WorldWideScience

Sample records for prevailing layers formed

  1. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  2. Epistaxis: Prevailing Factors and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Secchi, Myrian Marajó Dal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The epistaxis is one the most frequent otorhinolaryngologic emergencies in the medical practice. It is a benign affection, but the refractory cases require hospital admission. Objective: To evaluate prevailing factors in patients with epistaxis and treatment. Form of study: Retrospective study. Method: 60 patients with diagnosis of epistaxis were evaluated and they needed hospital admission between 2005 and 2006. Results: The main prevailing factors were: Systemic arterial hypertension 36% (n= 22, trauma 16% (n=10 and coagulopathy 5% (n=3. The treatment was the use of nasal splint: anterior 58% (n=35 and antero-posterior 27% (n=16, the electrocauterization of the identified bloody point 7% (n=4, endoscopic arterial bandage 8% (n=5 in severe epistaxis. For the patients with antero-posterior splint with recurrence of bleeding in the first 24 hours (five patients, after clinical stabilization, an arterial bandage was indicated by endoscopic means; four patients had systemic arterial hypertension and in one patient no prevailing factor was identified. Conclusion: The main associated prevailing factors were systemic arterial hypertension, trauma and coagulopathy. The treatment depends on the type, severity and cause of bleeding, initially the anterior and antero-posterior splint for bleeding control. The early endoscopic arterial bandage is indicated in patients with severe epistaxis and prevailing factors, and prolonged admission and morbidities associated with nasal splint should be avoided.

  3. Double layers formed by beam driven ion-acoustic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Ferreira, J.L.; Montes, A.

    1987-01-01

    Small amplitude steady-state ion-acoustic layers are observed to form in a plasma traversed by a beam of cold electrons. The importance of turbulence in maintaining the double layer is demonstrated. The measured wave spectrum is in approximate agrreement with models derived from renormalized turbulence theory. The general features of the double layer are compared with results from particle simulation studies. (author) [pt

  4. Double layer formed by beam driven ion-acoustic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Ferreira, J.L.; Montes, A.

    1987-08-01

    Small amplitudes steady-state ion-acoustic double layers are observed to form in a plasma transversed by a beam of cold electrons. The importance of turbulence in maintaining the double layer is demonstrated. The measured wave spectrum is in approximate agreement with models deriveted from renornalized turbulence theory. The general features of the double layer are compared with results from particle simulation studies. (author) [pt

  5. Method of forming a nanocluster comprising dielectric layer and device comprising such a layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    A method of forming a dielectric layer (330) on a further layer (114, 320) of a semiconductor device (300) is disclosed. The method comprises depositing a dielectric precursor compound and a further precursor compound over the further layer (114, 320), the dielectric precursor compound comprising a

  6. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brant R.; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:26475115

  7. Neutron activation analysis of baths forming conversion layer on aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, Istvan; Maleczki, Emil; Bodizs, Denes

    1988-01-01

    Chromate layers were formed on the surface of aluminium using yellow and green chromating solutions. For the determination of the aluminium content neutron activation method was used. Nuclear effects disturbing the determination were eliminated by double irradiation technique. (author) 8 refs.; 4 figs

  8. The PREVAIL Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Christopher P; Higano, Celestia S; Keane, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide, an oral androgen receptor inhibitor, significantly improved overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) versus placebo in the PREVAIL trial of men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. OBJECTIVE: To assess...... in men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, with or without visceral disease, low- or high-volume bone disease, or lymph node only disease. PATIENT SUMMARY: Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-including those with or without visceral disease...

  9. Spontaneous layering of porous silicon layers formed at high current densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhutik, Vitali; Curiel-Esparza, Jorge; Millan, Mari-Carmen [R and D Center MTM, Technical University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Albella, Jose [Institute of Materials Science (ICMM CSIC) Madrid (Spain)

    2005-06-01

    We report here a curious effect of spontaneous fracturing of the silicon layers formed in galvanostatic conditions at medium and high current densities. Instead of formation of homogeneous p-Si layer as at low currents, a stack of thin layers is formed. Each layer is nearly separated from others and possesses rather flat interfaces. The effects is observed using p{sup +}-Si wafers for the p-Si formation and starts being noticeable at above 100 mA/cm{sup 2}. We interpret these results in terms of the porous silicon growth model where generation of dynamic mechanical stress during the p-Si growth causes sharp changes in Si dissolution mechanism from anisotropic etching of individual needle-like pores in silicon to their branching and isotropic etching. At this moment p-Si layer loses its adhesion to the surface of Si wafer and another p-Si layer starts growing. One of the mechanisms triggering on the separation of p-Si layers from one another is a fluctuation of local anodic current in the pore bottoms associated with gas bubble evolution during the p-Si formation. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. A non-inflammatory form of immune competence prevails in acute pre-pubescent malnutrition: new evidence based on critical mRNA transcripts in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Jennifer M; Richard, Cynthia L; Woodward, Bill

    2012-05-01

    The declining inflammatory immune competence of acute (i.e. wasting) pre-pubescent protein-energy malnutrition has been regarded as reflecting an unregulated immunological disintegration. Recent evidence, however, suggests that malnutrition stimulates a regulated immunological reconfiguration to achieve a non-inflammatory form of competence, perhaps offering protection against autoimmune reactions - the 'Tolerance Model'. Our objective was to determine the influence of acute pre-pubescent malnutrition on the expression of genes critical to tolerogenic regulation. Male and female C57BL/6J mice, initially 19 d old, consumed a complete purified diet either ad libitum (age-matched controls) or in restricted daily quantities (mimicking marasmus), or consumed an isoenergetic low-protein diet ad libitum (mimicking incipient kwashiorkor) for 14 d (six animals per dietary group). Gene expression in the spleen, typically an inflammatory organ, and in the small intestine, a site designed for non-inflammatory defence, was assessed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, and normalised to β-actin. In the spleen of the malnourished groups, both IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 mRNA expression increased compared with controls (P 0.05). Moreover, forkhead box P3 mRNA expression, indicative of cell-based tolerogenic potential, was sustained in both the spleen and intestine of the malnourished groups (P>0.05). Thus, despite limited supplies of energy and substrates, the spleen shifted towards a non-inflammatory character and the intestine was sustained in this mode in advanced pre-pubescent weight loss. These findings provide the first support for the Tolerance Model at the level of mRNA transcript expression.

  11. Topotactic condensation of layer silicates with ferrierite-type layers forming porous tectosilicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marler, B; Wang, Y; Song, J; Gies, H

    2014-07-21

    Five different hydrous layer silicates (HLSs) containing fer layers (ferrierite-type layers) were obtained by hydrothermal syntheses from mixtures of silicic acid, water and tetraalkylammonium/tetraalkylphosphonium hydroxides. The organic cations had been added as structure directing agents (SDA). A characteristic feature of the structures is the presence of strong to medium strong hydrogen bonds between the terminal silanol/siloxy groups of neighbouring layers. The five-layered silicates differ chemically only with respect to the organic cations. Structurally, they differ with respect to the arrangement of the fer layers relative to each other, which is distinct for every SDA-fer-layer system. RUB-20 (containing tetramethylammonium) and RUB-40 (tetramethylphosphonium) are monoclinic with stacking sequence AAA and shift vectors between successive layers 1a0 + 0b0 + 0.19c0 and 1a0 + 0b0 + 0.24c0, respectively. RUB-36 (diethyldimethylammonium), RUB-38 (methyltriethylammonium) and RUB-48 (trimethylisopropylammonium) are orthorhombic with stacking sequence ABAB and shift vectors 0.5a0 + 0b0± 0.36c0, 0.5a0 + 0b0 + 0.5c0 and 0.5a0 + 0b0± 0.39c0, respectively. Unprecedented among the HLSs, two monoclinic materials are made up of fer layers which possess a significant amount of ordered defects within the layer. The ordered defects involve one particular Si-O-Si bridge which is, to a fraction of ca. 50%, hydrolyzed to form nests of two ≡Si-OH groups. When heated to 500-600 °C in air, the HLSs condense to form framework silicates. Although all layered precursors were moderately to well ordered, the resulting framework structures were of quite different crystallinity. The orthorhombic materials RUB-36, -38 and -48, general formula SDA4Si36O72(OH)4, which possess very strong hydrogen bonds (d[O···O] ≈ 2.4 Å), transform into a fairly or well ordered CDO-type silica zeolite RUB-37. The monoclinic materials RUB-20 and -40, general formula SDA2Si18O36(OH)2OH, possessing

  12. The multilayer nanoparticles formed by layer by layer approach for cancer-targeting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Keun Sang; Lee, Hwanbum; Kim, Jae Yeon; Koo, Eun Jin; Lee, Eun Hee; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Yuk, Soon Hong

    2013-01-10

    The multilayer nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared for cancer-targeting therapy using the layer by layer approach. When drug-loaded Pluronic NPs were mixed with vesicles (liposomes) in the aqueous medium, Pluronic NPs were incorporated into the vesicles to form the vesicle NPs. Then, the multilayer NPs were formed by freeze-drying the vesicle NPs in a Pluronic aqueous solution. The morphology and size distribution of the multilayer NPs were observed using a TEM and a particle size analyzer. In order to apply the multilayer NPs as a delivery system for docetaxel (DTX), which is a model anticancer drug, the release pattern of the DTX was observed and the tumor growth was monitored by injecting the multilayer NPs into the tail veins of tumor (squamous cell carcinoma)-bearing mice. The cytotoxicity of free DTX (commercial DTX formulation (Taxotere®)) and the multilayer NPs was evaluated using MTT assay. We also evaluated the tumor targeting ability of the multilayer NPs using magnetic resonance imaging. The multilayer NPs showed excellent tumor targetability and antitumor efficacy in tumor-bearing mice, caused by the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. These results suggest that the multilayer NPs could be a potential drug delivery system for cancer-targeting therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Can Cooler Heads Prevail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The significant correlation between dropping temperatures throughout the Pliocene and the concomitant explosive expansion of the Hominid brain has led a number of workers to postulate climate change drove human evolution. Our brain (that of Homo sapiens), comprises 1-2 percent of our body weight but consumes 20 -25 percent of the body's caloric intake. We are "hotheads". Brains are extremely sensitive to overheating but we are endowed with unparalleled thermal regulation, much of it given over to protecting the Central Nervous System (CNS). Will there be reversed trends with global warming? The human brain has been shrinking since the end of the Ice Ages, losing about 150cc over the past 10,000 years. Polar bear skulls have been downsizing as well. Almost all mass extinctions or evolutionary upheavals are attributed to global warming: e.g. the Permian/Triassic (P/T) event, i.e., "The Great Dying", 250 million years ago (~90% of all life forms wiped out); the Paleocene/ Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) 55 million years ago. They may be analogs for what might await us. Large creatures, whose body size inhibits cooling, melted away during the PETM. Horses, initially the size of dogs then, reduced to the size of cats. An unanticipated hazard for humans that may attend extreme global warming is dumbing down or needing to retreat to the Poles as did those creatures that survived the P/T event (some references: http://johnhawks.net/research/hawks-2011-brain-size-selection-holocene; Kandel, E. et al Principles of Neural Science 4th ed. New York (US): McGraw-Hill, 2000; Selective Brain Cooling in Early Hominids:phylogenetic and evolutionary implications, Reeser, H., reeser@flmnh.ufl.edu; How the body controls brain temperature; the temperature shielding effect of cerebral blood flow, Mingming Z. et al. J Appl Physiol. 2006 November; 101(5): 1481-1488; news.nationalgeographic.com/ news/2014/03/140327-climate-change-shrinks-salamanders-global-warming-science/; Heat illness and

  14. Optical and Electrical Characteristics of Graphene Double Layer Formed by a Double Transfer of Graphene Single Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jun; Bae, Gi Yoon; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate formation of double layer graphene by means of a double transfer using two single graphene layers grown by a chemical vapor deposition method. It is observed that shiftiness and broadness in the double-resonance of Raman scattering are much weaker than those of bilayer graphene formed naturally. Transport characteristics examined from transmission line measurements and field effect transistors show the similar behavior with those of single layer graphene. It indicates that interlayer separation, in electrical view, is large enough to avoid correlation between layers for the double layer structure. It is also observed from a transistor with the double layer graphene that molecules adsorpted on two inner graphene surfaces in the double layered structure are isolated and conserved from ambient environment.

  15. Stability and erosion of melt layers formed during plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Melting and vaporization of metallic reactor components such as the first wall and the limiter/divertor may be expected in fusion reactors due to the high energy deposition resulting from plasma instabilities occuring during both normal and off-normal operating conditions. Off-normal operating conditions result from plasma disruptions where the plasma losses confinement and dumps its energy on parts of reactor components. High heat flux may also result during normal operating conditions due to fluctuations in plasma edge conditions. Of particular significance is the stability and erosion of the resulting melt layer which directly impacts the total expected lifetime of the reactor. The loss of the melt layer during the disruption could have a serious impact on the required safe and economic operation of the reactor. A model is developed to describe the behavior of the melt layer during the time evolution of the disruption. The analysis is done parametrically for a range of disruption times, energy densities and various acting forces

  16. Wearable electronics formed on intermediate layer on textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-07-27

    One manner of producing more desirable clothing with electronic capabilities is to manufacture electronics, such as the charging wires or devices themselves, directly onto the textile materials. Textile materials generally do not support the manufacturing of electronic devices, in part because the surface of the textile is too rough for electronic devices or the processes used to manufacturing electronic devices. An intermediate layer (204) may be placed on the textile material (202) to reduce the roughness of the surface of the textile material and provide other beneficial characteristics for the placement of electronic devices (206) directly on the textile material.

  17. Earth's magnetosphere formed by the low-latitude boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Heikkila, W J

    2011-01-01

    The author argues that, after five decades of debate about the interactive of solar wind with the magnetosphere, it is time to get back to basics. Starting with Newton's law, this book also examines Maxwell's equations and subsidiary equations such as continuity, constitutive relations and the Lorentz transformation; Helmholtz' theorem, and Poynting's theorem, among other methods for understanding this interaction. Includes chapters on prompt particle acceleration to high energies, plasma transfer event, and the low latitude boundary layer More than 200 figures illustrate the text Includes a color insert.

  18. Linked Data: Forming Partnerships at the Data Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, A.; Chandler, C. L.; Arko, R. A.; Jones, M. B.; Hitzler, P.; Janowicz, K.; Krisnadhi, A.; Schildhauer, M.; Fils, D.; Narock, T.; Groman, R. C.; O'Brien, M.; Patton, E. W.; Kinkade, D.; Rauch, S.

    2015-12-01

    The challenges presented by big data are straining data management software architectures of the past. For smaller existing data facilities, the technical refactoring of software layers become costly to scale across the big data landscape. In response to these challenges, data facilities will need partnerships with external entities for improved solutions to perform tasks such as data cataloging, discovery and reuse, and data integration and processing with provenance. At its surface, the concept of linked open data suggests an uncalculated altruism. Yet, in his concept of five star open data, Tim Berners-Lee explains the strategic costs and benefits of deploying linked open data from the perspective of its consumer and producer - a data partnership. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) addresses some of the emerging needs of its research community by partnering with groups doing complementary work and linking their respective data layers using linked open data principles. Examples will show how these links, explicit manifestations of partnerships, reduce technical debt and provide a swift flexibility for future considerations.

  19. Pressing of three-layer, dry-formed MDF with binderless hardboard faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto Suchsland; George E. Woodson; Charles W. McMillin

    1986-01-01

    Severely cooked Masonite pulp was used as face material in three-layer experimental medium-density fiberboard (MDF). The core layer consisted of conventional MDF furnish with resin binder added. The faces were formed absolutely dry without additives of any kind. The three-layer mat was hot-pressed to overall densities ranging from 44 to 56 pcf. The faces had hardboard-...

  20. Deposited Micro Porous Layer as Lubricant Carrier in Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Bay, Niels; Tang, Peter Torben

    2008-01-01

    as lubricant reservoirs. Conventional friction tests for cold forming; ring compression and double cup extrusion tests are carried out with Molykote DX paste and mineral oil as lubricant. Both lubricants act as intended for the ring compressions test whereas only the low viscosity oil perform successfully...... in the cup extrusion test. For all specimens without the porous coating, high friction conditions are identified....

  1. 12 CFR 747.603 - Prevailing party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prevailing party. 747.603 Section 747.603 Banks... in NCUA Board Adjudications § 747.603 Prevailing party. An eligible applicant may be a “prevailing... dismissed. In appropriate situations an applicant may also have prevailed if the outcome of the proceeding...

  2. Financing Educational Facility Construction: Prevailing Wage Litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Steven M.; Wood, R. Craig

    This chapter presents an up-to-date analysis of prevailing state wage laws that affect educational facility construction or renovation and highlights relevant prevailing wage litigation in many states. Currently, 13 states have no prevailing wage laws for public works. The other 37 states and the District of Columbia do have prevailing wage laws…

  3. Turbine airfoil with dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell,; Christian X. , Morrison; Jay, A [Oviedo, FL

    2011-12-20

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure. The compliant structure may be configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand without limitation by the inner layer. The compliant structure may be formed from a plurality of pedestals positioned generally parallel with each other. The pedestals may include a first foot attached to a first end of the pedestal and extending in a first direction aligned with the outer layer, and may include a second foot attached to a second end of the pedestal and extending in a second direction aligned with the inner layer.

  4. Process for forming epitaxial perovskite thin film layers using halide precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Paul G.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Voigt, James A.; Ashley, Carol S.

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming an epitaxial perovskite-phase thin film on a substrate. This thin film can act as a buffer layer between a Ni substrate and a YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x superconductor layer. The process utilizes alkali or alkaline metal acetates dissolved in halogenated organic acid along with titanium isopropoxide to dip or spin-coat the substrate which is then heated to about 700.degree. C. in an inert gas atmosphere to form the epitaxial film on the substrate. The YBCO superconductor can then be deposited on the layer formed by this invention.

  5. PREVAIL: latest electron optics results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Hans C.; Golladay, Steven D.; Gordon, Michael S.; Kendall, Rodney A.; Lieberman, Jon E.; Rockrohr, James D.; Stickel, Werner; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Kazuya; Umemoto, Takaaki; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Kojima, Shinichi; Hamashima, Muneki

    2002-07-01

    The PREVAIL electron optics subsystem developed by IBM has been installed at Nikon's facility in Kumagaya, Japan, for integration into the Nikon commercial EPL stepper. The cornerstone of the electron optics design is the Curvilinear Variable Axis Lens (CVAL) technique originally demonstrated with a proof of concept system. This paper presents the latest experimental results obtained with the electron optical subsystem at Nikon's facility. The results include micrographs illustrating proper CVAL operation through the spatial resolution achieved over the entire optical field of view. They also include data on the most critical issue of the EPL exposure approach: subfield stitching. The methodology of distortion correction will be described and both micrographs and metrology data of stitched subfields will be presented. This paper represents a progress report of the IBM/Nikon alliance activity on EPL.

  6. XPS study of the passive layers formed on lead in aqueous nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Miho; Okuwaki, Akitsugu

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of the lead surface immersed in aqueous nitrate solutions by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows the formation of passive oxide layer containing nitrogen compound. The oxide layer formed on the lead surface in aqueous ammonium nitrate solution was hydrolyzed and cracked. (author)

  7. 12 CFR 263.102 - Prevailing party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prevailing party. 263.102 Section 263.102 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM RULES... Prevailing party. Only an eligible applicant that prevailed on the merits of an adversary proceeding may...

  8. 12 CFR 308.173 - Prevailing party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prevailing party. 308.173 Section 308.173 Banks....173 Prevailing party. (a) General rule. An eligible applicant who, following an adversary adjudication has gained victory on the merits in the proceeding is a “prevailing party”. An eligible applicant may...

  9. Hydrogen gas driven permeation through tungsten deposition layer formed by hydrogen plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Keiichiro; Katayama, Kazunari; Date, Hiroyuki; Fukada, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • H permeation tests for W layer formed by H plasma sputtering are performed. • H permeation flux through W layer is larger than that through W bulk. • H diffusivity in W layer is smaller than that in W bulk. • The equilibrium H concentration in W layer is larger than that in W bulk. - Abstract: It is important to evaluate the influence of deposition layers formed on plasma facing wall on tritium permeation and tritium retention in the vessel of a fusion reactor from a viewpoint of safety. In this work, tungsten deposition layers having different thickness and porosity were formed on circular nickel plates by hydrogen RF plasma sputtering. Hydrogen permeation experiment was carried out at the temperature range from 250 °C to 500 °C and at hydrogen pressure range from 1013 Pa to 101,300 Pa. The hydrogen permeation flux through the nickel plate with tungsten deposition layer was significantly smaller than that through a bare nickel plate. This indicates that a rate-controlling step in hydrogen permeation was not permeation through the nickel plate but permeation though the deposition layer. The pressure dependence on the permeation flux differed by temperature. Hydrogen permeation flux through tungsten deposition layer is larger than that through tungsten bulk. From analysis of the permeation curves, it was indicated that hydrogen diffusivity in tungsten deposition layer is smaller than that in tungsten bulk and the equilibrium hydrogen concentration in tungsten deposition layer is enormously larger than that in tungsten bulk at same hydrogen pressure.

  10. Compressibility of the fouling layer formed by membrane bioreactor sludge and supernatant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup; Poorasgari, Eskandar; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) are increasingly used for wastewater treatment as they give high effluent quality, low footprint and efficient sludge degradation. However, the accumulation and deposition of sludge components on and within the membrane (fouling) limits the widespread application of MBR....... Compressibility of the gel layer was studied in a dead-end filtration system, whereas the compressibility of a fouling layer formed by MBR sludge was studied in a submerged system hollow sheet membrane by TMP stepping. It was shown that the fouling layer formed by the MBR sludge was highly compressible within....... Hence, for MBR systems operated at constant flux mode, the applied pressure should be increased over time, to compensate for the lower permeability. Increasing applied pressure causes compression of the fouling layer and results in a more severe permeability decline [1]. In a general view, the fouling...

  11. XPS studies of SiO2 surface layers formed by oxygen ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, D.; Finster, J.

    1983-01-01

    SiO 2 surface layers of 160 nm thickness formed by 16 O + ion implantation into silicon are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements into the depth after a step-by-step chemical etching. The chemical nature and the thickness of the transition layer were determined. The results of the XPS measurements show that the outer surface and the bulk of the layers formed by oxygen implantation and subsequent high temperature annealing consist of SiO 2 . There is no evidence for Si or SiO/sub x/ (0 2 and Si is similar to that of thin grown oxide layers. Only its thickness is somewhat larger than in thermal oxide

  12. Analysis of white layers formed in hard turning of AISI 52100 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, A.; Melkote, S.N.; Allard, L.F.; Riester, L.; Watkins, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    The formation mechanisms and properties of white layers produced in machining of hardened steels are not clearly understood to date. In particular, detailed analysis of their structure and mechanical properties is lacking. This paper investigates the differences in structure and properties of white layers formed during machining of hardened AISI 52100 steel (62 HRC) at different cutting speeds. A combination of experimental techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nano-indentation are used to analyze the white layers formed. TEM results suggest that white layers produced at low-to-moderate cutting speeds are in large part due to grain refinement induced by severe plastic deformation, whereas white layer formation at high cutting speeds is mainly due to thermally-driven phase transformation. The white layers at all speeds are found to be comprised of very fine (nano-scale) grains compared to the bulk material. XRD-based residual stress and retained austenite measurements, and hardness data support these findings

  13. Corrosion resistance of modified layer on uranium formed by plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Zhong; Liu Kezhao; Bai Bin; Yan Dongxu

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen ion was implanted into uranium surface using plasma immersion ion implantation, and the corrosion resistance of modified layer was studied by corrosion experiment. SEM was used to observe variety of samples surface. In atmosphere, the sample surface had not changed during five months. In heat-humid environment, there was dot-corrosion appearing after two months, but it did not influence the integrity of the modified layer. AES was used to study the diffusion of oxygen and nitrogen during hot-humid corrosion, in three months, both of two elements diffused to the substrate, but the diffusion was weak. The structure of modified layer was not changed. Experimental results show that the modified layer formed by plasma immersion ion implantation has good corrosion resistance.

  14. Corrosion resistance of modified layer on uranium formed by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long Zhong, E-mail: long2001@163.co [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan, 621900 (China); Liu Kezhao; Bai Bin; Yan Dongxu [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan, 621900 (China)

    2010-02-18

    Nitrogen ion was implanted into uranium surface using plasma immersion ion implantation, and the corrosion resistance of modified layer was studied by corrosion experiment. SEM was used to observe variety of samples surface. In atmosphere, the sample surface had not changed during five months. In heat-humid environment, there was dot-corrosion appearing after two months, but it did not influence the integrity of the modified layer. AES was used to study the diffusion of oxygen and nitrogen during hot-humid corrosion, in three months, both of two elements diffused to the substrate, but the diffusion was weak. The structure of modified layer was not changed. Experimental results show that the modified layer formed by plasma immersion ion implantation has good corrosion resistance.

  15. Hydrogen retention in carbon-tungsten co-deposition layer formed by hydrogen RF plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, K.; Kawasaki, T.; Manabe, Y.; Nagase, H.; Takeishi, T.; Nishikawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-tungsten co-deposition layers (C-W layers) were formed by sputtering method using hydrogen or deuterium RF plasma. The deposition rate of the C-W layer by deuterium plasma was faster than that by hydrogen plasma, where the increase of deposition rate of tungsten was larger than that of carbon. This indicates that the isotope effect on sputtering-depositing process for tungsten is larger than that for carbon. The release curve of hydrogen from the C-W layer showed two peaks at 400 deg. C and 700 deg. C. Comparing the hydrogen release from the carbon deposition layer and the tungsten deposition layer, it is considered that the increase of the release rate at 400 deg. C is affected by tungsten and that at 700 deg. C is affected by carbon. The obtained hydrogen retention in the C-W layers which have over 60 at.% of carbon was in the range between 0.45 and 0.16 as H/(C + W)

  16. Etch-stop behavior of buried layers formed by substoichiometric nitrogen ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R.; Acero, M.C. Esteve, J.; Montserrat, J.; El-Hassani, A.

    1996-01-01

    In this work the etch-stop behavior of buried layers formed by substoichiometric nitrogen ion implantation into silicon is studied as a function of the processing parameters, the implantation dose and temperature, and the presence of capping layers during implantation. Etching characteristics have been probed using tetramethylammonium hydroxide or KOH solutions for different times up to 6 h. Results show that, after annealing, the minimum dose required for the formation of an efficient etch-stop layer is about 4 x 10 17 cm -2 , for an implantation energy of 75 keV. This is defined as a layer with an efficient etch selectivity in relation to Si of s ≥ 100. For larger implantation doses efficient etch selectivities larger than 100 are obtained. However, for these doses a considerable density of pits is observed in the etch-stop layer. These are related to the presence of nitrogen poor Si regions in the buried layer after annealing, due to a partial separation of silicon and silicon nitride phases during the annealing process. The influence of this separation of phases as well as nitrogen gettering in the buried layer on the etch-stop behavior is discussed as a function of the processing parameters

  17. Deuterium trapping in tungsten deposition layers formed by deuterium plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, V.Kh.; Roth, J.; Shu, W.M.; Komarov, D.A.; Isobe, K.; Yamanishi, T.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of the deposition conditions on the surface morphology and deuterium (D) concentration in tungsten (W) deposition layers formed by magnetron sputtering and in the linear plasma generator has been carried out. Thick W layers (≥0.4 μm) deposited onto copper substrates demonstrate areas of pilling and, after post-deposition heating to 1300 K, flaking-off and fracturing. For thin W layers (≤80 nm) deposited onto stainless steel (SS) and W substrates, no areas of flaking-off and fracturing exist both after deposition and after post-deposition heating to 673 K for the SS substrate and to 1300 K for the W substrate. The concentration of deuterium in the W layers was found to decrease with increasing substrate temperature and with increasing tungsten deposition rate. For layers with relatively high concentration of oxygen (0.20-0.60 O/W), a decrease of the D concentration with increasing substrate temperature is more pronounced than that for layers deposited in good vacuum conditions. To describe the evolution of the D/W ratio with the substrate temperature and the tungsten deposition rate, an empirical equation proposed by De Temmerman and Doerner [J. Nucl. Mater. 389 (2009) 479] but with alternative parameters has been used.

  18. Closed-form solution for piezoelectric layer with two collinear cracks parallel to the boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Singh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of determining the stress distribution in an infinitely long piezoelectric layer of finite width, with two collinear cracks of equal length and parallel to the layer boundaries. Within the framework of reigning piezoelectric theory under mode III, the cracked piezoelectric layer subjected to combined electromechanical loading is analyzed. The faces of the layers are subjected to electromechanical loading. The collinear cracks are located at the middle plane of the layer parallel to its face. By the use of Fourier transforms we reduce the problem to solving a set of triple integral equations with cosine kernel and a weight function. The triple integral equations are solved exactly. Closed form analytical expressions for stress intensity factors, electric displacement intensity factors, and shape of crack and energy release rate are derived. As the limiting case, the solution of the problem with one crack in the layer is derived. Some numerical results for the physical quantities are obtained and displayed graphically.

  19. Ordering of Nb3Sn layer formed in the bronze process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, S.K.; Nagpal, K.C.; Narlikar, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    The work reported here suggests that the ordering of superconducting Nb 3 Sn compound layers formed in the bronze process is much more intriguing than previously assumed. Various possible mechanisms of ordering of the layers have been examined in conjunction with the observed data on short duration annealed samples. The analysis suggests the ordering to be governed by a sequential operation of both Ist and IInd order kinetics, and seems to fall in line with the studies on disordered bulk samples annealed for long durations. (author)

  20. Forming method of a functional layer-built film by micro-wave plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Keishi

    1988-11-18

    In forming an amorphous semi-conductor material film, the micro-wave plasma CVD cannot be generally used because of such demerits as film-separation, low yield, columnar structure in the film, and problems in the optical and electrical properties. In this invention, a specific substrate is placed in a layer-built film forming unit which is capable of maintaining vacuum; raw material gas for the film formation is introduced; plasma is generated by a micro-wave energy to decompose the raw material gas, thus forming the layer-built film on the substarte. Then a film is made by adding a specific amount of calcoganide-containing gas to the raw material gas. By this, the utilization efficiency of the raw material gas gets roughly 100% and both the adhesion to the substrate and the structural flexibility of the layer-built film increase, enhancing the yield of forming various functional elements (sensor, solar cell, thin transistor film, etc.), and thus greatly reducing the production cost. 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Ultrathin silicon dioxide layers with a low leakage current density formed by chemical oxidation of Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuha,; Kobayashi, Takuya; Maida, Osamu; Inoue, Morio; Takahashi, Masao; Todokoro, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2002-10-01

    Chemical oxidation of Si by use of azeotrope of nitric acid and water can form 1.4-nm-thick silicon dioxide layers with a leakage current density as low as those of thermally grown SiO2 layers. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves for these ultrathin chemical SiO2 layers have been measured due to the low leakage current density. The leakage current density is further decreased to approx1/5 (cf. 0.4 A/cm2 at the forward gate bias of 1 V) by post-metallization annealing at 200 degC in hydrogen. Photoelectron spectroscopy and C-V measurements show that this decrease results from (i) increase in the energy discontinuity at the Si/SiO2 interface, and (ii) elimination of Si/SiO2 interface states and SiO2 gap states.

  2. Hydrogen and helium trapping in tungsten deposition layers formed by RF plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazunari Katayama; Kazumi Imaoka; Takayuki Okamura; Masabumi Nishikawa

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of tritium behavior in plasma facing materials is an important issue for fusion reactor from viewpoints of fuel control and radiation safety. Tungsten is used as a plasma facing material in the divertor region of ITER. However, investigation of hydrogen isotope behavior in tungsten deposition layer is not sufficient so far. It is also necessary to evaluate an effect of helium on a formation of deposition layer and an accumulation of hydrogen isotopes because helium generated by fusion reaction exists in fusion plasma. In this study, tungsten deposition layers were formed by sputtering method using hydrogen and helium RF plasma. An erosion rate and a deposition rate of tungsten were estimated by weight measurement. Hydrogen and helium retention were investigated by thermal desorption method. Tungsten deposition was performed using a capacitively-coupled RF plasma device equipped with parallel-plate electrodes. A tungsten target was mounted on one electrode which is supplied with RF power at 200 W. Tungsten substrates were mounted on the other electrode which is at ground potential. The plasma discharge was continued for 120 hours where pressure of hydrogen or helium was controlled to be 10 Pa. The amounts of hydrogen and helium released from deposition layers was quantified by a gas chromatograph. The erosion rate of target tungsten under helium plasma was estimated to be 1.8 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. The deposition rate on tungsten substrate under helium plasma was estimated to be 4.1 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. Atomic ratio of hydrogen to tungsten in a deposition layer formed by hydrogen plasma was estimated to be 0.17 by heating to 600 o C. From a deposition layer formed by helium plasma, not only helium but also hydrogen was released by heating to 500 o C. Atomic ratios of helium and hydrogen to tungsten were estimated to be 0.080 and 0.075, respectively. The trapped hydrogen is probably impurity hydrogen

  3. Method of forming a plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Charles J.; Folser, George R.; Vora, Shailesh D.; Kuo, Lewis; Richards, Von L.

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles doped with an element selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by plasma spraying doped LaCrO.sub.3 powder, preferably compensated with chromium as Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 and/or dopant element, preferably by plasma arc spraying; and, (C) heating the doped and compensated LaCrO.sub.3 layer to about 1100.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. to provide a dense, substantially gas-tight, substantially hydration-free, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell.

  4. Study on the CMP characteristics of a copper passivity layer formed by dipping in an oxidizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Youn-Ok; Lee, Woo-Sun; Choi, Gwon-Woo; Lee, Kang-Yeon; Kim, Nam-Oh

    2011-01-01

    Copper has been the material for ultra-large-scale integrated circuits owing to its excellent electromigration resistance and low electrical resistance. The polishing mechanism of metal chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) has been reported to be a repeated process of passive oxide layer formation through the use of on oxidizer and then the abrasion action of the slurry. However, because copper is softer and more sensitive to corrosion than tungsten, the slurry composition and the polishing mechanism during the copper CMP process may be more complicated. In a general Cu-CMP process, a mixture of an alumina-based slurry and an oxidizer in proper proportion is used in order to form a passive oxide layer such as CuO and CuO 2 . However, a conventional CMP process consumes an unnecessary amount of slurry to formed the passive layer. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method. The copper samples were oxidized by dipping in an oxidizer for an appropriate time to minimize the consumption of slurry before the CMP process. Then, we performed the CMP process. In order to compare the polishing characteristics of the copper thin film, we discuss the CMP removal rate and non-uniformity, as well as the microstructure of the surface and a layer cross-section based on a scanning.

  5. Methods of generalizing and classifying layer structures of a special form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viktorova, N P

    1981-09-01

    An examination is made of the problem of classifying structures represented by weighted multilayer graphs of special form with connections between the vertices of each layer. The classification of structures of such a form is based on the construction of resolving sets of graphs as a result of generalization of the elements of the training sample of each class and the testing of whether an input object is isomorphic (with allowance for the weights) to the structures of the resolving set or not. 4 references.

  6. Optical and electrical properties of porous silicon layer formed on the textured surface by electrochemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiying, Ou; Lei, Zhao; Hongwei, Diao; Jun, Zhang; Wenjing, Wang

    2011-05-01

    Porous silicon (PS) layers were formed on textured crystalline silicon by electrochemical etching in HF-based electrolyte. Optical and electrical properties of the TMAH textured surfaces with PS formation are studied. Moreover, the influences of the initial structures and the anodizing time on the optical and electrical properties of the surfaces after PS formation are investigated. The results show that the TMAH textured surfaces with PS formation present a dramatic decrease in reflectance. The longer the anodizing time is, the lower the reflectance. Moreover, an initial surface with bigger pyramids achieved lower reflectance in a short wavelength range. A minimum reflectance of 3.86% at 460 nm is achieved for a short anodizing time of 2 min. Furthermore, the reflectance spectrum of the sample, which was etched in 3 vol.% TMAH for 25 min and then anodized for 20 min, is extremely flat and lies between 3.67% and 6.15% in the wavelength range from 400 to 1040 nm. In addition, for a short anodizing time, a slight increase in the effective carrier lifetime is observed. Our results indicate that PS layers formed on a TMAH textured surface for a short anodization treatment can be used as both broadband antireflection coatings and passivation layers for the application in solar cells.

  7. Optical and electrical properties of porous silicon layer formed on the textured surface by electrochemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou Weiying; Zhao Lei; Diao Hongwei; Zhang Jun; Wang Wenjing, E-mail: wjwangwj@126.com [Key Laboratory of Solar Thermal Energy and Photovoltaic System, Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Porous silicon (PS) layers were formed on textured crystalline silicon by electrochemical etching in HF-based electrolyte. Optical and electrical properties of the TMAH textured surfaces with PS formation are studied. Moreover, the influences of the initial structures and the anodizing time on the optical and electrical properties of the surfaces after PS formation are investigated. The results show that the TMAH textured surfaces with PS formation present a dramatic decrease in reflectance. The longer the anodizing time is, the lower the reflectance. Moreover, an initial surface with bigger pyramids achieved lower reflectance in a short wavelength range. A minimum reflectance of 3.86% at 460 nm is achieved for a short anodizing time of 2 min. Furthermore, the reflectance spectrum of the sample, which was etched in 3 vol.% TMAH for 25 min and then anodized for 20 min, is extremely flat and lies between 3.67% and 6.15% in the wavelength range from 400 to 1040 nm. In addition, for a short anodizing time, a slight increase in the effective carrier lifetime is observed. Our results indicate that PS layers formed on a TMAH textured surface for a short anodization treatment can be used as both broadband antireflection coatings and passivation layers for the application in solar cells. (semiconductor technology)

  8. Method of generating magnetoactive plasma for forming thin surface layers on solid substrates and equipment therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardos, L.; Loncar, G.; Musil, J.; Zacek, F.

    1979-01-01

    The invention essentially consists in the use of the axially symmetrical high-frequency magnetized plasma column for thin layer formation. The plasma is generated using a cylindrical microwave slow-down structure in the outer magnetic field. Plasma particles density and temperature and their radial distribution are adjusted by changing the intensity of the magnetic field and of high-frequency power. The plasma may be generated from any gases in a pressure range of 10 -3 to 10 2 Pa. In an oxygen plasma, e.g., it is thus possible to form layers of 200 nm in thickness in 60 mins at an input high-frequency power of 100 to 300 W. (J.U.)

  9. A X-ray diffraction analysis on constituent distribution of heavy rust layer formed on weathering steel using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    A local structural analysis of heavy rust layers with large swelling and laminated layers formed on weathering steel bridges using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) in SPring-8 have been performed. The main constituent in average composition of the whole layer was spinel-type iron oxide [mainly Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 )] and the mass ratio was 30-40 mass%. In contrast the mass ratio of spinel in its local parts, i.e., outer layer, inter-layer and inner layer position was not higher in common but the mass ratio of β-FeOOH was higher. Therefore it indicates that these heavy rust layers have been composed of many layers of spinel poor, rich and poor - cell (SPRaP-cell). Thus SR-XRD is useful for the analysis of the constituent distribution in the rust layer. (author)

  10. Ionic double layer of atomically flat gold formed on mica templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilcott, Terry C.; Wong, Elicia L.S.; Coster, Hans G.L.; Coster, Adelle C.F.; James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Electrical impedance spectroscopy characterisations of gold surfaces formed on mica templates in contact with potassium chloride electrolytes were performed at the electric potential of zero charge over a frequency range of 6 x 10 -3 to 100 x 10 3 Hz. They revealed constant-phase-angle (CPA) behaviour with a frequency exponent value of 0.96 for surfaces that were also characterised as atomically flat using atomic force microscopy (AFM). As the frequency exponent value was only marginally less than unity, the CPA behaviour yielded a realistic estimate for the capacitance of the ionic double layer. The retention of the CPA behaviour was attributed to specific adsorption of chloride ions which was detected as an adsorption conductance element in parallel with the CPA impedance element. Significant variations in the ionic double layer capacitance as well as the adsorption conductance were observed for electrolyte concentrations ranging from 33 μM to 100 mM, but neither of these variations correlated with concentration. This is consistent with the electrical properties of the interface deriving principally from the inner or Stern region of the double layer.

  11. Electrodeposited Organic Layers Formed from Aryl Diazonium Salts for Inhibition of Copper Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Chira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper substrates deposed on a gold screen-printed electrode were covered with different aryl diazonium salts by electrodeposition at 0.25 mA for 30 or 300 s. Seven compounds were investigated: 4-aminophenylacetic acid, 4-aminophenethyl alcohol, 4-fluoroaniline, 4-(heptadecafluorooctylaniline, 4-aminoantipyrine, 4-(4-aminophenylbutyric acid and 3,4,5-trimethoxyaniline. Quantitative monitoring of the electrodeposition process was carried out by electrogravimetry using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM. The electrodeposited mass varies between 26 ng/cm2 for 4-fluoroaniline formed during 30 s to 442 ng/cm2 for 4-phenylbutyric acid formed during 300 s. The corrosion inhibition properties of aryl-modified layers have been studied in buffer citrate with pH = 3 or 3.5% NaCl solutions using electrochemical noise (ECN and Tafel potentiodynamic polarization measurements. A corrosion inhibiting efficiency up to 90% was found. The highest corrosion inhibition was obtained for 4-(4-aminophenylbutyric acid and the lowest for 4-fluoroaniline. A relation between the inhibition efficiency and the chemical nature of the substituents in the protective layer was found.

  12. Electrodeposited Organic Layers Formed from Aryl Diazonium Salts for Inhibition of Copper Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chira, Ana; Bucur, Bogdan; Radu, Gabriel-Lucian

    2017-02-28

    Copper substrates deposed on a gold screen-printed electrode were covered with different aryl diazonium salts by electrodeposition at 0.25 mA for 30 or 300 s. Seven compounds were investigated: 4-aminophenylacetic acid, 4-aminophenethyl alcohol, 4-fluoroaniline, 4-(heptadecafluorooctyl)aniline, 4-aminoantipyrine, 4-(4-aminophenyl)butyric acid and 3,4,5-trimethoxyaniline. Quantitative monitoring of the electrodeposition process was carried out by electrogravimetry using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The electrodeposited mass varies between 26 ng/cm² for 4-fluoroaniline formed during 30 s to 442 ng/cm² for 4-phenylbutyric acid formed during 300 s. The corrosion inhibition properties of aryl-modified layers have been studied in buffer citrate with pH = 3 or 3.5% NaCl solutions using electrochemical noise (ECN) and Tafel potentiodynamic polarization measurements. A corrosion inhibiting efficiency up to 90% was found. The highest corrosion inhibition was obtained for 4-(4-aminophenyl)butyric acid and the lowest for 4-fluoroaniline. A relation between the inhibition efficiency and the chemical nature of the substituents in the protective layer was found.

  13. Pronounced Photovoltaic Response from Multi-layered MoTe2 Phototransistor with Asymmetric Contact Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junku; Guo, Nan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Kenan; Jia, Yi; Zhou, Shuyun; Wu, Yang; Li, Qunqing; Xiao, Lin

    2017-11-22

    In this study, we fabricate air-stable p-type multi-layered MoTe 2 phototransistor using Au as electrodes, which shows pronounced photovoltaic response in off-state with asymmetric contact form. By analyzing the spatially resolved photoresponse using scanning photocurrent microscopy, we found that the potential steps are formed in the vicinity of the electrodes/MoTe 2 interface due to the doping of the MoTe 2 by the metal contacts. The potential step dominates the separation of photoexcited electron-hole pairs in short-circuit condition or with small V sd biased. Based on these findings, we infer that the asymmetric contact cross-section between MoTe 2 -source and MoTe 2 -drain electrodes is the reason to form non-zero net current and photovoltaic response. Furthermore, MoTe 2 phototransistor shows a faster response in short-circuit condition than that with higher biased V sd within sub-millisecond, and its spectral range can be extended to the infrared end of 1550 nm.

  14. Effect of irradiation on the evolution of alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougnaud, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) remaining after spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is immobilized within a glass matrix, eventually destined for geological disposal. Water intrusion into the repository is expected after several thousand years. The alteration of a non-radioactive surrogate for nuclear glass has been extensively studied and it has been determined that successive leaching mechanisms lead to the formation of a 'passivating' alteration layer and to the establishment of a residual rate regime in the long term. However, glass packages are submitted to the radioactivity of confined radioelements. This work focuses on the influence of irradiation on the alteration layer formed during the residual rate regime, in a structural and mechanistic point of view. Three focal areas have been selected. Non-radioactive simple glasses have been leached and externally irradiated in order to determine modifications induced by electronic effects (irradiations with electrons and alpha particles). The same type of glass samples have been previously irradiated with heavy ions and their leaching behavior have been studied in order to assess the impact of ballistic dose cumulated by the glass before water intrusion. Leaching behavior of a complex radioactive glass, doped with an alpha-emitter, has been studied to consider a more realistic situation. (author) [fr

  15. Copper diffusion in Ti-Si-N layers formed by inductively coupled plasma implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ee, Y.C.; Chen, Z.; Law, S.B.; Xu, S.; Yakovlev, N.L.; Lai, M.Y.

    2006-01-01

    Ternary Ti-Si-N refractory barrier films of 15 nm thick was prepared by low frequency, high density, inductively coupled plasma implantation of N into Ti x Si y substrate. This leads to the formation of Ti-N and Si-N compounds in the ternary film. Diffusion of copper in the barrier layer after annealing treatment at various temperatures was investigated using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer (ToF-SIMS) depth profiling, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and sheet resistance measurement. The current study found that barrier failure did not occur until 650 deg. C annealing for 30 min. The failure occurs by the diffusion of copper into the Ti-Si-N film to form Cu-Ti and Cu-N compounds. FESEM surface morphology and EDX show that copper compounds were formed on the ridge areas of the Ti-Si-N film. The sheet resistance verifies the diffusion of Cu into the Ti-Si-N film; there is a sudden drop in the resistance with Cu compound formation. This finding provides a simple and effective method of monitoring Cu diffusion in TiN-based diffusion barriers

  16. Effect of ultrathin GeOx interfacial layer formed by thermal oxidation on Al2O3 capped Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Le; Zhang Xiong; Wang Sheng-Kai; Xue Bai-Qing; Liu Hong-Gang; Wu Wang-Ran; Zhao Yi

    2014-01-01

    We propose a modified thermal oxidation method in which an Al 2 O 3 capping layer is used as an oxygen blocking layer (OBL) to form an ultrathin GeO x interfacial layer, and obtain a superior Al 2 O 3 /GeO x /Ge gate stack. The GeO x interfacial layer is formed in oxidation reaction by oxygen passing through the Al 2 O 3 OBL, in which the Al 2 O 3 layer could restrain the oxygen diffusion and suppress the GeO desorption during thermal treatment. The thickness of the GeO x interfacial layer would dramatically decrease as the thickness of Al 2 O 3 OBL increases, which is beneficial to achieving an ultrathin GeO x interfacial layer to satisfy the demand for small equivalent oxide thickness (EOT). In addition, the thickness of the GeO x interfacial layer has little influence on the passivation effect of the Al 2 O 3 /Ge interface. Ge (100) p-channel metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (pMOSFETs) using the Al 2 O 3 /GeO x /Ge gate stacks exhibit excellent electrical characteristics; that is, a drain current on-off (I on /I off ) ratio of above 1×10 4 , a subthreshold slope of ∼ 120 mV/dec, and a peak hole mobility of 265 cm 2 /V·s are achieved. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  17. Thickness and nanomechanical properties of protective layer formed by TiF4 varnish on enamel after erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Dantas de MEDEIROS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The layer formed by fluoride compounds on tooth surface is important to protect the underlying enamel from erosion. However, there is no investigation into the properties of protective layer formed by NaF and TiF4 varnishes on eroded enamel. This study aimed to evaluate the thickness, topography, nanohardness, and elastic modulus of the protective layer formed by NaF and TiF4 varnishes on enamel after erosion using nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Human enamel specimens were sorted into control, NaF, and TiF4 varnish groups (n = 10. The initial nanohardness and elastic modulus values were obtained and varnishes were applied to the enamel and submitted to erosive challenge (10 cycles: 5 s cola drink/5 s artificial saliva. Thereafter, nanohardness and elastic modulus were measured. Both topography and thickness were evaluated by AFM. The data were subjected to ANOVA, Tukey’s test and Student’s t test (α = 0.05. After erosion, TiF4 showed a thicker protective layer compared to the NaF group and nanohardness and elastic modulus values were significantly lower than those of the control group. It was not possible to measure nanohardness and elastic modulus in the NaF group due to the thin protective layer formed. AFM showed globular deposits, which completely covered the eroded surface in the TiF4 group. After erosive challenge, the protective layer formed by TiF4 varnish showed significant properties and it was thicker than the layer formed by NaF varnish.

  18. XPS studies of SiO/sub 2/ surface layers formed by oxygen ion implantation into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, D.; Finster, J. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Chemie); Hensel, E.; Skorupa, W.; Kreissig, U. (Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf bei Dresden (German Democratic Republic))

    1983-03-16

    SiO/sub 2/ surface layers of 160 nm thickness formed by /sup 16/O/sup +/ ion implantation into silicon are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements into the depth after a step-by-step chemical etching. The chemical nature and the thickness of the transition layer were determined. The results of the XPS measurements show that the outer surface and the bulk of the layers formed by oxygen implantation and subsequent high temperature annealing consist of SiO/sub 2/. There is no evidence for Si or SiO/sub x/ (0layers. Only its thickness is somewhat larger than in thermal oxide.

  19. Complementary study of the internal porous silicon layers formed under high-dose implantation of helium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomov, A. A., E-mail: lomov@ftian.ru; Myakon’kikh, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Chesnokov, Yu. M. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation); Shemukhin, A. A.; Oreshko, A. P. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The surface layers of Si(001) substrates subjected to plasma-immersion implantation of helium ions with an energy of 2–5 keV and a dose of 5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup –2} have been investigated using high-resolution X-ray reflectivity, Rutherford backscattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The electron density depth profile in the surface layer formed by helium ions is obtained, and its elemental and phase compositions are determined. This layer is found to have a complex structure and consist of an upper amorphous sublayer and a layer with a porosity of 30–35% beneath. It is shown that the porous layer has the sharpest boundaries at a lower energy of implantable ions.

  20. Zr/ZrC modified layer formed on AISI 440B stainless steel by plasma Zr-alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, H.H.; Liu, L.; Liu, X.Z.; Guo, Q.; Meng, T.X.; Wang, Z.X.; Yang, H.J.; Liu, X.P., E-mail: liuxiaoping@tyut.edu.cn

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • A Zr/ZrC modified layer was formed on AISI 440B stainless steel using plasma surface Zr-alloying. • The thickness of the modified layer increases with alloying temperature and time. • Formation mechanism of the modified layer is dependent on the mutual diffusion of Zr and substrate elements. • The modified surface shows an improved wear resistance. - Abstract: The surface Zr/ZrC gradient alloying layer was prepared by double glow plasma surface alloying technique to increase the surface hardness and wear resistance of AISI 440B stainless steel. The microstructure of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer formed at different alloying temperatures and times as well as its formation mechanism were discussed by using scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrum, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adhesive strength, hardness and tribological property of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer were also evaluated in the paper. The alloying surface consists of the Zr-top layer and ZrC-subsurface layer which adheres strongly to the AISI 440B steel substrate. The thickness of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer increases gradually from 16 μm to 23 μm with alloying temperature elevated from 900 °C to 1000 °C. With alloying time from 0.5 h to 4 h, the alloyed depth increases from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the ZrC-rich alloyed thickness vs time is basically parabola at temperature of 1000 °C. Both the hardness and wear resistance of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer obviously increase compared with untreated AISI 440B steel.

  1. UN{sub 2−x} layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Zhong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Hu, Yin [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Chen, Lin [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Luo, Lizhu [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Liu, Kezhao, E-mail: liukz@hotmail.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Lai, Xinchun, E-mail: lai319@yahoo.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We used a very simple method to prepare nitride layer on uranium metal surface. • This modified layer is nitrogen-rich nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. • TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains. • XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence in the nitride. - Abstract: Glow plasma nitriding is a simple and economical surface treatment method, and this technology was used to prepare nitride layer on the surface of uranium metal with thickness of several microns. The composition and structure of the nitride layer were analyzed by AES and XRD, indicating that this modified layer is nitrogen-rich uranium nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains, with compact structure. And XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence existing in the nitride. After the treated uranium storage in air for a long time, oxygen just entered the surface several nanometers, showing the nitride layer has excellent oxidation resistance. The mechanism of nitride layer formation and low valence uranium appearance is discussed.

  2. UN2−x layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Zhong; Hu, Yin; Chen, Lin; Luo, Lizhu; Liu, Kezhao; Lai, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We used a very simple method to prepare nitride layer on uranium metal surface. • This modified layer is nitrogen-rich nitride, which should be written as UN 2−x . • TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains. • XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence in the nitride. - Abstract: Glow plasma nitriding is a simple and economical surface treatment method, and this technology was used to prepare nitride layer on the surface of uranium metal with thickness of several microns. The composition and structure of the nitride layer were analyzed by AES and XRD, indicating that this modified layer is nitrogen-rich uranium nitride, which should be written as UN 2−x . TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains, with compact structure. And XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence existing in the nitride. After the treated uranium storage in air for a long time, oxygen just entered the surface several nanometers, showing the nitride layer has excellent oxidation resistance. The mechanism of nitride layer formation and low valence uranium appearance is discussed

  3. Analytic Closed-Form Solution of a Mixed Layer Model for Stratocumulus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyurek, Bengu Ozge

    Stratocumulus clouds play an important role in climate cooling and are hard to predict using global climate and weather forecast models. Thus, previous studies in the literature use observations and numerical simulation tools, such as large-eddy simulation (LES), to solve the governing equations for the evolution of stratocumulus clouds. In contrast to the previous works, this work provides an analytic closed-form solution to the cloud thickness evolution of stratocumulus clouds in a mixed-layer model framework. With a focus on application over coastal lands, the diurnal cycle of cloud thickness and whether or not clouds dissipate are of particular interest. An analytic solution enables the sensitivity analysis of implicitly interdependent variables and extrema analysis of cloud variables that are hard to achieve using numerical solutions. In this work, the sensitivity of inversion height, cloud-base height, and cloud thickness with respect to initial and boundary conditions, such as Bowen ratio, subsidence, surface temperature, and initial inversion height, are studied. A critical initial cloud thickness value that can be dissipated pre- and post-sunrise is provided. Furthermore, an extrema analysis is provided to obtain the minima and maxima of the inversion height and cloud thickness within 24 h. The proposed solution is validated against LES results under the same initial and boundary conditions. Then, the proposed analytic framework is extended to incorporate multiple vertical columns that are coupled by advection through wind flow. This enables a bridge between the micro-scale and the mesoscale relations. The effect of advection on cloud evolution is studied and a sensitivity analysis is provided.

  4. Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC) Annual Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Annual reports of the Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC), which studies the prevailing (market) rate system for wages and other matters pertinent to...

