and anxiety disorders and behavioral problems like - impulsivity, aggression and even psychotic behavior. Anxiety disorders like - Obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, agoraphobia and panic attacks are commonly seen with pediatric epilepsy. Presence of co-morbid anxiety disorder in pediatric epilepsy is responsible for scholastic decline, peer maladjustment and poor quality of life. Management of anxiety disorders in children with epilepsy is always a challenge. Until, there is no general consensus regarding management of anxiety disorders in pediatric epilepsy. Despite its enormous impact on an individual′s life, this area has not been addressed adequately through clinical research. This review focuses on psychiatric aspects of pediatric epilepsy with specific emphasis on anxiety disorders.

  15. Anxiety disorders in pregnancy and the postnatal period ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anxiety disorders in pregnancy and the postnatal period. ... Continuing Medical Education ... There is a growing realisation that many women suffer from either new onset or worsening of existing anxiety disorders during pregnancy and postnatally (the perinatal period).1 The occurrence of an anxiety disorder during this time ...

  16. Fluvoxamine in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Jane

    2005-12-01

    Fluvoxamine is a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that has proved effective in large double-blind, randomized, controlled trials involving patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and panic disorder. Improvements have also been demonstrated in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as those with a range of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders including binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, pathological gambling, and body dysmorphic disorder. Several well controlled studies have confirmed the efficacy of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents with OCD, SAD, and other anxiety disorders, and it was the first SSRI to be registered for the treatment of OCD in children. Fluvoxamine is well tolerated. In common with other SSRIs, the most frequently reported adverse event is nausea. Fluvoxamine does not cause sedation or cognitive impairment and is associated with a low risk of sexual dysfunction, suicidality, and withdrawal reactions. It is safe in overdose and has no significant effect on body weight or cardiovascular parameters.

  17. Two-year course of depressive and anxiety disorders: results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penninx, Brenda W J H; Nolen, Willem A; Lamers, Femke; Zitman, Frans G; Smit, Johannes H; Spinhoven, Philip; Cuijpers, Pim; de Jong, Peter J; van Marwijk, Harm W J; van der Meer, Klaas; Verhaak, Peter; Laurant, Miranda G H; de Graaf, Ron; Hoogendijk, Witte J; van der Wee, Nic; Ormel, Johan; van Dyck, Richard; Beekman, Aartjan T F

    2011-09-01

    Whether course trajectories of depressive and anxiety disorders are different, remains an important question for clinical practice and informs future psychiatric nosology. This longitudinal study compares depressive and anxiety disorders in terms of diagnostic and symptom course trajectories, and examines clinical prognostic factors. Data are from 1209 depressive and/or anxiety patients residing in primary and specialized care settings, participating in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Diagnostic and Life Chart Interviews provided 2-year course information. Course was more favorable for pure depression (n=267, median episode duration = 6 months, 24.5% chronic) than for pure anxiety (n=487, median duration = 16 months, 41.9% chronic). Worst course was observed in the comorbid depression-anxiety group (n=455, median duration > 24 months, 56.8% chronic). Independent predictors of poor diagnostic and symptom trajectory outcomes were severity and duration of index episode, comorbid depression-anxiety, earlier onset age and older age. With only these factors a reasonable discriminative ability (C-statistic 0.72-0.77) was reached in predicting 2-year prognosis. Depression and anxiety cases concern prevalent - not incident - cases. This, however, reflects the actual patient population in primary and specialized care settings. Their differential course trajectory justifies separate consideration of pure depression, pure anxiety and comorbid anxiety-depression in clinical practice and psychiatric nosology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Current irritability robustly related to current and prior anxiety in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Laura D; Miller, Shefali; Wang, Po W; Hooshmand, Farnaz; Holtzman, Jessica N; Goffin, Kathryn C; Shah, Saloni; Ketter, Terence A

    2016-08-01

    Although current irritability and current/prior anxiety have been associated in unipolar depression, these relationships are less well understood in bipolar disorder (BD). We investigated relationships between current irritability and current/prior anxiety as well as other current emotions and BD illness characteristics. Outpatients referred to the Stanford Bipolar Disorders Clinic during 2000-2011 were assessed with the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for BD (STEP-BD) Affective Disorders Evaluation. Prevalence and clinical correlates of current irritability and current/prior anxiety and other illness characteristics were examined. Among 497 BD outpatients (239 Type I, 258 Type II; 58.1% female; mean ± SD age 35.6 ± 13.1 years), 301 (60.6%) had baseline current irritability. Patients with versus without current irritability had significantly higher rates of current anxiety (77.1% versus 42.9%, p anxiety disorder (73.1% versus 52.6%, p anxiety than to current anhedonia, sadness, or euphoria (all p anxiety associations persisted across current predominant mood states. Current irritability was more robustly related to past anxiety than to all other assessed illness characteristics, including 1° family history of mood disorder, history of alcohol/substance use disorder, bipolar subtype, and current syndromal/subsyndromal depression (all p anxiety. Further studies are warranted to assess longitudinal clinical implications of relationships between irritability and anxiety in BD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety and related disorders are among the most common mental disorders, with lifetime prevalence reportedly as high as 31%. Unfortunately, anxiety disorders are under-diagnosed and under-treated. Methods These guidelines were developed by Canadian experts in anxiety and related disorders through a consensus process. Data on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment (psychological and pharmacological) were obtained through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and manual searches (1980–2012). Treatment strategies were rated on strength of evidence, and a clinical recommendation for each intervention was made, based on global impression of efficacy, effectiveness, and side effects, using a modified version of the periodic health examination guidelines. Results These guidelines are presented in 10 sections, including an introduction, principles of diagnosis and management, six sections (Sections 3 through 8) on the specific anxiety-related disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder), and two additional sections on special populations (children/adolescents, pregnant/lactating women, and the elderly) and clinical issues in patients with comorbid conditions. Conclusions Anxiety and related disorders are very common in clinical practice, and frequently comorbid with other psychiatric and medical conditions. Optimal management requires a good understanding of the efficacy and side effect profiles of pharmacological and psychological treatments. PMID:25081580

  20. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Hospitalized Women with Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neomi Vin-Raviv

    Full Text Available To document the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders, and their associations with mortality among hospitalized breast cancer patients.We examined the associations between breast cancer diagnosis and the diagnoses of anxiety or depression among 4,164 hospitalized breast cancer cases matched with 4,164 non-breast cancer controls using 2006-2009 inpatient data obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Conditional logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI for the associations between breast cancer diagnosis and diagnoses of anxiety or depression. We also used binary logistic regression models to examine the association between diagnoses of depression or anxiety, and in-hospital mortality among breast cancer patients.We observed that breast cancer cases were less likely to have a diagnosis of depression (OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.52-0.77, and less likely to have a diagnosis of anxiety (OR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.52-0.90 compared with controls. This association remained after controlling for race/ethnicity, residential income, insurance and residential region. Breast cancer patients with a depression diagnosis also had lower mortality (OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.52-0.89 compared with those without a depression diagnosis, but there was no significant difference in mortality among those with and without anxiety diagnoses.Diagnoses of depression and anxiety in breast cancer patients were less prevalent than expected based on our analysis of hospitalized breast cancer patients and matched non-breast cancer controls identified in the NIS dataset using ICD-9 diagnostic codes. Results suggest that under-diagnosis of mental health problems may be common among hospitalized women with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Future work may fruitfully explore reasons for, and consequences of, inappropriate identification of the mental health needs of breast cancer patients.

  1. Prevalence and factors associated with dental anxiety among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Dental anxiety has been associated with several negative effects on patients and communities' oral health. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and factors associated with dental anxiety among primary school teachers in Ngara district, Tanzania. Methods: This descriptive ...

  2. Transdiagnostic group CBT for anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholt, Nina; Aharoni, Ruth; Winding, Clas

    2017-01-01

    to Mental Health Services. Pre-post-treatment effects were examined for psychiatric outpatients with anxiety disorders receiving UP treatment in groups. Forty-seven patients (mean-age = 34.1 (SD = 9.92), 77% females) with a principal diagnosis of anxiety were included. We found significant and clinically....... The treatment effects found in the present study correspond to treatment effects of other TCBT studies, other UP group studies, and effectiveness studies on standard CBT for outpatients. The results indicate that the UP can be successfully applied to a MHS group setting, demonstrating positive effects...

  3. Amygdalar volumetric correlates of social anxiety in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Hyeon; Garrett, Amy; Boucher, Spencer; Howe, Meghan; Sanders, Erica; Kim, Eunjoo; Singh, Manpreet; Chang, Kiki

    2015-11-30

    The prevalence of social anxiety disorder is high in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder (BD) and anxiety may be a significant risk factor in these youth for developing BD. We compared social anxiety symptoms between BD offspring with mood symptoms (high-risk group for developing BD I or II: HR) and healthy controls (HC). We also explored the correlations between the amygdalar volumes and social anxiety symptoms in the HR group with high social anxiety scores (HRHSA) due to the potential involvement of the amygdala in the pathophysiology of both BD and social anxiety. Youth participating in the study included 29h and 17HC of comparable age and gender. To assess social anxiety symptoms, we used the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) social anxiety subscale. The HR group's MASC social anxiety score was significantly higher than that of the HC group. Among the 29h, 17 subjects (58.6%) showed high social anxiety and they were classified as the HRHSA group. No significant difference was observed in amygdalar volume between the HRHSA and HC groups. However, there were significant negative correlations between amydalar volumes and MASC social anxiety score in the HRHSA group. These findings have implications for the link between amygdalar structure and both anxiety and mood control. This link may serve to implicate high social anxiety as a risk marker for future BD development. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Association of temporomandibular disorder symptoms with anxiety and depression in Portuguese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minghelli, Beatriz; Morgado, Marcos; Caro, Tatiana

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its association with anxiety and depression among 1,493 Portuguese college students (age 17-69 years) at Piaget Institute. The assessment instruments were the Fonseca Anamnestic Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. TMD was present in 633 (42.4%) students, and anxiety or depression was present in 456 (30.5%) students. Regarding the association of TMD with anxiety and depression, 280 of the 633 students (61.4%) with TMD symptoms also had signs of anxiety or depression (P students without signs of anxiety or depression, students with such signs had an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval: 2.42-3.84; P College students from various fields of study and regions of Portugal had a high prevalence of TMD, which was significantly associated with anxiety and depression.

  5. Prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in men with erectile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalised anxiety disorder and social phobia were rated using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, while the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was used to rate depressive symptoms. Results. Thirty-three per cent of respondents had depressive symptoms, ...

  6. Parent and Child Perspectives on the Nature of Anxiety in Children and Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsivadjian, Ann; Knott, Fiona; Magiati, Iliana

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common among children and young people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Despite growing knowledge about the prevalence, phenomenology and treatment of anxiety disorders, relatively little is understood about the nature and impact of anxiety in this group and little is known about autism-specific factors that may have a…

  7. Attention network functioning in children with anxiety disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and non-clinical anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogg, K; Salum, G A; Bradley, B P; Gadelha, A; Pan, P; Alvarenga, P; Rohde, L A; Pine, D S; Manfro, G G

    2015-01-01

    Research with adults suggests that anxiety is associated with poor control of executive attention. However, in children, it is unclear (a) whether anxiety disorders and non-clinical anxiety are associated with deficits in executive attention, (b) whether such deficits are specific to anxiety versus other psychiatric disorders, and (c) whether there is heterogeneity among anxiety disorders (in particular, specific phobia versus other anxiety disorders). We examined executive attention in 860 children classified into three groups: anxiety disorders (n = 67), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 67) and no psychiatric disorder (n = 726). Anxiety disorders were subdivided into: anxiety disorders excluding specific phobia (n = 43) and specific phobia (n = 21). The Attention Network Task was used to assess executive attention, alerting and orienting. Findings indicated heterogeneity among anxiety disorders, as children with anxiety disorders (excluding specific phobia) showed impaired executive attention, compared with disorder-free children, whereas children with specific phobia showed no executive attention deficit. Among disorder-free children, executive attention was less efficient in those with high, relative to low, levels of anxiety. There were no anxiety-related deficits in orienting or alerting. Children with ADHD not only had poorer executive attention than disorder-free children, but also higher orienting scores, less accurate responses and more variable response times. Impaired executive attention in children (reflected by difficulty inhibiting processing of task-irrelevant information) was not fully explained by general psychopathology, but instead showed specific associations with anxiety disorders (other than specific phobia) and ADHD, as well as with high levels of anxiety symptoms in disorder-free children.

  8. Prevalence and correlates of anxiety and depression among family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... Background: The process of caregiving may cause emotional distress in form of anxiety and depression among family carers of cancer patients. Little is ... circumstances, such as generalized anxiety disorder, pan- ic attacks and ... Survivors of cancer diseases also suffer from psychological distress such as ...

  9. Pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Jennifer A; Mandos, Laura A; Rickels, Karl; Lohoff, Falk W

    2011-11-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic, relapsing, debilitating disorder, associated with markedly impaired social and occupational functioning. Pharmacological treatment is considered standard care and several drug classes are now FDA approved for the treatment of GAD. While there are clear data for the efficacy of short-term acute treatment, long-term treatment and treatment-resistant GAD remain challenging. This article describes current pharmacological treatment options for GAD, with focus on benzodiazepines, azapirones, antidepressants and anticonvulsant and antipsychotic drugs. Recent findings from placebo-controlled clinical trials are reviewed and evidence-based clinical implications are discussed. A PubMed search was completed using the terms: 'generalized anxiety disorder AND treatment' and 'generalized anxiety disorder AND therapy'. Additional pivotal trials were included for a historical perspective (older landmark trials that established efficacy and safety for older drug classes in the treatment of GAD). Efficacy for treatment of GAD has been established for several different drug classes. At present, based on clear efficacy and good tolerability, first-line treatment with either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) is indicated. If an initial, at least moderate, clinical response is achieved under antidepressant therapy, treatment should be at least continued for 12 months.

  10. Stress, Anxiety and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress has major role in functional gastrointestinal system disorders. The most typical example of this situation is Irritable bowel syndrome. Gastrointestinal system’s response to acute or short-term of stress is delay of gastric emptying and stimulation of colonic transition. While CRF2 receptors are mediate the upper section inhibition, CRF1 is responsible for the lower part colonic and anxiogenic response. Visceral hypersensitivity is managed by the emotional motor system, the amygdala plays a significant role and mucosal mast cells arise. But in people with symptoms of functional gastrointestinal, how is differ motility response in healthy individuals, this situation is due to lack of autonomous nervous system or an increased sensitivity of stress is not adequately understood. The brain-gastrointestinal axis frequency and severity of symptoms associated with negative emotions. American Gastroenterology Association is closely associated with the quality of life and is very difficult to treat the symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders, re-interpreted under the heading of 'Gastrointestinal Distress'. This review is defined as gastrointestinal distresses, physical, emotional, and behavioral components as a disorder in which, almost like an anxiety disorder are discussed. Physical component is pain, gas, and defecation problems, cognitive component is external foci control, catastrophization and anticipatory anxiety, the emotional component is somatic anxiety, hypervigilance, and avoidance of gastrointestinal stimuli as defined. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(2.000: 122-133

  11. Anxiety Symptoms in Psychotic Disorders: Results from the Second Australian National Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanac, Peter; Mancuso, Sam G; Castle, David J

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of anxiety symptoms among Australians with psychotic disorders was examined as part of the Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP). A two-phase design was used. Of 7,955 people who were screened positive for psychosis and eligible, there were 1,825 participants (18-34 years and 35-64 years) interviewed. Data were collected on symptomatology, substance use, cognitive ability, functioning, disability, physical health, mental health service utilization, medication use, education, employment and housing. Anxiety symptomatology was divided into generalized anxiety, panic, phobic, social anxiety and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The most common ICD-10 diagnoses were schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (63.0%) and bipolar (mania) disorder (17.5%). Overall, 59.8% (n=1,092) of participants reported experiencing anxiety symptoms in the previous twelve months. Female gender was highly associated with all domains of anxiety. Smoking was significantly associated with all domains of anxiety, except generalized anxiety. The presence of any depressive symptoms in the previous twelve months was significantly associated with all anxiety symptoms. Medication side effects were associated with phobic and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Social dysfunction was associated with social anxiety, and less so for obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Anxiety symptoms are common in people with psychotic disorders. Appropriate screening and treatment should be a clinical priority.

  12. Sexual dysfunction, mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Fatih; Küçük, Adem; Satan, Yılmaz; İlgün, Erdem; Arslan, Şevket; İlik, Faik

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the current prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD), mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia (FM). This case-control study involved 96 patients with FM and 94 healthy women. The SD diagnosis was based on a psychiatric interview in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria. Mood and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview. Personality disorders were diagnosed according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM, Revised Third Edition Personality Disorders. Fifty of the 96 patients (52.1%) suffered from SD. The most common SD was lack of sexual desire (n=36, 37.5%) and arousal disorder (n=10, 10.4%). Of the 96 patients, 45 (46.9%) had a mood or anxiety disorder and 13 (13.5%) had a personality disorder. The most common mood, anxiety, and personality disorders were major depression (26%), generalized anxiety disorder (8.3%), and histrionic personality disorder (10.4%). SD, mood, and anxiety disorders are frequently observed in female patients with FM. Pain plays a greater role in the development of SD in female patients with FM.

  13. Anxiety and depressive disorders in elderly with chronic dizziness of vestibular origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Érica Toledo Piza; Quintana, Maria Inês; Ganança, Fernando Freitas

    2016-01-01

    Dizziness is one of the most prevalent symptoms in the elderly. Anxiety and depression are common in dizzy adult patients, but there is scarce information about comorbidity between vestibular disturbances and psychiatric disorders in the aged. To assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression disorders in elderly with chronic dizziness of vestibular origin. Transversal study that used the Brazilian version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1 to assess anxiety and depressive disorders in elderly patients (≥ 60 years old) with chronic dizziness. Most of the 44 patients included in the study were female (88.6%) with a mean age of 71 years (± 7.5), 68.1% had experienced dizziness for 1 year or more. The most prevalent diagnosis was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (52.3%). The prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder and specific phobias during life were 29.5% and 22.7%, respectively, and, in the last 12 months, 18.2% and 15.9%. There was no patient with panic disorder, agoraphobia or social phobia. The prevalence of depressive disorder during life was 45.4%, and, in the last 12 months, were 11.3%. Aged patients with chronic dizziness had high prevalence of some mental disorders. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Anxiety and depressive disorders in elderly with chronic dizziness of vestibular origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Toledo Piza Peluso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Dizziness is one of the most prevalent symptoms in the elderly. Anxiety and depression are common in dizzy adult patients, but there is scarce information about comorbidity between vestibular disturbances and psychiatric disorders in the aged. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression disorders in elderly with chronic dizziness of vestibular origin. METHODS: Transversal study that used the Brazilian version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1 to assess anxiety and depressive disorders in elderly patients (≥60 years old with chronic dizziness. RESULTS: Most of the 44 patients included in the study were female (88.6% with a mean age of 71 years (±7.5, 68.1% had experienced dizziness for 1 year or more. The most prevalent diagnosis was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (52.3%. The prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder and specific phobias during life were 29.5% and 22.7%, respectively, and, in the last 12 months, 18.2% and 15.9%. There was no patient with panic disorder, agoraphobia or social phobia. The prevalence of depressive disorder during life was 45.4%, and, in the last 12 months, were 11.3%. CONCLUSION: Aged patients with chronic dizziness had high prevalence of some mental disorders.

  15. Defense Mechanisms in "Pure" Anxiety and "Pure" Depressive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colovic, Olga; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica; Perunicic Mladenovic, Ivana; Milosavljevic, Maja; Munjiza, Ana

    2016-10-01

    Our study was intended to test whether there are any differences in the way defense mechanisms are used by patients suffering from pure anxiety and those with pure depressive disorders. The sample size was as follows: depressive disorders without psychotic symptoms 30, anxiety disorders 30, and the healthy control group 30. The assessment of defense mechanisms was made using the DSQ-40 questionnaire. Our findings show that "pure" anxiety disorders differ from "pure" depressive disorders only in the use of immature defense mechanisms. The group with depressive disorders was significantly more prone to use immature defense mechanisms than the group with anxiety disorders (p = 0.005), primarily projection (p = 0.001) and devaluation (p = 0.003). These defense mechanisms may therefore be used both to differentiate between anxiety and depressive disorders and also to determine which symptoms (anxiety or depressive disorders) are dominant at any given stage of treatment.

  16. Parental social anxiety disorder prospectively predicts toddlers' fear/avoidance in a social referencing paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aktar, E.; Majdandžić, M.; de Vente, W.; Bögels, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety runs in families. Observational learning of anxious behavior from parents with anxiety disorders plays an important role in the intergenerational transmission of anxiety. We investigated the link between parental anxiety (parental lifetime anxiety disorders and expressed parental

  17. The Efficacy of Internet-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on the Anxiety Disorders among Adolescent Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Karbasi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of anxiety disorders among children and adolescents are found to be approximately between 8–12 and 5–10, respectively, and the long-lasting effects of such disorders can expose the sufferers to impairment and dysfunction in several areas of life the examples of which are poor educational performance, low self-esteem, and depression. The present study aims to evaluate the efficacy of internet-based, cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT in treating the anxiety disorders among adolescent females. Materials and Methods: The sample included thirty girls aged between 10 and 18 years suffering from a variety of anxiety disorders, under pharmaceutical therapy and referred to clinics of child and adolescent psychiatry specialists in Isfahan. The sample was selected through diagnostic interviews by psychiatrists based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision; afterward, they were randomly assigned to either the experimental or the control groups. To evaluate the efficacy of an ICBT in reducing anxiety disorder symptoms, Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders questionnaire was administered among the patients both before and 4 weeks after the treatment. Results: The covariance analysis results aimed to compare the anxiety disorder score variations between the two groups which demonstrate the fact that anxiety disorder scores in these two groups differ from one another (P < 0.001. Conclusions: This study is comprised of two Conclusions.the significant reduction in the mean of anxiety disorders scores in the experimental group compared to those in control group can be indicative of the efficacy of ICBT. In addition the significant reduction in the average of anxiety disorders symptoms' scores according to the type of anxiety disorders in the experimental group, compared to those in control group, can be indicative of the efficacy of ICBT.

  18. Comorbid depression, but not comorbid anxiety disorders, predicts poor outcome in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; van Boeijen, C.A.; Boeke, A.J.P.; van Oppen, P.C.; Kempe, P.T.; van Dyck, R.

    2008-01-01

    Influence of type of comorbidity was studied over the course of 1 year in a sample of 141 outpatients with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder, who were receiving different forms of cognitive behavior therapy. Influence of type of comorbidity was determined on

  19. Systematic review of factors associated with depression and anxiety disorders among older adults with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagna, Atami; Gallo, Joseph J; Pontone, Gregory M

    2014-07-01

    Depression and anxiety disorders have a substantial impact on the quality of life, the functioning and mortality of older adults with Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the factors associated with the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders among individuals with PD aged 60 years and older. Following a literature search in PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and EMBASE, 5 articles met the inclusion criteria (adults aged 60 years and older, individuals with PD, and with depression and anxiety disorders, and English-language peer reviewed articles) and were included in this review. These studies were conducted in the U.S (n = 3), in Italy (n = 1) and the U.K (n = 1). Findings indicated that autonomic symptoms, motor fluctuations, severity and frequency of symptoms, staging of the disease, and PD onset and duration were associated with the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders among older adults suffering from PD. Despite the limited number of studies included in the review, depression and anxiety disorders are often unrecognized and untreated and the comorbidity greatly exacerbates PD symptoms. The identification of factors associated with the development of depression and anxiety disorders could help in designing preventive interventions that would decrease the risk and burden of depression and anxiety disorders among older adults with PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Animal models of anxiety disorders and stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alline C. Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and stress-related disorders are severe psychiatric conditions that affect performance in daily tasks and represent a high cost to public health. The initial observation of Charles Darwin that animals and human beings share similar characteristics in the expression of emotion raise the possibility of studying the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders in other mammals (mainly rodents. The development of animal models of anxiety and stress has helped to identify the pharmacological mechanisms and potential clinical effects of several drugs. Animal models of anxiety are based on conflict situations that can generate opposite motivational states induced by approach-avoidance situations. The present review revisited the main rodent models of anxiety and stress responses used worldwide. Here we defined as “ethological” the tests that assess unlearned/unpunished responses (such as the elevated plus maze, light-dark box, and open field, whereas models that involve learned/punished responses are referred to as “conditioned operant conflict tests” (such as the Vogel conflict test. We also discussed models that involve mainly classical conditioning tests (fear conditioning. Finally, we addressed the main protocols used to induce stress responses in rodents, including psychosocial (social defeat and neonatal isolation stress, physical (restraint stress, and chronic unpredictable stress.

  1. Prevalence of substance use disorders in psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftdahl, Nanna Gilliam; Nordentoft, Merete; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    obtained from several Danish population-based registers. The study population was defined as all individuals with incidents of schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder, other psychoses, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD......PURPOSE: The present study established the national prevalence of substance use disorders (SUDs) among Danish psychiatric patients. Furthermore, patients with SUDs and those without SUDs were compared on a range of socio-demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics. METHODS: Data were......), and personality disorders since 1969. The prevalence of SUDs was examined for the following psychoactive substances: alcohol, opioids, cannabis, sedatives, cocaine, psycho-stimulants and hallucinogens. RESULTS: A total of 463,003 patients were included in the analysis. The prevalence of any lifetime SUD was: 37...

  2. The effect of somatic symptom attribution on the prevalence rate of depression and anxiety among nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smalbrugge, M.; Pot, A.M.; Jongenelis, L.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Eefsting, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The validity of diagnostic psychiatric instruments for depression and anxiety disorders may be compromised among patients with complex physical illness and disability. The objective of this study was to determine the effect on the prevalence rate of depression and anxiety in a nursing home

  3. Quantifying Risk for Anxiety Disorders in Preschool Children: A Machine Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kimberly L H; Sprechmann, Pablo; Calderbank, Robert; Sapiro, Guillermo; Egger, Helen L

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood anxiety disorders are common, impairing, and predictive of anxiety and mood disorders later in childhood. Epidemiological studies over the last decade find that the prevalence of impairing anxiety disorders in preschool children ranges from 0.3% to 6.5%. Yet, less than 15% of young children with an impairing anxiety disorder receive a mental health evaluation or treatment. One possible reason for the low rate of care for anxious preschoolers is the lack of affordable, timely, reliable and valid tools for identifying young children with clinically significant anxiety. Diagnostic interviews assessing psychopathology in young children require intensive training, take hours to administer and code, and are not available for use outside of research settings. The Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment (PAPA) is a reliable and valid structured diagnostic parent-report interview for assessing psychopathology, including anxiety disorders, in 2 to 5 year old children. In this paper, we apply machine-learning tools to already collected PAPA data from two large community studies to identify sub-sets of PAPA items that could be developed into an efficient, reliable, and valid screening tool to assess a young child's risk for an anxiety disorder. Using machine learning, we were able to decrease by an order of magnitude the number of items needed to identify a child who is at risk for an anxiety disorder with an accuracy of over 96% for both generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and separation anxiety disorder (SAD). Additionally, rather than considering GAD or SAD as discrete/binary entities, we present a continuous risk score representing the child's risk of meeting criteria for GAD or SAD. Identification of a short question-set that assesses risk for an anxiety disorder could be a first step toward development and validation of a relatively short screening tool feasible for use in pediatric clinics and daycare/preschool settings.

  4. Implications of the Research Domain Criteria project for childhood anxiety and its disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Eli R; Gee, Dylan G; Pine, Daniel S; Silverman, Wendy K

    2018-01-31

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in youth; however, progress in treatment for childhood anxiety has stalled over the past decade. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project represents a shift toward a dimensional and interdisciplinary approach to psychiatric disorders; this shift can reframe developmental psychopathology for childhood anxiety and facilitate novel advances in its classification and treatment. Here we highlight constructs in the Systems for Social Processes and the Negative Valence System domains of RDoC, as they relate to childhood anxiety disorders. Childhood anxiety relates to both RDoC domains. In terms of social processes, through natural reliance on parents to reduce children's fear, attachment represents one particular social process, which plays a central role in anxiety among youth. In terms of negative valence, considerable research links threat conditioning to pediatric anxiety. Finally, fronto-amygdala circuitry relates to all three entities, as it has been shown to underly both attachment processes and threat learning, while it also has been consistently implicated in anxiety disorders across development. Through integrative and translational approaches, RDoC provides unique opportunities and simultaneous challenges for advancing the understanding and treatment of childhood anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Emotional reasoning and anxiety sensitivity: Associations with social anxiety disorder in childhood☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkozei, Anna; Cooper, Peter J.; Creswell, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Background Two specific cognitive constructs that have been implicated in the development and maintenance of anxiety symptoms are anxiety sensitivity and emotional reasoning, both of which relate to the experience and meaning of physical symptoms of arousal or anxiety. The interpretation of physical symptoms has been particularly implicated in theories of social anxiety disorder, where internal physical symptoms are hypothesized to influence the individual's appraisals of the self as a social object. Method The current study compared 75 children on measures of anxiety sensitivity and emotional reasoning: 25 with social anxiety disorder, 25 with other anxiety disorders, and 25 nonanxious children (aged 7–12 years). Results Children with social anxiety disorder reported higher levels of anxiety sensitivity and were more likely than both other groups to view ambiguous situations as anxiety provoking, whether physical information was present or not. There were no group differences in the extent to which physical information altered children's interpretation of hypothetical scenarios. Limitations This study is the first to investigate emotional reasoning in clinically anxious children and therefore replication is needed. In addition, those in both anxious groups commonly had comorbid conditions and, consequently, specific conclusions about social anxiety disorder need to be treated with caution. Conclusion The findings highlight cognitive characteristics that may be particularly pertinent in the context of social anxiety disorder in childhood and which may be potential targets for treatment. Furthermore, the findings suggest that strategies to modify these particular cognitive constructs may not be necessary in treatments of some other childhood anxiety disorders. PMID:24120086

  6. Anxiety, mood, and behavioral disorders among pediatric patients with juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Parkins, Irina S; Graham, Thomas Brent; Lynch, Anne M; Passo, Murray; Johnston, Megan; Schikler, Kenneth N; Hashkes, Philip J; Banez, Gerard; Richards, Margaret M

    2008-09-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are common psychiatric conditions among adult patients with fibromyalgia syndrome, but little is known about whether psychiatric disorders are prevalent among pediatric patients with fibromyalgia. The primary objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of mood, anxiety, and behavioral disorders in a clinical sample of children and adolescents with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) and assess the relationship between psychiatric disorders and JPFS symptom severity. Standardized psychiatric interviews were conducted with children and their parents/primary caregivers, and measures of symptom severity including pain intensity and physician global ratings were obtained for 76 children and adolescents diagnosed with JPFS (ages 11 to 18 y) in pediatric rheumatology clinics at 4 hospitals in the Midwest. A total of 67.1% of patients had at least 1 current and 71.5% had at least 1 lifetime DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-fourth edition) psychiatric diagnosis. The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis was anxiety disorder (57.5% of JPFS patients). Although mood difficulties were also common, the presence of major depression was lower than has been reported for adults with fibromyalgia syndrome. Physicians' global assessment of functioning was significantly lower for patients with a current anxiety disorder. There were no significant differences in pain severity among patients with and without anxiety, mood, or behavioral disorders. There seems to be a high prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with JPFS, and presence of anxiety disorder is associated with poorer physician-rated functioning. Future research should explore whether early anxiety symptoms are predictive of long-term functioning.

