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Sample records for pretreatment compliance monitoring

  1. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease

  2. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  3. EU ETS monitoring and compliance in Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijknecht, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The success of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) as a whole depends on proper national monitoring and compliance mechanisms in each of the 31 participating States. This article will focus on the legal and practical realization of an EU ETS monitoring and compliance system in

  4. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

    2011-07-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  5. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

    2013-07-03

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  6. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, D. J.; Anderson, D. C.; Hall, D. B.; Greger, P. D.; Ostler, W. K.

    2012-06-13

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Dennis J.; Anderson, David C.; Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2009-04-30

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  8. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J. Dennis; Anderson, David C.; Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2010-07-13

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  9. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Derek B. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Anderson, David C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Greger, Paul D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  10. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2015 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Derek B. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ostler, W. Kent [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Anderson, David C. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Greger, Paul D. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2015. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2015, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  11. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2016 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Derek [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Perry, Jeanette [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Ostler, W. Kent [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2017-09-06

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2016. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2016, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Dennis; Anderson, David; Derek, Hall; Greger, Paul; Ostler, W. Kent

    2008-03-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  13. 40 CFR 415.01 - Compliance dates for pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Aluminum Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.01 Compliance dates for pretreatment standards for... from copper sulfate or nickel sulfate manufacturing operations, is August 22, 1987. (c) The compliance date for discharges from copper sulfate and nickel sulfate manufacturing operations and for all...

  14. Clinician compliance with laboratory monitoring and prescribing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    urban SA ART sites to describe clinician compliance with tenofovir prescribing and monitoring guidelines in HIVinfected adults on firstline ART. Methods. We included treatmentnaive patients aged ≥16 years who started firstline tenofovirbased ART between 2010 and 2012 at Khayelitsha and Themba Lethu clinics in Cape ...

  15. Institutional Conservation Program: Grants compliance monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, L.B.; Purpura, A.

    1991-09-01

    The Institutional Conservation Program (ICP) is a grant program for the States and certain eligible institutions (primarily schools and hospitals) to assist in administrating and funding energy conservation projects. These projects range from studies of building energy use conducted by engineers and architects, termed technical assistance reports, to actual acquisition and installation of equipment and materials to improve the efficiency of energy use in selected buildings. This document represents the final annual report on compliance monitoring of ICP grants and incorporates the findings of previous progress and other reports submitted under the contracts.

  16. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows

  17. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows

  18. ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

    2006-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  19. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2003-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

  20. 40 CFR 61.203 - Radon monitoring and compliance procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Radon monitoring and compliance... for Radon Emissions From Phosphogypsum Stacks § 61.203 Radon monitoring and compliance procedures. (a..., each owner or operator of an inactive phosphogypsum stack shall test the stack for radon-222 flux in...

  1. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2014 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Derek B. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Anderson, David C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Greger, Paul D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Ostler, W. Kent [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)

    2015-05-12

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2014. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2014, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives. Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NNSS include 42 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, 236 birds, and 27 mammals. These species are protected, regulated, or considered sensitive according to state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) are the only species on the NNSS protected under the Endangered Species Act, both listed as threatened. However, only one record of the cuckoo has ever been documented on the NNSS, and there is no good habitat for this species on the NNSS. It is considered a rare migrant. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 18 projects. A total of 199.18 hectares (ha) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found during these surveys included a predator burrow, one sidewinder rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes), two mating speckled rattlesnakes

  2. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy A. Wills

    1999-12-01

    The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  3. Electronic compliance monitoring of topical treatment after ophthalmic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Manuel Marcel; Ustündag, Can; Diestelhorst, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The success of many medical treatments is built on compliance. Electronic monitoring is the most accurate tool to quantify compliance by measuring adherence. In order to assess the efficiency of a recently introduced miniature monitoring device for eye drop application, we evaluated adherence in ophthalmic patients undergoing post-operative short-term topical treatment. This pilot study enrolled 30 outpatients (mean age 61.8 +/- 18.5 years) after cataract (n = 24) and glaucoma filtration surgery (n = 6) applying fixed-combination eye drops containing prednisolone and gentamicin five times daily for 2 weeks. Patients received eye drops in conventional bottles each equipped with a miniature monitoring device recording events of application. Two patients failed to bring back the monitoring device; therefore data collected from only 28 patients could be examined. Data showed highly variable results with a mean dose compliance of 50.2%. Dose compliance was below 25% in approximately one out of five patients. Four cataract patients, but no glaucoma patient, discontinued therapy prematurely. The observed mean dosage interval was calculated for each patient and ranged 4.6-19.7 h. Thirty percent of analysed dosage intervals exceeded 12.0 h. Different patterns of compliance behaviour-like early non-persistence, drug holiday and low treatment frequency could be identified and illustrated using electronic data. Age or gender did not significantly influence compliance rates. Our pilot study demonstrates successful electronic compliance monitoring using a technology capable of continuous data recording over weeks of treatment. The low compliance rate for a relevant part of the patients demonstrates the necessity to study and improve compliance in ophthalmology. In future, new application methods and electronic application devices may improve treatment response in eye care.

  4. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1998 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services

    1998-01-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1998. Twenty-one sites for seven projects were surveyed for the presence of state or federally protected species. Three projects were in or near habitat of the threatened desert tortoise and required special clearance and transect surveys. All geospatial data collected were entered into Bechtel Nevada's Ecological Geographic Information system for use in ongoing ecosystem management of the NTS

  5. Effluent treatment efficiency and compliance monitoring in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effectiveness of effluent treatment at the Eleme Petrochemical Industry, Port Harcourt, Nigeria was monitored weekly for six weeks to assess their level of compliance with the Directorate of Petroleum Resources (DPR) guidelines and standards for environmental safety. Effluent samples were taken from the untreated ...

  6. Incentivizing monitoring and compliance in trophy hunting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnefeld, Nils; Edwards, Charles T T; Atickem, Anagaw; Hailu, Fetene; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2013-12-01

    Conservation scientists are increasingly focusing on the drivers of human behavior and on the implications of various sources of uncertainty for management decision making. Trophy hunting has been suggested as a conservation tool because it gives economic value to wildlife, but recent examples show that overharvesting is a substantial problem and that data limitations are rife. We use a case study of trophy hunting of an endangered antelope, the mountain nyala (Tragelaphus buxtoni), to explore how uncertainties generated by population monitoring and poaching interact with decision making by 2 key stakeholders: the safari companies and the government. We built a management strategy evaluation model that encompasses the population dynamics of mountain nyala, a monitoring model, and a company decision making model. We investigated scenarios of investment into antipoaching and monitoring by governments and safari companies. Harvest strategy was robust to the uncertainty in the population estimates obtained from monitoring, but poaching had a much stronger effect on quota and sustainability. Hence, reducing poaching is in the interests of companies wishing to increase the profitability of their enterprises, for example by engaging community members as game scouts. There is a threshold level of uncertainty in the population estimates beyond which the year-to-year variation in the trophy quota prevented planning by the safari companies. This suggests a role for government in ensuring that a baseline level of population monitoring is carried out such that this level is not exceeded. Our results illustrate the importance of considering the incentives of multiple stakeholders when designing frameworks for resource use and when designing management frameworks to address the particular sources of uncertainty that affect system sustainability most heavily. Incentivando el Monitoreo y el Cumplimiento en la Caza de Trofeos. © 2013 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by

  7. Real-Time Monitoring of Psychotherapeutic Processes: Concept and Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiepek, Günter; Aichhorn, Wolfgang; Gruber, Martin; Strunk, Guido; Bachler, Egon; Aas, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The feasibility of a high-frequency real-time monitoring approach to psychotherapy is outlined and tested for patients' compliance to evaluate its integration to everyday practice. Criteria concern the ecological momentary assessment, the assessment of therapy-related cognitions and emotions, equidistant time sampling, real-time nonlinear time series analysis, continuous participative process control by client and therapist, and the application of idiographic (person-specific) surveys. Methods: The process-outcome monitoring is technically realized by an internet-based device for data collection and data analysis, the Synergetic Navigation System. Its feasibility is documented by a compliance study on 151 clients treated in an inpatient and a day-treatment clinic. Results: We found high compliance rates (mean: 78.3%, median: 89.4%) amongst the respondents, independent of the severity of symptoms or the degree of impairment. Compared to other diagnoses, the compliance rate was lower in the group diagnosed with personality disorders. Conclusion: The results support the feasibility of high-frequency monitoring in routine psychotherapy settings. Daily collection of psychological surveys allows for the assessment of highly resolved, equidistant time series data which gives insight into the nonlinear qualities of therapeutic change processes (e.g., pattern transitions, critical instabilities). PMID:27199837

  8. Real-Time Monitoring of Psychotherapeutic Processes: Concept and Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenter Karl Schiepek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective. The feasibility of a high-frequency real-time monitoring approach to psychotherapy is outlined and tested for patients’ compliance to evaluate its integration to everyday practice. Criteria concern the ecological momentary assessment, the assessment of therapy-related cognitions and emotions, equidistant time sampling, real-time nonlinear time series analysis, continuous participative process control by client and therapist, and the application of idiographic (person-specific surveys. Methods. The process-outcome monitoring is technically realized by an internet-based device for data collection and data analysis, the Synergetic Navigation System. Its feasibility is documented by a compliance study on 151 clients treated in an inpatient and a day-treatment clinic. Results. We found high compliance rates (mean: 78.3%, median: 89.4% amongst the respondents, independent of the severity of symptoms or the degree of impairment. Compared to other diagnoses, the compliance rate was lower in the group diagnosed with personality disorders. Conclusion. The results support the feasibility of high-frequency monitoring in routine psychotherapy settings. Daily collection of psychological surveys allows for assessment of highly resolved, equidistant time series data which gives insight into the nonlinear qualities of therapeutic change processes (e.g., pattern transitions, critical instabilities.

  9. Incentivizing Monitoring and Compliance in Trophy Hunting

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUNNEFELD, NILS; EDWARDS, CHARLES T T; ATICKEM, ANAGAW; HAILU, FETENE; MILNER-GULLAND, E J

    2014-01-01

    Conservation scientists are increasingly focusing on the drivers of human behavior and on the implications of various sources of uncertainty for management decision making. Trophy hunting has been suggested as a conservation tool because it gives economic value to wildlife, but recent examples show that overharvesting is a substantial problem and that data limitations are rife. We use a case study of trophy hunting of an endangered antelope, the mountain nyala (Tragelaphus buxtoni), to explore how uncertainties generated by population monitoring and poaching interact with decision making by 2 key stakeholders: the safari companies and the government. We built a management strategy evaluation model that encompasses the population dynamics of mountain nyala, a monitoring model, and a company decision making model. We investigated scenarios of investment into antipoaching and monitoring by governments and safari companies. Harvest strategy was robust to the uncertainty in the population estimates obtained from monitoring, but poaching had a much stronger effect on quota and sustainability. Hence, reducing poaching is in the interests of companies wishing to increase the profitability of their enterprises, for example by engaging community members as game scouts. There is a threshold level of uncertainty in the population estimates beyond which the year-to-year variation in the trophy quota prevented planning by the safari companies. This suggests a role for government in ensuring that a baseline level of population monitoring is carried out such that this level is not exceeded. Our results illustrate the importance of considering the incentives of multiple stakeholders when designing frameworks for resource use and when designing management frameworks to address the particular sources of uncertainty that affect system sustainability most heavily. Incentivando el Monitoreo y el Cumplimiento en la Caza de Trofeos Resumen Científicos conservacionistas cada vez se

  10. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1998 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services

    1998-10-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1998. Twenty-one sites for seven projects were surveyed for the presence of state or federally protected species. Three projects were in or near habitat of the threatened desert tortoise and required special clearance and transect surveys. All geospatial data collected were entered into Bechtel Nevada's Ecological Geographic Information system for use in ongoing ecosystem management of the NTS.

  11. 300 Area TEDF NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loll, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    This monitoring plan describes the activities and methods that will be employed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) in order to ensure compliance with the National Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Included in this document are a brief description of the project, the specifics of the sampling effort, including the physical location and frequency of sampling, the support required for sampling, and the Quality Assurance (QA) protocols to be followed in the sampling procedures

  12. 40 CFR 281.40 - Requirements for compliance monitoring program and authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for compliance monitoring program and authority. 281.40 Section 281.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... of Compliance § 281.40 Requirements for compliance monitoring program and authority. (a) Any...

  13. 12 CFR 748.2 - Procedures for monitoring Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for monitoring Bank Secrecy Act (BSA... AND BANK SECRECY ACT COMPLIANCE § 748.2 Procedures for monitoring Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) compliance... Department of Treasury, 31 CFR part 103. (b) Establishment of a BSA compliance program—(1) Program...

  14. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Wills

    2002-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species

  15. Institutional Conservation Program: Grants compliance monitoring. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, L.B.; Purpura, A.