  5. Angular behavior of the Berreman effect investigated in uniform Al2O3 layers formed by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarel, Giovanna; Na, Jeong-Seok; Parsons, Gregory N

    2010-04-21

    Experimental transmission absorbance infrared spectra of γ-Al(2)O(3) showing evidence of the angular dependence of the peaks of surface modes appearing next to the longitudinal optical phonon frequency ω(LO) (the Berreman effect) are collected from heat-treated thin oxide films deposited with thickness uniformity on Si(100) using atomic layer deposition. The peak area of the most intense surface longitudinal optical mode is plotted versus the infrared beam incidence angle θ(0). The experimental points closely follow the sin(4)(θ(0)) function in a broad thickness range. The best match occurs at a critical thickness, where a linear relationship exists between the surface longitudinal optical mode intensity and film thickness. Simulations suggest that below the critical thickness the sin(4)(θ(0)) behavior can be explained by refraction phenomena at the air/thin film and thin film/substrate interfaces. Above the critical thickness, the experimentally obtained result is derived from field boundary conditions at the air/thin film interface. The sin(4)(θ(0)) functional trend breaks down far above the critical thickness. This picture indicates that infrared radiation has a limited penetration depth into the oxide film, similarly to electromagnetic waves in conductors. Consequently, surface longitudinal optical modes are viewed as bulk phonons excited down to the penetration depth of the infrared beam. Comparison with simulated data suggests that the infrared radiation absorptance of surface longitudinal optical modes tends to approach the sin(2)(θ(0)) trend. Reflection phenomena are considered to be the origin of the deviation from the sin(4)(θ(0)) trend related to refraction.

  6. Electrochemically formed passive layers on titanium - preparation and biocompatibility assessment in Hank's balanced salt solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, B.; Jerkiewicz, G.

    2006-01-01

    Uniform and crack-free passive layers on Ti are prepared using AC voltage in 7.5 wt.% aq. NH 4 ·BF 4 at 25 o C. The passive layers possess coloration (wide spectrum of colors) that depends on the experimental conditions. The biocompatibility of such prepared passive layers is evaluated using corrosion science and analytical techniques. Their corrosion behavior, Ti-ion release, surface roughness, and wettability in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) at 37 o C are the main focus of this work. Open-circuit potential and polarization measurements demonstrate that the corrosion potential (E corr ) of the passive layers becomes more positive than that of the untreated Ti. The value of E corr increases as we increase the AC voltage (VAC). Their corrosion rate (CR) is lower than that of the untreated Ti, and they reduced the Ti-ion release level from 230 to 15 ppb. An increase in the AC voltage frequency (f) leads to a slightly higher level of the Ti-ion release (∼50 ppb). Surface profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses show that prolonged exposure of the passive layers to HBSS results in changes to their surface topography. The passive layers prepared by the application of AC voltage are rougher and more hydrophilic than the untreated Ti. Our methodology of preparing biocompatible passive layers on Ti might be applied as a new surface treatment procedure for Ti implants. (author)

  7. Simultaneous sound velocity and thickness measurement by the ultrasonic pitch-catch method for corrosion-layer-forming polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Masahiro; Takizawa, Shota; Sakai, Tetsuya; Arao, Yoshihiko; Kubouchi, Masatoshi

    2018-01-01

    Since thermosetting resins have excellent resistance to chemicals, fiber reinforced plastics composed of such resins and reinforcement fibers are widely used as construction materials for equipment in chemical plants. Such equipment is usually used for several decades under severe corrosive conditions so that failure due to degradation may result. One of the degradation behaviors in thermosetting resins under chemical solutions is "corrosion-layer-forming" degradation. In this type of degradation, surface resins in contact with a solution corrode, and some of them remain asa corrosion layer on the pristine part. It is difficult to precisely measure the thickness of the pristine part of such degradation type materials by conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic testing, because the sound velocity depends on the degree of corrosion of the polymeric material. In addition, the ultrasonic reflection interface between the pristine part and the corrosion layer is obscure. Thus, we propose a pitch-catch method using a pair of normal and angle probes to measure four parameters: the thicknesses of the pristine part and the corrosion layer, and their respective sound velocities. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by measuring a two-layer sample and a sample including corroded parts. The results demonstrate that the pitch-catch method can successfully measure the four parameters and evaluate the residual thickness of the pristine part in the corrosion-layer-forming sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultra thin buried oxide layers formed by low dose Simox process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspar, B.; Pudda, C.; Papon, A.M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Lab. d`Electronique et d`Instrumentation; Auberton Herve, A.J.; Lamure, J.M. [SOITEC, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    Oxygen low dose implantation is studied for two implantation energies. For 190 keV, a continuous buried oxide layer is obtained with a high dislocation density in the top silicon layer due to SiO{sub 2} precipitates. For 120 keV, this silicon layer is free of SiO{sub 2} precipitate and has a low dislocation density. Low density of pin-holes is observed in the buried oxide. The influence of silicon islands in the buried oxide on the breakdown electric fields is discussed. (authors). 6 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Ultra thin buried oxide layers formed by low dose Simox process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspar, B.; Pudda, C.; Papon, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen low dose implantation is studied for two implantation energies. For 190 keV, a continuous buried oxide layer is obtained with a high dislocation density in the top silicon layer due to SiO 2 precipitates. For 120 keV, this silicon layer is free of SiO 2 precipitate and has a low dislocation density. Low density of pin-holes is observed in the buried oxide. The influence of silicon islands in the buried oxide on the breakdown electric fields is discussed. (authors). 6 refs., 5 figs

  10. 29 CFR 505.3 - Prevailing minimum compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prevailing minimum compensation. 505.3 Section 505.3 Labor... HUMANITIES § 505.3 Prevailing minimum compensation. (a)(1) In the absence of an alternative determination...)(2) of this section, the prevailing minimum compensation required to be paid under the Act to the...

  11. 29 CFR 4.51 - Prevailing in the locality determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Prevailing in the locality determinations. 4.51 Section 4.51... Procedures § 4.51 Prevailing in the locality determinations. (a) Information considered. The minimum monetary... benefits contained in collective bargaining agreements where they have been determined to prevail in a...

  12. 26 CFR 301.7430-5 - Prevailing party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prevailing party. 301.7430-5 Section 301.7430-5... Prevailing party. (a) In general. For purposes of an award of reasonable administrative costs under section... prevailing party only if— (1) The position of the Internal Revenue Service was not substantially justified...

  13. Zr/ZrC modified layer formed on AISI 440B stainless steel by plasma Zr-alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H. H.; Liu, L.; Liu, X. Z.; Guo, Q.; Meng, T. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Yang, H. J.; Liu, X. P.

    2016-12-01

    The surface Zr/ZrC gradient alloying layer was prepared by double glow plasma surface alloying technique to increase the surface hardness and wear resistance of AISI 440B stainless steel. The microstructure of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer formed at different alloying temperatures and times as well as its formation mechanism were discussed by using scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrum, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adhesive strength, hardness and tribological property of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer were also evaluated in the paper. The alloying surface consists of the Zr-top layer and ZrC-subsurface layer which adheres strongly to the AISI 440B steel substrate. The thickness of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer increases gradually from 16 μm to 23 μm with alloying temperature elevated from 900 °C to 1000 °C. With alloying time from 0.5 h to 4 h, the alloyed depth increases from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the ZrC-rich alloyed thickness vs time is basically parabola at temperature of 1000 °C. Both the hardness and wear resistance of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer obviously increase compared with untreated AISI 440B steel.

  14. Effect of low dose electron beam irradiation on the alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougnaud, S., E-mail: sarah.mougnaud@gmail.com [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Tribet, M. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Renault, J.-P. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jollivet, P. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Panczer, G. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Charpentier, T. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jégou, C. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France)

    2016-12-15

    This investigation concerns borosilicate glass leaching mechanisms and the evolution of alteration layer under electron beam irradiation. A simple glass doped with rare earth elements was selected in order to access mechanistic and structural information and better evaluate the effects of irradiation. It was fully leached in initially pure water at 90 °C and at high glass surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V = 20 000 m{sup −1}) in static conditions. Under these conditions, the system quickly reaches the residual alteration rate regime. A small particle size fraction (2–5 μm) was sampled in order to obtain a fairly homogeneous altered material enabling the use of bulk characterization methods. External irradiations with 10 MeV electrons up to a dose of 10 MGy were performed either before or after leaching, to investigate respectively the effect of initial glass irradiation on its alteration behavior and the irradiation stability of the alteration layer. Glass dissolution rate was analyzed by regular leachate samplings and the alteration layer structure was characterized by Raman, luminescence (continuous or time-resolved), and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR and EPR spectroscopy. It was shown that the small initial glass evolutions under irradiation did not induce any modification of the leaching kinetic nor of the structure of the alteration layer. The alteration process seemed to “smooth over” the created defects. Otherwise, the alteration layer and initial glass appeared to have different behaviors under irradiation. No Eu{sup 3+} reduction was detected in the alteration layer after irradiation and the defect creation efficiency was much lower than for initial glass. This can possibly be explained by the protective role of pore water contained in the altered material (∼20%). Moreover, a slight depolymerization of the silicon network of the altered glass under irradiation with electrons was evidenced, whereas in the initial glass it typically

  15. Properties of deposited layer formed by interaction with Be seeded D–He mixture plasma and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, K., E-mail: tokunaga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Baldwin, M.J.; Nishijima, D.; Doerner, R.P. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Nagata, S. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Tsuchiya, B. [Department of General Education, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya, 468-8502 (Japan); Kurishita, H. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, IMR, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Fujiwara, T.; Araki, K.; Miyamoto, Y. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Ohno, N. [School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Be-seeded, high-flux, deuterium/helium mixture plasma exposure experiments on tungsten target materials have been performed to simulate ITER all tungsten divertor erosion/modification and deposition phenomena. The exposure conditions are kept fixed at a typical low-ion-energy of 60 eV and a flux of 3–6 × 10{sup 22}/m{sup 2}/s. Sample temperature is 1123 K and plasma exposure times spanning 1050–10,100 s are explored. The typical ratio of He/D ions is 0.2 and Be content is 0.2%. A He-induced nanostructure layer is formed on the exposure surfaces of tungsten materials and the surface of the nanostructure is covered by a thin layer of Be and O. A fraction of the re-eroded Be from the target is deposited on a glassy carbon plate with line of sight to the tungsten target. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses show that the Be redeposit layer is in the form of laminae. Small amounts of Mo, W and C are also found in the redeposited Be layer. Elastic recoil detection analyses show that D, He and H are also included in the redeposited Be layer.

  16. The Influence of the Tool Surface Texture on Friction and the Surface Layers Properties of Formed Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Šugárová

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphological texturing of forming tool surfaces has high potential to reduce friction and tool wear and also has impact on the surface layers properties of formed material. In order to understand the effect of different types of tool textures, produced by nanosecond fibre laser, on the tribological conditions at the interface tool-formed material and on the integrity of formed part surface layers, the series of experimental investigations have been carried out. The coefficient of friction for different texture parameters (individual feature shape, including the depth profile of the cavities and orientation of the features relative to the material flow was evaluated via a Ring Test and the surface layers integrity of formed material (surface roughness and subsurface micro hardness was also experimentally analysed. The results showed a positive effect of surface texturing on the friction coefficients and the strain hardening of test samples material. Application of surface texture consisting of dimple-like depressions arranged in radial layout contributed to the most significant friction reduction of about 40%. On the other hand, this surface texture contributed to the increase of surface roughness parameters, Ra parameter increased from 0.49 μm to 2.19 μm and the Rz parameter increased from 0.99 μm to 16.79 μm.

  17. Characteristics of Ni-based coating layer formed by laser and plasma cladding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guojian; Kutsuna, Muneharu; Liu Zhongjie; Zhang Hong

    2006-01-01

    The clad layers of Ni-based alloy were deposited on the SUS316L stainless plates by CO 2 laser and plasma cladding processes. The smooth clad bead was obtained by CO 2 laser cladding process. The phases of clad layer were investigated by an optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The microstructures of clad layers belonged to a hypereutectic structure. Primary phases consist of boride CrB and carbide Cr 7 C 3 . The eutectic structure consists of Ni + CrB or Ni + Cr 7 C 3 . Compared with the plasma cladding, the fine microstructures, low dilutions, high Vickers hardness and excellent wear resistance were obtained by CO 2 laser cladding. All that show the laser cladding process has a higher efficiency and good cladding quality

  18. Binding properties of a streptavidin layer formed on a biotinylated Langmuir–Schaefer film of unfolded protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuno, Taiji, E-mail: t_furuno@a8.keio.jp

    2016-04-01

    A Langmuir monolayer of carbonic anhydrase (CA) unfolded at an air/water interface was transferred onto the hydrophobic surface of a silicon wafer by means of the Langmuir–Schaefer technique. The transferred CA film was biotinylated and was incubated in a streptavidin (SAv) solution to obtain a densely packed SAv layer by biotin–SAv linkage. Biotinylated proteins including ferritin, catalase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and carbonic anhydrase were incubated with the SAv layer and binding of these proteins was examined by atomic force microscopy. High-density binding of the biotinylated proteins was observed, whereas the amount of adsorbed non-biotinylated proteins was low or negligible. The SAv layer on the Langmuir–Schaefer film of unfolded protein could become a basic architecture for protein immobilization studies. - Highlights: • Langmuir–Schaefer film of carbonic anhydrase (LSF-CA) was biotinylated. • A densely packed streptavidin (SAv) layer was formed on the biotinylated LSF-CA. • Biotinylated proteins were bound to the SAv layer at high density. • Nonspecific adsorption of intact proteins to the SAv layer was weak. • Atomic force microscopy showed the binding of proteins at molecular resolution.

  19. Method of forming a leak proof plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Vora, Shailesh D.

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by: (A) providing an electrode structure; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, an interconnection layer having the general formula La.sub.1-x M.sub.x Cr.sub.1-y N.sub.y O.sub.3, where M is a dopant selected from the group of Ca, Sr, Ba, and mixtures thereof, and where N is a dopant selected from the group of Mg, Co, Ni, Al, and mixtures thereof, and where x and y are each independently about 0.075-0.25, by thermally spraying, preferably plasma arc spraying, a flux added interconnection spray powder, preferably agglomerated, the flux added powder comprising flux particles, preferably including dopant, preferably (CaO).sub.12. (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3).sub.7 flux particles including Ca and Al dopant, and LaCrO.sub.3 interconnection particles, preferably undoped LaCrO.sub.3, to form a dense and substantially gas-tight interconnection material bonded to the electrode structure by a single plasma spraying step; and, (C) heat treating the interconnection layer at from about 1200.degree. to 1350.degree. C. to further densify and heal the micro-cracks and macro-cracks of the thermally sprayed interconnection layer. The result is a substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode structure. The electrode structure can be an air electrode, and a solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and further a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell for generation of electrical power.

  20. Genetics of Schizophrenia: Historical Insights and Prevailing Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Leemput, J; Hess, J L; Glatt, S J; Tsuang, M T

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia's (SZ's) heritability and familial transmission have been known for several decades; however, despite the clear evidence for a genetic component, it has been very difficult to pinpoint specific causative genes. Even so genetic studies have taught us a lot, even in the pregenomic era, about the molecular underpinnings and disease-relevant pathways. Recurring themes emerged revealing the involvement of neurodevelopmental processes, glutamate regulation, and immune system differential activation in SZ etiology. The recent emergence of epigenetic studies aimed at shedding light on the biological mechanisms underlying SZ has provided another layer of information in the investigation of gene and environment interactions. However, this epigenetic insight also brings forth another layer of complexity to the (epi)genomic landscape such as interactions between genetic variants, epigenetic marks-including cross-talk between DNA methylation and histone modification processes-, gene expression regulation, and environmental influences. In this review, we seek to synthesize perspectives, including limitations and obstacles yet to overcome, from genetic and epigenetic literature on SZ through a qualitative review of risk factors and prevailing hypotheses. Encouraged by the findings of both genetic and epigenetic studies to date, as well as the continued development of new technologies to collect and interpret large-scale studies, we are left with a positive outlook for the future of elucidating the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying SZ and other complex neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of various methods of measuring thin oxide layers formed on molybdenum and titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepage, F.; Bardolle, J.; Boulben, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of the growth of thin layers is very interesting from both the fundamental and technological viewpoints. This work deals with oxide films produced on two metals, molybdenum and titanium. The thicknesses obtained by various methods (microgravimetry, nuclear reactions and spectrophotometry) are compared and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are shown [fr

  2. Electrochemical Evaluation of Corrosion Inhibiting Layers Formed in a Defect from Lithium-Leaching Organic Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P.; Meeusen, M.; Gonzalez Garcia, Y.; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the electrochemical evaluation of protective layers generated in a coating defect from lithium-leaching organic coatings on AA2024-T3 aluminum alloys as a function of neutral salt spray exposure time. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to study the electrochemical

  3. Copper Benzenetricarboxylate Metal-Organic Framework Nucleation Mechanisms on Metal Oxide Powders and Thin Films formed by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Paul C; Zhao, Junjie; Williams, Philip S; Walls, Howard J; Shepherd, Sarah D; Losego, Mark D; Peterson, Gregory W; Parsons, Gregory N

    2016-04-13

    Chemically functional microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals are attractive for filtration and gas storage applications, and recent results show that they can be immobilized on high surface area substrates, such as fiber mats. However, fundamental knowledge is still lacking regarding initial key reaction steps in thin film MOF nucleation and growth. We find that thin inorganic nucleation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) can promote solvothermal growth of copper benzenetricarboxylate MOF (Cu-BTC) on various substrate surfaces. The nature of the ALD material affects the MOF nucleation time, crystal size and morphology, and the resulting MOF surface area per unit mass. To understand MOF nucleation mechanisms, we investigate detailed Cu-BTC MOF nucleation behavior on metal oxide powders and Al2O3, ZnO, and TiO2 layers formed by ALD on polypropylene substrates. Studying both combined and sequential MOF reactant exposure conditions, we find that during solvothermal synthesis ALD metal oxides can react with the MOF metal precursor to form double hydroxy salts that can further convert to Cu-BTC MOF. The acidic organic linker can also etch or react with the surface to form MOF from an oxide metal source, which can also function as a nucleation agent for Cu-BTC in the mixed solvothermal solution. We discuss the implications of these results for better controlled thin film MOF nucleation and growth.

  4. A nitride-based epitaxial surface layer formed by ammonia treatment of silicene-terminated ZrB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggers, F. B., E-mail: F.B.Wiggers@utwente.nl; Van Bui, H.; Schmitz, J.; Kovalgin, A. Y.; Jong, M. P. de [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Friedlein, R.; Yamada-Takamura, Y. [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-07

    We present a method for the formation of an epitaxial  surface layer involving B, N, and Si atoms on a ZrB{sub 2}(0001) thin film on Si(111). It has the potential to be an insulating growth template for 2D semiconductors. The chemical reaction of NH{sub 3} molecules with the silicene-terminated ZrB{sub 2}  surface was characterized by synchrotron-based, high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. In particular, the dissociative chemisorption of NH{sub 3} at 400 °C leads to surface  nitridation, and subsequent annealing up to 830 °C results in a solid phase reaction with the ZrB{sub 2} subsurface layers. In this way, a new nitride-based epitaxial  surface layer is formed with hexagonal symmetry and a single in-plane crystal orientation.

  5. Ion implantation into amorphous Si layers to form carrier-selective contacts for Si solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmann, Frank; Mueller, Ralph; Reichel, Christian; Hermle, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports our findings on the boron and phosphorus doping of very thin amorphous silicon layers by low energy ion implantation. These doped layers are implemented into a so-called tunnel oxide passivated contact structure for Si solar cells. They act as carrier-selective contacts and, thereby, lead to a significant reduction of the cell's recombination current. In this paper we address the influence of ion energy and ion dose in conjunction with the obligatory high-temperature anneal needed for the realization of the passivation quality of the carrier-selective contacts. The good results on the phosphorus-doped (implied V oc = 725 mV) and boron-doped passivated contacts (iV oc = 694 mV) open a promising route to a simplified interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cell featuring passivated contacts. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. In silico, in vitro and antifungal activity of the surface layers formed on zinc during this biomaterial degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marta M.; Marques, Luísa M.; Nogueira, Isabel; Santos, Catarina F.; Salazar, Sara B.; Eugénio, Sónia; Mira, Nuno P.; Montemor, M. F.

    2018-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) has been proposed as an alternative metallic biodegradable material to support transient wound-healing processes. Once a Zn piece is implanted inside the organism the degradation will depend upon the physiological surrounding environment. This, by modulating the composition of the surface layers formed on Zn devices, will govern the subsequent interactions with the surrounding living cells (e.g. biocompatibility and/or antifungal behaviour). In silico simulation of an implanted Zn piece at bone-muscle interface or inside the bone yielded the preferential precipitation of simonkolleite or zincite, respectively. To study the impact of these surface layers in the in vitro behaviour of Zn biomaterials, simonkolleite and zincite where synthesised. The successful production of simonkolleite or zincite was confirmed by an extensive physicochemical characterization. An in vitro layer formed on the top of these surface layers revealed that simonkolleite was rather inert, while zincite yielded a complex matrix containing hydroxyapatite, an important bone analogue. When analysing the "anti-biofilm" activity simonkolleite stood out for its activity against an important pathogenic fungi involved in implant-device infections, Candida albicans. The possible physiological implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Kinetics of boride layers formed on the surface of AISI 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Sen, U.; Bindal, C.

    2004-01-01

    The present study reports on boride layer growth kinetics of borided AISI 4140 steel. Steels were boronized in molten borax, boric acid and ferro-silicon bath at 1123 K 1173 K and 1223 K for 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours. Boride layer thickness ranged from 38.4 to 225 μm. Layer growth kinetics were analysed by measuring the extent of penetration of FeB and Fe 2 B sublayers as a function of boronizing time and temperature in the range of 1123-1223 K. The depth of the tips of the most deeply penetrated FeB and Fe 2 B needles are taken as measures for diffusion in the fast directions. The kinetics of the reaction, K=K 0 exp(-Q/RT) have also been determined by varying the boriding temperature and time. The results showed that K increase with boronizing temperature. Activation energy (Q) for present study was determined as 215 kj.mol -1 . The diffusion coefficient (K) ranged from 3 x 10 -9 cm 2 s -1 to 2 x 10 -8 cm 2 s -1 . Also temperature-dependent constant (K 0 ) at temperatures 1123 K, 1173 K and 1223 K was 179.4 cm 2 s -1 . (orig.)

  8. Kinetics of boride layers formed on the surface of AISI 4140 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, S.; Sen, U. [Sakarya Univ., Dept. of Metal Education, Sakarya (Turkey); Bindal, C. [Sakarya Univ., Dept. of Materials and Metallurgy, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2004-07-01

    The present study reports on boride layer growth kinetics of borided AISI 4140 steel. Steels were boronized in molten borax, boric acid and ferro-silicon bath at 1123 K 1173 K and 1223 K for 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours. Boride layer thickness ranged from 38.4 to 225 {mu}m. Layer growth kinetics were analysed by measuring the extent of penetration of FeB and Fe{sub 2}B sublayers as a function of boronizing time and temperature in the range of 1123-1223 K. The depth of the tips of the most deeply penetrated FeB and Fe{sub 2}B needles are taken as measures for diffusion in the fast directions. The kinetics of the reaction, K=K{sub 0} exp(-Q/RT) have also been determined by varying the boriding temperature and time. The results showed that K increase with boronizing temperature. Activation energy (Q) for present study was determined as 215 kj.mol{sup -1}. The diffusion coefficient (K) ranged from 3 x 10{sup -9} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} to 2 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1}. Also temperature-dependent constant (K{sub 0}) at temperatures 1123 K, 1173 K and 1223 K was 179.4 cm{sup 2}s{sup -1}. (orig.)

  9. Investigation into Composites Property Effect on the Forming Limits of Multi-Layer Hybrid Sheets Using Hydroforming Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shichen; Lang, Lihui; Guan, Shiwei; Alexandrov, Seigei; Zeng, Yipan

    2018-04-01

    Fiber-metal laminates (FMLs) such as Kevlar reinforced aluminum laminate (ARALL), Carbon reinforced aluminum laminate (CARALL), and Glass reinforced aluminum laminate (GLARE) offer great potential for weight reduction applications in automobile and aerospace construction. In order to investigate the feasibility for utilizing such materials in the form of laminates, sheet hydroforming technology are studied under the condition of uniform blank holder force for three-layered aluminum and aluminum-composite laminates using orthogonal carbon and Kevlar as well as glass fiber in the middle. The experimental results validate the finite element results and they exhibited that the forming limit of glass fiber in the middle is the highest among the studied materials, while carbon fiber material performs the worst. Furthermore, the crack modes are different for the three kinds of fiber materials investigated in the research. This study provides fundamental guidance for the selection of multi-layer sheet materials in the future manufacturing field.

  10. Airborne observations of newly formed boundary layer aerosol particles under cloudy conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Altstädter

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the appearance of ultrafine boundary layer aerosol particles under classical non-favourable conditions at the research site of TROPOS (Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research. Airborne measurements of meteorological and aerosol properties of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL were repeatedly performed with the unmanned aerial system ALADINA (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN-situ Aerosol during three seasons between October 2013 and July 2015. More than 100 measurement flights were conducted on 23 different days with a total flight duration of 53 h. In 26 % of the cases, maxima of ultrafine particles were observed close to the inversion layer at altitudes between 400 and 600 m and the particles were rapidly mixed vertically and mainly transported downwards during short time intervals of cloud gaps. This study focuses on two measurement days affected by low-level stratocumulus clouds, but different wind directions (NE, SW and minimal concentrations (< 4.6 µg m−3 of SO2, as a common indicator for precursor gases at ground. Taken from vertical profiles, the onset of clouds led to a non-linearity of humidity that resulted in an increased turbulence at the local-scale and caused fast nucleation e.g., but in relation to rapid dilution of surrounding air, seen in sporadic clusters of ground data, so that ultrafine particles disappeared in the verticality. The typical banana shape of new particle formation (NPF and growth was not seen at ground and thus these days might not have been classified as NPF event days by pure surface studies.

  11. Contribution of electron microscopy to the study of alteration layers formed on the surface of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovisier, J.L.; Eberhart, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the whole process of glass corrosion in aqueous solutions, the analysis of the reagent must be completed by a study of the actual alteration layers on the glass surface. Transmission electron microscopy on ultramicrotomic thin sections turns out to be a most suitable tool to achieve this. It enables to supplement the conventional methods of surface investigation, such as A.E.S., ESCA, IRRS, SIMS. Two examples are given. The first deals with a (SiO 2 -CaO-Na 2 O-P 2 O 5 )- glass leached in a buffer solution of tris-hydromethyl-aminomethane at 40 0 C. The major feature is ion exchange within a residual porous glass, followed by the precipitation of hydroxyapatite. In the second example, a basaltic glass is altered in sea-water at 50 0 C. The glass constituents are dissolved simultaneously and the alteration layer is a precipitate of crystalline and amorphous phases which have reached their saturation level [fr

  12. Ge clusters and wetting layers forming from granular films on the Si(001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storozhevykh, M S; Arapkina, L V; Yuryev, V A

    2016-01-01

    The report studies the transformation of a Ge granular film deposited on the Si(001) surface at room temperature into a Ge/Si(001) heterostructure as a result of rapid heating and annealing at 600 °C. As a result of the short-term annealing at 600 °C in conditions of a closed system, the Ge granular film transforms into a usual wetting layer and Ge clusters with multimodal size distribution and Ge oval drops having the highest number density. After the long-term thermal treatment of the Ge film at the same temperature, Ge drops disappear; the large clusters increase their sizes at the expense of the smaller ones. The total density of Ge clusters on the surface drastically decreases. The wetting layer mixed c(4 x 2) + p(2 x 2) reconstruction transforms into a single c(4 x 2) one which is likely to be thermodynamically favoured. Pyramids or domes are not observed on the surface after any annealing. (paper)

  13. Novel Bioactive Titanate Layers Formed on Ti Metal and Its Alloys by Chemical Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Kokubo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sodium titanate formed on Ti metal by NaOH and heat treatments induces apatite formation on its surface in a body environment and bonds to living bone. These treatments have been applied to porous Ti metal in artificial hip joints, and have been used clinically in Japan since 2007. Calcium titanate formed on Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta alloy by NaOH, CaCl2, heat, and water treatments induces apatite formation on its surface in a body environment. Titanium oxide formed on porous Ti metal by NaOH, HCl, and heat treatments exhibits osteoinductivity as well as osteoconductivity. This is now under clinical tests for application to a spinal fusion device.

  14. Zn Thin Film Deposition for Fe Layer Shielding Use the Sputtering Technique on Cylindrical Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunanto; Tjipto Sujitno, BA; Suprapto; Simbolon, Sahat

    2002-01-01

    Deposition of thin film on Fe substrate use sputtering technique on cylindrical form was carried out. The purpose of this research is to protect Fe due to the corrosion with Zn thin film. Sputtering method was proposed to protect a component of complex form. Substrate has functioned as anode, meanwhile target in cylindrical form as a cathode. Argon ion from anode bombard Zn with enough energy for releasing Zn. Zn atom would scatter and some of then was focused on the anode. For testing Zn atom on Fe by using XRF and corrosion rate with potentiostat. It was found that corrosion rate was decreased from 0.051 mpy to 0.031 mpy on 0.63 % of Fe substrate. (author)

  15. Diffusive boundary layers, photosynthesis, and respiration of the colony-forming plankton algae, Phaeocystis sp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Helle; Stolte, W.; Epping, E.H.G.

    1999-01-01

    H increased up to 0.4 units when measured in light at saturating intensities (>90 mu mol photons m(-2) s(-1)). The respiration in the dark was low, resulting in a 6% lowering in oxygen concentration and 0.04 units lowering in pH inside colonies, compared to the bulk water phase. Such colonies were net...... heterotrophic communities at light intensities up to 10 mu mol photons m(-2) s(-1). A week later, colonies were net heterotrophic at light intensities up to 80 mu mol photons m(-2) s(-1). The effective diffusion coefficient for oxygen in the gelatinous colonies was not significantly different from that in sea......Diffusive boundary layers, photosynthesis, and respiration in Phaeocystis colonies were studied by the use of microelectrodes for oxygen and pH during a bloom in the Barents Sea, 1993, and in the Marsdiep, Dutch North Sea, 1994. The oxygen microenvironment of a Phaeocystis colony with a mean...

  16. Characterization of Nitride Layers Formed by Nitrogen Ion Implantation into Surface Region of Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjatmoko; Subki, M. Iyos R.

    2000-01-01

    Ion implantation is a convenient means of modifying the physical and chemical properties of the near-surface region of materials. The nitrogen implantation into pure iron has been performed at room temperature with ion dose of 1.310 17 to 1.310 18 ions/cm 2 and ion energy of 20 to 100 keV. The optimum dose of nitrogen ions implanted into pure iron was around 2.2310 17 ions/cm 2 in order to get the maximum wear resistant. SEM micrographs and EDX show that the nitride layers were found on the surface of substrate. The nitrogen concentration profile was measured using EDX in combination with spot technique, and it can be shown that the depth profile of nitrogen implanted into substrate was nearly Gaussian. (author)

  17. Layers of Experience: Forms of Representation in a Waldorf School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, David W.

    2000-01-01

    Examines why a sixth-grade teacher in a Waldorf classroom selected the particular forms of representation for the lessons in a thematic unit. States that the teacher represented the lessons in ways that would bring about experiences, feelings, and imagination (such as story telling, visual arts, and singing.) (CMK)

  18. 29 CFR 525.10 - Prevailing wage rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prevailing wage rates. 525.10 Section 525.10 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.10 Prevailing wage rates. (a) A...

  19. Chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer formed on stainless steels in a glucose-oxidase solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marconnet, C. [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes et des Materiaux, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 CHATENAY-MALABRY (France)], E-mail: cyril.marconnet@yahoo.fr; Wouters, Y. [Science et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Miserque, F. [Laboratoire de Reactivite des Surfaces et des Interfaces, CEA Saclay, Bat. 391, 91191 GIF-SUR-YVETTE (France); Dagbert, C. [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes et des Materiaux, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 CHATENAY-MALABRY (France)], E-mail: catherine.dagbert@ecp.fr; Petit, J.-P. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, INPG, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Galerie, A. [Science et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Feron, D. [Service de Corrosion et du Comportement des Materiaux dans leur Environnement, CEA Saclay, Bat. 458, 91191 GIF-SUR-YVETTE (France)

    2008-12-01

    This article deals with the interaction between the passive layer formed on UNS S30403 and S31254 stainless steels and an enzymatic solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx) and its substrate D-glucose. This enzymatic solution is often used to reproduce in laboratory the ennoblement occuring in non-sterile aerated aqueous environments because of the biofilm settlement on the surface of the metallic material. GOx catalyses the oxidation of D-glucose to gluconic acid by reducing oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and produces an organic acid. Thanks to photocurrent measurements, XPS analysis and Mott-Schottky diagrams, it is here shown that such an environment generates modifications in the chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer: it induces a relative enrichment of the n-type semi-conducting phase containing chromium (chromine Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and an increase of the donors density in the space charge region.

  20. Chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer formed on stainless steels in a glucose-oxidase solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marconnet, C.; Wouters, Y.; Miserque, F.; Dagbert, C.; Petit, J.-P.; Galerie, A.; Feron, D.

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the interaction between the passive layer formed on UNS S30403 and S31254 stainless steels and an enzymatic solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx) and its substrate D-glucose. This enzymatic solution is often used to reproduce in laboratory the ennoblement occuring in non-sterile aerated aqueous environments because of the biofilm settlement on the surface of the metallic material. GOx catalyses the oxidation of D-glucose to gluconic acid by reducing oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and produces an organic acid. Thanks to photocurrent measurements, XPS analysis and Mott-Schottky diagrams, it is here shown that such an environment generates modifications in the chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer: it induces a relative enrichment of the n-type semi-conducting phase containing chromium (chromine Cr 2 O 3 ) and an increase of the donors density in the space charge region

  1. Neodymium conversion layers formed on zinc powder for improving electrochemical properties of zinc electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Liqun; Zhang Hui; Li Weiping; Liu Huicong

    2008-01-01

    Zinc powder, as active material of secondary alkaline zinc electrode, can greatly limit the performance of zinc electrode due to corrosion and dendritic growth of zinc resulting in great capacity-loss and short cycle life of the electrode. This work is devoted to modification study of zinc powder with neodymium conversion films coated directly onto it using ultrasonic immersion method for properties improvement of zinc electrodes. Scanning electron microscopy and other characterization techniques are applied to prove that neodymium conversion layers are distributing on the surface of modified zinc powder. The electrochemical performance of zinc electrodes made of such modified zinc powder is investigated through potentiodynamic polarization, potentiostatic polarization and cyclic voltammetry. The neodymium conversion films are found to have a significant effect on inhibition corrosion capability of zinc electrode in a beneficial way. It is also confirmed that the neodymium conversion coatings can obviously suppress dendritic growth of zinc electrode, which is attributed to the amelioration of deposition state of zinc. Moreover, the results of cyclic voltammetry reveal that surface modification of zinc powder enhances the cycle performance of the electrode mainly because the neodymium conversion films decrease the amounts of ZnO or Zn(OH) 2 dissolved in the electrolyte

  2. Rust Layer Formed on Low Carbon Weathering Steels with Different Mn, Ni Contents in Environment Containing Chloride Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-qin FU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rusting evolution of low carbon weathering steels with different Mn, Ni contents under a simulated environment containing chloride ions has been investigated to clarify the correlation between Mn, Ni and the rust formed on steels. The results show that Mn contents have little impact on corrosion kinetics of experimental steels. Content increase of Ni both enhances the anti-corrosion performance of steel substrate and the rust. Increasing Ni content is beneficial to forming compact rust. Semi-quantitative XRD phase analysis shows that the quantity ratio of α/γ*(α-FeOOH/(γ-FeOOH+Fe3O4 decreases as Mn content increases but it increases as Ni content increases. Ni enhances rust layer stability but Mn content exceeding 1.06 wt.% is disadvantageous for rust layer stability. The content increase of Mn does not significantly alter the parameters of the polarization curve. However, as Ni contents increases, Ecorr has shifted to the positive along with decreased icorr values indicating smaller corrosion rate especially as Ni content increases from 0.42 wt.% to 1.50 wt.%.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12844

  3. Effect of lead on Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 oxide layers formed in simulated steam generator secondary environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Mazario, M.; Lancha, A.M.; Hernandez, M.; Maffiotte, C.

    1996-01-01

    The existence of lead in steam generators, detected during the analysis of deposits in the damaged areas of tubing, supports the hypothesis that lead may contribute to the cracking problems experienced in steam generator tubes. In addition, the harmful effect of lead on Inconel 600 is known not only through laboratory tests but also as a result of operating experience. Operating experience of Incoloy 800 is, however, much more limited and there are very few laboratory studies in this area. Taking into account that thin films formed on metals reflect the interaction between such metals and the aqueous environment and also that incoloy 800 is considered to be a suitable material for new steam generators as a substitute for Inconel 600, attempts to determine the effect of lead on corrosion films are considered useful with a view to better understanding the stress-corrosion-cracking behaviour of these materials. For these reasons the objective of this paper is to gain some insights into the effect of lead on the oxide layers forming on Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 tested in the laboratory in various aggressive lead-containing environments. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) have been used to study the composition of these oxide layers. (orig.)

  4. Does undernutrition still prevail among nursing home residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törmä, Johanna; Winblad, Ulrika; Cederholm, Tommy; Saletti, Anja

    2013-08-01

    During recent years public awareness about malnutrition has increased and collective initiatives have been undertaken. Simultaneously, the number of older adults is increasing, and the elderly care has been placed under pressure. The aim was to assess the nutritional situation and one-year mortality among nursing home (NH) residents, and compare with historical data. Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF), ADL Barthel Index (BI), Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ), EQ-5D, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), and blood samples were collected from 172 NH residents (86.3 ± 8 years, 70% women). Mortality data was taken from NH records. Nutritional data from 166 NH residents (83.8 ± 8 years, 61% women) examined in 1996 was retrieved for historical comparison. The prevalence of malnutrition was 30%, as compared to 71% in the historical data set, corresponding to a present average body mass index of 23.7 ± 5.1 compared with 22.3 ± 4.2 kg/m(2) (p prevails and is associated with deteriorated cognition, function and increased mortality. A possible improvement in nutritional status in NH residents over time was observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Experiment Prevails Over Observation in Geophysical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, C.

    2006-05-01

    Thomson and Tait gave their name to a text (T and T') that sums up nineteenth century mechanics. T and T' says that scientists gain knowledge of the natural universe and the laws that regulate it through Experience. T and T' divides Experience into Observation and Experiment. The posthumous (1912) edition of T and T' appeared seven years before Eddington's expeditions to observe the eclipse of 29 May 1919 that demonstrated the bending of starlight predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity. During the 2005 centenary of young Einstein's remarkably productive year, Eddington's (1919) result was frequently remembered, but the description in 2005 of what Eddington did in 1919 often differed from what Eddington said that he did. In his words then, Eddington observed; in words from scientists, historians of science, and philosophers of science during 2005, Eddington often experimented. In 1912, T and T' had distinguished Observation from Experiment with an apt contrast: ""When, as in astronomy, we endeavour to ascertain these causes by simply watching, we observe; when, as in our laboratories, we interfere arbitrarily with the causes or circumstances of a phenomenon, we are said to experiment"". (italics in T and T'). Eddington himself conformed to this distinction in his report (Physical Society of London, 1920). In its Preface, he states that observations were made at each of two stations, and concludes that ""I think it may now be stated that Einstein's law of gravitation is definitely established by observation..."". Chapter V of that report deals with The Crucial Phenomena. In this chapter, some form of the word observe (noun, verb, adjective, adverb) appears 13 times. In this chapter, experiment appears only as experimental, and then only twice. Einstein's prediction, with Eddington's observations, profoundly impressed contemporary philosophers of science. Karl Popper, then aged 17, considered Eddington's findings to effect a turning point in his career

  6. A case for 'prevailing ecology' as premium determinant in home ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case for 'prevailing ecology' as premium determinant in home-based child care ... Ewe mothers located in Dzemeni a migrant, lakeside community in Ghana. ... It builds a case from the analysis of definitions and concepts in care literature.

  7. Effects of Prevailing Winds on Turbidity of a Shallow Estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hyun Jung

    2007-01-01

    Estuarine waters are generally more turbid than lakes or marine waters due to greater algal mass and continual re-suspension of sediments. The varying effects of diurnal and seasonal prevailing winds on the turbidity condition of a wind-dominated estuary were investigated by spatial and statistical analyses of wind direction, water level, turbidity, chlorophyll a, and PAR (Photosynthetically Active Radiation) collected in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA. The prolonged prevailing winds were...

  8. Electron transfer through solid-electrolyte-interphase layers formed on Si anodes of Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, L.; Cristancho, D.; Seminario, J.M.; Martinez de la Hoz, J.M.; Balbuena, P.B.

    2014-01-01

    Solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) films are formed on the electrode surfaces due to aggregation of products of reduction or oxidation of the electrolyte. These films may grow to thicknesses in the order of 50-100 nm and contain a variety of organic and inorganic products but their structure is not well defined. Although in some cases the films exert a passivating role, this is not always the case, and these phenomena are particularly more complex on Silicon anodes due to swelling and cracking of the electrode during lithiation and delithiation. Since the driving force for SEI growth is electron transfer, it is important to understand how electron transfer may keep occurring through the heterogeneous film once the bare electron surface is covered. Here we introduce a novel approach for studying electron transfer through model films and show preliminary results for the analysis of electron transfer through model composite interfacial systems integrated by electrode/SEI layer/electrolyte. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify deposition of SEI components, and a density functional theory/Green's function approach is utilized for characterizing electron transfer. Three degrees of lithiation are modeled for the electrodes, the SEI film is composed by LiF or Li 2 O, and the ethylene carbonate reduction is studied. An applied potential is used as driving force for the leakage current, which is evaluated as a function of the applied potential. Comparative analyses are done for LiF and Li 2 O model SEI layers

  9. Separation of metals in the form of ion associates by the method of thin-layer chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalova, E.N.; Timerbaev, A.R.; Bol'shova, T.A.; Mel'nik, S.V.; Kordejro, E.

    1990-01-01

    Behaviour of pyridylazo resorcinates of certain metals (Ga, In, Fe, Co) in the form of ionic pairs with tri-n-octylamine (TOA) under conditions of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) has been studied. For all eluents investigated Ga and In complexes possess the highest mobility. Selectivity of ionic associate separation decreases with an increase in mobile phase polarity. Mixtures with 10-15 % content of isopropanol in eluating solution are the optimal ones. Separation of Ga and In from Fe 3+ and Co takes place with separation criterion 3.1 and 4.1 respectively. An attempt to separate ionic associates of In and Ga failed owing to similar stability of their pyridylazoresorcinates. Solution of the problem of In and Ga determination in the presence of iron can contribute to concrete application of the method

  10. Chemical properties and GMR improvement of specular spin valves with nano-oxide layers, formed in ambient mixed gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quang, H D; Hien, N T; Oh, S K; Sinh, N H; Yu, S C

    2004-01-01

    Specular spin valves (SVs) containing nano-oxide layers (NOLs) structured as substrate/seed/AF/P 1 /NOL/P 2 /Cu/F/NOL, have been fabricated. The NOLs were formed by natural oxidation in different ambient atmospheres of pure oxygen, oxygen/nitrogen and oxygen/argon gas mixtures. The fabrication conditions were optimized to enhance the magnetoresistance (MR) ratio, to suppress the interlayer coupling fields (H f ) between the free and pinned layers, to suppress the high interface density of the NOL, to ease the control of the NOL thickness and to form a smooth NOL/P 2 interface for promoting specular electron scattering. The characteristics of our specular SVs are the MR ratio of 14.1%, the exchange bias field of 44-45 mT, and H f weaker than 1.0 mT. The optimal conditions for oxidation time, total oxidation pressure and the annealing temperature were found to be 300 s, 0.14 Pa (oxygen/argon = 80/20) and 250 deg. C, respectively. Also, the origin of thermal stability of MMn-based (M = Fe, Pt, Ir, etc) specular SVs has been explained in detail by chemical properties of NOL using secondary-ion mass spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profile analyses. Thermal stability turns out to be caused by a decrease in MR ratios at high temperatures (>250 deg. C), which is a serious problem for device applications using the SV structure as a high density read head device

  11. Prevailing Torque Locking Feature in Threaded Fasteners Using Anaerobic Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Alan; Hess, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results from tests to assess the use of anaerobic adhesive for providing a prevailing torque locking feature in threaded fasteners. Test procedures are developed and tests are performed on three fastener materials, four anaerobic adhesives, and both unseated assembly conditions. Five to ten samples are tested for each combination. Tests for initial use, reuse without additional adhesive, and reuse with additional adhesive are performed for all samples. A 48-hour cure time was used for all initial use and reuse tests. Test data are presented as removal torque versus removal angle with the specification required prevailing torque range added for performance assessment. Percent specification pass rates for the all combinations of fastener material, adhesive, and assembly condition are tabulated and reveal use of anaerobic adhesive as a prevailing torque locking feature is viable. Although not every possible fastener material and anaerobic adhesive combination provides prevailing torque values within specification, any combination can be assessed using the test procedures presented. Reuse without additional anaerobic adhesive generally provides some prevailing torque, and in some cases within specification. Reuse with additional adhesive often provides comparable removal torque data as in initial use.

  12. LAYER STRUCTURES FORMED BY SILICA NANOPARTICLES AND CELLULOSE NANOFIBRILS WITH CATIONIC POLYACRYLAMIDE (C-PAM ON CELLULOSE SURFACE AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON INTERACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani Salmi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D was used to study the adsorption of the layer formed by silica nanoparticles (SNP and cellulose nanofibrils (NFC together with cationic polyacrylamide (C-PAM on cellulose surface, accompanied by use of atomic force microscope (AFM to study the interactions between cellulose surfaces. The purpose was to understand the multilayer build-up compared to complex structure adsorption. The layer thickness and consequently also the repulsion between surfaces increased with each addition step during layer formation in the SNP-C-PAM systems, whereas the second addition of C-PAM decreased the repulsion in the case of NFC-C-PAM multilayer formation. An exceptionally high repulsion between surfaces was observed when nanofibrillar cellulose was added. This together with the extremely high dissipation values recorded with QCM-D indicated that nanofibrillar cellulose formed a loose and thick layer containing a lot of water. The multilayer systems formed fully and uniformly covered the surfaces. Silica nanoparticles were able to penetrate inside the loose C-PAM structure due to their small size. In contrast, NFC formed individual layers between C-PAM layers. The complex of C-PAM and SNP formed only a partly covered surface, leading to long-ranged pull-off force. This might explain the good flocculation properties reported for polyelectrolyte-nanoparticle systems.

  13. Difference between Cr and Ni K-edge XANES spectra of rust layers formed on Fe-based binary alloys exposed to Cl-rich environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Hiroyuki; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Yamashita, Masato; Uchida, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    The rust layer formed on weathering steel possesses a strong protective ability against corrosives in an atmospheres. This ability is related to the structure of the rust layer. The difference in the protective ability of a rust layer. The difference in the protective ability of a rust layer in a Cl-rich environment between conventional weathering steel containing Cr and advanced weathering steel containing Ni is believed to be caused by the differences in local structural and chemical properties between alloying elements. Cr and Ni, in the rust layer. In order to examine the effect of these alloying elements on the structure of the rust layer formed on steel in a Cl-rich environment, we have performed Cr and Ni K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements for the rust layer of Fe-Cr and Fe-Ni binary alloys exposed to a Cl-rich atmosphere using synchrotron radiation. The results of the Cr K-edge XANES measurements for the rust layer of Fe-Cr binary alloys show that the atomic geometry around Cr depends on the concentration of Cr. Therefore, it is expected that the local structure around Cr in the rust layer is unstable. On the other hand, from the results of the Ni K-edge XANES measurements for the rust layer of Fe-Ni binary alloys. Ni is considered to be positioned at a specific site in the crystal structure of a constituent of the rust layer, such as akaganeite or magnetite. As a consequence, Ni negligibly interacts with Cl - ions in the rust layer. (author)

  14. Oxidation of Dodecanoate Intercalated Iron(II)–Iron(III) Layered Double Hydroxide to Form 2D Iron(III) (Hydr)oxide Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li‐Zhi; Ayala‐Luis, Karina B.; Fang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    hydroxide planar layer were preserved during the oxidation, as shown by FTIR spectroscopy. The high positive charge in the hydroxide layer produced by the oxidation of iron(II) to iron(III) is partially compensated by the deprotonation of hydroxy groups, as shown by X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy...... between the alkyl chains of the intercalated dodecanoate anions play a crucial role in stabilizing the structure and hindering the collapse of the iron(II)–iron(III) (hydr)oxide structure during oxidation. This is the first report describing the formation of a stable planar layered octahedral iron......(III) (hydr)oxide. oxGRC12 shows promise as a sorbent and host for hydrophobic reagents, and as a possible source of single planar layers of iron(III) (hydr)oxide....

  15. Analysis of chemical bond states and electrical properties of stacked AlON/HfO{sub 2} gate oxides formed by using a layer-by-layer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Wonjoon; Lee, Jonghyun; Yang, Jungyup; Kim, Chaeok; Hong, Jinpyo; Nahm, Tschanguh; Byun, Byungsub; Kim, Moseok [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Stacked AlON/HfO{sub 2} thin films for gate oxides in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices are successfully prepared on Si substrates by utilizing a layer-by-layer technique integrated with an off-axis RF remote plasma sputtering process at room temperature. This off-axis structure is designed to improve the uniformity and the quality of gate oxide films. Also, a layer-by-layer technique is used to control the interface layer between the gate oxide and the Si substrate. The electrical properties of our stacked films are characterized by using capacitance versus voltage and leakage current versus voltage measurements. The stacked AlON/HfO{sub 2} gate oxide exhibits a low leakage current of about 10{sup -6} A/cm{sup 2} and a high dielectric constant value of 14.26 by effectively suppressing the interface layer between gate oxide and Si substrate. In addition, the chemical bond states and the optimum thickness of each AlON and HfO{sub 2} thin film are analyzed using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurement.

  16. Rapid visible color change and physical swelling during water exposure in triethanolamine-metalcone films formed by molecular layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, Paul C.; Oldham, Christopher J.; Parsons, Gregory N.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular layer deposition (MLD) of “metalcones,” including alucone, zincone, titanicone, and others, involves self-limiting half-reactions between organic and organometallic (or metal-halide) reactants. Studies have typically focused on metal precursors reacting with ethylene glycol or glycerol to form the films' polymeric O-M-O-(CH x ) y -O-M-O repeat units. The authors report new MLD materials that incorporate tertiary amine groups into the organic linkage. Specifically, reacting triethanolamine (TEA) with either trimethylaluminum or titanium tetrachloride produces TEA-alucone (Al-TEA) and TEA-titanicone (Ti-TEA), respectively, and the amine group leads to unique physical and optical properties. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) analysis confirms that the films have prominent C-H, C-N, and M-O-C peaks, consistent with the expected bond structure. When exposed to vapors, including water, alcohol, or ammonia, the Ti-TEA films changed their visible color within minutes and increased physical thickness by >35%. The Al-TEA showed significantly less response. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and FTIR suggest that HCl generated during MLD coordinates to the amine forming a quaternary ammonium salt that readily binds adsorbates via hydrogen bonding. The visible color change is reversible, and ellipsometry confirms that the color change results from vapor absorption. The unique absorptive and color-changing properties of the TEA-metalcone films point to new possible applications for MLD materials in filtration, chemical absorption, and multifunctional chemical separations/sensing device systems

  17. Rapid visible color change and physical swelling during water exposure in triethanolamine-metalcone films formed by molecular layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, Paul C.; Oldham, Christopher J.; Parsons, Gregory N., E-mail: gnp@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Molecular layer deposition (MLD) of “metalcones,” including alucone, zincone, titanicone, and others, involves self-limiting half-reactions between organic and organometallic (or metal-halide) reactants. Studies have typically focused on metal precursors reacting with ethylene glycol or glycerol to form the films' polymeric O-M-O-(CH{sub x}){sub y}-O-M-O repeat units. The authors report new MLD materials that incorporate tertiary amine groups into the organic linkage. Specifically, reacting triethanolamine (TEA) with either trimethylaluminum or titanium tetrachloride produces TEA-alucone (Al-TEA) and TEA-titanicone (Ti-TEA), respectively, and the amine group leads to unique physical and optical properties. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) analysis confirms that the films have prominent C-H, C-N, and M-O-C peaks, consistent with the expected bond structure. When exposed to vapors, including water, alcohol, or ammonia, the Ti-TEA films changed their visible color within minutes and increased physical thickness by >35%. The Al-TEA showed significantly less response. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and FTIR suggest that HCl generated during MLD coordinates to the amine forming a quaternary ammonium salt that readily binds adsorbates via hydrogen bonding. The visible color change is reversible, and ellipsometry confirms that the color change results from vapor absorption. The unique absorptive and color-changing properties of the TEA-metalcone films point to new possible applications for MLD materials in filtration, chemical absorption, and multifunctional chemical separations/sensing device systems.

  18. Efficient and Air-Stable Planar Perovskite Solar Cells Formed on Graphene-Oxide-Modified PEDOT:PSS Hole Transport Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui; Lin, Xuanhuai; Hou, Xian; Pan, Likun; Huang, Sumei; Chen, Xiaohong

    2017-10-01

    As a hole transport layer, PEDOT:PSS usually limits the stability and efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) due to its hygroscopic nature and inability to block electrons. Here, a graphene-oxide (GO)-modified PEDOT:PSS hole transport layer was fabricated by spin-coating a GO solution onto the PEDOT:PSS surface. PSCs fabricated on a GO-modified PEDOT:PSS layer exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.34%, which is higher than 11.90% of PSCs with the PEDOT:PSS layer. Furthermore, the stability of the PSCs was significantly improved, with the PCE remaining at 83.5% of the initial PCE values after aging for 39 days in air. The hygroscopic PSS material at the PEDOT:PSS surface was partly removed during spin-coating with the GO solution, which improves the moisture resistance and decreases the contact barrier between the hole transport layer and perovskite layer. The scattered distribution of the GO at the PEDOT:PSS surface exhibits superior wettability, which helps to form a high-quality perovskite layer with better crystallinity and fewer pin holes. Furthermore, the hole extraction selectivity of the GO further inhibits the carrier recombination at the interface between the perovskite and PEDOT:PSS layers. Therefore, the cooperative interactions of these factors greatly improve the light absorption of the perovskite layer, the carrier transport and collection abilities of the PSCs, and especially the stability of the cells.

  19. Analysis of nanopore arrangement of porous alumina layers formed by anodizing in oxalic acid at relatively high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraska, Leszek; Stępniowski, Wojciech J.; Jaskuła, Marian; Sulka, Grzegorz D.