  7. Anxiety and mood disorders in narcolepsy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuyn, H A Droogleever; Lappenschaar, Martijn A; Furer, Joop W; Hodiamont, Paul P; Rijnders, Cees A Th; Renier, Willy O; Buitelaar, Jan K; Overeem, Sebastiaan

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a primary sleeping disorder with excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy as core symptoms. There is increasing interest in the psychiatric phenotype of narcolepsy. Although many authors suggest an overrepresentation of mood disorders, few systematic studies have been performed and conflicting results have been reported. Anxiety disorders in narcolepsy have only received little attention. We performed a case-control study in 60 narcolepsy patients and 120 age- and sex-matched controls from a previous population study. The Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry were used to assess symptoms and diagnostic classifications of mood and anxiety disorders. Symptoms of mood disorders were reported by about one third of patients. However, the prevalence of formal mood disorder diagnoses - including major depression - was not increased. In contrast, more than half of the narcolepsy patients had anxiety or panic attacks. Thirty-five percent of the patients could be diagnosed with anxiety disorder (odds ratio=15.6), with social phobia being the most important diagnosis. There was no influence of age, sex, duration of illness or medication use on the prevalence of mood or anxiety symptoms and disorders. Anxiety disorders, especially panic attacks and social phobias, often affect patients with narcolepsy. Although symptoms of mood disorders are present in many patients, the prevalence of major depression is not increased. Anxiety and mood symptoms could be secondary complications of the chronic symptoms of narcolepsy. Recent studies have shown that narcolepsy is caused by defective hypocretin signaling. As hypocretin neurotransmission is also involved in stress regulation and addiction, this raises the possibility that mood and anxiety symptoms are primary disease phenomena in narcolepsy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Test Anxiety and College Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jason M.; Lindstrom, Will; Foels, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Test anxiety was examined in college students with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Results indicated that, relative to college students without ADHD, college students with ADHD reported higher total test anxiety as well as specific aspects of test anxiety, including worry (i.e., cognitive aspects of test anxiety) and…

  9. Changes in anxiety sensitivity with pharmacotherapy for panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, N.M.; Otto, M.W.; Smits, J.A.J.; Nicolaou, D.C.; Reese, H.E.; Pollack, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    Fear of anxiety symptoms (anxiety sensitivity) has been implicated in the etiology and maintenance of panic disorder, and has been shown to improve with cognitive-behavioral treatment. The impact of pharmacotherapy on anxiety sensitivity is less clear. We administered the Anxiety Sensitivity Index

  10. Meta-Analysis of the Relations of Anxiety Sensitivity to the Depressive and Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naragon-Gainey, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    There is a substantial literature relating the personality trait "anxiety sensitivity" (AS; tendency to fear anxiety-related sensations) and its lower order dimensions to the mood and anxiety (i.e., internalizing) disorders. However, particularly given the disorders' high comorbidity rates, it remains unclear whether AS is broadly related to these…

  11. Neuroenhancement of Exposure Therapy in Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan G. Hofmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although exposure-based treatments and anxiolytic medications are more effective than placebo for treating anxiety disorders, there is still considerable room for further improvement. Interestingly, combining these two modalities is usually not more effective than the monotherapies. Recent translational research has identified a number of novel approaches for treating anxiety disorders using agents that serve as neuroenhancers (also known as cognitive enhancers. Several of these agents have been studied to determine their efficacy at improving treatment outcome for patients with anxiety and other psychiatric disorders. In this review, we examine d-cycloserine, yohimbine, cortisol, catecholamines, oxytocin, modafinil, and nutrients such as caffeine and amino fatty acids as potential neuroenhancers. Of these agents, d-cycloserine shows the most promise as an effective neuroenhancer for extinction learning and exposure therapy. Yet, the optimal dosing and dose timing for drug administration remains uncertain. There is partial support for cortisol, catecholamines, yohimbine and oxytocin for improving extinction learning and exposure therapy. There is less evidence to indicate that modafinil and nutrients such as caffeine and amino fatty acids are effective neuroenhancers. More research is needed to determine their long term efficacy and clinical utility of these agents.

  12. Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and response to treatment in hepatitis C patients in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MM, Bassiony; A, Yousef; U, Youssef; GM, Salah El-Deen; M, Abdelghani; H, Al-Gohari; E, Fouad; MM, El-Shafaey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence and associated correlates of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder in hepatitis C virus patients before and after treatment and to investigate the relationship between major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and treatment response. A total of 116 consecutive hepatitis C virus patients from hepatitis C virus treatment center in Zagazig city, Egypt, were included in the study and divided into treated group (N = 58) and untreated group (N = 58). All hepatitis C virus patients were screened for major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder using hospital anxiety and depression scale, and those who screened positive were interviewed to confirm the diagnosis of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder using DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria. These measures were done at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment or observation. At baseline, 3.5% and 12.1% of hepatitis C virus patients (treated group) had major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder, respectively. After 12 weeks of treatment 37.9% of hepatitis C virus patients (treated group) had major depressive disorder and 46.6% had generalized anxiety disorder. There was a significant statistical difference between hospital anxiety and depression scale scores for depression (3.3 ± 2.3 vs. 6.4 ± 3.2, t = 9.6, p = 0.001) and for anxiety (4.6 ± 2.4 vs. 7.3 ± 3.0, t = 10.2, p = 0.001) before and after treatment. There was also significant statistical difference between treated group and untreated group regarding hospital anxiety and depression scale scores after treatment and observation (depression, treated group 6.4 ± 3.2 vs. untreated group 4.0 ± 2.4, t = 3.7, p = 0.001; anxiety, treated group 7.3 ± 3.0 vs. untreated group 4.5 ± 2.3, t = 4.4, p = 0.001). There was no association between major depressive disorder

  13. Animal models of social anxiety disorder and their validity criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Abelaira, Helena M; Quevedo, João

    2014-09-26

    Anxiety disorders pose one of the largest threats to global mental health, and they predominantly emerge early in life. Social anxiety disorder, also known as social phobia, is the most common of all anxiety disorders. Moreover, it has severe consequences and is a disabling disorder that can cause an individual to be unable to perform the tasks of daily life. Social anxiety disorder is associated with the subsequent development of major depression and other mental diseases, as well as increased substance abuse. Although some neurobiological alterations have been found to be associated with social anxiety disorder, little is known about this disorder. Animal models are useful tools for the investigation of this disorder, as well as for finding new pharmacological targets for treatment. Thus, this review will highlight the main animal models of anxiety associated with social phobia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychological treatment of social anxiety disorder improves body dysmorphic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Angela; Sawyer, Alice T; Aderka, Idan M; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2013-10-01

    Social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder are considered nosologically distinct disorders. In contrast, some cognitive models suggest that social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder share similar cognitive maintenance factors. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of psychological treatments for social anxiety disorder on body dysmorphic disorder concerns. In Study 1, we found that 12 weekly group sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy led to significant decreases in body dysmorphic symptom severity. In Study 2, we found that an attention retraining intervention for social anxiety disorder was associated with a reduction in body dysmorphic concerns, compared to a placebo control condition. These findings support the notion that psychological treatments for individuals with primary social anxiety disorder improve co-occurring body dysmorphic disorder symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetics of anxiety disorders - status quo and quo vadis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domschke, Katharina; Deckert, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Clinical genetic studies propose a strong genetic contribution to the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders with a heritability of about 30-67%. The present review will give an overview of linkage studies, association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) yielding support for some candidate genes. Additionally, first evidence for gene-environment interactions between candidate genes of anxiety disorders and stressful life events will be reported. On a systems level, neural activation correlates of anxiety-relevant emotional processing and neurophysiological measures such as peripheral sympathetic activity or the startle reflex have been shown to be potentially driven by vulnerability genes of anxiety disorders. Promising current approaches to further dissect the genetic underpinnings of anxiety disorders such as next generation sequencing, epigenetic analyses and pharmaco-/ psychotherapy-genetics will be presented. Genetic research in anxiety disorders will be discussed with respect to its potential benefit for future efforts to develop innovative and individually tailored therapeutic approaches for patients with anxiety disorders.

  16. A functionalist perspective on social anxiety and avoidant personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafreniere, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A developmental-evolutionary perspective is used to synthesize basic research from the neurosciences, ethology, genetics, and developmental psychology into a unified framework for understanding the nature and origins of social anxiety and avoidant personality disorder. Evidence is presented that social anxiety disorder (social phobia) and avoidant personality disorder may be alternate conceptualizations of the same disorder because they have virtually the same symptoms and genetic basis, and respond to the same pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions. A functionalist perspective on social anxiety is formulated to (a) explain the origins of normative states of anxiety, (b) outline developmental pathways in the transition from normative anxiety to social anxiety and avoidant personality disorders, and (c) account for the processes leading to gender-differentiated patterns of anxiety-related disorders after puberty.

  17. [Prevalence of teenage sleeping disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdereau-Noël, M; Saliou, P; Vic, P

    2017-04-01

    Teenage sleeping disorders can have short- and long-term consequences such as learning disorders, accidents, depression, and type 2 diabetes. To assess the prevalence of sleeping disorders in high school students in the southwest of Brittany (Finistère), France. To search for family and social factors causing these disorders and drug use. Observational multicenter study that took place in May, 2015, asking high school students to anonymously complete a questionnaire during school time. A variable was created: sleep disorders (TrS+) when teenagers responded "often" or "very often" to at least one of the six questions concerning sleeping disorders. The prevalence of TrS+ was 73 % (4170/5556). These teenagers had difficulty falling asleep (36 %), woke up during the night (33 %), or had nightmares (10 %). Their sleep routine was disrupted (35 %), they did not feel rested the following day (49 %): 9 % were late for class related to their sleeping disorders. TrS+ were more recurrent among females (OR: 2.64; P10 cigarettes per a day) (OR: 2.39; P8h per a day; OR: 2.7; Psleep quality. Ten percent of TrS+ individuals consume medications and 9 % cannabis to help them fall asleep. Technology, drugs, and well-being at school have an impact on sleep quality. Screening of teenagers with sleeping disorders and information programs for teenagers must be provided by the teaching and medical staff. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The differential diagnosis of anxiety. Psychiatric and medical disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, O G

    1985-03-01

    This article has reviewed clinical and demographic features of the primary anxiety disorders and other psychiatric and medical disorders that often are associated with anxiety symptoms, highlighting differential diagnosis. In summary, phobic disorders (exogenous anxiety) are characterized by anxiety reliably elicited by specific environmental stimuli; the stimuli involved determine which type of phobia is diagnosed. In contrast, panic attacks and generalized anxiety (endogenous anxiety) involve symptoms of anxiety not associated only with specific eliciting stimuli. Panic disorder is differentiated from generalized anxiety disorder by the presence of discrete attacks; both disorders usually have some level of persistent anxiety. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by recurrent unwanted but irresistible thoughts and the ritualized repetitive acts resulting from these obsessions, in the absence of preexisting psychosis or depression. Finally, posttraumatic stress disorder involves various anxiety (and other) symptoms as a direct result of an obvious stressor. Depressive symptoms are frequently associated with anxiety. It is sometimes impossible to determine which is the primary disorder. Overlap of syndromes probably also occurs with other primary psychiatric disorders, especially somatoform disorders, adjustment disorder with anxious mood, and several personality disorders. Finally, primary anxiety can be confused with several medical syndromes, especially when the medical disorder has not been recognized. Nevertheless, research with patients with pheochromocytoma suggests that medical causes of anxiety may be qualitatively different from primary anxiety disorders, especially the psychic anxiety component. Attention to the clinical and demographic features listed in Table 4, as well as the use of newly-developed structured diagnostic interviews should usually lead to a correct diagnosis, as illustrated by the following examples. The onset of a fear of

  19. Comparing family accommodation in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, and nonanxious children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Eli R; Scharfstein, Lindsay A; Jones, Johnna

    2014-12-01

    Family accommodation describes ways in which parents modify their behavior to help a child avoid or alleviate distress caused by emotional disorders. Accommodation is associated with increased symptom severity, lower functioning, and poorer treatment outcomes. Accommodation is prevalent in childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and anxiety disorders (ADs) but no studies have compared accommodation in these groups or compared them to healthy controls to ascertain if accommodation is prevalent in the general population. This study addresses these gaps by comparing patterns of accommodation, factors that maintain accommodation, and its relation to symptom severity in OCD and AD, relative to healthy controls. We directly compared reports of accommodation to childhood OCD (N = 26) and AD (N = 31), and a comparison group of nonanxious (NA) children (N = 30). Mothers completed measures of accommodation (Family Accommodation Scale (FAS)/Family Accommodation Scale-Anxiety (FASA)), anxiety (Screen for Childhood Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders-Parent Report (SCARED-PR)), and OCD (Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CYBOCS)). Family accommodation is prevalent among mothers of children with OCD and AD. Few differences were found between the two clinical groups who reported more accommodation (F[2,84] = 23.411, P anxiety in AD (r = .426, P = .017) and OCD (r = .465, P = .017), but not in the NA group. Findings highlight family accommodation as a phenomenon that applies broadly and in a similar manner to children with AD and OCD. Evaluating accommodation provides useful information for clinical care and is an important part of the assessment of children with AD and OCD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Disordered gambling and co-morbidity of psychiatric disorders among college students: an examination of problem drinking, anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ryan J; Usdan, Stuart; Cremeens, Jennifer; Vail-Smith, Karen

    2014-06-01

    We assessed the occurrence of co-morbid psychiatric disorders (i.e., problem drinking, anxiety, and depression) among college students who met the threshold for disordered gambling. The participants included a large sample of undergraduate students (n = 1,430) who were enrolled in an introductory health course at a large, southeastern university in Spring 2011 and completed an online assessment that included scales to assess disordered gambling, problem drinking, anxiety, and depression. We calculated screening scores, computed prevalence rates for each disorder, and calculated Pearson correlations and Chi square tests to examine correlations and co-morbid relationships between the four disorders. Analyses indicated that all disorders were significantly associated (p college students who experience disordered gambling (and other psychiatric disorders) are at increased risk of experiencing co-occurring disorders, it might be useful for college health professionals to concurrently screen and intervene for co-occurring disorders.

  1. Gaze perception in social anxiety and social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars eSchulze

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical observations suggest abnormal gaze perception to be an important indicator of social anxiety disorder (SAD. Experimental research has yet paid relatively little attention to the study of gaze perception in SAD. In this article we first discuss gaze perception in healthy human beings before reviewing self-referential and threat-related biases of gaze perception in clinical and non-clinical socially anxious samples. Relative to controls, socially anxious individuals exhibit an enhanced self-directed perception of gaze directions and demonstrate a pronounced fear of direct eye contact, though findings are less consistent regarding the avoidance of mutual gaze in SAD. Prospects for future research and clinical implications are discussed.

  2. Anxiety Disorders in Williams Syndrome Contrasted with Intellectual Disability and the General Population: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, R.; Howlin, P.; Waite, J.; Oliver, C.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with specific genetic syndromes associated with intellectual disability (ID), such as Williams syndrome (WS), are at increased risk for developing anxiety disorders. A systematic literature review identified sixteen WS papers that could generate pooled prevalence estimates of anxiety disorders for WS. A meta-analysis compared these…

  3. Evidence That Psychotic Symptoms Are Prevalent in Disorders of Anxiety and Depression, Impacting on Illness Onset, Risk, and Severity—Implications for Diagnosis and Ultra–High Risk Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigman, Johanna T. W.; van Nierop, Martine; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.; Lieb, Roselind; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Wittchen, Hans-Ullrich; van Os, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is commonly assumed that there are clear lines of demarcation between anxiety and depressive disorders on the one hand and psychosis on the other. Recent evidence, however, suggests that this principle may be in need of updating. Methods: Depressive and/or anxiety disorders, with no previous history of psychotic disorder, were examined for the presence of psychotic symptoms in a representative community sample of adolescents and young adults (Early Developmental Stages of Psychopathology study; n = 3021). Associations and consequences of psychotic symptomatology in the course of these disorders were examined in terms of demographic distribution, illness severity, onset of service use, and risk factors. Results: Around 27% of those with disorders of anxiety and depression displayed one or more psychotic symptoms, vs 14% in those without these disorders (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.89–2.66, P cannabis use (P < .0009), and any drug use (P < .0008). Conclusion: Copresence of psychotic symptomatology in disorders of anxiety and depression is common and a functionally and etiologically highly relevant feature, reinforcing the view that psychopathology is represented by a network or overlapping and reciprocally impacting dimensional liabilities. PMID:22258882

  4. Mood and anxiety disorders in patients with chronic low back and neck pain caused by disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Fatih; Albayrak Gezer, İlknur; Kayhan, Ayşegül; Kitiş, Serkan; Gölen, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in patients with chronic low back and neck pain caused by disc herniation and the relationships between pain and mood, and anxiety disorders. In total, 149 patients with disc herniation and 60 healthy subjects were included. Disc herniation was diagnosed based on a physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging. Mood and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition/Clinical Version. The mean age of the study subjects (n = 209) was 45.96 ± 11.45 years. Seventy (46.6%) patients with disc herniation met the criteria for at least one mood or anxiety disorder. The prevalence rates of mood and anxiety disorders were 16.6% and 35.8%, respectively. The most common specific diagnoses were major depression (n = 25, 16.9%) and generalised anxiety disorder (n = 19, 12.8%). Mood and anxiety disorders were more commonly seen in patients with lumbar or cervical disc herniation than in those without herniation. No relationship was detected between pain severity and mood or anxiety disorders. However, mood and anxiety disorders were associated with neurological deficits.

  5. EEG source activity during processing of neutral stimuli in subjects with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmaj, Bartłomiej; Januszko, Piotr; Kamiński, Jan; Drozdowicz, Ewa; Kopera, Maciej; Wołyńczyk-Gmaj, Dorota; Szelenberger, Waldemar; Wojnar, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are a social problem due to their prevalence and consequences. It is crucial to explore the influence of anxiety on cognitive processes. In this study we recorded EEG activity from 73 subjects (35 patients, 38 controls, matched for age and education) during performance of the Continuous Attention Task. We used low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) for evaluation of mechanisms of impaired cognitive performance in anxiety disorders. Analysis showed that patients with anxiety disorders committed more errors than the controls, had a short latency of P300 and higher amplitude of ERPs at all steps of stimulus processing. Furthermore, we showed that there was a relationship between the scores of Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Beck Depression Inventory, and amplitudes and latencies of ERPs. The results of LORETA analysis showed that enhanced neural responses were found within circuits mediating visual information processing, sustained attention and anxiety. Also, we found higher current density within areas playing an important role in the brain fear network - anterior cingulate and anterior part of insula. Electrophysiological neuroimaging showed greater recruitment of cognitive resources in anxiety disorders, evidenced by higher current density and activation of greater number of brain areas. Despite the strategy employed to compensate for cognitive problems, the anxiety patients did not achieve the same performance as controls. Present study demonstrates that anxiety disorders influence processing of neutral stimuli and this influence is observable at both behavioral and electrophysiological level. The data suggests instability of neural systems responsible for information selection, working memory, engagement and focusing of attention.

  6. Emotional Intelligence and Personality in Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie P. Lizeretti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders (AD are by far the most frequent psychiatric disorders, and according to epidemiologic data their chronicity, comorbidities, and negative prognostic constitute a public health problem. This is why it is necessary to continue exploring the factors which contribute to the incidence, appearance, and maintenance of this set of disorders. The goal of this study has been to analyze the possible relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI and personality disorders (PersD in outpatients suffering from AD. The sample was made up of 146 patients with AD from the Mental Health Center at the Health Consortium of Maresme, who were evaluated with the STAI, MSCEIT, and MCMI-II questionnaires. The main findings indicate that 89,4% of the patients in the sample met the criteria for the diagnosis of some PersD. The findings also confirm that patients with AD present a low EI, especially because of difficulties in the skills of emotional comprehension and regulation, and the lack of these skills is related to a higher level of anxiety and the presence of PersD. These findings suggest the need to consider emotional skills of EI and personality as central elements for the diagnosis and treatment of AD.

  7. The impact of mood, anxiety, and sleep disorders on fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consoli, Giorgio; Marazziti, Donatella; Ciapparelli, Antonio; Bazzichi, Laura; Massimetti, Gabriele; Giacomelli, Camillo; Rossi, Alessandra; Bombardieri, Stefano; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2012-10-01

    Several studies carried out mainly in North America revealed high rates of mood, anxiety and sleep disorders in patients with fibromyalgia (FM), while the information in other countries is scant. Therefore, we aimed at investigating the prevalence and the impact of such conditions on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and the severity of pain in a sample of Italian FM patients. One-hundred and sixty-seven women suffering from primary FM were consecutively enrolled. Psychiatric diagnoses were made by means of DSM-IV criteria. The HRQoL and the severity of pain were measured through the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS-SF-36) and the FM Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Fibromyalgia patients showed a high rate (80.8%) of lifetime and/or current comorbidity with mood and anxiety disorders. Patients with psychiatric comorbidity resulted significantly more impaired on the Mental Component Summary score of the MOS-SF-36 and showed a higher FIQ total score than those suffering from FM only. The severity of pain was associated with current psychiatric comorbidity. Patients with current mood disorders showed significantly lower Mental and Physical Component Summary scores of the MOS-SF-36 and higher FIQ total scores than those with current anxiety disorders or those without psychiatric comorbidity. Finally, patients with sleep disorders reported a lower HRQoL than those with a normal sleep, and specifically those with difficulty in falling in sleep had higher severity of pain. Psychiatric comorbidity, in particular with mood disorders, provokes a significant impairment of the HRQoL and, when current, a higher severity of pain in FM patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment response in child anxiety is differentially related to the form of maternal anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, P. J.; Gallop, C.; Willetts, L.; Creswell, C.

    2008-01-01

    An examination was made of the extent to which maternal anxiety predicted response to treatment of children presenting with an anxiety disorder. In a sample of 55 children referred to a local NHS CAMH service for treatment of an anxiety disorder, systematic mental state interview assessment was made of both mothers and children, and both completed self-report questionnaires to assess aspects of anxiety, both immediately before the children received treatment and following treatment. Children ...

  9. Animal defense strategies and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Shuhama

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are classified according to symptoms, time course and therapeutic response. Concurrently, the experimental analysis of defensive behavior has identified three strategies of defense that are shared by different animal species, triggered by situations of potential, distal and proximal predatory threat, respectively. The first one consists of cautious exploration of the environment for risk assessment. The associated emotion is supposed to be anxiety and its pathology, Generalized Anxiety Disorder. The second is manifested by oriented escape or by behavioral inhibition, being related to normal fear and to Specific Phobias, as disorders. The third consists of disorganized flight or complete immobility, associated to dread and Panic Disorder. Among conspecific interactions lies a forth defense strategy, submission, that has been related to normal social anxiety (shyness and to Social Anxiety Disorder. In turn, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder do not seem to be directly related to innate defense reactions. Such evolutionary approach offers a reliable theoretical framework for the study of the biological determinants of anxiety disorders, and a sound basis for psychiatric classification.Os transtornos de ansiedade são classificados conforme a sintomatologia, decurso temporal e resposta terapêutica. Paralelamente, a análise experimental dos comportamentos de defesa identificou três estratégias comuns a diferentes espécies de animais, desencadeadas por situações de perigo predatório potencial, distal ou proximal, respectivamente. A primeira consiste na investigação cautelosa do ambiente, avaliando o risco. Supõe-se que a emoção que a acompanha seja a ansiedade e sua patologia, o Transtorno de Ansiedade Generalizada. A segunda é expressa pela fuga orientada ou pela inibição comportamental, sendo a emoção correlata o medo, e a patologia representada pelas Fobias Específicas. Finalmente, a

  10. The Effects of an Exercise Program on Anxiety Levels and Metabolic Functions in Patients With Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Fen; Wu, Po-Lun; Su, Chia-Hsien; Yang, Tzu-Ching

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based (HB) exercise program on anxiety levels and metabolic functions in patients with anxiety disorders in Taiwan. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 86 participants for this randomized, experimental study. Participants were asked to complete a pretest before the 3-month exercise program, a posttest at 1 week, and a follow-up test at 3 months after the exercise program. Study measures included four Self-Report Scales and biophysical assessments to collect and assess personal data, lifestyle behaviors, anxiety levels, and metabolic control functions. Of the 86 study participants, 83 completed the posttest and the 3-month follow-up test, including 41 in the experimental group and 42 in the control group. Participants in the experimental group showed significant improvements in body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and the level of moderate exercise after the program relative to the control group, as analyzed by generalized estimating equations mixed-model repeated measures. State and trait anxiety levels were also significantly improved from pretest to follow-up test in the experimental group. Finally, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome declined for participants in the experimental group. The HB exercise program produced positive effects on the metabolic indicators and anxiety levels of Taiwanese adults with anxiety disorders. Health providers should consider using similar HB exercise programs to help improve the mental and physical health of patients with anxiety disorders in their communities.

  11. Induced-anxiety differentially disrupts working memory in generalized anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Vytal, Katherine E.; Arkin, Nicole E.; Overstreet, Cassie; Lieberman, Lynne; Grillon, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety is characterized by a bias towards threatening information, anxious apprehension, and disrupted concentration. Previous research in healthy subjects suggests that working memory (WM) is disrupted by induced anxiety, but that increased task-demand reduces anxiety and WM is preserved. However, it is unknown if patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can similarly normalize their performance on difficult WM tasks while reducing their anxiety. Increased threat-related ...

  12. Eating-related anxiety in individuals with eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, CM; Thuras, P; Peterson, CB; Lampert, J; Miller, D; Crow, SJ

    2011-01-01

    Although previous research has supported the importance of anxiety as an etiological and maintenance factor for eating disorders, the specific mechanisms are not well understood. The role of anxiety in the context of eating behavior is especially unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify anxiety-eliciting eating situations and anxiety management strategies patients use to mitigate anxiety experienced in the context of eating as determined by diagnostic groups and symptom patterns. Fi...

  13. Functional magnetic resonance imaging correlates of emotional word encoding and recognition in depression and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tol, Marie-José; Demenescu, Liliana R; van der Wee, Nic J A; Kortekaas, Rudie; Marjan M A, Nielen; Boer, J A Den; Renken, Remco J; van Buchem, Mark A; Zitman, Frans G; Aleman, André; Veltman, Dick J

    2012-04-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder are among the most prevalent and frequently co-occurring psychiatric disorders in adults and may be characterized by a common deficiency in processing of emotional information. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging during the performance of an emotional word encoding and recognition paradigm in patients with MDD (n = 51), comorbid MDD and anxiety (n = 59), panic disorder and/or social anxiety disorder without comorbid MDD (n = 56), and control subjects (n = 49). In addition, we studied effects of illness severity, regional brain volume, and antidepressant use. Patients with MDD, prevalent anxiety disorders, or both showed a common hyporesponse in the right hippocampus during positive (>neutral) word encoding compared with control subjects. During negative encoding, increased insular activation was observed in both depressed groups (MDD and MDD + anxiety), whereas increased amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex activation during positive word encoding were observed as depressive state-dependent effects in MDD only. During recognition, anxiety patients showed increased inferior frontal gyrus activation. Overall, effects were unaffected by medication use and regional brain volume. Hippocampal blunting during positive word encoding is a generic effect in depression and anxiety disorders, which may constitute a common vulnerability factor. Increased insular and amygdalar involvement during negative word encoding may underlie heightened experience of, and an inability to disengage from, negative emotions in depressive disorders. Our results emphasize a common neurobiological deficiency in both MDD and anxiety disorders, which may mark a general insensitiveness to positive information. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. ADad 8: School Phobia and Anxiety Disorders among adolescents in a rural community population in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M K C; Russell, Paul Swamidhas Sudhakar; Subramaniam, Vinod Shanmukham; Nazeema, Suma; Chembagam, Neethu; Russell, Sushila; Shankar, Satya Raj; Jakati, Praveen Kumar; Charles, Helen

    2013-11-01

    School Phobia (SP), although is not a formal psychiatric diagnosis, is widely prevalent debilitating phenomenon with a gamut of underlying psychiatric conditions in an overwhelming majority of cases. This study documents the prevalence, symptom presentation and the relationship between the various subtypes of Anxiety Disorders (AD) and School Phobia. In a prospective community survey of 500 adolescents, independent raters administered the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders and Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children/Present and Lifetime to identify SP and subtype of AD respectively. Descriptive statistics for the prevalence and symptom presentation, Spearman's Correlation test, Independent t tests, on-way ANOVA and Chi-square tests were done to compare the prevalence and severity of School Phobia among various age groups and gender. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done for documenting the relationship between the School Phobia and Anxiety Disorders. School Phobia was noted in 4.8% of adolescents. Although age was related to SP, gender, school grade the adolescent was attending and family structure were not related to SP. Somatic symptoms were more often noted than cognitive-emotional symptoms among adolescents with SP. Panic Disorder (OR = 8.62), Social Anxiety Disorder (OR = 8.63), and Separation Anxiety Disorder (OR = 6.26), were significantly related to SP. School Phobia is noted in a significant proportion of adolescents in the community. Anxiety Disorder is a major underlying factor resulting in SP. Community and clinical intervention and service models should include anxiety alleviation methods in adolescents with School Phobia.

  15. Generalized anxiety disorder: A comorbid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David; Argyropoulos, Spilos; Hood, Sean; Potokar, John

    2006-07-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently occurs comorbidly with other conditions, including depression and somatic complaints. Comorbid GAD sufferers have increased psychologic and social impairment, request additional treatment, and have an extended course and poorer outcome than those with GAD alone; therapy should alleviate both the psychic and somatic symptoms of GAD without negatively affecting the comorbid condition. The ideal treatment would provide relief from both GAD and the comorbid condition, reducing the need for polypharmacy. Physicians need suitable tools to assist them in the detection and monitoring of GAD patients-the GADI, a new, self-rating scale, may meet this requirement. Clinical data have shown that various neurobiologic irregularities (e.g., in the GABA and serotonin systems) are associated with the development of anxiety. Prescribing physicians must take into account these abnormalities when choosing a drug. Effective diagnosis and treatment should improve patients' quality of life and their prognosis for recovery.