    1991-09-01

    The Institutional Conservation Program (ICP) is a grant program for the States and certain eligible institutions (primarily schools and hospitals) to assist in administrating and funding energy conservation projects. These projects range from studies of building energy use conducted by engineers and architects, termed technical assistance reports, to actual acquisition and installation of equipment and materials to improve the efficiency of energy use in selected buildings. This document represents the final annual report on compliance monitoring of ICP grants and incorporates the findings of previous progress and other reports submitted under the contracts.

  16. Ballast water compliance monitoring: A new application for ATP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Curto, A.; Stehouwer, P.; Gianoli, C.; Schneider, G.; Raymond, M.; Bonamin, V.

    2018-03-01

    The coming into force of the USCG ballast water regulations and the IMO ballast water management convention resulted in the development of several technologies approved for the treatment of ballast water. To ensure compliance of these technologies, the development of rapid and robust analysis methods was necessary. In collaboration with the SGS Group (Switzerland) and LuminUltra (Canada), Aqua-tools (France) has developed an innovative Ballast Water Treatment Monitoring (BWTM) kit for rapid onboard testing. The affordable kit provides results in less than 1 h, is easy to use and durable ensuring that the ballast water treatment system on the ship is fully compliant with the discharge standards upon arrival in port. The core of this method is a combination of high-quality reagents (lysis solution and ATP 2G Luminase™ enzyme) not inhibited by salinity and a patented fast homogenizing method for ATP extraction developed for a higher ATP recovery from zooplankton and phytoplankton. Compared to traditional analysis methods, the BWTM Kit provides fast and accurate results for all three fractions of microorganisms (≥ 50 μm, ≥ 10 ÷ treatment systems used. Compliance limits were established for all size fractions and a correlation between the standard methods (microscopy, plate count, MPN) and ATP was evaluated. The BWTM kit can provide a fast indication of compliance or gross exceedance. The rare borderline cases, when encountered, of course require additional confirmation.

  17. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early

  18. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A

  19. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Discharge Monitoring Report Data Sets for FY2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data sets for Clean Water...

  20. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Discharge Monitoring Report Data Sets for FY2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data sets for Clean Water...

  1. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Discharge Monitoring Report Data Sets for FY2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data sets for Clean Water...

  2. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Discharge Monitoring Report Data Sets for FY2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data sets for Clean Water...

  3. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Discharge Monitoring Report Data Sets for FY2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data sets for Clean Water...

  4. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Discharge Monitoring Report Data Sets for FY2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data sets for Clean Water...

  5. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Discharge Monitoring Report Data Sets for FY2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data sets for Clean Water...

  6. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wills, C.A.

    2000-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition

  7. The impact of an electronic monitoring and reminder device on patient compliance with antihypertensive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Arne; Christrup, Lona Louring; Fabricius, Paul Erik

    2010-01-01

    and were randomized to either electronic compliance monitoring with a reminder and monitoring device or standard therapy for 6 months. Both groups were crossed over after 6 months. Intervention effectiveness was assessed using self-reported compliance and BP. RESULTS: Data from 398 patients were analysed......BACKGROUND: High blood pressure (BP) significantly increases overall cardiovascular risk, the incidence of ischemic heart disease and stroke. One of the most important causes of insufficient BP control is low treatment compliance. Reminders and electronic compliance monitoring have been shown...... to be effective in improving patient compliance to some extent, but the combined effect has not been documented. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of an electronic reminder and monitoring device on patient compliance and BP control. METHODS: All patients received medical treatment with telmisartan once daily...

  8. 12 CFR 21.21 - Procedures for monitoring Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for monitoring Bank Secrecy Act (BSA... Secrecy Act (BSA) compliance. (a) Purpose. This subpart is issued to assure that all national banks... promulgated thereunder by the Department of Treasury at 31 CFR part 103. (b) Establishment of a BSA compliance...

  9. 12 CFR 563.177 - Procedures for monitoring Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for monitoring Bank Secrecy Act (BSA... Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) compliance. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this regulation is to require savings... Treasury, 31 CFR part 103. (b) Establishment of a BSA compliance program—(1) Program requirement. Each...

  10. Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promulgated quality assurance Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

  11. Effects of compliance monitoring of vocal function exercises on voice outcome measures for normal voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lee W; Beltyukova, Svetlana A

    2011-06-01

    This experimental study examined the efficacy of the vocal function exercise program in improving voice production in individuals with normal voices. 20 young women (M age = 22 yr.) with normal voices, 10 in the Monitored compliance group and 10 in the Unmonitored compliance group, received training in performing vocal function exercises followed by daily practice of the exercises for 28 consecutive days. Participants in the Monitored compliance group were required to submit audio or video recordings of their daily practice of vocal function exercises, and those in the Unmonitored compliance group were not required to record their daily practice sessions. Results indicated that while the participants in both groups significantly increased maximum phonation times and maximum phonational frequency ranges, those in the Monitored group improved significantly more than the participants in the Unmonitored group on these outcome measures.

  12. 75 FR 63434 - Availability of Compliance Guide for the Use of Video or Other Electronic Monitoring or Recording...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ...] Availability of Compliance Guide for the Use of Video or Other Electronic Monitoring or Recording Equipment in... the availability of a compliance guide on the use of video or other electronic monitoring or recording... providing this draft guide to advise establishments that video or other electronic monitoring or recording...

  13. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal/Calendar Year 2004 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2005-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during the Fiscal Year 2004 and the additional months of October, November, and December 2004, reflecting a change in the monitoring period to a calendar year rather than a fiscal year as reported in the past. This change in the monitoring period was made to better accommodate information required for the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report, which reports on a calendar year rather than a fiscal year. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center.

  14. Monitoring Manual for Determining Compliance with Public Law 94-142. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    Designed to assist service providers as they strive to provide a full service goal for all handicapped pupils, this manual consists of checklists for monitoring compliance with Public Law 94-142 (Education for All Handicapped Children Act). Checklists of components in general policy areas are: (1) policy requirements (LEAs - Local Educational…

  15. 40 CFR 63.6003 - How do I monitor and collect data to demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.6003... compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? (a) You must monitor and collect..., calibration checks and required zero and span adjustments), you must monitor continuously (or collect data at...

  16. Compliance to HIV treatment monitoring guidelines can reduce ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Panel tests are a predetermined group of tests commonly requested together to provide a comprehensive and conclusive diagnosis, for example, liver function test (LFT). South African HIV antiretroviral treatment (ART) guidelines recommend individual tests for toxicity monitoring over panel tests. In 2008, the ...

  17. Optical monitoring systems for thermal spray processes: droplets behavior and substrate pre-treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Yamagata, Y.; Miyazaki, F.; Yamasaki, M.; Tanaka, J.; Muraoka, K.

    2017-11-01

    Thermal spray is a technique to form molten droplets using either plasma- or combustion-heating, which impinge upon substrates to form coating layers for various purposes, such as anti-corrosion and anti-wear layers. Although it is an established technique having a history of more than a century, operations of spray guns together with preparing suitable substrate surfaces for obtaining good coating layers still rely on experienced technicians. Because of the necessity of meeting more and more stringent requirements for coating quality and cost from customers, there has been a strong need to try to monitor spray processes, so as to obtain the best possible spray coating layers. The basic requirements for such monitoring systems are *reasonably cheap, *easy operation for laypersons, *easy access to targets to be investigated, and *an in-situ capability. The purpose of the present work is to provide suitable optical monitoring systems for (1) droplets behavior and (2) substrate pre-treatments. For the former (1), the first result was already presented at the 17th laser-aided plasma diagnostics meeting (LAPD17) in 2015 in Sapporo, and the results of its subsequent applications into real spray environments are shown in this article in order to validate the previous proposal. Topic (2) is new in the research program, and the proof-of-principle experiment for the proposed method yielded a favorable result. Based on this positive result, an overall strategy is being planned to fulfill the final objective of the optical monitoring of substrate pre-treatments. Details of these two programs (1) and (2) together with the present status are described.

  18. Monitoring compliance to an experimental treatment in an asymptomatic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durval Rosa Borges

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop strategies and to monitor patient’s adherence to the follow up of the experimental treatment of secondary cholestasis in its isolate chronic form with portal hypertension. Methods: Experimental study made with 11 patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid was administered in the dosage of 15 mg/kg/day twice a day for 45 days. Evaluation of adherence was performed using pill count strategy and interviews. Rresults: The variation during pill count had no influence on the patient’s laboratory results. Serum activity of γGT normalized during treatment, returning to increased levels after interruption of medication. Cconclusions: The strategies developed were effective presenting a significant laboratory result regarding the decrease of γGT serum activity.

  19. Pilot study: Assessing the effect of continual position monitoring technology on compliance with patient turning protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, Suann Cirigliano; Tarver, Christine; Pezzani, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    The study aim was to evaluate if continual patient position monitoring, taking into account self-turns and clinician-assisted turns, would increase the percentage of time a patient's position changed at least every 2 hr. While patient turning has clinical benefits, current models to help staff remember to turn patients, such as "turn clocks" and timers, have not resulted in high compliance with turning protocols. In addition, reminders are based on arbitrary 2-hr windows (such as turning on "even" hours) rather than on individual patient activity, including self-turns. This is a first inpatient, non-randomized, pre-/postintervention study. Data collection occurred from May 2013-February 2014 on a 39-bed medical unit in a community hospital. Baseline patient turning data were recorded by a sensor; however, the patient data were not displayed at the nurses' station to establish compliance with the hospital's turning protocol. Postintervention, patient position information was wirelessly displayed on nurses' station computer monitors in real time. A Student t test was used to compare baseline to postintervention "mean time in compliance." Data from 138 patients ( N  =   7,854 hr of monitoring) were collected. The baseline phase yielded 4,322 hr of position monitoring data and the postintervention phase yielded 3,532 hr of data. Statistically significant improvement was demonstrated in the percentage of time a patient's position changed at least every 2 hr from baseline to postintervention.

  20. Optimizing urine drug testing for monitoring medication compliance in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Stacy E F; Ptolemy, Adam S; Wasan, Ajay D

    2013-12-01

    It can be challenging to successfully monitor medication compliance in pain management. Clinicians and laboratorians need to collaborate to optimize patient care and maximize operational efficiency. The test menu, assay cutoffs, and testing algorithms utilized in the urine drug testing panels should be periodically reviewed and tailored to the patient population to effectively assess compliance and avoid unnecessary testing and cost to the patient. Pain management and pathology collaborated on an important quality improvement initiative to optimize urine drug testing for monitoring medication compliance in pain management. We retrospectively reviewed 18 months of data from our pain management center. We gathered data on test volumes, positivity rates, and the frequency of false positive results. We also reviewed the clinical utility of our testing algorithms, assay cutoffs, and adulterant panel. In addition, the cost of each component was calculated. The positivity rate for ethanol and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine were <1% so we eliminated this testing from our panel. We also lowered the screening cutoff for cocaine to meet the clinical needs of the pain management center. In addition, we changed our testing algorithm for 6-acetylmorphine, benzodiazepines, and methadone. For example, due the high rate of false negative results using our immunoassay-based benzodiazepine screen, we removed the screening portion of the algorithm and now perform benzodiazepine confirmation up front in all specimens by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Conducting an interdisciplinary quality improvement project allowed us to optimize our testing panel for monitoring medication compliance in pain management and reduce cost. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Monitoring compliance with transfusion guidelines in hospital departments by electronic data capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Astrid; De Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    . MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hospital data on admissions, diagnoses and surgical procedures were used to define the populations of patients. Data on haemoglobin measurements and red blood cell transfusions were used to calculate pre-transfusion haemoglobin, percentage of transfused patients and transfusion......BACKGROUND: The practice of transfusing red blood cells is still liberal in some centres suggesting a lack of compliance with guidelines recommending transfusion of red blood cells at haemoglobin levels of 6-8 g/dL in the non-bleeding patient. Few databases provide ongoing feedback of data on pre-transfusion...... haemoglobin levels at the departmental level. In a tertiary care hospital, no such data were produced before this study. Our aim was to establish a Patient Blood Management database based on electronic data capture in order to monitor compliance with transfusion guidelines at departmental and hospital levels...