    2014-06-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) layers were formed by a simple two-step anodization in 0.3 M oxalic acid at relatively high temperatures (20-30 °C) and various anodizing potentials (30-65 V). The effect of anodizing conditions on structural features of as-obtained oxides was carefully investigated. A linear and exponential relationships between cell diameter, pore density and anodizing potential were confirmed, respectively. On the other hand, no effect of temperature and duration of anodization on pore spacing and pore density was found. Detailed quantitative and qualitative analyses of hexagonal arrangement of nanopore arrays were performed for all studied samples. The nanopore arrangement was evaluated using various methods based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT) images, Delaunay triangulations (defect maps), pair distribution functions (PDF), and angular distribution functions (ADF). It was found that for short anodizations performed at relatively high temperatures, the optimal anodizing potential that results in formation of nanostructures with the highest degree of pore order is 45 V. No direct effect of temperature and time of anodization on the nanopore arrangement was observed.

  20. PREVAIL: IBM's e-beam technology for next generation lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Hans C.

    2000-07-01

    PREVAIL - Projection Reduction Exposure with Variable Axis Immersion Lenses represents the high throughput e-beam projection approach to NGL which IBM is pursuing in cooperation with Nikon Corporation as alliance partner. This paper discusses the challenges and accomplishments of the PREVAIL project. The supreme challenge facing all e-beam lithography approaches has been and still is throughput. Since the throughput of e-beam projection systems is severely limited by the available optical field size, the key to success is the ability to overcome this limitation. The PREVAIL technique overcomes field-limiting off-axis aberrations through the use of variable axis lenses, which electronically shift the optical axis simultaneously with the deflected beam so that the beam effectively remains on axis. The resist images obtained with the Proof-of-Concept (POC) system demonstrate that PREVAIL effectively eliminates off- axis aberrations affecting both resolution and placement accuracy of pixels. As part of the POC system a high emittance gun has been developed to provide uniform illumination of the patterned subfield and to fill the large numerical aperture projection optics designed to significantly reduce beam blur caused by Coulomb interaction.

  1. Is the Economic Crisis Challenging the Prevailing Gender Regime?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leschke, Janine; Jepsen, Maria

    2014-01-01

    and analysing the corresponding position of women and men in paid and unpaid work, the paper contains an in-depth discussion of the short- and medium-term policy responses to the crisis. Our analysis shows that independent of the prevailing gender regime, scant public attention has been directed to gender...

  2. The structure of carbon nanotubes formed of graphene layers L4-8, L5-7, L3-12, L4-6-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalova, K. E.; Belenkov, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    We geometrically calculate the optimized structure of nanotubes based on the graphene layers, using the method of molecular mechanics MM+. It was found that only the nanotubes, based on the graphene layers L4-8, L5-7, L3-12, L4-6-12, have a cylindrical form. Calculations of the sublimation energy, carried out using the semi-empirical quantum-mechanic method PM3, show that energy increases with the increase of nanotube diameters.

  3. Changes in the physical properties of the dynamic layer and its correlation with permeate quality in a self-forming dynamic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dao; Dai, Ji; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Chen, Guanghao

    2018-09-01

    The self-forming dynamic membrane bioreactor (SFDMBR) is a biological wastewater treatment technology based on the conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR) with membrane material modification to a large pore size (30-100 μm). This modification requires a dynamic layer formed by activated sludge to provide effective filtration function for high-quality permeate production. The properties of the dynamic layer are therefore important for permeate quality in SFDMBRs. The interaction between the structure of the dynamic layer and the performance of SFDMBRs is little known but understandably complex. To elucidate the interaction, a lab-scale SFDMBR system coupled with a nylon woven mesh as the supporting material was operated. After development of a mature dynamic layer, excellent solid-liquid separation was achieved, as evidenced by a low permeate turbidity of less than 2 NTU. The permeate turbidity stayed below this level for nearly 80 days. In the fouling phase, the dynamic layer was compressed with an increase in the trans-membrane pressure and the quality of the permeate kept deteriorating until the turbidity exceeded 10 NTU. The investigation revealed that the majority of permeate particles were dissociated from the dynamic layer on the back surface of the supporting material, which is caused by the compression, breakdown, and dissociation of the dynamic layer. This phenomenon was observed directly in experiment instead of model prediction or conjecture for the first time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characteristic electron energy loss spectra in SiC buried layers formed by C+ implantation into crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Hui; Chen Guanghua; Kwok, R.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    SiC buried layers were synthesized by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source, with C + ions implanted into crystalline Si substrates. According to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the characteristic electron energy loss spectra of the SiC buried layers were studied. It was found that the characteristic electron energy loss spectra depend on the profiles of the carbon content, and correlate well with the order of the buried layers

  5. Effects of Cr-N-ZrO 2 seed layer formed on glass substrates for longitudinal recording media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Djayaprawira, David D.; Takahashi, Yoshio; Ishikawa, Akira; Ono, Toshinori; Yahisa, Yotsuo

    1999-03-01

    Effects of Cr-N-ZrO 2 seed layer deposited on glass substrates before the deposition of C/Co-Cr-Pt/Cr-Ti layers for longitudinal recording media have been investigated. The product of v and Is, the activation volume and the saturation magnetization per unit volume, media noise Nd and S0/ Nd, which is the half value of peak-to-peak output voltage of an isolated pulse over Nd at 11.8 kFC/mm, are evaluated. We find that vIs is decreased by adding N and ZrO 2 to Cr seed layer. Nd is reduced as vIs decreases by adding nitrogen to the Cr seed layer. This is mainly due to the decreased grain sizes of both Cr-Ti underlayer and Co-Cr-Pt magnetic layer. The Nd is further reduced by the addition of ZrO 2 to the Cr-N seed layer. Highest S0/ Nd is achieved for the media with Cr-N-ZrO 2 seed layer. On the other hand, the media with Cr-ZrO 2 seed layer deposited without nitrogen show the higher Nd. Therefore the decrease of the grain size by addition of nitrogen into Ar is essential to reduce Nd, and the ZrO 2 addition to the Cr-N seed layer seems to enhance the effect of grain size reduction by nitrogen addition.

  6. Internal deformation in layered Zechstein-III K-Mg salts. Structures formed by complex deformation and high contrasts in viscosity observed in drill cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Alexander; Urai, Janos L.

    2016-04-01

    During the evaporation of a massive salt body, alternations of interrupted and full evaporation sequences can form a complex layering of different lithologies. Viscosity contrasts of up to five orders of magnitude between these different lithologies are possible in this environment. During the late stage of an evaporation cycle potassium and magnesium (K-Mg) salts are precipitated. These K-Mg salts are of economic interest but also a known drilling hazard due to their very low viscosity. How up to 200m thick layers of these evaporites affect salt deformation at different scales is not well known. A better understanding of salt tectonics with extreme mechanical stratification is needed for better exploration and production of potassium-magnesium salts and to predict the internal structure of potential nuclear waste repositories in salt. To gain a better understanding of the internal deformation of these layers we analyzed K-Mg salt rich drill cores out of the Zechstein III-1b subunit from the Veendam Pillow 10 km southeast of Groningen, near the city Veendam in the NE Netherlands. The study area has a complex geological history with multiple tectonic phases of extension and compression forming internal deformation in the pillow but also conserving most of the original layering. Beside halite the most common minerals in the ZIII-1b are carnallite, kieserite, anhydrite and bischofite alternating in thin layers of simple composition. Seismic interpretation revealed that the internal structure of the Veendam Pillow shows areas, in which the K-Mg salt rich ZIII 1b layer is much thicker than elsewhere, as a result of salt deformation. The internal structure of the ZIII-1b on the other hand, remains unknown. The core analysis shows a strong strain concentration in the weaker Bischofite (MgCl2*6H20) and Carnallite (KMgCl3*6H20) rich layers producing tectonic breccias and highly strained layers completely overprinting the original layering. Layers formed by alternating beds

  7. PREVAIL-EPL alpha tool electron optics subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Hans C.; Dhaliwal, Rajinder S.; Golladay, Steven D.; Doran, Samuel K.; Gordon, Michael S.; Kendall, Rodney A.; Lieberman, Jon E.; Pinckney, David J.; Quickle, Robert J.; Robinson, Christopher F.; Rockrohr, James D.; Stickel, Werner; Tressler, Eileen V.

    2001-08-01

    The IBM/Nikon alliance is continuing pursuit of an EPL stepper alpha tool based on the PREVAIL technology. This paper provides a status report of the alliance activity with particular focus on the Electron Optical Subsystem developed at IBM. We have previously reported on design features of the PREVAIL alpha system. The new state-of-the-art e-beam lithography concepts have since been reduced to practice and turned into functional building blocks of a production level lithography tool. The electron optical alpha tool subsystem has been designed, build, assembled and tested at IBM's Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC) in East Fishkill, New York. After demonstrating subsystem functionality, the electron optical column and all associated control electronics hardware and software have been shipped during January 2001 to Nikon's facility in Kumagaya, Japan, for integration into the Nikon commercial e-beam stepper alpha tool. Early pre-shipment results obtained with this electron optical subsystem are presented.

  8. Ultrathin highly uniform Ni(Al) germanosilicide layer with modulated B8 type Ni5(SiGe)3 phase formed on strained Si1−xGex layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Linjie; Xu, Dawei; Jin, Lei; Knoll, Lars; Wirths, Stephan; Nichau, Alexander; Buca, Dan; Mussler, Gregor; Holländer, Bernhard; Zhao, Qing-Tai; Mantl, Siegfried; Feng Di, Zeng; Zhang, Miao

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to form ultrathin highly uniform Ni(Al) germanosilicide layers on compressively strained Si 1−x Ge x substrates and their structural characteristics. The uniform Ni(Al) germanosilicide film is formed with Ni/Al alloy at an optimized temperature of 400 °C with an optimized Al atomic content of 20 at. %. We find only two kinds of grains in the layer. Both grains show orthogonal relationship with modified B8 type phase. The growth plane is identified to be (10-10)-type plane. After germanosilicidation the strain in the rest Si 1−x Ge x layer is conserved, which provides a great advantage for device application

  9. Fabrication of Hadfield-Cored Multi-layer Steel Sheet by Roll-Bonding with 1.8-GPa-Strength-Grade Hot-Press-Forming Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Kwang-Geun; Kang, Chung-Yun; Park, Jaeyeong; Lee, Sunghak

    2018-05-01

    An austenitic Hadfield steel was roll-bonded with a 1.8-GPa-strength-grade martensitic hot-press-forming (HPF) steel to fabricate a multi-layer steel (MLS) sheet. Near the Hadfield/HPF interface, the carburized and decarburized layers were formed by the carbon diffusion from the Hadfield (1.2%C) to HPF (0.35%C) layers, and could be regarded as kinds of very thin multi-layers of 35 μm in thickness. The tensile test and fractographic data indicated that the MLS sheet was fractured abruptly within the elastic range by the intergranular fracture occurred in the carburized layer. This was because C was mainly segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries in the carburized layer, which weakened grain boundaries to induce the intergranular fracture. In order to solve the intergranular facture problem, the MLS sheet was tempered at 200 °C. The stress-strain curve of the tempered MLS sheet lay between those of the HPF and Hadfield sheets, and a rule of mixtures was roughly satisfied. Tensile properties of the MLS sheet were dramatically improved after the tempering, and the intergranular fracture was erased completely. In particular, the yield strength up to 1073 MPa along with the high strain hardening and excellent ductility of 32.4% were outstanding because the yield strength over 1 GPa was hardly achieved in conventional austenitic steels.

  10. Impedance Characterization of the Capacitive field-Effect pH-Sensor Based on a thin-Layer Hafnium Oxide Formed by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael LEE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a sensing element, silicon dioxide (SiO2 has been applied within ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFET. However, a requirement of increasing pH-sensitivity and stability has observed an increased number of insulating materials that obtain high-k gate being applied as FETs. The increased high-k gate reduces the required metal oxide layer and, thus, the fabrication of thin hafnium oxide (HfO2 layers by atomic layer deposition (ALD has grown with interest in recent years. This metal oxide presents advantageous characteristics that can be beneficial for the advancements within miniaturization of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS technology. In this article, we describe a process for fabrication of HfO2 based on ALD by applying water (H2O as the oxygen precursor. As a first, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements were performed with varying pH (2-10 to demonstrate the sensitivity of HfO2 as a potential pH sensing material. The Nyquist plot demonstrates a high clear shift of the polarization resistance (Rp between pH 6-10 (R2 = 0.9986, Y = 3,054X + 12,100. At acidic conditions (between pH 2-10, the Rp change was small due to the unmodified oxide gate (R2 = 0.9655, Y = 2,104X + 4,250. These preliminary results demonstrate the HfO2 substrate functioned within basic to neutral conditions and establishes a great potential for applying HfO2 as a dielectric material for future pH measuring FET sensors.

  11. Regularities in forming hardened layer during electric spark alloying on the mechanized plant EhFI-66

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkhoturov, A.D.; Zajtsev, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    The regularities in erosion and formation of a hardened layer during electric spark alloying by a mechanized installation EFI-66-type have been studied. The heat resisting metals: Ti,Zr,V,Nb,Ta,Cr,Mo,W have been used as material for alloying electrodes. The effect of the thermophysical constants, as well as of the time of treatment and the material nature have been investigated. No direct dependence of erosion on the thermophysical constants was found. The erosion resistance of material, when treated by a mechanized installation, depends on its plasticity. Tantalum appeared to be more erosion-resistant, its cold-embrittlement temperature being the least. The dependence of the erosion on the alloying time is of a linear character. Depending on the nature of material are the most erosive vanadium and chromium, tantalum is the least erosive. The metallographic analysis has shown, that in the electric spark alloying by means of the mechanized installation the hardened layer could be subdivided into a ''white'' layer of high hardness and a layer of transformed structure. The ''white'' layer thickness is practically the same for each of the metals. The largest summary thickness of the layer is observed when alloying with the metals Ti, Zr, Nb, Ta

  12. Spatial variation of the number of graphene layers formed on the scratched 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osaklung, J. [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Euaruksakul, C. [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Meevasana, W., E-mail: worawat@g.sut.ac.th [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Songsiriritthigul, P. [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-03-01

    The unique properties of graphene can vary greatly depending on the number of graphene layers; therefore, spatial control of graphene thickness is desired to fully exploit these properties in promising new devices. Using low energy electron microscopy (LEEM), we investigate how scratches on the surface of 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) affect the epitaxial growth of graphene. Oscillations in the LEEM-image intensity as a function of electron energy (I-V LEEM analysis) show that the number of graphene layers clearly differs between regions of scratched and smooth substrate. The extent of the thicker graphene layers formed above scratches is found to be significantly larger than the width of the scratch itself. This finding can be implemented as an additional technique for spatially modulating graphene thickness.

  13. Evaluate prevailing climate change on Great Lakes water levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text:'In this paper, results of a comprehensive water mass balance modeling for the Great Lakes against prevailing and different anticipated climate change scenarios would be presented. Modeling is done in evaluating the changes in the lake storages and then changes in the lake's water level considering present condition, uncertainty and variability of climate and hydrologic conditions in the future. Inflow-outflow and consequent changes in the five Great Lake's storages are simulated for the last 30 years and then projected to evaluate the changes in the lake storages for the next 50 years. From the predicted changes in the lake storage data, water level is calculated using mass to linear conversion equation. Modeling and analysis results are expected to be helpful in understanding the possible impacts of the climate change on the Great Lakes water environment and preparing strategic plan for the sustainable management of lake's water resources. From the recent past, it is observed that there is a depleting trend in the lakes water level and hence there is a potential threat to lake's water environment and uncertainty of the availability of quality and quantity of water for the future generations, especially against prevailing and anticipated climate changes. For this reason, it is an urgent issue of understanding and quantifying the potential impacts of climate change on the Great Lake's water levels and storages. (author)

  14. Effects of Prevailing Winds on Turbidity of a Shallow Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jung Cho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Estuarine waters are generally more turbid than lakes or marine waters due to greater algal mass and continual re-suspension of sediments. The varying effects of diurnal and seasonal prevailing winds on the turbidity condition of a wind-dominated estuary were investigated by spatial and statistical analyses of wind direction, water level, turbidity, chlorophyll a, and PAR (Photosynthetically Active Radiation collected in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA. The prolonged prevailing winds were responsible for the long-term, large-scale turbidity pattern of the estuary, whereas the short-term changes in wind direction had differential effects on turbidity and water level in varying locations. There were temporal and spatial changes in the relationship between vertical light attenuation coefficient (Kd and turbidity, which indicate difference in phytoplankton and color also affect Kd. This study demonstrates that the effect of wind on turbidity and water level on different shores can be identified through system-specific analyses of turbidity patterns.

  15. Morphology and growing of nanometric multilayered films formed by alternated layers of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and poly(N-methylpyrrole)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aradilla, David [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, E. T. S. d' Enginyers Industrials, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Center for Research in Nano-Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Campus Sud, Edifici C' , C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Estrany, Francesc, E-mail: francesc.estrany@upc.ed [Center for Research in Nano-Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Campus Sud, Edifici C' , C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Unitat de Quimica Industrial, Escola Universitaria d' Enginyeria Tecnica Industrial de Barcelona, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Comte d' Urgell 187, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Armelin, Elaine [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, E. T. S. d' Enginyers Industrials, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Center for Research in Nano-Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Campus Sud, Edifici C' , C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Aleman, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.aleman@upc.ed [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, E. T. S. d' Enginyers Industrials, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Center for Research in Nano-Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Campus Sud, Edifici C' , C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain)

    2010-05-31

    Multilayered nanometric films formed by alternated layers of conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and poly(N-methylpyrrole) doped with perchlorate anions (ml-PEDOT/PNMPy) have been prepared using a layer-by-layer electrodeposition technique combined with a very small polymerization time. The mechanisms of formation and growth of the resulting multilayered systems have been investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and compared with those obtained for the corresponding homopolymers, which were prepared using identical experimental conditions. Furthermore, the local conductivity, electroactivity and electrostability have been also examined. Analyses of the morphology, topography and roughness of the surfaces indicate that the formation and growth of the multilayered films strongly depend on the number of layers as well as on the chemical nature of the conducting polymer. Interestingly, AFM reflects that the formation and growth of the ml-PEDOT/PNMPy films are significantly different from those of PEDOT and PNMPy homopolymers. The electrical and electrochemical properties of the systems under study are fully consistent with the proposed mechanisms. Results evidenced that multilayered systems formed by two conducting polymers are more advantageous from a technological point of view than the corresponding copolymers.

  16. Morphology and growing of nanometric multilayered films formed by alternated layers of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and poly(N-methylpyrrole)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aradilla, David; Estrany, Francesc; Armelin, Elaine; Aleman, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Multilayered nanometric films formed by alternated layers of conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and poly(N-methylpyrrole) doped with perchlorate anions (ml-PEDOT/PNMPy) have been prepared using a layer-by-layer electrodeposition technique combined with a very small polymerization time. The mechanisms of formation and growth of the resulting multilayered systems have been investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and compared with those obtained for the corresponding homopolymers, which were prepared using identical experimental conditions. Furthermore, the local conductivity, electroactivity and electrostability have been also examined. Analyses of the morphology, topography and roughness of the surfaces indicate that the formation and growth of the multilayered films strongly depend on the number of layers as well as on the chemical nature of the conducting polymer. Interestingly, AFM reflects that the formation and growth of the ml-PEDOT/PNMPy films are significantly different from those of PEDOT and PNMPy homopolymers. The electrical and electrochemical properties of the systems under study are fully consistent with the proposed mechanisms. Results evidenced that multilayered systems formed by two conducting polymers are more advantageous from a technological point of view than the corresponding copolymers.

  17. Cross-Sectional Imaging of Boundary Lubrication Layer Formed by Fatty Acid by Means of Frequency-Modulation Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Tomoko; Kawamura, Ryota; Fujino, Keita; Matsuoka, Takashi; Komiya, Hiroshi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2017-10-10

    To observe in situ the adsorption of fatty acid onto metal surfaces, cross-sectional images of the adsorption layer were acquired by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). Hexadecane and palmitic acid were used as the base oil and typical fatty acid, respectively. A Cu-coated silicon wafer was prepared as the target substrate. The solvation structure formed by hexadecane molecules at the interface between the Cu substrate and the hexadecane was observed, and the layer pitch was found to be about 0.6 nm, which corresponds to the height of hexadecane molecules. This demonstrates that hexadecane molecules physically adsorbed onto the surface due to van der Waals forces with lying orientation because hexadecane is a nonpolar hydrocarbon. When hexadecane with palmitic acid was put on the Cu substrate instead of pure hexadecane, an adsorption layer of palmitic acid was observed at the interface. The layer pitch was about 2.5-2.8 nm, which matches the chain length of palmitic acid molecules well. This indicates that the original adsorption layer was monolayer or single bilayer in the local area. In addition, a cross-sectional image captured 1 h after observation started to reveal that the adsorbed additive layer gradually grew up to be thicker than about 20 nm due to an external stimulus, such as cantilever oscillation. This is the first report of in situ observation of an adsorbed layer by FM-AFM in the tribology field and demonstrates that FM-AFM is useful for clarifying the actual boundary lubrication mechanism.

  18. Heterojunctions formed by annealing of GaSe and InSe layered crystals in zinc vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudrynskyi Z. R.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a method of creating heterojunc¬tions based on semiconductors with different lattice types. Substrates manufactured from GaSe and InSe layered crystals were annealed in Zn vapor. This way, n-ZnSe–p-GaSe and n-ZnSe–p-InSe heterojunctions were obtained. The obtained heterojunctions are photo¬sensitive in near and infrared spectral regions. This method opens up greate possibilities of producing heterostructures with a desired sensitivity band.

  19. Farmers prevailing perception profiles regarding GM crops: A classification proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Carla; Massarani, Luisa

    2018-04-01

    Genetically modified organisms have been at the centre of a major public controversy, involving different interests and actors. While much attention has been devoted to consumer views on genetically modified food, there have been few attempts to understand the perceptions of genetically modified technology among farmers. By investigating perceptions of genetically modified organisms among Brazilian farmers, we intend to contribute towards filling this gap and thereby add the views of this stakeholder group to the genetically modified debate. A comparative analysis of our data and data from other studies indicate there is a complex variety of views on genetically modified organisms among farmers. Despite this diversity, we found variations in such views occur within limited parameters, concerned principally with expectations or concrete experiences regarding the advantages of genetically modified crops, perceptions of risks associated with them, and ethical questions they raise. We then propose a classification of prevailing profiles to represent the spectrum of perceptions of genetically modified organisms among farmers.

  20. 78 FR 29657 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Vanderburgh County, Indiana, to a Nonappropriated Fund...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ...-AM82 Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Vanderburgh County, Indiana, to a Nonappropriated Fund... County, IN; and Jefferson and Pulaski Counties, MO. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee, the... as follows: [[Page 29658

  1. Light-emitting Si nanostructures formed by swift heavy ions in stoichiometric SiO2 layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachurin, G. A.; Cherkova, S. G.; Marin, D. V.; Kesler, V. G.; Volodin, V. A.; Skuratov, V. A.

    2012-07-01

    Three hundred and twenty nanometer-thick SiO2 layers were thermally grown on the Si substrates. The layers were irradiated with 167 MeV Xe ions to the fluences ranging between 1012 cm-2 and 1014 cm-2, or with 700 MeV Bi ions in the fluence range of 3 × 1012-1 × 1013 cm-2. After irradiation the yellow-orange photoluminescence (PL) band appeared and grew with the ion fluences. In parallel optical absorption in the region of 950-1150 cm-1, Raman scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy evidenced a decrease in the number of Si-O bonds and an increase in the number of Si-coordinated atoms. The results obtained are interpreted as the formation of the light-emitting Si-enriched nanostructures inside the tracks of swift heavy ions through the disproportionation of SiO2. Ionization losses of the ions are regarded as responsible for the processes observed. Difference between the dependences of the PL intensity on the fluences of Xe and Bi ions are ascribed to their different stopping energy, therewith the diameters of the tracks of Xe and Bi ions were assessed as <3 nm and ˜10 nm, respectively. The observed shift of the PL bands, induced by Xe and Bi ions, agrees with the predictions of the quantum confinement theory.

  2. Light-emitting Si nanostructures formed by swift heavy ions in stoichiometric SiO{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachurin, G.A., E-mail: kachurin@isp.nsc.ru [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Cherkova, S.G. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Marin, D.V. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kesler, V.G. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Volodin, V.A. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Skuratov, V.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Three hundred and twenty nanometer-thick SiO{sub 2} layers were thermally grown on the Si substrates. The layers were irradiated with 167 MeV Xe ions to the fluences ranging between 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} and 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, or with 700 MeV Bi ions in the fluence range of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. After irradiation the yellow-orange photoluminescence (PL) band appeared and grew with the ion fluences. In parallel optical absorption in the region of 950-1150 cm{sup -1}, Raman scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy evidenced a decrease in the number of Si-O bonds and an increase in the number of Si-coordinated atoms. The results obtained are interpreted as the formation of the light-emitting Si-enriched nanostructures inside the tracks of swift heavy ions through the disproportionation of SiO{sub 2}. Ionization losses of the ions are regarded as responsible for the processes observed. Difference between the dependences of the PL intensity on the fluences of Xe and Bi ions are ascribed to their different stopping energy, therewith the diameters of the tracks of Xe and Bi ions were assessed as <3 nm and {approx}10 nm, respectively. The observed shift of the PL bands, induced by Xe and Bi ions, agrees with the predictions of the quantum confinement theory.

  3. Light-emitting Si nanostructures formed by swift heavy ions in stoichiometric SiO2 layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, G.A.; Cherkova, S.G.; Marin, D.V.; Kesler, V.G.; Volodin, V.A.; Skuratov, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty nanometer-thick SiO 2 layers were thermally grown on the Si substrates. The layers were irradiated with 167 MeV Xe ions to the fluences ranging between 10 12 cm −2 and 10 14 cm −2 , or with 700 MeV Bi ions in the fluence range of 3 × 10 12 –1 × 10 13 cm −2 . After irradiation the yellow–orange photoluminescence (PL) band appeared and grew with the ion fluences. In parallel optical absorption in the region of 950–1150 cm −1 , Raman scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy evidenced a decrease in the number of Si–O bonds and an increase in the number of Si-coordinated atoms. The results obtained are interpreted as the formation of the light-emitting Si-enriched nanostructures inside the tracks of swift heavy ions through the disproportionation of SiO 2 . Ionization losses of the ions are regarded as responsible for the processes observed. Difference between the dependences of the PL intensity on the fluences of Xe and Bi ions are ascribed to their different stopping energy, therewith the diameters of the tracks of Xe and Bi ions were assessed as <3 nm and ∼10 nm, respectively. The observed shift of the PL bands, induced by Xe and Bi ions, agrees with the predictions of the quantum confinement theory.

  4. Molecular-Based Mechanisms of Mendelian Forms of Salt-Dependent Hypertension Questioning the Prevailing Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurtz, T. W.; Dominiczak, A. F.; DiCarlo, S. E.; Pravenec, Michal; Morris Jr., R. C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 5 (2015), s. 932-941 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/12/0696 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Mendelian * salt sensitive hypertension * vasodysfunction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.350, year: 2015

  5. 76 FR 9694 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Northeastern Arizona and Colorado Appropriated Fund...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... 3206-AM33 Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Northeastern Arizona and Colorado Appropriated... changes are based on recent consensus recommendations of the Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee to... Northeastern Arizona wage area. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC), the national labor...

  6. 76 FR 70321 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Northern Mississippi and Memphis, TN, Appropriated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 532 RIN 3206-AM37 Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition... on a consensus recommendation of the Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC) to best match... which OPM received no comments. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC), the national...

  7. 78 FR 60182 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Broward County, Florida, to a Nonappropriated Fund Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 532 RIN 3206-AM83 Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of... wage area. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee, the national labor-management committee... follows: PART 532--PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS 0 1. The authority citation for part 532 continues to read as...

  8. 78 FR 18252 - Prevailing Rate Systems; North American Industry Classification System Based Federal Wage System...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ...-AM78 Prevailing Rate Systems; North American Industry Classification System Based Federal Wage System... applicable sections. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee, the national labor- management committee... proposing to amend 5 CFR part 532 as follows: PART 532--PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS 0 1. The authority citation...

  9. 76 FR 12769 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of Upcoming Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of... Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee is issuing this notice to cancel the March 17, 2011, public meeting..., Chairman, Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee. [FR Doc. 2011-5266 Filed 3-7-11; 8:45 am] BILLING...

  10. 76 FR 9640 - Prevailing Rate Systems: Santa Clara, CA, Tulsa County, OK, and Angelina County, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 532 RIN 3206-AM22 Prevailing Rate Systems: Santa Clara... County, Texas, as an area of application to the Dallas, TX, NAF FWS wage area. The Federal Prevailing.... Accordingly, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management amends 5 CFR part 532 as follows: PART 532--PREVAILING...

  11. 48 CFR 22.1002-2 - Wage determinations based on prevailing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... on prevailing rates. 22.1002-2 Section 22.1002-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Contract Act of 1965, as Amended 22.1002-2 Wage determinations based on prevailing rates. Contractors... Department of Labor to prevail in the locality or, in the absence of a wage determination, the minimum wage...

  12. 78 FR 41962 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of Upcoming Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of... Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee is issuing this notice to cancel the July 18, 2013, public meeting... Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee. [FR Doc. 2013-16763 Filed 7-11-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6325-49-P ...

  13. 78 FR 20359 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of Upcoming Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of... Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee is issuing this notice to cancel the April 18, 2013, public meeting... Officer, Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee. [FR Doc. 2013-07875 Filed 4-3-13; 8:45 am] BILLING...

  14. 75 FR 58339 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Shreveport, LA; Texarkana, TX; Milwaukee, WI; and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... 3206-AM28 Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Shreveport, LA; Texarkana, TX; Milwaukee, WI... area. These changes are based on recent consensus recommendations of the Federal Prevailing Rate... below. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC), the national labor-management committee...

  15. 77 FR 28640 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of Upcoming Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of... Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee is issuing this notice to cancel the May 24, 2012, public meeting..., Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee. [FR Doc. 2012-11728 Filed 5-14-12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6325...

  16. 76 FR 31885 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Northern Mississippi and Memphis, TN, Appropriated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 532 RIN 3206-AM37 Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition... Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC) to best match the county proposed for redefinition to a nearby FWS... Memphis wage area. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC), the national labor-management...

  17. 29 CFR 2704.202 - Contents of application-where the applicant has prevailed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contents of application-where the applicant has prevailed... Information Required From Applicants § 2704.202 Contents of application—where the applicant has prevailed. (a) An application for an award under § 2704.105(a) shall show that the applicant has prevailed in a...

  18. 78 FR 29658 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Broward County, Florida, to a Nonappropriated Fund Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 532 RIN 3206-AM83 Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of... and Palm Beach Counties, FL. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee, the national labor... 532--PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS 0 1. The authority citation for part 532 continues to read as follows...

  19. 75 FR 34182 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of Upcoming Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of... Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee is issuing this notice to cancel the June 17, 2010, public [email protected] ; or FAX: (202) 606-4264. Sheldon Friedman, Chairman, Federal Prevailing Rate...

  20. 76 FR 70512 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of Upcoming Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Cancellation of... Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee is issuing this notice to cancel the November 17, 2011, public meeting..., Chairman, Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee. [FR Doc. 2011-29274 Filed 11-10-11; 8:45 am] BILLING...

  1. Characterization of Ag-porous silicon nanostructured layer formed by an electrochemical etching of p-type silicon surface for bio-application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, M.; Al-Mariri, A.; Haj-Mhmoud, N.

    2017-06-01

    Nanostructured layers composed of silver-porous silicon (Ag-PS) have been formed by an electrochemical etching of p-type (1 1 1) silicon substrate in a AgNO3:HF:C2H5OH solution at different etching times (10 min-30 min). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results reveal that the produced layers consist of Ag dendrites and a silicon-rich porous structure. The nanostructuring nature of the layer has been confirmed by spatial micro-Raman scattering and x-ray diffraction techniques. The Ag dendrites exhibit a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum, while the porous structure shows a typical PS Raman spectrum. Upon increasing the etching time, the average size of silicon nanocrystallite in the PS network decreases, while the average size of Ag nanocrystals is slightly affected. In addition, the immobilization of prokaryote Salmonella typhimurium DNA via physical adsorption onto the Ag-PS layer has been performed to demonstrate its efficiency as a platform for detection of biological molecules using SERS.

  2. Method and apparatus for forming high-critical-temperature superconducting layers on flat and/or elongated substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1994-01-01

    An elongated, flexible superconductive wire or strip is fabricated by pulling it through and out of a melt of metal oxide material at a rate conducive to forming a crystalline coating of superconductive metal oxide material on an elongated, flexible substrate wire or strip. A coating of crystalline superconductive material, such as Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 CaCu.sub.2 O.sub.8, is annealed to effect conductive contact between adjacent crystalline structures in the coating material, which is then cooled to room temperature. The container for the melt can accommodate continuous passage of the substrate through the melt. Also, a second pass-through container can be used to simultaneously anneal and overcoat the superconductive coating with a hot metallic material, such as silver or silver alloy. A hollow, elongated tube casting method of forming an elongated, flexible superconductive wire includes drawing the melt by differential pressure into a heated tubular substrate.

  3. A closed-form analytical model for predicting 3D boundary layer displacement thickness for the validation of viscous flow solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V. R. Sanal; Sankar, Vigneshwaran; Chandrasekaran, Nichith; Saravanan, Vignesh; Natarajan, Vishnu; Padmanabhan, Sathyan; Sukumaran, Ajith; Mani, Sivabalan; Rameshkumar, Tharikaa; Nagaraju Doddi, Hema Sai; Vysaprasad, Krithika; Sharan, Sharad; Murugesh, Pavithra; Shankar, S. Ganesh; Nejaamtheen, Mohammed Niyasdeen; Baskaran, Roshan Vignesh; Rahman Mohamed Rafic, Sulthan Ariff; Harisrinivasan, Ukeshkumar; Srinivasan, Vivek

    2018-02-01

    A closed-form analytical model is developed for estimating the 3D boundary-layer-displacement thickness of an internal flow system at the Sanal flow choking condition for adiabatic flows obeying the physics of compressible viscous fluids. At this unique condition the boundary-layer blockage induced fluid-throat choking and the adiabatic wall-friction persuaded flow choking occur at a single sonic-fluid-throat location. The beauty and novelty of this model is that without missing the flow physics we could predict the exact boundary-layer blockage of both 2D and 3D cases at the sonic-fluid-throat from the known values of the inlet Mach number, the adiabatic index of the gas and the inlet port diameter of the internal flow system. We found that the 3D blockage factor is 47.33 % lower than the 2D blockage factor with air as the working fluid. We concluded that the exact prediction of the boundary-layer-displacement thickness at the sonic-fluid-throat provides a means to correctly pinpoint the causes of errors of the viscous flow solvers. The methodology presented herein with state-of-the-art will play pivotal roles in future physical and biological sciences for a credible verification, calibration and validation of various viscous flow solvers for high-fidelity 2D/3D numerical simulations of real-world flows. Furthermore, our closed-form analytical model will be useful for the solid and hybrid rocket designers for the grain-port-geometry optimization of new generation single-stage-to-orbit dual-thrust-motors with the highest promising propellant loading density within the given envelope without manifestation of the Sanal flow choking leading to possible shock waves causing catastrophic failures.

  4. A closed-form analytical model for predicting 3D boundary layer displacement thickness for the validation of viscous flow solvers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Sanal Kumar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A closed-form analytical model is developed for estimating the 3D boundary-layer-displacement thickness of an internal flow system at the Sanal flow choking condition for adiabatic flows obeying the physics of compressible viscous fluids. At this unique condition the boundary-layer blockage induced fluid-throat choking and the adiabatic wall-friction persuaded flow choking occur at a single sonic-fluid-throat location. The beauty and novelty of this model is that without missing the flow physics we could predict the exact boundary-layer blockage of both 2D and 3D cases at the sonic-fluid-throat from the known values of the inlet Mach number, the adiabatic index of the gas and the inlet port diameter of the internal flow system. We found that the 3D blockage factor is 47.33 % lower than the 2D blockage factor with air as the working fluid. We concluded that the exact prediction of the boundary-layer-displacement thickness at the sonic-fluid-throat provides a means to correctly pinpoint the causes of errors of the viscous flow solvers. The methodology presented herein with state-of-the-art will play pivotal roles in future physical and biological sciences for a credible verification, calibration and validation of various viscous flow solvers for high-fidelity 2D/3D numerical simulations of real-world flows. Furthermore, our closed-form analytical model will be useful for the solid and hybrid rocket designers for the grain-port-geometry optimization of new generation single-stage-to-orbit dual-thrust-motors with the highest promising propellant loading density within the given envelope without manifestation of the Sanal flow choking leading to possible shock waves causing catastrophic failures.

  5. Analytical electron microscopy study of surface layers formed on the French SON68 nuclear waste glass during vapor hydration at 200 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, W.L.; Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.

    1998-01-01

    Extensive solid-state characterization (AEM/SEM/HRTEM) was completed on six SON68 (inactive R7T7) waste glasses which were altered in the presence of saturated water vapor (200 C) for 22, 91, 241, 908, 1000, 1013, and 1021 days. The samples were examined by AEM in cross-section (lattice-fringe imaging, micro-diffraction, and quantitative thin-film EDS analysis). The glass monoliths were invariably covered by a thin altered rind, and the surface layer thickness increased with increasing time of reaction, ranging from 0.5 to 30 μm in thickness. Six distinctive zones, based on phase chemistry and microstructure, were distinguished within the well-developed surface layers. Numerous crystalline phases such as analcime, gyrolite, tobermorite, apatite, and weeksite were identified on the surfaces of the reacted glasses as precipitates. The majority of the surface layer volume was composed of two basic structures that are morphologically and chemically distinct: The A-domain consisted of well-crystallized fibrous smectite aggregates; and the B-domain consisted of poorly-crystallized regions containing smectite, possibly montmorillonite, crystallites and a ZrO 2 -rich amorphous silica matrix. The retention of the rare-earth elements, Mo, and Zr mostly occurred within the B-domain; while transition metal elements, such as Zn, Cr, Ni, Mn, and Fe, were retained in the A-domain. The element partitioning among A-domains and B-domains and recrystallization of the earlier-formed B-domains into the A-domain smectites were the basic processes which have controlled the chemical and structural evolution of the surface layer. The mechanism of surface layer formation during vapor hydration are discussed based on these cross-sectional AEM results. (orig.)

  6. Stability indicating high performance thin layer chromatographic method for quantitation of venlafaxine in bulk and pharmaceutical dosage form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Dubey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Venlafaxine (VEN is a phenethylamine bicyclic compound, chemically, 1-(2-[dimethyl amino]-1-[4-methoxy phenyl] ethyl cyclo-hexan-1ol hydrochloride. It is a antidepressant. It inhibits the reuptake of serotonin, nor adrenaline and dopamine to a lesser extent at the presynaptic membrane. Aim: A simple, rapid, precise, accurate, and economical high performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC method has been developed and validated for the determination of VEN both as a bulk drug and in formulation. Materials and Methods: The method uses aluminum plates precoated with silica gel 60 F254 as the stationary phase and dichloromethane:acetonitrile:N-hexane:triethylamine: 0.5:0.5:4:0.7 (v/v/v/v as mobile phase. Results: This system gave compact spots for VEN (R f = 0.46 ± 0.05. Forced degradation studies were done by subjecting VEN to acid and alkali hydrolysis, oxidation, and reduction. The peak of the degradation product was well resolved from that of the pure drug and had significant different R f values. Analysis of VEN was performed in the absorbance mode at 225 nm. The limit of detection and quantification were 12.48 and 37.81 ng/spot respectively. Conclusions: The developed method was validated and found to be simple, specific, accurate and precise and can be used for routine quality control analysis of VEN in bulk and pharmaceutical formulation.

  7. Gastrointestinal cell lines form polarized epithelia with an adherent mucus layer when cultured in semi-wet interfaces with mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navabi, Nazanin; McGuckin, Michael A; Lindén, Sara K

    2013-01-01

    Mucin glycoproteins are secreted in large quantities by mucosal epithelia and cell surface mucins are a prominent feature of the glycocalyx of all mucosal epithelia. Currently, studies investigating the gastrointestinal mucosal barrier use either animal experiments or non-in vivo like cell cultures. Many pathogens cause different pathology in mice compared to humans and the in vitro cell cultures used are suboptimal because they are very different from an in vivo mucosal surface, are often not polarized, lack important components of the glycocalyx, and often lack the mucus layer. Although gastrointestinal cell lines exist that produce mucins or polarize, human cell line models that reproducibly create the combination of a polarized epithelial cell layer, functional tight junctions and an adherent mucus layer have been missing until now. We trialed a range of treatments to induce polarization, 3D-organization, tight junctions, mucin production, mucus secretion, and formation of an adherent mucus layer that can be carried out using standard equipment. These treatments were tested on cell lines of intestinal (Caco-2, LS513, HT29, T84, LS174T, HT29 MTX-P8 and HT29 MTX-E12) and gastric (MKN7, MKN45, AGS, NCI-N87 and its hTERT Clone5 and Clone6) origins using Ussing chamber methodology and (immuno)histology. Semi-wet interface culture in combination with mechanical stimulation and DAPT caused HT29 MTX-P8, HT29 MTX-E12 and LS513 cells to polarize, form functional tight junctions, a three-dimensional architecture resembling colonic crypts, and produce an adherent mucus layer. Caco-2 and T84 cells also polarized, formed functional tight junctions and produced a thin adherent mucus layer after this treatment, but with less consistency. In conclusion, culture methods affect cell lines differently, and testing a matrix of methods vs. cell lines may be important to develop better in vitro models. The methods developed herein create in vitro mucosal surfaces suitable for studies

  8. Gastrointestinal cell lines form polarized epithelia with an adherent mucus layer when cultured in semi-wet interfaces with mechanical stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Navabi

    Full Text Available Mucin glycoproteins are secreted in large quantities by mucosal epithelia and cell surface mucins are a prominent feature of the glycocalyx of all mucosal epithelia. Currently, studies investigating the gastrointestinal mucosal barrier use either animal experiments or non-in vivo like cell cultures. Many pathogens cause different pathology in mice compared to humans and the in vitro cell cultures used are suboptimal because they are very different from an in vivo mucosal surface, are often not polarized, lack important components of the glycocalyx, and often lack the mucus layer. Although gastrointestinal cell lines exist that produce mucins or polarize, human cell line models that reproducibly create the combination of a polarized epithelial cell layer, functional tight junctions and an adherent mucus layer have been missing until now. We trialed a range of treatments to induce polarization, 3D-organization, tight junctions, mucin production, mucus secretion, and formation of an adherent mucus layer that can be carried out using standard equipment. These treatments were tested on cell lines of intestinal (Caco-2, LS513, HT29, T84, LS174T, HT29 MTX-P8 and HT29 MTX-E12 and gastric (MKN7, MKN45, AGS, NCI-N87 and its hTERT Clone5 and Clone6 origins using Ussing chamber methodology and (immunohistology. Semi-wet interface culture in combination with mechanical stimulation and DAPT caused HT29 MTX-P8, HT29 MTX-E12 and LS513 cells to polarize, form functional tight junctions, a three-dimensional architecture resembling colonic crypts, and produce an adherent mucus layer. Caco-2 and T84 cells also polarized, formed functional tight junctions and produced a thin adherent mucus layer after this treatment, but with less consistency. In conclusion, culture methods affect cell lines differently, and testing a matrix of methods vs. cell lines may be important to develop better in vitro models. The methods developed herein create in vitro mucosal surfaces

  9. Familiar units prevail over statistical cues in word segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin-Charronnat, Bénédicte; Perruchet, Pierre; Tillmann, Barbara; Peereman, Ronald

    2017-09-01

    In language acquisition research, the prevailing position is that listeners exploit statistical cues, in particular transitional probabilities between syllables, to discover words of a language. However, other cues are also involved in word discovery. Assessing the weight learners give to these different cues leads to a better understanding of the processes underlying speech segmentation. The present study evaluated whether adult learners preferentially used known units or statistical cues for segmenting continuous speech. Before the exposure phase, participants were familiarized with part-words of a three-word artificial language. This design allowed the dissociation of the influence of statistical cues and familiar units, with statistical cues favoring word segmentation and familiar units favoring (nonoptimal) part-word segmentation. In Experiment 1, performance in a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) task between words and part-words revealed part-word segmentation (even though part-words were less cohesive in terms of transitional probabilities and less frequent than words). By contrast, an unfamiliarized group exhibited word segmentation, as usually observed in standard conditions. Experiment 2 used a syllable-detection task to remove the likely contamination of performance by memory and strategy effects in the 2AFC task. Overall, the results suggest that familiar units overrode statistical cues, ultimately questioning the need for computation mechanisms of transitional probabilities (TPs) in natural language speech segmentation.

  10. Hybrid polymer-CdS solar cell active layers formed by in situ growth of CdS nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masala, S.; Del Gobbo, S.; Borriello, C.; Bizzarro, V.; La Ferrara, V.; Re, M.; Pesce, E.; Minarini, C.; De Crescenzi, M.; Di Luccio, T.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) into a polymeric matrix has the potential to enhance the performance of polymer-based solar cells taking advantage of the physical properties of NPs and polymers. We synthesize a new class of CdS-NPs-based active layer employing a low-cost and low temperature route compatible with large-scale device manufacturing. Our approach is based on the controlled in situ thermal decomposition of a cadmium thiolate precursor in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The casted P3HT:precursor solid foils were heated up from 200 to 300 °C to allow the precursor decomposition and the CdS-NP formation within the polymer matrix. The CdS-NP growth was controlled by varying the annealing temperature. The polymer:precursor weight ratio was also varied to investigate the effects of increasing the NP volume fraction on the solar cell performances. The optical properties were studied by using UV–Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at room temperature. To investigate the photocurrent response of P3HT:CdS nanocomposites, ITO/P3HT:CdS/Al solar cell devices were realized. We measured the external quantum efficiency (EQE) as a function of the wavelength. The photovoltaic response of the devices containing CdS-NPs showed a variation compared with the devices with P3HT only. By changing the annealing temperature the EQE is enhanced in the 400–600 nm spectral region. By increasing the NPs volume fraction remarkable changes in the EQE spectra were observed. The data are discussed also in relation to morphological features of the interfaces studied by Focused Ion Beam technique.

  11. Composition, structure and morphology of oxide layers formed on austenitic stainless steel by oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anandan, C.; Rajam, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen ions were implanted in to austenitic stainless steel by plasma immersion ion implantation at 400 deg. C. The implanted samples were characterized by XPS, GIXRD, micro-Raman, AFM, optical and scanning electron microscopies. XPS studies showed the presence of Fe in elemental, as Fe 2+ in oxide form and as Fe 3+ in the form of oxyhydroxides in the substrate. Iron was present in the oxidation states of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ in the implanted samples. Cr and Mn were present as Cr 3+ and Mn 2+ , respectively, in both the substrate and implanted samples. Nickel remained unaffected by implantation. GIXRD and micro-Raman studies showed the oxide to be a mixture of spinel and corundum structures. Optical and AFM images showed an island structure on underlying oxide. This island structure was preserved at different thicknesses. Further, near the grain boundaries more oxide growth was found. This is explained on the basis of faster diffusion of oxygen in the grain boundary regions. Measurement of total hemispherical optical aborptance, α and emittance, ε of the implanted sample show that it has good solar selective properties

  12. Low-Temperature Transformations of Protonic Forms of Layered Complex Oxides HLnTiO4 and H2Ln2Ti3O10 (Ln = La, Nd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulaeva, L.D.; Silyukov, O.I.; Zvereva, I.A.; Petrov, Yu.V.

    2013-01-01

    In the present work protonic forms of layered Ruddlesden-Popper oxides HLnTiO 4 and H 2 Ln 2 Ti 3 O 10 (Ln = La, Nd) were used as the starting point for soft chemistry synthesis of two series of perovskite-like compounds by acid leaching and exfoliation, promoted by vanadyl sulfate. The last route leads to the nano structured VO 2+ containing samples. Characterization by SEM, powder XRD, and TGA has been performed for the determination of the structure and composition of synthesized oxides

  13. Pock forming ability of fowl pox virus isolated from layer chicken and its adaptation in chicken embryo fibroblast cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhare, Varsha Rani; Hirpurkar, S D; Kumar, Ashish; Naik, Surendra Kumar; Sahu, Tarini

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine pock forming ability of field strain and vaccine strain of fowl pox virus (FPV) in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of embryonated chicken eggs and its adaptation in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cell culture. Dry scabs were collected from 25 affected birds in glycerin-saline and preserved at 4°C until processed. Virus was isolated in 10-day-old embryonated chicken eggs by dropped CAM method. The identity of the virus is confirmed by clinical findings of affected birds, pock morphology and histopathology of infected CAM. In addition one field isolate and vaccine strain of FPV was adapted to CEF cell culture. CEF cell culture was prepared from 9-day-old embryonated chicken eggs. Clinical symptoms observed in affected birds include pox lesion on comb, wattle, eyelids and legs, no internal lesions were observed. All field isolates produced similar findings in CAM. Pocks produced by field isolates ranged from 3 mm to 5 mm at the third passage while initial passages edematous thickening and necrosis of CAM was observed. Pocks formed by lyophilized strain were ranges from 0.5 mm to 2.5 mm in diameter scattered all over the membrane at the first passage. Intra-cytoplasmic inclusion bodies are found on histopathology of CAM. At third passage level, the CEF inoculated with FPV showed characteristic cytopathic effect (CPE) included aggregation of cells, syncytia and plaque formation. FPV field isolates and vaccine strain produced distinct pock lesions on CAMs. Infected CAM showed intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies. The CEF inoculated with FPV field isolate as well as a vaccine strain showed characteristic CPE at third passage level.

  14. Microstructure of buried CoSi2 layers formed by high-dose Co implantation into (100) and (111) Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulle-Lieuwma, C.W.T.; Van Ommen, A.H.; Vandenhoudt, D.E.W.; Ottenheim, J.J.M.; de Jong, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    Heteroepitaxial Si/CoSi 2 /Si structures have been synthesized by implanting 170-keV Co + with doses in the range 1--3x10 17 Co + ions/cm 2 into (100) and (111) Si substrates and subsequent annealing. The microstructure of both the as-implanted and annealed structures is investigated in great detail by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In the as-implanted samples, the Co is present as CoSi 2 precipitates, occurring both in aligned (A-type) and twinned (B-type) orientation. For the highest dose, a continuous layer of stoichiometric CoSi 2 is already formed during implantation. It is found that the formation of a connected layer, already during implantation, is crucial for the formation of a buried CoSi 2 layer upon subsequent annealing. Particular attention is given to the coordination of the interfacial Co atoms at the Si/CoSi 2 (111) interfaces of both types of precipitates. We find that the interfacial Co atoms at the A-type interfaces are fully sevenfold coordinated, whereas at the B-type interfaces they appear to be eightfold coordinated

  15. Optimal properties for coated titanium implants with the hydroxyapatite layer formed by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmlova, Lucia; Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinek, Miroslav; Bartova, Jirina; Pesakova, V.; Adam, M.

    1999-02-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique allow to 'tailor' bioceramic coat for metal implants by the change of deposition conditions. Each attribute is influenced by the several deposition parameters and each parameter change several various properties. Problem caused that many parameters has an opposite function and improvement of one property is followed by deterioration of other attribute. This study monitor influence of each single deposition parameter and evaluate its importance form the point of view of coat properties. For deposition KrF excimer laser in stainless-steel deposition chamber was used. Deposition conditions (ambient composition and pressures, metallic substrate temperature, energy density and target-substrate distance) were changed according to the film properties. A non-coated titanium implant was used as a control. Films with promising mechanical quality underwent an in vitro biological tests -- measurement of proliferation activity, observing cell interactions with macrophages, fibroblasts, testing toxicity of percolates, observing a solubility of hydroxyapatite (HA) coat. Deposition conditions corresponding with the optimal mechanical and biochemical properties are: metal temperature 490 degrees Celsius, ambient-mixture of argon and water vapor, energy density 3 Jcm-2, target-substrate distance 7.5 cm.

  16. Self-forming Al oxide barrier for nanoscale Cu interconnects created by hybrid atomic layer deposition of Cu–Al alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Han, Dong-Suk; Kang, You-Jin [Division of Nanoscale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, So-Ra; Park, Jong-Wan, E-mail: jwpark@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    The authors synthesized a Cu–Al alloy by employing alternating atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface reactions using Cu and Al precursors, respectively. By alternating between these two ALD surface chemistries, the authors fabricated ALD Cu–Al alloy. Cu was deposited using bis(1-dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-butoxy) copper as a precursor and H{sub 2} plasma, while Al was deposited using trimethylaluminum as the precursor and H{sub 2} plasma. The Al atomic percent in the Cu–Al alloy films varied from 0 to 15.6 at. %. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that a uniform Al-based interlayer self-formed at the interface after annealing. To evaluate the barrier properties of the Al-based interlayer and adhesion between the Cu–Al alloy film and SiO{sub 2} dielectric, thermal stability and peel-off adhesion tests were performed, respectively. The Al-based interlayer showed similar thermal stability and adhesion to the reference Mn-based interlayer. Our results indicate that Cu–Al alloys formed by alternating ALD are suitable seed layer materials for Cu interconnects.

  17. Self-forming Al oxide barrier for nanoscale Cu interconnects created by hybrid atomic layer deposition of Cu–Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Han, Dong-Suk; Kang, You-Jin; Shin, So-Ra; Park, Jong-Wan

    2014-01-01

    The authors synthesized a Cu–Al alloy by employing alternating atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface reactions using Cu and Al precursors, respectively. By alternating between these two ALD surface chemistries, the authors fabricated ALD Cu–Al alloy. Cu was deposited using bis(1-dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-butoxy) copper as a precursor and H 2 plasma, while Al was deposited using trimethylaluminum as the precursor and H 2 plasma. The Al atomic percent in the Cu–Al alloy films varied from 0 to 15.6 at. %. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that a uniform Al-based interlayer self-formed at the interface after annealing. To evaluate the barrier properties of the Al-based interlayer and adhesion between the Cu–Al alloy film and SiO 2 dielectric, thermal stability and peel-off adhesion tests were performed, respectively. The Al-based interlayer showed similar thermal stability and adhesion to the reference Mn-based interlayer. Our results indicate that Cu–Al alloys formed by alternating ALD are suitable seed layer materials for Cu interconnects

  18. Production-ecological analysis of herb layer in the softwood floodplain forests formed after the gabčíkovo waterwork construction and their characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtková Jana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on phytocoenological characteristics and production analysis of herbaceous layer biomass of the softwood floodplain forests (Salici-Populetum (R. Tx. 1931 Meijer Drees 1936 association and their phytocoenological characteristics. The sampling site was located in the young stands, which were formed after the Gabčíkovo Waterwork construction in 1992. Redirection of the major ratio of flow into the supply channel has caused essential decrease of water level in the old Danube riverbed. As a result of this, new bare sites have appeared having character of pioneer habitat. In the process of primary succession, new softwood floodplain forests have formed here within a few years. These stands are the subject of the study presented in this paper. We estimated herb layer biomass using indirect sampling modified for non-repeated field measurements (Kubíček, Brechtl, 1970. Total biomass of herbaceous layer was estimated to be 5577 kg ha−1, the aboveground biomass was 4065 kg ha−1 while the belowground biomass was 1512 kg ha−1. The results were compared with the data of Kubíček et al. (2009 and Kollár et al. (2010. Some attention was also paid to their phytocoenologic characteristics. Considering this, it seems that they represent full-value softwood floodplain forest of the Salici-Populetum association despite a bit higher occurrence of some synanthropic species. Such statement is supported by comparison with the data of Jurko (1958 and Šomšák (2003.