  16. Anxiety in pregnancy: prevalence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mônica Maria de Jesus; Nogueira, Denismar Alves; Clapis, Maria José; Leite, Eliana Peres Rocha Carvalho

    2017-08-28

    Evaluating the occurrence of anxiety in pregnant women and the factors associated with its occurrence; comparing the presence of anxiety in each gestational trimester. A descriptive, correlational cross-sectional study. Data were collected from January to May 2013 using the Hospital Anxiety Subscale and a form composed of socioeconomic characterization; gestational anamnesis; life-changing habits and events; preexisting conditions and interpersonal relationships. A total of 209 pregnant women from a municipality in the south of Minas Gerais, Brazil, participated in the study. Anxiety was present in 26.8% of the pregnant women, being more frequent in the third trimester (42.9%). Occupation (p=0.04), complications in previous pregnancies (p=0.00), history of miscarriage risk of preterm birth (p=0.05), maternal desire regarding the pregnancy (p=0.01), number of abortions (p=0.02), number of cigarettes smoked daily (p=0.00) and drug use (p=0.01) were statistically associated with the occurrence of anxiety during pregnancy. Anxiety occurred frequently during pregnancy. Understanding the factors associated with its occurrence allows for elaborating preventive measures in prenatal care. Avaliar a ocorrência da ansiedade em gestantes e os fatores associados à sua ocorrência; comparar a presença de ansiedade em cada trimestre gestacional. Estudo descritivo, correlacional, de corte transversal. A coleta de dados ocorreu de janeiro a maio de 2013, utilizou-se da Subescala Hospitalar de Ansiedade e de um formulário composto por caracterização socioeconômica; anamnese gestacional; hábitos e eventos marcantes de vida; patologias preexistentes e relacionamentos interpessoais. Participaram do estudo 209 gestantes de um município do sul de Minas Gerais. A ansiedade esteve presente em 26,8% das gestantes, sendo mais frequente no terceiro trimestre (42,9%). Ocupação (p=0,04), complicações em gestações anteriores (p=0,00), histórico de abortamento/ameaça de parto

  17. Prevalence and Predictors of Depression and Anxiety among Korean Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun

    2018-01-01

    Despite the significant growth of the Asian population in the United States, current knowledge on their mental health and service utilization behaviors is very limited. The study examined the prevalence and predictors of depression and anxiety among Korean Americans in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. A total of 602 Koreans completed a self-administered survey on physical and mental well-being, and the study found that 18.2% and 16.9% of the participants had severe symptoms of depression and anxiety, respectively. Acculturative stress and perceived social support were common predictors for depression and anxiety, and the effects of demographic factors were minimal.

  18. Comorbidity and risk indicators for alcohol use disorders among persons with anxiety and/or depressive disorders: findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschloo, Lynn; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Smit, Johannes H; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2011-06-01

    This study examines comorbidity of alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence as well as its risk indicators among anxious and/or depressed persons, also considering temporal sequencing of disorders. Baseline data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used, including 2329 persons with lifetime DSM-IV anxiety (social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and agoraphobia) and/or depressive (major depressive disorder and dysthymia) disorders and 652 controls. Lifetime diagnoses of DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence were established, as well as information about socio-demographic, vulnerability, addiction-related and anxiety/depression-related characteristics. Temporal sequencing of disorders was established retrospectively, using age of onset. Of persons with combined anxiety/depression 20.3% showed alcohol dependence versus 5.5% of controls. Prevalence of alcohol abuse was similar across groups (± 12%). Independent risk indicators for alcohol dependence among anxious and/or depressed persons were male gender, vulnerability factors (family history of alcohol dependence, family history of anxiety/depression, openness to experience, low conscientiousness, being single, and childhood trauma), addiction-related factors (smoking and illicit drug use) and early anxiety/depression onset. Persons with secondary alcohol dependence were more neurotic, more often single and lonelier, while persons with primary alcohol dependence were more often male and more extravert. Alcohol dependence, but not abuse, is more prevalent in anxious and/or depressed persons. Persons with comorbid alcohol dependence constitute a distinct subgroup of anxious and/or depressed persons, characterized by addiction-related habits and vulnerability. However, considerable variation in characteristics exists depending on temporal sequencing of disorders. This knowledge may improve identification and treatment of those anxious and/or depressed patients who are

  19. Rates of isolated sleep paralysis in outpatients with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael W; Simon, Naomi M; Powers, Mark; Hinton, Devon; Zalta, Alyson K; Pollack, Mark H

    2006-01-01

    Initial research suggests that rates of isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) are elevated in individuals with panic disorder and particularly low in individuals with other anxiety disorders. To further evaluate these findings, we examined rates of ISP in a sample outpatients with primary diagnoses of panic disorder (n=24), social anxiety disorder (n=18), or generalized anxiety disorder (n=18). We obtained an overall rate of ISP of 19.7%; rates for patients with panic disorder (20.8%) fell between those with generalized anxiety disorder (15.8%) and social phobia (22.2%). Analysis of comorbidities failed to provide evidence of link between depressive disorders and ISP, but did indicate a significant association between anxiety comorbidity and higher rates of ISP. Results are discussed relative to other variables predicting variability in the occurrence of ISP.

  20. Overview of diagnosis and drug treatments of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J

    2005-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common and often disabling. They fall into five main categories: panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder, each of which have characteristic symptoms and cognitions. All anxiety disorders respond to drugs and psychological treatments. This review will focus on drug treatments. Recent research has emphasized the value of antidepressants especially the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, and related sedative-like compounds. The common co-existence of depression with all of the anxiety disorders means that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are now generally considered to be the first-line treatments but the benzodiazepines have some utility especially in promoting sleep and working acutely to reduce extreme distress.

  1. Familial and Temperamental Risk Factors for Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.

    2010-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common disorder that can lead to significant impairment. In this chapter, the author provides background on the disorder and reviews hypothesized familial and temperamental risk factors. In particular, it highlights the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Longitudinal Study of Children at Risk for Anxiety, now…

  2. Symptoms of social anxiety, depression, and stress in parents of children with social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsson, Brynjar; Draisey, Jenny; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy

    2018-01-16

    It has been suggested that elevated maternal social anxiety may play a disorder-specific role in maintaining childhood social anxiety disorder (SAD), but few studies have examined whether mothers of children with SAD are more socially anxious than mothers of children with other anxiety disorders (ANX). This study set out to examine whether symptoms of social anxiety were more severe amongst mothers of 7-12 year old children presenting for treatment with SAD (n = 260) compared to those presenting with ANX (n = 138). In addition, we examined whether there were differences between these two groups in terms of maternal and paternal general anxiety, depression, and stress. Parents of 7-12 year old children referred for treatment of SAD or ANX completed self-report questionnaire measures of emotional symptoms. Compared to mothers of children with ANX, mothers of children with SAD reported significantly higher levels of social anxiety, general anxiety, and depression. In addition, fathers of children with SAD reported significantly higher levels of anxiety, stress, and depression than fathers of children with ANX. This study is one of the few existing studies that have examined mothers' and fathers' psychopathology across different childhood anxiety disorders. Compared to parents of children with ANX, parents of children with SAD may have poorer mental health which may inhibit optimum child treatment outcomes for children with SAD. Thus, targeting parental psychopathology may be particularly important in the treatment of childhood SAD. Consideration of parental psychopathology may be particularly important in the treatment of childhood social anxiety disorder. Mothers of children with social anxiety disorder are more socially anxious than mothers of children with other anxiety disorders Fathers of children with social anxiety disorder are more anxious and depressed than fathers of children with other anxiety disorders Participants were predominantly of high

  3. Rates of Detection of Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care: A Descriptive, Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermani, Monica; Marcus, Madalyn; Katzman, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder and to assess their detection rates in the Canadian primary care setting. Method: The descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 7 primary care clinics in 3 Canadian provinces, Ontario, British Columbia, and Nova Scotia, from December 6, 2005, to May 5, 2006. Patients in clinic waiting rooms who consented to participate in the study were administered the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) (N = 840). These patients' medical charts were then reviewed for evidence of previous diagnosis of a mood or anxiety disorder. Misdiagnosis was defined as cases for which a diagnosis was reached on the MINI but not in the patient's chart. Results: Of the 840 primary care patients assessed, 27.2%, 11.4%, 12.6%, 31.2%, and 16.5% of patients met criteria for major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and social anxiety disorder, respectively. Misdiagnosis rates reached 65.9% for major depressive disorder, 92.7% for bipolar disorder, 85.8% for panic disorder, 71.0% for generalized anxiety disorder, and 97.8% for social anxiety disorder. Conclusions: With high prevalence rates and poor detection, there is an obvious need to enhance diagnostic screening in the primary care setting. PMID:21977354

  4. Prevalence and related risk factors of anxiety and depression among Chinese college freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Bian, Qian; Song, Yan-yan; Ren, Jia-yi; Xu, Xiao-ying; Zhao, Min

    2015-12-01

    Anxiety, depression, and even suicidal ideation are becoming the most common mental health problems affecting Chinese college students. The present study investigated the prevalence of mental health problems and their predictors in a sample of 1048 Chinese college freshmen from Shanghai. We used following brief screening instruments to measure symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as self-control and suicidal ideation: the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), a mental health and mental health knowledge questionnaire (MK), a mental disease-related attitude questionnaire (MA), questionnaires about the knowledge of psychological services and utilities, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) Suicide module, the Self-Rated Health Measurement Scale (SFHMS), the Self-Esteem Scale (SES), the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCQ), and the Perceived Stress Scale-10 (PSS-10). Over half of the students suffered from at least one mental health problem. Approximately 65.55% of freshmen had depression, and 46.85% had anxiety. Minority status, low family income, and religious belief were significantly associated with current mental health problems. These findings indicate that mental disorders are highly prevalent among the freshman student population. The prevalence of such mental disorders was greater than that of the general population, and the majority of students with mental health problems require treatment.

  5. Anxiety disorders and risk of stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Piñar, M; Ayerbe, L; González, E; Mathur, R; Foguet-Boreu, Q; Ayis, S

    2017-03-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem worldwide. However, the evidence on the association between anxiety disorders and risk of stroke is limited. This systematic review and meta-analysis presents a critical appraisal and summary of the available evidence on the association between anxiety disorders and risk of stroke. Cohort studies reporting risk of stroke among patients with anxiety disorders were searched in PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, Scopus, and the Web of Science, from database inception to June 2016. The quality of the studies was assessed using standard criteria. A meta-analysis was undertaken to obtain pooled estimates of the risk of stroke among patients with anxiety disorders. Eight studies, including 950,759 patients, from the 11,764 references initially identified, were included in this review. A significantly increased risk of stroke for patients with anxiety disorders was observed, with an overall hazard ratio: 1.24 (1.09-1.41), P=0.001. No significant heterogeneity between studies was detected and the funnel plot suggested that publication bias was unlikely. Limited evidence suggests that the risk of stroke is increased shortly after the diagnosis of anxiety and that risk of stroke may be higher for patients with severe anxiety. Anxiety disorders are a very prevalent modifiable condition associated with risk of stroke increased by 24%. This evidence could inform the development of interventions for the management of anxiety and the prevention of stroke. Further studies on the risk of stroke in patients with anxiety, and the explanatory factors for this association, are required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence and determinants of symptoms related to mental disorders in retired male professional footballers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouttebarge, Vincent; Aoki, Haruhito; Kerkhoffs, Gino M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of symptoms related to mental disorders (distress, anxiety/depression, sleep disturbance, adverse alcohol behavior, adverse smoking behavior, adverse nutrition behavior) among retired professional footballers, and to explore their

  7. [Body dysmorphic disorder : Anxiety about deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieler, T; Brähler, E

    2016-05-01

    Between 0.8 and 1.8 % of the German population suffers from a body dysmorphic disorder. In specific settings like dermatological offices up to 11.9 % of patients suffer from this disease. The highest prevalence could be found in the field of cosmetic dermatology with a prevalence of 13.1 %. Until now, the diagnosis has been made too rarely. The body dysmorphic disorder is a chronic psychic disease, in which the patients feel disfigured and experience shame and disgust at the same time. Comorbidities like social phobia, depression, suicidality, and eating disorders are frequent. The diagnosis is made using questionnaires (e.g., dysmorphic concern questionnaire) or by use of the DSM-5 manual. An early diagnosis seems to be important to avoid chronification and suicidal ideas. Therapeutic approaches should include cognitive behavioral therapies as well as the use of SSRIs.

  8. Genetics of Anxiety and Trauma-Related Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Norrholm, Seth D.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric illnesses in the U.S. with approximately 30% of the population experiencing anxiety-related symptoms in their lifetime (Kessler et al., 2005). Notably, a variety of studies have demonstrated that 30−40% of the variance contributing to these disorders is heritable. In the present review, we discuss the latest findings regarding the genetic and environmental influences on the development and symptomatology of anxiety disorders. Specific emphasis...

  9. Examining the Panic Attack Specifier in Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Nicholas P; Oglesby, Mary E; Short, Nicole A; Schmidt, Norman B

    2016-04-01

    Panic attacks (PAs) are characterized by overwhelming surges of fear and discomfort and are one of the most frequently occurring symptoms in psychiatric populations. The most recent version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (i.e. DSM-5) allows for a panic attack (PA) specifier for all disorders, including social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, there is little research examining differences between individuals diagnosed with SAD with the PA specifier versus individuals diagnosed with SAD without the PA specifier. The current study examined social anxiety, mood, anxiety, and anxiety sensitivity social concerns, a risk factor for social anxiety in SAD-diagnosed individuals without (N = 52) and with (N = 14) the PA specifier. The groups differed only in somatic symptoms of anxiety. Result of the current study provides preliminary evidence that the presence of the PA specifier in social anxiety does not result in elevated levels of comorbidity or a more severe presentation of social anxiety.

  10. Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders amongst Adolescents in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahrivar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: "n The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of different psychiatric disorders among 12 to 17 years old adolescents in urban areas of Tehran. "nMethod: In this study, 1105 adolescents (12 -17 years old were selected from 250 clusters of the entire 22 municipality areas of Tehran using a multistage sampling method. After responding to the Farsi version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire self-report version, the Farsi version of the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia - Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS-PL was administered to 273 adolescents and their families. The prevalence of adolescent psychiatric disorders was determined using the results of K-SADS-PL. "nResults: There were not any statistically significant differences between the sexes in the frequency of psychiatric disorders except for ADHD which was observed more frequently in boys. The most prevalent psychiatric disorders were attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder, depressive disorders and separation anxiety disorder. "nConclusion: The frequency of psychiatric disorders among the adolescents in Tehran's urban areas was comparable to the reports from other countries. However, using methods to deal with missing data makes these prevalence rates somehow higher.

  11. [Virtual reality therapy in anxiety disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrousia, V; Giotakos, O

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade a number of studies have been conducted in order to examine if virtual reality exposure therapy can be an alternative form of therapy for the treatment of mental disorders and particularly for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Imaginal exposure therapy, which is one of the components of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, cannot be easily applied to all patients and in cases like those virtual reality can be used as an alternative or a supportive psychotherapeutic technique. Most studies using virtual reality have focused on anxiety disorders, mainly in specific phobias, but some extend to other disorders such as eating disorders, drug dependence, pain control and palliative care and rehabilitation. Main characteristics of virtual reality therapy are: "interaction", "immersion", and "presence". High levels of "immersion" and "presence" are associated with increased response to exposure therapy in virtual environments, as well as better therapeutic outcomes and sustained therapeutic gains. Typical devices that are used in order patient's immersion to be achieved are the Head-Mounted Displays (HMD), which are only for individual use, and the computer automatic virtual environment (CAVE), which is a multiuser. Virtual reality therapy's disadvantages lie in the difficulties that arise due to the demanded specialized technology skills, devices' cost and side effects. Therapists' training is necessary in order for them to be able to manipulate the software and the hardware and to adjust it to each case's needs. Devices' cost is high but as technology continuously improves it constantly decreases. Immersion during virtual reality therapy can induce mild and temporary side effects such as nausea, dizziness or headache. Until today, however, experience shows that virtual reality offers several advantages. Patient's avoidance to be exposed in phobic stimuli is reduced via the use of virtual reality since the patient is exposed to them as many times as he

  12. Developmental risk factors in generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michelle G; Shin, Ki Eun; Zuellig, Andrea R

    2016-12-01

    There is a lack of clarity regarding specific risk factors discriminating generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) from panic disorder (PD). This study investigated whether GAD and PD could be discriminated through differences in developmental etiological factors including childhood parental loss/separation, psychological disorders, and maternal and paternal attachment. Twenty people with adult generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), 20 with adult panic disorder (PD), 11 with adult comorbid GAD and PD, and 21 adult non-anxious controls completed diagnostic interviews to assess symptoms of mental disorders in adulthood and childhood. Participants also reported on parental attachment, loss and separation. Childhood diagnoses of GAD and PD differentiated clinical groups from controls as well as from each other, suggesting greater likelihood for homotypic over heterotypic continuity. Compared to controls, specific phobia was associated with all three clinical groups, and childhood depression, social phobia, and PTSD were uniquely associated with adult GAD. Both maternal and paternal attachment also differentiated clinical groups from controls. However, higher levels of subscales reflecting maternal insecure avoidant attachment (e.g., no memory of early childhood experiences and balancing/forgiving current state of mind) emerged as more predictive of GAD relative to PD. There were no group differences in parental loss or separation. These results support differentiation of GAD and PD based on developmental risk factors. Recommendations for future research and implications of the findings for understanding the etiology and symptomatology of GAD and PD are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cognitive, affective, and behavioral characteristics of mothers with anxiety disorders in the context of child anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Cathy; Apetroaia, Adela; Murray, Lynne; Cooper, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Parental emotional distress, particularly high maternal anxiety, is one of the most consistent predictors of child anxiety treatment outcome. In order to identify the cognitive, affective, and behavioral parenting characteristics of mothers of children with anxiety disorders who themselves have an anxiety disorder, we assessed the expectations, appraisals, and behaviors of 88 mothers of anxious children (44 mothers who were not anxious [NONANX] and 44 mothers with a current anxiety disorder [ANX]) when interacting with their 7-12-year-old children. There were no observed differences in anxiety and avoidance among children of ANX and NONANX mothers, but, compared with NONANX mothers, ANX mothers held more negative expectations, and they differed on observations of intrusiveness, expressed anxiety, warmth, and the quality of the relationship. Associations were moderated by the degree to which children expressed anxiety during the tasks. Maternal-reported negative emotions during the task significantly mediated the association between maternal anxiety status and the observed quality of the relationship. These findings suggest that maternal anxiety disorder is associated with reduced tolerance of children's negative emotions. This may interfere with the maintenance of a positive, supportive mother-child interaction under conditions of stress and, as such, this may impede optimum treatment outcomes. The findings identify potential cognitive, affective, and behavioral targets to improve treatment outcomes for children with anxiety disorders in the context of a current maternal anxiety disorder. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  14. Prevalence of anxiety following adult traumatic brain injury: A meta-analysis comparing measures, samples and postinjury intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, A J; Mathias, J L; Fairweather-Schmidt, A K

    2016-02-01

    Anxiety following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common problem; however, disparate prevalence estimates limit the clinical utility of research. The purpose of the current study was to examine how differences in methodological variables and sample characteristics impact on the prevalence of anxiety. Data from 41 studies that examined either the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) diagnoses or clinically significant "cases" of self-reported anxiety following adult, nonpenetrating TBI were analyzed, and the impact of diagnostic criteria, measure, postinjury interval and injury severity was evaluated. Overall, 11% of people were diagnosed with GAD and 37% reported clinically significant levels of anxiety following TBI. Prevalence estimates varied for different diagnostic criteria (range: 2%-19%), interview schedules (range: 2%-28%), and self-report measures (range: 36%-50%). GAD and "cases" of anxiety were most prevalent 2 to 5 years postinjury. The rates of GAD increased with injury severity (mild: 11%, severe 15%), but "cases" decreased (mild: 53%, severe: 38%), although neither difference was significant. Anxiety is common after a TBI and ongoing monitoring and treatment should be provided. Methodological and sample characteristics should be clear and well-defined, as differences across studies (e.g., how anxiety is conceptualized, which measure is used, time since injury, injury severity) impact prevalence rates. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. The relation between anger management style, mood and somatic symptoms in anxiety disorders and somatoform disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyung Bong; Kim, Dong Kee; Kim, Shin Young; Park, Joong Kyu; Han, Mooyoung

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between anger management style, depression, anxiety and somatic symptoms in anxiety disorder and somatoform disorder patients. The subjects comprised 71 patients with anxiety disorders and 47 with somatoform disorders. The level of anger expression or anger suppression was assessed by the Anger Expression Scale, the severity of anxiety and depression by the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) anxiety and depression subscales, and the severity of somatic symptoms by the Somatization Rating Scale and the SCL-90-R somatization subscale. The results of path analyses showed that anger suppression had only an indirect effect on somatic symptoms through depression and anxiety in each of the disorders. In addition, only anxiety had a direct effect on somatic symptoms in anxiety disorder patients, whereas both anxiety and depression had direct effects on somatic symptoms in somatoform disorder patients. However, the anxiety disorder group showed a significant negative correlation between anger expression and anger suppression in the path from anger-out to anger-in to depression to anxiety to somatic symptoms, unlike the somatoform disorder group. The results suggest that anger suppression, but not anger expression, is associated with mood, i.e. depression and anxiety, and somatic symptoms characterize anxiety disorder and somatoform disorder patients. Anxiety is likely to be an important source of somatic symptoms in anxiety disorders, whereas both anxiety and depression are likely to be important sources of somatic symptoms in somatoform disorders. In addition, anger suppression preceded by inhibited anger expression is associated with anxiety and somatic symptoms in anxiety disorders.

  16. Body image in social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderka, Idan M; Gutner, Cassidy A; Lazarov, Amit; Hermesh, Haggai; Hofmann, Stefan G; Marom, Sofi

    2014-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder falls under the category of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, yet research has suggested it may also be highly associated with social anxiety disorder. The current study examined body image variables among 68 outpatients with primary obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; n=22), social anxiety disorder (SAD; n=25), and panic disorder (PD; n=21). Participants filled out self-report measures of body image disturbance, attitudes toward one's appearance, and anxiety. Body image disturbance and attitudes toward appearance did not significantly differ between the groups. However, SAD symptoms predicted body image disturbance, Appearance Evaluation and Body Areas Satisfaction, and OCD symptoms predicted Appearance Orientation. These findings suggest that SAD and OCD may be associated with different facets of body image. Implications for the treatment of anxiety disorders and for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anxiety Disorders in Adolescents and Psychosocial Outcomes at Age 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.; Olaya, Beatriz; Seeley, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are associated with adverse psychosocial functioning, and are predictive of a wide range of psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Objective The present study examined the associations between anxiety disorders during childhood and adolescence and psychosocial outcomes at age 30, and sought to address the extent to which psychopathology after age 19 mediated these relations. Method Eight hundred and sixteen participants from a large community sample were interviewed twice during adolescence, at age 24, and at age 30. They completed self-report measures of psychosocial functioning and semi-structured diagnostic interviews during adolescence and young adulthood. Results Childhood anxiety only predicted less years of completed education at age 30, whereas adolescent anxiety predicted income, unemployment, maladjustment, poor coping skills, more chronic stress and life events. Adult major depressive disorder (MDD) was the only disorder predicted by childhood anxiety, whereas adolescent anxiety predicted MDD, substance (SUD) and alcohol abuse/dependence (AUD) in adulthood. No adult psychopathology mediated the relationship between childhood anxiety disorders and psychosocial outcomes at age 30. Adult MDD, SUD and AUD partially or completely mediated the association between adolescent anxiety and most domains of psychosocial functioning at age 30. Limitations The participants are ethically and geographically homogenous, and changes in the diagnostic criteria and the interview schedules across the assessment periods. Conclusion Adolescent anxiety, compared to childhood anxiety, is associated with more adverse psychosocial outcomes at age 30. Adolescent anxiety affects negative outcomes at age 30 directly and through MDD, SUD and AUD. PMID:24456837

  18. Assessment and management of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Cathy; Waite, Polly; Cooper, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Anxiety disorders in childhood and adolescence are extremely common and are often associated with lifelong psychiatric disturbance. Consistent with DSM-5 and the extant literature, this review concerns the assessment and treatment of specific phobias, separation anxiety disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder and agoraphobia. Evidence-based psychological treatments (cognitive behaviour therapy; CBT) for these disorders have been developed and investigated, and in recent years promising low-intensity versions of CBT interventions have been proposed that offer a means to increase access to evidence-based treatments. There is some evidence of effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders in children and young people, however, routine prescription is not recommended due to concerns about potential harm.

  19. Episodic future thinking in generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jade Q; Szpunar, Karl K; Godovich, Sheina A; Schacter, Daniel L; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2015-12-01

    Research on future-oriented cognition in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has primarily focused on worry, while less is known about the role of episodic future thinking (EFT), an imagery-based cognitive process. To characterize EFT in this disorder, we used the experimental recombination procedure, in which 21 GAD and 19 healthy participants simulated positive, neutral and negative novel future events either once or repeatedly, and rated their phenomenological experience of EFT. Results showed that healthy controls spontaneously generated more detailed EFT over repeated simulations. Both groups found EFT easier to generate after repeated simulations, except when GAD participants simulated positive events. They also perceived higher plausibility of negative-not positive or neutral-future events than did controls. These results demonstrate a negativity bias in GAD individuals' episodic future cognition, and suggest their relative deficit in generating vivid EFT. We discuss implications for the theory and treatment of GAD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Episodic Memories in Anxiety Disorders: Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Machulska, Alla; Adolph, Dirk; Dere, Ekrem; Margraf, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize research on the emerging role of episodic memories in the context of anxiety disorders (AD). The available literature on explicit, autobiographical, and episodic memory function in AD including neuroimaging studies is critically discussed. We describe the methodological diversity of episodic memory research in AD and discuss the need for novel tests to measure episodic memory in a clinical setting. We argue that alterations in episodic memory functions might contribute to the etiology of AD. We further explain why future research on the interplay between episodic memory function and emotional disorders as well as its neuroanatomical foundations offers the promise to increase the effectiveness of modern psychological treatments. We conclude that one major task is to develop methods and training programs that might help patients suffering from AD to better understand, interpret, and possibly actively use their episodic memories in a way that would support therapeutic interventions and counteract the occurrence of symptoms. PMID:24795583

  1. Episodic memories in anxiety disorders: Clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin eZlomuzica

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to summarize research on the emerging role of episodic memories in the context of anxiety disorders (AD. The available literature on explicit-, autobiographical- and episodic memory function in AD including neuroimaging studies is critically discussed. We describe the methodological diversity of episodic memory research in AD and discuss the need for novel tests to measure episodic memory in a clinical setting. We argue that alterations in episodic memory functions might contribute to the etiology of AD. We further explain why future research on the interplay between episodic memory function and emotional disorders as well as its neuroanatomical foundations offers the promise to increase the effectiveness of modern psychological treatments. We conclude that one major task is to develop methods and training programs that might help patients suffering from AD to better understand, interpret and possibly actively use their episodic memories in a way that would support therapeutic interventions and counteract the occurrence of symptoms.

  2. Severity of Anxiety Disorders in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Safa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients with chronic physical diseases sometimes show increased loss of function; such patients need more care. Anxiety is a well-known symptom that is prevalent among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients that can prolong and increase the risk of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the severity of anxiety in the mentioned patients and to examine the presence of symptoms and appropriate treatment strategies to understand the role of psychological functions in physical patients.Methods: This was a cross sectional study conducted in Masih Daneshvari Hospital. One hundred forty- three patients entered into the project by accessible method and signed the informed consent; they filled demographic information and Hamilton anxiety and depression questionnaires. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 .Results: Of the participants, 68% were above 60 years of age; 78% were male; 89% were married; and 38% were self-employed. Also, among the participants, 51% were illiterate; 72% had history of smoking; 46% had history of substance abuse; and 49% had moderate to severe anxiety disorder. Moreover, of the patients with severe anxiety, 41.3% had severe muscle spasms; and severe sleeplessness was found in 38.5% of those with severe anxiety disorder. Severe anxiety related symptoms were found in 20.3% of the patients with severe anxiety disorder. Depressed mood was found in 27.3% of the patients with severe anxiety disorder. Severe physical and muscular signs were found in 35.7% of those with severe anxiety disorder .Conclusion: According to our findings, many chronic diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may contain anxiety and depression which result in vulnerability. Therefore, evaluation of anxiety in such patients is of importance for alleviating the disease.

  3. Heterogeneity in comorbidity between major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and its clinical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unick, George J; Snowden, Lonnie; Hastings, Julia

    2009-04-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are highly comorbid and, as diagnoses, problematic because they are heterogeneous, may impair functioning even in subclinical manifestations, and may not predict important external criteria as well as empirically-derived classifications. The present study employed a latent class analysis using data from National Comorbidity Survey (1990-1992) and focused on respondents who endorsed at least 1 screening question for MDD and 1 for GAD (N = 1009). Results revealed 4 symptom domains (somatic anxiety, somatic depression, psychological anxiety, and psychological depression) reflecting the heterogeneity of MDD and GAD, and 7 respondent classes. Analysis revealed that people in classes with a high prevalence of either somatic anxiety or somatic depression symptoms presented with the highest levels of disability, distress, and service utilization. Evidence also was found for clinically meaningful subthreshold comorbid conditions. Anxiety-related and depression-related symptoms can be meaningfully differentiated, but differentiating between somatic and psychological symptoms has the greatest practical significance.

  4. Association between Internet gaming disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Yang; Wu, Yu-Chen; Su, Chen-Hsiang; Lin, Pai-Cheng; Ko, Chih-Hung; Yen, Ju-Yu

    2017-12-01

    Introduction This study evaluates the association between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and Internet gaming disorder (IGD) and the role of behavior inhibition in young adults. Methods We recruited 87 people with IGD and a control group of 87 people without a history of IGD. All participants underwent a diagnostic interview based on the fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, IGD and GAD criteria, and completed a questionnaire on behavior inhibition, depression, and anxiety. Results Logistic regression revealed that adults with GAD were more likely (odds ratio = 8.11, 95% CI = 1.78-37.09) to have IGD than those without it. The OR decreased when controlling for behavior inhibition. IGD subjects with GAD had higher depressive and anxiety score than those without GAD. Conclusions GAD was associated with IGD. Comorbid GAD can contribute to higher emotional difficulty. GAD should be well-assessed and interventions planned when treating young adults with IGD. Behavioral inhibition confounds the association between GAD and IGD. Further study is necessary to evaluate how to intervene in behavioral inhibitions to attenuate the risk of GAD and IGD comorbidity.

  5. Biological basis of social anxiety disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2007-01-01

    Reviewed are functional imaging studies of the brain in social anxiety disorder (SAD) which are being under remarkable progress, to discuss the disease in relation to the neuronal network. Current consensuses on results, their meta-analysis and consideration of regions suggested in those studies are as follows. In MRI and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies, cerebral morphology and blood flow at rest with 99m Tc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) are normal in SAD. Many studies of SAD by positron emission tomography (PET) with probes such as 15 O-H 2 O and by fMRI have shown an anxiety-induced excess reaction in the amygdaloid body and insula, and certain studies, a reaction change in frontal lobe or cingulate gyrus. Pattern change of cerebral blood flow is observable by SPECT and PET with 11 C-WAY-100635 after treatment of SAD with SSRI (serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor). Image findings of brain functions in SAD are not contradictory to clinical findings. Discussion of SAD is also made here in relation to posttraumatic stress and panic disorders, and their image findings. (R.T.)