  2. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report (Part Two of Two)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Wills

    2002-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species

  3. ICP Monitoring and Phase-Contrast MRI to Investigate Intracranial Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokossou, A; Balédent, O; Garnotel, S; Page, G; Balardy, L; Czosnyka, Z; Payoux, P; Schmidt, E A

    2018-01-01

    The amplitude of intracranial pressure (ICP) can be measured by ICP monitoring. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI) can quantify blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flows. The aim of this work was to investigate intracranial compliance at rest by combining baseline ICP monitoring and PCMRI in hydrocephalus patients. ICP monitoring was performed before infusion testing to quantify ΔICP_rest at the basal condition in 33 suspected hydrocephalus patients (74 years). The day before, patients had had a PCMRI to assess total cerebral blood flow (tCBF), intracranial blood volume change (stroke volume SVblood), and cervical CSF volume change (the stroke volume CSV). Global (blood and CSF) intracranial volume change (ΔIVC) during each cardiac cycle (CC) was calculated. Finally, Compliance: C_rest = ΔIVC/ΔICP_rest was calculated. The data set was postprocessed by two operators according to blind analysis. Bland-Altman plots showed that measurements presented no significant difference between the two operators. ΔICP_rest = 2.41 ± 1.21 mmHg, tCBF = 469.89 ± 127.54 mL/min, SVblood = 0.82 ± 0.32 mL/cc, CSV = 0.50 ± 0.22 mL/cc, ΔIVC = 0.44 ± 0.22 mL, and C_rest = 0.23 ± 0.15 mL/mmHg. There are significant relations between SVblood and CSV and also SVblood and tCBF. During "basal" condition, the compliance amplitude of the intracranial compartment is heterogeneous in suspected hydrocephalus patients, and its value is lower than expected! This new parameter could represent new information, complementary to conventional infusion tests. We hope that this information can be applied to improve the selection of patients for shunt surgery.

  4. Pilot study: Assessing the effect of continual position monitoring technology on compliance with patient turning protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Schutt, Suann Cirigliano; Tarver, Christine; Pezzani, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aim The study aim was to evaluate if continual patient position monitoring, taking into account self‐turns and clinician‐assisted turns, would increase the percentage of time a patient's position changed at least every 2 hr. Background While patient turning has clinical benefits, current models to help staff remember to turn patients, such as “turn clocks” and timers, have not resulted in high compliance with turning protocols. In addition, reminders are based on arbitrary 2‐hr windo...

  5. Methodology for construction compliance monitoring in the crediting of investment projects for road construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaynshtok, Natalia

    2017-10-01

    The article provides the results of development of the methodology for construction compliance monitoring in the crediting of investment projects for road construction. Work scope analysis of construction audit was conducted and an algorithm of financial audit in the crediting investment projects was developed. Furthermore, the possible pitfalls and abuses of counterparties were investigated and recommendations were given allowing the bank to receive objective and independent information on the progress of the project in real time. This mechanism is useful for the bank in insurance of possible risks, targeted and rational use of credit funds.

  6. Effectiveness of an electronic hand hygiene monitoring system on healthcare workers' compliance to guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Salman, J M; Hani, S; de Marcellis-Warin, N; Isa, Sister Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Hand hygiene is a growing concern among populations and is a crucial element in ensuring patient safety in a healthcare environment. Numerous management efforts have been conducted in that regard, including education, awareness and observations. To better evaluate the possible impact of technology on a healthcare setting, we observed the impact of a particular niche technology developed as an answer to the growing hand hygiene concerns. A study was conducted at Salmaniya Medical Complex (SMC) in Bahrain on a total of 16 Coronary Care Unit (CCU) beds where the system was installed, and the hand hygiene activity of healthcare workers (HCWs) in this area was monitored for a total period of 28 days. Comments, remarks and suggestions were noted, and improvements were made to the technology during the course of the trial. While resistance to change was significant, overall results were satisfactory. Compliance with hand hygiene techniques went from 38-42% to 60% at the beginning of the trial and then increased to an average of 75% at the end of the 28-day trial. In some cases, compliance peaked at 85% or even at 100%. Our case study demonstrates that technology can be used effectively in promoting and improving hand hygiene compliance in hospitals, which is one way to prevent cross-infections, especially in critical care areas. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 40 CFR 63.2166 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limitations if I monitor brew ethanol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... with the emission limitations if I monitor brew ethanol? 63.2166 Section 63.2166 Protection of... demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limitations if I monitor brew ethanol? (a) You must... subpart. (b) You must establish the brew-to-exhaust correlation for each fermentation stage according to...

  8. Biomarkers to Monitor Gluten-Free Diet Compliance in Celiac Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Lourdes Moreno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluten-free diet (GFD is the only treatment for celiac disease (CD. There is a general consensus that strict GFD adherence in CD patients leads to full clinical and histological remission accompanied by improvement in quality of life and reduced long-term complications. Despite the importance of monitoring the GFD, there are no clear guidelines for assessing the outcome or for exploring its adherence. Available methods are insufficiently accurate to identify occasional gluten exposure that may cause intestinal mucosal damage. Serological tests are highly sensitive and specific for diagnosis, but do not predict recovery and are not useful for follow-up. The use of serial endoscopies, it is invasive and impractical for frequent monitoring, and dietary interview can be subjective. Therefore, the detection of gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP in feces and urine have been proposed as new non-invasive biomarkers to detect gluten intake and verify GFD compliance in CD patients. These simple immunoassays in human samples could overcome some key unresolved scientific and clinical problems in CD management. It is a significant advance that opens up new possibilities for the clinicians to evaluate the CD treatment, GFD compliance, and improvement in the quality of life of CD patients.

  9. Prescriber Compliance With Liver Monitoring Guidelines for Pazopanib in the Postapproval Setting: Results From a Distributed Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantakumar, Sumitra; Nordstrom, Beth L; Hall, Susan A; Djousse, Luc; van Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P P; Fraeman, Kathy H; Gagnon, David R; Chagin, Karen; Nelson, Jeanenne J

    2017-04-20

    Pazopanib received US Food and Drug Administration approval in 2009 for advanced renal cell carcinoma. During clinical development, liver chemistry abnormalities and adverse hepatic events were observed, leading to a boxed warning for hepatotoxicity and detailed label prescriber guidelines for liver monitoring. As part of postapproval regulatory commitments, a cohort study was conducted to assess prescriber compliance with liver monitoring guidelines. Over a 4-year period, a distributed network approach was used across 3 databases: US Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, a US outpatient oncology community practice database, and the Dutch PHARMO Database Network. Measures of prescriber compliance were designed using the original pazopanib label guidelines for liver monitoring. Results from the VA (n = 288) and oncology databases (n = 283) indicate that prescriber liver chemistry monitoring was less than 100%: 73% to 74% compliance with baseline testing and 37% to 39% compliance with testing every 4 weeks. Compliance was highest near drug initiation and decreased over time. Among patients who should have had weekly testing, the compliance was 56% in both databases. The more serious elevations examined, including combinations of liver enzyme elevations meeting the laboratory definition of Hy's law were infrequent but always led to appropriate discontinuation of pazopanib. Only 4 patients were identified for analysis in the Dutch database; none had recorded baseline testing. In this population-based study, prescriber compliance was reasonable near pazopanib initiation but low during subsequent weeks of treatment. This study provides information from real-world community practice settings and offers feedback to regulators on the effectiveness of label monitoring guidelines.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the

  10. Revised ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 300 area process trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalla, R.; Aaberg, R.L.; Bates, D.J.; Carlile, J.V.M.; Freshley, M.D.; Liikala, T.L.; Mitchell, P.J.; Olsen, K.B.; Rieger, J.T.

    1988-09-01

    This document contains ground-water monitoring plans for process-water disposal trenches located on the Hanford Site. These trenches, designated the 300 Area Process Trenches, have been used since 1973 for disposal of water that contains small quantities of both chemicals and radionuclides. The ground-water monitoring plans contained herein represent revision and expansion of an effort initiated in June 1985. At that time, a facility-specific monitoring program was implemented at the 300 Area Process Trenches as part of a regulatory compliance effort for hazardous chemicals being conducted on the Hanford Site. This monitoring program was based on the ground-water monitoring requirements for interim-status facilities, which are those facilities that do not yet have final permits, but are authorized to continue interim operations while engaged in the permitting process. The applicable monitoring requirements are described in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR 265.90 of the federal regulations, and in WAC 173-303-400 of Washington State's regulations (Washington State Department of Ecology 1986). The program implemented for the process trenches was designed to be an alternate program, which is required instead of the standard detection program when a facility is known or suspected to have contaminated the ground water in the uppermost aquifer. The plans for the program, contained in a document prepared by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) in 1985, called for monthly sampling of 14 of the 37 existing monitoring wells at the 300 Area plus the installation and sampling of 2 new wells. 27 refs., 25 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Introduction of an electronic monitoring system for monitoring compliance with Moments 1 and 4 of the WHO "My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene" methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Vincent C C; Tai, Josepha W M; Ho, Sara K Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Hung, Kwan Ngai; Ho, Pak Leung; Yuen, Kwok Yung

    2011-05-26

    MedSense is an electronic hand hygiene compliance monitoring system that provides Infection Control Practitioners with continuous access to hand hygiene compliance information by monitoring Moments 1 and 4 of the WHO "My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene" guidelines. Unlike previous electronic monitoring systems, MedSense operates in open cubicles with multiple beds and does not disrupt existing workflows. This study was conducted in a 6-bed neurosurgical intensive care unit with technical development and evaluation phases. Healthcare workers (HCWs) wore an electronic device in the style of an identity badge to detect hand hygiene opportunities and compliance. We compared the compliance determined by the system and an infection control nurse. At the same time, the system assessed compliance by time of day, day of week, work shift, professional category of HCWs, and individual subject, while the workload of HCWs was monitored by measuring the amount of time they spent in patient zones. During the three-month evaluation phase, the system identified 13,694 hand hygiene opportunities from 17 nurses, 3 physiotherapists, and 1 healthcare assistant, resulting in an overall compliance of 35.1% for the unit. The per-indication compliance for Moment 1, 4, and simultaneous 1 and 4 were 21.3% (95%CI: 19.0, 23.6), 39.6% (95%CI: 37.3, 41.9), and 49.2% (95%CI: 46.6, 51.8), respectively, and were all statistically significantly different (p monitored concurrently by the system and infection control nurse, the compliance were 88.9% and 95.6% respectively (p = 0.34), and the activity indices were 11.1 and 12.9 opportunities per hour, respectively. The hours from 12:00 to 14:00 had a notably lower compliance (21.3%, 95%CI: 17.2, 25.3) than nearly three quarters of the other periods of the day (p < 0.001). Nurses who used shared badges had significantly (p < 0.01) lower compliance (23.7%, 95%CI: 17.8, 29.6) than both the registered nurses (36.1%, 95%CI: 34.2, 37.9) and nursing officers (34

  12. Monitoring compliance with transfusion guidelines in hospital departments by electronic data capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Astrid; de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Nielsen, Jens; Johansson, Pär I.

    2014-01-01

    Background The practice of transfusing red blood cells is still liberal in some centres suggesting a lack of compliance with guidelines recommending transfusion of red blood cells at haemoglobin levels of 6–8 g/dL in the non-bleeding patient. Few databases provide ongoing feedback of data on pre-transfusion haemoglobin levels at the departmental level. In a tertiary care hospital, no such data were produced before this study. Our aim was to establish a Patient Blood Management database based on electronic data capture in order to monitor compliance with transfusion guidelines at departmental and hospital levels. Materials and methods Hospital data on admissions, diagnoses and surgical procedures were used to define the populations of patients. Data on haemoglobin measurements and red blood cell transfusions were used to calculate pre-transfusion haemoglobin, percentage of transfused patients and transfusion volumes. Results The model dataset include 33,587 admissions, of which 10% had received at least one unit of red blood cells. Haemoglobin measurements preceded 96.7% of the units transfused. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin was 8.9 g/dL (interquartile range 8.2–9.7) at the hospital level. In only 6.5% of the cases, transfusion was initiated at 7.3 g/dL or lower as recommended by the Danish national transfusion guideline. In 27% of the cases, transfusion was initiated when the haemoglobin level was 9.3 g/dL or higher, which is not recommended. A median of two units was transfused per transfusion episode and per hospital admission. Transfusion practice was more liberal in surgical and intensive care units than in medical departments. Discussion We described pre-transfusion haemoglobin levels, transfusion rates and volumes at hospital and departmental levels, and in surgical subpopulations. Initial data revealed an extensive liberal practice and low compliance with national transfusion guidelines, and identified wards in need of intervention. PMID

  13. A shipboard comparison of analytic methods for ballast water compliance monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradie, Johanna; Broeg, Katja; Gianoli, Claudio; He, Jianjun; Heitmüller, Susanne; Curto, Alberto Lo; Nakata, Akiko; Rolke, Manfred; Schillak, Lothar; Stehouwer, Peter; Vanden Byllaardt, Julie; Veldhuis, Marcel; Welschmeyer, Nick; Younan, Lawrence; Zaake, André; Bailey, Sarah

    2018-03-01

    Promising approaches for indicative analysis of ballast water samples have been developed that require study in the field to examine their utility for determining compliance with the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments. To address this gap, a voyage was undertaken on board the RV Meteor, sailing the North Atlantic Ocean from Mindelo (Cape Verde) to Hamburg (Germany) during June 4-15, 2015. Trials were conducted on local sea water taken up by the ship's ballast system at multiple locations along the trip, including open ocean, North Sea, and coastal water, to evaluate a number of analytic methods that measure the numeric concentration or biomass of viable organisms according to two size categories (≥ 50 μm in minimum dimension: 7 techniques, ≥ 10 μm and scientific approaches (e.g. flow cytometry). Several promising indicative methods were identified that showed high correlation with microscopy, but allow much quicker processing and require less expert knowledge. This study is the first to concurrently use a large number of analytic tools to examine a variety of ballast water samples on board an operational ship in the field. Results are useful to identify the merits of each method and can serve as a basis for further improvement and development of tools and methodologies for ballast water compliance monitoring.