  19. Experimentally Studied Thermal Piston-head State of the Internal-Combustion Engine with a Thermal Layer Formed by Micro-Arc Oxidation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Dudareva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of experimental study to show the efficiency of reducing thermal tension of internal combustion engine (ICE pistons through forming a thermal barrier coating on the piston-head. During the engine operation the piston is under the most thermal stress. High temperatures in the combustion chamber may lead to the piston-head burnout and destruction and engine failure.Micro-arc oxidation (MAO method was selected as the technology to create a thermal barrier coating. MAO technology allows us to form the ceramic coating with a thickness of 400μm on the surface of aluminum alloy, which have high heat resistance, and have good adhesion to the substrate even under thermal cycling stresses.Deliverables of MAO method used to protect pistons described in the scientific literature are insufficient, as they are either calculated or experimentally obtained at the special plants (units, which do not reproduce piston operation in a real engine. This work aims to fill this gap. The aim of the work is an experimental study of the thermal protective ability of MAO-layer formed on the piston-head with simulation of thermal processes of the real engine.The tests were performed on a specially designed and manufactured stand free of motor, which reproduces operation conditions maximum close to those of the real engine. The piston is heated by a fire source - gas burner with isobutene balloon, cooling is carried out by the water circulation system through the water-cooling jacket.Tests have been conducted to compare the thermal state of the regular engine piston without thermal protection and the piston with a heat layer formed on the piston-head by MAO method. The study findings show that the thermal protective MAO-layer with thickness of 100μm allows us to reduce thermal tension of piston on average by 8,5 %. Thus at high temperatures there is the most pronounced effect that is important for the uprated engines.The obtained findings can

  20. Microstructural study by XPS and GISAXS of surface layers formed via phase separation and percolation in polystyren/tetrabutyl titanate/alumina composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yanwei; Tian Changan; Liu Junliang

    2006-01-01

    The XPS and GISAXS have been employed as useful tools to probe the chemical compositional and microstructural evolutions in the surface layers formed via phase separation and percolation in polystyren/Ti(OBut) 4 /alumina composite thick films. The surface enrichment of Ti species due to the migration of Ti(OBut) 4 molecules in the films was found to show an incubation period of ∼15 h while the samples were treated at 100 deg. C before a remarkable progress can be identified. According to the XPS and GISAXS data, Key mechanism to govern this surface process is phenomenologically considered to be the specific phase separation behavior in Ti(OBut) 4 /PS blend and the subsequent percolating process. The extended thermal treatment was found to make the surface layer microstructure evolve from local phase separation featured with an increasing population of individual microbeads of Ti(OBut) 4 (∼1.5 nm in radius) to the formation of large size clusters of microbeads due to their interconnections, accompanied by the growth of every microbead itself to ∼10 nm on the average, which provokes and then enhances the surface enrichment of Ti(OBut) 4 since these clusters act as a fast diffusion network due to percolation effect

  1. Anhydrous thallium hydrogen L-glutamate: polymer networks formed by sandwich layers of oxygen-coordinated thallium ions cores shielded by hydrogen L-glutamate counterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Thomas; Wirnsberger, Bianca; Albering, Jörg; Wiesbrock, Frank

    2011-11-07

    Anhydrous thallium hydrogen L-glutamate [Tl(L-GluH)] crystallizes from water (space group P2(1)) with a layer structure in which the thallium ions are penta- and hexacoordinated exclusively by the oxygen atoms of the γ-carboxylate group of the hydrogen L-glutamate anions to form a two-dimensional coordination polymer. The thallium-oxygen layer is composed of Tl(2)O(2) and TlCO(2) quadrangles and is only 3 Å high. Only one hemisphere of the thallium ions participates in coordination, indicative of the presence of the 6s(2) lone pair of electrons. The thallium-oxygen assemblies are shielded by the hydrogen l-glutamate anions. Only the carbon atom of the α-carboxylate group deviates from the plane spanned by the thallium ions, the γ-carboxylate groups and the proton bearing carbon atoms, which are in trans conformation. Given the abundance of L-glutamic and L-aspartic acid in biological systems on the one hand and the high toxicity of thallium on the other hand, it is worth mentioning that the dominant structural motifs in the crystal structure of [Tl(L-GluH)] strongly resemble their corresponding analogues in the crystalline phase of [K(L-AspH)(H(2)O)(2)].

  2. Residual stress determination in oxide layers at different length scales combining Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction: Application to chromia-forming metallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerain, Mathieu; Grosseau-Poussard, Jean-Luc; Geandier, Guillaume; Panicaud, Benoit; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Dejoie, Catherine; Micha, Jean-Sebastien; Thiaudière, Dominique; Goudeau, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    In oxidizing environments, the protection of metals and alloys against further oxidation at high temperature is provided by the oxide film itself. This protection is efficient only if the formed film adheres well to the metal (substrate), i.e., without microcracks and spalls induced by thermomechanical stresses. In this study, the residual stresses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales in the oxide film adhering to the substrate and over the damaged areas have been rigorously determined on the same samples for both techniques. Ni-30Cr and Fe-47Cr alloys have been oxidized together at 900 and 1000 °C, respectively, to create films with a thickness of a few microns. A multi-scale approach was adopted: macroscopic stress was determined by conventional X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, while microscopic residual stress mappings were performed over different types of bucklings using Raman micro-spectroscopy and synchrotron micro-diffraction. A very good agreement is found at macro- and microscales between the residual stress values obtained with both techniques, giving confidence on the reliability of the measurements. In addition, relevant structural information at the interface between the metallic substrate and the oxide layer was collected by micro-diffraction, a non-destructive technique that allows mapping through the oxide layer, and both the grain size and the crystallographic orientation of the supporting polycrystalline metal located either under a buckling or not were measured.

  3. Pinning-free GaAs MIS structures with Si interface control layers formed on (4 x 6) reconstructed (0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anantathanasarn, Sanguan; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2003-06-30

    (0 0 1)-Oriented GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures having a silicon interface control layer (Si ICL) were fabricated on surfaces having Ga-rich (4x6) reconstructions. Si ICL was grown by molecular beam epitaxy. MIS structures were fabricated by partially converting Si ICL to SiN{sub x} by direct nitridation, and further depositing a thick SiO{sub 2} layer on top as the main passivation dielectric by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and MIS capacitance-voltage (C-V) techniques were used for characterization. The initial surface reconstruction was found to have a surprisingly strong effect on the degree of Fermi level pinning at the MIS interface. In contrast to the standard As-rich (2x4) surface, which results in strongly pinned MIS interfaces, the novel SiO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}/Si ICL/GaAs MIS structures formed on ''genuine'' (4x6) surface realized complete unpinning of Fermi level over the entire band gap with a minimum interface state density of 4x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1} range.

  4. Post-heat treatment of arc-sprayed coating prepared by the wires combination of Mg-cathode and Al-anode to form protective intermetallic layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Rongzheng; Song Gang

    2011-01-01

    A Mg-Al intermetallic compounds coating was prepared on the surface of Mg-steel lap joint by arc-sprayed Al-Mg composite coating (Mg-cathode and Al-anode) and its post-heat treatment (PHT). The effect of PHT temperature on the phase transition, microstructure and mechanical properties of the coating was investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscope and microhardness test. The result shows that the intermetallic compounds layer that is mainly composed of Al 3 Mg 2 and Mg 17 Al 12 is formed by the self-diffusion reaction of Mg and Al splats in the coating after PHT for 4 h at 430 deg. C.

  5. Semianalytical Solution for the Deformation of an Elastic Layer under an Axisymmetrically Distributed Power-Form Load: Application to Fluid-Jet-Induced Indentation of Biological Soft Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Minhua; Huang, Shuai; Yang, Xianglong; Yang, Lei; Mao, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Fluid-jet-based indentation is used as a noncontact excitation technique by systems measuring the mechanical properties of soft tissues. However, the application of these devices has been hindered by the lack of theoretical solutions. This study developed a mathematical model for testing the indentation induced by a fluid jet and determined a semianalytical solution. The soft tissue was modeled as an elastic layer bonded to a rigid base. The pressure of the fluid jet impinging on the soft tissue was assumed to have a power-form function. The semianalytical solution was verified in detail using finite-element modeling, with excellent agreement being achieved. The effects of several parameters on the solution behaviors are reported, and a method for applying the solution to determine the mechanical properties of soft tissues is suggested.

  6. 5 CFR 532.205 - The use of Federal, State, and local minimum wage requirements in determining prevailing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... minimum wage requirements in determining prevailing rates. 532.205 Section 532.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.205 The use of Federal, State, and local minimum wage requirements in determining prevailing...

  7. 7 CFR 27.35 - Lower class of two samples to prevail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lower class of two samples to prevail. 27.35 Section 27.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE... Micronaire Determinations § 27.35 Lower class of two samples to prevail. In case a sample drawn from one...

  8. 78 FR 60181 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Clayton-Cobb-Fulton, Georgia, Nonappropriated Fund...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 532 RIN 3206-AM84 Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Clayton-Cobb-Fulton, Georgia, Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage System Wage Area AGENCY: U.S... Counties). The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee, the national labor-management committee...

  9. 75 FR 18552 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Open Committee Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... of Personnel Management Building, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, DC. The Federal Prevailing Rate... business. Therefore, these caucuses will be closed to the public because of a determination made by the..., Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee, Room 5H27, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, DC 20415, (202) 606...

  10. Attenuation of an optical wave propagating in a waveguide, formed by layers of a semiconductor heterostructure, owing to scattering on inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogatov, Alexandr P; Burmistrov, I S

    1999-01-01

    The scattering of an optical wave, propagating in a waveguide made up of layers of a semiconductor heterostructure, is analysed. The attenuation coefficient of the wave is found both for quasi-homogeneous single-crystal layers of a semiconductor solid solution and for layers containing quantum dots. (active media)

  11. Types of analysis of trompenaar's (1994 organizational culture prevailing in the area of controllership in family businesses in textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to identify the types of analysis of Trompenaar's (1994 organizational culture prevailing in the area of controllership in family businesses in textile industry. Descriptive research was performed, with quantitative and qualitative approach, using a multiple case study. Data were collected through interviews with the controller of the companies. In the four basic culture types suggested by Trompenaars (1994, it is concluded that there isn´t a pure kind, but there is a strong presence of family culture among the companies surveyed in dimensions relationship between employees, attitude in relation to the ways of change, forms of motivation and reward

  12. Preparation of bone-implants by coating hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on self-formed titanium dioxide thin-layers on titanium metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, W.P.S.L.; Mantilaka, M.M.M.G.P.G.; Chathuranga Senarathna, K.G. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Herath, H.M.T.U. [Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Premachandra, T.N. [Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Ranasinghe, C.S.K. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Rajapakse, R.P.V.J. [Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Rajapakse, R.M.G., E-mail: rmgr@pdn.ac.lk [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Edirisinghe, Mohan; Mahalingam, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Bandara, I.M.C.C.D. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane 4001, QLD (Australia); Singh, Sanjleena [Central Analytical Research Facility, Institute of Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane 4001, QLD (Australia)

    2016-06-01

    Preparation of hydroxyapatite coated custom-made metallic bone-implants is very important for the replacement of injured bones of the body. Furthermore, these bone-implants are more stable under the corrosive environment of the body and biocompatible than bone-implants made up of pure metals and metal alloys. Herein, we describe a novel, simple and low-cost technique to prepare biocompatible hydroxyapatite coated titanium metal (TiM) implants through growth of self-formed TiO{sub 2} thin-layer (SFTL) on TiM via a heat treatment process. SFTL acts as a surface binder of HA nanoparticles in order to produce HA coated implants. Colloidal HA nanorods prepared by a novel surfactant-assisted synthesis method, have been coated on SFTL via atomized spray pyrolysis (ASP) technique. The corrosion behavior of the bare and surface-modified TiM (SMTiM) in a simulated body fluid (SBF) medium is also studied. The highest corrosion rate is found to be for the bare TiM plate, but the corrosion rate has been reduced with the heat-treatment of TiM due to the formation of SFTL. The lowest corrosion rate is recorded for the implant prepared by heat treatment of TiM at 700 °C. The HA-coating further assists in the passivation of the TiM in the SBF medium. Both SMTiM and HA coated SMTiM are noncytotoxic against osteoblast-like (HOS) cells and are in high-bioactivity. The overall production process of bone-implant described in this paper is in high economic value. - Highlights: • Colloidal hydroxyapatite nanorods are prepared by a novel method. • Surfaces of titanium metal plates are modified by self-forming TiO{sub 2} thin-films. • Prostheses are prepared by coating hydroxyapatite on surface modified Ti metal. • Bioactivity and noncytotoxicity are increased with surface modifications.

  13. Preparation of bone-implants by coating hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on self-formed titanium dioxide thin-layers on titanium metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijesinghe, W.P.S.L.; Mantilaka, M.M.M.G.P.G.; Chathuranga Senarathna, K.G.; Herath, H.M.T.U.; Premachandra, T.N.; Ranasinghe, C.S.K.; Rajapakse, R.P.V.J.; Rajapakse, R.M.G.; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Mahalingam, S.; Bandara, I.M.C.C.D.; Singh, Sanjleena

    2016-01-01

    Preparation of hydroxyapatite coated custom-made metallic bone-implants is very important for the replacement of injured bones of the body. Furthermore, these bone-implants are more stable under the corrosive environment of the body and biocompatible than bone-implants made up of pure metals and metal alloys. Herein, we describe a novel, simple and low-cost technique to prepare biocompatible hydroxyapatite coated titanium metal (TiM) implants through growth of self-formed TiO_2 thin-layer (SFTL) on TiM via a heat treatment process. SFTL acts as a surface binder of HA nanoparticles in order to produce HA coated implants. Colloidal HA nanorods prepared by a novel surfactant-assisted synthesis method, have been coated on SFTL via atomized spray pyrolysis (ASP) technique. The corrosion behavior of the bare and surface-modified TiM (SMTiM) in a simulated body fluid (SBF) medium is also studied. The highest corrosion rate is found to be for the bare TiM plate, but the corrosion rate has been reduced with the heat-treatment of TiM due to the formation of SFTL. The lowest corrosion rate is recorded for the implant prepared by heat treatment of TiM at 700 °C. The HA-coating further assists in the passivation of the TiM in the SBF medium. Both SMTiM and HA coated SMTiM are noncytotoxic against osteoblast-like (HOS) cells and are in high-bioactivity. The overall production process of bone-implant described in this paper is in high economic value. - Highlights: • Colloidal hydroxyapatite nanorods are prepared by a novel method. • Surfaces of titanium metal plates are modified by self-forming TiO_2 thin-films. • Prostheses are prepared by coating hydroxyapatite on surface modified Ti metal. • Bioactivity and noncytotoxicity are increased with surface modifications.

  14. Investigation of the atomic interface structure of mesotaxial Si/CoSi2(100) layers formed by high-dose implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulle-Lieuwma, C.W.T.; Jong, A.F. de; Vandenhoudt, D.E.W.

    1991-01-01

    Aligned mesotaxial films of CoSi 2 in monocrystalline (100) oriented Si substrates have been formed by high-dose ion implantation of Co, followed by a high temperature treatment. The atomic structures of both the lower and upper Si/CoSi 2 (100) interfaces of the buried CoSi 2 layer have been investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) combined with image simulations. A domain-like structure is observed consisting of areas with different interfaces. In order to derive the atomic configuration, image simulations of different proposed models are presented. By comparing simulated images and HREM images, two different atomic structure models for the Si/CoSi 2 (100) interface have been found. In the first model the interfacial Co atoms are six-fold coordinated and the tetrahedral coordination and bond lengths of silicon atoms are everywhere maintained. In the second model we found evidence for a 2 x 1 interface reconstruction, involving a difference in composition. The interfacial Co atoms are seven-fold coordinated. It is shown that the boundaries between the domains are associated with interfacial dislocations of edge-type with Burgers vectors b a/4 inclined and b = a/2 parallel to the interfacial plane. (author)

  15. Improved integration of ultra-thin high-k dielectrics in few-layer MoS2 FET by remote forming gas plasma pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tian-Bao; Yang, Wen; Zhu, Hao; Chen, Lin; Sun, Qing-Qing; Zhang, David Wei

    2017-01-01

    The effective and high-quality integration of high-k dielectrics on two-dimensional (2D) crystals is essential to the device structure engineering and performance improvement of field-effect transistor (FET) based on the 2D semiconductors. We report a 2D MoS2 transistor with ultra-thin Al2O3 top-gate dielectric (6.1 nm) and extremely low leakage current. Remote forming gas plasma pretreatment was carried out prior to the atomic layer deposition, providing nucleation sites with the physically adsorbed ions on the MoS2 surface. The top gate MoS2 FET exhibited excellent electrical performance, including high on/off current ratio over 109, subthreshold swing of 85 mV/decade and field-effect mobility of 45.03 cm2/V s. Top gate leakage current less than 0.08 pA/μm2 at 4 MV/cm has been obtained, which is the smallest compared with the reported top-gated MoS2 transistors. Such an optimized integration of high-k dielectric in 2D semiconductor FET with enhanced performance is very attractive, and it paves the way towards the realization of more advanced 2D nanoelectronic devices and integrated circuits.

  16. Effect of plasma surface functionalization on preosteoblast cells spreading and adhesion on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer formed on a titanium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung, Sung Woon; Ko, Yeong Mu; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the plasma surface modification of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) formed on a titanium (Ti) surface as well as its influence on the behavior of preosteoblast cells. Ti substrates pre-treated with a plasma-polymerized thin film rich in carboxyl groups were subjected to a biomimetic process in a simulated body fluid solution to synthesize the HAp. The HAp layer grown on Ti substrate was then coated with two types of plasma polymerized acrylic acid and allyl amine thin film. The different types of Ti substrates were characterized by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. HAp with a Ca/P ratio from 1.25 to 1.38 was obtained on the Ti substrate and hydrophilic carboxyl (-COOH) and amine (-NH 2 ) functional groups were introduced to its surface. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the surface of the HAp coatings and the morphology of MC3T3-E1 cells. These results showed that the -COOH-modified HAp surfaces promoted the cell spreading synergistically by changing the surface morphology and chemical state.-NH 2 modified HAp had the lowest cell spreading and proliferation compared to HAp and -COOH-modified HAp. These results correspond to fluorescein analysis, which showed many more cell spreading of COOH/HAp/Ti surface compared to HAp and NH 2 modified HAp. A MTT assay was used to evaluate cell proliferation. The results showed that the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells increased in the order of COOH/HAp/Ti > HAp/Ti > NH 2 /Ti > Ti, corresponding to the effect of cell spreading for 6 days. The change in morphology and the chemical surface properties of the biomaterial via plasma polymerization can affect the behavior of MC3T3-E1 cells.

  17. Effect of plasma surface functionalization on preosteoblast cells spreading and adhesion on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer formed on a titanium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myung, Sung Woon; Ko, Yeong Mu; Kim, Byung Hoon, E-mail: kim5055@chosun.ac.kr

    2013-12-15

    This study examined the plasma surface modification of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) formed on a titanium (Ti) surface as well as its influence on the behavior of preosteoblast cells. Ti substrates pre-treated with a plasma-polymerized thin film rich in carboxyl groups were subjected to a biomimetic process in a simulated body fluid solution to synthesize the HAp. The HAp layer grown on Ti substrate was then coated with two types of plasma polymerized acrylic acid and allyl amine thin film. The different types of Ti substrates were characterized by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. HAp with a Ca/P ratio from 1.25 to 1.38 was obtained on the Ti substrate and hydrophilic carboxyl (-COOH) and amine (-NH{sub 2}) functional groups were introduced to its surface. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the surface of the HAp coatings and the morphology of MC3T3-E1 cells. These results showed that the -COOH-modified HAp surfaces promoted the cell spreading synergistically by changing the surface morphology and chemical state.-NH{sub 2} modified HAp had the lowest cell spreading and proliferation compared to HAp and -COOH-modified HAp. These results correspond to fluorescein analysis, which showed many more cell spreading of COOH/HAp/Ti surface compared to HAp and NH{sub 2} modified HAp. A MTT assay was used to evaluate cell proliferation. The results showed that the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells increased in the order of COOH/HAp/Ti > HAp/Ti > NH{sub 2}/Ti > Ti, corresponding to the effect of cell spreading for 6 days. The change in morphology and the chemical surface properties of the biomaterial via plasma polymerization can affect the behavior of MC3T3-E1 cells.

  18. Preparation of bone-implants by coating hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on self-formed titanium dioxide thin-layers on titanium metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, W P S L; Mantilaka, M M M G P G; Chathuranga Senarathna, K G; Herath, H M T U; Premachandra, T N; Ranasinghe, C S K; Rajapakse, R P V J; Rajapakse, R M G; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Mahalingam, S; Bandara, I M C C D; Singh, Sanjleena

    2016-06-01

    Preparation of hydroxyapatite coated custom-made metallic bone-implants is very important for the replacement of injured bones of the body. Furthermore, these bone-implants are more stable under the corrosive environment of the body and biocompatible than bone-implants made up of pure metals and metal alloys. Herein, we describe a novel, simple and low-cost technique to prepare biocompatible hydroxyapatite coated titanium metal (TiM) implants through growth of self-formed TiO2 thin-layer (SFTL) on TiM via a heat treatment process. SFTL acts as a surface binder of HA nanoparticles in order to produce HA coated implants. Colloidal HA nanorods prepared by a novel surfactant-assisted synthesis method, have been coated on SFTL via atomized spray pyrolysis (ASP) technique. The corrosion behavior of the bare and surface-modified TiM (SMTiM) in a simulated body fluid (SBF) medium is also studied. The highest corrosion rate is found to be for the bare TiM plate, but the corrosion rate has been reduced with the heat-treatment of TiM due to the formation of SFTL. The lowest corrosion rate is recorded for the implant prepared by heat treatment of TiM at 700 °C. The HA-coating further assists in the passivation of the TiM in the SBF medium. Both SMTiM and HA coated SMTiM are noncytotoxic against osteoblast-like (HOS) cells and are in high-bioactivity. The overall production process of bone-implant described in this paper is in high economic value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of atomic layer deposition temperature on current conduction in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films formed using H{sub 2}O oxidant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi, E-mail: hiraiwa@aoni.waseda.jp, E-mail: qs4a-hriw@asahi-net.or.jp [Research Organization for Nano and Life Innovation, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-Tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Matsumura, Daisuke [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kawarada, Hiroshi, E-mail: kawarada@waseda.jp [Research Organization for Nano and Life Innovation, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-Tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); The Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, 2-8-26 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan)

    2016-08-28

    To develop high-performance, high-reliability gate insulation and surface passivation technologies for wide-bandgap semiconductor devices, the effect of atomic layer deposition (ALD) temperature on current conduction in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is investigated based on the recently proposed space-charge-controlled field emission model. Leakage current measurement shows that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors formed on the Si substrates underperform thermally grown SiO{sub 2} capacitors at the same average field. However, using equivalent oxide field as a more practical measure, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capacitors are found to outperform the SiO{sub 2} capacitors in the cases where the capacitors are negatively biased and the gate material is adequately selected to reduce virtual dipoles at the gate/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} electron affinity increases with the increasing ALD temperature, but the gate-side virtual dipoles are not affected. Therefore, the leakage current of negatively biased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capacitors is approximately independent of the ALD temperature because of the compensation of the opposite effects of increased electron affinity and permittivity in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. By contrast, the substrate-side sheet of charge increases with increasing ALD temperature above 210 °C and hence enhances the current of positively biased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capacitors more significantly at high temperatures. Additionally, an anomalous oscillatory shift of the current-voltage characteristics with ALD temperature was observed in positively biased capacitors formed by low-temperature (≤210 °C) ALD. This shift is caused by dipoles at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/underlying SiO{sub 2} interface. Although they have a minimal positive-bias leakage current, the low-temperature-grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films cause the so-called blisters problem when heated above 400 °C. Therefore, because of the absence of blistering, a 450

  20. Characterization Of Oxide Layers Formed On 13CrMo4-5 Steel Operated For A Long Time At An Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwoździk M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains results of studies into the formation of oxide layers on 13CrMo4-5 (15HM steel long-term operated at an elevated temperature. The oxide layer was studied on a surface and a cross-section at the inner and outer surface of the tube wall. The 13CrMo4-5 steel operated at the temperature of 470°C during 190,000 hours was investigated. X-ray structural examinations (XRD were carried out, microscope observation s using an optical, scanning microscope were performed. The native material chemical composition was analysed by means of emission spark spectroscopy, while that of oxide layers on a scanning microscope (EDS. The studies on the topography of the oxide layers comprised studies on the roughness plane, which were carried out using a AFM microscope designed for 2D and 3D studies on the surface. Mechanical properties of the oxide layer – steel (substrate were characterised on the basis of scratch test. The adhesion of oxide layers, friction force, friction coefficient, scratching depth were determined as well as the force at which the layer was delaminated.

  1. 76 FR 70365 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Austin, TX and Waco, TX, Appropriated Fund Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... 3206-AM50 Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Austin, TX and Waco, TX, Appropriated Fund... the Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee to best match the counties proposed for redefinition to... Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC), the national labor-management committee responsible for advising...

  2. 77 FR 68073 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the St. Louis, MO; Southern Missouri; Cleveland, OH; and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... 3206-AM70 Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the St. Louis, MO; Southern Missouri; Cleveland, OH... Cleveland wage area. These changes are based on recent consensus recommendations of the Federal Prevailing... proposing the changes described below. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC), the national...

  3. 75 FR 39460 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Chicago, IL; Fort Wayne-Marion, IN; Indianapolis, IN...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ...-AM21 Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Chicago, IL; Fort Wayne-Marion, IN; Indianapolis, IN... wage area. These changes are based on recent consensus recommendations of the Federal Prevailing Rate... below. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC), the national labor-management committee...

  4. 76 FR 14679 - Prevailing Wage Rates for Construction Occupations on Guam for Purposes of the H-2B Temporary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ...)(v)(E) and (F). If the prevailing wage rate is too low, available U.S. workers may be dissuaded from... Docket No. USCIS-2010-0006] RIN 1615-ZA98 Prevailing Wage Rates for Construction Occupations on Guam for... the public on the system that the Governor of Guam is using to determine prevailing wage rates for...

  5. The surface oxidation kinetics of zirconium-niobium alloys and aα-Fe with prevailing cubical texture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhambetov, D.G.; Kargin, D.B.; Chalaya, O. V.; Berber, N.N.

    2002-01-01

    It is known, that the kinetics of oxidation of zirconium at formed heating is characterized by two consecutive stages. At the initial stage the thin protecting film will be derived. The relation of its depth from time h (t) is described predominantly by parabolic law. Some time later there can be a transition to the linear law of oxidation. The time moment divided these areas on the kinetic relation is called as a point of break. The film is formed at the second stage, has a developed grid of pores or cracks, can be flake away and be crumbled by losing its protective properties. At the oxidation of the surface shells of the heat generating elements and the technological channels of atomic boilers both stages are proceeded simultaneously. This phenomenon is called modular corrosion. Its consequences can be dangerous for the equipment. Its mechanism is not clear till now. Similar dependencies h(t), with the break point, beginning from which the thin film is transformed into the thick one were found by us at the oxidation α-Fe with prevailing cubical texture. The task of the work was to study the oxide film growth laws in order to clarify the mechanisms of transition of the thin film into the oxide layer on the α-Fe surface and Zr-Nb alloy modular corrosion emergence. Low-carbonate steel with contents 99.43 % of α-Fe was used as a model object of our research. In the texture of the steel surface planar direction [100] was prevalent. Its part accounted for about 40 %. The isothermal air oxidation was carried out in the interval of 450-500 deg. C . Phase composition of the film was determined with X-ray diffraction. The mathematical treatment of the dependencies h(t) obtained by experiment showed that the kinetics of the film growth can be conditionally divided into 4-stages. The initial stage is described by function logarithmic function, the other stages - by the power mode h n =A n ·t, namely, the second stage - is described by function close to cubical (n≅3

  6. A quantitative genetic model of reciprocal altruism: a condition for kin or group selection to prevail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, K

    1983-01-01

    A condition is derived for reciprocal altruism to evolve by kin or group selection. It is assumed that many additively acting genes of small effect and the environment determine the probability that an individual is a reciprocal altruist, as opposed to being unconditionally selfish. The particular form of reciprocal altruism considered is TIT FOR TAT, a strategy that involves being altruistic on the first encounter with another individual and doing whatever the other did on the previous encounter in subsequent encounters with the same individual. Encounters are restricted to individuals of the same generation belonging to the same kin or breeding group, but first encounters occur at random within that group. The number of individuals with which an individual interacts is assumed to be the same within any kin or breeding group. There are 1 + i expected encounters between two interacting individuals. On any encounter, it is assumed that an individual who behaves altruistically suffers a cost in personal fitness proportional to c while improving his partner's fitness by the same proportion of b. Then, the condition for kin or group selection to prevail is [Formula: see text] if group size is sufficiently large and the group mean and the within-group genotypic variance of the trait value (i.e., the probability of being a TIT-FOR-TAT strategist) are uncorrelated. Here, C, Vb, and Tb are the population mean, between-group variance, and between-group third central moment of the trait value and r is the correlation between the additive genotypic values of interacting kin or of individuals within the same breeding group. The right-hand side of the above inequality is monotone decreasing in C if we hold Tb/Vb constant, and kin and group selection become superfluous beyond a certain threshold value of C. The effect of finite group size is also considered in a kin-selection model. PMID:6575395

  7. Characterization and diffusion model for the titanium boride layers formed on the Ti6Al4V alloy by plasma paste boriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keddam, Mourad, E-mail: keddam@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Technologie des Matériaux, Faculté de Génie Mécanique et Génie des Procédés, USTHB, B.P. No. 32, 16111 El-Alia, Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Taktak, Sukru [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Afyon Kocatepe University, ANS Campus, 03200, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Titanium boride layers were produced by plasma paste boriding on Ti6Al4V at 973–1073 K. • Formation rates of the Ti boride layers have parabolic character at all temperatures. • Boron diffusivities were estimated using a diffusion model including incubation times. • Activation energies of boron in TiB{sub 2} and TiB were 136 and 63 kJ/mol respectively. - Abstract: The present study is focused on the estimation of activation energy of boron in the plasma paste borided Ti6Al4V alloy, which is extensively used in technological applications, using an analytical diffusion model. Titanium boride layers were successfully produced by plasma paste boriding method on the Ti6Al4V alloy in the temperature range of 973–1073 K for a treatment time ranging from 3 to 7 h. The presence of both TiB{sub 2} top-layer and TiB whiskers sub-layer was confirmed by the XRD analysis and SEM observations. The surface hardness of the borided alloy was evaluated using Micro-Knoop indenter. The formation rates of the TiB{sub 2} and TiB layers were found to have a parabolic character at all applied process temperatures. A diffusion model was suggested to estimate the boron diffusivities in TiB{sub 2} and TiB layers under certain assumptions, by considering the effect of boride incubation times. Basing on own experimental data on boriding kinetics, the activation energies of boron in TiB{sub 2} and TiB phases were estimated as 136.24 ± 0.5 and 63.76 ± 0.5 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. Finally, the obtained values of boron activation energies for Ti6Al4V alloy were compared with the data available in the literature.

  8. Enhancement of the surface methane hydrate-bearing layer based on the specific microorganisms form deep seabed sediment in Japan Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, T.; Yoneda, J.; Yamamoto, K.

    2017-12-01

    A methane hydrate-bearing layer located near the Japan Sea has been investigated as a new potential energy resource. In this study examined the feasibility of the seabed surface sediment strength located in the Japan Sea improvement technologies for enhancing microbial induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) process. First, the authors cultivated the specific urease production bacterium culture medium from this surface methane hydrate-bearing layer in the seabed (-600m depth) of Japan Sea. After that, two types of the laboratory test (consolidated-drained triaxial tests) were conducted using this specific culture medium from the seabed in the Japan Sea near the Toyama Prefecture and high urease activities bacterium named Bacillus pasteurii. The main outcomes of this research are as follows. 1) Specific culture medium focused on the urease production bacterium can enhancement of the urease activities from the methane hydrate-bearing layer near the Japan Sea side, 2) This specific culture medium can be enhancement of the surface layer strength, 3) The microbial induced carbonate precipitation process can increase the particle size compared to that of the original particles coating the calcite layer surface, 4) The mechanism for increasing the soil strength is based on the addition of cohesion like a cement stabilized soil.

  9. Layering and Ordering in Electrochemical Double Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yihua [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Kawaguchi, Tomoya [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Pierce, Michael S. [Rochester Institute of Technology, School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, New York 14623, United States; Komanicky, Vladimir [Faculty of Science, Safarik University, 041 54 Kosice, Slovakia; You, Hoydoo [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States

    2018-02-26

    Electrochemical double layers (EDL) form at electrified interfaces. While Gouy-Chapman model describes moderately charged EDL, formation of Stern layers was predicted for highly charged EDL. Our results provide structural evidence for a Stern layer of cations, at potentials close to hydrogen evolution in alkali fluoride and chloride electrolytes. Layering was observed by x-ray crystal truncation rods and atomic-scale recoil responses of Pt(111) surface layers. Ordering in the layer is confirmed by glancing-incidence in-plane diffraction measurements.

  10. Seed morphology, germination phenology, and capacity to form a seed bank in six herbaceous layer apiaceae species of the eastern deciduous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy S. Hawkins; Jerry M. Baskin; Carol C. Baskin

    2007-01-01

    We compared seed mass, seed morphology, and long-term germination phenology of three monocarpic (MI and three polycarpic (P) Apiaceae species of the herbaceous layer of the Eastern Deciduous Forest. Seeds (mericarps) of the six species differed considerably in mass, shape, and ornamentation. Mean seed masses were ranked Cryptotaenia canadensis (M)...

  11. Nonvolatile memory thin film transistors using CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-poly(methyl methacrylate) composite layer formed by a two-step spin coating technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chih; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Yu, Hsin-Chieh; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2012-08-01

    The nonvolatile memory thin film transistors (TFTs) using a core/shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD)-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) composite layer as the floating gate have been demonstrated, with the device configuration of n+-Si gate/SiO2 insulator/QD-PMMA composite layer/pentacene channel/Au source-drain being proposed. To achieve the QD-PMMA composite layer, a two-step spin coating technique was used to successively deposit QD-PMMA composite and PMMA on the insulator. After the processes, the variation of crystal quality and surface morphology of the subsequent pentacene films characterized by x-ray diffraction spectra and atomic force microscopy was correlated to the two-step spin coating. The crystalline size of pentacene was improved from 147.9 to 165.2 Å, while the degree of structural disorder was decreased from 4.5% to 3.1% after the adoption of this technique. In pentacene-based TFTs, the improvement of the performance was also significant, besides the appearances of strong memory characteristics. The memory behaviors were attributed to the charge storage/discharge effect in QD-PMMA composite layer. Under the programming and erasing operations, programmable memory devices with the memory window (Δ Vth) = 23 V and long retention time were obtained.

  12. 76 FR 21036 - Application of the Prevailing Wage Methodology in the H-2B Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Department to ``promulgate new rules concerning the calculation of the prevailing wage rate in the H-2B... wage methodology set forth in this Rule applies only to wages paid for work performed on or after...: Notice. SUMMARY: On January 19, 2011, the Department of Labor (Department) published a final rule, Wage...

  13. 75 FR 75706 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Open Committee Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... Building, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, DC. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee is composed of... considered and would disrupt substantially the disposition of its business. Therefore, these caucuses will be... 5H27, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, DC 20415, (202) 606-9400. U.S. Office of Personnel Management...

  14. 78 FR 70599 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Open Committee Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ... of Personnel Management Building, 1900 E Street NW., Washington, DC. The Federal Prevailing Rate... the matters being considered and would disrupt substantially the disposition of its business... Advisory Committee, Room 5H27, 1900 E Street NW., Washington, DC 20415, (202) 606-9400. U.S. Office of...

  15. 76 FR 75567 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Open Committee Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ..., 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, DC. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee is composed of a... disrupt substantially the disposition of its business. Therefore, these caucuses will be closed to the... 5H27, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, DC 20415, (202) 606-9400. U.S. Office of Personnel Management...

  16. 77 FR 8926 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Open Committee Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... Personnel Management Building, 1900 E Street NW., Washington, DC. The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory... considered and would disrupt substantially the disposition of its business. Therefore, these caucuses will be... 5H27, 1900 E Street NW., Washington, DC 20415, (202) 606-9400. U.S. Office of Personnel Management...

  17. 77 FR 76304 - Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee; Open Committee Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-27

    ... 5A06A, U.S. Office of Personnel Management Building, 1900 E Street NW., Washington, DC. The Federal... the matters being considered and would disrupt substantially the disposition of its business... Management, Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee, Room 5H27, 1900 E Street NW., Washington, DC 20415...

  18. Prevailing Wage Regulations and School Construction Costs: Evidence from British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilginsoy, Cihan; Philips, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Examines effects of prevailing wage laws on school construction costs, using final cost data from six British Columbia school districts. When controlling for factors such as construction business cycle, number of competitors, and school type, there was no significant unit cost change following the Skill Development and Fair Wage Policy Act.…

  19. Vets prevail online intervention reduces PTSD and depression in veterans with mild-to-moderate symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobfoll, Stevan E; Blais, Rebecca K; Stevens, Natalie R; Walt, Lisa; Gengler, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Despite heightened rates of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among in Iraq/Afghanistan veterans, the majority of distressed veterans will not receive mental health care. Overcoming barriers to mental health services requires innovative approaches to broaden the reach of evidence-based treatment. The current study examined the efficacy and acceptability of an innovative and dynamic online cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention for PTSD and depression called Vets Prevail. A randomized clinical trial conducted between 2011 and 2013 assessed changes in PTSD and depression in veterans with mild-to-moderate distress. Veterans randomized to Vets Prevail (n = 209) were aged 34.2 ± 7.6 years, mostly male (81.3%), and nonminority (73.7%). Veterans randomized to adjustment as usual (n = 94) were aged 34.7 ± 8.9, mostly male (81.9%), and White (67.0%). Veterans completed the PTSD Checklist-Military Version and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (10-item version) postintervention and at 12-week follow-up. Veterans in the Vets Prevail condition reported significantly greater reductions in PTSD, t(250) = 3.24, p = .001 (Mreduction = 5.51, SD = 9.63), and depression, t(252) = 4.37, p = .001 (Mreduction = 2.31, SD = 5.34), at 12-week follow-up compared with veterans in the adjustment as usual condition (PTSD Mreduction = 1.00, SD = 7.32; depression Mreduction = 0.48, SD = 4.95), with moderate effect sizes for PTSD (Cohen's d = 0.42) and depression (Cohen's d = 0.56). Exploratory analysis shows that Vets Prevail may be effective regardless of combat trauma exposure, gender, and ethnic minority status. Vets Prevail circumvents many barriers to care and effectively addresses the dire mental health needs of veterans. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Application of XPS and nuclear technique to the study of the gel layers formed under different redex conditions on leached glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manara, A.; Lanza, F.; Ceccone, G.; Della Mea, G.; Salvagno, G.

    1984-01-01

    Surface analysis has been conducted on samples leached in a Soxhlet apparatus at 100 0 C in presence and in absence of air. The XPS and RBS techniques were applied to analyse the content of the silicon, iron and uranium while the nuclear reaction method was utilized to analyse the hydrogen content. The anoxic environment favors the release of iron while decreasing the dissolution of uranium. Hydrogen content is always higher in samples leached in presence of air. Silicon depletion is evident in all cases. The diffusion process seems to regulate the growth of the layer on the glass surface. After long leaching time a detachment, at least partial, of this layer is observed. 14 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  1. Examining the evolution towards turbulence through spatio-temporal analysis of multi-dimensional structures formed by instability growth along a shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Elizabeth; Doss, Forrest; Loomis, Eric; Flippo, Kirk; Devolder, Barbara; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie; Fincke, James; Kline, John

    2014-10-01

    The counter-propagating shear campaign is examining instability growth and its transition to turbulence relevant to mix in ICF capsules. Experimental platforms on both OMEGA and NIF use anti-symmetric flows about a shear interface to examine isolated Kelvin-Helmholtz instability growth. Measurements of interface (an Al or Ti tracer layer) dynamics are used to benchmark the LANL RAGE hydrocode with BHR turbulence model. The tracer layer does not expand uniformly, but breaks up into multi-dimensional structures that are initially quasi-2D due to the target geometry. We are developing techniques to analyze the multi-D structure growth along the tracer surface with a focus on characterizing the time-dependent structures' spectrum of scales in order to appraise a transition to turbulence in the system and potentially provide tighter constraints on initialization schemes for the BHR model. To this end, we use a wavelet based analysis to diagnose single-time radiographs of the tracer layer surface (w/low and amplified roughness for random noise seeding) with observed spatially non-repetitive features, in order to identify spatial and temporal trends in radiographs taken at different times across several experimental shots. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  2. Uranium oxidation: characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Smyrl, N.R.; Condon, J.B.; Eager, M.H.

    1983-01-01

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. Results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. 27 figures

  3. Seasonal variability and descent of mid-latitude sporadic E layers at Arecibo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Christakis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic E layers (Es follow regular daily patterns in variability and altitude descent, which are determined primarily by the vertical tidal wind shears in the lower thermosphere. In the present study a large set of sporadic E layer incoherent scatter radar (ISR measurements are analyzed. These were made at Arecibo (Geog. Lat. ~18° N; Magnetic Dip ~50° over many years with ISR runs lasting from several hours to several days, covering evenly all seasons. A new methodology is applied, in which both weak and strong layers are clearly traced by using the vertical electron density gradient as a function of altitude and time. Taking a time base equal to the 24-h local day, statistics were obtained on the seasonal behavior of the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal variability and altitude descent patterns of sporadic E at Arecibo. The diurnal tide, most likely the S(1,1 tide with a vertical wavelength around 25 km, controls fully the formation and descent of the metallic Es layers at low altitudes below 110 km. At higher altitudes, there are two prevailing layers formed presumably by vertical wind shears associated mainly with semidiurnal tides. These include: 1 a daytime layer starting at ~130 km around midday and descending down to 105 km by local midnight, and 2 a less frequent and weaker nighttime layer which starts prior to midnight at ~130 km, descending downwards at somewhat faster rate to reach 110 km by sunrise. The diurnal and semidiurnal-like pattern prevails, with some differences, in all seasons. The differences in occurrence, strength and descending speeds between the daytime and nighttime upper layers are not well understood from the present data alone and require further study.

  4. Review on the prevailing methods for the prediction of potential rock burst / rock spalling in tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Panthi, Krishna Kanta

    2017-01-01

    Rock burst / rock spalling is among the prevailing stability challenges, which can be met while tunneling through hard rock mass. Especially, this is very relevant for the mountainous country like Norway where hard rock is dominating and many road, railway and hydropower tunnels have to be aligned deep into the mountain with steep valley slope topography. Tunnels passing beneath deep rock cover (overburden), in general, are subjected to high in-situ stresses. If the rock mass is relatively un...

  5. Nuclear energy is not the prevailing energy in the French energetic mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destais, G.

    2011-01-01

    The author first shows that the share of nuclear energy in the French electricity production is in fact of 76% (and not 80% as usually said), and that the share of this energy in the final electricity consumption was 69% in 2009. She also outlines that nuclear electricity is only 16,5% of the total final energy consumption in France in 2009, whereas oil still prevails with 42%

  6. Influence of a deep-level-defect band formed in a heavily Mg-doped GaN contact layer on the Ni/Au contact to p-GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiao-Jing; Zhao De-Gang; Jiang De-Sheng; Chen Ping; Zhu Jian-Jun; Liu Zong-Shun; Yang Jing; He Xiao-Guang; Yang Hui; Zhang Li-Qun; Zhang Shu-Ming; Le Ling-Cong; Liu Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a deep-level-defect (DLD) band formed in a heavily Mg-doped GaN contact layer on the performance of Ni/Au contact to p-GaN is investigated. The thin heavily Mg-doped GaN (p ++ -GaN) contact layer with DLD band can effectively improve the performance of Ni/Au ohmic contact to p-GaN. The temperature-dependent I–V measurement shows that the variable-range hopping (VRH) transportation through the DLD band plays a dominant role in the ohmic contact. The thickness and Mg/Ga flow ratio of p ++ -GaN contact layer have a significant effect on ohmic contact by controlling the Mg impurity doping and the formation of a proper DLD band. When the thickness of the p ++ -GaN contact layer is 25 nm thick and the Mg/Ga flow rate ratio is 10.29%, an ohmic contact with low specific contact resistivity of 6.97× 10 −4 Ω·cm 2 is achieved. (paper)

  7. Stability indicating high performance thin-layer chromatographic method for simultaneous estimation of pantoprazole sodium and itopride hydrochloride in combined dosage form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Bageshwar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A specific, precise and stability indicating high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method for simultaneous estimation of pantoprazole sodium and itopride hydrochloride in pharmaceutical formulations was developed and validated. The method employed TLC aluminium plates precoated with silica gel 60F254 as the stationary phase. The solvent system consisted of methanol:water:ammonium acetate; 4.0:1.0:0.5 (v/v/v. This system was found to give compact and dense spots for both itopride hydrochloride (Rf value of 0.55±0.02 and pantoprazole sodium (Rf value of 0.85±0.04. Densitometric analysis of both drugs was carried out in the reflectance–absorbance mode at 289 nm. The linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed a good linear relationship with R2=0.9988±0.0012 in the concentration range of 100–400 ng for pantoprazole sodium. Also, the linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed a good linear relationship with R2=0.9990±0.0008 in the concentration range of 200–1200 ng for itopride hydrochloride. The method was validated for specificity, precision, robustness and recovery. Statistical analysis proves that the method is repeatable and selective for the estimation of both the said drugs. As the method could effectively separate the drug from its degradation products, it can be employed as a stability indicating method. Keywords: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, Itopride hydrochloride, Pantoprazole sodium, High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC, Stability indicating, Forced degradation

  8. Interfacial, Electrical, and Band Alignment Characteristics of HfO2/Ge Stacks with In Situ-Formed SiO2 Interlayer by Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan-Qiang; Wu, Bing; Wu, Di; Li, Ai-Dong

    2017-05-01

    In situ-formed SiO2 was introduced into HfO2 gate dielectrics on Ge substrate as interlayer by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). The interfacial, electrical, and band alignment characteristics of the HfO2/SiO2 high-k gate dielectric stacks on Ge have been well investigated. It has been demonstrated that Si-O-Ge interlayer is formed on Ge surface during the in situ PEALD SiO2 deposition process. This interlayer shows fantastic thermal stability during annealing without obvious Hf-silicates formation. In addition, it can also suppress the GeO2 degradation. The electrical measurements show that capacitance equivalent thickness of 1.53 nm and a leakage current density of 2.1 × 10-3 A/cm2 at gate bias of Vfb + 1 V was obtained for the annealed sample. The conduction (valence) band offsets at the HfO2/SiO2/Ge interface with and without PDA are found to be 2.24 (2.69) and 2.48 (2.45) eV, respectively. These results indicate that in situ PEALD SiO2 may be a promising interfacial control layer for the realization of high-quality Ge-based transistor devices. Moreover, it can be demonstrated that PEALD is a much more powerful technology for ultrathin interfacial control layer deposition than MOCVD.

  9. Ultrathin SiO{sub 2} layer formed by the nitric acid oxidation of Si (NAOS) method to improve the thermal-SiO{sub 2}/Si interface for crystalline Si solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Taketoshi; Nakajima, Hiroki; Irishika, Daichi; Nonaka, Takaaki; Imamura, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Hikaru, E-mail: h.kobayashi@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The density of interface states at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface is decreased by NAOS. • The minority carrier lifetime is increased by the NAOS treatment. • Great interfacial properties of the NAOS layer are kept after thermal oxidation. - Abstract: A combination of the nitric acid oxidation of Si (NAOS) method and post-thermal oxidation is found to efficiently passivate the SiO{sub 2}/n-Si(100) interface. Thermal oxidation at 925 °C and annealing at 450 °C in pure hydrogen atmosphere increases the minority carrier lifetime by three orders of magnitude, and it is attributed to elimination of Si dangling bond interface states. Fabrication of an ultrathin, i.e., 1.1 nm, NAOS SiO{sub 2} layer before thermal oxidation and H{sub 2} annealing further increases the minority carrier lifetime by 30% from 8.6 to 11.1 ms, and decreased the interface state density by 10% from 6.9 × 10{sup 9} to 6.3 × 10{sup 9}eV{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. After thermal oxidation at 800 °C, the SiO{sub 2} layer on the NAOS-SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) structure is 2.26 nm thick, i.e., 0.24 nm thicker than that on the Si(100) surface, while after thermal oxidation at 925 °C, it is 4.2 nm thick, i.e., 0.4 nm thinner than that on Si(100). The chemical stability results from the higher atomic density of a NAOS SiO{sub 2} layer than that of a thermal oxide layer as reported in Ref. [28] (Asuha et al., 2002). Higher minority carrier lifetime in the presence of the NAOS layer indicates that the NAOS-SiO{sub 2}/Si interface with a low interface state density is preserved after thermal oxidation, which supports out-diffusion oxidation mechanism, by which a thermal oxide layer is formed on the NAOS SiO{sub 2} layer.

  10. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...

  11. Chemical properties of various organic electrolytes for lithium rechargeable batteries. Pt. 1.. Characterization of passivating layer formed on graphite in alkyl carbonate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Shoichiro; Asahina, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Yonei, Ayako; Yokoto, Kiyomi [Tsukuba Research Center, Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    The characteristics and reaction mechanisms of the passivating film formed on the surface of graphite were investigated in ethylene carbonate-diethyl carbonate solutions containing LiClO{sub 4}, LiPF{sub 6} and LiN(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2}. The electron consumption resulting on the irreversible capacity of graphite was almost equivalent to that used in the one-electron reduction of Li{sup +} found in the film. The electrochemical reactions in the first discharge process may be divided into the following steps: (i) `initial film formation step` from 1.4 to 0.55 V; (ii) `main film formation step` from 0.55 to 0.2 V, and (iii) `lithium intercalation step from 0.2 to 0.0 V. Most of the passivating film is formed together with the lithium intercalation reaction at step (ii). The passivating film formed at this step contained a significant amount of organic film such as EtOCO{sub 2}Li, (CH{sub 2}OCO{sub 2}Li){sub 2}, etc. Through the consecutive formation of passivating film at steps (i) and (ii), lithium intercalation into graphite proceeds smoothly without further decomposition of organic electrolyte. (orig.)

  12. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  13. Stability indicating high performance thin-layer chromatographic method for simultaneous estimation of pantoprazole sodium and itopride hydrochloride in combined dosage form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bageshwar, Deepak; Khanvilkar, Vineeta; Kadam, Vilasrao

    2011-11-01

    A specific, precise and stability indicating high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method for simultaneous estimation of pantoprazole sodium and itopride hydrochloride in pharmaceutical formulations was developed and validated. The method employed TLC aluminium plates precoated with silica gel 60F 254 as the stationary phase. The solvent system consisted of methanol:water:ammonium acetate; 4.0:1.0:0.5 (v/v/v). This system was found to give compact and dense spots for both itopride hydrochloride ( R f value of 0.55±0.02) and pantoprazole sodium ( R f value of 0.85±0.04). Densitometric analysis of both drugs was carried out in the reflectance-absorbance mode at 289 nm. The linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed a good linear relationship with R 2 =0.9988±0.0012 in the concentration range of 100-400 ng for pantoprazole sodium. Also, the linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed a good linear relationship with R 2 =0.9990±0.0008 in the concentration range of 200-1200 ng for itopride hydrochloride. The method was validated for specificity, precision, robustness and recovery. Statistical analysis proves that the method is repeatable and selective for the estimation of both the said drugs. As the method could effectively separate the drug from its degradation products, it can be employed as a stability indicating method.

  14. Acetate-intercalated Ni–In layered double hydroxides with low infrared emissivity: Synthesis, delamination and restacked to form the multilayer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yongjuan; Zhou, Yuming; Zhang, Tao; He, Man; Bu, Xiaohai; Yang, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    The low-emissive membrane materials have potential applications in infrared detecting technologies. Herein, we report a novel LDHs film with low infrared emissivity, which was based on the deposition of the exfoliated LDH nanosheets. The monodispersed hexagonal plate-like particles of Ni–In–CO 3 2− LDHs were prepared by coprecipitation method with hydrothermal treatment under optimized conditions. In order to exfoliate the LDHs into nanosheets, acetate-intercalated Ni–In LDHs were prepared by anion-exchange of Ni–In–CO 3 2− LDHs. The as-prepared acetate-intercalated LDHs exhibited excellent delaminating behavior in water and unilamellar nanosheets were easily obtained. The resulting positive-charged nanosheets were assembled onto quartz substrates to produce the multilayer films. The infrared emissivity values of all the samples were characterized. It was found that the incorporation of Ni 2+ and In 3+ in the host layer significantly reduced the infrared emissivity value. Moreover, the value was further reduced by the fabrication of multilayer ultrathin films, which can be ascribed to the dense orderly structure and smooth surface morphology.

  15. 47nm alumina–water nanofluid flow within boundary layer formed on upper horizontal surface of paraboloid of revolution in the presence of quartic autocatalysis chemical reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Lare Animasaun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a modified version of buoyancy-induced model is considered to investigate the flow of 47nm alumina–water nanofluid along an upper surface of horizontal paraboloid of revolution in the presence of nonlinear thermal radiation, Lorentz force and quartic autocatalysis kind of homogeneous heterogeneous chemical reaction. The case of unequal diffusion coefficients of reactant A (bulk fluid and B (high concentration of catalyst at the surface in the presence of bioconvection is considered. Governing equation suitable to unravel the thermophoresis which takes place within the boundary layer is presented. Since chemical reactant B is of higher concentration at the surface more than the concept described as cubic autocatalytic, the suitable schemes are herein described as isothermal quartic autocatalytic reaction and first order reaction. The viscosity and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary with volume fraction (ϕ and suitable models for the case 0%⩽ϕ⩽0.8% are adopted. The transformed governing equations are solved numerically using Runge–Kutta fourth order along with shooting technique (RK4SM. Good agreement is obtained between the solutions of RK4SM and MATLAB bvp5c for a limiting case. The influence of some pertinent parameters on velocity, temperature, diffusion of motile microorganism, concentration of bulk fluid and catalyst is illustrated graphically and discussed.

  16. The effect of aerobic corrosion on anaerobically-formed sulfide layers on carbon steel in dilute near-neutral pH saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherar, B.W.A.; Keech, P.G.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is low when steel is exposed to anaerobic conditions (pH = 8.9). •An anaerobic corrosion with sulfide to aerobic switch increases the corrosion rate. •Aerobic conditions leads to corrosion and oxide deposition beneath FeS. •Continual air exposure leads to the blistering of the original FeS film. -- Abstract: The aerobic corrosion of pipeline steel was investigated in an aqueous sulfide solution by monitoring the corrosion potential and periodically measuring the polarization resistance. The properties and composition of the corrosion product deposits formed were determined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The establishment of aerobic conditions leads to corrosion and (oxyhydr)oxide deposition beneath the anaerobically-formed mackinawite film originally present on the steel surface. This leads to blistering and spalling of the sulfide film. Chemical conversion of the mackinawite to Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides also occurs but is a relatively slow reaction

  17. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  18. Forming of nanocrystal silicon films by implantation of high dose of H+ in layers of silicon on isolator and following fast thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyschenko, I.E.; Popov, V.P.; Talochkin, A.B.; Gutakovskij, A.K.; Zhuravlev, K.S.