  6. Eating-related anxiety in individuals with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, C M; Thuras, P; Peterson, C B; Lampert, J; Miller, D; Crow, S J

    2011-12-01

    Although previous research has supported the importance of anxiety as an etiological and maintenance factor for eating disorders, the specific mechanisms are not well understood. The role of anxiety in the context of eating behavior is especially unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify anxiety-eliciting eating situations and anxiety management strategies patients use to mitigate anxiety experienced in the context of eating as determined by diagnostic groups and symptom patterns. Fifty-three eating disorder outpatients were administered the Eating and Anxiety Questionnaire (EAQ) and the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale. Ratings indicated significant anxiety in most eating situations, whereas management strategies were more limited yet regularly employed. Factor analysis of the EAQ revealed a 6-factor solution for anxiety management strategies and a 4-factor solution for anxiety-eliciting situations. These results indicate patients with eating disorders report high levels of anxiety associated with eating behaviors but utilize limited yet consistent anxiety management strategies. Effective intervention strategies for managing eating-related anxiety should be incorporated into treatment and may need to be specified for different diagnostic subgroups.

  7. Anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Bögels, S.M.; Perrin, S.

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that children and adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are at increased risk of anxiety and anxiety disorders. However, it is less clear which of the specific DSM-IV anxiety disorders occur most in this population. The present study used meta-analytic

  8. Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Bogels, Susan M.; Perrin, Sean

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that children and adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are at increased risk of anxiety and anxiety disorders. However, it is less clear which of the specific DSM-IV anxiety disorders occur most in this population. The present study used meta-analytic techniques to help clarify this issue. A systematic…

  9. Prevalence of depression, anxiety, stress, and anger in Turkish prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unver, Yener; Yuce, Mehmet; Bayram, Nuran; Bilgel, Nazan

    2013-09-01

    In Turkey, prison studies are rare and the mental health status of prisoners has not received proper attention. The purpose of this cross-sectional and descriptive study was to assess the prevalence of depression, anxiety, stress, and anger among a group of Turkish prisoners. Two self-reporting instruments (the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-42 and Multidimensional Anger Scale) were filled out by 685 prisoners. Prisoners in the study group were found to be depressive, anxious, and stressed. Anger symptoms and aggressive behaviors were found to be at a moderate level. Prisoners with a history of being subjected to domestic violence in childhood had higher depression, anxiety, and stress scores than those without such a history. Young prisoners, those who had been previously imprisoned, with substance dependency and higher stress and anxiety levels reported more anger symptoms than others. Psychological support, together with stress and anger management programs, seems to be essential. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Prevalence of anxiety and depression among medical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Motaz B. Ibrahim

    2014-07-28

    Jul 28, 2014 ... was found higher than that in Faculty of Pharmacy. Further- more, it was noticed that the prevalence of symptoms was higher among females. Medical students with anxiety and depression if identified early can be managed by behavioral therapy, emotional sup- port, interpersonal psychotherapy, social skill ...

  11. Anxiety, psychosis and substance use: prevalence, correlates and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anxiety, psychosis and substance use: prevalence, correlates and recognition in an outpatient mental health setting. KM Wyman1,JA Chamberlain1, DJ Castle2. 1Frameworks for Health, St Vincent's Health, Melbourne, Australia. 2Department of Psychiatry, St Vincent's Health and The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, ...

  12. Prevalence and associated factors of stress, anxiety and depression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and associated factors of stress, anxiety and depression among medical Fayoum University students. ... Background: Mental health issues are increasing in severity and number on college campuses. Improving ... Female sex, increasing age, overweight and obesity are significant associated factors. Further ...

  13. Anxiety Disorder in a Case of Arnold-Chiari Malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, B. Terry; Velamoor, R.; Chandarana, P.C.; Cochrane, David K.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a patient who suffered concurrently from panic disorder with agoraphobia and Arnold-Chiari malformation. Surgical correction of the neuroanatomical anomaly altered the patient's symptom pattern, enabling a more clear delineation of her anxiety disorder. PMID:8461284

  14. Sexual dysfunction, mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayhan F

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatih Kayhan,1 Adem Küçük,2 Yılmaz Satan,3 Erdem İlgün,4 Şevket Arslan,5 Faik İlik6 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Selçuk University, 2Department of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Necmettin Erbakan University, 3Department of Psychiatry, Konya Numune State Hospital, 4Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Mevlana University, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Necmettin Erbakan University, 6Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Başkent University, Konya, Turkey Background: We aimed to investigate the current prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD, mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia (FM.  Methods: This case–control study involved 96 patients with FM and 94 healthy women. The SD diagnosis was based on a psychiatric interview in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria. Mood and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview. Personality disorders were diagnosed according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM, Revised Third Edition Personality Disorders.  Results: Fifty of the 96 patients (52.1% suffered from SD. The most common SD was lack of sexual desire (n=36, 37.5% and arousal disorder (n=10, 10.4%. Of the 96 patients, 45 (46.9% had a mood or anxiety disorder and 13 (13.5% had a personality disorder. The most common mood, anxiety, and personality disorders were major depression (26%, generalized anxiety disorder (8.3%, and histrionic personality disorder (10.4%.  Conclusion: SD, mood, and anxiety disorders are frequently observed in female patients with FM. Pain plays a greater role in the development of SD in female patients with FM. Keywords: anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, sexual dysfunction

  15. Obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders in obsessive-compulsive disorder and other anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J

    2010-01-01

    There has been debate about whether obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) should be classified as one of the anxiety disorders, or should rather be categorized with obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions. The question of where OCD should be located in the diagnostic system was addressed by investigating the relationship of OCD, obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSDs), and anxiety disorders. We administered a structured diagnostic interview (the SCID-OCSD) for assessing putative OCSDs in patients who presented with a primary diagnosis of OCD, panic disorder with/out agoraphobia (PD) or social anxiety disorder (SAD) in an attempt to address the proposed differentiation of OCD from the other DSM-IV anxiety disorders. Patients with OCD were significantly more likely to have multiple comorbid putative OCSDs than patients with PD or SAD. Some OCSDs, i.e. any tic disorder/Tourette's disorder as well as body-focused repetitive behaviors (self-injury, trichotillomania), and certain impulsive/reward-focused disorders (kleptomania, hypersexual disorder) were more common in OCD. Some of the putative OCSDs (e.g. hypochondriasis and body dysmorphic disorder) were more common in PD and SAD, respectively. Depression had equally high comorbidity with OCD, PD, and SAD, while generalized anxiety disorder and alcohol dependence were particularly associated with SAD. These findings suggest that some putative OCSDs may be related to OCD, while some may have a closer relationship to other anxiety disorders. From a nosological perspective, it may be useful to include OCD and certain OCSDs under the rubric of an enlarged category of anxiety and OCSDs. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Emotional reasoning and anxiety sensitivity: associations with social anxiety disorder in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkozei, Anna; Cooper, Peter J; Creswell, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Two specific cognitive constructs that have been implicated in the development and maintenance of anxiety symptoms are anxiety sensitivity and emotional reasoning, both of which relate to the experience and meaning of physical symptoms of arousal or anxiety. The interpretation of physical symptoms has been particularly implicated in theories of social anxiety disorder, where internal physical symptoms are hypothesized to influence the individual's appraisals of the self as a social object. The current study compared 75 children on measures of anxiety sensitivity and emotional reasoning: 25 with social anxiety disorder, 25 with other anxiety disorders, and 25 nonanxious children (aged 7-12 years). Children with social anxiety disorder reported higher levels of anxiety sensitivity and were more likely than both other groups to view ambiguous situations as anxiety provoking, whether physical information was present or not. There were no group differences in the extent to which physical information altered children's interpretation of hypothetical scenarios. This study is the first to investigate emotional reasoning in clinically anxious children and therefore replication is needed. In addition, those in both anxious groups commonly had comorbid conditions and, consequently, specific conclusions about social anxiety disorder need to be treated with caution. The findings highlight cognitive characteristics that may be particularly pertinent in the context of social anxiety disorder in childhood and which may be potential targets for treatment. Furthermore, the findings suggest that strategies to modify these particular cognitive constructs may not be necessary in treatments of some other childhood anxiety disorders. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Suicide in late-life depression with and without comorbid anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Voshaar, Richard C; van der Veen, Date C; Hunt, Isabelle; Kapur, Nav

    2016-02-01

    Comorbid anxiety in depression increases the risk of suicidal ideation and behavior, although data on death by suicide are scarce. We compared characteristics of depressed elderly patients with and without anxiety disorders who died by suicide. From a 16-year clinical survey of all suicides in the UK (n = 25,128), we identified 1909 cases aged ≥60 years with a primary diagnosis of depression and no comorbidity other than anxiety disorders. Clinical characteristics of cases with (n = 333, 17.4%) and without (n = 1576) comorbid anxiety disorders were compared by logistic regression adjusted for demographic differences. Compared with cases without comorbid anxiety disorders, cases with comorbid anxiety disorders were more likely to have a duration of illness over 1 year (OR(1-5 years)  = 1.4 [95% CI: 1.0-1.9], p = 0.061; OR(≥5 years)  = 1.4 [95% CI: 1.6-2.8], p suicidal risks lower in those with comorbid anxiety disorders (OR = 0.6 [95% CI: 0.3-0.9], p = 0.011 and OR = 0.7 [95% CI: 0.6-1.0], p = 0.028, respectively). Among depressed suicide cases, a comorbid anxiety disorder was identified in one out of six cases and associated with a higher prevalence of several suicide risk factors. This is important, as the detection of anxiety disorders comorbid to depression seems rather low and even when recognized clinicians rated such individuals as at low suicide risk. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. A comparison of the nature and correlates of panic attacks in the context of Panic Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lily A; LeBeau, Richard; Liao, Betty; Niles, Andrea N; Glenn, Daniel; Craske, Michelle G

    2016-01-30

    Panic attacks occurring outside of Panic Disorder are not well-understood despite their inclusion as a diagnostic specifier in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5). This study compares panic attacks in the context of Panic Disorder compared to social anxiety in terms of their symptom frequency, severity, and clinical correlates. Participants (n=404) were interviewed using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (ADIS-IV-L; Brown et al., 1994), from which we analyzed interviewer ratings of panic attacks and panic attack symptoms, as well as other demographic and clinical characteristics. Panic attacks in the context of Panic Disorder were characterized by a greater number and severity of symptoms compared to panic attacks in the context of Social Anxiety Disorder, and were associated with a history of traumatization, inpatient psychiatric treatment, and benzodiazepine use. Social anxiety panic attacks were associated with reduced physical health concerns. Cognitive panic attack symptoms were more prevalent in Panic Disorder and were associated with a variety of poor clinical correlates. Panic attacks in the context of Panic Disorder are more severe than those in social anxiety, and this may be driven by cognitive disturbances during those attacks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Moderated Effects of Video Feedback for Social Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Schultz, Luke T.; Blackmore, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Despite initially positive results, video feedback for social anxiety has never been shown to reduce social anxiety in a controlled experiment with diagnosed participants, and only once with undiagnosed participants. Previous studies arguably did not detect such an effect because of limited assessment of anxiety and potential moderators. We tested video feedback with cognitive preparation among treatment-seeking participants with a primary diagnosis of social anxiety disorder. In Session 1, p...

  20. ADULT ANXIETY DISORDERS IN RELATION TO TRAIT ANXIETY AND PERCEIVED STRESS IN CHILDHOOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Elizabeth A; Weber, Mareen; Rauch, Scott L; Killgore, William D S; Simon, Naomi M; Pollack, Mark H; Rosso, Isabelle M

    2015-10-01

    It is well established that objective early life stressors increase risk for anxiety disorders and that environmental stressors interact with dispositional factors such as trait anxiety. There is less information on how subjective perception of stress during childhood relates to later clinical anxiety. This study tested whether childhood perceived stress and trait anxiety were independently and interactively associated with adult anxiety disorders. Forty-seven adults diagnosed with anxiety disorders (M age = 34 yr., SD = 11) and 29 healthy participants (M = 33 yr., SD = 13) completed the adult Perceived Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Global Perceived Early Life Events Scale as a measure of perceived stress during childhood. In a logistic regression model, high childhood perceived stress (β = 0.64) and trait anxiety (β = 0.11) were associated with significantly greater odds of adult anxiety disorder. The association between childhood perceived stress and adult anxiety remained significant when controlling for adult perceived stress. These findings suggest that children's perception of stress in their daily lives may be an important target of intervention to prevent the progression of stress into clinically significant anxiety.

  1. Prevalence and predictive factors of depression and anxiety in patients with pancreatic cancer: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akizuki, Nobuya; Shimizu, Ken; Asai, Mariko; Nakano, Tomohito; Okusaka, Takuji; Shimada, Kazuaki; Inoguchi, Hironobu; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Fujimori, Maiko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    It is known that depression and anxiety occur more frequently in pancreatic cancer patients than in those with other malignancies. However, few studies have assessed depression and anxiety using reliable psychiatric diagnostic tools. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of depression and anxiety among pancreatic cancer patients before and 1 month after the start of anticancer treatment using reliable psychiatric diagnostic tools, and to identify factors that predict their occurrence. Pancreatic cancer patients were consecutively recruited. Structured clinical interviews were used to determine the presence of affective disorders, anxiety disorders and adjustment disorders. Baseline interviews were performed prior to initiation of anticancer treatment, while follow-up interviews were performed 1 month after treatment was started. Medical, demographic and psychosocial backgrounds were also assessed as predictive factors. One hundred and ten patients participated in the baseline interview and 91 in the follow-up interview. Depression and anxiety were observed in 15 patients (13.6%) at the baseline, and 15 patients (16.5%) at the follow-up. Lack of confidants was associated with depression and anxiety at the baseline. At the baseline, sadness, lower Karnofsky Performance Status and prior experience with the death of a family member due to cancer predicted newly diagnosed depression and anxiety at the follow-up. A considerable percentage of pancreatic cancer patients experienced depression and anxiety. Multidimensional psychosocial predictive factors were found and optimal psychological care should incorporate early detection of sadness. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Current evidence regarding the management of mood and anxiety disorders using complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzan, Anthony J; Zabrecky, George; Monti, Daniel A; Newberg, Andrew B

    2014-04-01

    This article is an updated review on the potential uses of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches for the management of patients with mood and anxiety disorders. We have focused this current paper on the different types of disorders and the CAM intervention which might be useful. This is in distinction to the prior paper which focused on the CAM interventions. In addition, we have provided a discussion of more recent studies that help to further inform practitioners about CAM interventions in these disorders. Mood and anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental health issues affecting people today and there are many approaches towards their management. CAM interventions can include supplements, botanical remedies, meditation and spiritual practices, acupuncture, and dietary practices. There are a growing number of research studies on the effectiveness of CAM interventions in mood and anxiety disorders, and this review evaluates and critiques such data.

  3. Is obsessive-compulsive disorder an anxiety disorder, and what, if any, are spectrum conditions? A family study perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienvenu, O J; Samuels, J F; Wuyek, L A; Liang, K-Y; Wang, Y; Grados, M A; Cullen, B A; Riddle, M A; Greenberg, B D; Rasmussen, S A; Fyer, A J; Pinto, A; Rauch, S L; Pauls, D L; McCracken, J T; Piacentini, J; Murphy, D L; Knowles, J A; Nestadt, G

    2012-01-01

    Experts have proposed removing obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) from the anxiety disorders section and grouping it with putatively related conditions in DSM-5. The current study uses co-morbidity and familiality data to inform these issues. Case family data from the OCD Collaborative Genetics Study (382 OCD-affected probands and 974 of their first-degree relatives) were compared with control family data from the Johns Hopkins OCD Family Study (73 non-OCD-affected probands and 233 of their first-degree relatives). Anxiety disorders (especially agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder), cluster C personality disorders (especially obsessive-compulsive and avoidant), tic disorders, somatoform disorders (hypochondriasis and body dysmorphic disorder), grooming disorders (especially trichotillomania and pathological skin picking) and mood disorders (especially unipolar depressive disorders) were more common in case than control probands; however, the prevalences of eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia nervosa), other impulse-control disorders (pathological gambling, pyromania, kleptomania) and substance dependence (alcohol or drug) did not differ between the groups. The same general pattern was evident in relatives of case versus control probands. Results in relatives did not differ markedly when adjusted for demographic variables and proband diagnosis of the same disorder, though the strength of associations was lower when adjusted for OCD in relatives. Nevertheless, several anxiety, depressive and putative OCD-related conditions remained significantly more common in case than control relatives when adjusting for all of these variables simultaneously. On the basis of co-morbidity and familiality, OCD appears related both to anxiety disorders and to some conditions currently classified in other sections of DSM-IV.

  4. Some psychosocial predictors of anxiety disorder in epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to expose the variables or predictors that mediate in anxiety disorders among epileptics in Nigeria. Such variables or predictors are age, level of social support and perceived level of stigmatization were examined with reference to their roles in causing anxiety disorder among epileptics in Nigeria.

  5. Some psychosocial predictors of anxiety disorder in epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some psychosocial predictors of anxiety disorder in epilepsy. A A Adesina, O A Afolabi, R O Ohwojero. Abstract. This study was designed to expose the variables or predictors that mediate in anxiety disorders among epileptics in Nigeria. Such variables or predictors are age, level of social support and perceived level of ...

  6. Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Referred Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Gabriele; Millepiedi, Stefania; Mucci, Maria; Poli, Paola; Bertini, Nicoletta; Milantoni, Luca

    2004-01-01

    Objective: There are insufficient data on generalized anxiety disorder in children and adolescents. Symptoms and comorbidity of generalized anxiety disorder are described as a function of age, gender, and comorbidity in a consecutive series of referred children and adolescents. Method: One hundred fifty-seven outpatients (97 males and 60 females,…

  7. Functional Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Children with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Allison M.; Schilpzand, Elizabeth; Bell, Clare; Walker, Lynn S.; Baber, Kari

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the incidence and correlates of functional gastrointestinal symptoms in children with anxiety disorders. Participants were 6-13 year old children diagnosed with one or more anxiety disorders (n = 54) and non-clinical control children (n = 51). Telephone diagnostic interviews were performed with parents to determine the presence…

  8. Complex anxiety disorders : Risk factors, underlying mechanisms, and treatment enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hofmeijer-Sevink, M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to address lacunas in the current knowledge of complex anxiety disorders. This is an important topic since complex anxiety disorders tend to develop a chronic course and because current guidelines are incomplete. In this thesis, several studies are presented regarding the various

  9. Bullying Victimization, Parenting Stress, and Anxiety among Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan A; Cappadocia, M Catherine; Tint, Ami; Pepler, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Bullying victimization is commonly associated with anxiety among individuals with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and both bullying victimization and anxiety are more prevalent among youth with ASD than in the general population. We explored individual and contextual factors that relate to anxiety in adolescents and young adults with ASD who also experience bullying victimization. Participants included 101 mothers of adolescents and young adults diagnosed with ASD. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to investigate the relationship between bullying victimization and anxiety in children with ASD, as well as parenting stress as a potential moderator of that relationship. Findings indicate that parenting stress moderates the association between bullying victimization and anxiety. The severity of anxiety was most strongly associated with bullying victimization when mothers reported high levels of stress. Implications for interventions that assist parents with coping and address bullying victimization are discussed. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Precursors to the Development of Anxiety Disorders in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    SOR can also have an impact on oral care , both in the home and dental office. Similarly, the presence of an anxiety disorder has been shown to...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0526 TITLE: Precursors to the Development of Anxiety Disorders in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Precursors to the Development of Anxiety Disorders in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  11. [The Relationship Between Anger Expression, Body Image and Eating Attitudes in Social Anxiety Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal Yağız, Ayşegül; Kuğu, Nesim; Semiz, Murat; Kavakçı, Önder

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate both the prevalence of social anxiety disorder (SAD) and itsassociation of trait anger and anger expression, eating attitudes and body perceptions in university students having the said disorder. One thousand students from Cumhuriyet University were included in the study. During the initial stage, Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) and socio-demographic data form were administered to the students. Those obtaining 30 points or more in LSAS were called for a psychiatric interview. The students diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (n=87) and the control group (n=87) were administered Eating Attitude Test (EAT), Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ) and The State Trait Anger Scale (STAXI). The point prevalence of social anxiety disorder was found to be 9.4% in those attending the study. Trait anger, anger-in and anger-out scores were statistically significantly higher; anger control and multidimensional body-self relations scale points were statistically lower at the SAB group when compared to the control group. The MBSRQ scores correlated negatively, while the EAT scores correlated positively, with anger-in scores in students with SAD. SAD is a common disorder in university students. Our study, showed that repressed anger could adversely affect body image and eating behaviors in SAD. In students having social anxiety disorder, approaches aiming at appropriate anger expression and positive body perception may yield positive results to treatment in students with SAD.

  12. National prevalence of respiratory allergic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahl, R; Andersen, PS; Chivato, T; Valovirta, E; De Monchy, J

    Background: Many epidemiological studies have assessed the prevalence of respiratory allergic disorders in confined geographical locations. However, no study has yet established nationally prevalence data in a uniform manner representing whole countries and, thus, enabling cross-national

  13. Relationship between anxiety, anxiety sensitivity and conduct disorder symptoms in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgiç, Ayhan; Türkoğlu, Serhat; Ozcan, Ozlem; Tufan, Ali Evren; Yılmaz, Savaş; Yüksel, Tuğba

    2013-09-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often comorbid with anxiety disorders and previous studies observed that anxiety could have an impact on the clinical course of ADHD and comorbid disruptive behavioral disorders (conduct disorders and oppositional-defiant disorders). Anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a different concept from anxiety per se and it is believed to represent the constitutionally based sensitivity of individuals to anxiety and anxiety symptoms. We aimed to assess the associations between anxiety, AS and symptoms of disruptive behavioral disorders (DBD) in a clinical sample of children and adolescents with ADHD. The sample consisted of 274 treatment naive children with ADHD aged 8-17 years. The severity of ADHD symptoms and comorbid DBD were assessed via parent rated Turgay DSM-IV-Based Child and Adolescent Behavioral Disorders Screening and Rating Scale (T-DSM-IV-S), Conners' Parent Rating Scale (CPRS), and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale (CTRS). AS and severity of anxiety symptoms of children were evaluated by self-report inventories. The association between anxiety, AS, and DBD was evaluated using structural equation modeling. Analyses revealed that AS social subscale scores negatively predicted symptoms of conduct disorder (CD) reported in T-DSM-IV-S. On the other hand, CD symptoms positively predicted severity of anxiety. No direct relationships were detected between anxiety, AS and oppositional-defiant behavior scores in any scales. These results may suggest a protective effect of AS social area on the development of conduct disorder in the presence of a diagnosis of ADHD, while the presence of symptoms of CD may be a vulnerability factor for the development of anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents with ADHD.

  14. Mood and anxiety disorders across the adult lifespan: a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, R D; Ryan, A; Bunting, B P; O'Neill, S M; Alonso, J; Bruffaerts, R; de Graaf, R; Florescu, S; Vilagut, G; de Almeida, J M C; de Girolamo, G; Haro, J M; Hinkov, H; Kovess-Masfety, V; Matschinger, H; Tomov, T

    2014-03-01

    The World Mental Health Survey Initiative (WMHSI) has advanced our understanding of mental disorders by providing data suitable for analysis across many countries. However, these data have not yet been fully explored from a cross-national lifespan perspective. In particular, there is a shortage of research on the relationship between mood and anxiety disorders and age across countries. In this study we used multigroup methods to model the distribution of 12-month DSM-IV/CIDI mood and anxiety disorders across the adult lifespan in relation to determinants of mental health in 10 European Union (EU) countries. Logistic regression was used to model the odds of any mood or any anxiety disorder as a function of age, gender, marital status, urbanicity and employment using a multigroup approach (n = 35500). This allowed for the testing of specific lifespan hypotheses across participating countries. No simple geographical pattern exists with which to describe the relationship between 12-month prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders and age. Of the adults sampled, very few aged ≥ 80 years met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for these disorders. The associations between these disorders and key sociodemographic variables were relatively homogeneous across countries after adjusting for age. Further research is required to confirm that there are indeed stages in the lifespan where the reported prevalence of mental disorders is low, such as among younger adults in the East and older adults in the West. This project illustrates the difficulties in conducting research among different age groups simultaneously.

  15. False memories in social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRISCILA DE CAMARGO PALMA

    Full Text Available Abstract Background False memories are memories of events that never occurred or that occurred, but not exactly as we recall. Events with emotional content are subject to false memories production similar to neutral events. However, individual differences, such as the level of maladjustment and emotional instability characteristics of Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD, may interfere in the production of false memories. Objectives This study aimed to assess the effect of emotion in memory performance for an event witnessed by participants with and without SAD. Methods Participants were 61 young adults with SAD and 76 without any symptoms of SAD who were randomly assigned to watch a story with or without emotional arousal. Participants answered a subjective scale of emotion about the story and a recognition memory test. Results Participants with SAD recovered more true memories and more false memories for the non-emotional version compared to the emotional version of the story. Overall, participants with SAD produced fewer false memories compared to those without SAD. Discussion This finding suggests that social anxiety may have a significant impact on emotional memory accuracy, which may assist in the development and improvement of techniques for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with chronic digestive system diseases: A multicenter epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, An-Zhong; Wang, Qing-Cai; Huang, Kun-Ming; Huang, Jia-Guo; Zhou, Chang-Hong; Sun, Fu-Qiang; Wang, Su-Wen; Wu, Feng-Ting

    2016-11-14

    To investigate the prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with chronic digestive system diseases. A total of 1736 patients with chronic digestive system diseases were included in this cross-sectional study, including 871 outpatients and 865 in-patients. A self-designed General Information for Patients of the Department of Gastroenterology of General Hospitals questionnaire was used to collect each patient's general information, which included demographic data (including age, sex, marital status, and education) and disease characteristics (including major diseases, disease duration, principal symptoms, chronic pain, sleep disorder, and limited daily activities). The overall detection rate was 31.11% (540/1736) for depression symptoms alone, 27.02% (469/1736) for anxiety symptoms alone, 20.68% (359/1736) for both depression and anxiety symptoms, and 37.44% (650/1736) for either depression or anxiety symptoms. Subjects aged 70 years or above had the highest detection rate of depression (44.06%) and anxiety symptoms (33.33%). χ 2 trend test showed: the higher the body mass index (BMI), the lower the detection rate of depression and anxiety symptoms ( χ 2 trend = 13.697, P digestive system tumors had the highest detection rate of depression (57.55%) and anxiety (55.19%), followed by patients with liver cirrhosis (41.35% and 48.08%). Depression and anxiety symptoms were also high in subjects with comorbid hypertension and coronary heart disease. Depression and anxiety occur in patients with tumors, liver cirrhosis, functional dyspepsia, and chronic viral hepatitis. Elderly, divorced/widowed, poor sleep quality, and lower BMI are associated with higher risk of depression and anxiety.

  17. Prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders in hospitalized patients at the dermatology clinical ward of a university hospital Prevalência de depressão e ansiedade em pacientes hospitalizados na enfermaria da clínica de dermatologia de um hospital universitário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Polo Gascón

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders in hospitalized patients at the dermatology ward at a university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in hospitalized patients at the dermatology ward at a university hospital in São Paulo. METHOD: A total of 75 patients, men and women, aged between 18 and 76 years, took part in the research. The study employed a descriptive, cross sectional and correlational method. The data was collected by means of a social demographic questionnaire and the PRIME-MD. RESULTS: It was found that 45.3 percent of the subjects presented with depressive symptoms, and 52 percent presented with symptoms of anxiety and that this survey showed moderate and high significant correlations (pFUNDAMENTOS: O presente estudo teve como objetivo verificar a freqüência de depressão e ansiedade em pacientes internados na Divisão da Clínica de Dermatologia de um hospital universitário de São Paulo. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência de depressão e ansiedade em pacientes hospitalizados na enfermaria da clínica de dermatologia de um hospital universitário em São Paulo. MÉTODO: Participaram da pesquisa 75 sujeitos, homens e mulheres, entre 18 e 76 anos. O delineamento do estudo foi transversal e descritivo. Os instrumentos utilizados foram Entrevista Sócio Demográfica e PRIME-MD. RESULTADOS: Identificou-se a presença de depressão em 45,3% e de ansiedade em 52% dos pacientes avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: Verificou-se correlação moderada e altamente significativa (p<0,01; r =0,616 para os índices de depressão e ansiedade, que pode evidenciar a relação entre adoecimento físico e psíquico muito encontrada na literatura.

  18. Behavioral symptoms and sleep problems in children with anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadare, Yoshitaka; Kamei, Yuichi; Usami, Masahide; Ushijima, Hirokage; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kyota; Kodaira, Masaki; Saito, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disorders are frequently associated with childhood behavioral problems and mental illnesses such as anxiety disorder. To identify promising behavioral targets for pediatric anxiety disorder therapy, we investigated the associations between specific sleep and behavioral problems. We conducted retrospective reviews of 105 patients aged 4-12 years who met the DSM-IV criteria for primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (n = 33), separation anxiety disorder (n = 23), social phobia (n = 21), or obsessive compulsive disorder (n = 28). Sleep problems were evaluated using the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and behavioral problems by the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale, Oppositional Defiant Behavior Inventory (ODBI), and Depression Self-Rating Scale for Children. Depressive behavior was weakly correlated with CSHQ subscores for sleep onset delay and night waking but not with total sleep disturbance. Anxiety was correlated with bedtime resistance, night waking, and total sleep disturbance score. Oppositional defiance was correlated with bedtime resistance, daytime sleepiness, sleep onset delay, and most strongly with total sleep disturbance. On multiple regression analysis ODBI score had the strongest positive association with total sleep disturbance and the strongest negative association with total sleep duration. Sleep problems in children with anxiety disorders are closely related to anxiety and oppositional defiant symptoms. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms and Medical Illness Among Adults with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N.; Dour, Halina J.; Stanton, Annette L.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Rose, Raphael D.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anxiety is linked to a number of medical conditions, yet few studies have examined how symptom severity relates to medical comorbidity. Purpose The current study assessed associations between severity of anxiety and depression and presence of medical conditions in adults diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Method Nine-hundred eighty-nine patients diagnosed with panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorders reported on the severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms and on diagnoses of 11 medical conditions. Results Severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms was strongly associated with having more medical conditions over and above control variables, and the association was as strong as that between BMI and disease. Odds of having asthma, heart disease, back problems, ulcer, migraine headache and eyesight difficulties also increased as anxiety and depressive symptom severity increased. Anxiety symptoms were independently associated with ulcer, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with heart disease, migraine, and eyesight difficulties. Conclusions These findings add to a growing body of research linking anxiety disorders with physical health problems and indicate that anxiety and depressive symptoms deserve greater attention in their association with disease. PMID:25510186

  20. Anxiety and depressive symptoms and medical illness among adults with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N; Dour, Halina J; Stanton, Annette L; Roy-Byrne, Peter P; Stein, Murray B; Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Rose, Raphael D; Craske, Michelle G

    2015-02-01

    Anxiety is linked to a number of medical conditions, yet few studies have examined how symptom severity relates to medical comorbidity. The current study assessed associations between severity of anxiety and depression and the presence of medical conditions in adults diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Nine-hundred eighty-nine patients diagnosed with panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorders reported on the severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms and on diagnoses of 11 medical conditions. Severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms was strongly associated with having more medical conditions over and above control variables, and the association was as strong as that between BMI and disease. Odds of having asthma, heart disease, back problems, ulcer, migraine headache and eyesight difficulties also increased as anxiety and depressive symptom severity increased. Anxiety symptoms were independently associated with ulcer, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with heart disease, migraine, and eyesight difficulties. These findings add to a growing body of research linking anxiety disorders with physical health problems and indicate that anxiety and depressive symptoms deserve greater attention in their association with disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Major Depressive Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Do the Sexual Dysfunctions Differ?