  14. Compliance score as a monitoring tool to promote treatment adherence in children with thalassemia major for improved physical growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Sarala; Singh, Amarjeet

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/HYPOTHESIS: Creeping monotony in the treatment provides minimal motivation for children with beta-thalassemia major, leading to noncompliance for adequate blood transfusions and iron chelation therapy. This study was envisaged to formulate a clinical compliance score and correlate the score with their linear growth velocity and weight gain. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective longitudinal study among 30 thalassemia children aged between 1 and 18 years was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Tata Main Hospital (TMH), Jamshedpur, from July 2012 to January 2014. Relevant clinical information and investigations were recorded using a predesigned pro forma. Compliance score was calculated using pre-, post-transfusion hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels. The height velocity and weight gain were calculated. The same patients were re-assessed in January 2015. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Mean age of children was 10.18 ± 4.98 years. Forty percent were females. Using the scoring table, 33% were in good category of compliance while 4% had poor compliance. The mean height velocity was significantly higher in good compliance category as compared to average or poor score category in 2014 (P = 0.017). Good compliance score children continued to maintain higher height velocity during the 1-year follow-up (P = 0.02). Average weight gain was higher in good compliance category. CONCLUSION: This paper brings out a simple, regularly monitored scoring system to promote growth in thalassemia children through improved compliance to treatment, which incentivized them to maintain or improve their scores for better height velocity and weight gain. No such compliance score has been tabulated for thalassemia patients as of date. PMID:28970676

  15. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Aaaaa of... - Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Periodic Monitoring for Compliance With Opacity and Visible Emissions Limits 6 Table 6 to Subpart AAAAA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Lime Manufacturing Plants Part 63, Subpt. AAAAA, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart...

  16. 25 CFR 291.12 - Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Class III gaming procedures? 291.12 Section 291.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.12 Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures? The Indian tribe and the State may have an agreement...

  17. A detection-level hazardous waste ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 200 areas low-level burial grounds and retrievable storage units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This plan defines the actions needed to achieve detection-level monitoring compliance at the Hanford Site 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Compliance will be achieved through characterization of the hydrogeology and monitoring of the ground water beneath the LLBG located in the Hanford Site 200 Areas. 13 refs., 20 figs

  18. A detection-level hazardous waste ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 200 areas low-level burial grounds and retrievable storage units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-01

    This plan defines the actions needed to achieve detection-level monitoring compliance at the Hanford Site 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Compliance will be achieved through characterization of the hydrogeology and monitoring of the ground water beneath the LLBG located in the Hanford Site 200 Areas. 13 refs., 20 figs.

  19. Business process improvement: an electronic system to monitor compliance with medical resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landesman, Linda Young; Markowitz, Forest; Conde, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    The limitation of medical intern and resident work hours, known as the Bell 405 regulations, was initiated in New York State in 1989 with a modification to the state hospital code. The Bell 405 regulations were strengthened in 2000, and facilities would now be fined for noncompliance. Monitoring systems in place at that time were insufficient to provide an adequate level of review for the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) with more than 7,000 medical residents whose training is based at or who rotate through these public hospitals. A "simple to use," yet comprehensive, method of monitoring compliance needed to be developed to ensure that residents and interns complied with laws regulating working hours. The subsequent development of national accreditation standards increased the stakes for reliable scrutiny. HHC developed and implemented a Web-based Structured Query Language (SQL) application that facilitated easy access to work hour surveys captured through electronic time sheets. The time sheet data automatically entered a database that provided instant analysis of conformance to state law. The development of an electronic on-line application accessible from anywhere allowed HHC to efficiently identify nonconformance and pinpoint corrective action. Since the inception of the application and its expansion allowing access through the intranet, 26,000 individual time sheets have been submitted for evaluation. With the national movement regulating work hours, other hospitals still at the pencil and manual computation stage would greatly benefit by developing a similar application.

  20. Use of passive sampling devices for monitoring and compliance checking of POP concentrations in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Rainer; Booij, Kees; Smedes, Foppe; Vrana, Branislav

    2012-07-01

    The state of the art of passive water sampling of (nonpolar) organic contaminants is presented. Its suitability for regulatory monitoring is discussed, with an emphasis on the information yielded by passive sampling devices (PSDs), their relevance and associated uncertainties. Almost all persistent organic pollutants (POPs) targeted by the Stockholm Convention are nonpolar or weakly polar, hydrophobic substances, making them ideal targets for sampling in water using PSDs. Widely used nonpolar PSDs include semi-permeable membrane devices, low-density polyethylene and silicone rubber. The inter-laboratory variation of equilibrium partition constants between PSD and water is mostly 0.2-0.5 log units, depending on the exact matrix used. The sampling rate of PSDs is best determined by using performance reference compounds during field deployment. The major advantage of PSDs over alternative matrices applicable in trend monitoring (e.g. sediments or biota) is that the various sources of variance including analytical variance and natural environmental variance can be much better controlled, which in turn results in a reduction of the number of analysed samples required to obtain results with comparable statistical power. Compliance checking with regulatory limits and analysis of temporal and spatial contaminant trends are two possible fields of application. In contrast to the established use of nonpolar PSDs, polar samplers are insufficiently understood, but research is in progress to develop PSDs for the quantitative assessment of polar waterborne contaminants. In summary, PSD-based monitoring is a mature technique for the measurement of aqueous concentrations of apolar POPs, with a well-defined accuracy and precision.

  1. Thermal pretreatment of olive mill wastewater for efficient methane production: control of aromatic substances degradation by monitoring cyclohexane carboxylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontoni, Ludovico; d'Antonio, Giuseppe; Esposito, Giovanni; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is investigated as a sustainable depurative strategy of olive oil mill wastewater (OOMW). The effect of thermal pretreatment on the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic compounds present in (OMWW) was investigated. The anaerobic degradation of phenolic compounds, well known to be the main concern related to this kind of effluents, was monitored in batch anaerobic tests at a laboratory scale on samples pretreated at mild (80±1 °C), intermediate (90±1 °C) and high temperature (120±1 °C). The obtained results showed an increase of 34% in specific methane production (SMP) for OMWW treated at the lowest temperature and a decrease of 18% for treatment at the highest temperature. These results were related to the different decomposition pathways of the lignocellulosic compounds obtained in the tested conditions. The decomposition pathway was determined by measuring the concentrations of volatile organic acids, phenols, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) versus time. Cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) production was identified in all the tests with a maximum concentration of around 200 µmol L(-1) in accordance with the phenols degradation, suggesting that anaerobic digestion of aromatic compounds follows the benzoyl-CoA pathway. Accurate monitoring of this compound was proposed as the key element to control the process evolution. The total phenols (TP) and total COD removals were, with SMP, the highest (TP 62.7%-COD 63.2%) at 80 °C and lowest (TP 44.9%-COD 32.2%) at 120 °C. In all cases, thermal pretreatment was able to enhance the TP removal ability (up to 42% increase).

  2. Compliance monitoring system using screen printing technology based on conductive ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Kenji; Kawakami, Junko; Aoki, Sorama; Hamada, Kouji; Sato, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    We developed a compliance monitoring system that electrically detects which drug among the multiple prescribed drugs a patient has taken and the date of drug-taking by a patient to prevent the patient from missing doses and taking drugs incorrectly at home. A conductive pattern is screen printed using conductive ink (silver paste) on the surface of a calendar-type pill organizer containing medications for as long as 1 week (4 times per day × 7 days, 28 doses) to create a sensor for detecting the opening of a pill organizer. Whenever the patient opens the pill organizer and removes a dose of the drug (pill), information about which of the 28 locations is opened and the date of opening are recorded in nonvolatile memory. This system is applicable to patients who take multiple drugs, for whom recording of drug-taking behavior is reportedly difficult. Specific benefits are that the user needs no additional manipulation to use the system: the user can take the drug from the pill organizer according to usual procedures.

  3. Fault detection and diagnosis for compliance monitoring in international supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yuxin; Tian, Yifu; Teixeira, André; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

    Currently international supply chains are facing risks concerning faults in compliance, such as altering shipping documentations, fictitious inventory, and inter-company manipulations. In this paper a method to detect and diagnose fault scenarios regarding customs compliance in supply chains is

  4. 40 CFR 63.2374 - When do I monitor and collect data to demonstrate continuous compliance and how do I use the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... demonstrate continuous compliance and how do I use the collected data? 63.2374 Section 63.2374 Protection of... I monitor and collect data to demonstrate continuous compliance and how do I use the collected data... applicable, calibration checks and required zero and span adjustments). (c) Do not use data recorded during...

  5. Using particle counters for pretreatment optimization, iron transport monitoring, condenser leak detection, and carryover monitoring - a synopsis of experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Steam generating systems all require clean water. The effects of particulate material in the steam/water cycle on metal corrosion, erosion, cracking, and deposition are frequently observed. However, the physical/chemical mechanisms are often difficult to correlate with a specific plant event, since the periodic ''grab'' samples from various areas of the water/steam process which are generally conducted do not allow real time continuous on-line particulate monitoring and data collection. This paper introduces the concept of using particulate measuring instruments to monitor the steam generation cycle, and presents case histories of real world plant situations where on-line particulate measurement using particle counters and particle monitors has defined the source of a problem, quantified the severity of a problem, and provided a solution to a problem. (orig.)

  6. Monitoring of Growth and Production Characteristics of Red Yeasts Cultivated on Hydrothermally Pretreated Lignocellulosic Pine Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Haronikova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the production of carotenes and ergosterol by red yeasts grown on pine lignocellulose substrates. The yeast strains Rhodotorula aurantiaca and Sporobolomyces shibatanus were grown on the liquid fraction of steam pretreated pine (210 °C, catalyst SO2. Biomass production on a pine hydrolysate was lower than on glucose. The highest content of carotenoids and ergosterol in the cells of R. aurantiaca grown on pine hydrolysate was about 1.7 mg g–1 and 0.8 mg g–1 (dwt, respectively, and in S. shibatanus about 0.9 mg g–1 and 0.1 mg g–1, respectively. Hemicellulose hydrolysates may contain many compounds that have inhibitory effects on microorganisms. In this work, the influences of some inhibitors were assessed by cultivating yeasts on media with a representative addition of the selected compounds. From these tests, furfural appears to be the most critical inhibitor, whereas acetic acid and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF do not affect the growth so much.

  7. Compliance to self-monitoring of blood glucose among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its influential factors: a real-world cross-sectional study based on the Tencent TDF-I blood glucose monitoring platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi-De; Zhang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Ying; Zhu, Shu

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the compliance to self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its influential factors. The real-world SMBG use over 90 days among 415 T2DM patients were recorded by using a blood glucose monitoring platform (TDF-I, Tencent, China). Clinical features including age, sex, duration of diabetes, insulin treatment or not, and use of oral antidiabetic drugs were collected. Poor compliance was defined as the average frequency of weekly SMBG use over 90 days was below the criteria established by the physicians, and otherwise the patients were regarded as with good compliance. Factors affecting the SMBG compliance were analyzed by using independent sample t -test, Mann-Whitney U test, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Only 57.6% of patients in the study cohort had good compliance to SMBG. Multivariate logistic regression models showed that only the duration of T2DM and the use of oral antidiabetic agents were independently associated with SMBG compliance; more specifically, patients with longer course of disease had poorer SMBG compliance, and those had used oral antidiabetic agents had poorer SMBG compliance. SMBG compliance in T2DM patients needs to be further improved. For patients with a longer course of disease and/or under oral antidiabetic medication, interventions such as patient education should be adopted to increase the SMBG compliance.

  8. Theory of Compliance: Indicator Checklist Statistical Model and Instrument Based Program Monitoring Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiene, Richard J.; Woods, Lawrence

    Two unanswered questions about child care are: (1) Does compliance with state child care regulations have a positive impact on children? and (2) Have predictors of program quality been identified? This paper explores a research study and related model that have had some success in answering these questions. Section I, a general introduction,…

  9. 40 CFR 63.1112 - Extension of compliance, and performance test, monitoring, recordkeeping and reporting waivers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... by which orders will be issued for the purchase of component parts to accomplish emission control or... or intention to deny approval of a request for an extension of compliance within 30 days after... writing of the Administrator's intention to issue the denial, together with— (A) Notice of the information...