    2004-01-01

    Formation of nanocrystalline silicon films during rapid thermal annealing of the high-dose H + ion implanted silicon-on-insulator structures was studied. It was found, that Si nanocrystals had formed alter annealings at 300-400 deg C, their formation being strongly limited by the hydrogen content in silicon and also by the annealing time. It was supposed that the nucleation of crystalline phase occurred inside the silicon islands between micropores. It is conditioned by ordering Si-Si bonds as hydrogen atoms are leaving their sites in silicon network. No coalescence of micropores takes place during the rapid thermal annealing at the temperatures up to ∼ 900 deg C. Green-orange photoluminescence was observed on synthesized films at room temperature [ru

  19. Simultaneous determination of atorvastatin calcium and ramipril in capsule dosage forms by high-performance liquid chromatography and high-performance thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Hiral J; Suhagia, Bhanubhai N

    2010-01-01

    Two simple and accurate methods to determine atorvastatin calcium and ramipril in capsule dosage forms were developed and validated using HPLC and HPTLC. The HPLC separation was achieved on a Phenomenex Luna C18 column (250 x 4.6 mm id, 5 microm) in the isocratic mode using 0.1% phosphoric acid-acetonitrile (38 + 62, v/v), pH 3.5 +/- 0.05, mobile phase at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. The retention times were 6.42 and 2.86 min for atorvastatin calcium and ramipril, respectively. Quantification was achieved with a photodiode array detector set at 210 nm over the concentration range of 0.5-5 microg/mL for each, with mean recoveries (at three concentration levels) of 100.06 +/- 0.49% and 99.95 +/- 0.63% RSD for atorvastatin calcium and ramipril, respectively. The HPTLC separation was achieved on silica gel 60 F254 HPTLC plates using methanol-benzene-glacial acetic acid (19.6 + 80.0 + 0.4, v/v/v) as the mobile phase. The Rf values were 0.40 and 0.20 for atorvastatin calcium and ramipril, respectively. Quantification was achieved with UV densitometry at 210 nm over the concentration range of 50-500 ng/spot for each, with mean recoveries (at three concentration levels) of 99.98 +/- 0.75% and 99.87 +/- 0.83% RSD for atorvastatin calcium and ramipril, respectively. Both methods were validated according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines and found to be simple, specific, accurate, precise, and robust. The mean assay percentages for atorvastatin calcium and ramipril were 99.90 and 99.55% for HPLC and 99.91 and 99.47% for HPTLC, respectively. The methods were successfully applied for the determination of atorvastatin calcium and ramipril in capsule dosage forms without any interference from common excipients.

  20. Hygienic features of working conditions prevailing in X-ray cabinets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usol'tsev, V.I.; Serebryanyj, V.A.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an investigation of 352 x-ray cabinets showed that their personnel is subjected to simultaneous action of a number of factors: discomfortable microclimate, small concentrations of ozone and nitrogen oxides (within 0.1 of the maximum permissible concentration). The hands of the personnel, especially those of the x-ray laboratory assistants are contaminated with lead (2.38mg in the hands washings). Therefore the assessment of labour conditions prevailing in an x-ray cabinet and the accomplishment of measures of their provement should be carried out with due regards to all the complex of the above mentioned factors besides the ionizing radiation

  1. Temporal evolution of blobs in the scrape-off layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Madsen, Jens; Garcia, O.E.

    Experimental observations have revealed that the transport in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) of toroidally magnetized plasmas is strongly intermittent and involves large outbreaks of hot plasma. These structures, often referred to as “blobs”, are formed near the last closed flux surface (LCFS......) and propagate far into the SOL. The convective transport mediated by the blob-like structures prevails in virtually all confinement states, including edge-localized modes. They have a profound influence on the pressure profiles in the SOL, the ensuing parallel flows, and the power deposition on plasma facing...... and non-local [3] gyro-fluid equations. The focus of the investigations is the propagation of Gaussian “blob” like density structures. We examine the speed and the associated radial density transport as a function of blob amplitude and width. We observe an increase radial transport if finite ion...

  2. A study of surface films formed during maraging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Haq, A.U.; Khan, A.Q.; Waris, J.; Suleman, M.

    1993-01-01

    A study was carried out on thin films produced during maraging at 480 deg. 0 C for 3 hours in vacuum (of the order of 10/sup -4/ torr) and in N/ sub 2/ atmosphere. These surface films have been analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Depth profiling for chemical analysis was performed after Ar /sup +/ ion sputtering to predict the compounds formed on the sample surface under prevailing conditions. It was noted that O/sub 2/N/sub 2/ and C are the main constituents of the top layers. These are considered as impurities in the films. Depth profiling showed a smooth interface between the N/sub 2/ and Ti and formation of Titanium nitride is predicted. (author)

  3. Characterization of oxide film layers formed on A106 B carbon steel in simulated secondary coolant conditions of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strack, M.; Bordoni, R.; Chocron, M.; Olmedo, A.M.; Zampieri, G.

    2011-01-01

    The water chemistry of the secondary coolant in the majority Nuclear Power Plants is controlled by AVT (All Volatile Treatment) procedure, wherein volatile amines are use to maintain the alkaline pH required for minimizing the corrosion of structural materials which one of them is Carbon Steel. In this procedure: hydrazine, morpholine and ethanolamine are used commonly as conditioning reagents. In this context, experiments were carried out by exposing carbon steel A106 B samples in a simulated secondary coolant in order to study the nature of the oxide films. The tests were performed in a static autoclave at 260 ºC using two media: 1) Hydrazine + morpholine and 2) Hydrazine + ethanolamine during different exposure periods up to ≈1020 h. The composition, surface morphology, X-ray diffraction, a chemical descaling procedure were used- XPS, was also employed, to analyze the films grown during ≈1020 h in both media. The characterization showed that magnetite was the main corrosion product formed in the films grown in the two media. The material weight loss (W) could be fitted by a law of the type W = k t n , up to 1020 h of exposure, resulting in n =0,42, k = 6,24 for films grown in medium 1) and n = 0,39, k =6,08 for films grown in medium 2); where W is in mg/d m 2 and t in h. (author) [es

  4. The cation-deficient Ruddlesden-Popper oxysulfide Y2Ti2O5S2 as a layered sulfide: topotactic potassium intercalation to form KY2Ti2O5S2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutt, Oliver J; Hill, Timothy L; Gál, Zoltán A; Hayward, Michael A; Clarke, Simon J

    2003-12-01

    Potassium intercalation into the cation-deficient n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper oxysulfide Y(2)Ti(2)O(5)S(2) to form KY(2)Ti(2)O(5)S(2) has been carried out by reaction of the oxysulfide with potassium vapor in sealed metal tubes at 400 degrees C, potassium naphthalide in THF at 50 degrees C, or potassium in liquid ammonia at temperatures as low as -78 degrees C. Insertion of potassium is topotactic, and although a site 12-coordinate by oxide ions is vacant in the perovskite-type oxide slabs of the structure, potassium is too large to enter this site via the 4-coordinate window, and instead enters the rock-salt-type sulfide layers of the structure which necessitates a 30% increase in the lattice parameter c normal to the layers. In contrast with one of the sodium intercalates of Y(2)Ti(2)O(5)S(2) (beta-NaY(2)Ti(2)O(5)S(2)) in which sodium occupies a tetrahedral site in the sulfide layers, potassium favors an 8-coordinate site which necessitates a relative translation of adjacent oxide slabs. KY(2)Ti(2)O(5)S(2) is tetragonal: P4/mmm, a = 3.71563(4) A, c = 14.8682(2) A (at 298 K), Z = 1. Although the resistivity (3.4(1) x 10(3) Omega cm) is larger than would be expected for a metal, temperature independent paramagnetism dominates the magnetic susceptibility, and the material is electronically very similar to the analogous sodium intercalate beta-NaY(2)Ti(2)O(5)S(2) which features reduced-titanium-containing oxide layers of very similar geometry and electron count.

  5. 5-Year Outcomes After Left Atrial Appendage Closure: From the PREVAIL and PROTECT AF Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vivek Y; Doshi, Shephal K; Kar, Saibal; Gibson, Douglas N; Price, Matthew J; Huber, Kenneth; Horton, Rodney P; Buchbinder, Maurice; Neuzil, Petr; Gordon, Nicole T; Holmes, David R

    2017-12-19

    The PROTECT AF (WATCHMAN Left Atrial Appendage System for Embolic Protection in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation) trial demonstrated that left atrial appendage closure (LAAC) with the Watchman device (Boston Scientific, St. Paul, Minnesota) was equivalent to warfarin for preventing stroke in atrial fibrillation, but had a high rate of complications. In a second randomized trial, PREVAIL (Evaluation of the WATCHMAN LAA Closure Device in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Versus Long Term Warfarin Therapy), the complication rate was low. The warfarin cohort experienced an unexpectedly low ischemic stroke rate, rendering the efficacy endpoints inconclusive. However, these outcomes were based on relatively few patients followed for a relatively short time. The final results of the PREVAIL trial, both alone and as part of a patient-level meta-analysis with the PROTECT AF trial, are reported with patients in both trials followed for 5 years. PREVAIL and PROTECT AF are prospective randomized clinical trials with patients randomized 2:1 to LAAC or warfarin; together, they enrolled 1,114 patients for 4,343 patient-years. Analyses are by intention-to-treat, and rates are events per 100 patient-years. For the PREVAIL trial, the first composite coprimary endpoint of stroke, systemic embolism (SE), or cardiovascular/unexplained death did not achieve noninferiority (posterior probability for noninferiority = 88.4%), whereas the second coprimary endpoint of post-procedure ischemic stroke/SE did achieve noninferiority (posterior probability for noninferiority = 97.5%); the warfarin arm maintained an unusually low ischemic stroke rate (0.73%). In the meta-analysis, the composite endpoint was similar between groups (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.820; p = 0.27), as were all-stroke/SE (HR: 0.961; p = 0.87). The ischemic stroke/SE rate was numerically higher with LAAC, but this difference did not reach statistical significance (HR: 1.71; p = 0.080). However, differences in

  6. Impact of electrically formed interfacial layer and improved memory characteristics of IrOx/high-κx/W structures containing AlOx, GdOx, HfOx, and TaOx switching materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Amit; Maikap, Siddheswar; Banerjee, Writam; Jana, Debanjan; Lai, Chao-Sung

    2013-09-06

    Improved switching characteristics were obtained from high-κ oxides AlOx, GdOx, HfOx, and TaOx in IrOx/high-κx/W structures because of a layer that formed at the IrOx/high-κx interface under external positive bias. The surface roughness and morphology of the bottom electrode in these devices were observed by atomic force microscopy. Device size was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. More than 100 repeatable consecutive switching cycles were observed for positive-formatted memory devices compared with that of the negative-formatted devices (only five unstable cycles) because it contained an electrically formed interfacial layer that controlled 'SET/RESET' current overshoot. This phenomenon was independent of the switching material in the device. The electrically formed oxygen-rich interfacial layer at the IrOx/high-κx interface improved switching in both via-hole and cross-point structures. The switching mechanism was attributed to filamentary conduction and oxygen ion migration. Using the positive-formatted design approach, cross-point memory in an IrOx/AlOx/W structure was fabricated. This cross-point memory exhibited forming-free, uniform switching for >1,000 consecutive dc cycles with a small voltage/current operation of ±2 V/200 μA and high yield of >95% switchable with a large resistance ratio of >100. These properties make this cross-point memory particularly promising for high-density applications. Furthermore, this memory device also showed multilevel capability with a switching current as low as 10 μA and a RESET current of 137 μA, good pulse read endurance of each level (>105 cycles), and data retention of >104 s at a low current compliance of 50 μA at 85°C. Our improvement of the switching characteristics of this resistive memory device will aid in the design of memory stacks for practical applications.

  7. Improved electron transport layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution......; a method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according...

  8. Two layer powder pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, H.

    1979-01-01

    First, significance and advantages of sintered materials consisting of two layers are pointed out. By means of the two layer powder pressing technique metal powders are formed resulting in compacts with high accuracy of shape and mass. Attributes of basic powders, different filling methods and pressing techniques are discussed. The described technique is supposed to find further applications in the field of two layer compacts in the near future

  9. CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DIFFUSION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: LIMITATIONS OF PREVAILING INNOVATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia van Egmond-deWilde de Ligny

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion of innovative technologies in the market is usually a complex and difficult process with a varying degree of success and the effects of the diffused innovative technologies are very un-balanced. The objective of our research is to gain insight into the reasons why the diffusion of innovative technology fails, even though they promise a superior performance compared to incumbent technologies. Drawing on innovation systems theories, we have identified and used the concepts of technological regime, actor network and technology sets to analyze technology diffusion in a case study in the dwelling construction industry in Costa Rica. The results showed bottlenecks in the prevailing innovation system that curtailed the diffusion of an innovative construction technology.

  10. Economic impact of enoxaparin after acute ischemic stroke based on PREVAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineo, Graham; Lin, Jay; Stern, Lee; Subrahmanian, Tarun; Annemans, Lieven

    2011-04-01

    The efficacy and safety of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) versus unfractionated heparin (UFH) has been demonstrated for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after acute ischemic stroke. Few data exist regarding the economic impact of LMWHs versus UFH in this population. A decision-analytic model was constructed using clinical information from the Prevention of VTE after Acute Ischemic stroke with LMWH Enoxaparin (PREVAIL) study, and drug costs and mean Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services event costs. When considering the total cost of events and drugs, enoxaparin was associated with cost-savings of $895 per patient compared with UFH ($2018 vs $2913). Findings were retained within the univariate and multivariate analyses. From a payer perspective, enoxaparin was cost-effective compared with UFH in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The difference was driven by the lower clinical event rates with enoxaparin. Use of enoxaparin may help to reduce the clinical and economic burden of VTE.

  11. El suicidio: Una conducta antisocial que prevalece/Suicide: An antisocial behavior that prevails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Alejandro De León Palomo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The suicide has existed throughout history and has prevailed as a behavior that was contrary to the rules of the society in terms of preservation of life itself; the objective of this research was to make emphasis on the nature of antisocial behavior of this behavior and show its prevalence in the years 2006 to 2010 in Mexico and Tamaulipas, as well as from 1999 to 2008 in Reynosa, Tamaulipas. For which the data were obtained from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography to the country and the State and the books of the register of deaths by cause violent of the Regional Unit of Expert Services of the Attorney General of Justice, which has its headquarters in Reynosa; developed a theoretical framework on the impact of the conduct in society and the means to prevent it, The data obtained we revealed the continued presence of this conduct year-on-year, 23.554 cases appearing in Mexico and 819 in Tamaulipas in the period from 2006 to 2010; in Reynosa, Tamaulipas were presented 278 suicides in the period 1999 to 2008. The results show us a conduct stable in numbers, but without excessive overflows that prevails year-on-year, suicide, and the attempt of the same should be viewed as a social problem and not detract from the importance that it deserves a conduct of these dimensions, that is no more than a reflection of the situation in which are the means of social control toward the preservation of life itself.

  12. Population Causes and Consequences of Leading Chronic Diseases: A Comparative Analysis of Prevailing Explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckler, David

    2008-01-01

    Context The mortality numbers and rates of chronic disease are rising faster in developing than in developed countries. This article compares prevailing explanations of population chronic disease trends with theoretical and empirical models of population chronic disease epidemiology and assesses some economic consequences of the growth of chronic diseases in developing countries based on the experiences of developed countries. Methods Four decades of male mortality rates of cardiovascular and chronic noncommunicable diseases were regressed on changes in and levels of country income per capita, market integration, foreign direct investment, urbanization rates, and population aging in fifty-six countries for which comparative data were available. Neoclassical economic growth models were used to estimate the effect of the mortality rates of chronic noncommunicable diseases on economic growth in high-income OECD countries. Findings Processes of economic growth, market integration, foreign direct investment, and urbanization were significant determinants of long-term changes in mortality rates of heart disease and chronic noncommunicable disease, and the observed relationships with these social and economic factors were roughly three times stronger than the relationships with the population's aging. In low-income countries, higher levels of country income per capita, population urbanization, foreign direct investment, and market integration were associated with greater mortality rates of heart disease and chronic noncommunicable disease, less increased or sometimes reduced rates in middle-income countries, and decreased rates in high-income countries. Each 10 percent increase in the working-age mortality rates of chronic noncommunicable disease decreased economic growth rates by close to a half percent. Conclusions Macrosocial and macroeconomic forces are major determinants of population rises in chronic disease mortality, and some prevailing demographic explanations

  13. Population causes and consequences of leading chronic diseases: a comparative analysis of prevailing explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckler, David

    2008-06-01

    The mortality numbers and rates of chronic disease are rising faster in developing than in developed countries. This article compares prevailing explanations of population chronic disease trends with theoretical and empirical models of population chronic disease epidemiology and assesses some economic consequences of the growth of chronic diseases in developing countries based on the experiences of developed countries. Four decades of male mortality rates of cardiovascular and chronic noncommunicable diseases were regressed on changes in and levels of country income per capita, market integration, foreign direct investment, urbanization rates, and population aging in fifty-six countries for which comparative data were available. Neoclassical economic growth models were used to estimate the effect of the mortality rates of chronic noncommunicable diseases on economic growth in high-income OECD countries. Processes of economic growth, market integration, foreign direct investment, and urbanization were significant determinants of long-term changes in mortality rates of heart disease and chronic noncommunicable disease, and the observed relationships with these social and economic factors were roughly three times stronger than the relationships with the population's aging. In low-income countries, higher levels of country income per capita, population urbanization, foreign direct investment, and market integration were associated with greater mortality rates of heart disease and chronic noncommunicable disease, less increased or sometimes reduced rates in middle-income countries, and decreased rates in high-income countries. Each 10 percent increase in the working-age mortality rates of chronic noncommunicable disease decreased economic growth rates by close to a half percent. Macrosocial and macroeconomic forces are major determinants of population rises in chronic disease mortality, and some prevailing demographic explanations, such as population aging, are

  14. Evidence for Kinetic Limitations as a Controlling Factor of Ge Pyramid Formation: a Study of Structural Features of Ge/Si(001) Wetting Layer Formed by Ge Deposition at Room Temperature Followed by Annealing at 600 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storozhevykh, Mikhail S; Arapkina, Larisa V; Yuryev, Vladimir A

    2015-12-01

    The article presents an experimental study of an issue of whether the formation of arrays of Ge quantum dots on the Si(001) surface is an equilibrium process or it is kinetically controlled. We deposited Ge on Si(001) at the room temperature and explored crystallization of the disordered Ge film as a result of annealing at 600 °C. The experiment has demonstrated that the Ge/Si(001) film formed in the conditions of an isolated system consists of the standard patched wetting layer and large droplike clusters of Ge rather than of huts or domes which appear when a film is grown in a flux of Ge atoms arriving on its surface. We conclude that the growth of the pyramids appearing at temperatures greater than 600 °C is controlled by kinetics rather than thermodynamic equilibrium whereas the wetting layer is an equilibrium structure. Primary 68.37.Ef; 68.55.Ac; 68.65.Hb; 81.07.Ta; 81.16.Dn.

  15. Evaluation of operational numerical weather predictions in relation to the prevailing synoptic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytharoulis, Ioannis; Tegoulias, Ioannis; Karacostas, Theodore; Kotsopoulos, Stylianos; Kartsios, Stergios; Bampzelis, Dimitrios

    2015-04-01

    The Thessaly plain, which is located in central Greece, has a vital role in the financial life of the country, because of its significant agricultural production. The aim of DAPHNE project (http://www.daphne-meteo.gr) is to tackle the problem of drought in this area by means of Weather Modification in convective clouds. This problem is reinforced by the increase of population and the water demand for irrigation, especially during the warm period of the year. The nonhydrostatic Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), is utilized for research and operational purposes of DAPHNE project. The WRF output fields are employed by the partners in order to provide high-resolution meteorological guidance and plan the project's operations. The model domains cover: i) Europe, the Mediterranean sea and northern Africa, ii) Greece and iii) the wider region of Thessaly (at selected periods), at horizontal grid-spacings of 15km, 5km and 1km, respectively, using 2-way telescoping nesting. The aim of this research work is to investigate the model performance in relation to the prevailing upper-air synoptic circulation. The statistical evaluation of the high-resolution operational forecasts of near-surface and upper air fields is performed at a selected period of the operational phase of the project using surface observations, gridded fields and weather radar data. The verification is based on gridded, point and object oriented techniques. The 10 upper-air circulation types, which describe the prevailing conditions over Greece, are employed in the synoptic classification. This methodology allows the identification of model errors that occur and/or are maximized at specific synoptic conditions and may otherwise be obscured in aggregate statistics. Preliminary analysis indicates that the largest errors are associated with cyclonic conditions. Acknowledgments This research work of Daphne project (11SYN_8_1088) is co-funded by the European Union (European Regional Development Fund

  16. Photovoltaic cell module and method of forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Malinda; Juen, Donnie; Ketola, Barry; Tomalia, Mary Kay

    2017-12-12

    A photovoltaic cell module, a photovoltaic array including at least two modules, and a method of forming the module are provided. The module includes a first outermost layer and a photovoltaic cell disposed on the first outermost layer. The module also includes a second outermost layer disposed on the photovoltaic cell and sandwiching the photovoltaic cell between the second outermost layer and the first outermost layer. The method of forming the module includes the steps of disposing the photovoltaic cell on the first outermost layer, disposing a silicone composition on the photovoltaic cell, and compressing the first outermost layer, the photovoltaic cell, and the second layer to form the photovoltaic cell module.

  17. Uranium oxidation: Characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water by infrared and sorption analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, E. L.; Smyrl, N. R.; Condon, J. B.; Eager, M. H.

    1984-04-01

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. The results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. Inert gas sorption analyses and diffuse reflectance infrared studies combined with electron microscopy prove valuable in defining the chemistry and morphology of the oxidic products and hydrated intermediates.

  18. Analysis of the Effect of Prevailing Weather Conditions on the Occurrence of Grain Dust Explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghi, Achint; Ambrose, R P Kingsly

    2016-07-27

    Grain dust explosions have been occurring in the U.S. for the past twenty years. In the past ten years, there have been an average of ten explosions a year, resulting in nine fatalities and 93 injuries. In more than half of these cases, the ignition source remains unidentified. The effect of ambient humidity on the likelihood of a dust explosion has been discussed for many years. However, no investigation into a possible link between the two has been carried out. In this study, we analyzed local weather data and grain dust explosions during the period 2006 to 2014 to measure potential relationships between the two events. The 84 analyzed explosions do not show any trend with regard to prevailing temperatures, or relative or absolute humidity. In addition, the ignition source could not be identified in 54 of the incidents. The majority of grain dust explosion incidents occurred at grain elevator facilities, where the dust generation potential was high compared with grain processing industries. Copyright© by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

  19. On the prevailing construction waste recycling practices: a South East Queensland study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vivian W Y; Kotrayothar, Duangthidar; Loo, Yew-Chaye

    2009-03-01

    Waste generated from construction and building demolition work constitutes about 68% of all solid waste generated each year in South East Queensland. Consequently, it has created a serious waste management problem. The State Governments of Victoria and New South Wales have been encouraging the use of recycled materials from construction and related waste; they have also promulgated specifications for their use. In Queensland, however, similar regulations are not anticipated in the near future, which explains the lack of funded research conducted in this important arena. This paper presents an evaluation of the prevailing waste recycling practices in Queensland. Nine sites were visited, including two construction sites, three demolition sites, three recycling plants and one landfill in South East Queensland. The difficulties encountered by the recycling programme operators and their associates at these sites are described and the benefits of recycling construction materials are presented. One of the major barriers is that the local councils disallow the use of recycled materials in new construction work. To help rectify these impediments to recycling, recommendations are given to increase the use of recycled construction waste in South East Queensland.

  20. Appreciation of the nature of light demands enhancement over the prevailing scientific epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    2011-09-01

    Based on attempts to resolve the problem of various self contradictory assumptions behind the prevailing belief on single photon interference, we have analyzed the process steps behind our experimental measurements and named the process as the Interaction Process Mapping Epistemology (IPM-E). This has helped us recognize that the quantum mechanical Measurement Problem has a much universal and deeper root in nature. Our scientific theorization process suffers from a Perpetual Information Challenge (PIC), which cannot be overcome by elegant and/or sophisticated mathematical theories alone. Iterative imaginative application of IPM-E needs to be used as a metaphorical analytical continuation to fill up the missing information gaps. IPM-E has also guided us to recognize the generic NIW-principle (Non-Interaction of Waves) in the linear domain, not explicitly recognized in current books and literature. Superposition effects become manifest through light-matter interactions. Detecting dipoles gets stimulated by multiple superposed beams; it sums the simultaneous multiple stimulations into a single resultant undulation, which then guides the resultant energy exchange. The consequent transformation in the detector corresponds to observed fringes. They neither represent interference of light; nor represent selective arrival or non-arrival of photons on the detector. Photons do not possess any force of mutual interaction to generate their redistribution. Implementation of IPM-E requires us to recognize our subjective interpretation propensity with which we are burdened due to our evolutionary successes.

  1. Why nature prevails over nurture in the making of the elite athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiades, Evelina; Klissouras, Vassilis; Baulch, Jamie; Wang, Guan; Pitsiladis, Yannis

    2017-11-14

    While the influence of nature (genes) and nurture (environment) on elite sporting performance remains difficult to precisely determine, the dismissal of either as a contributing factor to performance is unwarranted. It is accepted that a complex interaction of a combination of innumerable factors may mold a talented athlete into a champion. The prevailing view today is that understanding elite human performance will require the deciphering of two major sources of individual differences, genes and the environment. It is widely accepted that superior performers are endowed with a high genetic potential actualised through hard and prodigious effort. Heritability studies using the twin model have provided the basis to disentangle genetic and environmental factors that contribute to complex human traits and have paved the way to the detection of specific genes for elite sport performance. Yet, the heritability for most phenotypes essential to elite human performance is above 50% but below 100%, meaning that the environment is also important. Furthermore, individual differences can potentially also be explained not only by the impact of DNA sequence variation on biology and behaviour, but also by the effects of epigenetic changes which affect phenotype by modifying gene expression. Despite this complexity, the overwhelming and accumulating evidence, amounted through experimental research spanning almost two centuries, tips the balance in favour of nature in the "nature" and "nurture" debate. In other words, truly elite-level athletes are built - but only from those born with innate ability.

  2. Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Portnyagin

    Full Text Available An updated empirical climatic zonally averaged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere (70-110 km, extending from 80°N to 80°S is presented. The model is constructed from the fitting of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed over the globe. The height-latitude contour plots of monthly mean zonal and meridional winds for all months of the year, and of annual mean wind, amplitudes and phases of annual and semiannual harmonics of wind variations are analyzed to reveal the main features of the seasonal variation of the global wind structures in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Some results of comparison between the ground-based wind models and the space-based models are presented. It is shown that, with the exception of annual mean systematic bias between the zonal winds provided by the ground-based and space-based models, a good agreement between the models is observed. The possible origin of this bias is discussed.

    Key words: Meteorology and Atmospheric dynamics (general circulation; middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics

  3. Phylogenomics resolves a spider backbone phylogeny and rejects a prevailing paradigm for orb web evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Jason E; Garrison, Nicole L; Hamilton, Chris A; Godwin, Rebecca L; Hedin, Marshal; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2014-08-04

    Spiders represent an ancient predatory lineage known for their extraordinary biomaterials, including venoms and silks. These adaptations make spiders key arthropod predators in most terrestrial ecosystems. Despite ecological, biomedical, and biomaterial importance, relationships among major spider lineages remain unresolved or poorly supported. Current working hypotheses for a spider "backbone" phylogeny are largely based on morphological evidence, as most molecular markers currently employed are generally inadequate for resolving deeper-level relationships. We present here a phylogenomic analysis of spiders including taxa representing all major spider lineages. Our robust phylogenetic hypothesis recovers some fundamental and uncontroversial spider clades, but rejects the prevailing paradigm of a monophyletic Orbiculariae, the most diverse lineage, containing orb-weaving spiders. Based on our results, the orb web either evolved much earlier than previously hypothesized and is ancestral for a majority of spiders or else it has multiple independent origins, as hypothesized by precladistic authors. Cribellate deinopoid orb weavers that use mechanically adhesive silk are more closely related to a diverse clade of mostly webless spiders than to the araneoid orb-weaving spiders that use adhesive droplet silks. The fundamental shift in our understanding of spider phylogeny proposed here has broad implications for interpreting the evolution of spiders, their remarkable biomaterials, and a key extended phenotype--the spider web. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Basis reduction for layered lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L. Torreão Dassen (Erwin)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractWe develop the theory of layered Euclidean spaces and layered lattices. With this new theory certain problems that usually are solved by using classical lattices with a "weighting" gain a new, more natural form. Using the layered lattice basis reduction algorithms introduced here these

  5. The networked minority: How a small group prevailed in a local windfarm conflict

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Carmel

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explain through a qualitative case study how a small protest group prevailed during a local windfarm conflict in south-eastern Australia. A social capital analytical framework was developed to analyse the data. The analysis found that two communities inhabited the area for which the windfarm development was proposed. The public participation process failed to address the concerns of both communities and led to the emergence of a social network of resistance. The network had high stocks of bridging social capital, which enabled an effective protest that led to the abandonment of the development. Their effectiveness was inadvertently aided by the windfarm supporters who were unable to act collectively to defend their interests because socio-economic changes in the community among other factors had led to a depletion of their social capital. In this context, different democratic participatory processes were needed to address the concerns of the two communities. Guidance and tools for researching and developing the types of participatory processes needed for vulnerable communities with low social capital and those similar to the social network with high social capital are provided. These will inform community-appropriate public participation processes and participatory planning policy. - Highlights: ► A case study of a local social network's resistance to a windfarm is undertaken. ► The link between high social capital and resistance is confirmed. ► Successful protest groups can be aided by passive windfarm supporters. ► Protesters are likely to participate in well-designed participatory processes. ► Guidance for developing community-specific participatory processes is provided

  6. Additive effects prevail: The response of biota to multiple stressors in an intensively monitored watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieswein, Alexander; Hering, Daniel; Feld, Christian K

    2017-09-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are impacted by a range of stressors arising from diverse human-caused land and water uses. Identifying the relative importance of single stressors and understanding how multiple stressors interact and jointly affect biology is crucial for River Basin Management. This study addressed multiple human-induced stressors and their effects on the aquatic flora and fauna based on data from standard WFD monitoring schemes. For altogether 1095 sites within a mountainous catchment, we used 12 stressor variables covering three different stressor groups: riparian land use, physical habitat quality and nutrient enrichment. Twenty-one biological metrics calculated from taxa lists of three organism groups (fish, benthic invertebrates and aquatic macrophytes) served as response variables. Stressor and response variables were subjected to Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) analysis to identify stressor hierarchy and stressor interactions and subsequently to Generalised Linear Regression Modelling (GLM) to quantify the stressors standardised effect size. Our results show that riverine habitat degradation was the dominant stressor group for the river fauna, notably the bed physical habitat structure. Overall, the explained variation in benthic invertebrate metrics was higher than it was in fish and macrophyte metrics. In particular, general integrative (aggregate) metrics such as % Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT) taxa performed better than ecological traits (e.g. % feeding types). Overall, additive stressor effects dominated, while significant and meaningful stressor interactions were generally rare and weak. We concluded that given the type of stressor and ecological response variables addressed in this study, river basin managers do not need to bother much about complex stressor interactions, but can focus on the prevailing stressors according to the hierarchy identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevailing theories of consciousness are challenged by novel cross-modal associations acquired between subliminal stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ryan B; Samaha, Jason; Chrisley, Ron; Dienes, Zoltan

    2018-06-01

    While theories of consciousness differ substantially, the 'conscious access hypothesis', which aligns consciousness with the global accessibility of information across cortical regions, is present in many of the prevailing frameworks. This account holds that consciousness is necessary to integrate information arising from independent functions such as the specialist processing required by different senses. We directly tested this account by evaluating the potential for associative learning between novel pairs of subliminal stimuli presented in different sensory modalities. First, pairs of subliminal stimuli were presented and then their association assessed by examining the ability of the first stimulus to prime classification of the second. In Experiments 1-4 the stimuli were word-pairs consisting of a male name preceding either a creative or uncreative profession. Participants were subliminally exposed to two name-profession pairs where one name was paired with a creative profession and the other an uncreative profession. A supraliminal task followed requiring the timed classification of one of those two professions. The target profession was preceded by either the name with which it had been subliminally paired (concordant) or the alternate name (discordant). Experiment 1 presented stimuli auditorily, Experiment 2 visually, and Experiment 3 presented names auditorily and professions visually. All three experiments revealed the same inverse priming effect with concordant test pairs associated with significantly slower classification judgements. Experiment 4 sought to establish if learning would be more efficient with supraliminal stimuli and found evidence that a different strategy is adopted when stimuli are consciously perceived. Finally, Experiment 5 replicated the unconscious cross-modal association achieved in Experiment 3 utilising non-linguistic stimuli. The results demonstrate the acquisition of novel cross-modal associations between stimuli which are not

  8. Projected changes in prevailing winds for transatlantic migratory birds under global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Sorte, Frank A; Fink, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    A number of terrestrial bird species that breed in North America cross the Atlantic Ocean during autumn migration when travelling to their non-breeding grounds in the Caribbean or South America. When conducting oceanic crossings, migratory birds tend to associate with mild or supportive winds, whose speed and direction may change under global warming. The implications of these changes for transoceanic migratory bird populations have not been addressed. We used occurrence information from eBird (1950-2015) to estimate the geographical location of population centres at a daily temporal resolution across the annual cycle for 10 transatlantic migratory bird species. We used this information to estimate the location and timing of autumn migration within the transatlantic flyway. We estimated how prevailing winds are projected to change within the transatlantic flyway during this time using daily wind speed anomalies (1996-2005 and 2091-2100) from 29 Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models implemented under CMIP5. Autumn transatlantic migrants have the potential to encounter strong westerly crosswinds early in their transatlantic journey at intermediate and especially high migration altitudes, strong headwinds at low and intermediate migration altitudes within the Caribbean that increase in strength as the season progresses, and weak tailwinds at intermediate and high migration altitudes east of the Caribbean. The CMIP5 simulations suggest that, during this century, the likelihood of autumn transatlantic migrants encountering strong westerly crosswinds will diminish. As global warming progresses, the need for species to compensate or drift under the influence of strong westerly crosswinds during the initial phase of their autumn transatlantic journey may be diminished. Existing strategies that promote headwind avoidance and tailwind assistance will likely remain valid. Thus, climate change may reduce time and energy requirements and the chance of mortality or

  9. Prevailing negative soil biota effect and no evidence for local adaptation in a widespread Eurasian grass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Wagner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil biota effects are increasingly accepted as an important driver of the abundance and distribution of plants. While biogeographical studies on alien invasive plant species have indicated coevolution with soil biota in their native distribution range, it is unknown whether adaptation to soil biota varies among populations within the native distribution range. The question of local adaptation between plants and their soil biota has important implications for conservation of biodiversity and may justify the use of seed material from local provenances in restoration campaigns.We studied soil biota effects in ten populations of the steppe grass Stipa capillata from two distinct regions, Europe and Asia. We tested for local adaptation at two different scales, both within (ca. 10-80 km and between (ca. 3300 km regions, using a reciprocal inoculation experiment in the greenhouse for nine months. Generally, negative soil biota effects were consistent. However, we did not find evidence for local adaptation: both within and between regions, growth of plants in their 'home soil' was not significantly larger relative to that in soil from other, more distant, populations.Our study suggests that negative soil biota effects can prevail in different parts of a plant species' range. Absence of local adaptation points to the possibility of similar rhizosphere biota composition across populations and regions, sufficient gene flow to prevent coevolution, selection in favor of plasticity, or functional redundancy among different soil biota. From the point of view of plant--soil biota interactions, our findings indicate that the current practice of using seeds exclusively from local provenances in ecosystem restoration campaigns may not be justified.

  10. Prevailing trends of climatic extremes across Indus-Delta of Sindh-Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Farhat; Rehman, Iqra; Adrees, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Saleem, Farhan; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Salik, Muhammad Raza

    2018-02-01

    This study examines the variability and change in the patterns of climatic extremes experienced in Indus-Delta of Sindh province of Pakistan, comprising regions of Karachi, Badin, Mohenjodaro, and Rohri. The homogenized daily minimum and maximum temperature and precipitation data for a 36-year period were used to calculate 13 and 11 indices of temperature and precipitation extremes with the help of RClimDex, a program written in the statistical software package R. A non-parametric Mann-Kendall test and Sen's slope estimates were used to determine the statistical significance and magnitude of the calculated trend. Temperatures of summer days and tropical nights increased in the region with overall significant warming trends for monthly maximum temperature as well as for warm days and nights reflecting dry conditions in the study area. The warm extremes and nighttime temperature indices showed greater trends than cold extremes and daytime indices depicting an overall warming trends in the Delta. Historic decrease in the acreage of major crops and over 33% decrease in agriculture credit for Sindh are the indicators of adverse impacts of warmer and drier weather on Sindh agriculture. Trends reported for Karachi and Badin are expected to decrease rice cultivation, hatching of fisheries, and mangroves forest surrounding these cities. Increase in the prevailing temperature trends will lead to increasingly hotter and drier summers resulting to constraints on cotton, wheat, and rice yield in Rohri and Mohenjodaro areas due to increased crop water requirements that may be met with additional groundwater pumping; nonetheless, the depleted groundwater resources would have a direct impact on the region's economy.

  11. Formation of double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.; Wong, A.Y.; Quon, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on both stationary and propagating double layers and a related analytical model are described. Stationary double layers were produced in a multiple plasma device, in which an electron drift current was present. An investigation of the plasma parameters for the stable double layer condition is described. The particle distribution in the stable double layer establishes a potential profile, which creates electron and ion beams that excite plasma instabilities. The measured characteristics of the instabilities are consistent with the existence of the double layer. Propagating double layers are formed when the initial electron drift current is large. Ths slopes of the transition region increase as they propagate. A physical model for the formation of a double layer in the experimental device is described. This model explains the formation of the low potential region on the basis of the space charge. This space charge is created by the electron drift current. The model also accounts for the role of ions in double layer formation and explains the formation of moving double layers. (Auth.)

  12. Numerical simulation of growth of flames formed in two-dimensional mixing layer. 2nd Report. Effect of dilution of fuel; Nijigen kongo sonai ni keiseisareta kaen no seicho ni kansuru suchi simulation. 2. Nenryo no kishaku ni yoru eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, S [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Hashimoto, K [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Nakajima, T [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-07-25

    The effect of fuel dilution on growth of flames formed in 2-D mixing layers was studied by numerical simulation. The methane mass fraction of fuel was adjusted to 1.0, 0.3 and 0.2 through dilution by nitrogen, while the oxygen mass fraction of an oxidizer was fixed at 0.27. Flame structure was complicated due to the flows separated by flame at the leading edge of flames, and three peaks of the second Damkohler number were observed. Fuel dilution by nitrogen caused blow-off of flames, and the mixing ratio of the fuel and oxidizer at the leading edge of flames was essential to blow-off of diffused flames. In the case where vortices were observed in a flow field, the first Damkohler number was important which was determined by the hydrodynamic characteristic time of coherent vortices and the chemical characteristic time of flame propagation based on the mixing ratio of the fuel and oxidizer at the leading edge of flames. The diffused flames were elongated by shearing force, and an exothermic reaction was suppressed and a flame stabilization decreased with a decrease in second Damkohler number. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Crystal orientation of monoclinic β-Ga2O3 thin films formed on cubic MgO substrates with a γ-Ga2O3 interfacial layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Shinji; Kokubun, Yoshihiro

    2017-12-01

    The crystal orientation relationship between β-Ga2O3 and MgO in β-Ga2O3 thin films prepared on (1 0 0), (1 1 1), and (1 1 0) MgO substrates was investigated by X-ray diffraction measurements and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images. The γ-Ga2O3 interfacial layer was present between β-Ga2O3 and MgO acted as a buffer to connect β-Ga2O3 on MgO. The following conditions were satisfied under each case: β-Ga2O3 (1 0 0)||MgO (1 0 0) and β-Ga2O3 [0 0 1]||MgO 〈0 1 1〉 for the formation of β-Ga2O3 on (1 0 0) MgO, and β-Ga2O3 (2 bar 0 1)||MgO (1 1 1) for the formation of β-Ga2O3 on (1 1 1) MgO, as well as each condition of β-Ga2O3 [0 1 0] (1 0 0)||MgO [ 1 bar 1 0 ] (0 0 1), β-Ga2O3 [0 1 0] (1 0 0)||MgO [ 0 1 bar 1 ] (1 0 0), and β-Ga2O3 [0 1 0] (1 0 0)||MgO [ 1 0 1 bar ] (0 1 0). β-Ga2O3 (1 bar 0 2)||MgO(1 1 0) and β-Ga2O3 [0 1 0] ⊥ MgO [0 0 1] for β-Ga2O3 formed on (1 1 0) MgO. The β-Ga2O3 formed on (1 1 1) MgO at 800 °C exhibited a threefold structure. The β-Ga2O3 formed on (1 1 0) MgO had a twofold structure but different by 90° from the result reported previously.

  14. Prevailing climatic trends and runoff response from Hindukush-Karakoram-Himalaya, upper Indus Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Shabeh ul; Böhner, Jürgen; Lucarini, Valerio

    2017-05-01

    Largely depending on the meltwater from the Hindukush-Karakoram-Himalaya, withdrawals from the upper Indus Basin (UIB) contribute half of the surface water availability in Pakistan, indispensable for agricultural production systems, industrial and domestic use, and hydropower generation. Despite such importance, a comprehensive assessment of prevailing state of relevant climatic variables determining the water availability is largely missing. Against this background, this study assesses the trends in maximum, minimum and mean temperatures, diurnal temperature range and precipitation from 18 stations (1250-4500 m a.s.l.) for their overlapping period of record (1995-2012) and, separately, from six stations of their long-term record (1961-2012). For this, a Mann-Kendall test on serially independent time series is applied to detect the existence of a trend, while its true slope is estimated using the Sen's slope method. Further, locally identified climatic trends are statistically assessed for their spatial-scale significance within 10 identified subregions of the UIB, and the spatially (field-) significant climatic trends are then qualitatively compared with the trends in discharge out of corresponding subregions. Over the recent period (1995-2012), we find warming and drying of spring (field-significant in March) and increasing early melt season discharge from most of the subregions, likely due to a rapid snowmelt. In stark contrast, most of the subregions feature a field-significant cooling within the monsoon period (particularly in July and September), which coincides well with the main glacier melt season. Hence, a decreasing or weakly increasing discharge is observed from the corresponding subregions during mid- to late melt season (particularly in July). Such tendencies, being largely consistent with the long-term trends (1961-2012), most likely indicate dominance of the nival but suppression of the glacial melt regime, altering overall hydrology of the UIB in

  15. Prevailing climatic trends and runoff response from Hindukush–Karakoram–Himalaya, upper Indus Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. U. Hasson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Largely depending on the meltwater from the Hindukush–Karakoram–Himalaya, withdrawals from the upper Indus Basin (UIB contribute half of the surface water availability in Pakistan, indispensable for agricultural production systems, industrial and domestic use, and hydropower generation. Despite such importance, a comprehensive assessment of prevailing state of relevant climatic variables determining the water availability is largely missing. Against this background, this study assesses the trends in maximum, minimum and mean temperatures, diurnal temperature range and precipitation from 18 stations (1250–4500 m a.s.l. for their overlapping period of record (1995–2012 and, separately, from six stations of their long-term record (1961–2012. For this, a Mann–Kendall test on serially independent time series is applied to detect the existence of a trend, while its true slope is estimated using the Sen's slope method. Further, locally identified climatic trends are statistically assessed for their spatial-scale significance within 10 identified subregions of the UIB, and the spatially (field- significant climatic trends are then qualitatively compared with the trends in discharge out of corresponding subregions. Over the recent period (1995–2012, we find warming and drying of spring (field-significant in March and increasing early melt season discharge from most of the subregions, likely due to a rapid snowmelt. In stark contrast, most of the subregions feature a field-significant cooling within the monsoon period (particularly in July and September, which coincides well with the main glacier melt season. Hence, a decreasing or weakly increasing discharge is observed from the corresponding subregions during mid- to late melt season (particularly in July. Such tendencies, being largely consistent with the long-term trends (1961–2012, most likely indicate dominance of the nival but suppression of the glacial melt regime

  16. Methods for forming particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert V.; Zhang, Fengyan; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin

    2016-06-21

    Single source precursors or pre-copolymers of single source precursors are subjected to microwave radiation to form particles of a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Such particles may be formed in a wurtzite phase and may be converted to a chalcopyrite phase by, for example, exposure to heat. The particles in the wurtzite phase may have a substantially hexagonal shape that enables stacking into ordered layers. The particles in the wurtzite phase may be mixed with particles in the chalcopyrite phase (i.e., chalcopyrite nanoparticles) that may fill voids within the ordered layers of the particles in the wurtzite phase thus produce films with good coverage. In some embodiments, the methods are used to form layers of semiconductor materials comprising a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Devices such as, for example, thin-film solar cells may be fabricated using such methods.

  17. Processes for multi-layer devices utilizing layer transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Kim, Bongsang; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2015-02-03

    A method includes forming a release layer over a donor substrate. A plurality of devices made of a first semiconductor material are formed over the release layer. A first dielectric layer is formed over the plurality of devices such that all exposed surfaces of the plurality of devices are covered by the first dielectric layer. The plurality of devices are chemically attached to a receiving device made of a second semiconductor material different than the first semiconductor material, the receiving device having a receiving substrate attached to a surface of the receiving device opposite the plurality of devices. The release layer is etched to release the donor substrate from the plurality of devices. A second dielectric layer is applied over the plurality of devices and the receiving device to mechanically attach the plurality of devices to the receiving device.

  18. Influence of different sulfur to selenium ratios on the structural and electronic properties of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin films and solar cells formed by the stacked elemental layer process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, B. J., E-mail: bjm.mueller@web.de [Robert Bosch GmbH, Corporate Research and Advance Engineering, Advanced Functional Materials and Microsystems, D-70839 Gerlingen (Germany); Institute of Micro- and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Zimmermann, C.; Haug, V., E-mail: veronika.haug@de.bosch.com; Koehler, T.; Zweigart, S. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Corporate Research and Advance Engineering, Advanced Functional Materials and Microsystems, D-70839 Gerlingen (Germany); Hergert, F. [Bosch Solar CISTech GmbH, D-14772 Brandenburg (Germany); Herr, U., E-mail: ulrich.herr@uni-ulm.de [Institute of Micro- and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-11-07

    In this study, we investigate the effect of different elemental selenium to elemental sulfur ratios on the chalcopyrite phase formation in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin films. The films are formed by the stacked elemental layer process. The structural and electronic properties of the thin films and solar cells are analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, spectral photoluminescence as well as current-voltage, and quantum efficiency measurements. The influence of different S/(S+Se) ratios on the anion incorporation and on the Ga/In distribution is investigated. We find a homogenous sulfur concentration profile inside the film from the top surface to the bottom. External quantum efficiency measurements show that the band edge of the solar cell device is shifted to shorter wavelength, which enhances the open-circuit voltages. The relative increase of the open-circuit voltage with S/(S+Se) ratio is lower than expected from the band gap energy trend, which is attributed to the presence of S-induced defects. We also observe a linear decrease of the short-circuit current density with increasing S/(S+Se) ratio which can be explained by a reduced absorption. Above a critical S/(S+Se) ratio of around 0.61, the fill factor drops drastically, which is accompanied by a strong series resistance increase which may be attributed to changes in the back contact or p-n junction properties.

  19. Characterization of rust layer formed on Fe, Fe-Ni and Fe-Cr alloys exposed to Cl-rich environment by Cl and Fe K-edge XANES measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Hiroyuki; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Yamashita, Masato; Uchida, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    Chloride in atmosphere considerably reduces the corrosion resistance of conventional weathering steel containing a small amount of Cr. Ni is an effective anticorrosive element for improving the corrosion resistance of steel in a Cl-rich environment. In order to clarify the structure of the protective rust layer of weathering steel, Cl and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of atmospheric corrosion products (rust) formed on Fe, Fe-Ni and Fe-Cr alloys exposed to Cl-rich atmosphere were measured. The Fe K-XANES measurements enable the characterization of mixture of iron oxides such as rust. The chemical composition of the rust was determined by performing pattern fitting of the measured spectra. All the rust is composed mainly of goethite, akaganeite, lepidocrocite and magnetite. Among these iron oxides, akaganeite in particular is the major component in the rust. Additionally, the amount of akaganeite in the rust of Fe-Ni alloy is much greater than that in rust of Fe-Cr alloy. Akaganeite is generally considered to facilitate the corrosion of steel, but our results indicate that akaganeite in the rust of Fe-Ni alloy is quantitatively different from that in rust of Fe-Cr alloy and does not facilitate the corrosion of steel. The shoulder peak observed in Cl K-XANES spectra reveals that the rust contains a chloride other than akaganeite. The energy of the shoulder peak does not correspond to that of any well-known chlorides. In the measured spectra, there is no proof that Cl, by combining with the alloying element, inhibits the alloying element from acting in corrosion resistance. The shoulder peak appears only when the content of the alloying element is lower than a certain value. This suggests that the generation of the unidentified chloride is related to the corrosion rate of steel. (author)

  20. Geostatistical analysis of prevailing groundwater conditions and potential solute migration at Elstow, Bedfordshire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKay, R.; Cooper, T.A.; Porter, J.D.; O'Connell, P.E.; Metcalfe, A.V.

    1988-06-01

    A geostatistical approach is applied in a study of the potential migration of contaminants from a hypothetical waste disposal facility near Elstow, Bedfordshire. A deterministic numerical model of groundwater flow in the Kellaways Sands formation and adjacent layers is coupled with geostatistical simulation of the heterogeneous transmissivity field of this principal formation. A particle tracking technique is used to predict the migration pathways for alternative realisations of flow. Alternative statistical descriptions of the spatial structure of the transmissivity field are implemented and the temporal and spatial distributions of escape of contaminants to the biosphere are investigated. (author)

  1. Further analysis of PREVAIL: enzalutamide use in chemotherapy-naïve men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2014-01-01

    PREVAIL was a phase III multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that enrolled chemotherapy-naïve men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), which showed remarkable improvement in co-primary endpoints with an overall 81% reduction in the risk of radiographic progression, as well as 29% reduction in the risk of death in favor of the enzalutamide arm over placebo. All secondary endpoints including time to subsequent chemotherapy initiation and prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression were in favor of the enzalutamide arm. The results of PREVAIL shows the utility of enzalutamide that would likely soon expand the indication to asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic men with mCRPC not previously treated with chemotherapy.

  2. False-positive findings in mammography screening induces short-term distress - breast cancer-specific concern prevails longer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Pilvikki Absetz, S; van Elderen, T M

    2000-01-01

    -ups at 2 and 12 months postscreening. At 2 months, there was a moderate multivariate effect of group on distress; and intrusive thinking and worry about breast cancer, in particular, were most frequent amongst the false positives. Intrusive thinking still prevailed at 12 months, in addition to a higher...... findings (n=1407), false-positive findings (n=492) and referents from outside the screening programme (n=1718, age 48-49 years). Distress was measured as illness worry, anxiety, depression, cancer beliefs and early detection behaviour. Measurements were one month before screening invitation with follow...... perceived breast cancer risk and susceptibility. Distress related to screening and false-positive findings seems to be moderate, but prevailing cancer-specific concerns call for improvements in screening programmes....

  3. False-positive findings in mammography screening induces short-term distress - breast cancer-specific concern prevails longer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Pilvikki Absetz, S; van Elderen, T M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine psychological distress in a mammography screening process as a consequence of screening after adjusting for background, personality and prescreening distress. Subjects, aged 50 years, were invitees at their first screening. There were three groups; normal find...... perceived breast cancer risk and susceptibility. Distress related to screening and false-positive findings seems to be moderate, but prevailing cancer-specific concerns call for improvements in screening programmes....

  4. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  5. Article and method of forming an article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Kottilingam, Srikanth Chandrudu; Dutta, Sandip; Schick, David Edward

    2017-12-26

    Provided are an article and a method of forming an article. The method includes providing a metallic powder, heating the metallic powder to a temperature sufficient to joint at least a portion of the metallic powder to form an initial layer, sequentially forming additional layers in a build direction by providing a distributed layer of the metallic powder over the initial layer and heating the distributed layer of the metallic powder, repeating the steps of sequentially forming the additional layers in the build direction to form a portion of the article having a hollow space formed in the build direction, and forming an overhang feature extending into the hollow space. The article includes an article formed by the method described herein.

  6. Radiolysis of cesium iodide solutions in conditions prevailing in a pressurized water reactor severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements were made of I/sub 2/ formed when aqueous cesium iodide (CsI) solutions were exposed to two temperatures, 43 and 95 0 C, with irradiation. Iodine partition coefficients were obtained from the experiments. The parameters varied were dose, CsI concentration, and Cs/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ concentration, in the presence of air-carbon dioxide and air-carbon dioxide-hydrogen mixtures, to provide information to calculate the form in which iodine released from fuel as CsI in a reactor accident might reach the environment. In a series of experiments, a two-compartment cell was used to trap the gaseous iodine produced. In this case, it was found that the quantity of gaseous iodine produced increased approximately linearly with the dose (at the dose rate used)

  7. Prevailing ship financing methods applied to major dry-bulk companies

    OpenAIRE

    Χριστοδούλου, Αγγελική

    2015-01-01

    Shipping finance of 2014 has altered substantially regarding that of last decades and the shipping companies’ traditional capital structure of bank lending along with shareholders equity gives way to sophisticated and innovative financing methods forming a new capital structure which is more complicated but serves better the present-day financial needs. Not only constitutes the scope of this dissertation to exhibit the current ship-financing instruments but also to seek the optimal capital st...