    OpenAIRE

    Kendurkar, Arvind; Kaur, Brinder

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Major depressive disorder (MDD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are known to have significant impact on sexual functioning. They have been studied individually. Therefore, this study was planned to compare the sexual dysfunction between MDD, OCD, and GAD with healthy subjects as controls.

  2. Prevalence of Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riahi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is often associated with other psychological problems. Objectives The present study aimed to study the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents with ADHD who admitted to Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz. Patients and Methods This was a descriptive/analytic cross-sectional study carried out on 118 outpatient children and adolescents who were selected by convenient sampling. The data were collected using the questionnaire, designed by authors, and were analyzed through descriptive statistics and chi-square test. Results The prevalence of comorbid disorders were as follows: anxiety disorders (48.3%; depression (20.33%; bipolar disorder (17.79%; obsessive-compulsive (47.45%; tic and tourette (35.59%, oppositional defiant disorder (43.22%; conduct disorder (11.01%; urinary incontinence (58.47%; communication disorder (9.32%; and learning disorder (21.18%. There was no significant difference between females and males with respect to the prevalence of comorbid disorders. Conclusions Similar to previous studies, we found some comorbid psychiatric disorders with ADHD. The treatment of the disorder can be improved, by more attention to comorbid psychiatric disorders, early diagnosis of them, and using distinct and specific treatment for everyone.

  3. Anxiety symptoms in a major mood and schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, B; Joffe, G; Aaltonen, K; Suvisaari, J; Baryshnikov, I; Näätänen, P; Koivisto, M; Melartin, T; Oksanen, J; Suominen, K; Heikkinen, M; Paunio, T; Isometsä, E

    2016-09-01

    Comorbid anxiety symptoms and disorders are present in many psychiatric disorders, but methodological variations render comparisons of their frequency and intensity difficult. Furthermore, whether risk factors for comorbid anxiety symptoms are similar in patients with mood disorders and schizophrenia spectrum disorders remains unclear. The Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale (OASIS) was used to measure anxiety symptoms in psychiatric care patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (SSA, n=113), bipolar disorder (BD, n=99), or depressive disorder (DD, n=188) in the Helsinki University Psychiatric Consortium Study. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression models were used to examine associations of depressive symptoms, neuroticism, early psychological trauma and distress, self-efficacy, symptoms of borderline personality disorder, and attachment style with anxiety symptoms in the three diagnostic groups. Frequent or constant anxiety was reported by 40.2% of SSA, 51.5% of BD, and 55.6% of DD patients; it was described as severe or extreme by 43.8%, 41.4%, and 41.2% of these patients, respectively. SSA patients were significantly less anxious (P=0.010) and less often avoided anxiety-provoking situations (P=0.009) than the other patients. In regression analyses, OASIS was associated with high neuroticism, symptoms of depression and borderline personality disorder and low self-efficacy in all patients, and with early trauma in patients with mood disorders. Comorbid anxiety symptoms are ubiquitous among psychiatric patients with mood or schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and in almost half of them, reportedly severe. Anxiety symptoms appear to be strongly related to both concurrent depressive symptoms and personality characteristics, regardless of principal diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence Rates of Mental Disorders in Chilean Prisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Adrian P.; Alvarado, Rubén; Fritsch, Rosemarie; Poblete, Catalina; Villagra, Carolina; Kastner, Sinja; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Objective High rates of mental disorders have been reported for prison populations worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The present study aimed to establish prevalence rates of mental disorders in Chilean prisoners. Method A nationwide random sample of 1008 prisoners was assessed in 7 penal institutions throughout Chile. Twelve-month prevalence rates were established using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and compared to the prevalence rates previously published for the general population. Results Prevalence rates were 12.2% (95% CI, 10.2-14.1) for any substance use disorder, 8.3% (6.6-10.0) for anxiety disorders, 8.1% (6.5-9.8) for affective disorders, 5.7% (4.4-7.1) for intermittent explosive disorders, 2.2% (1.4-3.2) for ADHD of the adult, and 0.8% (0.3-1.3) for non-affective psychoses. Significantly higher prevalence rates among prisoners as compared to the general population in Chile were seen for major depression (6.1% vs. 3.7% males, Z=2.58, pprison population than in the general population. One-year prevalence rates of alcohol abuse (2.3% vs. 3.9%; Z=-2.04; pprison population than in the general population. Conclusions Service provision for prison populations in Chile should acknowledge high rates of depression and illicit drug use. Overall prevalence rates are lower than reported in other LMICs. Previous research in prison populations in LMICs might have overestimated prevalence rates of mental disorders. PMID:23894415

  5. Attachment and parenting in adult patients with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Angelo; Caroppo, Emanuele; Fabi, Elisa; Proietti, Serena; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Meldolesi, Giulio Nicolò; Martinotti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The literature suggests that dysfunctional parenting and insecure attachment may increase risk of anxiety-related psychopathology. This study aimed at testing the association between anxiety disorders, attachment insecurity and dysfunctional parenting while controlling for factors usually not controlled for in previous studies, such as gender, age, and being ill. A sample of 32 non-psychotic inpatients with SCID-I diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, either alone or in comorbidity, was compared with two age- and sex-matched control groups consisting of 32 non-clinical participants and 32 in-patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Study measures included the Experience in Close Relationships questionnaire (ECR) and the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). The patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly higher on attachment-related anxiety and avoidance than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and non-clinical participants. These findings were independent of comorbidity for mood disorders. ECR scores did not differ among diagnostic subgroups (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, other anxiety disorders). Patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly lower on PBI mother's care and borderline significantly lower on PBI father's care than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Although limitations such as the relatively small sample size and the cross-sectional nature suggest caution in interpreting these findings, they are consistent with the few previous adult studies performed on this topic and corroborate Bowlby's seminal hypothesis of a link between negative attachment-related experiences, attachment insecurity, and clinical anxiety. Attachment theory provides a useful theoretical framework for integrating research findings from several fields concerning the development of anxiety disorders and for planning therapeutic interventions.

  6. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder, but Not Panic Anxiety Disorder, Are Associated with Higher Sensitivity to Learning from Negative Feedback: Behavioral and Computational Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdour, Hussain Y; Abushalbaq, Oday M; Mughrabi, Ibrahim T; Imam, Aya F; Gluck, Mark A; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and panic anxiety disorder (PAD), are a group of common psychiatric conditions. They are characterized by excessive worrying, uneasiness, and fear of future events, such that they affect social and occupational functioning. Anxiety disorders can alter behavior and cognition as well, yet little is known about the particular domains they affect. In this study, we tested the cognitive correlates of medication-free patients with GAD, SAD, and PAD, along with matched healthy participants using a probabilistic category-learning task that allows the dissociation between positive and negative feedback learning. We also fitted all participants' data to a Q-learning model and various actor-critic models that examine learning rate parameters from positive and negative feedback to investigate effects of valence vs. action on performance. SAD and GAD patients were more sensitive to negative feedback than either PAD patients or healthy participants. PAD, SAD, and GAD patients did not differ in positive-feedback learning compared to healthy participants. We found that Q-learning models provide the simplest fit of the data in comparison to other models. However, computational analysis revealed that groups did not differ in terms of learning rate or exploration values. These findings argue that (a) not all anxiety spectrum disorders share similar cognitive correlates, but are rather different in ways that do not link them to the hallmark of anxiety (higher sensitivity to negative feedback); and (b) perception of negative consequences is the core feature of GAD and SAD, but not PAD. Further research is needed to examine the similarities and differences between anxiety spectrum disorders in other cognitive domains and potential implementation of behavioral therapy to remediate cognitive deficits.

  7. The Development of a Transdiagnostic, Cognitive Behavioral Group Intervention for Childhood Anxiety Disorders and Co-Occurring Depression Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Bilek, Emily L.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are highly prevalent and frequently comorbid classes of disorder associated with significant impairment in youth. While current transdiagnostic protocols address a range of potential anxiety and depression symptoms among adult and adolescent populations, there are few similar treatment options for school-aged children with…

  8. Increased mortality among people with anxiety disorders: total population study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sandra M.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Laursen, Thomas M.; Penninx, Brenda W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders and depression are the most common mental disorders worldwide and have a striking impact on global disease burden. Although depression has consistently been found to increase mortality; the role of anxiety disorders in predicting mortality risk is unclear. Aims To assess mortality risk in people with anxiety disorders. Method We used nationwide Danish register data to conduct a prospective cohort study with over 30 million person-years of follow-up. Results In total, 1066 (2.1%) people with anxiety disorders died during an average follow-up of 9.7 years. The risk of death by natural and unnatural causes was significantly higher among individuals with anxiety disorders (natural mortality rate ratio (MRR) = 1.39, 95% CI 1.28–1.51; unnatural MRR = 2.46, 95% CI 2.20–2.73) compared with the general population. Of those who died from unnatural causes, 16.5% had comorbid diagnoses of depression (MRR = 11.72, 95% CI 10.11–13.51). Conclusions Anxiety disorders significantly increased mortality risk. Comorbidity of anxiety disorders and depression played an important part in the increased mortality. PMID:27388572

  9. Group schema therapy versus group cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder with comorbid avoidant personality disorder : Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baljé, A.; Greeven, A.; van Giezen, A.; Korrelboom, K.; Arntz, A.; Spinhoven, P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) with comorbid avoidant personality disorder (APD) has a high prevalence and is associated with serious psychosocial problems and high societal costs. When patients suffer from both SAD and APD, the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for personality disorders

  10. Group schema therapy versus group cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder with comorbid avoidant personality disorder : Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baljé, A.; Greeven, A.; van Giezen, A.; Korrelboom, C.W.; Arntz, A.; Spinhoven, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Social anxiety disorder (SAD) with comorbid avoidant personality disorder (APD) has a high prevalence and is associated with serious psychosocial problems and high societal costs. When patients suffer from both SAD and APD, the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for personality disorders

  11. Bipolar disorder and substance use disorders. Madrid study on the prevalence of dual disorders/pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Francisco; Szerman, Nestor; Vega, Pablo; Mesías, Beatriz; Basurte, Ignacio; Rentero, David

    2017-06-28

    Given its prevalence and impact on public health, the comorbidity of bipolar and substance use disorders is one of the most relevant of dual diagnoses. The objective was to evaluate the characteristics of patients from community mental health and substance abuse centres in Madrid. The sample consisted of 837 outpatients from mental health and substance abuse centres. We used the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and Personality Disorder Questionnaire (PDQ4+) to evaluate axis I and II disorders. Of these patients, 174 had a lifetime bipolar disorder, 83 had bipolar disorder type I and 91 had type II. Most patients had dual pathology. Of the 208 participants from the mental health centres, 21 had bipolar disorder and 13 (61.9%) were considered dually-diagnosed patients, while 33.2% of non-bipolar patients had a dual diagnoses (p = 0.03). Of the 629 participants from the substance abuse centres, 153 patients (24.3%) had a bipolar diagnosis. Bipolar dual patients had higher rates of alcohol and cocaine dependence than non-bipolar patients. Moreover, age at onset of alcohol use was earlier in bipolar duallydiagnosed patients than in other alcoholics. Bipolar dually-diagnosed patients had higher personality and anxiety disorder comorbidities and greater suicide risk. Thus, alcohol and cocaine are the drugs most associated with bipolar disorder. Given the nature of the study, the type of relationship between these disorders cannot be determined.

  12. Co-morbid anxiety disorders in patients with schizophrenia in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of anxiety disorders among the participants with schizophrenia .... mental illness. The WHODAS II is a self-report questionnaire that as- sesses activity limitations and disability in the previous month. It was developed to assess six different adult life tasks: ...

  13. Comorbid Depressive Disorders in Anxiety-Disordered Youth: Demographic, Clinical, and Family Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Kelly A.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that depression and anxiety are highly comorbid in youth. Little is known, however, about the clinical and family characteristics of youth with principal anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive diagnoses. The present study examined the demographic, clinical, and family characteristics of 200 anxiety-disordered children and…

  14. Depression/anxiety disorder and amygdala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iidaka, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    Described and discussed are neuro-imaging studies on the amygdala (Am) concerning its volume, neuro-active drug effect on it and its response to repulsive and attractive stress-evoked character/temperament tests in patients mainly with major depression (MD) and anxiety disorder (AD), by functional MRI (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). A recent trend of volumetry of Am is the voxel-based morphometry by MRI, of which results are still controversial in MD. In contrast, many studies by PET and fMRI using neuro-active drugs have revealed that Am activity in MD is stimulated, and this hyperactivity can be improved by anti-depressive drugs. In addition, difference of activities is suggested in Am left and right hemispheres. The hyperactivity in Am has been reported also in AD and phobic disorders, of which symptoms are conceivably expressed by the sensitivity changes in the cerebral limbic system involving Am. The author considers the central region responsible for the depressive mood is present around cortex of anteroinferior genu of corpus callosum where neuro-network with Am is dense. (R.T.)

  15. PREVALENCE OF IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME IN COLLEGE STUDENTS AND ASSOCIATION WITH ANXIETY, DEPRESSION AND FODMAP DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopi K.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: I rritable bowel syndrome ( IBS is the most common functional gastro - intestinal disorder. The data regarding the prevalence of IBS in young adults is limited along with its association with anxiety and depression in a community setting in India . MATERIALS AND METHODS: the prevalence of IBS and its subtypes based on Rome iii criteria were assessed in 2078 college students above 18 year s of age along with the prevalence of anxiety and depression based on hospital anxiety depression scale. Frequency of intake of food containing fermentable oligo - di - monosaccharides and polyols ( F odmaps were obtained. RESULTS: T he mean age of the study gro up is 19.73±1.4 years. The prevalence of IBS is 5.2%, the prevalence in females (6.1% as compared with males (3.9%. Mixed type of IBS is the most common involving 47.9% of students followed by diarrhea predominant in 22.9%, un subtyped in 17.7% and const ipation predominant in 11.5%. The mean anxiety score in students with IBS is 9.61±3.74 as compared to 7.15±3.73 in students without IBS with a p - value of 0.000. The mean depression score as per hads - d in students with IBS is 5.79±3.290 as compared to 4.39± 2.942 in students without IBS with a p - value of 0.000. Among students with IBS 48.9% were found to have psychological disorders as compared to 21% without IBS . There was no difference in the intake of food containing fodmaps.

  16. Conditioned Subjective Responses to Socially Relevant Stimuli in Social Anxiety Disorder and Subclinical Social Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco-González, Daniella; Fullana, Miquel Angel; Torrents-Rodas, David; Bonillo, Albert; Vervliet, Bram; Pailhez, Guillem; Farré, Magí; Andión, Oscar; Perez, Víctor; Torrubia, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Although enhanced fear conditioning has been implicated in the origins of social anxiety disorder (SAD), laboratory evidence in support of this association is limited. Using a paradigm employing socially relevant unconditioned stimuli, we conducted two separate studies to asses fear conditioning in individuals with SAD and non-clinical individuals with high social anxiety (subclinical social anxiety [SSA]). They were compared with age-matched and gender-matched individuals with another anxiety disorder (panic disorder with agoraphobia) and healthy controls (Study 1) and with individuals with low social anxiety (Study 2). Contrary to our expectations, in both studies, self-report measures (ratings of anxiety, unpleasantness and arousal to the conditioned stimuli) of fear conditioning failed to discriminate between SAD or SSA and the other participant groups. Our results suggest that enhanced fear conditioning does not play a major role in pathological social anxiety. We used a social conditioning paradigm to study fear conditioning in clinical and subclinical social anxiety. We found no evidence of enhanced fear conditioning in social anxiety individuals. Enhanced fear conditioning may not be a hallmark of pathological social anxiety. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Parental responsibility beliefs: associations with parental anxiety and behaviours in the context of childhood anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetroaia, Adela; Hill, Claire; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-12-01

    High levels of parental anxiety are associated with poor treatment outcomes for children with anxiety disorders. Associated parental cognitions and behaviours have been implicated as impediments to successful treatment. We examined the association between parental responsibility beliefs, maternal anxiety and parenting behaviours in the context of childhood anxiety disorders. Anxious and non-anxious mothers of 7-12 year old children with a current anxiety disorder reported their parental responsibility beliefs using a questionnaire measure. Parental behaviours towards their child during a stressor task were measured. Parents with a current anxiety disorder reported a greater sense of responsibility for their child's actions and wellbeing than parents who scored within the normal range for anxiety. Furthermore, higher parental responsibility was associated with more intrusive and less warm behaviours in parent-child interactions and there was an indirect effect between maternal anxiety and maternal intrusive behaviours via parental responsibility beliefs. The sample was limited to a treatment-seeking, relatively high socio-economic population and only mothers were included so replication with more diverse groups is needed. The use of a range of stressor tasks may have allowed for a more comprehensive assessment of parental behaviours. The findings suggest that parental anxiety disorder is associated with an elevated sense of parental responsibility and may promote parental behaviours likely to inhibit optimum child treatment outcomes. Parental responsibility beliefs may therefore be important to target in child anxiety treatments in the context of parental anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. New research on anxiety disorders in the elderly and an update on evidence-based treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreescu, Carmen; Varon, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorders are frequently encountered in the elderly, but they are largely undetected and untreated. Epidemiological studies indicate a prevalence ranging from 1.2 to 15 %. With the exception of generalized anxiety disorder and agoraphobia, which can often start in late life, most anxiety disorders in older patients are chronic and have their onset earlier in life. Anxiety disorders are an often unrecognized cause of distress, disability, and mortality risk in older adults, and they have been associated with cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cognitive decline. The mechanisms of anxiety in older adults differ from that in younger adults due to age-related neuropathology, as well as the loss and isolation so prominent in late life. Our review intends to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent research done in the field of anxiety disorders in the elderly. Recent findings in clinical research, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology, and neuropsychology are covered. An update on treatment options is discussed, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological alternatives.

  19. Fluvoxamine-controlled release formulation for the treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jonathan; Yaryura-Tobias, Jose; DuPont, Robert; Stallings, Loretta; Barbato, Luigi M; van der Hoop, Roland Gerritsen; Li, David

    2004-04-01

    Generalized social anxiety disorder is a highly prevalent anxiety disorder with deleterious effects on social and family relationships, as well as work performance. We report the results of a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial comparing the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fluvoxamine controlled release (CR) to placebo in patients with generalized social anxiety disorder. A total of 279 adult patients meeting all inclusion/exclusion criteria was recruited at 23 United States sites and randomly assigned to receive either fluvoxamine CR (100-300 mg/d) or placebo for 12 weeks. The dose could be increased, based on efficacy and tolerability, in increments of 50 mg/d at weekly intervals. The dosage remained constant during weeks 6 to 12. Treatment with fluvoxamine CR resulted in statistically and clinically significant improvements in symptoms associated with generalized social anxiety disorder as early as week 4 on the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale and the Clinical Global Impression Scale Global Improvement, and at week 6 on the Sheehan Disability Scale, Clinical Global Impression Scale Severity of Illness and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement Scale. The most frequent adverse events reported by patients on fluvoxamine CR were headache, nausea, somnolence, and insomnia. No weight gain was observed for either treatment group, and at end point, there were no differences between treatments on overall sexual function, as measured by the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale. Both physician and patient-rated scales indicate that fluvoxamine CR is effective and safe for the treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder.

  20. Social anxiety disorder: A review of environmental risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A Brook

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Christina A Brook, Louis A SchmidtDepartment of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Social anxiety disorder (SAD is a debilitating and chronic illness characterized by persistent fear of one or more social or performance situations, with a relatively high lifetime prevalence of 7% to 13% in the general population. Although the last two decades have witnessed enormous growth in the study of biological and dispositional factors underlying SAD, comparatively little attention has been directed towards environmental factors in SAD, even though there has been much ongoing work in the area. In this paper, we provide a recent review and critique of proposed environmental risk factors for SAD, focusing on traditional as well as some understudied and overlooked environmental risk factors: parenting and family environment, adverse life events, cultural and societal factors, and gender roles. We also discuss the need for research design improvements and considerations for future directions.

  1. Positive thinking in anxiety disordered children reconsidered

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogendoorn, S.M.; Prins, P.J.M.; Vervoort, L.; Wolters, L.H.; Nauta, M.H.; Hartman, C.A.; Moorlag, H; de Haan, E.; Boer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Negatively valenced thoughts are assumed to play a central role in the development and maintenance of anxiety. However, the role of positive thoughts in anxiety is rather unclear. In the current study we examined the role of negative and positive self-statements in the anxiety level of anxious and

  2. Positive thinking in anxiety disordered children reconsidered

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogendoorn, S.M.; Prins, P.J.M.; Vervoort, L.; Wolters, L.H.; Nauta, M.H.; Hartman, C.A.; Moorlag, H.; de Haan, E.; Boer, F.

    Negatively valenced thoughts are assumed to play a central role in the development and maintenance of anxiety. However, the role of positive thoughts in anxiety is rather unclear. In the current study we examined the role of negative and positive self-statements in the anxiety level of anxious and

  3. Relationships among depression, anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and perceived social support in adolescents with conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Savaş; Bilgiç, Ayhan; Akça, Ömer Faruk; Türkoğlu, Serhat; Hergüner, Sabri

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationships of depression, anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and perceived social support with conversion symptoms in adolescents with conversion disorder (CD). Fifty outpatients, aged 8-18 years, who had been diagnosed with CD and members of a control group were assessed using the psychological questionnaires. Compared with controls, adolescents with CD scored higher on the Child Depression Inventory (CDI), Screen for Child Anxiety-related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), Childhood Anxiety Sensitivity Index (CASI) total, CASI physical and cognitive subscales, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support family subscale. Multiple regression analysis showed that CDI, CASI total, and CASI cognitive scores predicted the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ) scores and that CDI and CASI total scores predicted the Children's Somatization Inventory (CSI) scores of subjects. This study suggest that adolescents with CD had poor psychosocial well-being, and depression, global anxiety sensitivity and anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns are related to conversion symptoms.

  4. Examining the Role of Anxiety Sensitivity in Sleep Dysfunction Across Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Amanda W; Keshaviah, Aparna; Goetter, Elizabeth M; Bui, Eric; Swee, Michaela; Rosencrans, Peter L; Simon, Naomi M

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety Sensitivity (AS) has been associated with sleep difficulties in certain anxiety disorder populations, but no studies have examined cross-diagnostically the role of anxiety sensitivity in sleep dysfunction. Three hundred one participants with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and panic disorder (PD) completed an ancillary questionnaire-based study. Linear regression was used to examine AS and sleep dysfunction, and mediation analyses were used to examine whether AS was a mediator of the effect of primary diagnosis on sleep. AS was associated with increased sleep dysfunction across anxiety disorders, and primary anxiety disorder diagnosis was significantly associated with sleep dysfunction. However, after controlling for AS, primary diagnosis was no longer significant. AS significantly mediated the effects of PD versus SAD and of PD versus GAD on sleep dysfunction, but did not significantly mediate the effect of GAD versus SAD on sleep dysfunction. Taken together, AS appears to be a more important predictor of sleep dysfunction overall, emphasizing the cross-diagnostic nature of AS and bolstering the RDoC initiative approach for treating psychological dysfunction.

  5. The effect of social anxiety on urge and craving among smokers with and without anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrel, Nathan A; Morissette, Sandra B; Gulliver, Suzy B; Langdon, Kirsten J; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Despite the often social nature of smoking, relatively little research has been conducted on the relationship between smoking and social anxiety disorder (SAD). Participants (N=99) included 34 smokers without current mental health disorders, 37 smokers with SAD, and 28 smokers who met criteria for other anxiety disorder diagnoses (e.g., panic disorder or generalized anxiety disorder, but not SAD). Nicotine and placebo patches were administered to participants in a counterbalanced manner across two assessment days. Urge and craving were assessed before and after a 5-h nicotine absorption/deprivation period. Compared to smokers without current mental health disorders, smokers with SAD did not report greater nicotine dependence, but did endorse greater motivation to use nicotine to avoid negative outcomes. In addition, after controlling for demographic variables, smoking characteristics, pre-deprivation urge and craving, and other anxiety/depression symptoms, social anxiety symptoms uniquely predicted urge and craving in the placebo patch condition; however, social anxiety had no influence on urge and craving in the nicotine patch condition. These findings suggest that one potential reason that smokers with SAD may have worse cessation outcomes is that they may experience higher levels of craving and urge to smoke during quit attempts. Thus, during a quit attempt, particularly in the absence of nicotine replacement therapy, smokers with SAD are likely to benefit from additional treatment aimed at managing or reducing their social anxiety symptoms. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. High Magnitude of Social Anxiety Disorder in School Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kindie Mekuria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Social phobia is the most prevalent and chronic type of anxiety disorder worldwide and it affects occupational, educational, and social affairs of the individual. Social phobia is also known for its association with depression and substance use disorder. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of social phobia among high school students in Ethiopia. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted among 386 randomly selected students. Data were collected using pretested and self-administered questionnaire. Social phobia was assessed by using Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN. Logistic regression was used to analyze the data with 95% confidence interval and variables with p value less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results. From 386 study participants, 106 (27.5% of them were positive for social phobia. Being female (AOR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.82–5.27, current alcohol drinking (AOR = 1.75; 95% CI: 1.03–2.98, poor social support (AOR = 2.40; 95% CI: 1.17–4.92, and living with single parent (AOR = 5.72; 95% CI: 2.98–10.99 were significantly associated with social phobia. Conclusion. The proportion of social phobia was higher compared to previous evidences. School-based youth-friendly mental health services might be helpful to tackle this problem.

  7. Depression and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Alice; Rizzi, Eleonora; Schneider, Maude; Debbane, Martin; Eliez, Stephan

    2012-07-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is characterized by a high prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders in childhood and adolescence. These disorders are a source of great impairment in everyday functioning, as well as important risk factors for the emergence of later psychotic disorders. Impairment in daily and social functioning as well as loss of IQ throughout growth are also are well-established correlates of the VCFS. This study aimed to confirm the high prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders. The second objective was to ascertain the correlation between anxious and depressive symptoms and the decline in adaptive and cognitive functioning. A total of 73 children and adolescents with VCFS (mean age 11.9 years) underwent psychiatric evaluation. Subjects were further divided into four age groups: ages 6-9, 9-12, 12-15 and 15-18 years. Assessments measuring intelligence, anxious and depressive symptoms, and adaptation skills reported by parents were submitted to a subsample of 62 children (mean age 12.2 years); 62.2 % of the sample showed an anxiety disorder, specific phobia being the most represented at all ages. Lifetime depression concerned 27 % of the sample, peaking at age 12-15 years. Anxious and depressive symptoms and low IQ were significantly associated with low adaptive functioning. Anxiety and depression are common disorders in children and adolescents with VCFS and have a great impact on adaptive functioning. Clinicians should pay great attention to diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Mood, anxiety, and personality disorders among first and second-generation immigrants to the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Kagotho, Njeri; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    A careful examination of the multigenerational relationship between immigrant status and mental disorders can provide important information about the robustness and nature of the immigrant-mental health link. We examine immigrant status as a protective factor against mental illness, assess intergenerational effects, examine differences across race/ethnicity, and report the prevalence of mood, anxiety, and personality disorders of immigrants across major world regions. We employ data from the ...

  9. Cannabidiol Regulation of Learned Fear: Implications for Treating Anxiety-Related Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Jurkus, Regimantas; Day, Harriet L. L.; Guimarães, Francisco S.; Lee, Jonathan L. C.; Bertoglio, Leandro J.; Stevenson, Carl W.

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and trauma-related disorders are psychiatric diseases with a lifetime prevalence of up to 25%. Phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are characterized by abnormal and persistent memories of fear-related contexts and cues. The effects of psychological treatments such as exposure therapy are often only temporary and medications can be ineffective and have adverse side effects. Growing evidence from human and animal studies indicates that cannabidiol, the main non-psychotomim...

  10. Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsawh, Holly J; Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B; Cissell, Shadha H; Lang, Ariel J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to posttreatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers.

  11. Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsawh, Holly J.; Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B.; Cissell, Shadha H.; Lang, Ariel J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to post-treatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers. PMID:26244485

  12. The Prevalence of Anxiety and its related Factors among School-age Children in South West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Banaeipour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Anxiety is one of the most common childhood disorders, so it is necessary to explore extend and its related factors in the students. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of anxiety and the related factors of anxiety among the children aged 9-12 years. Materials and Methods At a descriptive-analytic study 623 children aged 9-12 year- old who were studying in the fourth to sixth grade of elementary school in Dezful city, were selected through multistage random sampling.  The data were collected using demographic profile questionnaire and School Anxiety Scale (SAS using SPSS-16. Results Of total 623 students, 36.3% were girls. 232 (37.2% students had mild anxiety, 304 students (48.8% had moderate anxiety and 87 students (14% had severe anxiety. There was a significant relationship between the mean score of children anxiety and the number of children in family (P0.0.5. Conclusion This study showed that the prevalence of anxiety was higher in boyes, children who were single children, children who had a family history of hereditary disease, and children who experienced corporal punishment at home. It is recommended arranging programs including training, counseling, and psychotherapy ones for these children and their families.