  10. Monitoring Compliance to Promote Quality Assurance: Development of a Mental Health Clinical Chart Audit Tool in Belize, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Rachel A; Bennett, Eleanor; Murillo, Illouise; Schuetz-Mueller, Jan; Katz, Craig L

    2015-09-01

    Belize trained psychiatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) in the early 1990s to provide mental health services throughout the country. Despite overwhelming success, the program is limited by lack of monitoring, evaluation, and surveillance. To promote quality assurance, we developed a chart audit tool to monitor mental healthcare delivery compliance for initial psychiatric assessment notes completed by PNPs. After reviewing the Belize Health Information System electronic medical record system, we developed a clinical audit tool to capture 20 essential components for initial assessment clinical notes. The audit tool was then piloted for initial assessment notes completed during July through September of 2013. One hundred and thirty-four initial psychiatric interviews were audited. The average chart score among all PNPs was 9.57, ranging from 3 to 15. Twenty-three charts-or 17.2%-had a score of 14 or higher and met a 70% compliance benchmark goal. Among indicators most frequently omitted included labs ordered and named (15.7%) and psychiatric diagnosis (21.6%). Explicit statement of medications initiated with dose and frequency occurred in 47.0% of charts. Our findings provide direction for training and improvement, such as emphasizing the importance of naming labs ordered, medications and doses prescribed, and psychiatric diagnoses in initial assessment clinical notes. We hope this initial assessment helps enhance mental health delivery compliance by prompting creation of BHIS templates, development of audits tools for revisit follow-up visits, and establishment of corrective actions for low-scoring practitioners. These efforts may serve as a model for implementing quality assurance programming in other low resource settings.

  11. Immunoassay-Based Drug Tests Are Inadequately Sensitive for Medication Compliance Monitoring in Patients Treated for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Marion L; Fantz, Corrine R; Melanson, Stacy

    2017-02-01

    Enzyme immunoassays (EIA) have notable limitations for monitoring therapeutic compliance in pain management. Chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry provides definitive results and superior sensitivity and specificity over traditional EIA testing. To analyze and compare the sensitivity of EIA results together with known prescriptions to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for monitoring drug use (and abuse) in patients treated for chronic pain. A total of 530 urine samples from patients being treated for chronic pain were studied. Pain management clinic in the United States. The samples were tested for a profile of chronic pain medications and illicit drugs with commercially available EIA kits followed by analysis with Agilent LC-MS/MS system. The EIAs exhibited poor sensitivity and high rates of false negative results in the pain management setting. For example, 21% of EIA for opiates show false negative results. Mass spectrometry methods were more sensitive, detected a broader range of drugs and metabolites, and could detect non-prescribed drug use and simulations in compliance. Patients do not always accurately report drug use information, and some drugs do not have EIA methods available for comparative purposes. Mass spectrometry is a more robust and reliable method for detection of drugs used in the pain management setting. Due to the extent of undisclosed use and abuse of medications and illicit drugs, LC-MS/MS testing is necessary for adequate and accurate drug detection. In addition, LC-MS/MS methods are superior in terms of sensitivity and number of compounds that can be screened, making this a better method for use in pain management. Key words: Pain management, enzyme immunoassays, mass spectrometry, urine drug testing, prescription status, compliance.

  12. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  13. Monitoring compliance with standards of care for chronic diseases using healthcare administrative databases in Italy: Strengths and limitations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Gini

    Full Text Available A recent comprehensive report on healthcare quality in Italy published by the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD recommended that regular monitoring of quality of primary care by means of compliance with standards of care for chronic diseases is performed. A previous ecological study demonstrated that compliance with standards of care could be reliably estimated on regional level using administrative databases. This study compares estimates based on administrative data with estimates based on GP records for the same persons, to understand whether ecological fallacy played a role in the results of the previous study.We compared estimates of compliance with diagnostic and therapeutic standards of care for type 2 diabetes (T2DM, hypertension and ischaemic heart disease (IHD from administrative data (IAD with estimates from medical records (MR for the same persons registered with 24 GP's in 2012. Data were linked at an individual level.32,688 persons entered the study, 12,673 having at least one of the three diseases according to at least one data source. Patients not detected by IAD were many, for all three conditions: adding MR increased the number of cases of T2DM, hypertension, and IHD by +40%, +42%, and +104%, respectively. IAD had imperfect sensitivity in detecting population compliance with therapies (adding MR increased the estimate, from +11.5% for statins to +14.7% for antithrombotics, and, more substantially, with diagnostic recommendations (adding MR increased the estimate, from +23.7% in glycated hemoglobin tests, to +50.5% in electrocardiogram. Patients not detected by IAD were less compliant with respect to those that IAD correctly identified (from -4.8 percentage points in proportion of IHD patients compliant with a yearly glycated hemoglobin test, to -40.1 points in the proportion of T2DM patients compliant with the same recommendation. IAD overestimated indicators of compliance with therapeutic standards

  14. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  15. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  16. Factors influencing intracranial pressure monitoring guideline compliance and outcome after severe traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biersteker, H.A.; Andriessen, T.M.J.C.; Horn, J.; Franschman, G.; Naalt, J. van der; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Lingsma, H.F.; Haitsma, I.; Vos, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine adherence to Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines for intracranial pressure monitoring after severe traumatic brain injury, to investigate if characteristics of patients treated according to guidelines (ICP+) differ from those who were not (ICP-), and whether guideline

  17. Factors influencing intracranial pressure monitoring guideline compliance and outcome after severe traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biersteker, Heleen A. R.; Andriessen, Teuntje M. J. C.; Horn, Janneke; Franschman, Gaby; van der Naalt, Joukje; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W. E.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Haitsma, Iain; Vos, Pieter E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine adherence to Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines for intracranial pressure monitoring after severe traumatic brain injury, to investigate if characteristics of patients treated according to guidelines (ICP+) differ from those who were not (ICP-), and whether guideline

  18. Factors influencing intracranial pressure monitoring guideline compliance and outcome after severe traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biersteker, Heleen A. R.; Andriessen, Teuntje M. J. C.; Horn, Janneke; Franschman, Gaby; van der Naalt, Joukje; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W. E.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Haitsma, Iain; Vos, Pieter E.

    Objective: To determine adherence to Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines for intracranial pressure monitoring after severe traumatic brain injury, to investigate if characteristics of patients treated according to guidelines (ICP+) differ from those who were not (ICP-), and whether guideline

  19. Can oral fluid cannabinoid testing monitor medication compliance and/or cannabis smoking during oral THC and oromucosal Sativex administration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dayong; Karschner, Erin L; Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J; Goodwin, Robert S; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-06-01

    We characterize cannabinoid disposition in oral fluid (OF) after dronabinol, synthetic oral Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and Sativex, a cannabis-extract oromucosal spray, and evaluate whether smoked cannabis relapse or Sativex compliance can be identified with OF cannabinoid monitoring. 5 and 15 mg synthetic oral THC, low (5.4 mg THC, 5.0 mg cannabidiol (CBD)) and high (16.2 mg THC, 15.0 mg CBD) dose Sativex, and placebo were administered in random order (n=14). Oral fluid specimens were collected for 10.5 h after dosing and analyzed for THC, CBD, cannabinol (CBN), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). After oral THC, OF THC concentrations decreased over time from baseline, reflecting residual THC excretion from previously self-administered smoked cannabis. CBD and CBN also were rarely detected. After Sativex, THC, CBD and CBN increased greatly, peaking at 0.25-1 h. Median CBD/THC and CBN/THC ratios were 0.82-1.34 and 0.04-0.06, respectively, reflecting cannabinoids' composition in Sativex. THCCOOH/THC ratios within 4.5 h post Sativex were ≤ 1.6 pg/ng, always lower than after oral THC and placebo. THCCOOH/THC ratios increased throughout each dosing session. Lack of measurable THC, CBD and CBN in OF following oral THC, and high OF CBD/THC ratios after Sativex distinguish oral and sublingual drug delivery routes from cannabis smoking. Low THCCOOH/THC ratios suggest recent Sativex and smoked cannabis exposure. These data indicate that OF cannabinoid monitoring can document compliance with Sativex pharmacotherapy, and identify relapse to smoked cannabis during oral THC medication but not Sativex treatment, unless samples were collected shortly after smoking. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Biomass pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

    2013-05-21

    A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

  1. AANA journal course: new technologies in anesthesia: update for nurse anesthetists--monitoring ventilation and compliance with Side Stream Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, L M

    1991-06-01

    A new anesthesia technology, Side Stream Spirometry, now allows clinicians to monitor pressure, volume, flow, compliance, and resistance during routine anesthesia practice. Continuous monitoring with Side Stream Spirometry is a major adjunct to patient safety because numerical and visual references show how change in one respiratory parameter affects the mechanics of the entire breath cycle. To optimize ventilation and ensure adequate oxygenation, it is common practice for clinicians to verify that the proper volume per breath is being delivered to the patient at the lowest possible pressure. For artificial ventilation to be most physiologic, each breath must be delivered with the most appropriate flow, at the required volume, under the pressure appropriate for each patient's pulmonary system, and at the correct respiratory breath rate. Side Stream Spirometry makes it possible to continuously measure lung mechanics and the gas dynamics of flow, volume and pressure. Using a simple sensor, the D-lite, Side Stream Spirometry is compatible with all common models of anesthesia machines, ventilators and breathing circuits. Side Stream Spirometry measures all parameters closest to the patient, at the tracheal tube or mask. This sensor location provides actual patient information which is not altered by the volume of gas compressed in the breathing circuit, the absorber system, or in the bellows of the ventilator. This installment of the AANA Journal Course will discuss the technology of Side Stream Spirometry and its application to monitoring pulmonary ventilation. Clinical evidence of ventilatory changes will be graphically demonstrated using the CAPNOMAC ULTIMA, a respiratory gas monitoring system, equipped with Side Stream Spirometry.

  2. Research monitoring by US medical institutions to protect human subjects: compliance or quality improvement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Jean Philippe; van Zwieten, Myra C. B.; Willems, Dick L.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, to protect the rights and welfare of human subjects, institutions in the USA have begun to set up programmes to monitor ongoing medical research. These programmes provide routine, onsite oversight, and thus go beyond existing oversight such as investigating suspected misconduct or

  3. Increasing Compliance in Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using Functional Behavioral Assessment and Self-Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Jamie P.; Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Sarah B.

    2015-01-01

    Noncompliance in three elementary age students with intellectual disabilities was assessed using functional behavioral assessments. Escape was identified as the primary function of the behavior in all three students, and access to tangible items was identified in one of the students as a secondary function. Teacher-monitoring and self-monitoring…

  4. 40 CFR 141.26 - Monitoring frequency and compliance requirements for radionuclides in community water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... identified in the finished water. (iii) Annual monitoring for strontium-90 and tritium shall be conducted by... requirements for radionuclides in community water systems. 141.26 Section 141.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER...

  5. Use of passive sampling devices for monitoring and compliance checking of POP concentrations in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohmann, R.; Booij, K.; Smedes, F.; Vrana, B.

    2012-01-01

    The state of the art of passive water sampling of (nonpolar) organic contaminants is presented. Its suitability for regulatory monitoring is discussed, with an emphasis on the information yielded by passive sampling devices (PSDs), their relevance and associated uncertainties. Almost all persistent

  6. Towards a lean-government using new IT-architectures for compliance monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharosa, N; Hulstijn, J; Janssen, MFWHA; Tan, Y; van Wijk, R; de Winne, N; Estevez E. and Janssen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent turmoil in financial markets has invoked governments to monitor activities and transactions in the private sector more strictly. At the same time, policy makers strive to cut back on government spending by reducing the size of government agencies. These contradicting developments require

  7. 40 CFR 63.5895 - How do I monitor and collect data to demonstrate continuous compliance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... applicable, calibration checks and required zero and span adjustments), you must conduct all monitoring in... emissions limits based on an organic HAP emissions limit in Tables 3 or 5 to this subpart. You must collect... if you are meeting any organic HAP content limits in Table 7 to this subpart if you are averaging...

  8. Monitoring of neutron field parameters of pressure vessels of russian WWER in compliance with regulatory demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodkin, P.G.; Khrennikov, N.N.; Miroshnichenko, M.I.