  8. The Questionable Prevailing Meat Inspection Regulations for Prevention of Tuberculosis and Brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-03-16

    results of bacteriological research carried out by Kieberle and various other authors, The folloxd.ng forms of bovine tuberculosis are considered to be...January 195/V» xre have as early as 195? proposed a sliding scale for meat inspection with regard to bovine tuberculosis which takes into consideration...of other clinical symptoms, such as metritides, orchitis, arthritis, inflammation of .JW»^ mastitis , paralysis of hind feet, abscesses in muscles

  9. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  10. Desulfofrigus sp. prevails in sulfate-reducing dilution cultures from sediments of the Benguela upwelling area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Beate; Engelen, Bert; Goldhammer, Tobias; Lin, Yu-Shih; Cypionka, Heribert; Könneke, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Sediments of coastal upwelling areas are generally characterized by a high content of organic carbon that is mainly degraded via anaerobic microbial processes including sulfate reduction as a major terminal oxidation step. Despite the high importance of sulfate reduction in these sediments, the identity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has remained almost unknown. Here, we applied a cultivation-based approach using selective enrichment conditions to study the diversity and distribution of active SRB in sediments along a transect perpendicular to the continental slope off the coast of Namibia (Meteor-cruise M76/1). To promote growth of the most abundant SRB, dilution series were prepared and amended with hydrogen, acetate, or a mixture of monomers representing typical substrates for SRB. Growth of SRB could be detected in the presence of all electron donors and from sediment down to 4 m depth. 16S rRNA gene-based DGGE analysis and sequencing revealed the predominance of SRB related to psychrophiles in particular to the genus Desulfofrigus, which made up 1 % of the total microbial community, accounting for an absolute abundance of up to 4.8 × 10(7)  cells mL(-1) . In general, the abundance of cultured SRB changed with depth and between the different sampling sites and correlated with the content of organic carbon as previously reported. Growth of chemolithotrophic SRB in relatively high dilution steps and the enrichment of methanogens as well as acetogens from deeper sediment point to a competition between hydrogen-utilizing microbial processes and their biogeochemical significance in deep sediment layers of the Benguela upwelling area. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  12. (EOI) Form

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Dorine Odongo

    COLLABORATING TECHNICAL AGENCIES: EXPRESSION OF INTEREST FORM. • Please read the information provided about the initiative and the eligibility requirements in the Prospectus before completing this application form. • Ensure all the sections of the form are accurately completed and saved in PDF format.

  13. Modular forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edixhoven, B.; van der Geer, G.; Moonen, B.; Edixhoven, B.; van der Geer, G.; Moonen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Modular forms are functions with an enormous amount of symmetry that play a central role in number theory, connecting it with analysis and geometry. They have played a prominent role in mathematics since the 19th century and their study continues to flourish today. Modular forms formed the

  14. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  15. Assorted interactions of amino acids prevailing in aqueous vitamin C solutions probed by physicochemical and ab-initio contrivances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koyeli; Roy, Milan Chandra; Rajbanshi, Biplab; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2017-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular interaction prevailing in tyrosine and tryptophan in aqueous solution of vitamin C have been probed by thermophysical properties. The apparent molar volume (ϕV), viscosity B-coefficient, molal refraction (RM) of tyrosine and tryptophan have been studied in aqueous vitamin C solutions at diverse temperatures via Masson equation which deduced solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions, respectively. Spectroscopic study along with physicochemical and computational techniques provides lots of interesting and highly significant insights of the model biological systems. The overall results established strong solute-solvent interactions between studied amino acids and vitamin C mixture in the ternary solutions.

  16. Forming lead-based anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnichuk, V I; Voitsekhovich, R I

    1972-01-01

    Lead-based anodes can be produced by forming a layer of lead dioxide by chemical treatment in a solution of sulfuric acid in potassium permanganate at 80 to 100/sup 0/. The solution is mixed by compressed air. (RWR)

  17. Vocational training in pre-university education: trends that have prevailed in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Dueñas Bravo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the new generations to respond to the needs of the labor force that society requires is a responsibility of all and vocational training plays an important role in this endeavor. The present article aims to present a theoretical review about the positions that have been assumed on this subject. The documentary review of articles, books and other information supports were used as a fundamental method to obtain as an essential result an overview of the antecedents and trends in the formation of this concept, as well as of its relations with education. It was possible to conclude that until now there are ambiguities in the national scientific community about the process to form vocations and the ages in which it must occur.

  18. Atmospheric aerosol layers over Bangkok Metropolitan Region from CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridhikitti, Arika

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Earth Observing System satellite retrievals could be used for inference of ground-level air quality in various locations. This application may be appropriate if pollution in elevated atmospheric layers is insignificant. This study investigated the significance of elevated air pollution layers over the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) from all available aerosol layer scenes taken from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) for years 2007 to 2011. The results show that biomass burning smoke layers alone were the most frequently observed. The smoke layers accounted for high AOD variations and increased AOD levels. In the dry seasons, the smoke layers alone with high AOD levels were likely brought to the BMR via northeasterly to easterly prevailing winds and found at altitudes above the typical BMR mixing heights of approximately 0.7 to 1.5 km. The smoke should be attributed to biomass burning emissions outside the BMR.

  19. Where "Old Heads" Prevail: Inmate Hierarchy in a Men's Prison Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreager, Derek A; Young, Jacob T N; Haynie, Dana L; Bouchard, Martin; Schaefer, David R; Zajac, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Research of inmate social order is a once-vibrant area that receded just as American incarceration rates climbed and the country's carceral contexts dramatically changed. This study reengages inmate society with an abductive mixed methods investigation of informal status within a contemporary men's prison unit. The authors collect narrative and social network data from 133 male inmates housed in a unit of a Pennsylvania medium-security prison. Analyses of inmate narratives suggest that unit "old heads" provide collective goods in the form of mentoring and role modeling that foster a positive and stable peer environment. This hypothesis is then tested with Exponential Random Graph Models (ERGMs) of peer nomination data. The ERGM results complement the qualitative analysis and suggest that older inmates and those who have been on the unit longer are perceived by their peers as powerful and influential. Both analytical strategies point to the maturity of aging and the acquisition of local knowledge as important for attaining informal status in the unit. In sum, this mixed methods case study extends theoretical insights of classic prison ethnographies, adds quantifiable results capable of future replication, and points to a growing population of older inmates as important for contemporary prison social organization.

  20. Management of acute basilar artery occlusion: should any treatment strategy prevail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornak, Tomas; Herzig, Roman; Sanak, Daniel; Skoloudik, David

    2014-12-01

    Acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO) is relatively infrequent form of acute ischemic stroke associated with severe and persisting neurological deficit and high mortality rate (to 86%). Early recanalization is essential for good clinical outcome but the most effective treatment approach remains unestablished. Several treatment strategies are currently available but their safety and efficacy have only been tested in retrospective/prospective case series. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are lacking. We searched the PubMed database for assessments of recanalization rate and clinical outcome in BAO patients treated with various treatment methods. The results show that antithrombotics are least effective while specific reperfusion therapies including intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) and various types of intra-arterial therapy (IAT) are more so. Less than half of BAO patients reach independent outcome following IVT with a recanalization rate 52-78%. Even though IAT recanalizes BAO more frequently (in up to 100%), the higher recanalization rate is not necessarily associated with better outcome. Good clinical outcome is strongly dependent on recanalization time. Thus, the concept of bridging therapy, combining widely available IVT with IAT, was introduced and is usually considered a rescue strategy in non-responders to IV alteplase. A trend to better outcome in patients treated with bridging therapy in some studies, has to be confirmed by large RCTs.

  1. The contributions of the cerebellum in sensorimotor control: what are the prevailing opinions which will guide forthcoming studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Oulad Ben Taib, Nordeyn

    2013-06-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in developing models of cerebellar function in sensorimotor control, the exact nature of the basic operations performed by the cerebellum remain elusive. Several major theories have emerged these last decades. According to the hypothesis of Marr and Albus, the climbing fiber input carries an error signal weakening the strength of a subset of parallel fibers/Purkinje neurons synapses in the cerebellar cortex. Cerebellar circuits would gain the control of movement through trial and error. The hypothesis of internal models emulating movements is currently highly cited. There is a general agreement that (1) the central nervous system has to cope with an intrinsic time delay of sensory feedback related to motor activities and (2) estimations of future motor states are essential to perform fast and accurate movements. According to this second theory, cerebellar dysmetria, one of the cardinal cerebellar deficits, would result from a distorted predictive control. A third popular theory relates to the inverse models that would be stored in the cerebellum. Acquisition of a motor act would require forward models, and the acquisition process itself would generate an inverse model to allow an unconscious coordinated movement. Recently, an international panel of experts from various disciplines discussed the prevailing opinions in a consensus statement and tried to extract their clinical relevance in terms of pathogenesis of the clinical symptoms. Although a consensus is still not reached, the prevailing opinions provide a sound framework to conduct novel studies and try to discover the secrets of cerebellar circuits.

  2. Superfluid Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, G W; Parker, N G; Barenghi, C F

    2017-03-31

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  3. Some theoretical aspects of electrostatic double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1978-11-01

    A review is presented of the main results of the theoretical work on electrostatic double layers. The general properties of double layers are first considered. Then the time-independent double layer is discussed. The discussion deals with the potential drop, the thickness, and some necessary criteria for the existence and stability of the layer. As a complement to the study of the timeindependent double layer a few remarks are also made upon the timedependent double layer. Finally the question of how double layers are formed and maintained is treated. Several possible formation mechanisms are considered. (author)

  4. Method of forming an HTS article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Zhang, Xun; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2014-08-19

    A method of forming a superconducting article includes providing a substrate tape, forming a superconducting layer overlying the substrate tape, and depositing a capping layer overlying the superconducting layer. The capping layer includes a noble metal and has a thickness not greater than about 1.0 micron. The method further includes electrodepositing a stabilizer layer overlying the capping layer using a solution that is non-reactive to the superconducting layer. The superconducting layer has an as-formed critical current I.sub.C(AF) and a post-stabilized critical current I.sub.C(PS). The I.sub.C(PS) is at least about 95% of the I.sub.C(AF).

  5. Die singulation method and package formed thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert C [Tucson, AZ; Shul, Randy J [Albuquerque, NM; Clews, Peggy J [Tijeras, NM; Baker, Michael S [Albuquerque, NM; De Boer, Maarten P [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-08-07

    A method is disclosed for singulating die from a substrate having a sacrificial layer and one or more device layers, with a retainer being formed in the device layer(s) and anchored to the substrate. Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) etching of a trench through the substrate from the bottom side defines a shape for each die. A handle wafer is then attached to the bottom side of the substrate, and the sacrificial layer is etched to singulate the die and to form a frame from the retainer and the substrate. The frame and handle wafer, which retain the singulated die in place, can be attached together with a clamp or a clip and to form a package for the singulated die. One or more stops can be formed from the device layer(s) to limit a sliding motion of the singulated die.

  6. Hollow fiber membranes and methods for forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Dhaval Ajit; McCloskey, Patrick Joseph; Howson, Paul Edward; Narang, Kristi Jean; Koros, William

    2016-03-22

    The invention provides improved hollow fiber membranes having at least two layers, and methods for forming the same. The methods include co-extruding a first composition, a second composition, and a third composition to form a dual layer hollow fiber membrane. The first composition includes a glassy polymer; the second composition includes a polysiloxane; and the third composition includes a bore fluid. The dual layer hollow fiber membranes include a first layer and a second layer, the first layer being a porous layer which includes the glassy polymer of the first composition, and the second layer being a polysiloxane layer which includes the polysiloxane of the second composition.

  7. Boosting water oxidation layer-by-layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Acosta, Jonnathan C; Scanlon, Micheál D; Méndez, Manuel A; Amstutz, Véronique; Vrubel, Heron; Opallo, Marcin; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-04-07

    Electrocatalysis of water oxidation was achieved using fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes modified with layer-by-layer deposited films consisting of bilayers of negatively charged citrate-stabilized IrO2 NPs and positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) polymer. The IrO2 NP surface coverage can be fine-tuned by controlling the number of bilayers. The IrO2 NP films were amorphous, with the NPs therein being well-dispersed and retaining their as-synthesized shape and sizes. UV/vis spectroscopic and spectro-electrochemical studies confirmed that the total surface coverage and electrochemically addressable surface coverage of IrO2 NPs increased linearly with the number of bilayers up to 10 bilayers. The voltammetry of the modified electrode was that of hydrous iridium oxide films (HIROFs) with an observed super-Nernstian pH response of the Ir(III)/Ir(IV) and Ir(IV)-Ir(IV)/Ir(IV)-Ir(V) redox transitions and Nernstian shift of the oxygen evolution onset potential. The overpotential of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was essentially pH independent, varying only from 0.22 V to 0.28 V (at a current density of 0.1 mA cm(-2)), moving from acidic to alkaline conditions. Bulk electrolysis experiments revealed that the IrO2/PDDA films were stable and adherent under acidic and neutral conditions but degraded in alkaline solutions. Oxygen was evolved with Faradaic efficiencies approaching 100% under acidic (pH 1) and neutral (pH 7) conditions, and 88% in alkaline solutions (pH 13). This layer-by-layer approach forms the basis of future large-scale OER electrode development using ink-jet printing technology.

  8. Prospective randomized evaluation of the watchman left atrial appendage closure device in patients with atrial fibrillation versus long-term warfarin therapy: The PREVAIL trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgaid, Djouhar Roufeida; Khan, Zara; Zaidi, Mariam; Hobbs, Adrian

    2016-09-15

    Assessing the safety and effectiveness of left atrial appendage (LAA) (pouch found in the upper chambers of the heart) occlusion, using the Watchman device compared to long term warfarin therapy (drug that reduces clot formation), in preventing the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (most common type of irregular heart beat). 90% of strokes in atrial fibrillation arise from clots forming in this pouch. By mechanically blocking it using the device less clots are suggested to be formed. This is an alternative to taking warfarin especially in patients who cannot take it. 50 sites in the United States enrolled 407 participants. After being randomly allocated, the device group had 269 participants and warfarin group (comparator)had 138 participants. Patients with atrial fibrillation and at high risk of stroke were randomly allocated a group after they were deemed eligible. Patients in the device group had to take warfarin and aspirin for 45days till the complete closure of the LAA. The oral anticoagulant was followed by dual antiplatelet therapy until 6months and then ASA. Patients in the warfarin group have to take it for life and were continually monitored. The study ran for 26months. The trial assessed the rate of adverse events using three endpoints: The PREVAIL trial was not designed to show superiority, but non-inferiority. It met the safety endpoint and one efficacy endpoint for the watchman device compared to long term warfarin for overall efficacy of the device. The results established that LAA occlusion is not worse than warfarin intake for the prevention of stroke more than 1week after randomization. Compared to previous trials, the safety of the device has also improved. LAA occlusion is a reasonable alternative to chronic warfarin therapy in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiographic progression with nonrising PSA in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: post hoc analysis of PREVAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, A H; Alumkal, J J; Armstrong, A; Higano, C S; Iversen, P; Sternberg, C N; Rathkopf, D; Loriot, Y; de Bono, J; Tombal, B; Abhyankar, S; Lin, P; Krivoshik, A; Phung, D; Beer, T M

    2017-06-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is a phenotypically diverse disease that evolves through multiple clinical courses. PSA level is the most widely used parameter for disease monitoring, but it has well-recognized limitations. Unlike in clinical trials, in practice, clinicians may rely on PSA monitoring alone to determine disease status on therapy. This approach has not been adequately tested. Chemotherapy-naive asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic men (n=872) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who were treated with the androgen receptor inhibitor enzalutamide in the PREVAIL study were analyzed post hoc for rising versus nonrising PSA (empirically defined as >1.05 vs ⩽1.05 times the PSA level from 3 months earlier) at the time of radiographic progression. Clinical characteristics and disease outcomes were compared between the rising and nonrising PSA groups. Of 265 PREVAIL patients with radiographic progression and evaluable PSA levels on the enzalutamide arm, nearly one-quarter had a nonrising PSA. Median progression-free survival in this cohort was 8.3 months versus 11.1 months in the rising PSA cohort (hazard ratio 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.26-2.23); overall survival was similar between the two groups, although less than half of patients in either group were still at risk at 24 months. Baseline clinical characteristics of the two groups were similar. Non-rising PSA at radiographic progression is a common phenomenon in mCRPC patients treated with enzalutamide. As restaging in advanced prostate cancer patients is often guided by increases in PSA levels, our results demonstrate that disease progression on enzalutamide can occur without rising PSA levels. Therefore, a disease monitoring strategy that includes imaging not entirely reliant on serial serum PSA measurement may more accurately identify disease progression.

  10. Immediate occlusal loading of NanoTite PREVAIL implants: a prospective 1-year clinical and radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pär-Olov; Wennerberg, Ann; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2010-03-01

    Recently, a new implant surface texture, featuring application of nanometer-scale calcium phosphate has been shown to enhance early bone fixation and formation in preclinical studies and in human histomorphometric studies, which may be beneficial in immediate loading situations. The purpose of the present prospective clinical study was to, during 1 year, clinically and radiographically evaluate a nanometer scale surface modified implant placed for immediate loading of fixed prostheses in both maxillary and mandibular regions. Thirty-five out of 38 patients who needed implant treatment and met inclusion criteria agreed to participate in the study and were consecutively enrolled. Surgical implant placement requirements consisted of a final torque of a least 25 Ncm prior to final seating and an implant stability quotient above 55. A total of 102 NanoTite PREVAIL (NTP) implants (BIOMET 3i, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, USA) (66 maxillary and 36 mandibular) were placed by one investigator, and the majority of these were placed in posterior regions (65%) and in soft bone (69%). A total of 44 prosthetic constructions were evaluated consisting of 14 single-tooth restorations, 26 fixed partial dentures, and four complete fixed restorations. All provisional constructions were delivered within 1 hour, and the final constructions placed after 4 months. Implants were monitored for clinical and radiographic outcomes at follow-up examinations scheduled for 3, 6, and 12 months. Of the 102 study implants, one implant failed. The simple cumulative survival rate value at 1 year was 99.2%. The average marginal bone resorption was 0.37 mm (SD 0.39) during the first year in function. According to the success criteria of Albrektsson and Zarb, success grade 1 was found with 93% of the implants. Although limited to the short follow-up, immediate loading of NanoTite Prevail implants seems to be a viable option in implant rehabilitation, at least when a good initial fixation is achieved.

  11. One-year multicentre outcomes of transapical aortic valve implantation using the SAPIEN XT™ valve: the PREVAIL transapical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Thomas; Thielmann, Matthias; Kempfert, Joerg; Schroefel, Holger; Wimmer-Greinecker, Gerhard; Treede, Hendrik; Wahlers, Thorsten; Wendler, Olaf

    2013-05-01

    The study aimed to evaluate 1-year outcomes of the multicentre PREVAIL transapical (TA) study of TA-aortic valve implantation (AVI) in high-risk patients. From September 2009 to August 2010, a total of 150 patients, aged 81.6 ± 5.8 years, 40.7% female, were included at 12 European TA-AVI experienced sites. Patients received 23 (n = 36), 26 (n = 57) and 29 mm (n = 57) second-generation SAPIEN XT™ (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) valves. The mean logistic EuroSCORE was 24.3 ± 7.0, and mean Society Thoracic Surgeons score was 7.5 ± 4.4%. Survival was 91.3% at 30 days and 77.9% at 1 year. Subgroup analysis revealed survivals of 91.7/88.9, 86.0/70.2, 96.55/91.2% for patients receiving 23-, 26- and 29-mm valves at 30 days and at 1 year, respectively. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed preserved left ventricular ejection fraction and low gradients. Aortic incompetence was none in 41/48, trace 30/36, mild 22/12 and moderate in 7/4% at discharge and 1 year. Walking distance increased from 221 (postimplant) to 284 m (at 1 year, P = 0.0004). Three patients required reoperation due to increasing aortic incompetence during follow-up. Causes of mortality at 1 year were cardiac (n = 7), stroke (n = 1) and others (n = 5). The European PREVAIL multicentre trial demonstrates good functionality and good outcomes for TA-AVI using the second-generation SAPIEN XT prosthesis and the ASCENDRA-II delivery system. The 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve was successfully introduced and showed excellent results.

  12. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Barry P [Princeton, NJ; Forrest, Stephen R [Princeton, NJ

    2011-05-24

    A photosensitive device includes a series of organic photoactive layers disposed between two electrodes. Each layer in the series is in direct contact with a next layer in the series. The series is arranged to form at least one donor-acceptor heterojunction, and includes a first organic photoactive layer comprising a first host material serving as a donor, a thin second organic photoactive layer comprising a second host material disposed between the first and a third organic photoactive layer, and the third organic photoactive layer comprising a third host material serving as an acceptor. The first, second, and third host materials are different. The thin second layer serves as an acceptor relative to the first layer or as a donor relative to the third layer.

  13. Single-crystal micromachining using multiple fusion-bonded layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alan; O'Neill, Garry; Blackstone, Scott C.

    2000-08-01

    Multi-layer structures have been fabricated using Fusion bonding. The paper shows void free layers of between 2 and 100 microns that have been bonded to form multi-layer structures. Silicon layers have been bonded both with and without interfacial oxide layers.

  14. Stability of diffusion flame formed in a laminar flat plate boundary layer. Effect of fuel dilution; Soryu heiban kyokai sonai ni keiseisareru kakusan kaen no anteisei. Nenryo kishaku no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, M [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Ueda, T; Mizumoto, M [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology; Amari, T [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-25

    A stability limit of the diffusion flame with fuel injection from a porous wall in a laminar flat plate boundary layer is measured as functions of fuel (CH4) concentration of CH4/N2 injectant mixture ({chi}) and its injection velocity (v). The free stream velocity (U{infinity}) is set as 0.6 m/s. The thermal condition at the wall is controlled by setting temperature at the upstream end of the porous wall as a reference temperature. When v >20 mm/s, the flame becomes unstable with the separation of leading flame edge with decreasing {chi}. The value of {chi} at the stability limit is constant without regard to v as long as the wall temperature is kept constant. As the wall temperature is decreased the value of {chi} increases. The separation is supposed to take place as a result of the limit of the reaction rate. When v <20 mm/s, the flame becomes unstable with the oscillation. The value of {chi} at the stability limit increases drastically with decreasing v. The oscillation takes place mainly due to the repeat of the extinction due to heat loss to the wall and the flame propagation in the combustible layer. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Reflective article having a sacrificial cathodic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Buchanan, Michael J.; Scott, Matthew S.; Rearick, Brian K.; Medwick, Paul A.; McCamy, James W.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention relates to reflective articles, such as solar mirrors, that include a sacrificial cathodic layer. The reflective article, more particularly includes a substrate, such as glass, having a multi-layered coating thereon that includes a lead-free sacrificial cathodic layer. The sacrificial cathodic layer includes at least one transition metal, such as a particulate transition metal, which can be in the form of flakes (e.g., zinc flakes). The sacrificial cathodic layer can include an inorganic matrix formed from one or more organo-titanates. Alternatively, the sacrificial cathodic layer can include an organic polymer matrix (e.g., a crosslinked organic polymer matrix formed from an organic polymer and an aminoplast crosslinking agent). The reflective article also includes an outer organic polymer coating, that can be electrodeposited over the sacrificial cathodic layer.

  16. Modification of porosity in the catalyst layer of membrane electrode assemblies using pore-forming agents; Modificacion de la porosidad en la capa catalitica de ensambles membrana-electrodo empleando agentes formadores de poros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Hernandez, J. Roberto [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)] e-mail: jrflores@iie.org.mx; Reyes, Brenda [UNAM. Facultad de Quimica, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Barbosa P., Romeli [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Cano Castillo, Ulises; Albarran, Lorena [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    Membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) are the most important part of PEM fuel cells since their interface results in the electrochemical reactions that make the generation of electricity possible. The MEA is composed of a proton exchange membrane, both sides of which are impregnated with a catalyst layer, normally of carbon-supported platinum. Depending on the technique used for its fabrication (atomization, serigraphy, brush methods, chemical reduction, etc.), the properties of the MEA can be different in terms of porosity, distribution of the catalyst, thickness and structure of the catalyst layer, and the quality of the union between the catalyst layer and the membrane, etc. Currently, the porosity of the electrodes is generated by isopropanol evaporation (solvent used in the dye) during the fabrication process conducted in the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE). This document presents the results obtained from adding a porous agent to the catalytic dye base composition used in the fabrication of MEA at the IIE. [Spanish] Los Ensambles Membrana-Electrodo (MEA's) son la parte mas importante en las celdas de combustibles tipo PEM, ya que en su interfaz se llevan a cabo las reacciones electroquimicas que hacen posible la generacion de electricidad. El MEA esta compuesto de una membrana de intercambio protonico a la cual se le impregna en ambos lados una capa catalitica normalmente de platino soportado en carbon. Dependiendo de la tecnica empleada en su fabricacion (atomizado, serigrafia, brocha, reduccion quimica, etc.), las propiedades del MEA pueden ser diferentes en cuanto a porosidad, distribucion del catalizador, grosor y estructura de la capa catalitica, asi como la calidad de la union entre la capa catalizadora y la membrana, etc. Actualmente, la porosidad de los electrodos es generada por la evaporacion del isopropanol (solvente utilizado en la tinta) durante el proceso de fabricacion que se realiza en el Instituto de Investigaciones

  17. When politics prevails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Dagnis; Snaith, Holly

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses Britain’s quest to negotiate its future membership of the European Union (EU) through the lens of Liberal intergovernmentalism. The article demonstrates that despite the significant economic consequences of a potential Brexit, party political factors have hitherto proven more...

  18. OECOSYS prevailing exercise applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueck, K.; Suda, M.

    1999-10-01

    In the Research Center Seibersdorf the computer simulation code OECOSYS was installed in 1989 which represents a version of the model ECOSYS-87 developed by GSF in Neuherberg, and adapted to the Austrian situation. The model available since then simulates from input parameters such as the integral of the activity concentration in air and the ground deposition of each radionuclide as well as the precipitation values via the interception on plants and deposition on soil and the transfer of radionuclides into the various ecosystems and fodder-food chains into the various foodstuffs and calculates in this way the course of the activity concentration in these foodstuffs. Via the consumption rates of each foodstuff the contribution of the ingestion of each foodstuff and by that the total ingestion dose may be evaluated. Further, the simulation model permits the calculation of the various exposure pathways as inhalation and external irradiation from the plume and ground and enable the user to obtain a fast comparison of the various exposure pathways. In order to ensure the availability of the code and the accompanying infrastructure, by order of the federal chancellery sect. VI the computer code is run in certain intervals and test calculations are performed with it. Each exercise run was based on scenarios which could result in case of severe accidents in neighboring nuclear power plants. Generally, extremely unrealistic scenarios were assumed which do not correspond to the safety standard of the respective nuclear power plant in order to obtain calculation examples which may serve the emergency units in their planning for emergency situations. Furthermore, by these exercise runs a demonstration of the contribution of the various exposure pathways for the persons responsible for emergency management in case of a crisis shall be given to enable them to appropriately design the respective planning features. In the present report the calculations performed up to now are compiled and comparatively displayed. (author)

  19. Where the signs prevail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dardo Scavino

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose to show in our paper that through his semiotic theory, Barthes developed a theory of subjectivity and society continued with the anti-utilitarian tradition of the Collège de Sociologie where George Bataille, Carl Einstein or Michel Leiris had favored the mythical and ritual dimension of collective life.

  20. Virtual-bound, filamentary and layered states in a box-shaped quantum dot of square potential form the exact numerical solution of the effective mass Schrödinger equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luque, A., E-mail: a.luque@upm.es [Instituto de Energía Solar, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain); Mellor, A.; Tobías, I.; Antolín, E.; Linares, P.G.; Ramiro, I.; Martí, A. [Instituto de Energía Solar, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    The effective mass Schrödinger equation of a QD of parallelepipedic shape with a square potential well is solved by diagonalizing the exact Hamiltonian matrix developed in a basis of separation-of-variables wavefunctions. The expected below bandgap bound states are found not to differ very much from the former approximate calculations. In addition, the presence of bound states within the conduction band is confirmed. Furthermore, filamentary states bounded in two dimensions and extended in one dimension and layered states with only one dimension bounded, all within the conduction band—which are similar to those originated in quantum wires and quantum wells—coexist with the ordinary continuum spectrum of plane waves. All these subtleties are absent in spherically shaped quantum dots, often used for modeling.

  1. Skeletal-related events significantly impact health-related quality of life in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: data from PREVAIL and AFFIRM trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, F; Ivanescu, C; Phung, D; Loriot, Y; Abhyankar, S; Beer, T M; Tombal, B; Holmstrom, S

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the impact of skeletal-related events (SREs) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in phase III trials of enzalutamide versus placebo. Patients with mCRPC experiencing at least one SRE during AFFIRM and PREVAIL were assessed for trajectory-adjusted mean change in HRQoL by first SRE using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P; AFFIRM, three domains, and PREVAIL, nine domains) and EQ-5D (PREVAIL) instruments. First SREs caused HRQoL deterioration in both trials. Spinal cord compression had the largest impact, with clinically meaningful reductions in seven of nine FACT-P domains in PREVAIL and all three in AFFIRM (mean (95% confidence interval (CI)) change in FACT-P total score -16.95 (-26.47, -7.44) and -9.69 (-16.10, -3.27), respectively). In PREVAIL, first SREs caused clinically meaningful declines in EQ-5D utility index, irrespective of category; spinal cord compression had the largest impact (mean (95% CI) change -0.24 (-0.39, -0.08)). In AFFIRM, FACT-P and FACT-General total scores showed clinically meaningful declines after radiation/surgery to bone. SREs were associated with clinically meaningful functional declines in the daily lives of patients with mCRPC. Spinal cord compression had the largest impact on HRQoL.

  2. Numerical modelling evaluation for the microclimate of an outdoor urban form in Cairo, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. Elnabawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve outdoor thermal comfort it is necessary to understand the interactions between the prevailing climate, the urban form and roughness. The near surface boundary layer is directly influenced by local irradiative and convective exchange processes due to the presence of a variety of different surfaces, sheltering elements and obstacles to air flow leading to distinctive micro-scale climates. The paper presents a micro-scale numerical model for an outdoor urban form for a hot summer’s day in Al-Muizz street located at the Islamic quarter of Cairo, where a few studies have attempted to study these conditions in vernacular settings in hot arid areas where the continuously evolving urban patterns and shaded environments were perceived to produce more pedestrian friendly outdoor environments. In situ measurements are used to validate the ENVI-met results which showed an overall agreement with the observed ones, representing adequate mean radiant temperature (Tmrt which is one of the most important meteorological parameters governing human energy balance and has therefore a strong influence on thermal sensation of the pedestrians using the open public spaces and generating a micro-climatic map as an initial step in addressing the urgent need for a modelling platform accessible to urban designers, architects, and decision makers towards sustainable urban forms.

  3. The double layers in the plasma sheet boundary layer during magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Yu, B.

    2014-11-01

    We studied the evolutions of double layers which appear after the magnetic reconnection through two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation. The simulation results show that the double layers are formed in the plasma sheet boundary layer after magnetic reconnection. At first, the double layers which have unipolar structures are formed. And then the double layers turn into bipolar structures, which will couple with another new weak bipolar structure. Thus a new double layer or tripolar structure comes into being. The double layers found in our work are about several ten Debye lengths, which accords with the observation results. It is suggested that the electron beam formed during the magnetic reconnection is responsible for the production of the double layers.

  4. Clinical efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis in high-risk patients: the PREVAIL JAPAN trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Yoshiki; Takayama, Morimasa; Mitsudo, Kazuaki; Nanto, Shinsuke; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Kuratani, Toru; Tobaru, Tetsuya; Goto, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is suggested to be less invasive and/or equally effective in comparison to conventional aortic valve replacement for high-risk symptomatic aortic stenosis patients. We herein report the initial results of a pivotal clinical trial of TAVR in Japan (the PREVAIL JAPAN). Sixty-four aortic stenosis patients (mean age 84.3 ± 6.1 years) not suitable for surgery were enrolled at three centers in Japan, with a primary composite endpoint of the 6-month post-procedure improvements in the aortic valve area and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification. A transfemoral approach was used in 37 patients and a transapical approach was used in 27. The device success rate was 91.9 %. After 30 days and 6 months, the rates of mortality from any cause were 8.1 and 11.3 %, respectively. At 6 months, symptomatic stroke was found in 3.1 % of the patients, and silent infarction in 7.8 %. The aortic valve area and mean pressure gradient were significantly improved over time with both approaches (p < 0.001). At 6 months, the NYHA functional classification based on a conventional physician's assessment was improved in 87.9 % of the patients. We found results that were equivalent to those in other major TAVR trials, such as an acceptable 30-day survival (91.9 %), suggesting that balloon-expandable TAVR is effective for small Japanese AS patients classified as high-risk or inoperable.

  5. Activating KIR molecules and their cognate ligands prevail in children with a diagnosis of ASD and in their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerini, Franca R; Bolognesi, Elisabetta; Chiappedi, Matteo; Manca, Salvatorica; Ghezzo, Alessandro; Agliardi, Cristina; Zanette, Michela; Littera, Roberto; Carcassi, Carlo; Sotgiu, Stefano; Clerici, Mario

    2014-02-01

    The activity of natural killer (NK) cells is modulated by the interaction between killer-cell immune globulin-like receptor (KIR) proteins and their cognate HLA ligands; activated NK cells produce inflammatory cytokines and mediate innate immune responses. Activating KIR/HLA complexes (aKIR/HLA) were recently suggested to prevail in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), a neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by brain and behavioral abnormalities and associated with a degree of inflammation. We verified whether such findings could be confirmed by analyzing two sample cohorts of Sardinian and continental Italian ASD children and their mothers. Results showed that aKIR/HLA are increased whereas inhibitory KIR/HLA complexes are reduced in ASD children; notably this skewing was even more significant in their mothers. KIR and HLA molecules are expressed by placental cells and by the trophoblast and their interactions result in immune activation and influence fetal, as well as central nervous system development and plasticity. Data herein suggest that in utero KIR/HLA immune interactions favor immune activation in ASD; this may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Will the New Gnosticism prevail? Remarks on Synthetic Biology, Nanotechnologies and Genetic Manipulation facing the Century of the Big Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Riechmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Technological utopianism seduces many people, from the very origins of Western modernity –remember Francis Bacon’s island of Bensalem in his New Atlantis–, with the temptation of complete mastery over nature (which includes human immortality. Today, the prevailing mentality in the West, which tends to become a universal worldview, has much in common with the beliefs of the ancient Gnostics. According to this mindset, science and technology can allow the human mind to escape the limitations that characterize its natural state, releasing the anchor to biological stuff and escaping the human condition. In short, we would become gods –gods thought of as Immortal Super-Engineers. We must resist these destructive illusions and delusions, which means: technical rationality has to make his own critique of utopian reason (in the sense of Franz Hinkelammert. Without this self-criticism, a judicious use of techniques and technologies will be out of reach –and they do have an enormous potential for improving the human condition–, while avoiding –if it were still possible– the exterminist, nihilistic and suicidal drift of industrial civilization.

  7. Optimal Silicon Doping Layers of Quantum Barriers in the Growth Sequence Forming Soft Confinement Potential of Eight-Period In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN Quantum Wells of Blue LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Chen, Meng-Chu; Lin, Yen-Sheng; Lu, Ming-Yen; Lin, Kuang-I.; Cheng, Yung-Chen

    2017-11-01

    The features of eight-period In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN quantum wells (QWs) with silicon (Si) doping in the first two to five quantum barriers (QBs) in the growth sequence of blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are explored. Epilayers of QWs' structures are grown on 20 pairs of In0.02Ga0.98N/GaN superlattice acting as strain relief layers (SRLs) on patterned sapphire substrates (PSSs) by a low-pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD) system. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectra, current versus voltage ( I- V) curves, light output power versus injection current ( L- I) curves, and images of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) of epilayers are measured. The consequences show that QWs with four Si-doped QBs have larger carrier localization energy (41 meV), lower turn-on (3.27 V) and breakdown (- 6.77 V) voltages, and higher output power of light of blue LEDs at higher injection current than other samples. Low barrier height of QBs in a four-Si-doped QB sample results in soft confinement potential of QWs and lower turn-on and breakdown voltages of the diode. HRTEM images give the evidence that this sample has relatively diffusive interfaces of QWs. Uniform spread of carriers among eight QWs and superior localization of carriers in each well are responsible for the enhancement of light output power, in particular, for high injection current in the four-Si-doped QB sample. The results demonstrate that four QBs of eight In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN QWs with Si doping not only reduce the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) but also improve the distribution and localization of carriers in QWs for better optical performance of blue LEDs.

  8. Influence of selenium amount on the structural and electronic properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films and solar cells formed by the stacked elemental layer process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, B.J., E-mail: bjm.mueller@web.de [Institute of Micro- and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Corporate Research, Robert Bosch GmbH, D-71272 Renningen (Germany); Opasanont, B.; Haug, V. [Corporate Research, Robert Bosch GmbH, D-71272 Renningen (Germany); Hergert, F. [Bosch Solar CISTech GmbH, D-14772 Brandenburg (Germany); Zweigart, S. [Corporate Research, Robert Bosch GmbH, D-71272 Renningen (Germany); Herr, U., E-mail: ulrich.herr@uni-ulm.de [Institute of Micro- and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2016-06-01

    In the following article the influence of selenium supply on the stacked elemental layer process during the final annealing step is investigated. We find that the Se supply strongly influences the phase formation in the Cu(In,Ga)Se {sub 2} resulting in a modified Ga/In distribution. The effects of Se supply on the structural and electronic properties of the films are reported. The solar cell performance has been investigated in detail using current voltage and external quantum efficiency measurements. We find that the chalcopyrite crystal formation is strongly influenced by the Se supply during the growth process. Furthermore the interdiffusion of Ga and In is accelerated with increasing Se amount. This has direct consequences on band gap and series resistance, which leads to changes in the values of short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage and fill factor. The open-circuit voltage increases with increasing band gap of the Cu(In,Ga)Se {sub 2}, whereas the short-circuit current density decreases with increasing band gap. The fill factor is affected by the formation of MoSe {sub 2} at the back contact. The experimental findings are compared with the theoretical efficiency limits calculated from the Shockley–Queisser model, and also with numerical 1D SCAPS simulations. - Highlights: • Adjustment of the Ga/In distribution by the Se supply • Enhanced Ga incorporation near-surface • Interdiffusion coefficients of Ga/In are investigated. • Shockley–Queisser modeling and 1D SCAPS simulations • Fill factor is strongly coupled on the MoSe2/Mo ratio.

  9. Growth and characterization of highly tensile strained Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} formed on relaxed In{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}P buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; D' Costa, Vijay Richard; Dong, Yuan; Liang, Gengchiau; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Loke, Wan Khai; Yoon, Soon Fatt [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Yin, Tingting; Shen, Zexiang [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Jisheng [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, #08-03, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Tok, Eng Soon [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117551 (Singapore)

    2016-03-28

    Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} films with high tensile strain were grown on strain-relaxed In{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}P virtual substrates using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The in-plane tensile strain in the Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} film was varied by changing the In mole fraction in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}P buffer layer. The tensile strained Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} films were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. An in-plane tensile strain of up to 1% in the Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} was measured, which is much higher than that achieved using other buffer systems. Controlled thermal anneal experiment demonstrated that the strain was not relaxed for temperatures up to 500 °C. The band alignment of the tensile strained Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} on In{sub 0.77}Ga{sub 0.23}P was obtained by high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06}/In{sub 0.77}Ga{sub 0.23}P interface was found to be of the type I band alignment, with a valence band offset of 0.31 ± 0.12 eV and a conduction band offset of 0.74 ± 0.12 eV.

  10. Process for obtaining luminescent glass layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindi, R.; Robert, A.

    1984-01-01

    Process for obtaining luminescent glass layers, application to the production of devices provided with said layers and to the construction of photoscintillators. The process comprises projecting onto a support, by cathodic sputtering, the material of at least one target, each target including silica and at least one chemical compound able to give luminescent centers, such as a cerium oxide, so as to form at least one luminescent glass layer of the said support. The layer or layers formed preferably undergo a heat treatment such as annealing in order to increase the luminous efficiency thereof. It is in this way possible to form a scintillating glass layer on the previously frosted entrance window of a photomultiplier in order to obtain an integrated photoscintillator

  11. In-situ formed Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 barrier layers on yttria stabilized zirconia backbones by infiltration - A promising path to high performing oxygen electrodes of solid oxide cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovtar, Simona; Chen, Ming; Samson, Alfred Junio

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen electrodes for solid oxide cells were prepared by a consecutive infiltration of a gadolinium doped ceria (Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9, CGO) barrier layer and a lanthanum cobalt nickelate (La0.95Co0.4Ni0.6O3, LCN) electro catalyst layer into a porous yttrium doped zirconia (YSZ) backbone. The influences...... of the following parameters on the microstructure of the formed CGO barrier layer and on the electrochemical performance of the cells were studied: i) surfactants and wetting agents, ii) ceria/gadolinia coverage, iii) calcination profiles and iv) exposure temperature during testing. The infiltration process...... performance and only a small increase of the cell-resistance with increasing exposure temperatures during testing were obtained. A complete and homogenous covering of the YSZ backbone with Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 was found to be necessary to maintain high performance also at higher exposure temperatures (> 800 °C)....

  12. Gradient SiNO anti-reflective layers in solar selective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Cao, Feng; Sun, Tianyi; Chen, Gang

    2017-08-01

    A solar selective coating includes a substrate, a cermet layer having nanoparticles therein deposited on the substrate, and an anti-reflection layer deposited on the cermet layer. The cermet layer and the anti-reflection layer may each be formed of intermediate layers. A method for constructing a solar-selective coating is disclosed and includes preparing a substrate, depositing a cermet layer on the substrate, and depositing an anti-reflection layer on the cermet layer.

  13. Environmental factors prevail over dispersal constraints in determining the distribution and assembly of Trichoptera species in mountain lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendoza, Guillermo; Ventura, Marc; Catalan, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    Aiming to elucidate whether large-scale dispersal factors or environmental species sorting prevail in determining patterns of Trichoptera species composition in mountain lakes, we analyzed the distribution and assembly of the most common Trichoptera (Plectrocnemia laetabilis, Polycentropus flavomaculatus, Drusus rectus, Annitella pyrenaea, and Mystacides azurea) in the mountain lakes of the Pyrenees (Spain, France, Andorra) based on a survey of 82 lakes covering the geographical and environmental extremes of the lake district. Spatial autocorrelation in species composition was determined using Moran's eigenvector maps (MEM). Redundancy analysis (RDA) was applied to explore the influence of MEM variables and in-lake, and catchment environmental variables on Trichoptera assemblages. Variance partitioning analysis (partial RDA) revealed the fraction of species composition variation that could be attributed uniquely to either environmental variability or MEM variables. Finally, the distribution of individual species was analyzed in relation to specific environmental factors using binomial generalized linear models (GLM). Trichoptera assemblages showed spatial structure. However, the most relevant environmental variables in the RDA (i.e., temperature and woody vegetation in-lake catchments) were also related with spatial variables (i.e., altitude and longitude). Partial RDA revealed that the fraction of variation in species composition that was uniquely explained by environmental variability was larger than that uniquely explained by MEM variables. GLM results showed that the distribution of species with longitudinal bias is related to specific environmental factors with geographical trend. The environmental dependence found agrees with the particular traits of each species. We conclude that Trichoptera species distribution and composition in the lakes of the Pyrenees are governed predominantly by local environmental factors, rather than by dispersal constraints. For

  14. Melt formed superconducting joint between superconducting tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.G.; Knudsen, B.A.; Rumaner, L.E.; Zaabala, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a superconducting joint between contiguous superconducting tapes having an inner laminate comprised of a parent-metal layer selected from the group niobium, tantalum, technetium, and vanadium, a superconductive intermetallic compound layer on the parent-metal layer, a reactive-metal layer that is capable of combining with the parent-metal and forming the superconductive intermetallic compound, the joint comprising: a continuous precipitate of the superconductive intermetallic compound fused to the tapes forming a continuous superconducting path between the tapes

  15. Peeling Back the Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image of the rock target named 'Mazatzal' on sol 77 (March 22, 2004). It is a close-up look at the rock face and the targets that will be brushed and ground by the rock abrasion tool in upcoming sols. Mazatzal, like most rocks on Earth and Mars, has layers of material near its surface that provide clues about the history of the rock. Scientists believe that the top layer of Mazatzal is actually a coating of dust and possibly even salts. Under this light coating may be a more solid portion of the rock that has been chemically altered by weathering. Past this layer is the unaltered rock, which may give scientists the best information about how Mazatzal was formed. Because each layer reveals information about the formation and subsequent history of Mazatzal, it is important that scientists get a look at each of them. For this reason, they have developed a multi-part strategy to use the rock abrasion tool to systematically peel back Mazatzal's layers and analyze what's underneath with the rover's microscopic imager, and its Moessbauer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometers. The strategy began on sol 77 when scientists used the microscopic imager to get a closer look at targets on Mazatzal named 'New York,' 'Illinois' and 'Arizona.' These rock areas were targeted because they posed the best opportunity for successfully using the rock abrasion tool; Arizona also allowed for a close-up look at a range of tones. On sol 78, Spirit's rock abrasion tool will do a light brushing on the Illinois target to preserve some of the surface layers. Then, a brushing of the New York target should remove the top coating of any dust and salts and perhaps reveal the chemically altered rock underneath. Finally, on sol 79, the rock abrasion tool will be commanded to grind into the New York target, which will give scientists the best chance of observing Mazatzal's interior. The Mazatzal targets were named after the home states of

  16. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naive Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Extended Analysis of the Phase 3 PREVAIL Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, T.M.; Armstrong, A.J.; Rathkopf, D.; Loriot, Y.; Sternberg, C.N.; Higano, C.S.; Iversen, P.; Evans, C.P.; Kim, C.S.; Kimura, G.; Miller, K.; Saad, F.; Bjartell, A.S.; Borre, M.; Mulders, P.; Tammela, T.L.; Parli, T.; Sari, S.; Os, S. van; Theeuwes, A.; Tombal, B.

    2017-01-01

    Enzalutamide significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) among men with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at the prespecified interim analysis of PREVAIL, a phase 3, double-blind, randomized study. We evaluated the

  17. Prevailing of sensitive blood driving to AIDS/HIV. Provincial Blood Bank of Sancti Spíritus. 2007-2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Quesada Concepción

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of blood transfusions are one of the ways of transmitting the immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS/HIV; it constitutes warriness from the epidemiological point of view. A descriptive research was done with the objective of determining the prevailing of sensitive blood driving AIDS/HIV in the Provincial Blood Bank from Sancti Spíritus from January 1 st , 2007 to December 31 st, 2008. The sample was conformed by 312 donants with positive diagnosis to AIDS/HIV. Some variables were used such as prevailing, age, sex, race, home town. The scores of higher prevailing to AIDS/HIV were shown by the male sex (4,42, the 26-33 year old group (1,55; it prevailing volunteer blood driving (81,0 % , and Sancti Spíritus municipality gave more cases (27,5% .Just because sensibility to tests based on antibody, that is why it is important the constant checking of all processes that guarantee blood driving to be sired.

  18. Influence of prevailing disturbances on soil biology and biochemistry of montane habitats at Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, India during wet and dry seasons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, S.K.; Singh, Anoop; Rai, J.P.N.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of prevailing disturbances in montane habitats of Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR) was studied on soil microbial population, biomass, soil respiration and enzyme activities during wet and dry seasons. The physico-chemical characteristics of soils exhibited conspicuous variation in t...

  19. Delivery Device and Method for Forming the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peter X. (Inventor); Liu, Xiaohua (Inventor); McCauley, Laurie (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A delivery device includes a hollow container, and a plurality of biodegradable and/or erodible polymeric layers established in the container. A layer including a predetermined substance is established between each of the plurality of polymeric layers, whereby degradation of the polymeric layer and release of the predetermined substance occur intermittently. Methods for forming the device are also disclosed herein.

  20. Prevailing of ischemia cardiopathy, demonstrated by gammagraphy in less than 40 years old persons and its association with risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano G, M.A.; Castillo M, L.; Orea T, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Coronary Arterial Illness (EAC) is the first cause of death of those Mexicans. Among their numerous risk factors it highlights the age with more bias starting from the 45 years. The objective of this investigation was to determine the prevailing of ischemic cardiopathy (Cl) and heart attack to the myocardium (IAM) in fellows smaller than 40 years and to identify risk factors. The study of myocardial perfusion (EPM) it is a non invasive study and of great sensibility and specificity that it allows to detect obstructive coronary lesions. The used method was retrospective-traverse Study in 125 patients smaller than 40 years. Files of patients to who EPM had been practiced with Technetium 99m-SESTAMlBI, protocol of one day, were revised, where its were analyzed the short and long axis (vertical and horizontal). General data, somatometry, emotional profile analysis, lipids and glucose profiles were gathered. Results. The population conformed it 53% women and 47% men with average of 31.9 year-old age of corporal mass index (IMC) 25.1 kg/cm 2 . 46% of abnormal studies was obtained, of which 35% was compatible with ischemic cardiopathy (Cl) and 11% with heart attack to the myocardium (IAM). The characteristics of these were: age 31.6±6 Vs 32.6±5.9 years; IMC 25.4±7.0 Vs 24.4±3.34 kg/cm 2 ; stature 161.6±9.8 Vs 165.5±9.7cm; TAS 139.1±29.2 Vs. 115±13.4 mm Hg, TAD 84.5±17.4 Vs. 75±9.4 mm Hg; civil state married 65.5% (p=0.005) Vs single 57%; bigger depression 32% Vs anxiety 28%, in the group of patients with Cl and IAM, respectively. In the IAM population it was found an additional IRC 21% (p=0.030), HAS 21% (p=0.025) and drug addiction 21% (p=0.002). The rest of the results didn't show significant differences. Conclusion: Only 6.5% of the patients that went to EPM- 99m Tc-SESTAMIBl in a 6 year-old lapse, were smaller than 40 years. 71% of them was referred by prechordal pain in who almost the half it was evidenced Cl or IAM. In this investigation besides the

  1. Contributor Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2014-09-01

    to produce preprints or reprints and translate into languages other than English for sale or free distribution; and 4 the right to republish the work in a collection of articles in any other mechanical or electronic format. We give the rights to the corresponding author to make necessary changes as per the request of the journal, do the rest of the correspondence on our behalf and he/she will act as the guarantor for the manuscript on our behalf. All persons who have made substantial contributions to the work reported in the manuscript, but who are not contributors, are named in the Acknowledgment and have given me/us their written permission to be named. If I/we do not include an Acknowledgment that means I/we have not received substantial contributions from non-contributors and no contributor has been omitted.S NoAuthors' NamesContribution (IJCME Guidelines{1 substantial contributions to conception and design, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; 2 drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content; and 3 final approval of the version to be published. Authors should meet conditions 1, 2, and 3}.SignatureDate                              Note: All the authors are required to sign independently in this form in the sequence given above. In case an author has left the institution/country and whose whereabouts are not known, the senior author may sign on his/her behalf taking the responsibility.No addition/deletion/ or any change in the sequence of the authorship will be permissible at a later stage, without valid reasons and permission of the Editor.If the authorship is contested at any stage, the article will be either returned or will not be processed for publication till the issue is solved.Maximum up to 4 authors for short communication and up to 6 authors for original article.

  2. Contributors Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    to produce preprints or reprints and translate into languages other than English for sale or free distribution; and 4 the right to republish the work in a collection of articles in any other mechanical or electronic format. We give the rights to the corresponding author to make necessary changes as per the request of the journal, do the rest of the correspondence on our behalf and he/she will act as the guarantor for the manuscript on our behalf. All persons who have made substantial contributions to the work reported in the manuscript, but who are not contributors, are named in the Acknowledgment and have given me/us their written permission to be named. If I/we do not include an Acknowledgment that means I/we have not received substantial contributions from non-contributors and no contributor has been omitted.S NoAuthors' NamesContribution (IJCME Guidelines{1 substantial contributions to conception and design, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; 2 drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content; and 3 final approval of the version to be published. Authors should meet conditions 1, 2, and 3}.SignatureDate                              Note: All the authors are required to sign independently in this form in the sequence given above. In case an author has left the institution/country and whose whereabouts are not known, the senior author may sign on his/her behalf taking the responsibility.No addition/deletion/ or any change in the sequence of the authorship will be permissible at a later stage, without valid reasons and permission of the Editor.If the authorship is contested at any stage, the article will be either returned or will not be processed for publication till the issue is solved.Maximum up to 4 authors for short communication and up to 6 authors for original article.

  3. Analysis of the prevailing standard and technical documents for their applicability under conditions of the 'Ukrytie' operation and technical proposals relating to the elaboration of new ones concerning fire safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, B.S.; Emets, V.G.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of the prevailing laws and standards and technical documents (STD) to ensure safe operation of nuclear power installations, with requirements of nuclear, radiation and fire safety taken into account, has been performed. Proposals on application of some items of prevailing STD under conditions of the 'Ukrytie' operation are presented. Also given are technical proposals on correction of the prevailing operational standard documents and elaboration of special STD

  4. Organically pillared layered zinc hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kongshaug, K.O.; Fjellvaag, Helmer

    2004-01-01

    The two organically pillared layered zinc hydroxides [Zn 2 (OH) 2 (ndc)], CPO-6, and [Zn 3 (OH) 4 (bpdc)], CPO-7, were obtained in hydrothermal reactions between 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid (ndc) and zinc nitrate (CPO-6) and 4,4'biphenyldicarboxylate (bpdc) and zinc nitrate (CPO-7), respectively. In CPO-6, the tetrahedral zinc atoms are connected by two μ 2 -OH groups and two carboxylate oxygen atoms, forming infinite layers extending parallel to the bc-plane. These layers are pillared by ndc to form a three-dimensional structure. In CPO-7, the zinc hydroxide layers are containing four-, five- and six coordinated zinc atoms, and the layers are built like stairways running along the [001] direction. Each step is composed of three infinite chains running in the [010] direction. Both crystal structures were solved from conventional single crystal data. Crystal data for CPO-6: Monoclinic space group P2 1 /c (No. 14), a=11.9703(7), b=7.8154(5), c=6.2428(4) A, β=90.816(2) deg., V=583.97(6) A 3 and Z=4. Crystal data for CPO-7: Monoclinic space group C2/c (No. 15), a=35.220(4), b=6.2658(8), c=14.8888(17) A, β=112.580(4) deg., V=3033.8(6) A 3 and Z=8. The compounds were further characterized by thermogravimetric- and chemical analysis

  5. Substrate system for spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Men G. (Export, PA); Chernicoff, William P. (Harrisburg, PA)

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  6. Adaptive Control of Freeze-Form Extrusion Fabrication Processes (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Xiyue; Landers, Robert G; Leu, Ming C

    2008-01-01

    Freeze-form Extrusion Fabrication (FEF) is an additive manufacturing process that extrudes high solids loading aqueous ceramic pastes in a layer-by-layer fashion below the paste freezing temperature for component fabrication...

  7. Rubber curing chemistry governing the orientation of layered silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of curing systems on the orientation and the dispersion of the layered silicates in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber nanocomposite is reported. Significant differences in X-ray diffraction pattern between peroxide curing and sulfur curing was observed. Intense X-ray scattering values in the XRD experiments from peroxide cured vulcanizates indicate an orientation of the layers in a preferred direction as evinced by transmission electron micrographs. However, sulfur cured vulcanizates show no preferential orientation of the silicate particles. Nevertheless, a closer inspection of transmission electron microscopy (TEM images of peroxide and sulfur cured samples shows exfoliated silicate layers in the acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR matrix. It was revealed in the prevailing study that the use of an excess amount of stearic acid in the formulation of the sulfur curing package leads to almost exfoliated type X-ray scattering pattern.