  13. Anxiety-Promoting Parenting Behaviors: A Comparison of Anxious Parents with and without Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, Meghan Crosby; Drazdowski, Tess K.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2013-01-01

    While parenting behaviors among anxious parents have been implicated in the familial transmission of anxiety, little is known about whether these parenting behaviors are unique to specific parental anxiety disorders. The current study examined differences in the use of five specific parenting behaviors (i.e., warmth/positive affect, criticism,…

  14. Peer Social Status of Children with Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Cyd C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated peer social status of 6- through 13-year-olds. Found anxiety-disorder children significantly less liked than normal children, but anxious and conduct-disorder children similarly liked. Conduct disorder children received more "like least" and "fight most" nominations, with anxious and nonreferred groups alike. The anxious group…

  15. The Prevalence of Tic Disorders and Clinical Characteristics in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Lawrence; Specht, Matthew; Page, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevalence is a simple statement about the frequency of a disease in the population. For many medical conditions, including Tourette syndrome, there are true cases that have not been previously diagnosed due to problems of access to appropriate clinical services. Therefore, to obtain a trustworthy estimate of prevalence, it is necessary to go beyond cases identified in clinical settings and evaluate community samples. Method We reviewed 11 community surveys in children with Tourette syndrome (TS) published since 2000. We also examined the frequency of co-occurring psychiatric conditions in community samples and large clinically-ascertained samples. Results Transient tics are relatively common affecting as many as 20% of school-age children. The 11 studies reviewed here offer a wide range of estimates from 2.6 to 38 per 1000 children for TS. Six studies provide estimates in a narrower range from 4.3 to 7.6 per 1000, but the confidence interval around this narrower range remains wide. Six studies provided results on chronic tic disorders ranging from 3 to 50 per 1000 for Chronic Motor Tic Disorder and 2.5 to 9.4 per 1000 for Chronic Vocal Tic Disorder. Community samples and large clinically-ascertained samples consistently show high rates of ADHD, disruptive behavior and anxiety disorders in children with TS. Conclusions The wide range of prevalence estimates for TS and chronic tic disorders is likely due to differences in sample size and assessment methods. The best estimate of prevalence for TS in school-age children is likely to fall between 4 and 8 cases per 1000. Clinical assessment of children with chronic tic disorders warrants examination of other problems such as ADHD, disruptive behavior and anxiety. PMID:25436183

  16. The Prevalence of Tic Disorders and Clinical Characteristics in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Lawrence; Specht, Matthew; Page, Christopher

    2014-10-01

    Prevalence is a simple statement about the frequency of a disease in the population. For many medical conditions, including Tourette syndrome, there are true cases that have not been previously diagnosed due to problems of access to appropriate clinical services. Therefore, to obtain a trustworthy estimate of prevalence, it is necessary to go beyond cases identified in clinical settings and evaluate community samples. We reviewed 11 community surveys in children with Tourette syndrome (TS) published since 2000. We also examined the frequency of co-occurring psychiatric conditions in community samples and large clinically-ascertained samples. Transient tics are relatively common affecting as many as 20% of school-age children. The 11 studies reviewed here offer a wide range of estimates from 2.6 to 38 per 1000 children for TS. Six studies provide estimates in a narrower range from 4.3 to 7.6 per 1000, but the confidence interval around this narrower range remains wide. Six studies provided results on chronic tic disorders ranging from 3 to 50 per 1000 for Chronic Motor Tic Disorder and 2.5 to 9.4 per 1000 for Chronic Vocal Tic Disorder. Community samples and large clinically-ascertained samples consistently show high rates of ADHD, disruptive behavior and anxiety disorders in children with TS. The wide range of prevalence estimates for TS and chronic tic disorders is likely due to differences in sample size and assessment methods. The best estimate of prevalence for TS in school-age children is likely to fall between 4 and 8 cases per 1000. Clinical assessment of children with chronic tic disorders warrants examination of other problems such as ADHD, disruptive behavior and anxiety.

  17. Autism Spectrum Traits in Children with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Bogels, Susan M.; Wood, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine ASD traits in children with clinical anxiety in early development, as well as current manifestations. Parents of 42 children with an anxiety disorder (but no known diagnosis of ASD) and 42 typically developing children were interviewed using the Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI-R). They also completed…

  18. Family Factors in the Development and Management of Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapee, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    Family variables are thought to play a key role in a wide variety of psychopathology according to many theories. Yet, specific models of the development of anxiety disorders place little emphasis on general family factors despite clear evidence that anxiety runs in families. The current review examines evidence for the involvement of a number of…

  19. Origins of Phobias and Anxiety Disorders : Why More Women Than ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathways that lead to excessive anxiety and fear and draws on up-to-date research from the fields of developmental psychology, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and psychiatry. A clear and objective analysis follows of how many of the factors that place people at risk for anxiety disorders (e.g. negative affectivity and.

  20. Assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehry, Anna M; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Hennelly, Meghann M; Connolly, Sucheta D; Strawn, Jeffrey R

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in the developmental epidemiology, neurobiology, and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders have increased our understanding of these conditions and herald improved outcomes for affected children and adolescents. This article reviews the current epidemiology, longitudinal trajectory, and neurobiology of anxiety disorders in youth. Additionally, we summarize the current evidence for both psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatments of fear-based anxiety disorders (e.g., generalized, social, and separation anxiety disorders) in children and adolescents. Current data suggest that these disorders begin in childhood and adolescence, exhibit homotypic continuity, and increase the risk of secondary anxiety and mood disorders. Psychopharmacologic trials involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) are effective in pediatric patients with anxiety disorders and have generally demonstrated moderate effect sizes. Additionally, current data support cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of these conditions in youth and suggest that the combination of psychotherapy + an SSRI may be associated with greater improvement than would be expected with either treatment as monotherapy.

  1. Assessment and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehry, Anna M.; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Hennelly, Meghann M.; Connolly, Sucheta D.; Strawn, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the developmental epidemiology, neurobiology and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders have increased our understanding of these conditions and herald improved outcomes for affected children and adolescents. This article reviews the current epidemiology, longitudinal trajectory, and neurobiology of anxiety disorders in youth. Additionally, we summarize the current evidence for both psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatments of fear-based anxiety disorders (e.g., generalized, social and separation anxiety disorders) in children and adolescents. Current data suggest that these disorders begin in childhood and adolescence, exhibit homotypic continuity and increase the risk of secondary anxiety and mood disorders. Psychopharmacologic trials involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) are effective in pediatric patients with anxiety disorders and have generally demonstrated moderate effect sizes. Additionally, current data support cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are efficacious in the treatment of these conditions in youth and that combination of CBT + an SSRI may be associated with greater improvement than would be expected with either treatment as monotherapy. PMID:25980507

  2. Methylphenidate and Comorbid Anxiety Disorder in Children with both Chronic Multiple Tic Disorder and ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Nolan, Edith E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine if comorbid anxiety disorder is associated with differential response to immediate release methylphenidate (MPH-IR) in children with both ADHD and chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD). Method: Children with (n = 17) and without (n = 37) diagnosed anxiety disorder (ANX) were evaluated in an 8-week, placebo-controlled trial…

  3. Cbt for anxiety disorders in children with and without autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Bögels, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) was examined, and compared with children without ASD. Method: Children with ASD and comorbid anxiety disorders (n = 79, 58 boys; Mage = 11.76) and children with

  4. Examining the Screen for Child Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorder-71 as an Assessment Tool for Anxiety in Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Deutschman, Amber A. C. G.; Bögels, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a questionnaire developed to assess symptoms of anxiety disorders (SCARED-71) were compared between two groups of children: children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder and comorbid anxiety disorders (ASD-group; "n" = 115), and children with anxiety disorders (AD-group; "n" = 122).…

  5. Anxiety and Depression in Drug-Dependent Patients with Cluster C Personality Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roncero

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveComorbidity between personality disorders (PD and substance-use disorders (SUD is one of the most common findings in the psychiatric field. The patients with Cluster C disorders present maladjustment traits often characterized by high levels of anxiety. The main aim of this study was to find evidences about higher anxiety and depression prevalence on Cluster C than others Clusters, analyzing similarities and differences within, with other Cluster A and B PD patients and patients without PD.MethodA total of 822 substance dependent patients (ages18–78; Mean = 38.35, SD = 10.14 completed the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV Axis I and Axis II disorders, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.ResultsResults supported poly-consumption in Cluster C patients, being greater alcohol consumption as well as abuse of both stimulants and depressants. Anxiety and depression did not show just one pattern for all patients with SUD-Cluster C PD. There was a relation between anxiety and depression for all the groups except for the Dependent-PD.ConclusionInterventions should focus on aspects like depression and anxiety more than on the substance consumed.

  6. Book Review: Generalized Anxiety Disorder Across the Lifespan: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review: Generalized Anxiety Disorder Across the Lifespan: An Integrative Approach. ME Portman. Abstract. Michael E. Portman: Publisher: New York: Springer, 2009. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  7. Manifesto for a European Anxiety Disorders Research Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, David S.; Allgulander, Christer; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo; Angst, Jules; Bandelow, Borwin; den Boer, Johan; Boyer, Patrice; Davies, Simon; dell'Osso, Bernardo; Eriksson, Elias; Fineberg, Naomi; Fredrikson, Mats; Herran, Andres; Maron, Eduard; Metspalu, Andres; Nutt, David; van der Wee, Nic; Luis Vazquez-Barquero, Jose; Zohar, Joseph

    Despite the size, burden and costs of anxiety disorders, many patients remain unrecognised, and the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions in routine clinical practice can be disappointing. The European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) has established the ECNP Network Initiative

  8. Social functioning in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saris, I M J; Aghajani, M; van der Werff, S J A; van der Wee, N J A; Penninx, B W J H

    2017-10-01

    Adaptive social functioning is severely impeded in depressive and anxiety disorders, even after remission. However, a comprehensive overview is still lacking. Using data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA), behavioural (network size, social activities, social support) and affective (loneliness, affiliation, perceived social disability) indicators of social functioning were analyzed in patients with anxiety (N = 540), depressive (N = 393), comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders ('comorbid', N = 748), remitted participants (N = 621), and healthy control subjects (N = 650). Analyses revealed an increasing trend of social dysfunction among patient groups, in patients with comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders, showing the most severe impairments, followed by depressed and anxious patients (P's social functioning indicators). Affective indicators showed the largest effect sizes (Cohen's d range from 0.13 to 1.76). We also found impairments in social functioning among remitted patients. Furthermore, perceived social disability among patients was predictive of still having a depressive and/or anxiety diagnosis 2 years later (P social functioning are impaired in patients with anxiety or depressive disorders and most in patients with comorbid disorders. After remission of affective psychopathology, residual impairments tend to remain, while social dysfunction in patients seems predictive of future psychopathology. © 2017The Authors. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Prevalence of Maternal Affective Disorders in Chinese Mothers of Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y W; Chung, K H; Lee, Y K; Lam, W C; Yiu, M Gc

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of affective disorders and identify their associated factors among Chinese mothers of preschool children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Autism Spectrum Disorders Multidisciplinary Clinic of the United Christian Hospital from August 2012 to June 2013. All mothers of a consecutive series of preschool children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders at their first visit to the clinic were recruited. Information regarding the child-related, maternal, and environmental factors was collected. Psychiatric diagnoses were made according to the Chinese-Bilingual Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. Independent factors associated with maternal affective disorders were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. Of the 121 subjects, the point prevalence of affective disorders as a group was 29.8%. The point prevalence of major depressive disorders, adjustment disorders, anxiety disorders, and bipolar affective disorders was 14.9%, 10.7%, 3.3% and 0.8%, respectively. A higher level of disruptive and self-absorbed behaviours in the children (as assessed by the Developmental Behaviour Checklist), a higher level of affiliate stigma (as assessed by 22-item Affiliate Stigma Scale), and a history of psychiatric disorders were independently associated with current affective disorders. Psychiatric disorders, predominantly affective disorders, are common among Chinese mothers of preschool children with autism spectrum disorders. Identification of independent factors associated with maternal affective disorders can aid in the early detection of cases and planning of early intervention programmes to address both child and maternal psychological needs.

  10. Precursors to the Development of Anxiety Disorders in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Specific Aim 1: Evaluate the relationship between Sensory Over -reactivity (SOR) and anxiety symptoms/ disorders in a sample of 3-5 year old children with...relationship between sensory over -responsivity (SOR) and anxiety symptoms/ disorders in a sample of 3-5 year old children with ASD using parent report...anxiety disorder . Further, 39 children (60%) with ASD fell 2SDs above typically developing norms for sensory over -responsivity. Overall, there was a

  11. Body dysmorphic disorder, social anxiety and depressive symptoms in Chinese medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yanhui; Knoesen, Natalie P; Deng, Yunlong; Tang, Jinsong; Castle, David J; Bookun, Riteesh; Hao, Wei; Chen, Xiaogang; Liu, Tieqiao

    2010-10-01

    This cross-sectional study explored the prevalence of body image dissatisfaction, body dysmorphic disorder, social anxiety and depressive symptoms in first-year medical students in China. A self-report survey design was employed, using the Body Shape Questionnaire, Swansea Muscularity Attitudes Questionnaire, Social Interaction Anxiety Scale, Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire, Self-Rating Depression Scale and the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire. A total of 487 first-year medical students participated. About one-third of participants (32.5%) indicated that they were very concerned about some aspect of their appearance unrelated to weight, with six female participants (1.3%) screening positive for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Those who displayed concern with their appearance (including those who did not screen positive for BDD) had higher levels of depressive and social anxiety symptoms than those who had no appearance concerns.

  12. Pharmacologic treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velosa, J F; Riddle, M A

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacologic treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. These disorders are quite common and can be considered a "silent epidemic" because they are more often reported by the children and adolescents than by their parents. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), benzodiazepines, buspirone, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been used to treat anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with varying degrees of success. Considering safety and efficacy, the SSRIs appear to be the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders in youth, but more studies are needed to confirm preliminary results. Tricyclic antidepressants and benzodiazepines may be considered when the child has not responded to SSRIs or when adverse effects have exceeded benefits. Although nonpharmacologic approaches for the treatment of anxiety in children and adolescents are beyond the scope of this article, their importance is to be underscored and they should be considered as part of the treatment plan. Over the next decade, research data will be generated regarding the treatment of anxiety disorders in youth. Ongoing research studies include the use of fluoxetine (B. Birmaher, personal communication, 1999) and fluvoxamine (J. Walkup, personal communication, 1999) for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, or social phobia; and buspirone for generalized anxiety disorder in children. Despite these efforts, there is a need for more studies to examine the safety and efficacy of different pharmacologic treatments, as well as longitudinal studies to monitor for long-term tolerability and side effects. Pharmacokinetic studies for children and adolescents will provide information on the metabolism and absorption of these medications and delineate the developmental differences between children and adolescents when compared to adults. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, studies that compare medication

  13. Stigma, social anxiety, and illness severity in bipolar disorder: Implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Boaz; Tsoy, Elena; Brodt, Madeline; Petrosyan, Karen; Malloy, Mary

    2015-02-01

    Studies indicate that comorbid anxiety disorders predict a more severe course of illness in bipolar disorder (BD). The relatively high prevalence of social anxiety in BD points to the potential role that socio-cultural factors, such as stigma, play in exacerbating the progression of this disorder. Stigma creates social anxiety in affected individuals because it essentially forces them into a vulnerable social status that is marked by public disgrace. Although the etiology of debilitating social anxiety in BD may involve multiple factors, stigma deserves particular clinical attention because research in this area indicates that it is common and its internalization is associated with poor outcome. We conducted a literature review using search terms related to stigma, social anxiety, bipolar disorder, illness severity, and outcomes. The electronic databases searched included PsychINFO, PubMed, JSTOR, and EBSCOhost Academic Search Complete with limits set to include articles published in English. The literature indicates that internalized stigma often triggers the core psychological experiences of social anxiety and is highly correlated with clinical and functional outcome in BD. On a psychological level, internalized stigma and social anxiety can create distress that triggers symptoms of BD. From a biological perspective, stigma constitutes a chronic psychosocial stressor that may interact with the pathophysiology of BD in inflammatory ways. The connection between stigma and social anxiety, and their combined effects on people with BD, carries important implications for psychiatric care. To obtain an accurate clinical formulation, initial evaluations may seek to examine stigma-related experiences and determine their relationship to anxiety symptoms and psychosocial functioning. In addition, direct interventions for reducing the ill effects of stigma in BD deserve clinical attention, because they may carry the potential to enhance outcomes.

  14. Social anxiety and self-consciousness in binge eating disorder: associations with eating disorder psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaoka, Takuya; Barnes, Rachel D; Blomquist, Kerstin K; Masheb, Robin M; Grilo, Carlos M

    2012-08-01

    Research has consistently shown that anxiety disorders are common among individuals with eating disorders. Although social phobia has been found to be highly associated with eating disorders, less is known about social anxiety in individuals with binge eating disorder (BED). The present study examined associations between social anxiety and self-consciousness with body mass index (BMI) and eating disorder psychopathology in BED. Participants were 113 overweight or obese treatment-seeking men and women with BED. Participants were administered semistructural diagnostic clinical interviews and completed a battery of self-report measures. Social anxiety was positively and significantly correlated with shape and weight concerns and binge eating frequency. After accounting for depressive levels, social anxiety and self-consciousness accounted for significant variance in eating, shape, and weight concerns and overall eating disorder global severity scores (Eating Disorder Examination). Social anxiety also accounted for significant variance in binge eating frequency after covarying for depressive levels. Social anxiety and self-consciousness were not significantly associated with BMI or dietary restraint. Our findings suggest that greater social anxiety and heightened self-consciousness are associated with greater eating disorder psychopathology, most notably with greater shape and weight concerns and binge eating frequency in patients with BED. Social anxiety and self-consciousness do not appear to be merely functions of excess weight, and future research should examine whether they contribute to the maintenance of binge eating and associated eating disorder psychopathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Anxiety driven atypical eating disorder in the course of phenylketonuria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapps, Nora; Mack, Isabelle; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Phenylketonuria is the most common genetic disease in amino acid metabolism. We report the case of a 22-year old patient with phenylketonuria and psychological symptoms. After early treatment, phenylalanine levels had been controlled and were within target area. Clinical interview and psychometrics showed atypical eating disorder and anxiety disorder. Possible toxic effects and psychological factors may play a role in pathogenesis. Most likely the frequency of eating disorders and anxiety disorders in phenylketonuria is underestimated. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Common and disorder-specific neural responses to emotional faces in generalised anxiety, social anxiety and panic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonzo, Gregory A.; Ramsawh, Holly J.; Flagan, Taru M.; Sullivan, Sarah G.; Letamendi, Andrea; Simmons, Alan N.; Paulus, Martin P.; Stein, Murray B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although evidence exists for abnormal brain function across various anxiety disorders, direct comparison of neural function across diagnoses is needed to elicit abnormalities common across disorders and those distinct to a particular diagnosis. Aims To delineate common and distinct abnormalities within generalised anxiety (GAD), panic and social anxiety disorder (SAD) during affective processing. Method Fifty-nine adults (15 with GAD, 15 with panic disorder, 14 with SAD, and 15 healthy controls) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing a facial emotion matching task with fearful, angry and happy faces. Results Greater differential right amygdala activation to matching fearful v. happy facial expressions related to greater negative affectivity (i.e. trait anxiety) and was heightened across all anxiety disorder groups compared with controls. Collapsing across emotional face types, participants with panic disorder uniquely displayed greater posterior insula activation. Conclusions These preliminary results highlight a common neural basis for clinical anxiety in these diagnoses and also suggest the presence of disorder-specific dysfunction. PMID:25573399

  17. Information and Decision-Making Needs Among People with Anxiety Disorders: Results of an Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebherz, Sarah; Härter, Martin; Dirmaier, Jörg; Tlach, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    People with anxiety disorders are faced with treatment decisions considerably affecting their life. Patient decision aids are aimed at enabling patients to deliberate treatment options based on individual values and to participate in medical decisions. This is the first study to determine patients' information and decision-making needs as a pre-requisite for the development of patient decision aids for anxiety disorders. An online cross-sectional survey was conducted between January and April 2013 on the e-health portal http://www.psychenet.de by using a self-administered questionnaire with items on internet use, online health information needs, role in decision making and important treatment decisions. Descriptive and inferential statistical as well as qualitative data analyses were performed. A total of 60 people with anxiety disorders with a mean age of 33.3 years (SD 10.5) participated in the survey. The most prevalent reasons for online health information search were the need for general information on anxiety disorders, the search for a physician or psychiatrist and the insufficiency of information given by the healthcare provider. Respondents experienced less shared and more autonomous decisions than they preferred. They assessed decisions on psychotherapy, medication, and treatment setting (inpatient or outpatient) as the most difficult decisions. Our results confirm the importance of offering patient decision aids for people with anxiety disorders that encourage patients to participate in decision making by providing information about the pros and cons of evidence-based treatment options.

  18. Pediatric anxiety disorders: from neuroscience to evidence-based clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Desousa, Diogo Araújo; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Pine, Daniel Samuel; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this narrative review of the literature is to describe the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders. We aim to guide clinicians in understanding the biology of anxiety disorders and to provide general guidelines for the proper diagnoses and treatment of these conditions early in life. Anxiety disorders are prevalent, associated with a number of negative life outcomes, and currently under-recognized and under-treated. The etiology involves both genes and environmental influences modifying the neural substrate in a complex interplay. Research on pathophysiology is still in its infancy, but some brain regions, such as the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex, have been implicated in fear and anxiety. Current practice is to establish diagnosis based purely on clinical features, derived from clinical interviews with the child, parents, and teachers. Treatment is effective using medication, cognitive behavioral therapy, or a combination of both. An introduction to the neuroscience behind anxiety disorders combined with an evidence-based approach may help clinicians to understand these disorders and treat them properly in childhood.

  19. Threshold and subthreshold Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and suicide ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Heather

    2016-11-16

    Subthreshold Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) has been reported to be at least as prevalent as threshold GAD and of comparable clinical significance. It is not clear if GAD is uniquely associated with the risk of suicide, or if psychiatric comorbidity drives the association. Data from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health were used to estimate the prevalence of threshold and subthreshold GAD in the household population aged 15 or older. As well, the relationship between GAD and suicide ideation was studied. Multivariate logistic regression was used in a sample of 24,785 people to identify significant associations, while adjusting for the confounding effects of sociodemographic factors and other mental disorders. In 2012, an estimated 722,000 Canadians aged 15 or older (2.6%) met the criteria for threshold GAD; an additional 2.3% (655,000) had subthreshold GAD. For people with threshold GAD, past 12-month suicide ideation was more prevalent among men than women (32.0% versus 21.2% respectively). In multivariate models that controlled sociodemographic factors, the odds of past 12-month suicide ideation among people with either past 12-month threshold or subthreshold GAD were significantly higher than the odds for those without GAD. When psychiatric comorbidity was also controlled, associations between threshold and subthreshold GAD and suicidal ideation were attenuated, but remained significant. Threshold and subthreshold GAD affect similar percentages of the Canadian household population. This study adds to the literature that has identified an independent association between threshold GAD and suicide ideation, and demonstrates that an association is also apparent for subthreshold GAD.

  20. Object relations theory and pharmacopsychotherapy of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, N G; Sacks, L H; Hamilton, C A

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of object relations concepts, applying them specifically to combined psychoterapy-pharmacotherapy of anxiety disorders. Anxiety in this clinical theory is conceptualized as arising from threatened loss of the self- and object-relationship. At a rudimentary level, individuals can attempt to manage potential loss through splitting and projective identification. As benign and loving experiences accumulate and ego functions neurophysiologically develop, whole object relations provide alternate and more modulated ways of coping with anxiety. In anxiety disorders, these more mature coping styles break down. Treatment combining object relations approaches to psychotherapy with pharmacotherapy pay particular attention to the relationship aspects and meanings of medication and prescribing. These approaches use the concepts of empathy, containment, countertransference, splitting, projective identification, and transitional object formation to help patients come to terms with their anxiety and with the treatment relationship.

  1. Social phobia in obsessive-compulsive disorder: prevalence and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Melissa Chagas; Costa, Daniel Lucas da Conceição; de Mathis, Maria Alice; Shavitt, Roseli Gedanke; Ferrão, Ygor Arzeno; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Miguel, Euripedes Constantino; Torres, Albina Rodrigues

    2012-12-20

    Social Phobia (SP) is an anxiety disorder that frequently co-occurs with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); however, studies that evaluate clinical factors associated with this specific comorbidity are rare. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of SP in a large multicenter sample of OCD patients and compare the characteristics of individuals with and without SP. A cross-sectional study with 1001 patients of the Brazilian Research Consortium on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders using several assessment instruments, including the Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. Univariate analyses were followed by logistic regression. Lifetime prevalence of SP was 34.6% (N=346). The following variables remained associated with SP comorbidity after logistic regression: male sex, lower socioeconomic status, body dysmorphic disorder, specific phobia, dysthymia, generalized anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, Tourette syndrome and binge eating disorder. The cross-sectional design does not permit the inference of causal relationships; some retrospective information may have been subject to recall bias; all patients were being treated in tertiary services, therefore generalization of the results to other samples of OCD sufferers should be cautious. Despite the large sample size, some hypotheses may not have been confirmed due to the small number of cases with these characteristics (type 2 error). SP is frequent among OCD patients and co-occurs with other disorders that have common phenomenological features. These findings have important implications for clinical practice, indicating the need for broader treatment approaches for individuals with this profile. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mood, anxiety, and personality disorders among first and second-generation immigrants to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P; Kagotho, Njeri; Vaughn, Michael G

    2014-12-30

    A careful examination of the multigenerational relationship between immigrant status and mental disorders can provide important information about the robustness and nature of the immigrant-mental health link. We examine immigrant status as a protective factor against mental illness, assess intergenerational effects, examine differences across race/ethnicity, and report the prevalence of mood, anxiety, and personality disorders of immigrants across major world regions. We employ data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and compare first (n=5363) and second-generation (n=4826) immigrants from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America to native-born Americans (n=24,461) with respect to mental disorders. First-generation immigrants are significantly less likely than native-born Americans to be diagnosed with a mood, anxiety, or personality disorder, though the prevalence of mental health diagnoses increases among second generation immigrants. Similar results were observed for immigrants from major world regions as the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was lower among immigrants from Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Asia compared to native-born Americans. Findings provide evidence in support of the notion that the immigrant paradox may be extended to include mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in the United States. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mood, anxiety, and personality disorders among first and second-generation immigrants to the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Kagotho, Njeri; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    A careful examination of the multigenerational relationship between immigrant status and mental disorders can provide important information about the robustness and nature of the immigrant-mental health link. We examine immigrant status as a protective factor against mental illness, assess intergenerational effects, examine differences across race/ethnicity, and report the prevalence of mood, anxiety, and personality disorders of immigrants across major world regions. We employ data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and compare first (n = 5,363) and second-generation (n = 4826) immigrants from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America to native-born Americans (n = 24,461) with respect to mental disorders. First-generation immigrants are significantly less likely than native-born Americans to be diagnosed with a mood, anxiety, or personality disorder, though the prevalence of mental health diagnoses increases among second generation immigrants. Similar results were observed for immigrants from major world regions as the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was lower among immigrants from Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Asia compared to native-born Americans. Findings provide evidence in support of the notion that the immigrant paradox may be extended to include mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in the United States. PMID:25223256

  4. Prevalence of and associations between body dysmorphic concerns, obsessive beliefs and social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahmand, Usha; Shahbazi, Zeynab

    2015-03-01

    Physical attractiveness has been of concern in different cultures and at different times. Physical attractiveness can influence one's thoughts and actions, and concerns regarding body image can be destructive, giving rise to psychological problems. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of body dysmorphic concerns, related sex differences and comorbidity with social anxiety and obsessive beliefs. Using a stratified and cluster sampling procedure, 1,200 males and females were randomly selected. Self-report measures on body image, social anxiety and obsessive beliefs were distributed of which 843 completed questionnaires (54.9% males and 45.1% females) were returned (return rate of 70.25%). Therefore, data pertaining to 463 males and 380 females ranging in age from 17 to 20 years with a mean age of 18.12 years (SD = 1.06) were analyzed. Findings suggest a prevalence rate of 19.1% for body dysmorphic disorder, 23.6% for social anxiety and 8.8% for obsessive beliefs. Both social anxiety and obsessive beliefs were found to be comorbid with body dysmorphic concerns. The percentage of individuals reporting comorbid social anxiety (12.9%) was greater than that of those reporting comorbid obsessive beliefs (6.4%). Males with body dysmorphic concerns reported more obsessive beliefs (8.2% versus 4.1%), while their female counterparts reported more social anxiety (23.4% versus 4.2%). In males, body image concerns appear to be more cognitive in quality, while in females, body image concerns seem more emotional in tone. As the measures used do not yield formal diagnoses, findings should be viewed with caution. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Major depressive disorder, suicidal behaviour, bipolar disorder, and generalised anxiety disorder among emerging adults with and without chronic health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, M A

    2016-10-01

    Despite the considerable physical, emotional and social change that occurs during emerging adulthood, there is little research that examines the association between having a chronic health condition and mental disorder during this developmental period. The aims of this study were to examine the sex-specific prevalence of lifetime mental disorder in an epidemiological sample of emerging adults aged 15-30 years with and without chronic health conditions; quantify the association between chronic health conditions and mental disorder, adjusting for sociodemographic and health factors; and, examine potential moderating and mediating effects of sex, level of disability and pain. Data come from the Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health. Respondents were 15-30 years of age (n = 5947) and self-reported whether they had a chronic health condition. Chronic health conditions were classified as: respiratory, musculoskeletal/connective tissue, cardiovascular, neurological and endocrine/digestive. The World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0 was used to assess the presence of mental disorder (major depressive disorder, suicidal behaviour, bipolar disorder and generalised anxiety disorder). Lifetime prevalence of mental disorder was significantly higher for individuals with chronic health conditions compared with healthy controls. Substantial heterogeneity in the prevalence of mental disorder was found in males, but not in females. Logistic regression models adjusting for several sociodemographic and health factors showed that the individuals with chronic health conditions were at elevated risk for mental disorder. There was no evidence that the level of disability or pain moderated the associations between chronic health conditions and mental disorder. Sex was found to moderate the association between musculoskeletal/connective tissue conditions and bipolar disorder (β = 1.71, p = 0.002). Exploratory analyses suggest that the levels of

  6. Ventilatory physiology of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, D S; Coplan, J D; Papp, L A; Klein, R G; Martinez, J M; Kovalenko, P; Tancer, N; Moreau, D; Dummit, E S; Shaffer, D; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    1998-02-01

    Abnormalities in ventilatory physiology have been noted in adults with panic disorder. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in ventilatory physiology differentiate children and adolescents with anxiety disorders from psychiatrically healthy children. Ventilatory physiology was monitored with a canopy apparatus during room-air breathing and 15 minutes of carbon dioxide exposure in 33 children and adolescents comprising 18 probands with an anxiety disorder and 15 psychiatrically healthy children. During room-air breathing, probands had significantly larger minute ventilation, larger tidal volumes, and more variable breathing patterns than healthy comparisons, but the groups did not differ in end-tidal carbon dioxide or respiratory rate. During carbon dioxide challenge, probands exhibited larger minute ventilation and respiratory rate responses relative to comparisons. These findings on the association between ventilatory physiology and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are consistent with results from studies of adults with panic disorder.