    2015-01-01

    Results of finished calculational-experimental measurements which are performed on the number of Russian power units with WWER-440 and WWER-1000 are presented. The analysis of core power distribution of WWER-1000 and its influence on measurements and calculations of the integral through-vessel neutron leak-age are proposed. It is shown how to get improved estimation of parameters with reasonable uncertainty from actual reactor data (core operational parameters (from in-core monitoring system) and experimentally evaluated the integral leakage at the reactor vessel (neutron activation measurements). In the present paper discusses the results of such investigations and gives the conclusions on the necessity and sufficiency of monitoring of neutron field parameters on RPV [ru

  9. Official monitoring for compliance with permissible dose limits in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlermann, D.A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The ban on food irradiation in Germany is aimed at the trade and consumption of irradiated food in this country. If and when food irradiated is permitted, identification methods will be used only to check for the correctness of product labelling. After permission, official monitoring will have to verify whether irradiation was performed within specified dose limits. The identification methods available to date fall short of this objective in principle. If irradiation facilities are monitored strictly. Identification will not have to be performed in products subsequently. Successful inspection needs to be based on detailed knowledge about the mode of action of irradiation facilities and methods of dosimetry. Pertinent legal provisions need to be implemented in technical facilities. It is indispensable to gain a clear understanding of the different terms of dose and to link them to legal provisions. In this way, official monitoring will be able to face up to its future tasks in time. Concerning the EC market regulations, there are indications that the EC will specify individual values for the permissible mean 'over-all' dose for each permitted product. (orig./UHE) [de

  10. Monitoramento da adesão ao tratamento com lítio Monitoring the compliance to lithium treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane Ribeiro Rosa

    2006-01-01

    .BACKGROUND: Lithium has been used as the treatment of choice for bipolar disorder. It is efficient in reducing depressive and maniac episodes and has an anti-suicidal effect. However, the effectiveness of lithium is decreased by low compliance to treatment, influenced by patient's characteristics and the pharmacological properties of lithium. OBJECTIVE: To review some of the clinical pharmacological aspects of lithium and its importance for the therapeutic monitoring of lithium, through concentration measurements and through translated to Portuguese self-report scales of non-compliance to lithium treatment. METHOD: Relevant basic and clinical scientific literature available in English and in Portuguese were searched in PUBMED and SCIELO with the words "lithium", "monitoring", "compliance" OR "adherence". RESULTS: Lithium is a drug with very low therapeutic index and difficult individual pharmacokinetic properties, leading to the necessity of intensive therapeutic monitoring, through lithium measurements in serum and in red blood cells. The rates of compliance to lithium prescription by Brazilian bipolar patients who attend outpatient treatment are between 60 and 85%, being higher than those of patients not receiving psychoeducational programs (compliance around 46%. The non-compliant patients present lower knowledge about lithium and their disorder and more negative attitudes toward the use of medication, besides the fear of side-effects. CONCLUSION: Biological monitoring helps in treatment adherence, through the improvement of therapeutic individualization and lithium dose adjustments, besides being helpful in the detection of drugs interactions.

  11. Regulating Effluents From India’s Textile Sector: New Commands and Compliance Monitoring for Zero Liquid Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Grönwall

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2016 large parts of India had experienced failing monsoons for two consecutive years. Textiles production was a natural target in the quest for solutions when re-distribution of water between sectors became imperative, and it seemed likely that the zero liquid discharge (ZLD approach would be mainstreamed nationwide. However, when amended standards for discharge of effluents were enacted it was without strict requirements for reuse of water in-house; the legislator chose to make ZLD applicable only to large units and refrained from making it mandatory. The carrying capacity of the environment in sensitive or otherwise critical areas may henceforth be taken into account by the executive, but the textile sector’s wastewater is not yet regarded the resource that a circular economy calls for. This paper examines the command-side of regulation by shedding light on the applicable law, the reform steps taken in 2014–16 and how judicial interventions influenced these. It also seeks to contribute to the understanding of enforcement control by discussing what role court-established committees are playing in implementation and monitoring of compliance, based on an in-depth case study of Tirupur, India’s ‘knit city’.

  12. Detection of UV-treatment effects on plankton by rapid analytic tools for ballast water compliance monitoring immediately following treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradie, Johanna; Gianoli, Claudio; He, Jianjun; Lo Curto, Alberto; Stehouwer, Peter; Veldhuis, Marcel; Welschmeyer, Nick; Younan, Lawrence; Zaake, André; Bailey, Sarah

    2018-03-01

    Non-indigenous species seriously threaten native biodiversity. To reduce establishments, the International Maritime Organization established the Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments which limits organism concentrations at discharge under regulation D-2. Most ships will comply by using on-board treatment systems to disinfect their ballast water. Port state control officers will need simple, rapid methods to detect compliance. Appropriate monitoring methods may be dependent on treatment type, since different treatments will affect organisms by a variety of mechanisms. Many indicative tools have been developed, but must be examined to ensure the measured variable is an appropriate signal for the response of the organisms to the applied treatment. We assessed the abilities of multiple analytic tools to rapidly detect the effects of a ballast water treatment system based on UV disinfection. All devices detected a large decrease in the concentrations of vital organisms ≥ 50 μm and organisms organisms, as examined herein for UV-C treatment systems.

  13. Measurement of isotopic uranium in water for compliance monitoring by liquid scintillation counting with alpha/beta discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venso, E.A.S.

    1993-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method is described for analysis of uranium (U) activity and mass in water by liquid scintillation counting using α/β discrimination. This method appears to offer a solution to the need for an inexpensive protocol for monitoring U activity and mass simultaneously and an alternative to the potential inaccuracy involved when depending on the mass-to-activity conversion factor or activity screen. U is extracted virtually quantitatively into 20 ml extractive scintillator from a 1-ell aliquot of water acidified to less than pH 2. After phase separation, the sample is counted for a 20-minute screening count with a minimum detection level of 0.27 pCi ell -1 . α-particle emissions from the extracted U are counted with close to 100% efficiency with a Beckman LS6000 LL liquid scintillation counter equipped with pulse-shape discrimination electronics. Samples with activities higher than 10 pCi ell -1 are recounted for 500-1000 minutes for isotopic analysis. Isotopic analysis uses events that are automatically stored in spectral files and transferred to a computer during assay. The data can be transferred to a commercially available spreadsheet and retrieved for examination or data manipulation. Values for three readily observable spectral features can be rapidly identified by data examination and substituted into a simple formula to obtain 234 U/ 238 U ratio for most samples. U mass is calculated by substituting the isotopic ratio value into a simple equation. The utility of this method for the proposed compliance monitoring of U in public drinking water supplies was field tested with a survey of drinking water from Texas supplies that had previously been known to contain elevated levels of gross α activity. U concentrations in 32 samples from 27 drinking water supplies ranged from 0.26 to 65.5 pCi ell -1 , with seven samples exceeding the proposed Maximum Contaminant Level

  14. A compliance monitoring program for use and operation of the Grasslands Bypass for drainage conveyance in the western San Joaquin Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1995-11-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) signed a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) No. 92-02-MP dated October 18, 1991 and a Supplement to the FONSI No. 92-03-MP dated April 15, 1991, for use of a 19 mile segment of the San Luis Drain, renamed the Grasslands Bypass, to convey agricultural drainage waters to the San Joaquin River. An Environmental Assessment was prepared and published in support of the FONSI. On September 7, 1995 a Supplemental Environmental Assessment was prepared to update the original document to account for changes to the original project. These changes included a change to the point of entry to the Drain and an increase in the length of the Drain utilized by the Project from 19 to 28 miles. Environmental commitments and a schedule of fees for non-compliance with monthly and annual selenium load targets were also agreed upon for the current Project. Environmental documents preceding the FONSI outlined a monitoring program that obtained general and informal concurrence by technical staff of the participating agencies. A revised version of the proposed monitoring program was distributed by Reclamation for review and comment by the agencies in July 1992. A final monitoring plan document was issued in June 1993 and was subsequently approved by the Oversight Committee. This document includes substantial revisions to the existing June 1993 monitoring plan to reflect the compliance requirements of the current Project.

  15. Monitoring for compliance with a ketogenic diet: what is the best time of day to test for urinary ketosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, Paul; Bertz, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat and adequate-protein diet with no calorie limit that induces a metabolic condition called "physiological ketosis". It was first introduced to treat epilepsy in the 1920s and has become quite popular recently as weight-loss and performance-enhancing diet. Its therapeutic use in a range of diseases is under investigation. During KD interventions people are supposed to monitor compliance with the dietary regimen by daily urine testing for ketosis. However, there are no studies investigating the best time for testing. Twelve healthy subjects (37 ± 11 years; BMI = 23.0 ± 2.5 kg/m 2 ) were instructed to, during the sixth week of a KD and with stable ketosis, measure their urine (8×) and blood (18×) ketone concentration at regular intervals during a 24-h period. According to their 1-day food record, the subjects consumed on average a diet with 74.3 ± 4.0 %, 19.5 ± 3.5 %, and 6.2 ± 2.0 % of total energy intake from fat, protein and carbohydrate, respectively. The lowest blood ß-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) (0.33 ± 0.17 mmol/l) and urine acetoacetate (AA) (0.46 ± 0.54 mmol/l) concentrations were measured at 10:00, respectively. The highest BHB (0.70 ± 0.62 mmol/l) and AA concentrations were noted at 03:00, respectively. Via urine testing the highest levels of ketosis were found at 22:00 and 03:00 and the highest detection rates (>90 %) for ketosis were at 07:00, 22:00 and 03:00, respectively. These results indicate that ketonuria in subjects with stable ketosis is highest and can be most reliably detected in the early morning and post-dinner urine. Recommendations can be given regarding precise time of the day for measuring ketone bodies in urine in future studies with KDs.

  16. Serum potassium monitoring for users of ethinyl estradiol/drospirenone taking medications predisposing to hyperkalemia: physician compliance and survey of knowledge and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona Eng, Patricia; Seeger, John D; Loughlin, Jeanne; Oh, Kelly; Walker, Alexander M

    2007-02-01

    Yasmin-28 [ethinyl estradiol 0.03 mg/drospirenone 3 mg (EE/DRSP)] contains drospirenone, a progestin component that possesses antimineralocorticoid activity with a potassium-sparing diuretic effect similar to that in spironolactone. Product labeling recommends potassium monitoring in the first month of use for women concurrently receiving medication that may increase serum potassium. We evaluated compliance with this recommendation by measuring monitoring around the date of oral contraceptive (OC) initiation in women who received EE/DRSP while being treated with medications predisposing to hyperkalemia and in similar women who received other OCs. Because preliminary analyses indicated incomplete compliance, we surveyed physicians who prescribed EE/DRSP to women receiving drugs predisposing to hyperkalemia on their knowledge and attitudes with regard to the recommendation. We conducted this study using data from the Ingenix Research Datamart, which includes insurance claims for reimbursement for medical services and prescription medications for approximately 8,000,000 members of a large nationally dispersed health plan. We used claims for pharmacy dispensings of prescription medications to identify all women aged 10-59 years old who initiated EE/DRSP or other OCs during the first 3 years of EE/DRSP availability (July 2001 to June 2004). The frequency of potassium monitoring was measured by identifying claims for serum potassium tests. We conducted a telephone survey of 58 physicians who had prescribed EE/DRSP up to June 2003 to women who received concomitant hyperkalemic drugs. Although potassium monitoring was generally more frequent among EE/DRSP initiators receiving concomitant hyperkalemic drugs than among other OC initiators receiving similar medications, only 40% of 466 EE/DRSP initiators with concurrent hyperkalemic treatment had potassium tests. More than 98% of surveyed physicians were aware of the potassium-sparing property of EE/DRSP. Compared with

  17. 76 FR 54194 - Availability of Final Compliance Guide for the Use of Video or Other Electronic Monitoring or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... posted this final compliance guide on its Significant Guidance Documents Web page ( http://www.fsis.usda..., FSIS will announce it online through the FSIS Web page located at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/regulations... also available on the FSIS Web page. Through the Listserv and Web page, FSIS is able to provide...