  8. Nanostructured layers of thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffrey J.; Lynch, Jared; Coates, Nelson; Forster, Jason; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Chabinyc, Michael; Russ, Boris

    2018-01-30

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to thermoelectric materials. In one aspect, a method includes providing a plurality of nanostructures. The plurality of nanostructures comprise a thermoelectric material, with each nanostructure of the plurality of nanostructures having first ligands disposed on a surface of the nanostructure. The plurality of nanostructures is mixed with a solution containing second ligands and a ligand exchange process occurs in which the first ligands disposed on the plurality of nanostructures are replaced with the second ligands. The plurality of nanostructures is deposited on a substrate to form a layer. The layer is thermally annealed.

  9. Solare Cell Roof Tile And Method Of Forming Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoka, Jack I.; Real, Markus

    1999-11-16

    A solar cell roof tile includes a front support layer, a transparent encapsulant layer, a plurality of interconnected solar cells and a backskin layer. The front support layer is formed of light transmitting material and has first and second surfaces. The transparent encapsulant layer is disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. The interconnected solar cells has a first surface disposed adjacent the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer has a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells, wherein a portion of the backskin layer wraps around and contacts the first surface of the front support layer to form the border region. A portion of the border region has an extended width. The solar cell roof tile may have stand-offs disposed on the extended width border region for providing vertical spacing with respect to an adjacent solar cell roof tile.

  10. Evidence for a continuous decline in lower stratospheric ozone offsetting ozone layer recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, William T.; Alsing, Justin; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Staehelin, Johannes; Haigh, Joanna D.; Peter, Thomas; Tummon, Fiona; Stübi, Rene; Stenke, Andrea; Anderson, John; Bourassa, Adam; Davis, Sean M.; Degenstein, Doug; Frith, Stacey; Froidevaux, Lucien; Roth, Chris; Sofieva, Viktoria; Wang, Ray; Wild, Jeannette; Yu, Pengfei; Ziemke, Jerald R.; Rozanov, Eugene V.

    2018-02-01

    Ozone forms in the Earth's atmosphere from the photodissociation of molecular oxygen, primarily in the tropical stratosphere. It is then transported to the extratropics by the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC), forming a protective ozone layer around the globe. Human emissions of halogen-containing ozone-depleting substances (hODSs) led to a decline in stratospheric ozone until they were banned by the Montreal Protocol, and since 1998 ozone in the upper stratosphere is rising again, likely the recovery from halogen-induced losses. Total column measurements of ozone between the Earth's surface and the top of the atmosphere indicate that the ozone layer has stopped declining across the globe, but no clear increase has been observed at latitudes between 60° S and 60° N outside the polar regions (60-90°). Here we report evidence from multiple satellite measurements that ozone in the lower stratosphere between 60° S and 60° N has indeed continued to decline since 1998. We find that, even though upper stratospheric ozone is recovering, the continuing downward trend in the lower stratosphere prevails, resulting in a downward trend in stratospheric column ozone between 60° S and 60° N. We find that total column ozone between 60° S and 60° N appears not to have decreased only because of increases in tropospheric column ozone that compensate for the stratospheric decreases. The reasons for the continued reduction of lower stratospheric ozone are not clear; models do not reproduce these trends, and thus the causes now urgently need to be established.

  11. Evidence for a Continuous Decline in Lower Stratospheric Ozone Offsetting Ozone Layer Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, William T.; Alsing, Justin; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Staehelin, Johannes; Haigh, Joanna D.; Peter, Thomas; Tummon, Fiona; Stuebi, Rene; Stenke, Andrea; Anderson, John; hide

    2018-01-01

    Ozone forms in the Earth's atmosphere from the photodissociation of molecular oxygen, primarily in the tropical stratosphere. It is then transported to the extratropics by the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC), forming a protective "ozone layer" around the globe. Human emissions of halogen-containing ozone-depleting substances (hODSs) led to a decline in stratospheric ozone until they were banned by the Montreal Protocol, and since 1998 ozone in the upper stratosphere is rising again, likely the recovery from halogen-induced losses. Total column measurements of ozone between the Earth's surface and the top of the atmosphere indicate that the ozone layer has stopped declining across the globe, but no clear increase has been observed at latitudes between 60degS and 60degN outside the polar regions (60-90deg). Here we report evidence from multiple satellite measurements that ozone in the lower stratosphere between 60degS and 60degN has indeed continued to decline since 1998. We find that, even though upper stratospheric ozone is recovering, the continuing downward trend in the lower stratosphere prevails, resulting in a downward trend in stratospheric column ozone between 60degS and 60degN. We find that total column ozone between 60degS and 60degN appears not to have decreased only because of increases in tropospheric column ozone that compensate for the stratospheric decreases. The reasons for the continued reduction of lower stratospheric ozone are not clear; models do not reproduce these trends, and thus the causes now urgently need to be established.

  12. The Prevailing Weather and Traffic Conditions in the Evaluation of a Future ECA in the Mediterranean Sea. A view into the Western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Castells i Sanabra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Appendix III of MARPOL's Annex VI sets out the criteria and procedures for designating an emission control area (ECA.These criteria includes: a clear delineation of the proposed ECA; types of emissions proposed for control, land and sea areas at risk; emission quantification and impact assessment; prevailing weather conditions; data and quality on marine traffic; land based measures concurrent with the ECA adoption and the relative costs of reducing emissions from ships. This paper analyses the climate parameter together with traffic conditions: prevailing weather conditions as a parameter to be kept in mind for the adoption of a future ECA in the Mediterranean Sea. Preliminary results would show how marine emissions coming from existing traffic will impact the sea and land ecology in the Mediterranean area.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Percutaneous Closure of the Left Atrial Appendage in Atrial Fibrillation Based on Results From PROTECT AF Versus PREVAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, James V; Hutton, David W; Barnes, Geoffrey D; Zhu, Ruo P; Owens, Douglas K; Garber, Alan M; Go, Alan S; Hlatky, Mark A; Heidenreich, Paul A; Wang, Paul J; Al-Ahmad, Amin; Turakhia, Mintu P

    2016-06-01

    Randomized trials of left atrial appendage (LAA) closure with the Watchman device have shown varying results, and its cost effectiveness compared with anticoagulation has not been evaluated using all available contemporary trial data. We used a Markov decision model to estimate lifetime quality-adjusted survival, costs, and cost effectiveness of LAA closure with Watchman, compared directly with warfarin and indirectly with dabigatran, using data from the long-term (mean 3.8 year) follow-up of Percutaneous Closure of the Left Atrial Appendage Versus Warfarin Therapy for Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation (PROTECT AF) and Prospective Randomized Evaluation of the Watchman LAA Closure Device in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation (PREVAIL) randomized trials. Using data from PROTECT AF, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios compared with warfarin and dabigatran were $20 486 and $23 422 per quality-adjusted life year, respectively. Using data from PREVAIL, LAA closure was dominated by warfarin and dabigatran, meaning that it was less effective (8.44, 8.54, and 8.59 quality-adjusted life years, respectively) and more costly. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000 per quality-adjusted life year, LAA closure was cost effective 90% and 9% of the time under PROTECT AF and PREVAIL assumptions, respectively. These results were sensitive to the rates of ischemic stroke and intracranial hemorrhage for LAA closure and medical anticoagulation. Using data from the PROTECT AF trial, LAA closure with the Watchman device was cost effective; using PREVAIL trial data, Watchman was more costly and less effective than warfarin and dabigatran. PROTECT AF enrolled more patients and has substantially longer follow-up time, allowing greater statistical certainty with the cost-effectiveness results. However, longer-term trial results and postmarketing surveillance of major adverse events will be vital to determining the value of the Watchman in clinical

  14. First direct comparison of clinical outcomes between European and Asian cohorts in transcatheter aortic valve implantation: the Massy study group vs. the PREVAIL JAPAN trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Hayashida, Kentaro; Takayama, Morimasa; Mitsudo, Kazuaki; Nanto, Shinsuke; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Kuratani, Toru; Tobaru, Tetsuya; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Lefèvre, Thierry; Sawa, Yoshiki; Morice, Marie-Claude

    2015-02-01

    The efficacy and safety of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in Asian populations were unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare directly the clinical outcomes of the first Japanese trial and a European single-center experience after TAVI. Between April 2010 and October 2011, 64 patients were included in the PREVAIL JAPAN multicenter trial which was set up to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) in high-risk Japanese patients with severe aortic stenosis. Between March 2010 and January 2012, 237 consecutive patients treated with TAVI using the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ prosthesis at Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud were prospectively included in the Massy cohort. We compared the clinical outcomes of these two cohorts. Patients were of similar age (83.4±6.6 years vs. 84.5±6.1 years, p=0.25), but logistic EuroSCORE was higher in the Massy cohort (20.2±11.7% vs. 15.6±8.0%, pPREVAIL JAPAN cohort (1.41±0.14m(2) vs. 1.72±0.18m(2); pPREVAIL JAPAN cohort (12.7±11.4mmHg vs. 10.1±3.6mmHg, p=0.01), but satisfactory improvement in 6-month functional status was obtained in both cohorts (76.5% vs. 77.2%, p=0.91). Clinical outcomes after TAVI in the patients included in the PREVAIL JAPAN trial were acceptable and as safe as that of a single-center European cohort. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Percutaneous Closure of the Left Atrial Appendage in Atrial Fibrillation Based on Results from PROTECT AF vs. PREVAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, James V.; Hutton, David W.; Barnes, Geoffrey D.; Zhu, Ruo P.; Owens, Douglas K.; Garber, Alan M.; Go, Alan S.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Wang, Paul J.; Al-Ahmad, Amin; Turakhia, Mintu P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Randomized trials of left atrial appendage (LAA) closure with the Watchman device have shown varying results, and its cost-effectiveness compared to anticoagulation has not been evaluated using all available contemporary trial data. Methods and Results We used a Markov decision model to estimate lifetime quality-adjusted survival, costs, and cost-effectiveness of LAA closure with Watchman, compared directly with warfarin and indirectly with dabigatran, using data from the long-term (mean 3.8 year) follow-up of PROTECT AF and PREVAIL randomized trials. Using data from PROTECT AF, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) compared to warfarin and dabigatran were $20,486 and $23,422 per quality adjusted life year (QALY), respectively. Using data from PREVAIL, LAA closure was dominated by warfarin and dabigatran, meaning that it was less effective (8.44, 8.54, and 8.59 QALYs, respectively) and more costly. At a willingness-to-pay-threshold of $50,000 per QALY, LAA closure was cost-effective 90% and 9% of the time under PROTECT AF and PREVAIL assumptions, respectively. These results were sensitive to the rates of ischemic stroke and intracranial hemorrhage for LAA closure and medical anticoagulation. Conclusions Using data from the PROTECT AF trial, LAA closure with the Watchman device was cost-effective; using PREVAIL trial data, Watchman was more costly and less effective than warfarin and dabigatran. PROTECT AF enrolled more patients and has substantially longer follow-up time, allowing greater statistical certainty with the cost-effectiveness results. However, longer term trial results and post-marketing surveillance of major adverse events will be vital to determining the value of the Watchman in clinical practice. PMID:27307517

  16. Method of forming catalyst layer by single step infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Kirk; Lee, Shiwoo; Dowd, Regis

    2018-05-01

    Provided herein is a method for electrocatalyst infiltration of a porous substrate, of particular use for preparation of a cathode for a solid oxide fuel cell. The method generally comprises preparing an electrocatalyst infiltrate solution comprising an electrocatalyst, surfactant, chelating agent, and a solvent; pretreating a porous mixed ionic-electric conductive substrate; and applying the electrocatalyst infiltration solution to the porous mixed ionic-electric conductive substrate.

  17. Biosorption of mercury by capsulated and slime layer- forming Gram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... high negatively charged components, showed more than 1.5 fold increase as compared to capsulated ... Mercury is one of the most toxic heavy metals released in ... ion exchange, activated carbon adsorption and separation.

  18. Wearable electronics formed on intermediate layer on textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    One manner of producing more desirable clothing with electronic capabilities is to manufacture electronics, such as the charging wires or devices themselves, directly onto the textile materials. Textile materials generally do not support

  19. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Extended Analysis of the Phase 3 PREVAIL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana; Loriot, Yohann; Sternberg, Cora N; Higano, Celestia S; Iversen, Peter; Evans, Christopher P; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kimura, Go; Miller, Kurt; Saad, Fred; Bjartell, Anders S; Borre, Michael; Mulders, Peter; Tammela, Teuvo L; Parli, Teresa; Sari, Suha; van Os, Steve; Theeuwes, Ad; Tombal, Bertrand

    2017-02-01

    Enzalutamide significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) among men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at the prespecified interim analysis of PREVAIL, a phase 3, double-blind, randomized study. We evaluated the longer-term efficacy and safety of enzalutamide up to the prespecified number of deaths in the final analysis, which included an additional 20 mo of follow-up for investigator-assessed rPFS, 9 mo of follow-up for OS, and 4 mo of follow-up for safety. Enzalutamide reduced the risk of radiographic progression or death by 68% (hazard ratio [HR] 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.37; pPREVAIL provides more complete assessment of the clinical benefit of enzalutamide. PREVAIL is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01212991. According to data from longer follow-up, enzalutamide continued to provide benefit over placebo in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Article with buffer layer and method of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamy, James W.; Ma, Zhixun; Kabagambe, Benjamin; Koram, Kwaku K.; Hung, Cheng-Hung; Nelis, Gary J.

    2017-11-14

    A method of forming a coating layer on a glass substrate in a glass manufacturing process includes: providing a first coating precursor material for a selected coating layer composition to at least one multislot coater to form a first coating region of the selected coating layer; and providing a second coating precursor material for the selected coating layer composition to the multislot coater to form a second coating region of the selected coating layer over the first region. The first coating precursor material is different than the second precursor coating material.

  1. Double layers in the laboratory and above the aurora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, L.P.

    1980-11-01

    Recent laboratory double layer experiments have simulated, much better than before, the conditions prevailing on auroral field lines at high altitudes. In particular, magnetic fields strong enough to magnetize the electrons (but not quite the ions) have been used. Particle and wave spectra have been measured. Wave-particle interaction has been shown to play a minor role in the only case that has been quantitatively analyzed. The three-dimensional potential distribution has been mapped. The particle budget requires the radial electric field to be outward in the no magnetic field case but inward with magnetic field, in agreement with what is observed above the aurora. (author)

  2. 'Blueberry' Layers Indicate Watery Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic image, taken at the outcrop region dubbed 'El Capitan' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, reveals millimeter-scale (.04 inch-scale) layers in the lower portion. This same layering is hinted at by the fine notches that run horizontally across the sphere-like grain or 'blueberry' in the center left. The thin layers do not appear to deform around the blueberry, indicating that these geologic features are concretions and not impact spherules or ejected volcanic material called lapilli. Concretions are balls of minerals that form in pre-existing wet sediments. This image was taken by the rover's microscopic imager on the 29th martian day, or sol, of its mission. The observed area is about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

  3. Heterogeneity prevails: the state of clinical trial data management in Europe - results of a survey of ECRIN centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Ohmann, Christian; Yang, Qin

    2010-01-01

    The use of Clinical Data Management Systems (CDMS) has become essential in clinical trials to handle the increasing amount of data that must be collected and analyzed. With a CDMS trial data are captured at investigator sites with "electronic Case Report Forms". Although more and more of these el...

  4. Methods for producing thin film charge selective transport layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Scott Ryan; Olson, Dana C.; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2018-01-02

    Methods for producing thin film charge selective transport layers are provided. In one embodiment, a method for forming a thin film charge selective transport layer comprises: providing a precursor solution comprising a metal containing reactive precursor material dissolved into a complexing solvent; depositing the precursor solution onto a surface of a substrate to form a film; and forming a charge selective transport layer on the substrate by annealing the film.

  5. Bipolar pulse forming line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    2008-10-21

    A bipolar pulse forming transmission line module for linear induction accelerators having first, second, third, fourth, and fifth planar conductors which form an interleaved stack with dielectric layers between the conductors. Each conductor has a first end, and a second end adjacent an acceleration axis. The first and second planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, the fourth and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, and the first and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the first ends via a shorting plate adjacent the first ends. The third planar conductor is electrically connectable to a high voltage source, and an internal switch functions to short a high voltage from the first end of the third planar conductor to the first end of the fourth planar conductor to produce a bipolar pulse at the acceleration axis with a zero net time integral. Improved access to the switch is enabled by an aperture through the shorting plate and the proximity of the aperture to the switch.

  6. Improving the forming capability of laser dynamic forming by using rubber as a forming medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zongbao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Cuntang

    2016-04-01

    Laser dynamic forming (LDF) is a novel high velocity forming technique, which employs laser-generated shock wave to load the sample. The forming velocity induced by the high energy laser pulse may exceed the critical forming velocity, resulting in the occurrence of premature fracture. To avoid the above premature fracture, rubber is introduced in LDF as a forming medium to prolong the loading duration in this paper. Laser induced shock wave energy is transferred to the sample in different forming stages, so the forming velocity can be kept below the critical forming velocity when the initial laser energy is high for fracture. Bulge forming experiments with and without rubber were performed to study the effect of rubber on loading duration. The experimental results show that, the shock wave energy attenuates during the propagation through the rubber layer, the rubber can avoid the premature fracture. So the plastic deformation can continue, the forming capability of LDF is improved. Due to the severe plastic deformation under rubber compression, adiabatic shear bands (ASB) occur in LDF with rubber. The material softening in ASB leads to the irregular fracture, which is different from the premature fracture pattern (regular fracture) in LDF without rubber. To better understand this deformation behavior, Johnson-Cook model is used to simulate the dynamic response and the evolution of ASB of copper sample. The simulation results also indicate the rubber can prolong the loading duration.

  7. Densified waste form and method for forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2015-08-25

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  8. Double Layer Dynamics in a Collisionless Magnetoplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iizuka, S.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    and propagation of a double layer. The period of the oscillations is determined by the propagation length of the double layer. The current is limited during the propagation of the double layer by a growing negative potential barrier formed on the low potential tail. Similar phenomena appear when a potential......An experimental investigation of the dynamics of double layers is presented. The experiments are performed in a Q-machine plasma and the double layers are generated by applying a positive step potential to a cold collector plate terminating the plasma column. The double layer is created...... at the grounded plasma source just after the pulse is applied and it propagates towards the collector with a speed around the ion acoustic speed. When the collector is biased positively, large oscillations are obserced in the plasma current. These oscillations are found to be related to a recurring formation...

  9. Gravity control of growth form in brassica rapa and arabidopsis thaliana (brassicaceae): consequences for secondary metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, J.; Bisbee, P.A.; Darnell, R.L.; Kuang, A.; Levine, L.H.; Musgrave, M.E.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    How gravity influences the growth form and flavor components of plants is of interest to the space program because plants could be used for food and life support during prolonged missions away from the planet, where that constant feature of Earth’s environment does not prevail. We used plant growth

  10. Dynamics of Viral Abundance and Diversity in a Sphagnum-Dominated Peatland: Temporal Fluctuations Prevail Over Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaud, Flore; Dufresne, Alexis; Francez, André-Jean; Colombet, Jonathan; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Quaiser, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Viruses impact microbial activity and carbon cycling in various environments, but their diversity and ecological importance in Sphagnum-peatlands are unknown. Abundances of viral particles and prokaryotes were monitored bi-monthly at a fen and a bog at two different layers of the peat surface. Viral particle abundance ranged from 1.7 x 10(6) to 5.6 x 10(8) particles mL(-1), and did not differ between fen and bog but showed seasonal fluctuations. These fluctuations were positively correlated with prokaryote abundance and dissolved organic carbon, and negatively correlated with water-table height and dissolved oxygen. Using shotgun metagenomics we observed a shift in viral diversity between winter/spring and summer/autumn, indicating a seasonal succession of viral communities, mainly driven by weather-related environmental changes. Based on the seasonal asynchrony between viral and microbial diversity, we hypothesize a seasonal shift in the active microbial communities associated with a shift from lysogenic to lytic lifestyles. Our results suggest that temporal variations of environmental conditions rather than current habitat differences control the dynamics of virus-host interactions in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands.

  11. VSWI Wetlands Advisory Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset represents the DEC Wetlands Program's Advisory layer. This layer makes the most up-to-date, non-jurisdictional, wetlands mapping avaiable to the public...

  12. Generational distribution of a Candida glabrata population: Resilient old cells prevail, while younger cells dominate in the vulnerable host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouklas, Tejas; Alonso-Crisóstomo, Luz; Székely, Tamás; Diago-Navarro, Elizabeth; Orner, Erika P; Smith, Kalie; Munshi, Mansa A; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Balázsi, Gábor; Fries, Bettina C

    2017-05-01

    Similar to other yeasts, the human pathogen Candida glabrata ages when it undergoes asymmetric, finite cell divisions, which determines its replicative lifespan. We sought to investigate if and how aging changes resilience of C. glabrata populations in the host environment. Our data demonstrate that old C. glabrata are more resistant to hydrogen peroxide and neutrophil killing, whereas young cells adhere better to epithelial cell layers. Consequently, virulence of old compared to younger C. glabrata cells is enhanced in the Galleria mellonella infection model. Electron microscopy images of old C. glabrata cells indicate a marked increase in cell wall thickness. Comparison of transcriptomes of old and young C. glabrata cells reveals differential regulation of ergosterol and Hog pathway associated genes as well as adhesion proteins, and suggests that aging is accompanied by remodeling of the fungal cell wall. Biochemical analysis supports this conclusion as older cells exhibit a qualitatively different lipid composition, leading to the observed increased emergence of fluconazole resistance when grown in the presence of fluconazole selection pressure. Older C. glabrata cells accumulate during murine and human infection, which is statistically unlikely without very strong selection. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that neutrophils constitute the predominant selection pressure in vivo. When we altered experimentally the selection pressure by antibody-mediated removal of neutrophils, we observed a significantly younger pathogen population in mice. Mathematical modeling confirmed that differential selection of older cells is sufficient to cause the observed demographic shift in the fungal population. Hence our data support the concept that pathogenesis is affected by the generational age distribution of the infecting C. glabrata population in a host. We conclude that replicative aging constitutes an emerging trait, which is selected by the host and may even play an

  13. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  14. Method for producing substrates for superconducting layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a method for producing a substrate (600) suitable for supporting an elongated superconducting element, wherein, e.g., a deformation process is utilized in order to form disruptive strips in a layered solid element, and where etching is used to form undercut volumes (330, 332...

  15. Effect of Visceral Disease Site on Outcomes in Patients With Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Treated With Enzalutamide in the PREVAIL Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alumkal, Joshi J; Chowdhury, Simon; Loriot, Yohann; Sternberg, Cora N; de Bono, Johann S; Tombal, Bertrand; Carles, Joan; Flaig, Thomas W; Dorff, Tanya B; Phung, De; Forer, David; Noonberg, Sarah B; Mansbach, Hank; Beer, Tomasz M; Higano, Celestia S

    2017-10-01

    The Multinational Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Efficacy and Safety Study of Oral MDV3100 in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients With Progressive Metastatic Prostate Cancer Who Have Failed Androgen Deprivation Therapy (PREVAIL) trial was unique as it included patients with visceral disease. This analysis was designed to describe outcomes for the subgroup of men from PREVAIL with specific sites of visceral disease to help clinicians understand how these patients responded to enzalutamide prior to chemotherapy. Prespecified analyses examined the coprimary endpoints of radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) only. All other efficacy analyses were post hoc. The visceral subgroup was divided into liver or lung subsets. Patients with both liver and lung metastases were included in the liver subset. Of the 1717 patients in PREVAIL, 204 (12%) had visceral metastases at screening (liver only or liver/lung metastases, n = 74; lung only metastases, n = 130). In patients with liver metastases, enzalutamide was associated with an improvement in rPFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.22-0.90) but not OS (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.57-1.87). In patients with lung metastases only, the HR for rPFS (0.14; 95% CI, 0.06-0.36) and the HR for OS (0.59; 95% CI, 0.33-1.06) favored enzalutamide over placebo. Patients with liver metastases had worse outcomes than those with lung metastases, regardless of treatment. Enzalutamide was well tolerated in patients with visceral disease. Enzalutamide is an active first-line treatment option for men with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and visceral disease. Patients with lung-only disease fared better than patients with liver disease, regardless of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of high-dose pitavastatin on glucose homeostasis in patients at elevated risk of new-onset diabetes: insights from the CAPITAIN and PREVAIL-US studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M J; Orsoni, A; Robillard, P; Hounslow, N; Sponseller, C A; Giral, P

    2014-05-01

    Statin treatment may impair glucose homeostasis and increase the risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus, although this may depend on the statin, dose and patient population. We evaluated the effects of pitavastatin 4 mg/day on glucose homeostasis in patients with metabolic syndrome in the CAPITAIN trial. Findings were validated in a subset of patients enrolled in PREVAIL-US. Participants with a well defined metabolic syndrome phenotype were recruited to CAPITAIN to reduce the influence of confounding factors. Validation and comparison datasets were selected comprising phenotypically similar subsets of individuals enrolled in PREVAIL-US and treated with pitavastatin or pravastatin, respectively. Mean change from baseline in parameters of glucose homeostasis (fasting plasma glucose [FPG], glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c], insulin, quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index [QUICKI] and homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) and plasma lipid profile were assessed at 6 months (CAPITAIN) and 3 months (PREVAIL-US) after initiating treatment. In CAPITAIN (n = 12), no significant differences from baseline in HbA1c, insulin, HOMA-IR and QUICKI were observed at day 180 in patients treated with pitavastatin. A small (4%) increase in FPG from baseline to day 180 (P  0.05). Similar results were observed for pravastatin in the comparison dataset (n = 14). Other than a small change in FPG in the CAPITAIN study, neutral effects of pitavastatin on glucose homeostasis were observed in two cohorts of patients with metabolic syndrome, independent of its efficacy in reducing levels of atherogenic lipoproteins. The small number of patients and relatively short follow-up period represent limitations of the study. Nevertheless, these data suggest that statin-induced diabetogenesis may not represent a class effect.

  17. Electric-double-layer potential distribution in multiple-layer immiscible electrolytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, S.; Hardt, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    In this Brief Report, we calculate the electric-double-layer (EDL) electrostatic potential in a system of several layers of immiscible electrolytes. Verwey-Niessen theory predicts that at the interface between two immiscible electrolytes back-to-back EDLs are formed. The present analysis extends

  18. TWO-LAYER PHASE COMPENSATING INTERFERENCE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiy V. Nikandrov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with creation of optical interferential coatings, giving the possibility to form the wave front without the change of energy characteristics of the incident and reflected radiation. Correction is achieved due to the layer, which thickness is a function of coordinate of an optical element surface. Selection technique is suggested for refractive index materials, forming two-layer interference coating that creates a coating with a constant coefficient of reflection on the surface of the optical element. By this procedure the change of coefficient of reflection for the optical element surface, arising because of the variable thickness is eliminated. Magnesium oxide and zirconium dioxide were used as the film-forming materials. The paper presents experimentally obtained thickness distribution of the layer, which is a part of the phase compensating coating. A new class of optical coatings proposed in the paper can find its application for correcting the form of a wave front.

  19. Double layers in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-07-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. We briefly discuss the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Author)

  20. Double layers in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-01-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. The author briefly discusses the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Auth.)

  1. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  2. Whole grains and health: attitudes to whole grains against a prevailing background of increased marketing and promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMackin, Elaine; Dean, Moira; Woodside, Jayne V; McKinley, Michelle C

    2013-04-01

    To explore current awareness and perceptions of whole grain foods and perceived barriers and facilitators of whole grain consumption. Focus groups were conducted to investigate consumer attitudes to whole grains. Discussions were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Discussions were held throughout Northern Ireland with adults who were at least partly responsible for food shopping. Seven focus groups were held (n 43; thirty-three females, ten males). All participants were aware of the term 'whole grain' and had a basic level of awareness of their health benefits. Prominent barriers and facilitators of whole grain intake were related to perceptions of the sensory properties (most dominant factor) of whole grains; knowledge of how to locate, identify and use whole grains; and awareness of the health benefits, perceived cost and family influences. Parents of young children appeared to be altruistically motivated with many stating they wanted to ensure their children consumed whole grains in order to establish good eating habits. Participants were generally aware of the term 'whole grain'; however, even against a background of increased availability and promotion of whole grain foods, many key barriers to whole grain consumption were still evident. Alongside general education efforts, opportunities and challenges exist for the food industry to develop novel, but affordable, food products that are able to deliver whole grains in a wide variety of forms, including whole grains 'in disguise' for those who are most resistant to change.

  3. How desert varnish forms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Randall S.; Kolb, Vera M.; Lynne, Bridget Y.; Sephton, Mark A.; Mcloughlin, Nicola; Engel, Michael H.; Olendzenski, Lorraine; Brasier, Martin; Staley, James T., Jr.

    2005-09-01

    Desert varnish is a black, manganese-rich rock coating that is widespread on Earth. The mechanism underlying its formation, however, has remained unresolved. We present here new data and an associated model for how desert varnish forms, which substantively challenges previously accepted models. We tested both inorganic processes (e.g. clays and oxides cementing coatings) and microbial methods of formation. Techniques used in this preliminary study include SEM-EDAX with backscatter, HRTEM of focused ion beam prepared (FIB) wafers and several other methods including XRPD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and Tof-SIMS. The only hypothesis capable of explaining a high water content, the presence of organic compounds, an amorphous silica phase (opal-A) and lesser quantities of clays than previously reported, is a mechanism involving the mobilization and redistribution of silica. The discovery of silica in desert varnish suggests labile organics are preserved by interaction with condensing silicic acid. Organisms are not needed for desert varnish formation but Bacteria, Archaea, Eukarya, and other organic compounds are passively incorporated and preserved as organominerals. The rock coatings thus provide useful records of past environments on Earth and possibly other planets. Additionally this model also helps to explain the origin of key varnish and rock glaze features, including their hardness, the nature of the "glue" that binds heterogeneous components together, its layered botryoidal morphology, and its slow rate of formation.

  4. Double layer dynamics in a collisionless magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Satoru; Michelsen, P.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Schrittwieser, R.; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Saeki, Koichi; Sato, Noriyoshi.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations of double layer dynamics are performed in a Q-machine plasma by applying a positive step potential to a cold end-plate collector. The double layer created at the grounded plasma source just after the pulse is applied propagates towards the collector with the plasma flow speed. Large oscillations occur in the plasma current which is related to a recurring formation and propagation of the double layer. The current is limited during the propagation by a growing negative potential dip formed on the low-potential tail. Similar phenomena appear on the low-potential tail of the stationary double layer formed by applying a potential difference between two plasma sources. (author)

  5. Double layer dynamics in a collisionless magnetoplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iizuka, S.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1985-01-01

    Investigations of double layer dynamics are performed in a Q-machine plasma by applying a positive step potential to a cold end-plate collector. The double layer created at the grounded plasma source just after the pulse is applied propagates towards the collector with the plasma flow speed. Large...... oscillations occur in the plasma current which is related to a recurring formation and propagation of the double layer. The current is limited during the propagation by a growing negative potential dip formed on the low-potential tail. Similar phenomena appear on the low-potential tail of the stationary double...... layer formed by applying a potential difference between two plasma sources...

  6. Thermally-insulating layer for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The thermally-insulating layer has been designed both for insulating surfaces within the core of a nuclear reactor and transmitting loads such as the core-weight. Said layer comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles with smaller clearance between the tiles than between the bricks, the latter having a reduced cross-section against the tiles so as to be surrounded by relatively large interconnected ducts forming a continuous chamber behind the tile-layer in order to induce a substantial decreases in the transverse flow of the reactor-core coolant. The core preferably comprises hexagonal columns supported by rhomb-shaped plates, with channels distributed so as to mix the coolant of twelve columns. The plates are separated from support-tiles by means of pillars [fr

  7. Selenium implantation in epitaxial gallium arsenide layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, T.; Tokunaga, K.; Taka, S.; Yuge, Y.; Kohzu, H.

    1981-01-01

    Selenium implantation at room temperature in S-doped epitaxial GaAs layers as a means of the formation of n + layers has been investigated. Doping profiles for Se-implanted layers have been examined by a C-V technique and/or a differential Hall effect method. It has been shown that n + layers with a maximum carrier concentration of approx. equal to1.5 x 10 18 cm -3 can be formed by implantation followed by a 15 min annealing at 950 0 C. Contact resistance of ohmic electrodes is reduced by use of the Se-implanted n + layers, resulting in the improvement on GaAs FET performance. Measured minimum noise figure of the Se-implanted GaAs FETs is 0.74 dB at 4 GHz. (orig.)

  8. Diffractive Hyperbola of a Skin Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, V. P.; Vaiman, E. V.; Shipilov, S. È.; Prasath, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    Based on an analysis of physics of the phase transition from the quasistatic state field to the running wave field of elementary electric and magnetic dipoles located in absorbing media, it is concluded that the skin layer is formed at the boundary of this phase transition. The possibility is considered of obtaining the diffractive hyperbola of the skin layer and its subsequent application for sensing of objects in strongly absorbing media.

  9. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  10. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  11. Block copolymer/homopolymer dual-layer hollow fiber membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Hilke, Roland

    2014-12-01

    We manufactured the first time block copolymer dual-layer hollow fiber membranes and dual layer flat sheet membranes manufactured by double solution casting and phase inversion in water. The support porous layer was based on polystyrene and the selective layer with isopores was formed by micelle assembly of polystyrene-. b-poly-4-vinyl pyridine. The dual layers had an excellent interfacial adhesion and pore interconnectivity. The dual membranes showed pH response behavior like single layer block copolymer membranes with a low flux for pH values less than 3, a fast increase between pH4 and pH6 and a constant high flux level for pH values above 7. The dry/wet spinning process was optimized to produce dual layer hollow fiber membranes with polystyrene internal support layer and a shell block copolymer selective layer.

  12. Stationary Double Layers in a Collisionless Magnetoplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noriyoshi, Sato; Mieno, Tetsu; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    1983-01-01

    of the plate on the low-potential side, being accompanied with current limitation. This localized potential drop moves along the plasma column, but finally stops and results in the formation of the stationary double layer in the presence of sufficient plasma supply from the plate on the high-potential side.......Stationary double layers are generated in a magnetoplasma by applying potential differences between two heated plates on which the plasma is produced by surface ionization. By measuring the double-layer formation process, a localized potential drop is found to be formed initially in front...

  13. A double layer review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, L.P.

    1977-06-01

    A review of the main results on electrostatic double layers (sometimes called space charge layers or sheaths) obtained from theory, and laboratory and space experiments up to the spring of 1977 is given. By means of barium jets and satellite probes, double layers have now been found at the altitudes, earlier predicted theoretically. The general potential distribution above the auroral zone, suggested by inverted V-events and electric field reversals, is corroborated. (author)

  14. Economical Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Richard; Davis, Robert; Linford, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition is a self limiting deposition process that can produce films at a user specified height. At BYU we have designed a low cost and automated atomic layer deposition system. We have used the system to deposit silicon dioxide at room temperature using silicon tetrachloride and tetramethyl orthosilicate. Basics of atomic layer deposition, the system set up, automation techniques and our system's characterization are discussed.

  15. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The development of robust stable boundary layer parameterizations for use in NWP and climate models is hampered by the multiplicity of processes and their unknown interactions. As a result, these models suffer ...

  16. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is .gtoreq.2 and is the number of selective layers.

  17. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  18. Harmonic Maass forms and mock modular forms

    CERN Document Server

    Bringmann, Kathrin; Ono, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Modular forms and Jacobi forms play a central role in many areas of mathematics. Over the last 10-15 years, this theory has been extended to certain non-holomorphic functions, the so-called "harmonic Maass forms". The first glimpses of this theory appeared in Ramanujan's enigmatic last letter to G. H. Hardy written from his deathbed. Ramanujan discovered functions he called "mock theta functions" which over eighty years later were recognized as pieces of harmonic Maass forms. This book contains the essential features of the theory of harmonic Maass forms and mock modular forms, together with a wide variety of applications to algebraic number theory, combinatorics, elliptic curves, mathematical physics, quantum modular forms, and representation theory.

  19. Efficacy and safety of enzalutamide in patients 75 years or older with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results from PREVAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, J N; Baciarello, G; Armstrong, A J; Higano, C S; Iversen, P; Flaig, T W; Forer, D; Parli, T; Phung, D; Tombal, B; Beer, T M; Sternberg, C N

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer disproportionately affects older men. Because age affects treatment decisions, it is important to understand the efficacy and tolerability of therapies for advanced prostate cancer in elderly men. This analysis describes efficacy and safety outcomes in men aged ≥75 years who received enzalutamide, an androgen receptor inhibitor, in the phase III PREVAIL trial. PREVAIL was a randomised, double-blind, multinational study of oral enzalutamide 160 mg/day (N = 872) versus placebo (N = 845) in chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) were coprimary end points. Subgroup analysis of men aged ≥75 years (elderly) and men aged PREVAIL, median treatment duration was 16.6 and 5.0 months in the enzalutamide and placebo arms, respectively. In the elderly subgroup, OS was greater with enzalutamide than with placebo [32.4 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 27.7-not yet reached] versus 25.1 months (95% CI 22.6-28.0); hazard ratio (HR) = 0.61 (95% CI 0.47-0.79); P = 0.0001], as was rPFS [not yet reached (95% CI 12.3-not yet reached) versus 3.7 months (95% CI 3.6-5.3); HR = 0.17 (95% CI 0.12-0.24); P < 0.0001]. Irrespective of treatment assignment, incidence of AEs was similar between the two age groups, except for an overall higher incidence of falls among elderly patients than younger patients [84/609 (13.8%) versus 62/1106 (5.6%)] and among elderly patients receiving enzalutamide than those receiving placebo [61/317 (19.2%) versus 23/292 (7.9%)]. Elderly men benefited from treatment with enzalutamide in terms of OS and rPFS. Enzalutamide was well tolerated in the elderly subgroup and those aged <75 years. Age and enzalutamide treatment were associated with a higher incidence of falls. NCT01212991, ClinicalTrials.gov. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For

  20. Reassembly of S-layer proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) represent the outermost cell envelope component in a broad range of bacteria and archaea. They are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. They are highly porous protein mesh works with unit cell sizes in the range of 3 to 30 nm, and pore sizes of 2 to 8 nm. S-layers are usually 5 to 20 nm thick (in archaea, up to 70 nm). S-layer proteins are one of the most abundant biopolymers on earth. One of their key features, and the focus of this review, is the intrinsic capability of isolated native and recombinant S-layer proteins to form self-assembled mono- or double layers in suspension, at solid supports, the air-water interface, planar lipid films, liposomes, nanocapsules, and nanoparticles. The reassembly is entropy-driven and a fascinating example of matrix assembly following a multistage, non-classical pathway in which the process of S-layer protein folding is directly linked with assembly into extended clusters. Moreover, basic research on the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly, and function of S-layer proteins laid the foundation for their application in novel approaches in biotechnology, biomimetics, synthetic biology, and nanotechnology. (topical review)

  1. On good ETOL forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Sven

    1978-01-01

    This paper continues the study of ETOL forms and good EOL forms done by Maurer, Salomaa and Wood. It is proven that binary very complete ETOL forms exist, good synchronized ETOL forms exist and that no propagating or synchronized ETOL form can be very complete.......This paper continues the study of ETOL forms and good EOL forms done by Maurer, Salomaa and Wood. It is proven that binary very complete ETOL forms exist, good synchronized ETOL forms exist and that no propagating or synchronized ETOL form can be very complete....

  2. Solar cell modules with improved backskin and methods for forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoka, Jack I.

    1998-04-21

    A laminated solar cell module with a backskin layer that reduces the materials and labor required during the manufacturing process. The solar cell module includes a rigid front support layer formed of light transmitting material having first and second surfaces. A transparent encapsulant layer has a first surface disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. A plurality of interconnected solar cells have a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer is formed of a thermoplastic olefin, which includes first ionomer, a second ionomer, glass fiber, and carbon black. A first surface of the backskin layer is disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells. The transparent encapsulant layer and the backskin layer, in combination, encapsulate the interconnected solar cells. An end portion of the backskin layer can be wrapped around the edge of the module for contacting the first surface of the front support layer to form an edge seal. A laminated solar cell module with a backskin layer that reduces the materials and labor required during the manufacturing process. The solar cell module includes a rigid front support layer formed of light transmitting material having first and second surfaces. A transparent encapsulant layer has a first surface disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. A plurality of interconnected solar cells have a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer is formed of a thermoplastic olefin, which includes first ionomer, a second ionomer, glass fiber, and carbon black. A first surface of the backskin layer is disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells. The transparent encapsulant layer and the backskin layer, in combination, encapsulate the interconnected solar cells. An end portion of the backskin layer can be wrapped around the edge of the

  3. Multi-layer monochromator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Caspar, D.L.D.

    1975-01-01

    This invention provides an artificial monochromator crystal for efficiently selecting a narrow band of neutron wavelengths from a neutron beam having a Maxwellian wavelength distribution, by providing on a substrate a plurality of germanium layers, and alternate periodic layers of a different metal having tailored thicknesses, shapes, and volumetric and neutron scattering densities. (U.S.)

  4. Ozone Layer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Research Centers Contact Us Share Ozone Layer Protection The stratospheric ozone layer is Earth’s “sunscreen” – protecting ... GreenChill Partnership Responsible Appliance Disposal (RAD) Program Ozone Protection vs. Ozone Pollution This website addresses stratospheric ozone ...

  5. Skin layer mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerligs, M.

    2010-01-01

    The human skin is composed of several layers, each with an unique structure and function. Knowledge about the mechanical behavior of these skin layers is important for clinical and cosmetic research, such as the development of personal care products and the understanding of skin diseases. Until

  6. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  7. The PREVAIL trial of enzalutamide in men with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Post hoc analysis of Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choung-Soo; Theeuwes, Ad; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Choi, Young Deuk; Chung, Byung Ha; Lee, Hyun Moo; Lee, Kang Hyun; Lee, Sang Eun

    2016-05-01

    This post hoc analysis evaluated treatment effects, safety, and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Korean patients in the phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial. Asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed on androgen deprivation therapy received 160 mg/d oral enzalutamide or placebo (1:1) until death or discontinuation due to radiographic progression or skeletal-related event and initiation of subsequent therapy. Coprimary end points were centrally assessed radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included investigator-assessed rPFS, time to initiation of chemotherapy, time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression, PSA response (≥50% decline), and time to skeletal-related event. Of 1,717 total patients, 78 patients were enrolled in Korea (enzalutamide, n=40; placebo, n=38). Hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for enzalutamide versus placebo were 0.23 (0.02-2.24) for centrally assessed rPFS, 0.77 (0.28-2.15) for OS, 0.21 (0.08-0.51) for time to chemotherapy, and 0.31 (0.17-0.56) for time to PSA progression. A PSA response was observed in 70.0% of enzalutamide-treated and 10.5% of placebo-treated Korean patients. Adverse events of grade ≥3 occurred in 33% of enzalutamide-treated and 11% of placebo-treated Korean patients, with median treatment durations of 13.0 and 5.1 months, respectively. At 13 weeks, the plasma concentration of enzalutamide plus N-desmethyl enzalutamide was similar in Korean and non-Korean patients (geometric mean ratio, 1.04; 90% confidence interval, 0.97-1.10). In Korean patients, treatment effects and safety of enzalutamide were consistent with those observed in the overall PREVAIL study population (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01212991).

  8. Comparison of the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial coronary angiography via right versus left radial artery approaches (from the PREVAIL Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe G L; Nazzaro, Marco; Berni, Andrea; Patti, Giuseppe; Patrizi, Roberto; Pironi, Bruno; Mazzarotto, Pietro; Gioffrè, Gaetano; Speciale, Giulio; Pristipino, Christian

    2012-09-15

    It remains undefined if transradial coronary angiography from a right or left radial arterial approach differs in real-world practice. To address this issue, we performed a subanalysis of the PREVAIL study. The PREVAIL study was a prospective, multicenter, observational survey of unselected consecutive patients undergoing invasive cardiovascular procedures over a 1-month observation period, specifically aimed at assessing the outcomes of radial approach in the contemporary real world. The choice of arterial approach was left to the discretion of the operator. Prespecified end points of this subanalysis were procedural characteristics. Of 1,052 patients consecutively enrolled, 509 patients underwent transradial catheterization, 304 with a right radial and 205 with a left radial approach. Procedural success rates were similar between the 2 groups. Compared to the left radial group, the right radial group had longer procedure duration (46 ± 29 vs 33 ± 24 minutes, p <0.0001) and fluoroscopy time (765 ± 787 vs 533 ± 502, p <0.0001). At multivariate analysis, including a parsimonious propensity score for the choice of left radial approach, duration of procedure (beta coefficient 11.38, p <0.001) and total dose-area product (beta coefficient 11.38, p <0.001) were independently associated with the choice of the left radial artery approach. The operator's proficiency in right/left radial approach did not influence study results. In conclusion, right and left radial approaches are feasible and effective to perform percutaneous procedures. In the contemporary real world, however, the left radial route is associated with shorter procedures and lower radiologic exposure than the right radial approach, independently of an operator's proficiency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. PREvaIL, an integrative approach for inferring catalytic residues using sequence, structural, and network features in a machine-learning framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiangning; Li, Fuyi; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Haffari, Gholamreza; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Chou, Kuo-Chen; Webb, Geoffrey I

    2018-04-14

    Determining the catalytic residues in an enzyme is critical to our understanding the relationship between protein sequence, structure, function, and enhancing our ability to design novel enzymes and their inhibitors. Although many enzymes have been sequenced, and their primary and tertiary structures determined, experimental methods for enzyme functional characterization lag behind. Because experimental methods used for identifying catalytic residues are resource- and labor-intensive, computational approaches have considerable value and are highly desirable for their ability to complement experimental studies in identifying catalytic residues and helping to bridge the sequence-structure-function gap. In this study, we describe a new computational method called PREvaIL for predicting enzyme catalytic residues. This method was developed by leveraging a comprehensive set of informative features extracted from multiple levels, including sequence, structure, and residue-contact network, in a random forest machine-learning framework. Extensive benchmarking experiments on eight different datasets based on 10-fold cross-validation and independent tests, as well as side-by-side performance comparisons with seven modern sequence- and structure-based methods, showed that PREvaIL achieved competitive predictive performance, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and area under the precision-recall curve ranging from 0.896 to 0.973 and from 0.294 to 0.523, respectively. We demonstrated that this method was able to capture useful signals arising from different levels, leveraging such differential but useful types of features and allowing us to significantly improve the performance of catalytic residue prediction. We believe that this new method can be utilized as a valuable tool for both understanding the complex sequence-structure-function relationships of proteins and facilitating the characterization of novel enzymes lacking functional annotations

  10. Economic impact of enoxaparin versus unfractionated heparin for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients with acute ischemic stroke: a hospital perspective of the PREVAIL trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineo, Graham; Lin, Jay; Stern, Lee; Subrahmanian, Tarun; Annemans, Lieven

    2012-03-01

    The PREVAIL (Prevention of VTE [venous thromboembolism] after acute ischemic stroke with LMWH [low-molecular-weight heparin] and UFH [unfractionated heparin]) study demonstrated a 43% VTE risk reduction with enoxaparin versus UFH in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). A 1% rate of symptomatic intracranial and major extracranial hemorrhage was observed in both groups. To determine the economic impact, from a hospital perspective, of enoxaparin versus UFH for VTE prophylaxis after AIS. A decision-analytic model was constructed and hospital-based costs analyzed using clinical information from PREVAIL. Total hospital costs were calculated based on mean costs in the Premier™ database and from wholesalers acquisition data. Costs were also compared in patients with severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score ≥14) and less severe stroke (NIHSS score <14). The average cost per patient due to VTE or bleeding events was lower with enoxaparin versus UFH ($422 vs $662, respectively; net savings $240). The average anticoagulant cost, including drug-administration cost per patient, was lower with UFH versus enoxaparin ($259 vs $360, respectively; net savings $101). However, when both clinical events and drug-acquisition costs were considered, the total hospital cost was lower with enoxaparin versus UFH ($782 vs $922, respectively; savings $140). Hospital cost-savings were greatest ($287) in patients with NIHSS scores ≥14. The higher drug cost of enoxaparin was offset by the reduction in clinical events as compared to the use of UFH for VTE prophylaxis after an AIS, particularly in patients with severe stroke. Copyright © 2011 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  11. Five-Year Outcomes of the First Pivotal Clinical Trial of Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Japan (PREVAIL JAPAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Yoshiki; Takayama, Morimasa; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Tobaru, Tetsuya; Maeda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Sakata, Yasushi

    2017-07-25

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been an alternative less invasive therapy for high-surgical risk/inoperable patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS) in Japan. We report 5-year outcomes of the first pivotal clinical trial of TAVR in Japan (PREVAIL JAPAN).Methods and Results:A total of 64 patients with AS who were considered unsuitable candidates for surgery were enrolled at 3 centers in Japan (mean age: 84.3±6.1 years, female: 65.6%, STS score: 9.0±4.5%). Transfemoral approach (TF) and transapical approach (TA) was performed in 37 patients and 27 patients, respectively. At 5 years, freedom from all-cause death was 52.7% (TF: 51.3%, TA: 56.3%). Risk of all stroke at 5-year was 15.8% (TF: 8.9%, TA: 25.5%) and risk of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events at 5 years was 58.0% (TF: 51.3%, TA: 69.2%). Mild or greater aortic regurgitation (AR) at 1 week was not associated with increased all-cause death at 5 years (69.1%) compared with none or trace AR (48.3%) (P=0.184). Patients with high STS score (>8) had higher mortality rate than those with low STS scores (≤8). The 5-year data from PREVAIL JAPAN show the clinical benefit of TAVR and suggest that balloon-expandable TAVR is an effective treatment option for Japanese patients with severe AS who are not suitable for surgery. (Funded by Edwards Lifesciences Limited; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01113983.).

  12. Development of boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.

    1980-01-01

    Boundary layers develop along the blade surfaces on both the pressure and the suction side in a non-stationary flow field. This is due to the fact that there is a strongly fluctuating flow on the downstream blade row, especially as a result of the wakes of the upstream blade row. The author investigates the formation of boundary layers under non-stationary flow conditions and tries to establish a model describing the non-stationary boundary layer. For this purpose, plate boundary layers are measured, at constant flow rates but different interferent frequency and variable pressure gradients. By introducing the sample technique, measurements of the non-stationary boundary layer become possible, and the flow rate fluctuation can be divided in its components, i.e. stochastic turbulence and periodical fluctuation. (GL) [de

  13. The Transient Intermediate Plexiform Layer, a Plexiform Layer-like Structure Temporarily Existing in the Inner Nuclear Layer in Developing Rat Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Hong-Lim; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, In-Beom

    2018-02-01

    The retina is a highly specialised part of the brain responsible for visual processing. It is well-laminated; three layers containing five different types of neurons are compartmentalised by two synaptic layers. Among the retinal layers, the inner nuclear layer (INL) is composed of horizontal, bipolar, and amacrine cell types. Bipolar cells form one sublayer in the distal half of the IPL, while amacrine cells form another sublayer in the proximal half, without any border-like structure. Here, we report that a plexiform layer-like structure exists temporarily in the border between the bipolar and amacrine sublayers in the INL in the rat retina during retinal development. This transient intermediate plexiform layer (TIPL) appeared at postnatal day (PD) 7 and then disappeared around PD 12. Most apoptotic cells in the INL were found near the TIPL. These results suggest that the TIPL may contribute to the formation of sublayers and the cell number limit in the INL.

  14. Durable superhydrophobic surfaces made by intensely connecting a bipolar top layer to the substrate with a middle connecting layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Jinghui; Zhang, Li-Zhi

    2017-08-30

    This study reported a simple fabrication method for a durable superhydrophobic surface. The superhydrophobic top layer of the durable superhydrophobic surface was connected intensely to the substrate through a middle connecting layer. Glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (KH-560) after hydrolysis was used to obtain a hydrophilic middle connecting layer. It could be adhered to the hydrophilic substrate by covalent bonds. Ring-open reaction with octadecylamine let the KH-560 middle layer form a net-like structure. The net-like sturcture would then encompass and station the silica particles that were used to form the coarse micro structures, intensely to increase the durability. The top hydrophobic layer with nano-structures was formed on the KH-560 middle layer. It was obtained by a bipolar nano-silica solution modified by hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS). This layer was connected to the middle layer intensely by the polar Si hydroxy groups, while the non-polar methyl groups on the surface, accompanied by the micro and nano structures, made the surface rather hydrophobic. The covalently interfacial interactions between the substrate and the middle layer, and between the middle layer and the top layer, strengthened the durability of the superhydrophobic surface. The abrasion test results showed that the superhydrophobic surface could bear 180 abrasion cycles on 1200 CW sandpaper under 2 kPa applied pressure.

  15. Unsplit bipolar pulse forming line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Mark A [Pleasanton, CA

    2011-05-24

    A bipolar pulse forming transmission line module and system for linear induction accelerators having first, second, third, and fourth planar conductors which form a sequentially arranged interleaved stack having opposing first and second ends, with dielectric layers between the conductors. The first and second planar conductors are connected to each other at the first end, and the first and fourth planar conductors are connected to each other at the second end via a shorting plate. The third planar conductor is electrically connectable to a high voltage source, and an internal switch functions to short at the first end a high voltage from the third planar conductor to the fourth planar conductor to produce a bipolar pulse at the acceleration axis with a zero net time integral. Improved access to the switch is enabled by an aperture through the shorting plate and the proximity of the aperture to the switch.

  16. On the porosity of barrier layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mignot

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Barrier layers are defined as the layer between the pycnocline and the thermocline when the latter are different as a result of salinity stratification. We present a revisited 2-degree resolution global climatology of monthly mean oceanic Barrier Layer (BL thickness first proposed by de Boyer Montégut et al. (2007. In addition to using an extended data set, we present a modified computation method that addresses the observed porosity of BLs. We name porosity the fact that barrier layers distribution can, in some areas, be very uneven regarding the space and time scales that are considered. This implies an intermittent alteration of air-sea exchanges by the BL. Therefore, it may have important consequences for the climatic impact of BLs. Differences between the two computation methods are small for robust BLs that are formed by large-scale processes. However, the former approach can significantly underestimate the thickness of short and/or localized barrier layers. This is especially the case for barrier layers formed by mesoscale mechanisms (under the intertropical convergence zone for example and along western boundary currents and equatorward of the sea surface salinity subtropical maxima. Complete characterisation of regional BL dynamics therefore requires a description of the robustness of BL distribution to assess the overall impact of BLs on the process of heat exchange between the ocean interior and the atmosphere.