  7. Anxiety and mood disorders and cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Joyce T W; Mann, Robert E; Ialomiteanu, Anca; Stoduto, Gina; Chan, Vincy; Ala-Leppilampi, Kari; Rehm, Jürgen

    2010-03-01

    Cannabis use has been linked to anxiety and mood disorders (AMD) in clinical cases, but little research on this relationship has been reported at the epidemiological level. We examined the relationship between self-reported frequency of cannabis use and risk for AMD in the general Ontario adult population. Data were based on the CAMH Monitor survey of Ontario adults from 2001 to 2006 (n = 14,531). AMD was assessed with the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12). Frequency of cannabis use within the past year was grouped into five categories: No use (abstainer), less than once a month but at least once a year, less than once a week but at least once a month, less than daily but at least once a week, almost every day to more than once a day. Logistic regression analysis of AMD and cannabis use was implemented while controlling for demographics and alcohol problems. AMD was most common among heavy cannabis users (used almost every day or more) (18.1%) and lowest for abstainers (8.7%). Compared to abstainers, the risk of AMD was significantly greater for infrequent cannabis users (OR = 1.43) and heavy cannabis users (OR = 2.04) but not for those in between. These data provide epidemiological evidence for a link between both light and heavy cannabis use and AMD. Recognizing the comorbidity of heavy cannabis use and AMD should facilitate improved treatment efforts. Our results also suggest the possibility that, for some individuals, AMD may occur at relatively low levels of cannabis use.

  8. Variation in the Profile of Anxiety Disorders in Boys with an ASD According to Method and Source of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    To determine any variation that might occur due to the type of assessment and source used to assess them, the prevalence of 7 anxiety disorders were investigated in a sample of 140 boys with an Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 50 non-ASD (NASD) boys via the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory and the KIDSCID Clinical Interview. Boys with an…

  9. Voxel-based morphometry multi-center mega-analysis of brain structure in social anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bas-Hoogendam, J.M.; van Steenbergen, H.; Pannekoek, J.N.; Fouche, J.-P.; Lochner, C.; Hattingh, C.J.; Cremers, H.R.; Furmark, T.; Månsson, K.N.T.; Frick, A.; Engman, J.; Boraxbekk, C.-J.; Carlbring, P.; Andersson, G.; Fredrikson, M.; Straube, T.; Peterburs, J.; Klumpp, H.; Phan, K.L.; Roelofs, K.; Veltman, D. J.; van Tol, M.-J.; Stein, D.J.; van der Wee, N.J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a prevalent and disabling mental disorder, associated with significant psychiatric co-morbidity. Previous research on structural brain alterations associated with SAD has yielded inconsistent results concerning the direction of the changes in gray matter (GM) in

  10. Anxiety disorders, physical illnesses, and health care utilization in older male veterans with Parkinson disease and comorbid depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Salah U; Amspoker, Amber B; Calleo, Jessica S; Kunik, Mark E; Marsh, Laura

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the rates of anxiety and depressive disorders, physical illnesses, and health service use in male patients 55 years or older with a diagnosis of Parkinson disease who were seen at least twice at the 10 medical centers in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare Network of the South Central region of the United States. Of the 273 male patients diagnosed between October 1, 1997, and September 30, 2009, 62 (22.7%) had a depressive disorder. The overall prevalence of anxiety disorders was 12.8%; patients with comorbid depression had a 5-fold greater prevalence of anxiety disorders than those without depression (35.5% vs 6.2%, Panxiety disorders and several physical illnesses, to be using antipsychotic and dementia medicines, and to have increased health service utilization than those without depression.

  11. Association between temporomandibular disorders and music performance anxiety in violinists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, M I T; Jorge, A I L

    2016-10-01

    Professional violin playing has been associated with a predisposition to develop temporomandibular disorder (TMD). There are a number of risk factors, including physical trauma from the playing posture and the presence of parafunctional habits. Music performance anxiety (MPA) may also be a factor, as it has been associated with playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD). To evaluate a possible association between the presence of TMD and the level of MPA in violin players. An observational study using a written questionnaire that retrieved data related to TMD symptoms (Fonseca Anamnestic Questionnaire), MPA level (Kenny Music Performance Anxiety Inventory, K-MPAI), instrument practice time, chinrest type, sex and age. Descriptive, bivariate and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Ninety-three professional or semi-professional violinists performing in and around Lisbon, Portugal, completed the questionnaire (73% response rate). TMD was present in 50 violinists (58%). There was a statistically significant association between the presence of TMD and high MPA levels (P < 0.001) and the most anxious violinists were six times (95% confidence interval 2.51-15.33; P < 0.001) more likely to report TMD symptoms when compared with the least anxious players. Violin players had a high prevalence of reported TMD symptoms, which was significantly associated with high MPA levels. It may therefore be necessary to address psychological and physical factors simultaneously in musicians who do not improve with physical therapy alone. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Social anxiety disorder and alcohol use disorder co-morbidity in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneier, F R; Foose, T E; Hasin, D S; Heimberg, R G; Liu, S-M; Grant, B F; Blanco, C

    2010-06-01

    To assess the prevalence and clinical impact of co-morbid social anxiety disorder (SAD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD, i.e. alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence) in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Data came from a large representative sample of the US population. Face-to-face interviews of 43093 adults residing in households were conducted during 2001-2002. Diagnoses of mood, anxiety, alcohol and drug use disorders and personality disorders were based on the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule - DSM-IV version. Lifetime prevalence of co-morbid AUD and SAD in the general population was 2.4%. SAD was associated with significantly increased rates of alcohol dependence [odds ratio (OR) 2.8] and alcohol abuse (OR 1.2). Among respondents with alcohol dependence, SAD was associated with significantly more mood, anxiety, psychotic and personality disorders. Among respondents with SAD, alcohol dependence and abuse were most strongly associated with more substance use disorders, pathological gambling and antisocial personality disorders. SAD occurred before alcohol dependence in 79.7% of co-morbid cases, but co-morbidity status did not influence age of onset for either disorder. Co-morbid SAD was associated with increased severity of alcohol dependence and abuse. Respondents with co-morbid SAD and alcohol dependence or abuse reported low rates of treatment-seeking. Co-morbid lifetime AUD and SAD is a prevalent dual diagnosis, associated with substantial rates of additional co-morbidity, but remaining largely untreated. Future research should clarify the etiology of this co-morbid presentation to better identify effective means of intervention.

  13. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders in HIV patients in the Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The psychiatric conditions identi ed were mood disorders (depression and mania) and anxiety disorders (General anxiety, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post traumatic stress disorder). Conclusion: Findings suggest that there is need to consider mental and psychological care of clients ...

  14. Anxiety, psychosis and substance use: prevalence, correlates and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Department of Psychiatry, St Vincent's Health and The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. Abstract. Objective: The ... use disorder and psychosis is highly prevalent, is associated with poorer outcomes, and is under detected by case managers. ..... 28 days was: alcohol 80% (66/82), cannabis 57% (47/83),.

  15. Anxiety in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciberras, Emma; Lycett, Kate; Efron, Daryl; Mensah, Fiona; Gerner, Bibi; Hiscock, Harriet

    2014-05-01

    Although anxiety is common in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), it is unclear how anxiety influences the lives of these children. This study examined the association between anxiety comorbidities and functioning by comparing children with ADHD and no, 1, or ≥2 anxiety comorbidities. Differential associations were examined by current ADHD presentation (subtype). Children with diagnostically confirmed ADHD (N = 392; 5-13 years) were recruited via 21 pediatrician practices across Victoria, Australia. Anxiety was assessed by using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children-IV. Functional measures included parent-reported: quality of life (QoL; Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0), behavior and peer problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), daily functioning (Daily Parent Rating of Evening and Morning Behavior), and school attendance. Teacher-reported behavior and peer problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) were also examined. Linear and logistic regression controlled for ADHD severity, medication use, comorbidities, and demographic factors. Children with ≥2 anxiety comorbidities (n = 143; 39%) had poorer QoL (effect size: -0.8) and more difficulties with behavior (effect size: 0.4) and daily functioning (effect size: 0.3) than children without anxiety (n = 132; 36%). Poorer functioning was not observed for children with 1 anxiety comorbidity (n = 95; 26%). Two or more anxiety comorbidities were associated with poorer functioning for children with both ADHD-Inattentive and ADHD-Combined presentation. Children with ADHD demonstrate poorer QoL, daily functioning and behavior when ≥2 anxiety comorbidities are present. Future research should examine whether treating anxiety in children with ADHD improves functional outcomes. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Disorder-specific cognitive profiles in major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Sanne M; Licht, Carmilla M M; Spijker, Jan; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Hardeveld, Florian; de Graaf, Ron; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2014-04-01

    This investigation examines differences in cognitive profiles in subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Data were used from subjects with current MDD (n = 655), GAD (n = 107) and comorbid MDD/GAD (n = 266) diagnosis from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). The Composite Interview Diagnostic Instrument was used to diagnose MDD and GAD. Cognitive profiles were measured using the Leiden Index of Depression Sensitivity, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Results showed that differences in cognitive profiles between single MDD and single GAD subjects were present: scores on hopelessness/suicidality and rumination were significantly higher in MDD than GAD, whereas anxiety sensitivity for physical concerns and pathological worry were higher in GAD than MDD. The cognitive profile of comorbid MDD/GAD showed more extreme depression cognitions compared to single disorders, and a similar anxiety profile compared to single GAD subjects. Despite the commonalities in cognitive profiles in MDD and GAD, there are differences suggesting that MDD and GAD have disorder-specific cognitive profiles. Findings of this investigation give support for models like the cognitive content-specificity model and the tripartite model and could provide useful handles for treatment focus.

  17. The comparison of attentional control deficits in the three group of normal, with social anxiety disorder and with comorbidity (social anxiety disorder and depression) students of Lorestan University

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadampour E; Rezaei F; Hosseini Ramaghani NA; Moradi M

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: One of the mechanisms that thought to underlie social anxiety disorder is dysfunction in attentional control. The current study was designed to compare attentional control deficits in the three group: normal, with social anxiety disorder and with comorbidity (social anxiety disorder and depression) students. Methods: The design of present study was causal-comparative. Statistical population of this study contained all normal female students, with social anxiety disorde...

  18. Body dysmorphic disorder in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder: prevalence and clinical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição Costa, Daniel Lucas; Chagas Assunção, Melissa; Arzeno Ferrão, Ygor; Archetti Conrado, Luciana; Hajaj Gonzalez, Christina; Franklin Fontenelle, Leonardo; Fossaluza, Victor; Constantino Miguel, Eurípedes; Rodrigues Torres, Albina; Gedanke Shavitt, Roseli

    2012-11-01

    The prevalence, sociodemographic aspects, and clinical features of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been previously addressed in primarily relatively small samples. We performed a cross-sectional demographic and clinical assessment of 901 OCD patients participating in the Brazilian Research Consortium on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders. We used the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders; Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale; Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (DY-BOCS); Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale; Clinical Global Impression Scale; and Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. The lifetime prevalence of BDD was 12.1%. The individuals with comorbid BDD (OCD-BDD; n = 109) were younger than were those without it. In addition, the proportions of single and unemployed patients were greater in the OCD-BDD group. This group of patients also showed higher rates of suicidal behaviors; mood, anxiety, and eating disorders; hypochondriasis; skin picking; Tourette syndrome; and symptoms of the sexual/religious, aggressive, and miscellaneous dimensions. Furthermore, OCD-BDD patients had an earlier onset of OC symptoms; greater severity of OCD, depression, and anxiety symptoms; and poorer insight. After logistic regression, the following features were associated with OCD-BDD: current age; age at OCD onset; severity of the miscellaneous DY-BOCS dimension; severity of depressive symptoms; and comorbid social phobia, dysthymia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and skin picking. Because OCD patients might not inform clinicians about concerns regarding their appearance, it is essential to investigate symptoms of BDD, especially in young patients with early onset and comorbid social anxiety, chronic depression, skin picking, or eating disorders. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The diagnosis and treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin; Boerner J, Reinhard; Kasper, Siegfried; Linden, Michael; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common and serious disease with a lifetime prevalence of 4.3% to 5.9%. It is underdiagnosed in primary care. Recommendations on the treatment of GAD are given on the basis of all available findings from pertinent randomized trials, retrieved by a selective search of the literature. Among psychotherapeutic techniques, various kinds of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have been found useful in controlled trials. The drugs of first choice include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and the calcium-channel modulator pregabalin. Tricyclic antidepressants are also effective but have more adverse effects than SSRIs. Although benzodiazepines are effective anxiolytic agents for short-term use, they should not be given over the long term because of the danger of addiction. Buspirone, an azapirone, was found to be effective in a small number of trials, but the findings across trials are inconsistent. The response rate of GAD to CBT in published studies lies between 47% and 75%, while its response rate to drug treatment lies between 44% and 81%. The treatment of GAD with CBT and drugs is evidence-based and has a good chance of improving the manifestations of the disorder.

  20. Beliefs regarding child anxiety and parenting competence in parents of children with separation anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herren, Chantal; In-Albon, Tina; Schneider, Silvia

    2013-03-01

    Despite the fact that numerous developmental models have highlighted the role of parental cognitive processes in connection with anxiety disorders in children and adolescents, the role of parents' beliefs about their children and parenting remains largely unexplored. This study investigated the specific association between parental beliefs and child separation anxiety. Parents of children with a diagnosis of Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD) reported on beliefs and expectations related to their child's fears and own parenting competence. To study the potential specificity of relationships, a clinical control group of mothers of children with social phobia (SoP) and a group of mothers of children without a mental disorder (healthy controls, HC) were included. Results indicated that parents of anxious children had significantly higher levels of dysfunctional beliefs than the parents in the HC group. Mothers of children with SAD showed lower levels of parenting self-efficacy than mothers of children with SoP. They also demonstrated lower parenting self-efficacy and satisfaction compared to mothers of healthy children. Parental dysfunctional beliefs about child anxiety and paternal parenting self-efficacy were significantly positively associated with child anxiety. The effects remained significant after controlling for parental anxiety and depression. Due to the cross-sectional design of the study, causality of the found effects cannot be inferred. Data suggest that children's anxiety and parents' beliefs about their child's anxiety, coping skills and parenting are strongly associated. Further research is needed to investigate whether addressing parental cognitions in addition to parents' anxiety may improve prevention and intervention of child anxiety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Uric acid in major depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Catherine N; Bot, Mariska; Scheffer, Peter G; Snieder, Harold; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2018-01-01

    Uric acid has neuroprotective effects, owing to its antioxidant properties. Lowered antioxidant capacity, causing increased oxidative stress, may be involved in affective disorders and might be altered by antidepressants. This study investigated the association of plasma uric acid, the greatest contributor to blood antioxidant capacity, with major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders. Data were from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety including patients with current (N = 1648), remitted (N = 609) MDD and/or anxiety disorders (of which N = 710 antidepressant users) and 618 controls. Diagnoses were established with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Symptom severity was assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms-Self Report, Beck Anxiety Inventory and Fear Questionnaire. Uric acid was measured in plasma. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic, health and lifestyle variables. Plasma uric acid adjusted mean levels were lower in current MDD and/or anxiety disorder(s) (289μmol/l) compared to remitted disorders (298μmol/l, p uric acid. Limitations include the lack of data on dietary intake which could be a potential confounding factor. From these cross-sectional findings, the association between uric acid and psychopathology cannot be inferred to be causal. This large scale study finds plasma uric acid levels are lower in current, but not remitted, MDD and/or anxiety disorders, according to a dose-response gradient. This suggests the involvement of decreased antioxidant status in affective disorders, and points to their potential as an avenue for treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Passananti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2, Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, and Symptom Check List (SCL-90. Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC.

  3. Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule – Autism Addendum: Reliability and Validity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Renno, Patricia; Kendall, Philip C.; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Storch, Eric A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Assessing anxiety in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is inherently challenging due to overlapping (e.g., social avoidance) and ambiguous symptoms (e.g., fears of change). An ASD addendum to the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule–Child/Parent, Parent Version (ADIS/ASA) was developed to provide a systematic approach for differentiating traditional anxiety disorders from symptoms of ASD and more ambiguous, ASD-related anxiety symptoms. Method Inter-rater reliability and convergent and discriminant validity were examined in a sample of 69 youth with ASD (8–13 years, 75% male, IQ:68–143) seeking treatment for anxiety. The parents of participants completed the ADIS/ASA and a battery of behavioral measures. A second rater independently observed and scored recordings of the original interviews. Results Findings suggest reliable measurement of comorbid (ICC=0.85–0.98; κ =0.67–0.91) as well as ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms (ICC=0.87–95, κ=0.77–0.90) in children with ASD. Convergent and discriminant validity were supported for the traditional anxiety symptoms on the ADIS/ASA, whereas convergent and discriminant validity were partially supported for the ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms. Conclusions Results provide evidence for the reliability and validity of the ADIS/ASA as a measure of traditional anxiety categories in youth with ASD, with partial support for the validity of the ambiguous anxiety-like categories. Unlike other measures, the ADIS/ASA differentiates comorbid anxiety disorders from overlapping and ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms in ASD, allowing for more precise measurement and clinical conceptualization. Ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms appear phenomenologically distinct from comorbid anxiety disorders and may reflect either symptoms of ASD or a novel variant of anxiety in ASD. PMID:27925775

  4. Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Autism Addendum: Reliability and Validity in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Renno, Patricia; Kendall, Philip C; Wood, Jeffrey J; Storch, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    Assessing anxiety in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is inherently challenging due to overlapping (e.g., social avoidance) and ambiguous symptoms (e.g., fears of change). An ASD addendum to the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Child/Parent, Parent Version (ADIS/ASA) was developed to provide a systematic approach for differentiating traditional anxiety disorders from symptoms of ASD and more ambiguous, ASD-related anxiety symptoms. Interrater reliability and convergent and discriminant validity were examined in a sample of 69 youth with ASD (8-13 years, 75% male, IQ = 68-143) seeking treatment for anxiety. The parents of participants completed the ADIS/ASA and a battery of behavioral measures. A second rater independently observed and scored recordings of the original interviews. Findings suggest reliable measurement of comorbid (intraclass correlation = 0.85-0.98, κ = 0.67-0.91) as well as ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms (intraclass correlation = 0.87-95, κ = 0.77-0.90) in children with ASD. Convergent and discriminant validity were supported for the traditional anxiety symptoms on the ADIS/ASA, whereas convergent and discriminant validity were partially supported for the ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms. Results provide evidence for the reliability and validity of the ADIS/ASA as a measure of traditional anxiety categories in youth with ASD, with partial support for the validity of the ambiguous anxiety-like categories. Unlike other measures, the ADIS/ASA differentiates comorbid anxiety disorders from overlapping and ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms in ASD, allowing for more precise measurement and clinical conceptualization. Ambiguous anxiety-like symptoms appear phenomenologically distinct from comorbid anxiety disorders and may reflect either symptoms of ASD or a novel variant of anxiety in ASD.

  5. A translational approach to the genetics of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, N W; Dimatelis, J J; Van Zyl, P J; Hemmings, S M J; Kinnear, C; Russell, V A; Stein, D J; Lochner, C

    2018-04-02

    There have been important advances in our understanding of the genetic architecture of anxiety disorders. At the same time, relatively few genes have reached genome wide significance in anxiety disorders, and there is relatively little work on how exposure to an adverse environment impacts on gene expression in either animal models or human clinical populations. Here we assessed differential expression of genes of the dorsal striatum involved in synaptic transmission in an animal models of early adversity (maternal separation followed by restraint stress), and investigated whether variants in these genes were associated with risk for anxiety disorders, particularly in the presence of environmental stressors. Fifty-two male Sprague Dawley rats underwent maternal separation, and gene expression was studied using array technology. The human homologues of the differentially expressed genes were screened and analysed in a DSM-IV anxiety disorders cohort, and healthy controls (patients, n = 92; controls, n = 194), using blood. Two candidate genes (Mmp9 and Bdnf) were aberrantly expressed in the experimental rodent group relative to controls. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human homologues of these genes were significantly associated with susceptibility for anxiety disorders (MMP9: rs3918242 and BDNF: rs6265, rs10835210 and rs11030107). Three of these (BDNF: rs6265, rs10835210, rs11030107) were found to interact significantly with childhood trauma severity resulting in increased likelihood of an anxiety disorder diagnosis. This study provides insights into the utility of rat models for identifying molecular candidates for anxiety disorders in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichstrom, Lars; Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne; Angold, Adrian; Egger, Helen Link; Solheim, Elisabet; Sveen, Trude Hamre

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many disorders in childhood and adolescence were already present in the preschool years. However, there is little empirical research on the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in young children. A true community study using structured diagnostic tools has yet to be published. Methods: All children born in 2003 or 2004 in the city of…

  7. Impact of parental history of substance use disorders on the clinical course of anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskowitz Amanda T

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the psychological difficulties seen in children of parents with substance use problems, the anxiety disorders are among the most chronic conditions. Although children of alcoholic parents often struggle with the effects of parental substance use problems long into adulthood, empirical investigations of the influence of parental substance use disorders on the course of anxiety disorders in adult offspring are rare. The purpose of this study was to examine prospectively the relationship between parental substance use disorders and the course of anxiety disorders in adulthood over the course of 12 years. Methods Data on 618 subjects were derived from the Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project (HARP, a longitudinal naturalistic investigation of the clinical course of multiple anxiety disorders. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates were used to calculate probabilities of time to anxiety disorder remission and relapse. Proportional hazards regressions were conducted to determine whether the likelihood of remission and relapse for specific anxiety disorders was lower for those who had a history of parental substance use disorders than for individuals without this parental history. Results Adults with a history of parental substance use disorders were significantly more likely to be divorced and to have a high school level of education. History of parental substance use disorder was a significant predictor of relapse of social phobia and panic disorders. Conclusion These findings provide compelling evidence that adult children of parents with substance use disorders are more likely to have relapses of social phobia and panic disorders. Clinicians who treat adults with anxiety disorders should assess parental substance use disorders and dependence histories. Such information may facilitate treatment planning with regards to their patients' level of vulnerability to perceive scrutiny by others in social situations, and ability to

  8. Effect of juggling therapy on anxiety disorders in female patients

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    Nakahara Toshihiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of juggling therapy for anxiety disorder patients. Design and Method Subjects were 17 female outpatients who met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorders. Subjects were treated with standard psychotherapy, medication and counseling for 6 months. For the last 3 months of treatment, subjects were randomized into either a non-juggling group (n = 9 or a juggling therapy group (juggling group: n = 8. The juggling group gradually acquired juggling skills by practicing juggling beanbags (otedama in Japan with both hands. The therapeutic effect was evaluated using scores of psychological testing (STAI: State and Trate Anxiety Inventry, POMS: Profile of Mood Status and of ADL (FAI: Franchay Activity Index collected before treatment, 3 months after treatment (before juggling therapy, and at the end of both treatments. Results After 6 months, an analysis of variance revealed that scores on the state anxiety, trait anxiety subscales of STAI and tension-anxiety (T-A score of POMS were significantly lower in the juggling group than in the non-juggling group (p Conclusion These findings suggest that juggling therapy may be effective for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  9. Maternal Anxiety and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD in Children

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    Roohallah Mirzaaghas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim:  According to the previous studies, anxiety along with some other psychiatric disorders is common among mothers of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Since maternal anxiety affects mother-child interactions, early treatment plays an important role in the prognosis of ADHD in children. This study aimed to determine the relationship between maternal anxiety and hyperactivity in children. Methods: This study was conducted on 112 mothers of ADHD children (aged 6-12 years, selected via convenience sampling from October to December 2012. The subjects lived in districts 2 and 6 of Tehran and were referred to consultation centers. Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 42 (DASS-42 and Swanson, Nolan and Pelham (SNAP-IV questionnaires were completed by the subjects. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used for the analysis of the relationship between variables. Results: A positive correlation was found between maternal anxiety and children’s hyperactivity (P=0.05. In fact, high levels of maternal anxiety are accounted for various child-rearing problems such as children’s hyperactivity. Conclusion: High levels of maternal anxiety lead to child rearing problems, which in turn cause various disorders such as hyperactivity in children.

  10. Discriminant and Convergent Validity of the Anxiety Construct in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

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    Renno, Patricia; Wood, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite reports of high anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), there is controversy regarding differential diagnosis of ASD symptoms and anxiety symptoms. This study examined 88 children, aged 7-11 years, with ASD referred for concerns about anxiety. A multitrait-(social anxiety, separation anxiety, overall anxiety severity, and…

  11. Serotonergic drugs in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Boer, JA; Bosker, FJ; Slaap, BR

    Serotonergic dysfunction has been implicated in the aetiology of several psychiatric conditions, including depressive and anxiety disorders. Much of the evidence for the role of serotonin (5-HT) in these disorders comes from treatment studies with serotonergic drugs, including selective serotonin

  12. Ambiguity in the Manifestation of Adult Separation Anxiety Disorder Occurring in Complex Anxiety Presentations: Two Clinical Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudaee-Faass, Sigal; Marnane, Claire; Wagner, Renate

    2009-01-01

    Two case reports are described in which patients presented for the treatment of multiple comorbid anxiety disorders, all of which appeared to derive from prolonged separation anxiety disorder. In particular, these adults had effectively altered their lifestyles to avoid separation, thereby displaying only ambiguous separation anxiety symptoms that…

  13. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders among nurses of a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SCID), 57% of the 100 study sample of female nurses of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria met definitive diagnoses for Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Major Depressive Disorder, and Major Depression with probable Panic Disorder.

  14. Speech and language deficits in separation anxiety disorder

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    Roha M. Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Separation anxiety disorder (SAD is one of the most commonly occurring pediatric anxiety disorders. Children with SAD are characterized by excessive anxiety of separation from the primary attachment figure. These children exhibit fear of separation from their parents and display behaviors such as clinging, excessive crying, and tantrums. Children with SAD are found to have significant brain changes. SAD can co-occur with other conditions such as autism spectrum disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Past studies have identified not only cognitive deficits in children diagnosed with SAD, but also speech and language deficits, which vary depending on comorbidities. A team-centered approach is essential in the assessment and treatment of children diagnosed with SAD.

  15. The overlap between anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

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    Goodwin, Guy M

    2015-09-01

    The anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder. In addition to the specific symptoms of these disorders, there may be a common experience of anxiety and even dysphoria across the conditions, and of course recourse to the same drug or choice of drugs for treatment. This overlap probably occurs because of universal dimensions of distress or negative affectivity, a shared genetic predisposition, and a common neurobiology Evidence of shared genes is still based mainly on twin studies, but the shared neurobiology can be investigated directly by the investigation of emotional or cognitive bias either behaviorally or using functional brain imaging. This intermediate phenotype can then provide a substrate for understanding and developing medicines and psychological treatments.

  16. Prevalence rates of mental disorders in Chilean prisons.

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    Adrian P Mundt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: High rates of mental disorders have been reported for prison populations worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. The present study aimed to establish prevalence rates of mental disorders in Chilean prisoners. METHOD: A nationwide random sample of 1008 prisoners was assessed in 7 penal institutions throughout Chile. Twelve-month prevalence rates were established using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI and compared to the prevalence rates previously published for the general population. RESULTS: Prevalence rates were 12.2% (95% CI, 10.2-14.1 for any substance use disorder, 8.3% (6.6-10.0 for anxiety disorders, 8.1% (6.5-9.8 for affective disorders, 5.7% (4.4-7.1 for intermittent explosive disorders, 2.2% (1.4-3.2 for ADHD of the adult, and 0.8% (0.3-1.3 for non-affective psychoses. Significantly higher prevalence rates among prisoners as compared to the general population in Chile were seen for major depression (6.1% vs. 3.7% males, Z=2.58, p<0.05 and illicit drug use (3.3% vs. 0.6% males with drug abuse, Z=2.04, p<0.05; 2.6% vs. 0.1% females with drug abuse, Z=5.36, p<0.001; 3.4% vs. 1.1% males with drug dependence, Z=3.70; p<0.001. Dysthymia (6.5% vs. 15.6%, Z=-2.39, p<0.05, simple (3.3% vs. 11.5%, Z=-3.13, p<0.001 and social phobias (3.9% vs. 9.7%, Z=2.38, p<0.05 were significantly less frequent in the female prison population than in the general population. One-year prevalence rates of alcohol abuse (2.3% vs. 3.9%; Z=-2.04; p<0.05 and dependence (2.7% vs. 8.2%; Z=-5.24; p<0.001 were less prevalent in the male prison population than in the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Service provision for prison populations in Chile should acknowledge high rates of depression and illicit drug use. Overall prevalence rates are lower than reported in other LMICs. Previous research in prison populations in LMICs might have overestimated prevalence rates of mental disorders.

  17. Targeting the endocannabinoid system to treat anxiety-related disorders.

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    Korem, Nachshon; Zer-Aviv, Tomer Mizrachi; Ganon-Elazar, Eti; Abush, Hila; Akirav, Irit

    2016-05-01

    The endocannabinoid system plays an important role in the control of emotions, and its dysregulation has been implicated in several psychiatric disorders. The most common self-reported reason for using cannabis is rooted in its ability to reduce feelings of stress, tension, and anxiety. Nevertheless, there are only few studies in controlled clinical settings that confirm that administration of cannabinoids can benefit patients with a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). There are considerable encouraging preclinical data to suggest that endocannabinoid-targeted therapeutics for anxiety disorders should continue. In this review, we will describe data supporting a role for the endocannabinoid system in preventing and treating anxiety-like behavior in animal models and PTSD patients. Cannabinoids have shown beneficial outcomes in rat and mouse models of anxiety and PTSD, but they also may have untoward effects that discourage their chronic usage, including anxiogenic effects. Hence, clinical and preclinical research on the endocannabinoid system should further study the effects of cannabinoids on anxiety and help determine whether the benefits of using exogenous cannabinoids outweigh the risks. In general, this review suggests that targeting the endocannabinoid system represents an attractive and novel approach to the treatment of anxiety-related disorders and, in particular, PTSD.

  18. The history of generalized anxiety disorder as a diagnostic category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocq, Marc-Antoine

    2017-06-01

    From the 19th century into the 20th century, the terms used to diagnose generalized anxiety included "pantophobia" and "anxiety neurosis." Such terms designated paroxysmal manifestations (panic attacks) as well as interparoxysmal phenomenology (the apprehensive mental state). Also, generalized anxiety was considered one of numerous symptoms of neurasthenia, a vaguely defined illness. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) appeared as a diagnostic category in the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders ( DSM-III ) in 1980, when anxiety neurosis was split into GAD and panic disorder. The distinct responses these two disorders had to imipramine therapy was one reason to distinguish between the two. Since the revised DSM-III ( DSM-III-R ), worry about a number of life circumstances has been gradually emphasized as the distinctive symptom of GAD. Thus, a cognitive aspect of anxiety has become the core criterion of GAD. The validity of GAD as an independent category has been questioned from DSM-III up to preparation of DSM-5 . Areas of concern have included the difficulty to establish clear boundaries between GAD and (i) personality dimensions, (ii) other anxiety-spectrum disorders, and (iii) nonbipolar depression. The National Institute of Mental Health has recently proposed the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), a framework destined to facilitate biological research into the etiology of mental symptoms. Within the RDoC framework, generalized anxiety might be studied as a dimension denominated "anxious apprehension" that would typically fit into the research domain called "negative valence systems" and the more specific construct termed "potential threat."