  18. Monitoring patients on chronic treatment with antidepressants between 2003 and 2011: analysis of factors associated with compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, M Catalina; Real, Jordi; Cruz, Inés; Galván, Leonardo; Martin, Elisabet

    2015-11-26

    Clinical practice guidelines consider the use of antidepressants as one of the standard treatments for anxiety disorders, due to the significant improvements obtained in quality of life and functional disability. In addition, in patients who have not achieved a favorable response after 3 months of psychotherapy, antidepressants are recommended as part of a combined treatment approach. This combination with psychotropic drugs and psychotherapy appears to be indicated from baseline in patients with moderate, severe or recurrent depression. In the last decade, antidepressant prescription rates in general practice have increased between 4 and 10 times. Depression presents high rates of relapse and recurrence. Treatment is often interrupted prematurely, leading to increases in both relapse rates and health care costs. Few studies have analysed the chronic use of antidepressant drugs and long-term adherence. To evaluate compliance with antidepressant treatment between 2003 and 2011 and to explore the associated factors. Retrospective cohort study of antidepressant dispensing. Health Region of Lleida between 2003 and 2011. Patients with chronic prescription of antidepressants (ATC code NO6A) during 2003 were followed up until December 2011. The sample comprised 3684 subjects. The compliance rate was calculated on the basis of the number of units withdrawn from the pharmacy and the theoretical number of units required according to the scheduled duration of treatment: compliance was defined in cases with scores greater than or equal to 80%. 12.5% of patients received chronic antidepressant treatment for at least 4 years. Mean age was 54 years, and 73.2% of patients were female. Almost a third (32.4%) presented anxiety disorders and 26.5% mood disorders. The overall compliance rate was 22% (28% in patients with depression, and 21% in patients with anxiety). According to gender, compliance rates were 21.4% for males and 22.4% for females. Compliance was more likely in

  19. Radiotherapy pre-treatment dose validation: A second verification of monitor units (MU with a commercial software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Al Amri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inversely planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and stereotactic small field radiotherapy should be verified before treatment execution. A second verification is carried out for planned treatments in IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT using a monitor verification commercial dose calculation management software (DCMS. For the same reference point the ion-chamber measured doses are compared for IMRT plans. DCMS (Diamond computes dose based on modified Clarkson integration, accounting for multi-leaf collimators (MLC transmission and measured collimator scatter factors. DCMS was validated with treatment planning system (TPS (Eclipse 6.5 Version, Varian, USA separately. Treatment plans computed from TPS are exported to DCMS using DICOM interface. Doses are re-calculated at selected points for fields delivered to IMRT phantom (IBA Scanditronix Wellhofer in high-energy linac (Clinac 2300 CD, Varian. Doses measured at central axis, for the same points using CC13 (0.13 cc ion chamber with Dose 1 Electrometer (Scanditronix Wellhofer are compared with calculated data on DCMS and TPS. The data of 53 IMRT patients with fields ranging from 5 to 9 are reported. The computed dose for selected monitor units (MU by Diamond showed good agreement with planned doses by TPS. DCMS dose prediction matched well in 3D-CRT forward plans (0.8 ± 1.3%, n = 37 and in IMRT inverse plans (−0.1 ± 2.2%, n = 37. Ion chamber measurements agreed well with Eclipse planned doses (−2.1 ± 2.0%, n = 53 and re-calculated DCMS doses (−1.5 ± 2.6%, n = 37 in phantom. DCMS dose validation is in reasonable agreement with TPS. DCMS calculations corroborate well with ionometric measured doses in most of the treatment plans.

  20. Radiotherapy pre-treatment dose validation: A second verification of monitor units (MU) with a commercial software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Amri, Iqbal; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Sivakumar, Somangili Satyamoorthi; Binukumar, Johnson Pichi; Davis, Chirayathmanjiyil Antony; Al Rahbi, Zakia; Al Shukeili, Khalsa; Al Kindi, Fatima

    2012-01-01

    Inversely planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and stereotactic small field radiotherapy should be verified before treatment execution. A second verification is carried out for planned treatments in IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) using a monitor verification commercial dose calculation management software (DCMS). For the same reference point the ion-chamber measured doses are compared for IMRT plans. DCMS (Diamond) computes dose based on modified Clarkson integration, accounting for multi-leaf collimators (MLC) transmission and measured collimator scatter factors. DCMS was validated with treatment planning system (TPS) (Eclipse 6.5 Version, Varian, USA) separately. Treatment plans computed from TPS are exported to DCMS using DICOM interface. Doses are re-calculated at selected points for fields delivered to IMRT phantom (IBA Scanditronix Wellhofer) in high-energy linac (Clinac 2300 CD, Varian). Doses measured at central axis, for the same points using CC13 (0.13 cc) ion chamber with Dose 1 Electrometer (Scanditronix Wellhofer) are compared with calculated data on DCMS and TPS. The data of 53 IMRT patients with fields ranging from 5 to 9 are reported. The computed dose for selected monitor units (MU) by Diamond showed good agreement with planned doses by TPS. DCMS dose prediction matched well in 3D-CRT forward plans (0.8 ± 1.3%, n = 37) and in IMRT inverse plans (–0.1 ± 2.2%, n = 37). Ion chamber measurements agreed well with Eclipse planned doses (–2.1 ± 2.0%, n = 53) and re-calculated DCMS doses (–1.5 ± 2.6%, n = 37) in phantom. DCMS dose validation is in reasonable agreement with TPS. DCMS calculations corroborate well with ionometric measured doses in most of the treatment plans. PMID:23293456

  1. Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at the Dalles Dam, Spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    if applicable): Not applicable; this is a compliance study Fish: Implant Procedure: Species-race: yearling Chinook salmon (CH1), steelhead ( STH ...Surgical: Yes Injected: No Source: John Day Dam fish collection facility Size (median): CH1 STH Sample Size: CH1 STH Weight: 31.4 g 78.1 g...conditions and survival for downstream migrants. Survival and Passage Estimates (value & SE): CH1 STH Dam survival 0.9641 (SE = 0.0096) 0.9534

  2. Feasibility and Acceptability of Utilizing a Smartphone Based Application to Monitor Outpatient Discharge Instruction Compliance in Cardiac Disease Patients around Discharge from Hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee M. Layton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of utilizing a smartphone based application to monitor compliance in patients with cardiac disease around discharge. For 60 days after discharge, patients’ medication compliance, physical activity, follow-up care, symptoms, and reading of education material were monitored daily with the application. 16 patients were enrolled in the study (12 males, 4 females, age 55 ± 18 years during their hospital stay. Five participants were rehospitalized during the study and did not use the application once discharged. Seven participants completed 1–30 days and four patients completed >31 days. For those 11 patients, medication reminders were utilized 37% (1–30-day group and 53% (>31-day group of the time, education material was read 44% (1–30 and 53% (>31 of the time, and physical activity was reported 25% (1–30 and 42% (>31 of the time. Findings demonstrated that patients with stable health utilized the application, even if only minimally. Patients with decreased breath sounds by physical exam and who reported their health as fair to poor on the day of discharge were less likely to utilize the application. Acceptability of the application to report health status varied among the stable patients.

  3. Evaluation of bank filtration as a pretreatment method for the provision of hygienically safe drinking water in Norway: results from monitoring at two full-scale sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitsand, Hanne M. L.; Myrmel, Mette; Fiksdal, Liv; Østerhus, Stein W.

    2017-08-01

    Two case studies were carried out in central Norway in order to assess the performance of bank filtration systems in cold-climate fluvial aquifers relying on recharge from humic-rich surface waters with moderate microbial contamination. Three municipal wells and two surface-water sources at operative bank filtration systems were monitored for naturally occurring bacteriophages, fecal indicators, natural organic matter (NOM) and physico-chemical water quality parameters during a 4-month period. Aquifer passage effectively reduced the microorganism and NOM concentrations at both study sites. Bacteriophages were detected in 13 of 16 (81%) surface-water samples and in 4 of 24 (17%) well-water samples, and underwent 3 ± 0.3 log10 reduction after 50-80-m filtration and 20-30 days of subsurface passage. NOM reductions (color: 74-97%; dissolved organic carbon: 54-80%; very hydrophobic acids: 70%) were similar to those achieved by conventional water-treatment processes and no further treatment was needed. Both groundwater dilution and sediment filtration contributed to the hygienic water quality improvements, but sediment filtration appeared to be the most important process with regard to microbial and NOM reductions. A strengths-weaknesses-opportunities-threats analysis showed that bank filtration technology has a high potential as a pretreatment method for the provision of hygienically safe drinking water in Norway.

  4. Criminal Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Antonella Andretta

    2015-10-01

    The article discusses the concepts of both compliance and criminal compliance, its main components and structure as well as the main rules relating to its global application, and finally his emergence in the Ecuadorian legal system.

  5. Compliance and quality control monitoring of diagnostic X-ray facilities in Dar es Salaam city, Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nkuba, Leonid L.; Nyanda, Pendo B., E-mail: leonid.nkuba@taec.or.tz [Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Control Directorate, Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    2017-09-01

    The compliance evaluation and quality control measurements on 60 diagnostic X-ray units were performed. The results on legal compliance show that 25 % of X-ray facilities operated without or with an expired license. The rest of the centers were new and had already applied for license and others had valid licenses. For basic requirements compliance, 47 % of X-ray facilities did not have the changing cubicles, 37 % of X-ray facilities did not post radiation warning sign and symbols also 46 % of units were found either without protective gear or operated by unqualified personnel. The QC test results showed that 93 % had X-ray tube voltage within the tolerance limit of 10 % and HVL ≥ 2.3 mmAl, at 80 kV was observed in 98.2 % of the units, whereas 98 % of exposure had acceptable kV reproducibility within the tolerance limit of 5 %. Of the X-ray generators assessed, 93 % had tolerable mAs linearity. 93 % and 97 % had acceptable beam alignment and light beam diaphragm. Of the assessed units, 13 (93 %) had tube leakage < 1000 μGy/hr at 1m. For shielding tests, 47 % of units had radiation levels above 0.5 μSv/hr at the main door leading to the X-ray rooms and the registration area. The dose rates > 10 μSv/hr were recorded at viewing windows, walls and doors of control cubicles and behind the doors of changing cubicles. These dose rates indicating higher health risk to workers and member of public. (author)

  6. Remotely-Sensed Mapping of Irrigation Area in the Chu-Talas River Basin in Central Asia and Application to Compliance Monitoring of Transboundary Water Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, S.; Siegfried, T.; Herberz, T.

    2017-12-01

    In the Central Asian Chu-Talas River Basin, farmers depend on freshwater from international rivers to irrigate their fields during the summer growing season. While the allocation percentages of water sharing between up- and downstream are defined for both rivers, marked interannual supply variability plus inadequate monitoring renders the compliance with these quotas difficult. In such circumstances, data on irrigated area obtained by remote sensing can be used to map the extent of irrigation in terms of its area on at national and subnational scales. Due to its transparency on how the data was obtained (freely available satellite data) and processed, this objective measure could potentially be used as a data product for confidence building and for compliance monitoring. This study assesses the extent and location of irrigated areas over the period 2000 - 2016 in the basins by using state-of-the-art remote sensing technology. Using a random forest classifier, an automated irrigated cropland mapping algorithm was implemented in Google Earth Engine using Landsat 7 data. First, a training set was established through visual interpretation (irrigated and non-irrigated classes for the year 2015) and the classifier then trained. The classier was then applied on a series of seasonal greenest pixels image mosaics from 2000 to 2016. A four-stepped accuracy assessment confirmed that the classifier yielded robust, reliable and reproducible results. Outcomes indicate that irrigated areas in the Kyrgyz side of the Talas Basin approximately doubled by 2016 since 2000 while the irrigated area in the Kazakh part of the basin did not significantly change over the 17 year time period. In the Chu River Basin, total irrigated area tripled since 2000. Comparison with officially reported statistics shows differences and points to reporting issues in both countries. We conclude that remote sensing of irrigated areas in arid and semi-arid regions in combination with cloud computing offers

  7. An integral approach to compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, T G

    2000-08-01

    Financial managers of managed care organizations should structure their compliance plans to conform with requirements shaped by forces such as judicial decisions and extralegal standards for managed care operations, in addition to state and Federal laws and regulations. In addition to researching the law and training employees, an integral compliance plan should include monitoring organizational systems that can encourage or impede compliance, measuring employees' motivation to adhere to compliance standards, and modifying corporate culture to support compliance goals. Managed care organizations should empower compliance officers with a broad range of tools to assess and improve compliance efforts, or risk having organizational decisions examined externally through the lens of an onerous, dynamic system of laws and judicial decisions.

  8. Remote Sensing and the Kyoto Protocol: A Review of Available and Future Technology for Monitoring Treaty Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Rosenquist, A.; Milne, A. K.; Dobson, M. C.; Qi, J.

    2000-01-01

    An International workshop was held to address how remote sensing technology could be used to support the environmental monitoring requirements of the Kyoto Protocol. An overview of the issues addressed and the findings of the workshop are discussed.

  9. The Strategic Nature of Compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Thomas; Mäder, Lars Kai

    2014-01-01

    This compliance study models correct and timely implementation of policies in a multilevel system as a strategic game between a central monitoring agency and multiple implementers and evaluates statistically the empirical implications of this model. We test whether compliance is determined...

  10. Compliance with risk management plan recommendations on laboratory monitoring of antitumor necrosis factor-α therapy in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Ju Chan

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: The rate of laboratory test monitoring for anti-TNF-α therapy increased after RMP implementation. A strategy that integrates efforts from patient's education, health profession, and regulatory agencies is needed to improve safety screening and access to laboratory resources for the at-risk group of patients.

  11. Performing compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmelmann, Camilla Lawaetz

    2017-01-01

    the local policy workers front-staged some practices in the implementation process and back-staged others. The local policy workers deliberately performed ‘guideline compliance’ by using information control and impression management techniques. The findings suggest that local guideline compliance should...... be regarded as a staged performance in which deliberate techniques are used to produce and manage certain impressions of compliance....