  17. Protein and lipid oxidation affect the viscoelasticity of whey protein layers at the oil-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berton-Carabin, Claire C.; Schroder, Anja; Rovalino-Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin; Sagis, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Protein and lipid oxidation are prevailing issues that negatively affect the nutritional and sensory quality of food emulsions. It is probable that such oxidative modifications affect the functional properties of proteins, and in particular their ability to form densely packed, interconnected

  18. The Application of Layer Theory to Design: The Control Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Langton, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of design layers proposed by Gibbons ("An Architectural Approach to Instructional Design." Routledge, New York, 2014) asserts that each layer of an instructional design is related to a body of theory closely associated with the concerns of that particular layer. This study focuses on one layer, the control layer, examining…

  19. Thin film photovoltaic devices with a minimally conductive buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Teresa M.; Burst, James

    2016-11-15

    A thin film photovoltaic device (100) with a tunable, minimally conductive buffer (128) layer is provided. The photovoltaic device (100) may include a back contact (150), a transparent front contact stack (120), and an absorber (140) positioned between the front contact stack (120) and the back contact (150). The front contact stack (120) may include a low resistivity transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layer (124) and a buffer layer (128) that is proximate to the absorber layer (140). The photovoltaic device (100) may also include a window layer (130) between the buffer layer (128) and the absorber (140). In some cases, the buffer layer (128) is minimally conductive, with its resistivity being tunable, and the buffer layer (128) may be formed as an alloy from a host oxide and a high-permittivity oxide. The high-permittivity oxide may further be chosen to have a bandgap greater than the host oxide.

  20. Electroweak form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    The present status of electroweak nucleon form factors and the N - Δ transition form factors is reviewed. Particularly the determination of dipole mass M A in the axial vector form factor is discussed

  1. Will Exports Prevail over Austerity?

    OpenAIRE

    Vasily Astrov; Vladimir Gligorov; Peter Havlik; Mario Holzner; Gabor Hunya; Kazimierz Laski; Sebastian Leitner; Zdenek Lukas; Anton Mihailov; Olga Pindyuk; Leon Podkaminer; Josef Pöschl; Sandor Richter; Waltraut Urban; Hermine Vidovic

    2010-01-01

    The Central, East and Southeast European (CESEE) economies will experience on average a minor rebound of economic growth to 1% in 2010 which will speed up to 2.5% in 2011 and 3.5% in 2012. GDP growth will be higher in the CIS countries and in Turkey, about average in the Central European NMS and lower in the SEE countries and the Baltics. Growth is currently driven mostly by exports which should outweigh the dampening effects of the austerity measures. Whether the countries will actually bene...

  2. Proliferating macrophages prevail in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J

    2013-09-01

    Macrophages accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions during the inflammation that is part of atherosclerosis development and progression. A new study in mice indicates that the accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques depends on local macrophage proliferation rather than the recruitment of circulating monocytes.

  3. Thermionic detector with multiple layered ionization source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for analyzing specific chemical substances in a gaseous environment comprises a thermionic source formed of multiple layers of ceramic material composition, an electrical current instrumentality for heating the thermionic source to operating temperatures in the range of 100 0 C. to 1000 0 C., an instrumentality for exposing the surface of the thermionic source to contact with the specific chemical substances for the purpose of forming gas phase ionization of the substances by a process of electrical charge emission from the surface, a collector electrode disposed adjacent to the thermiomic source, an instrumentality for biasing the thermionic source at an electrical potential which causes the gas phase ions to move toward the collector, and an instrumentality for measuring the ion current arriving at the collector. The thermionic source is constructed of a metallic heater element molded inside a sub-layer of hardened ceramic cement material impregnated with a metallic compound additive which is non-corrosive to the heater element during operation. The sub-layer is further covered by a surface-layer formed of hardened ceramic cement material impregnated with an alkali metal compound in a manner that eliminates corrosive contact of the alkali compounds with the heater element. The sub-layer further protects the heater element from contact with gas environments which may be corrosive. The specific ionization of different chemical substances is varied over a wide range by changing the composition and temperature of the thermionic source, and by changing the composition of the gas environment

  4. Topologically nontrivial quantum layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carron, G.; Exner, P.; Krejcirik, D.

    2004-01-01

    Given a complete noncompact surface Σ embedded in R 3 , we consider the Dirichlet Laplacian in the layer Ω that is defined as a tubular neighborhood of constant width about Σ. Using an intrinsic approach to the geometry of Ω, we generalize the spectral results of the original paper by Duclos et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 223, 13 (2001)] to the situation when Σ does not possess poles. This enables us to consider topologically more complicated layers and state new spectral results. In particular, we are interested in layers built over surfaces with handles or several cylindrically symmetric ends. We also discuss more general regions obtained by compact deformations of certain Ω

  5. III-V group compound semiconductor light-emitting element having a doped tantalum barrier layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oanna, Y.; Ozawa, N.; Yamashita, M.; Yasuda, N.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a III-V Group compound semiconductor light-emitting element having a III-V Group compound semiconductor body with a p-n junction and including a p-type layer involved in forming the p-n junction; and a multi-layer electrode mounted on the p-type layer of the semiconductor body. The electrode comprises a first layer of gold alloy containing a small amount of beryllium or zinc and formed in direct contact with the p-type layer of the semiconductor body and an uppermost layer formed of gold or aluminum. A tantalum layer doped with carbon, nitrogen and/or oxygen is formed between the first layer and the uppermost layer by means of vacuum vapor deposition

  6. Moon (Form-Origin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiapas, Elias; Soumelidou, Despina; Tsiapas, Christos

    2017-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  7. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A; Thomas, Edwin L

    2012-01-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  8. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P.; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A.; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2012-11-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  9. Structure of gels layers with cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokusaev, B. G.; Karlov, S. P.; Vyazmin, A. V.; Nekrasov, D. A.; Zakharov, N. S.; Khramtsov, D. P.; Skladnev, D. A.; Tyupa, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    The structure of two-layer agarose gels containing yeast cells is investigated experimentally by spectrometry, to shed a light on the theoretical foundations for the development of bioreactors by the method of 3D bioprinting. Due to division, cells overcome the layer of the dispersion phase separating successively applied layers of the agarose gel. However a gel layer of 100 μm thick with a high concentration of silver nanoparticles completely excludes the infiltration of yeast cells through it. A special sort of agarose is suggested where the concentration of silver nanoparticles formed by cells from salt of silver can serve as an indicator of the state of the yeast cells in the volume of the gel.

  10. Optimization of multi-layered metallic shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Dor, G.; Dubinsky, A.; Elperin, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We investigated the problem of optimization of a multi-layered metallic shield. → The maximum ballistic limit velocity is a criterion of optimization. → The sequence of materials and the thicknesses of layers in the shield are varied. → The general problem is reduced to the problem of Geometric Programming. → Analytical solutions are obtained for two- and three-layered shields. - Abstract: We investigate the problem of optimization of multi-layered metallic shield whereby the goal is to determine the sequence of materials and the thicknesses of the layers that provide the maximum ballistic limit velocity of the shield. Optimization is performed under the following constraints: fixed areal density of the shield, the upper bound on the total thickness of the shield and the bounds on the thicknesses of the plates manufactured from every material. The problem is reduced to the problem of Geometric Programming which can be solved numerically using known methods. For the most interesting in practice cases of two-layered and three-layered shields the solution is obtained in the explicit analytical form.

  11. Arctic Mixed Layer Dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morison, James

    2003-01-01

    .... Over the years we have sought to understand the heat and mass balance of the mixed layer, marginal ice zone processes, the Arctic internal wave and mixing environment, summer and winter leads, and convection...

  12. Layered inorganic solids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čejka, Jiří; Morris, R. E.; Nachtigall, P.; Roth, Wieslaw Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 27 (2014), s. 10274-10275 ISSN 1477-9226 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : layered inorganic solids * physical chemistry * catalysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  13. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  14. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  15. The Bottom Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H; Lentz, Steven J

    2018-01-03

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  16. The Bottom Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2018-01-01

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  17. Contour forming of metals by laser peening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for forming shapes and contours in metal sections by generating laser induced compressive stress on the surface of the metal workpiece. The laser process can generate deep compressive stresses to shape even thick components without inducing unwanted tensile stress at the metal surface. The precision of the laser-induced stress enables exact prediction and subsequent contouring of parts. A light beam of 10 to 100 J/pulse is imaged to create an energy fluence of 60 to 200 J/cm.sup.2 on an absorptive layer applied over a metal surface. A tamping layer of water is flowed over the absorptive layer. The absorption of laser light causes a plasma to form and consequently creates a shock wave that induces a deep residual compressive stress into the metal. The metal responds to this residual stress by bending.

  18. p-Type semiconducting nickel oxide as an efficiency-enhancing anodal interfacial layer in bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael D; Buchholz, Donald B; Marks, Tobin J; Chang, Robert P. H.

    2014-11-25

    The present invention, in one aspect, relates to a solar cell. In one embodiment, the solar cell includes an anode, a p-type semiconductor layer formed on the anode, and an active organic layer formed on the p-type semiconductor layer, where the active organic layer has an electron-donating organic material and an electron-accepting organic material.

  19. Organic photovoltaic device with interfacial layer and method of fabricating same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Tobin J.; Hains, Alexander W.

    2013-03-19

    An organic photovoltaic device and method of forming same. In one embodiment, the organic photovoltaic device has an anode, a cathode, an active layer disposed between the anode and the cathode; and an interfacial layer disposed between the anode and the active layer, the interfacial layer comprising 5,5'-bis[(p-trichlorosilylpropylphenyl)phenylamino]-2,2'-bithiophene (PABTSi.sub.2).

  20. Neutron Diffraction from the Second Layer of 4He on Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Costa Carneiro, Kim; Passell, L.; Thomlinson, W.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used to study the second atomic layer of **4He adsorbed on graphite. As the **4He-coverage exceeds the first layer, the second initially forms a fluid phase. But when there is enough **4He in the third layer to compress the second, this layer solidifies. The structure...

  1. Multi-layer coatings for bipolar rechargeable batteries with enhanced terminal voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Kaschmitter, James; Pierce, Steve

    2017-06-06

    A method for producing a multi-layer bipolar coated cell according to one embodiment includes applying a first active cathode material above a substrate to form a first cathode; applying a first solid-phase ionically-conductive electrolyte material above the first cathode to form a first electrode separation layer; applying a first active anode material above the first electrode separation layer to form a first anode; applying an electrically conductive barrier layer above the first anode; applying a second active cathode material above the anode material to form a second cathode; applying a second solid-phase ionically-conductive electrolyte material above the second cathode to form a second electrode separation layer; applying a second active anode material above the second electrode separation layer to form a second anode; and applying a metal material above the second anode to form a metal coating section. In another embodiment, the anode is formed prior to the cathode. Cells are also disclosed.

  2. Improved adhesion of metal oxide layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide layer, which method comprises the steps of: a) mixing zinc acetate and AlOH (OAc)2 in water or methanol and b) filtering out solids; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and AlOH (OAc)2 in aqueous or m...

  3. Origin of the outer layer of martian low-aspect ratio layered ejecta craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Joseph M.; Wilson, Lionel; Barlow, Nadine G.

    2015-01-01

    Low-aspect ratio layered ejecta (LARLE) craters are one of the most enigmatic types of martian layered ejecta craters. We propose that the extensive outer layer of these craters is produced through the same base surge mechanism as that which produced the base surge deposits generated by near-surface, buried nuclear and high-explosive detonations. However, the LARLE layers have higher aspect ratios compared with base surge deposits from explosion craters, a result of differences in thicknesses of these layers. This characteristics is probably caused by the addition of large amounts of small particles of dust and ice derived from climate-related mantles of snow, ice and dust in the areas where LARLE craters form. These deposits are likely to be quickly stabilized (order of a few days to a few years) from eolian erosion by formation of duricrust produced by diffusion of water vapor out of the deposits.

  4. Semiconductor Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals with Novel Layer-by-Layer Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Iwamoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional photonic crystals (3D PhCs are a fascinating platform for manipulating photons and controlling their interactions with matter. One widely investigated structure is the layer-by-layer woodpile structure, which possesses a complete photonic bandgap. On the other hand, other types of 3D PhC structures also offer various possibilities for controlling light by utilizing the three dimensional nature of structures. In this article, we discuss our recent research into novel types of layer-by-layer structures, including the experimental demonstration of a 3D PhC nanocavity formed in a <110>-layered diamond structure and the realization of artificial optical activity in rotationally stacked woodpile structures.

  5. A new lubricant carrier for metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Bay, Niels; Tang, Peter Torben

    2009-01-01

    A lubricant carrier for metal forming processes is developed. Surfaces with pores of micrometer size for entrapping lubricant are generated by electrochemical deposition of an alloy, consisting of two immiscible metals, of which one metal subsequently is etched away leaving 5 mu m layers with a s...... extrusion at high reduction and excessive stroke comparing with conventionally lubrication using phosphate coating and soap....

  6. Adaptive municipal electronic forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Pieternel; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Guiderdoni-Jourdain, Karine; Oiry, Ewan

    Adaptation of electronic forms (e-forms) seems to be a step forward to reduce the burden for people who fill in forms. Municipalities more and more offer e-forms online that can be used by citizens to request a municipal product or service or by municipal employees to place a request on behalf of a

  7. Radiographic Progression-Free Survival as a Clinically Meaningful End Point in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: The PREVAIL Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathkopf, Dana E; Beer, Tomasz M; Loriot, Yohann; Higano, Celestia S; Armstrong, Andrew J; Sternberg, Cora N; de Bono, Johann S; Tombal, Bertrand; Parli, Teresa; Bhattacharya, Suman; Phung, De; Krivoshik, Andrew; Scher, Howard I; Morris, Michael J

    2018-05-01

    Drug development for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has been limited by a lack of clinically relevant trial end points short of overall survival (OS). Radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) as defined by the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group 2 (PCWG2) is a candidate end point that represents a clinically meaningful benefit to patients. To demonstrate the robustness of the PCWG2 definition and to examine the relationship between rPFS and OS. PREVAIL was a phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multinational study that enrolled 1717 chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer from September 2010 through September 2012. The data were analyzed in November 2016. Patients were randomized 1:1 to enzalutamide 160 mg or placebo until confirmed radiographic disease progression or a skeletal-related event and initiation of either cytotoxic chemotherapy or an investigational agent for prostate cancer treatment. Sensitivity analyses (SAs) of investigator-assessed rPFS were performed using the final rPFS data cutoff (May 6, 2012; 439 events; SA1) and the interim OS data cutoff (September 16, 2013; 540 events; SA2). Additional SAs using investigator-assessed rPFS from the final rPFS data cutoff assessed the impact of skeletal-related events (SA3), clinical progression (SA4), a confirmatory scan for soft-tissue disease progression (SA5), and all deaths regardless of time after study drug discontinuation (SA6). Correlations between investigator-assessed rPFS (SA2) and OS were calculated using Spearman ρ and Kendall τ via Clayton copula. In the 1717 men (mean age, 72.0 [range, 43.0-93.0] years in enzalutamide arm and 71.0 [range, 42.0-93.0] years in placebo arm), enzalutamide significantly reduced risk of radiographic progression or death in all SAs, with hazard ratios of 0.22 (SA1; 95% CI, 0.18-0.27), 0.31 (SA2; 95% CI, 0.27-0.35), 0.21 (SA3; 95% CI, 0.18-0.26), 0.21 (SA4; 95% CI, 0.17-0.26), 0

  8. Enzalutamide in Japanese patients with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: A post-hoc analysis of the placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Go; Yonese, Junji; Fukagai, Takashi; Kamba, Tomomi; Nishimura, Kazuo; Nozawa, Masahiro; Mansbach, Hank; Theeuwes, Ad; Beer, Tomasz M; Tombal, Bertrand; Ueda, Takeshi

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the treatment effects, safety and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Japanese patients. This was a post-hoc analysis of the phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial. Asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing on androgen deprivation therapy were randomized one-to-one to 160 mg/day oral enzalutamide or placebo until discontinuation on radiographic progression or skeletal-related event and initiation of subsequent antineoplastic therapy. Coprimary end-points were centrally assessed radiographic progression-free survival and overall survival. Secondary end-points were investigator-assessed radiographic progression-free survival, time to initiation of chemotherapy, time to prostate-specific antigen progression, prostate-specific antigen response (≥50% decline) and time to skeletal-related event. Of 1717 patients, 61 were enrolled in Japan (enzalutamide, n = 28; placebo, n = 33); hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of 0.30 for centrally assessed radiographic progression-free survival (0.03-2.95), 0.59 for overall survival (0.20-1.8), 0.46 for time to chemotherapy (0.22-0.96) and 0.36 for time to prostate-specific antigen progression (0.17-0.75) showed the treatment benefit of enzalutamide over the placebo. Prostate-specific antigen responses were observed in 60.7% of enzalutamide-treated men versus 21.2% of placebo-treated men. Plasma concentrations of enzalutamide were higher in Japanese patients: the geometric mean ratio of Japanese/non-Japanese patients was 1.126 (90% confidence interval 1.018-1.245) at 13 weeks. Treatment-related adverse events grade ≥3 occurred in 3.6% of enzalutamide- and 6.1% of placebo-treated Japanese patients. Treatment effects and safety in Japanese patients were generally consistent with the overall results from PREVAIL. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Urology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on

  9. Identifying factors that predict the choice and success rate of radial artery catheterisation in contemporary real world cardiology practice: a sub-analysis of the PREVAIL study data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristipino, Christian; Roncella, Adriana; Trani, Carlo; Nazzaro, Marco S; Berni, Andrea; Di Sciascio, Germano; Sciahbasi, Alessandro; Musarò, Salvatore Donato; Mazzarotto, Pietro; Gioffrè, Gaetano; Speciale, Giulio

    2010-06-01

    To assess: the reasons behind an operator choosing to perform radial artery catheterisation (RAC) as against femoral arterial catheterisation, and to explore why RAC may fail in the real world. A pre-determined analysis of PREVAIL study database was performed. Relevant data were collected in a prospective, observational survey of 1,052 consecutive patients undergoing invasive cardiovascular procedures at nine Italian hospitals over a one month observation period. By multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of RAC choice were having the procedure performed: (1) at a high procedural volume centre; and (2) by an operator who performs a high volume of radial procedures; clinical variables played no statistically significant role. RAC failure was predicted independently by (1) a lower operator propensity to use RAC; and (2) the presence of obstructive peripheral artery disease. A 10-fold lower rate of RAC failure was observed among operators who perform RAC for > 85% of their personal caseload than among those who use RAC < 25% of the time (3.8% vs. 33.0%, respectively); by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, no threshold value for operator RAC volume predicted RAC failure. A routine RAC in all-comers is superior to a selective strategy in terms of feasibility and success rate.

  10. Protective layer formation on magnesium in cell culture medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagener, V.; Virtanen, S., E-mail: virtanen@ww.uni-erlangen.de

    2016-06-01

    In the past, different studies showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) or similar calcium phosphates can be precipitated on Mg during immersion in simulated body fluids. However, at the same time, in most cases a dark grey or black layer is built under the white HA crystals. This layer seems to consist as well of calcium phosphates. Until now, neither the morphology nor its influence on Mg corrosion have been investigated in detail. In this work commercially pure magnesium (cp) was immersed in cell culture medium for one, three and five days at room temperature and in the incubator (37 °C, 5% CO{sub 2}). In addition, the influence of proteins on the formation of a corrosion layer was investigated by adding 20% of fetal calf serum (FCS) to the cell culture medium in the incubator. In order to analyze the formed layers, SEM images of cross sections, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements were carried out. Characterization of the corrosion behavior was achieved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and by potentio-dynamic polarization in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) at 37 °C. Surface analysis showed that all formed layers consist mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. For the immersion at room temperature the Ca/P ratio indicates the formation of HA, while in the incubator probably pre-stages to HA are formed. The different immersion conditions lead to a variation in layer thicknesses. However, electrochemical characterization shows that the layer thickness does not influence the corrosion resistance of magnesium. The main influencing factor for the corrosion behavior is the layer morphology. Thus, immersion at room temperature leads to the highest corrosion protection due to the formation of a compact outer layer. Layers formed in the incubator show much worse performances due to completely porous

  11. Protective layer formation on magnesium in cell culture medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagener, V.; Virtanen, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the past, different studies showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) or similar calcium phosphates can be precipitated on Mg during immersion in simulated body fluids. However, at the same time, in most cases a dark grey or black layer is built under the white HA crystals. This layer seems to consist as well of calcium phosphates. Until now, neither the morphology nor its influence on Mg corrosion have been investigated in detail. In this work commercially pure magnesium (cp) was immersed in cell culture medium for one, three and five days at room temperature and in the incubator (37 °C, 5% CO_2). In addition, the influence of proteins on the formation of a corrosion layer was investigated by adding 20% of fetal calf serum (FCS) to the cell culture medium in the incubator. In order to analyze the formed layers, SEM images of cross sections, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements were carried out. Characterization of the corrosion behavior was achieved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and by potentio-dynamic polarization in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) at 37 °C. Surface analysis showed that all formed layers consist mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. For the immersion at room temperature the Ca/P ratio indicates the formation of HA, while in the incubator probably pre-stages to HA are formed. The different immersion conditions lead to a variation in layer thicknesses. However, electrochemical characterization shows that the layer thickness does not influence the corrosion resistance of magnesium. The main influencing factor for the corrosion behavior is the layer morphology. Thus, immersion at room temperature leads to the highest corrosion protection due to the formation of a compact outer layer. Layers formed in the incubator show much worse performances due to completely porous structures. The

  12. Stability of mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Krothapalli, A

    1993-01-01

    The research program for the first year of this project (see the original research proposal) consists of developing an explicit marching scheme for solving the parabolized stability equations (PSE). Performing mathematical analysis of the computational algorithm including numerical stability analysis and the determination of the proper boundary conditions needed at the boundary of the computation domain are implicit in the task. Before one can solve the parabolized stability equations for high-speed mixing layers, the mean flow must first be found. In the past, instability analysis of high-speed mixing layer has mostly been performed on mean flow profiles calculated by the boundary layer equations. In carrying out this project, it is believed that the boundary layer equations might not give an accurate enough nonparallel, nonlinear mean flow needed for parabolized stability analysis. A more accurate mean flow can, however, be found by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The advantage of the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations is that its accuracy is consistent with the PSE method. Furthermore, the method of solution is similar. Hence, the major part of the effort of the work of this year has been devoted to the development of an explicit numerical marching scheme for the solution of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equation as applied to the high-seed mixing layer problem.

  13. Enhanced Charge Collection with Passivation Layers in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Hui; Luo, Jingshan; Son, Min-Kyu; Gao, Peng; Cho, Kyung Taek; Seo, Jiyoun; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-05-01

    The Al2 O3 passivation layer is beneficial for mesoporous TiO2 -based perovskite solar cells when it is deposited selectively on the compact TiO2 surface. Such a passivation layer suppressing surface recombination can be formed by thermal decomposition of the perovskite layer during post-annealing. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Establishment of the Vertebrate Germ Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Wei-Chia; Munisha, Mumingjiang; Gutierrez, Juan B; Dougan, Scott T

    2017-01-01

    The process of germ layer formation is a universal feature of animal development. The germ layers separate the cells that produce the internal organs and tissues from those that produce the nervous system and outer tissues. Their discovery in the early nineteenth century transformed embryology from a purely descriptive field into a rigorous scientific discipline, in which hypotheses could be tested by observation and experimentation. By systematically addressing the questions of how the germ layers are formed and how they generate overall body plan, scientists have made fundamental contributions to the fields of evolution, cell signaling, morphogenesis, and stem cell biology. At each step, this work was advanced by the development of innovative methods of observing cell behavior in vivo and in culture. Here, we take an historical approach to describe our current understanding of vertebrate germ layer formation as it relates to the long-standing questions of developmental biology. By comparing how germ layers form in distantly related vertebrate species, we find that highly conserved molecular pathways can be adapted to perform the same function in dramatically different embryonic environments.

  15. Atomic scale characterization of mismatched graphene layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Li, Guohong; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Review of STM/STS of graphene with various degree of coupling. • Review of vertically twisted graphene with respect with each other. • Review of Landau levels in graphene layers weakly decoupled electronically. • Review of laterally twisted graphene forming grain boundaries. - Abstract: In the bourgeoning field of two dimensional layered materials and their atomically thin counterparts, it has been established that the electronic coupling between the layers of the material plays a key role in determining its properties [1,2]. We are just beginning to understand how each material is unique in that respect while working our way up to building new materials with functionalities enabled by interlayer interactions. In this review, we will focus on a system that despite its apparent simplicity possesses a wealth of intriguing physics: layers of graphene with various degree of coupling. The situations discussed here are graphene layers vertically twisted with respect with each other, weakly decoupled electronically and laterally twisted forming grain boundaries. We emphasize experiments that atomically resolve the electronic properties.

  16. Asymmetric polymeric membranes containing a metal-rich dense layer with a controlled thickness and method of making same

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Villalobos, Vazquez De La Parra Luis Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A structure, and methods of making the structure are provided in which the structure can include: a membrane having a first layer and a second layer, the first layer comprising polymer chains formed with coordination complexes with metal ions, and the second layer consisting of a porous support layer formed of polymer chains substantially, if not completely, lacking the presence of metal ions. The structure can be an asymmetric polymeric membrane containing a metal-rich layer as the first layer. In various embodiments the first layer can be a metal-rich dense layer. The first layer can include pores. The polymer chains of the first layer can be closely packed. The second layer can include a plurality of macro voids and can have an absence of the metal ions of the first layer.

  17. Asymmetric polymeric membranes containing a metal-rich dense layer with a controlled thickness and method of making same

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2016-01-21

    A structure, and methods of making the structure are provided in which the structure can include: a membrane having a first layer and a second layer, the first layer comprising polymer chains formed with coordination complexes with metal ions, and the second layer consisting of a porous support layer formed of polymer chains substantially, if not completely, lacking the presence of metal ions. The structure can be an asymmetric polymeric membrane containing a metal-rich layer as the first layer. In various embodiments the first layer can be a metal-rich dense layer. The first layer can include pores. The polymer chains of the first layer can be closely packed. The second layer can include a plurality of macro voids and can have an absence of the metal ions of the first layer.

  18. Textured strontium titanate layers on platinum by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, T.; Anttila, J.; Haukka, S.; Tuominen, M.; Lukosius, M.; Wenger, Ch.; Saukkonen, T.

    2012-01-01

    Formation of textured strontium titanate (STO) layers with large lateral grain size (0.2–1 μm) and low X-ray reflectivity roughness (∼ 1.36 nm) on Pt electrodes by industry proven atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is demonstrated. Sr(t-Bu 3 Cp) 2 , Ti(OMe) 4 and O 3 precursors at 250 °C were used to deposit Sr rich STO on Pt/Ti/SiO 2 /Si ∅200 mm substrates. After crystallization post deposition annealing at 600 °C in air, most of the STO grains showed a preferential orientation of the {001} plane parallel to the substrate surface, although other orientations were also present. Cross sectional and plan view transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis revealed more than an order of magnitude larger lateral grain sizes for the STO compared to the underlying multicrystalline {111} oriented platinum electrode. The combination of platinum bottom electrodes with ALD STO(O 3 ) shows a promising path towards the formation of single oriented STO film. - Highlights: ► Amorphous strontium titanate (STO) on platinum formed a textured film after annealing. ► Single crystal domains in 60 nm STO film were 0.2–1 μm wide. ► Most STO grains were {001} oriented.

  19. Three-layer magnetoconvection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.-K.; Silvers, L.J.; Proctor, M.R.E.

    2008-01-01

    It is believed that some stars have two or more convection zones in close proximity near to the stellar photosphere. These zones are separated by convectively stable regions that are relatively narrow. Due to the close proximity of these regions it is important to construct mathematical models to understand the transport and mixing of passive and dynamic quantities. One key quantity of interest is a magnetic field, a dynamic vector quantity, that can drastically alter the convectively driven flows, and have an important role in coupling the different layers. In this Letter we present the first investigation into the effect of an imposed magnetic field in such a geometry. We focus our attention on the effect of field strength and show that, while there are some similarities with results for magnetic field evolution in a single layer, new and interesting phenomena are also present in a three layer system

  20. Layered tin dioxide microrods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Junhong; Huang Hongbo; Gong Jiangfeng; Zhao Xiaoning; Cheng Guangxu; Yang Shaoguang

    2007-01-01

    Single-crystalline layered SnO 2 microrods were synthesized by a simple tin-water reaction at 900 deg. C. The structural and optical properties of the sample were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies and selected area electron diffraction patterns revealed that the layered SnO 2 microrods are single crystalline and their growth direction is along [1 1 0]. The growth mechanism of the microrods was proposed based on SEM, TEM characterization and thermodynamic analysis. It is deduced that the layered microrods grow by the stacking of SnO 2 sheets with a (1 1 0) surface in a vapour-liquid-solid process. Three emission peaks at 523, 569 and 626 nm were detected in room-temperature PL measurements

  1. Layer-by-layer films from tartrazine dye with bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Nara C.; Flores, Júlio C. Johner; Silva, Josmary R.

    2009-12-01

    We report on the preparation and study of the adsorption process of layer-by-layer films of tartrazine alternated with bovine serum albumin. UV-Vis spectroscopy indicated that the films form J-aggregates of tartrazine. Adsorption kinetics was fitted by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation and surface morphological analyses by atomic force microscopy suggested that the J-aggregates were column-shaped, which was attributed to the column-like symmetry of the tartrazine molecules. The columnar structures that formed probably arose from the juxtaposition of smaller aggregates that were already present at the beginning of film growth.

  2. Numerical simulation of growth of flames formed in a two-dimensional mixing layer. 3rd Report. Flame instability induced by vortices; Nijigen kongo sonai ni keiseisareta kaen no seicho ni kansuru suchi simulation. 3. Uzu ni yotte reikisareru kaen no fuanteisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, S; Makino, H [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Nakajima, T [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-03-25

    The flame instability induced by large vortices has been studied numerically. The numerical simulation is concerned with an unstable, two-dimensional, two-stream, spatially developing, confined, reacting shear layer. The behavior just after ignition is related to the flame instability which is affected strongly by large vortices in the mixing layer. Although flames are basically stable due to the balance between the burning velocity and the stream velocity, it is revealed that the leading edge is exposed under the strain in the mixing layer, and the flame becomes instable. Moreover, a method is also proposed to improve the flame stability by increasing the oxygen concentration in the oxidizer. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. The Links Between Target Properties and Layered Ejecta Craters in Acidalia and Utopia Planitiae Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E.; Osinski, G. R.

    2013-08-01

    Layered ejecta craters on Mars may form from excavation into subsurface volatiles. We examine a new catalogue of martian craters to decipher differences between the single- and double-layered ejecta populations in Acidalia and Utopia.

  4. S-Layer Protein-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Schuster

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper highlights the application of bacterial surface (S- layer proteins as versatile components for the fabrication of biosensors. One technologically relevant feature of S-layer proteins is their ability to self-assemble on many surfaces and interfaces to form a crystalline two-dimensional (2D protein lattice. The S-layer lattice on the surface of a biosensor becomes part of the interface architecture linking the bioreceptor to the transducer interface, which may cause signal amplification. The S-layer lattice as ultrathin, highly porous structure with functional groups in a well-defined special distribution and orientation and an overall anti-fouling characteristics can significantly raise the limit in terms of variety and the ease of bioreceptor immobilization, compactness of bioreceptor molecule arrangement, sensitivity, specificity, and detection limit for many types of biosensors. The present paper discusses and summarizes examples for the successful implementation of S-layer lattices on biosensor surfaces in order to give a comprehensive overview on the application potential of these bioinspired S-layer protein-based biosensors.

  5. S-Layer Protein-Based Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Bernhard

    2018-04-11

    The present paper highlights the application of bacterial surface (S-) layer proteins as versatile components for the fabrication of biosensors. One technologically relevant feature of S-layer proteins is their ability to self-assemble on many surfaces and interfaces to form a crystalline two-dimensional (2D) protein lattice. The S-layer lattice on the surface of a biosensor becomes part of the interface architecture linking the bioreceptor to the transducer interface, which may cause signal amplification. The S-layer lattice as ultrathin, highly porous structure with functional groups in a well-defined special distribution and orientation and an overall anti-fouling characteristics can significantly raise the limit in terms of variety and the ease of bioreceptor immobilization, compactness of bioreceptor molecule arrangement, sensitivity, specificity, and detection limit for many types of biosensors. The present paper discusses and summarizes examples for the successful implementation of S-layer lattices on biosensor surfaces in order to give a comprehensive overview on the application potential of these bioinspired S-layer protein-based biosensors.

  6. Against Logical Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P N Johnson-Laird

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available An old view in logic going back to Aristotle is that an inference is valid in virtue of its logical form. Many psychologists have adopted the same point of view about human reasoning: the first step is to recover the logical form of an inference, and the second step is to apply rules of inference that match these forms in order to prove that the conclusion follows from the premises. The present paper argues against this idea. The logical form of an inference transcends the grammatical forms of the sentences used to express it, because logical form also depends on context. Context is not readily expressed in additional premises. And the recovery of logical form leads ineluctably to the need for infinitely many axioms to capture the logical properties of relations. An alternative theory is that reasoning depends on mental models, and this theory obviates the need to recover logical form.

  7. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  8. Forms Management Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    To establish EPA’s Forms Management Program; to describe the requisite roles, responsibilities, and procedures necessary for the successful management of EPA forms; and to more clearly fulfill EPA’s obligations in this regard.

  9. Growth of high purity semiconductor epitaxial layers by liquid phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    semiconductor materials in high purity form by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique. Various possible sources of impurities in such ... reference to the growth of GaAs layers. The technique of growing very high purity layers ... the inner walls of the gas lines and (e) the containers for storing, handling and cleaning of the mate-.

  10. Organic light emitting diode with light extracting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Songwei

    2016-06-14

    A light extraction substrate includes a glass substrate having a first surface and a second surface. A light extraction layer is formed on at least one of the surfaces. The light extraction layer is a coating, such as a silicon-containing coating, incorporating nanoparticles.

  11. Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Rajeewa R.

    1988-01-12

    Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

  12. On hairpin vortices in a transitional boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uruba Václav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the presented paper the results of experiments on transitional boundary layer are presented. The boundary layer was generated on smooth flat wall with zero pressure gradient forming one side of the channel of rectangular cross section. The hairpin vortices, packets of hairpin vortices, turbulent spots and calmed regions were experimentally investigated using time-resolved PIV technique.

  13. FORMS OF YOUTH TRAVEL

    OpenAIRE

    Moisã Claudia Olimpia; Moisã Claudia Olimpia

    2011-01-01

    Taking into account the suite of motivation that youth has when practicing tourism, it can be said that the youth travel takes highly diverse forms. These forms are educational tourism, volunteer programs and “work and travel”, cultural exchanges or sports tourism and adventure travel. In this article, we identified and analyzed in detail the main forms of youth travel both internationally and in Romania. We also illustrated for each form of tourism the specific tourism products targeting you...

  14. Membranes having aligned 1-D nanoparticles in a matrix layer for improved fluid separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revanur, Ravindra; Lulevich, Valentin; Roh, Il Juhn; Klare, Jennifer E.; Kim, Sangil; Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica

    2015-12-22

    Membranes for fluid separation are disclosed. These membranes have a matrix layer sandwiched between an active layer and a porous support layer. The matrix layer includes 1-D nanoparticles that are vertically aligned in a porous polymer matrix, and which substantially extend through the matrix layer. The active layer provides species-specific transport, while the support layer provides mechanical support. A matrix layer of this type has favorable surface morphology for forming the active layer. Furthermore, the pores that form in the matrix layer tend to be smaller and more evenly distributed as a result of the presence of aligned 1-D nanoparticles. Improved performance of separation membranes of this type is attributed to these effects.

  15. Unified form language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alnæs, Martin S.; Logg, Anders; Ølgaard, Kristian Breum

    2014-01-01

    We present the Unied Form Language (UFL), which is a domain-specic language for representing weak formulations of partial dierential equations with a view to numerical approximation. Features of UFL include support for variational forms and functionals, automatic dierentiation of forms and expres...... libraries to generate concrete low-level implementations. Some application examples are presented and libraries that support UFL are highlighted....

  16. Method for forming ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C.; Pink, Robert J.; Zuck, Larry D.

    2008-08-19

    A method for forming ammonia is disclosed and which includes the steps of forming a plasma; providing a source of metal particles, and supplying the metal particles to the plasma to form metal nitride particles; and providing a substance, and reacting the metal nitride particles with the substance to produce ammonia, and an oxide byproduct.

  17. Mesonic Form Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederic D. R. Bonnet; Robert G. Edwards; George T. Fleming; Randal Lewis; David Richards

    2003-07-22

    We have started a program to compute the electromagnetic form factors of mesons. We discuss the techniques used to compute the pion form factor and present preliminary results computed with domain wall valence fermions on MILC asqtad lattices, as well as Wilson fermions on quenched lattices. These methods can easily be extended to rho-to-gamma-pi transition form factors.

  18. Simulation of atomic layer deposition on nanoparticle agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, W.; van Ommen, J.R.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Coated nanoparticles have many potential applications; production of large quantities is feasible by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on nanoparticles in a fluidized bed reactor. However, due to the cohesive interparticle forces, nanoparticles form large agglomerates, which influences the coating

  19. Thermal insulation layer for the vacuum containers of a thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Masana; Yamada, Masao; Kameari, Akihisa; Niikura, Setsuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent temperature rise of a thermal insulation layer for a vacuum container of a thermonuclear device higher than allowable value when irradiated by neutron by constructing the layer of a cooling unit in thermal insulation material. Constitution: A metal plate attached with cooling pipes is buried in a thermal insulation material forming a thermal insulation layer to form the layer provided between a vacuum container of a thermonuclear device and a shield. (Yoshihara, H.)

  20. Physical layer network coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukui, Hironori; Popovski, Petar; Yomo, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has been proposed to improve throughput of the two-way relay channel, where two nodes communicate with each other, being assisted by a relay node. Most of the works related to PLNC are focused on a simple three-node model and they do not take into account...

  1. Thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweickert, H.; Fehsenfeld, P.

    1995-01-01

    The reliability of industrial equip ment is substantially influenced by wear and corrosion; monitoring can prevent accidents and avoid down-time. One powerful tool is thin layer activation analysis (TLA) using accelerator systems. The information is used to improve mechanical design and material usage; the technology is used by many large companies, particularly in the automotive industry, e.g. Daimler Benz. A critical area of a machine component receives a thin layer of radioactivity by irradiation with charged particles from an accelerator - usually a cyclotron. The radioactivity can be made homogeneous by suitable selection of particle, beam energy and angle of incidence. Layer thickness can be varied from 20 microns to around 1 mm with different depth distributions; the position and size of the wear zone can be set to within 0.1 mm. The machine is then reassembled and operated so that wear can be measured. An example is a combustion engine comprising piston ring, cylinder wall, cooling water jacket and housing wall, where wear measurements on the cylinder wall are required in a critical zone around the dead-point of the piston ring. Proton beam bombardment creates a radioactive layer whose thickness is known accurately, and characteristic gamma radiation from this radioactive zone penetrates through the engine and is detected externally. Measurements can be made either of the activity removed from the surface, or of the (reduced) residual activity; wear measurement of the order of 10 -9 metres is possible

  2. Our Shrinking Ozone Layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Depletion of the ozone layer is therefore having significant effects on life on .... but there is always a net balance between the rate of formation and destruction ..... award of Commonwealth Fellowship during the present work and also being an ...

  3. Layer-Cake Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedford, Rebecca; Warny, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a safe, fun, effective way to introduce geology concepts to elementary school children of all ages: "coring" layer cakes. This activity introduces the concepts and challenges that geologists face and at the same time strengthens students' inferential, observational, and problem-solving skills. It also addresses…

  4. Layered double hydroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López Rayo, Sandra; Imran, Ahmad; Hansen, Hans Chr. Bruun

    2017-01-01

    A novel zinc (Zn) fertilizer concept based on Zn doped layered double hydroxides (Zn-doped Mg-Fe-LDHs) has been investigated. Zn-doped Mg-Fe-LDHs were synthetized, their chemical composition was analyzed and their nutrient release was studied in buffered solutions with different pH values. Uptake...

  5. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  6. Cross-Layer QoS Control for Video Communications over Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Yong

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Assuming a wireless ad hoc network consisting of homogeneous video users with each of them also serving as a possible relay node for other users, we propose a cross-layer rate-control scheme based on an analytical study of how the effective video transmission rate is affected by the prevailing operating parameters, such as the interference environment, the number of transmission hops to a destination, and the packet loss rate. Furthermore, in order to provide error-resilient video delivery over such wireless ad hoc networks, a cross-layer joint source-channel coding (JSCC approach, to be used in conjunction with rate-control, is proposed and investigated. This approach attempts to optimally apply the appropriate channel coding rate given the constraints imposed by the effective transmission rate obtained from the proposed rate-control scheme, the allowable real-time video play-out delay, and the prevailing channel conditions. Simulation results are provided which demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cross-layer combined rate-control and JSCC approach.

  7. Effects of eHealth physical activity encouragement in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease: The PReVaiL randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Susanne Hwiid; Andersen, Lars L; Søndergaard, Lars; Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Dideriksen, Kasper; Kruse, Anne; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-10-15

    To assess benefit and harms of adding an eHealth intervention to health education and individual counseling in adolescents with congenital heart disease. Randomized clinical trial. Denmark. A total of 158 adolescents aged 13-16years with no physical activity restrictions after repaired complex congenital heart disease. PReVaiL consisted of individually tailored eHealth encouragement physical activity for 52weeks. All patients received 45min of group-based health education and 15min of individual counseling involving patients' parents. The primary outcome was maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) at 52weeks after randomization. The secondary outcome was physical activity. Exploratory outcomes were generic and disease-specific questionnaires. In the intervention group, 58 patients (72%) completed the final test, but of those, only 46 (57%) fulfilled the compliance criteria of using the eHealth application for at least 2 consecutive weeks. In the control group, 61 patients (79%) completed both exercise tests. Adjusted for baseline values, the difference between the intervention group and the control group in mean VO2 peak at 1year was -0.65ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (95% CI -2.66 to 1.36). Between-group differences at 1year in physical activity, generic health-related quality of life, and disease-specific quality of life were not statistically significant. Adding a tailored eHealth intervention to health education and individual counseling did not affect outcomes among adolescents with congenital heart disease. Our results do not support the use of this eHealth intervention in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease. Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT01189981. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of time of initiation of once-monthly paliperidone palmitate in hospitalized Asian patients with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia: a post hoc analysis from the PREVAIL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huafang; Li, Yan; Feng, Yu; Zhuo, Jianmin; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Mathews, Maju; Tan, Wilson

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the differences in efficacy and safety outcomes in acute exacerbating schizophrenia patients between 2 subgroups (≤1 week and >1 week), differing in time interval from hospitalization to time of initiation of once-monthly paliperidone palmitate. PREVAIL was a multicenter, single-arm, open-label, prospective Phase IV study in hospitalized Asian patients (either sex, aged 18-65 years) diagnosed with schizophrenia ( Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , Fourth Edition). Change from baseline to week 13 in primary (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale [PANSS] total score), secondary endpoints (PANSS responder rate, PANSS subscale, PANSS Marder factor, Clinical Global Impression-Severity, and Personal and Social Performance scale scores, readiness for hospital discharge questionnaire) and safety were assessed in this post hoc analysis. Significant mean reduction from baseline to week 13 in the PANSS total score, 30% PANSS responder rates ( P ≤0.01), PANSS subscales (positive and general psychopathology; all P ≤0.01), PANSS Marder factor (positive symptoms, uncontrolled hostility, and excitement and anxiety/depression; all P ≤0.01), Personal and Social Performance scale scores ( P ≤0.05) and Clinical Global Impression-Severity categorical summary ( P ≤0.05) were significantly greater in the ≤1 week subgroup versus >1 week subgroup ( P ≤0.05). The readiness for hospital discharge questionnaire improved over time for the overall study population, but remained similar between subgroups at all-time points. Treatment-emergent adverse events were similar between the subgroups. Early initiation of once-monthly paliperidone palmitate in hospitalized patients with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia led to greater improvements in psychotic symptoms with comparable safety than treatment initiation following 1 week of hospitalization.

  9. PREVAIL TRANSAPICAL: multicentre trial of transcatheter aortic valve implantation using the newly designed bioprosthesis (SAPIEN-XT) and delivery system (ASCENDRA-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Thomas; Thielmann, Matthias; Kempfert, Joerg; Schroefel, Holger; Wimmer-Greinecker, Gerhard; Treede, Hendrik; Wahlers, Thorsten; Wendler, Olaf

    2012-08-01

    Transapical (TA) aortic valve implantation (AVI) has evolved as an alternative procedure for high-risk patients. We evaluated the second-generation SAPIEN XT™ prosthesis in a prospective multicentre clinical trial. A total of 150 patients (age: 81.6 ± 5.8 years; 40.7% female) were included. Prosthetic valves (diameter: 23 mm (n = 36), 26 mm (n = 57) and 29 mm (n = 57)) were implanted. The ASCENDRA-II™ modified delivery system was used in the smaller sizes. Mean logistic EuroSCORE was 24.3 ± 7.0%, and mean STS score 7.5 ± 4.4%. All patients gave written informed consent. Off-pump AVI was performed using femoral arterial and venous access wires as a safety net. All but two patients received TA-AVI, as planned. The 29-mm valve showed similar function as the values of two other diameters did. Three patients (2%) required temporary cardiopulmonary bypass support. Postoperative complications included renal failure requiring long-term dialysis in four, bleeding requiring rethoracotomy in four, respiratory complication requiring reintubation in eight and sepsis in four patients, respectively. Thirty-day mortality was 13 (8.7%) for the total cohort and 2/57 (3.5%) for patients receiving the 29-mm valve, respectively. Echocardiography at discharge showed none or trivial aortic incompetence (AI) in 71% and mild-AI in 22% of the patients. Post-implantation AI was predominantly paravalvular and ≥ 2+ in 7% of patients. One patient required reoperation for AI within 30 days. The PREVAIL TA multicentre trial demonstrates good functionality and good outcomes for TA-AVI, using the SAPIEN XT™ prosthesis and its second-generation ASCENDRA-II™ delivery system, as well successful introduction of the 29-mm SAPIEN XT™ valve for the benefit of high-risk elderly patients.

  10. Evaluation of work-based screening for early signs of alcohol-related liver disease in hazardous and harmful drinkers: the PrevAIL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Penny A; Morleo, Michela; Billington, David; Sanderson-Shortt, Kevin; Jones, Colin; Gabbay, Mark; Sheron, Nick; Bellis, Mark A; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A; Gilmore, Ian T

    2015-06-04

    The direct cost of excessive alcohol consumption to health services is substantial but dwarfed by the cost borne by the workplace as a result of lost productivity. The workplace is also a promising setting for health interventions. The Preventing Alcohol Harm in Liverpool and Knowsley (PrevAIL) project aimed to evaluate a mechanism for detecting the prevalence of alcohol related liver disease using fibrosis biomarkers. Secondary aims were to identify the additive effect of obesity as a risk factor for early liver disease; to assess other impacts of alcohol on work, using a cross-sectional survey. Participants (aged 36-55 y) from 13 workplaces participated (March 2011-April 2012). BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure and self-reported alcohol consumption in the previous week was recorded. Those consuming more than the accepted UK threshold (men: >21 units; female: >14 units alcohol) provided a 20 ml venous blood sample for a biomarker test (Southampton Traffic Light Test) and completed an alcohol questionnaire (incorporating the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire). The screening mechanism enrolled 363 individuals (52 % women), 39 % of whom drank above the threshold and participated in the liver screen (n = 141, complete data = 124 persons). Workplaces with successful participation were those where employers actively promoted, encouraged and facilitated attendance. Biomarkers detected that 30 % had liver disease (25 %, intermediate; 5 % probable). Liver disease was associated with the frequency of visits to the family physician (P = 0.036) and obesity (P = 0.052). The workplace is an important setting for addressing alcohol harm, but there are barriers to voluntary screening that need to be addressed. Early detection and support of cases in the community could avert deaths and save health and social costs. Alcohol and obesity should be addressed simultaneously, because of their known multiplicative effect on liver disease risk, and because employers

  11. Layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte-polyester hybrid microcapsules for encapsulation and delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rongcong; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Neu, Björn

    2013-07-08

    A two-step process is developed to form layer-by-layer (LbL) polyelectrolyte microcapsules, which are able to encapsulate and deliver hydrophobic drugs. Spherical porous calcium carbonate (CaCO3) microparticles were used as templates and coated with a poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) layer containing hydrophobic compounds via an in situ precipitation gelling process. PLGA layers that precipitated from N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) had a lower loading and smoother surface than those precipitated from acetone. The difference may be due to different viscosities and solvent exchange dynamics. In the second step, the successful coating of multilayer polyelectrolytes poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) onto the PLGA coated CaCO3 microparticles was confirmed with AFM and ζ-potential studies. The release of a model hydrophobic drug, ibuprofen, from these hybrid microcapsules with different numbers of PAH/PSS layers was investigated. It was found that the release of ibuprofen decreases with increasing layer numbers demonstrating the possibility to control the release of ibuprofen with these novel hybrid microcapsules. Besides loading of hydrophobic drugs, the interior of these microcapsules can also be loaded with hydrophilic compounds and functional nanoparticles as demonstrated by loading with Fe3O4 nanoparticles, forming magnetically responsive dual drug releasing carriers.

  12. Post hoc analysis of Japanese patients from the placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial of enzalutamide in patients with chemotherapy-naive, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-updated results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Go; Ueda, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    A post hoc analysis of interim results from PREVAIL, a Phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, demonstrated that the treatment effects, safety and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Japanese patients were generally consistent with those of the overall population. A recent longer term analysis of PREVAIL demonstrated continued benefit of enzalutamide treatment over placebo. Here, we report results from a post hoc analysis of Japanese patients enrolled in PREVAIL at the prespecified number of deaths for the final analysis. In Japanese patients, enzalutamide reduced the risk of death by 35% (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-1.51) and the risk of investigator-assessed radiographic progression or death by 60% (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.90). These results show that treatment effects and safety in Japanese patients in the final analysis of PREVAIL continued to be generally consistent with those of the overall population. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Post hoc analysis of Japanese patients from the placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial of enzalutamide in patients with chemotherapy-naive, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer—updated results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A post hoc analysis of interim results from PREVAIL, a Phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, demonstrated that the treatment effects, safety and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Japanese patients were generally consistent with those of the overall population. A recent longer term analysis of PREVAIL demonstrated continued benefit of enzalutamide treatment over placebo. Here, we report results from a post hoc analysis of Japanese patients enrolled in PREVAIL at the prespecified number of deaths for the final analysis. In Japanese patients, enzalutamide reduced the risk of death by 35% (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.28–1.51) and the risk of investigator-assessed radiographic progression or death by 60% (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.18–0.90). These results show that treatment effects and safety in Japanese patients in the final analysis of PREVAIL continued to be generally consistent with those of the overall population. PMID:28003320

  14. Forms of Life, Forms of Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piergiorgio Donatelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article explores aspects of the notion of forms of life in the Wittgensteinian tradition especially following Iris Murdoch’s lead. On the one hand, the notion signals the hardness and inexhaustible character of reality, as the background needed in order to make sense of our lives in various ways. On the other, the hardness of reality is the object of a moral work of apprehension and deepening to the point at which its distinctive character dissolves into the family of connections we have gained for ourselves. The two movements of thought are connected and necessary.

  15. SEM and XPS study of layer-by-layer deposited polypyrrole thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigois-Landureau, E.; Nicolau, Y. F.; Delamar, M.

    1996-01-01

    Layer-by-layer deposition of thin films (a few nm) of polypyrrole was carried out on various substrates such as silver, platinum, electrochemically oxidized aluminum and pretreated glass. SEM micrographs showed that the deposited layers nucleate by an island-type mechanism on hydrated alumina and KOH-pretreated (hydrophilic) glass before forming a continuous film. However, continuous thin films are obtained on chromic acid pretreated (hydrophobic) glass and sputtered Ag or Pt on glass after only 3-4 deposition cycles. The mean deposition rate evaluated by XPS for the first deposition cycles on Ag and Pt is 3 and 4 nm/cycle, respectively, in agreement with previous gravimetric determinations on thicker films, proving the constancy of the deposition rate. The XPS study of the very thin films obtained by a few deposition cycles shows that the first polypyrrole layers are dedoped by hydroxydic (basic) substrate surfaces.

  16. SEM and XPS study of layer-by-layer deposited polypyrrole thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigois-Landureau, E.; Nicolau, Y.F.; Delamar, M.

    1996-01-01

    Layer-by-layer deposition of thin films (a few nm) of polypyrrole was carried out on various substrates such as silver, platinum, electrochemically oxidized aluminum and pretreated glass. SEM micrographs showed that the deposited layers nucleate by an island-type mechanism on hydrated alumina and KOH-pretreated (hydrophilic) glass before forming a continuous film. However, continuous thin films are obtained on chromic acid pretreated (hydrophobic) glass and sputtered Ag or Pt on glass after only 3 endash 4 deposition cycles. The mean deposition rate evaluated by XPS for the first deposition cycles on Ag and Pt is 3 and 4 nm/cycle, respectively, in agreement with previous gravimetric determinations on thicker films, proving the constancy of the deposition rate. The XPS study of the very thin films obtained by a few deposition cycles shows that the first polypyrrole layers are dedoped by hydroxydic (basic) substrate surfaces. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Optoelectronic devices, low temperature preparation methods, and improved electron transport layers

    KAUST Repository

    Eita, Mohamed S.

    2016-08-04

    An optoelectronic device such as a photovoltaic device which has at least one layer, such as an electron transport layer, which comprises a plurality of alternating, oppositely charged layers including metal oxide layers. The metal oxide can be zinc oxide. The plurality of layers can be prepared by layer-by-layer processing in which alternating layers are built up step-by-step due to electrostatic attraction. The efficiency of the device can be increased by this processing method compared to a comparable method like sputtering. The number of layers can be controlled to improve device efficiency. Aqueous solutions can be used which is environmentally friendly. Annealing can be avoided. A quantum dot layer can be used next to the metal oxide layer to form a quantum dot heterojunction solar device.

  18. Micro metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Micro Metal Forming, i. e. forming of parts and features with dimensions below 1 mm, is a young area of research in the wide field of metal forming technologies, expanding the limits for applying metal forming towards micro technology. The essential challenges arise from the reduced geometrical size and the increased lot size. In order to enable potential users to apply micro metal forming in production, information about the following topics are given: tribological behavior: friction between tool and work piece as well as tool wear mechanical behavior: strength and formability of the work piece material, durability of the work pieces size effects: basic description of effects occurring due to the fact, that the quantitative relation between different features changes with decreasing size process windows and limits for forming processes tool making methods numerical modeling of processes and process chains quality assurance and metrology All topics are discussed with respect to the questions relevant to micro...

  19. Gravitation and quadratic forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananth, Sudarshan; Brink, Lars; Majumdar, Sucheta; Mali, Mahendra; Shah, Nabha

    2017-01-01

    The light-cone Hamiltonians describing both pure (N=0) Yang-Mills and N=4 super Yang-Mills may be expressed as quadratic forms. Here, we show that this feature extends to theories of gravity. We demonstrate how the Hamiltonians of both pure gravity and N=8 supergravity, in four dimensions, may be written as quadratic forms. We examine the effect of residual reparametrizations on the Hamiltonian and the resulting quadratic form.

  20. Three forms of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    The physical sense of three forms of the relativity is discussed. The first - instant from - respects in fact the traditional approach based on the concept of instant distance. The normal form corresponds the radar formulation which is based on the light or retarded distances. The front form in the special case is characterized by 'observable' variables, and the known method of k-coefficient is its obvious expression. 16 refs