  19. Family Factors in the Development, Treatment, and Prevention of Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Kelly L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that anxiety disorders run in families, and current etiological models have proposed both genetic and environmental pathways to anxiety development. In this paper, the familial role in the development, treatment, and prevention of anxiety disorders in children is reviewed. We focus on three anxiety disorders in youth,…

  20. Prevalence and predictors of depression and anxiety among the elderly population living in geriatric homes in Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Dalia; El Shair, Inas Helmi; Taher, Eman; Zyada, Fadia

    2014-12-01

    Anxiety and depression are common in the elderly and affect their quality of life. The rates of depression and anxiety are higher among those living in institutional settings and are usually undiagnosed. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of depression, anxiety and mixed form (i.e. depression and anxiety) in the elderly living at geriatric homes. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 240 elderly participants from four randomly selected geriatric homes in Cairo. A pretested interview questionnaire was used to collect data. A short version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, the Katz scale for Activity of Daily living, the three-item loneliness scale and the Personal Wellbeing Index Scale were used. The prevalence of depression, anxiety and mixed disorder among the studied group were 37.5, 14.2 and 30%, respectively. Old age and the presence of comorbidities were predictors for depression and/or anxiety. Female sex, a lower social class, insufficient income, partial independence and loneliness feeling are significant predictors for depression. Being married and loneliness feeling are significant predictors for anxiety, whereas the functional status is a significant predictor for mixed depression and anxiety. Depression and/or anxiety were found in more than 80% of the studied group. An older age, female sex, insufficient income, a lower social class, a partially independent functional status, the presence of comorbidities, more frequent loneliness feeling and being married or divorced were found to be significant predictors for these problems. This study reflects the need for the screening of the elderly in geriatric homes for depression and/or anxiety, especially among high-risk groups, and developing interventions to prevent and control such problems.

  1. Comparison of the Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Performance-Enhancing Drug Users and Nonuser Bodybuilders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostovar, Afshin; Haerinejad, Mohammad Javad; Akbarzadeh, Samad; Keshavarz, Mojtaba

    2017-10-01

    Objective: The present study aimed at comparing the prevalence of major psychiatric disorders including major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and generalized anxiety disorder between performance-enhancing drug users and nonuser bodybuilders. Moreover, the prevalence of major psychiatric disorders in bodybuilders was also reported. Method: In this study, 453 athletes were recruited from Bushehr bodybuilding gyms from February to May 2015. A structured questionnaire was used to collect the participants' information, including demographic characteristics, sports' status and performance-enhancing drug use. According to the condition of performance-enhancing drug use, the participants were divided into current users, non-current users, and nonusers. The psychiatric status of the participants was evaluated using DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and schizophrenia. We also asked about the acute psychotic disturbances after using performance-enhancing drugs, alcohol use, and history of aggressive behavior in bodybuilders. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and chi-square tests. Results: Prevalence of major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, generalized anxiety disorder, and the overall prevalence of psychiatric disorders in the bodybuilders was 19.7%, 3.8%, 1.5%, 16.6%, and 26.7%, respectively. After using performance-enhancing drugs, 33% of the bodybuilders had experienced acute psychological disturbances. There were no significant differences between current, non-current, and nonuser bodybuilding athletes in the measured psychiatric disorders. Conclusion: Prevalence of psychiatric disorders was not significantly different in performance-enhancing drug users and nonusers. Thus, it can be concluded that performance-enhancing drugs do not increase the risk of psychiatric disorders in bodybuilders.

  2. Comparison of the Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Performance-Enhancing Drug Users and Nonuser Bodybuilders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Ostovar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed at comparing the prevalence of major psychiatric disorders including major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and generalized anxiety disorder between performance-enhancing drug users and nonuser bodybuilders. Moreover, the prevalence of major psychiatric disorders in bodybuilders was also reported.Method: In this study, 453 athletes were recruited from Bushehr bodybuilding gyms from February to May 2015. A structured questionnaire was used to collect the participants’ information, including demographic characteristics, sports’ status and performance-enhancing drug use. According to the condition of performance-enhancing drug use, the participants were divided into current users, non-current users, and nonusers. The psychiatric status of the participants was evaluated using DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and schizophrenia. We also asked about the acute psychotic disturbances after using performance-enhancing drugs, alcohol use, and history of aggressive behavior in bodybuilders. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and chi-square tests.Results: Prevalence of major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, generalized anxiety disorder, and the overall prevalence of psychiatric disorders in the bodybuilders was 19.7%, 3.8%, 1.5%, 16.6%, and 26.7%, respectively. After using performance-enhancing drugs, 33% of the bodybuilders had experienced acute psychological disturbances. There were no significant differences between current, non-current, and nonuser bodybuilding athletes in the measured psychiatric disorders.Conclusion: Prevalence of psychiatric disorders was not significantly different in performance-enhancing drug users and nonusers. Thus, it can be concluded that performance-enhancing drugs do not increase the risk of psychiatric disorders in bodybuilders.

  3. Excess costs of social anxiety disorder in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dams, Judith; König, Hans-Helmut; Bleibler, Florian; Hoyer, Jürgen; Wiltink, Jörg; Beutel, Manfred E; Salzer, Simone; Herpertz, Stephan; Willutzki, Ulrike; Strauß, Bernhard; Leibing, Eric; Leichsenring, Falk; Konnopka, Alexander

    2017-04-15

    Social anxiety disorder is one of the most frequent mental disorders. It is often associated with mental comorbidities and causes a high economic burden. The aim of our analysis was to estimate the excess costs of patients with social anxiety disorder compared to persons without anxiety disorder in Germany. Excess costs of social anxiety disorder were determined by comparing two data sets. Patient data came from the SOPHO-NET study A1 (n=495), whereas data of persons without anxiety disorder originated from a representative phone survey (n=3213) of the general German population. Missing data were handled by "Multiple Imputation by Chained Equations". Both data sets were matched using "Entropy Balancing". Excess costs were calculated from a societal perspective for the year 2014 using general linear regression with a gamma distribution and log-link function. Analyses considered direct costs (in- and outpatient treatment, rehabilitation, and professional and informal care) and indirect costs due to absenteeism from work. Total six-month excess costs amounted to 451€ (95% CI: 199€-703€). Excess costs were mainly caused by indirect excess costs due to absenteeism from work of 317€ (95% CI: 172€-461€), whereas direct excess costs amounted to 134€ (95% CI: 110€-159€). Costs for medication, unemployment and disability pension was not evaluated. Social anxiety disorder was associated with statistically significant excess costs, in particular due to indirect costs. As patients in general are often unaware of their disorder or its severity, awareness should be strengthened. Prevention and early treatment might reduce long-term indirect costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing Anxiety Among Individuals Receiving Treatment for Alcohol and Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenico, Lisa H; Lewis, Ben; Hazarika, Mythili; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2017-11-01

    Despite high prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) substance use disorder (SUD) comorbidity, little is known regarding demographic characteristics associated with GAD in SUD treatment seekers. To characterize demographic differences between inpatient SUD treatment seekers reporting varying levels of GAD symptomatology. General linear models, chi-square test, t test, and correlational analyses were utilized to assess group differences. Groups included those with no history of significant anxiety (No GAD; n = 256), subclinical anxiety (Subclinical; n = 85), and those meeting GAD diagnostic criteria (GAD; n = 61). The No GAD group differed substantially from Subclinical and GAD individuals. With the exception of polysubstance use, no differences were found regarding Subclinical and GAD groups. Individuals with subclinical GAD symptoms and those meeting diagnostic criteria were nearly identical regarding precursors to problematic substance use, severity of use, and key mental health indicators. Findings suggest subclinical levels of GAD should not be overlooked when assessing and treating SUDs.

  5. [Depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorders in labor migrants, asylum seekers and refugees. A systematic overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindert, Jutta; Brähler, Elmar; Wittig, Ulla; Mielck, Andreas; Priebe, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 there were about 200 millions of transnational "voluntary" migrants like labor migrants and "involuntary migrants" like refugees and asylum seekers worldwide. Depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in general populations and is reported to be highly prevalent among migrants. We aimed to assess and compare syndromes and symptoms of depression and anxiety in labor migrants and refugees; and to examine whether the prevalence rates are associated with study methods' and study quality. We systematically searched in the databases MEDLINE and EMBASE for studies published from 1994 - 2007. Studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria are 1) systematically described: 2) and evaluated with 15 quality criteria. The literature search generated 348 results; and 37 fulfilled our inclusion criteria (35 populations) with n = 24 681 migrants (labor migrants: n = 16 971; refugees: n = 7710). Size of studies varies from a minimum of n = 55 participants to a maximum of n = 4558 participants (Median: n = 338). Prevalence rates for depression vary between 3 % and 47 % (labor migrants) and between 3 % and 81 % (refugees); for anxiety between 6 % and 44 % (labor migrants) and between 5 % and 90 % (refugees) and for PTSD between 4 % and 86 %. No study fulfilled all 15 quality criteria. Migrants are a heterogeneous group and prevalence rates vary widely between studies. There is a need of high-quality representative studies on migrants' mental health to adequately plan health and social care.

  6. Alcohol use, anxiety, and insomnia in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, M. Cristina; Amspoker, Amber B.; Nadorff, Michael R.; Kunik, Mark E.; Cully, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Nancy; Calleo, Jessica; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examined the presence and frequency of alcohol consumption among older primary care patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and their relation to demographic variables, insomnia, worry, and anxiety. We expected alcohol-use distribution to be similar to previous reports and alcohol use to be associated with higher anxiety and insomnia. A third aim was to examine the moderating role of alcohol use on the relation between anxiety and insomnia. We expected alcohol use to worsen the relation between anxiety and insomnia. Design Baseline data from a randomized controlled trial Sample 223 patients, age 60 and older, with DSM-IV GAD diagnoses Setting Patients were recruited through internal medicine, family practice, and geriatric clinics at 2 diverse healthcare settings: Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Administration Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine. Measurements Measures addressed alcohol use (presence and frequency); insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index); self-reported worry severity (Penn State Worry Questionnaire − Abbreviated); clinician-rated worry severity (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale); self-reported anxiety severity (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - Trait); and clinician-rated anxiety (Structured Interview Guidelines for the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale). Results Most patients endorsed alcohol use in the past month, but overall weekly frequency was low. Presence and frequency of use among patients with GAD were greater than in prior reports of primary care samples. Alcohol use among patients with GAD was associated with higher education and female gender. Higher education also was associated with more drinks per week, and Caucasians reported more drinks per week than African Americans. Alcohol use was associated with less severe insomnia, lower self-reported anxiety, and less clinician-rated worry and anxiety. More drinks per week were associated with lower clinician-rated anxiety. Moderation analyses revealed lower

  7. The anxious heart in whose mind? A systematic review and meta-regression of factors associated with anxiety disorder diagnosis, treatment and morbidity risk in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Cosh, Suzanne M; Baumeister, Harald

    2014-12-01

    To (1) report the prognostic association between anxiety disorder subtypes and major adverse cardiac events (MACE), (2) report anxiety disorder prevalence in coronary heart disease (CHD), and (3) report the efficacy of anxiety disorder treatments in CHD. A comprehensive electronic database search was performed in November 2013 for studies reporting anxiety disorder prevalence according to structured interview in CHD samples or MACE, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing anxiety disorder treatment with placebo or usual care. From 4041 articles 42 samples were selected for extraction (8 for MACE prognosis, 39 for prevalence, no RCTs were eligible). Five generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) studies reported 883 MACE events (combined n=2851). There was a non-significant association between GAD and MACE (risk ratio=1.20, 95% CI .86-1.68, P=.28) however the effect size was highly significant in outpatient samples (adjusted hazard ratio=1.94, 95% CI 1.45-2.60, Panxiety disorder subtype was associated with MACE. Prevalence data showed high comorbidity with depression (49.06%; 95% CI 34.28-64.01) and substantial heterogeneity between studies. Panic disorder prevalence was higher in psychiatrist/psychologist raters (9.92% vs. 4.74%) as was GAD (18.45% vs. 13.01%). Panic and GAD estimates were also heterogeneous according to DSM-III-R versus DSM-IV taxonomies. The paucity of extant anxiety disorder RCTs, alongside MACE risk for GAD outpatients, should stimulate further anxiety disorder intervention in CHD populations. Research should focus on depression and anxiety, thereby unraveling disorder specific and more generic pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Does generalized anxiety disorder predict coronary heart disease risk factors independently of major depressive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Steven D; Sydeman, Sumner J

    2005-09-01

    Anxiety symptoms are associated with elevated coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but it is not known whether such associations extend to anxiety disorders or if they are independent of depression. We sought to determine if generalized anxiety disorder is associated with elevated CHD risk, and whether this association is independent of or interacts with major depressive disorder. Generalized anxiety and major depressive disorders were assessed in a cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of U.S. adults aged 25-74 (N=3032). Coronary heart disease risk was determined by self-reported smoking status, body mass index, and recent medication use for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes. Generalized anxiety disorder independently predicted increased CHD risk (F(1,3018)=5.14; b=0.39; 95% confidence interval (0.05-0.72)) and tended to denote the greatest risk in the absence of major depressive disorder. The cross-sectional design cannot determine the causal direction of the association. Generalized anxiety disorder appears to be associated with elevated CHD risk in the general population. It may denote excess CHD risk relative to major depressive disorder, and clinicians should consider CHD risk when treating generalized anxiety disorder.

  9. Sequential Treatment of Comorbid Insomnia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleville, Geneviève; Ivers, Hans; Bélanger, Lynda; Blais, France C; Morin, Charles M

    2016-09-01

    To explore the efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for patients with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and insomnia using 2 sequential treatments. Using a single-case methodology, 10 women (mean age = 45) with chronic insomnia and GAD were randomly assigned to CBT for GAD followed by CBT for insomnia, or to CBT for insomnia followed by CBT for GAD. Sleep and anxiety were measured via diagnostic interviews, daily diaries, and self-report questionnaires. Time series analyses, group effect sizes, and indications of clinically significant change revealed improvements on anxiety, worry, and sleep after CBT for GAD. Following CBT for insomnia, positive changes were observed on sleep and, to a lesser extent, anxiety and worry. In the presence of comorbid GAD and insomnia, initiating treatment for GAD first produced superior clinical benefits in anxiety and sleep. The addition of insomnia-specific treatment led to additional improvements in worry and sleep quality. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Prevalence and correlates of body dysmorphic disorder in a community sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sophie C; Turner, Cynthia M; Mond, Jonathan; Hudson, Jennifer L

    2017-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder typically begins in adolescence, yet little is known about the prevalence and correlates of the disorder in this age group. The current study aimed to explore the presenting features of adolescents meeting probable criteria for body dysmorphic disorder in a large community sample, and compare levels of comorbid psychopathology, quality of life and mental health service use between adolescents with probable body dysmorphic disorder and those without. Questionnaires were completed at school by 3149 adolescents: 63% male, aged 12-18 years ( M = 14.58). These assessed Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) body dysmorphic disorder criteria, past mental health service use and symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder, anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and eating disorders. In male participants, additional measures assessed quality of life, muscularity concerns, emotional symptoms, peer problems, conduct problems and hyperactivity. The prevalence of probable body dysmorphic disorder was 1.7%; there was no sex difference in prevalence, but older adolescents reported higher prevalence than younger adolescents. Probable body dysmorphic disorder participants reported substantially elevated levels of psychopathology, quality of life impairment and mental health service use compared to non-body dysmorphic disorder participants. The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in adolescents is similar to adult samples, and probable body dysmorphic disorder is associated with comorbidity, distress and functional impairment in a community sample. Further research is required to better understand the presentation of body dysmorphic disorder in adolescents, and to improve diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Experience sampling and ecological momentary assessment for studying the daily lives of patients with anxiety disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Laura C; Nauta, Maaike H; Aan Het Rot, Marije

    2014-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent. Symptoms may occur unpredictably (e.g., panic attacks) or predictably in specific situations (e.g., social phobia). Consequently, it may be difficult to assess anxiety and related constructs realistically in the laboratory or by traditional retrospective questionnaires. Experience sampling methods (ESM) and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) can deepen the understanding of the course of anxiety disorders by frequently assessing symptoms and other variables in the natural environment. We review 34 ESM/EMA studies on adult panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, as well as anxiety disorders in youth. Benefits of ESM/EMA for the study of anxiety disorders include generating insight into the temporal variability of symptoms and into the associations among daily affect, behaviors, and situational cues. Further, ESM/EMA has been successfully combined with ambulatory assessment of physiological variables and with treatment evaluations. We provide suggestions for future research, as well as for clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. How people evaluate others with social anxiety disorder: A comparison to depression and general mental illness stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kristin N; Jeon, Andrew B; Blenner, Jordan A; Wiener, Richard L; Hope, Debra A

    2015-03-01

    Despite the availability of effective interventions, most individuals with social anxiety disorder do not seek treatment. Given their fear of negative evaluation, socially anxious individuals might be especially susceptible to stigma concerns, a recognized barrier for mental health treatment. However, very little is known about the stigma specific to social anxiety disorder. In a design similar to Feldman and Crandall (2007), university undergraduate students read vignettes about target individuals with a generic mental illness label, major depressive disorder, and social anxiety disorder. Subjects rated each of 3 people in the vignettes on social distance and 17 dimensions including dangerousness, heritability and prevalence of the disorder, and gender ratio. Results indicated that being male and not having experience with mental health treatment was associated with somewhat greater preferred social distance. Multiple regression analyses revealed that being embarrassed by the disorder and dangerousness predicted social distance across all 3 vignettes. The vignette for social anxiety disorder had the most complex model and included work impairment, more common among women, and more avoidable. These results have implications for understanding the specific aspects of the stigma associated with social anxiety disorder. Public service messages to reduce stigma should focus on more accurate information about dangerousness and mental illness, given this is an established aspect of mental illness stigma. More nuanced messages about social anxiety might be best incorporated into the treatment referral process and as part of treatment. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Social anxiety disorder and the psychobiology of self-consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Dan J.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) are characterized by fear or anxiety about social situations, but also by important alterations in self-referential processing. Given advances in our understanding of the neurocircuitry and neurochemistry of SAD, the question arises of the relationship between this research and an emergent literature on the psychobiology of self and self-consciousness. A number of investigations of SAD have highlighted altered activity in the medial prefrontal co...

  14. Duloxetine in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Trevor R; Olver, James S

    2008-01-01

    Trevor R Norman, James S OlverDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Duloxetine, a medication with effects on both serotonin and noradrenaline transporter molecules, has recently been approved for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. The evidence for its efficacy lies in a limited number of double blind, placebo controlled comparisons. Statistically significant improvements in the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale fro...

  15. Prevalence of stress, anxiety and depression in with Alzheimer caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Vito Elisabetta

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease presents a social and public health problem affecting millions of Italians. Those affected receive home care from caregivers, subjected to risk of stress. The present investigation focuses on stress, anxiety and depression in caregivers. Methods Data on 200 caregivers and their patients were collected using a specific form to assess cognitive, behavioural, functional patient (MMSE, and ADL-IAD and caregiver stress (CBI. The relationship between stress, depression and disease has been assessed by means of a linear regression, logistic analysis which reveals the relationship between anxiety, stress and depression and cognitive problems, age, the patient's income. Results The caregivers are usually female (64%, mean age of 56.1 years, daughters (70.5%, pensioners and housewives (30%, who care for the sick at home (79%. Of these, 53% had little time for themselves, 55% observed worsening of health, 56% are tired, 51% are not getting enough sleep. Overall, 55% have problems with the patient's family and/or their own family, 57% at work. Furthermore, 29% feel they are failing to cope with the situation as they wish to move away from home. The increase in the degree of anxiety and depression is directly proportional to the severity of the illness, affecting the patient (r = 0.3 stress and depression r = 0.4 related to CBI score. The memory disorders (OR = 8.4, engine problems (OR = 2.6, perception disorders (OR = 1.9 sick of the patient with Alzheimer's disease are predictive of caregiver stress, depression is associated with the presence of other disorders, mainly behavioural (OR = 5.2, low income (OR = 3.4, patients Conclusion The quality of life of caregivers is correlated with the severity of behavioural disorders and duration of the Alzheimer's disease. The severity of the disease plays an important role in reorganization of the family environment in families caring for patients not institutionalised. It is

  16. Mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders and later cause-specific sick leave in young adult employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torvik, Fartein Ask; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Gjerde, Line C; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Ystrom, Eivind; Tambs, Kristian; Røysamb, Espen; Østby, Kristian; Ørstavik, Ragnhild

    2016-08-03

    Mental disorders strongly influence work capability in young adults, but it is not clear which disorders that are most strongly associated with sick leave, and which diagnoses that are stated on the sick leave certificates. Better knowledge of the impairments associated with different mental disorders is needed for optimal planning of interventions and prioritization of health services. In the current study, we investigate the prospective associations between eight mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders, and later sick leave granted for mental, somatic, or any disorder. Lifetime mental disorders were assessed by structured diagnostic interviews in 2,178 young adults followed for eight years with registry data on sick leave. Relative risk ratios were estimated for the associations between each mental disorder and the different forms of sick leave. All included diagnoses were associated with later sick leave. In adjusted analyses, major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were the strongest predictors of sick leave granted for mental disorders, whereas social anxiety disorder and specific phobia were the strongest predictors of sick leave granted for somatic disorders. Specific phobia and major depressive disorder had the highest attributable fractions for all-cause sick leave. Mood and anxiety disorders constituted independent risk factors for all cause sick leave, whereas alcohol use disorders seemed to be of less importance in young adulthood. Disorders characterised by distress were most strongly associated with sick leave granted for mental disorders, whereas disorders characterised by fear primarily predicted sick leave granted for somatic conditions. A large part of all sick leave is related to specific phobia, due to the high prevalence of this disorder. The impairment associated with this common disorder may be under-acknowledged, and it could decrease work capacity among individuals with somatic disorders. This disorder has good treatment

  17. Mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders and later cause-specific sick leave in young adult employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fartein Ask Torvik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental disorders strongly influence work capability in young adults, but it is not clear which disorders that are most strongly associated with sick leave, and which diagnoses that are stated on the sick leave certificates. Better knowledge of the impairments associated with different mental disorders is needed for optimal planning of interventions and prioritization of health services. In the current study, we investigate the prospective associations between eight mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders, and later sick leave granted for mental, somatic, or any disorder. Methods Lifetime mental disorders were assessed by structured diagnostic interviews in 2,178 young adults followed for eight years with registry data on sick leave. Relative risk ratios were estimated for the associations between each mental disorder and the different forms of sick leave. Results All included diagnoses were associated with later sick leave. In adjusted analyses, major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were the strongest predictors of sick leave granted for mental disorders, whereas social anxiety disorder and specific phobia were the strongest predictors of sick leave granted for somatic disorders. Specific phobia and major depressive disorder had the highest attributable fractions for all-cause sick leave. Conclusions Mood and anxiety disorders constituted independent risk factors for all cause sick leave, whereas alcohol use disorders seemed to be of less importance in young adulthood. Disorders characterised by distress were most strongly associated with sick leave granted for mental disorders, whereas disorders characterised by fear primarily predicted sick leave granted for somatic conditions. A large part of all sick leave is related to specific phobia, due to the high prevalence of this disorder. The impairment associated with this common disorder may be under-acknowledged, and it could decrease work capacity among

  18. Symptom Similarities and Differences in Anxiety and Depressive Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Sirvanli Ozen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The question if there is a valid distinction between depression and anxiety disorders remains controversial. These two disorders have various overlaps in the symptomatology and sometimes it is difficult to make a clear diagnosis. The difficulty in making a definite diagnosis destined researchers to determine the differences and the similarities between anxiety and depression. The negative affect which has multiple dimensions such as low self-esteem, negative mood and negative cognitions is seen as the common factor in both disorders. The positive affect which has been defined as the harmony and satisfaction with others and milieu, is regarded as the discriminating factor for the diagnosis of depression. Further research has characterized somatic arousal as the third dimension, a candidate to be the discriminating factor for anxiety disorders. Although phenotypic models appear to find a solution for this problem the facts that negative affect dimension is more loaded compared to the other two dimensions and predominance of negative affect on several symptom patterns prevent researchers to reach a conclusive results regarding the differences between these two disorders. In this review article, symptom similarities and differences of anxiety and depressive disorders are discussed within the frame of phenotypic models and some alternative ideas are provided for possible changes in upcoming versions of classification systems.

  19. [Comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, H-P

    2015-03-01

    Patients with cancer face a high risk of comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders that have to be paradigmatically considered within a complex biopsychosocial context. Several conceptual challenges have to be mastered in arriving at a correct clinical diagnosis. Coexistent affective and anxiety disorders in cancer patients include a more dramatic subjective suffering, reduced psychological coping, possible negative interference with somatic treatment and rehabilitation, impaired quality of life and higher grades of psychosocial disability. They may also lead to an overall increased risk of somatic morbidity, a more rapid progression of cancer and a higher cancer-related mortality in the course of the disease. Manifold psychological, psychosocial and existential, cancer and treatment-related stressors have to be considered with respect to common neurobiological, especially neuroendocrine and neuroinflammatory mechanisms. Complex psychosomatic, somatopsychic and somato-somatic effects must always be considered. Evidence-based approaches in psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy exist for the integrative treatment of comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders in cancer.

  20. [Treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in terms of cognitive behavioral].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrowska, Anna; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    Risk of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) within life is estimated at 2.6-5.1%. Amongst etiological factors that affect the development of the disorder are: biological and psychological problems, including cognitive models. There are known several cognitive models: metacognitive, Borkovec'c model and the model developed in Quebec. Key cognitive contents that occur with generalized anxiety disorder are focused on two aspects: metacognitive beliefs and intolerance of uncertainty. A primary purpose of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is the modification of dysfunctional beliefs about worry. Cognitive behavioural therapy is effective in reducing anxiety, makes it easier to operate in the professional sphere and improves the quality of life. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  1. Anxiety trajectories in response to a speech task in social anxiety disorder: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial of CBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Amanda S.; Brozovich, Faith A.; Lee, Ihno A.; Jazaieri, Hooria; Goldin, Philippe R.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Gross, James J.

    2016-01-01

    The subjective experience of anxiety plays a central role in cognitive behavioral models of social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, much remains to be learned about the temporal dynamics of anxiety elicited by feared social situations. The aims of the current study were: 1) to compare anxiety trajectories during a speech task in individuals with SAD (n = 135) versus healthy controls (HCs; n = 47), and 2) to compare the effects of CBT on anxiety trajectories with a waitlist control condition. SAD was associated with higher levels of anxiety and greater increases in anticipatory anxiety compared to HCs, but not differential change in anxiety from pre- to post-speech. CBT was associated with decreases in anxiety from pre- to post-speech but not with changes in absolute levels of anticipatory anxiety or rates of change in anxiety during anticipation. The findings suggest that anticipatory experiences should be further incorporated into exposures. PMID:26760456

  2. Treatment of childhood anxiety disorder in the context of maternal anxiety disorder: a randomised controlled trial and economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Cathy; Cruddace, Susan; Gerry, Stephen; Gitau, Rachel; McIntosh, Emma; Mollison, Jill; Murray, Lynne; Shafran, Rosamund; Stein, Alan; Violato, Mara; Voysey, Merryn; Willetts, Lucy; Williams, Nicola; Yu, Ly-Mee; Cooper, Peter J

    2015-05-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for childhood anxiety disorders is associated with modest outcomes in the context of parental anxiety disorder. This study evaluated whether or not the outcome of CBT for children with anxiety disorders in the context of maternal anxiety disorders is improved by the addition of (i) treatment of maternal anxiety disorders, or (ii) treatment focused on maternal responses. The incremental cost-effectiveness of the additional treatments was also evaluated. Participants were randomised to receive (i) child cognitive-behavioural therapy (CCBT); (ii) CCBT with CBT to target maternal anxiety disorders [CCBT + maternal cognitive-behavioural therapy (MCBT)]; or (iii) CCBT with an intervention to target mother-child interactions (MCIs) (CCBT + MCI). A NHS university clinic in Berkshire, UK. Two hundred and eleven children with a primary anxiety disorder, whose mothers also had an anxiety disorder. All families received eight sessions of individual CCBT. Mothers in the CCBT + MCBT arm also received eight sessions of CBT targeting their own anxiety disorders. Mothers in the MCI arm received 10 sessions targeting maternal parenting cognitions and behaviours. Non-specific interventions were delivered to balance groups for therapist contact. Primary clinical outcomes were the child's primary anxiety disorder status and degree of improvement at the end of treatment. Follow-up assessments were conducted at 6 and 12 months. Outcomes in the economic analyses were identified and measured using estimated quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). QALYS were combined with treatment, health and social care costs and presented within an incremental cost-utility analysis framework with associated uncertainty. MCBT was associated with significant short-term improvement in maternal anxiety; however, after children had received CCBT, group differences were no longer apparent. CCBT + MCI was associated with a reduction in maternal overinvolvement

  3. The Development of Anxiety Disorders: Considering the Contributions of Attachment and Emotion Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbjorn, B. H.; Bender, P. K.; Reinholdt-Dunne, M. L.; Munck, L. A.; Ollendick, T. H.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders in childhood. Nonetheless, theoretical knowledge of the development and maintenance of childhood anxiety disorders is still in its infancy. Recently, research has begun to investigate the influence of emotion regulation on anxiety disorders. Although a relation between anxiety…

  4. Should OCD be classified as an anxiety disorder in DSM-V?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Dan J.; Fineberg, Naomi A.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Denys, Damiaan; Lochner, Christine; Nestadt, Gerald; Leckman, James F.; Rauch, Scott L.; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2010-01-01

    In DSM-III, DSM-III-R, and DSM-IV, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was classified as an anxiety disorder. In ICD-10, OCD is classified separately from the anxiety disorders, although within the same larger category as anxiety disorders (as one of the "neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform

  5. Collaborative care for panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder and social phobia in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curth, Nadja Kehler; Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Davidsen, Annette Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with anxiety disorders represent a significant part of a general practitioner’s patient population. However, there are organisational obstacles for optimal treatment, such as a lack of coordination of illness management and limited access to evidence-based treatment...... such as cognitive behavioral therapy. A limited number of studies suggest that collaborative care has a positive effect on symptoms for people with anxiety disorders. However, most studies are carried out in the USA and none have reported results for social phobia or generalised anxiety disorder separately. Thus......, there is a need for studies carried out in different settings for specific anxiety populations. A Danish model for collaborative care (the Collabri model) has been developed for people diagnosed with depression or anxiety disorders. The model is evaluated through four trials, of which three will be outlined...