  12. Compliance status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the activities conducted to ensure that the Hanford Site is in compliance with federal environmental protection statutes and related Washington State and local environmental protection regulations and the status of Hanford's compliance with these requirements. Environmental permits required under the environmental protection regulations are discussed under the applicable statute

  13. Statutory Management Requirements on "Animal Identification and Registration" (Act A7, Act A8: monitoring methods for compliance and related costs in four Italian farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisanna Speroni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The European and national laws concerning the identification and registration of livestock are meant to make possible their traceability and facilitate food safety and animal health, especially in case of a disease outbreak; such rules have also become prerequisites that farmers must meet to obtain single farm payments under the common agricultural policy. Failure to comply with these obligations entails the reduction or exclusion from direct payments. Act A7, reports the obligations imposed by the EC Regulation 1760/2000 establishing a system for the identification and registration of bovine animals and regarding the labelling of beef and beef products; Act A8, report the obligations established by the EC Reg. 21/2004 establishing a system for the identification and registration of sheep and goats. The project MO.NA.CO. monitored the application of rules for identification and registration of cattle, sheep and goats and their costs. The system of identification and registration of dairy cows resulted well organized with a good level of coordination between the involved actors in both farms. The activities necessary for compliance with rules of identification and registration of cattle are distributed throughout the year, but vary from day to day. The average total cost for annual obligations amounted to € 533.34 year-1 while the average cost for individual fulfilment in the monitoring period amounted to € 4.10. Even in the case of sheep and goats, the monitoring showed a good cooperation between farms and technicians. However, some difficulties were detected, mainly due to the size of the rumen boluses and the limited effectiveness of the ear tags. The operators suggested using smaller rumen boluses and tattoo instead of ear tags; they also suggest to extend the period within which the animals have to be labelled from the current 6 months to 9 months. The cost of compliance amounted to € 5.27 head-1 for sheep and € 4.90 head-1 for

  14. Monitoring compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes in west Africa: multisite cross sectional survey in Togo and Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Victor M; Ross, Jay S; Kanon, Souleyman; Ouedraogo, Andre N

    2003-01-18

    To monitor compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes in health systems, sales outlets, distribution points, and the news media in Togo and Burkina Faso, west Africa. Multisite cross sectional survey. Staff at 43 health facilities and 66 sales outlets and distribution points, 186 health providers, and 105 mothers of infants aged market commercial breast milk substitutes were found in 29 (44%) sales and distribution points. Forty commercial breast milk substitutes violated the labelling standards of the code: 21 were manufactured by Danone, 11 by Nestlé, and eight by other national and international manufacturers. Most (148, 90%) health providers had never heard of the code, and 66 mothers (63%) had never received any counselling on breast feeding by their health providers. In west Africa manufacturers are violating the code of marketing of breast milk substitutes. Comparable levels of code violations are observed with (Burkina Faso) or without (Togo) regulating legislation. Legislation must be accompanied by effective information, training, and monitoring systems to ensure that healthcare providers and manufacturers comply with evidence based practice and the code.

  15. 7 CFR 16.5 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 16.5 Section 16.5 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EQUAL OPPORTUNITY FOR RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS § 16.5 Compliance. USDA agencies will monitor compliance with this part in the course of regular oversight of USDA programs. ...

  16. 31 CFR 208.9 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 208.9 Section 208.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Compliance. (a) Treasury will monitor agencies' compliance with this part. Treasury may require agencies to...

  17. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during the spring and summer outmigrations in 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 for spring migrants and greater than or equal to 0.93 for summer migrants, estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 3 km downstream of the dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords). A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam. The approach included releases of smolts, tagged with acoustic micro-transmitters, above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of John Day Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below John Day Dam. A total of 3376 yearling Chinook salmon, 5726 subyearling Chinook salmon, and 3239 steelhead smolts were used in the virtual releases. Sample sizes for the below-dam paired releases (R2 and R3, respectively) were 997 and 995 for yearling Chinook salmon smolts, 986 and 983 for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts, and 1000 and 1000 for steelhead smolts. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tags were manufactured by Advanced Telemetry Systems. Model SS300 tags, weighing 0.304 g in air, were surgically implanted in yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon, and Model SS130 tag, weighing 0.438 g in air, were surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead for this investigation. The intent of the spring study was to estimate dam passage survival during both 30% and 40% spill conditions. The two

  18. Nitrate framework directive and cross compliance: two case studies from the MO.NA.CO. monitoring network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisanna Speroni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Act A4 refers to Articles 4 and 5 of Directive 91/676 / EEC concerning the protection of waters against pollution caused by nitrates from agricultural sources. The A4 Act applies to farms that have land within a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone (NVZ; it also applies to farms, with or without herds, that participate in measure 214 of the Rural Development Plans. The monitoring was performed in two experimental farms belonging to CREA-FLC. Both monitoring sites are located in  vulnerable areas designated by the Lombardy Region. In the monitoring period MO.NA.CO., the regional standard of reference were the Decrees of the Regional Government DGR5868 / 2007 and DGR2208 / 2011. The average cost attributable to administrative requirements was about € 600 / year / company and was mainly due to a professional agronomist who prepared the Agronomic Utilization Plan (PUA, assisted the farm in preparing its communication, provided advice and informed farm managers on regulatory updates. An informal, not systematic survey made possible to detect that the cost to fulfil the obligations of communication can be very variable depending on the farm’s characteristics (size, production, size of the herd and the type of consultant assisting the breeder (freelancer, association, cooperative. For example, in some cases the cost is based on the area of the farm, in others on the number of animals in the herd; and in other situations, the associations and freelance agronomist apply a flat rate for the compilation of the PUAs which is unaffected by farm characteristics and ranging from a minimum of € 100 / year / company practiced by some farmers’ association to a maximum of € 800 / year / company required by some freelance agronomist. At Baroncina farm the storage capacity of the slurry, during the monitoring period, was not compliant with the law because the volumes produced could not be stocked for 120 days as required by the standard. New storage facilities

  19. Low-Cost Air Quality Monitoring Methods to Assess Compliance With Smoke-Free Regulations: A Multi-Center Study in Six Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Morris, Angela; Bleymann, Kayleigh; Lyall, Elaine; Aslam, Fouad; Bam, Tara Singh; Chowdhury, Ishrat; Daouda, Elhadj Adam; Espinosa, Mariana; Romo, Jonathan; Singh, Rana J; Semple, Sean

    2016-05-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have enacted legislation banning smoking in public places, yet enforcement remains challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using a validated low-cost methodology (the Dylos DC1700) to provide objective evidence of smoke-free (SF) law compliance in hospitality venues in urban LMIC settings, where outdoor air pollution levels are generally high. Teams measured indoor fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations and systematically observed smoking behavior and SF signage in a convenience sample of hospitality venues (bars, restaurants, cafes, and hotels) covered by existing SF legislation in Mexico, Pakistan, Indonesia, Chad, Bangladesh, and India. Outdoor air PM2.5 was also measured on each sampling day. Data were collected from 626 venues. Smoking was observed during almost one-third of visits with substantial differences between countries-from 5% in India to 72% in Chad. After excluding venues where other combustion sources were observed, secondhand smoke (SHS) derived PM2.5 was calculated by subtracting outdoor ambient PM2.5 concentrations from indoor measurements and was, on average, 34 µg/m(3) in venues with observed smoking-compared to an average value of 0 µg/m(3) in venues where smoking was not observed (P hospitality venues in LMICs. Air quality monitoring can provide objective scientific data on SHS and air quality levels in venues to assess the effectiveness of SF laws and identify required improvements. Equipment costs and high outdoor air pollution levels have hitherto limited application in LMICs. This study tested the feasibility of using a validated low-cost methodology in hospitality venues in six LMIC urban settings and suggests this is a viable method for improving knowledge about SHS exposure and can provide indicative data on compliance with SF legislation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and

  20. Compliance monitoring for remediated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Throughout the world, many countries have experienced problems associated with pollution of the environment. Poorly managed practices in nuclear fuel cycle, medicine, industry, weapons production and testing, research and development activities, as well as accidents, and poor disposal practices have produced a large array of radioactively contaminated facilities and sites. Structures, biota, soils, rocks, and both surface and groundwaters have become contaminated with radionuclides and other associated contaminants, a condition that raises serious concern due to potential health effects to the exposed human populations and the environment. In response to the needs of its Member States in dealing with the problems of radioactive contamination in the environment, the IAEA has established an Environmental Restoration Project. The principal aspects of current IAEA efforts in this area include (1) gathering information and data, performing analyses, and publishing technical summaries, and other documents on key technical aspects of environmental restoration; (2) conducting a Co-ordinated Research Project on Environmental Restoration; and (3) providing direct technical assistance to Member States through technical co-operation programmes. The transfer of technologies to Member States in need of applicable methodologies and techniques for the remediation of contaminated sites is a principal objective of this project

  1. Methods for pretreating biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir; Sousa, Leonardo

    2017-05-09

    A method for pretreating biomass is provided, which includes, in a reactor, allowing gaseous ammonia to condense on the biomass and react with water present in the biomass to produce pretreated biomass, wherein reactivity of polysaccharides in the biomass is increased during subsequent biological conversion as compared to the reactivity of polysaccharides in biomass which has not been pretreated. A method for pretreating biomass with a liquid ammonia and recovering the liquid ammonia is also provided. Related systems which include a biochemical or biofuel production facility are also disclosed.

  2. Compliance monitoring of prohibition of smoking (under section-4 of COTPA) at a tertiary health-care institution in a smoke-free city of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Jaya Prasad; Goel, Sonu; Patro, Binod Kumar

    2013-10-01

    India enacted a comprehensive tobacco control law known as cigarettes and other tobacco products act (COTPA) in 2003. However, enforcement of the provisions under the law is still a matter of concern. Compliance survey is an effective tool to measure the status of implementation of the law at various public places. Smoke-free hospital campus demonstrates commitment to good health and sends a pro-healthy signal to the community. The objective of this study was to assess the compliance to the prohibition of smoking at public places (under section-4 of COTPA) in a tertiary health-care institution in a smoke-free city of India. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at 40 different venues within a tertiary health-care institution in a smoke-free city of India. These places were observed for certain parameters of assessment by a structured checklist, which included evidence of active smoking, evidence of recent smoking, display of signages, presence of smoking aids, cigarette butts and bidi ends. Overall compliance rate for section-4 of COTPA was found to be mere 23%. Evidence of active smoking was observed in 21 (52.5%) venues. Signages were seen at only 8 places (20%). Butt ends and other smoking aids were seen in 37 (92.5%) and 26 (65%) places respectively. These dismal findings suggest non-compliance to the provisions under COTPA, which calls for a sensitization workshop and advocacy for all the stakeholders.

  3. Pretreatment of microbial sludges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Christopher J.; Nagle, Nicholas J.

    1995-01-01

    Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

  4. Environmental Compliance Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkouris, Panagiotis; Fitzmaurice, Malgosia

    2017-01-01

    Compliance mechanisms can be found in treaties regulating such diverse issues as human rights, disarmament law, and environmental law. In this bibliography, the focus will be on compliance mechanisms of multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs). Compliance with norms of international

  5. Compliance monitoring of prohibition of smoking (under section-4 of COTPA at a tertiary health-care institution in a smoke-free city of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Prasad Tripathy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India enacted a comprehensive tobacco control law known as cigarettes and other tobacco products act (COTPA in 2003. However, enforcement of the provisions under the law is still a matter of concern. Compliance survey is an effective tool to measure the status of implementation of the law at various public places. Smoke-free hospital campus demonstrates commitment to good health and sends a pro-healthy signal to the community. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the compliance to the prohibition of smoking at public places (under section-4 of COTPA in a tertiary health-care institution in a smoke-free city of India. Materials and Methods: An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at 40 different venues within a tertiary health-care institution in a smoke-free city of India. These places were observed for certain parameters of assessment by a structured checklist, which included evidence of active smoking, evidence of recent smoking, display of signages, presence of smoking aids, cigarette butts and bidi ends. Results: Overall compliance rate for section-4 of COTPA was found to be mere 23%. Evidence of active smoking was observed in 21 (52.5% venues. Signages were seen at only 8 places (20%. Butt ends and other smoking aids were seen in 37 (92.5% and 26 (65% places respectively. Conclusion: These dismal findings suggest non-compliance to the provisions under COTPA, which calls for a sensitization workshop and advocacy for all the stakeholders.

  6. Compliance monitoring of prohibition of smoking (under section-4 of COTPA) at a tertiary health-care institution in a smoke-free city of India

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy, Jaya Prasad; Goel, Sonu; Patro, Binod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: India enacted a comprehensive tobacco control law known as cigarettes and other tobacco products act (COTPA) in 2003. However, enforcement of the provisions under the law is still a matter of concern. Compliance survey is an effective tool to measure the status of implementation of the law at various public places. Smoke-free hospital campus demonstrates commitment to good health and sends a pro-healthy signal to the community. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess ...

  7. Explaining G20 and BRICS Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Larionova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the internal and external factors influencing the compliance performance of the Group of 20 (G20 and the BRICS. The authors start with an overview of the G20 and BRICS compliance patterns using comparative data onthe number of commitments made by the two institutions, the level of institutional compliance, and distribution of commitments and compliance across issue areas. G20 compliance is traced since the leaders’ first 2008 summit in Washington. The BRICS compliance performance record includes data since the third stand alone summit in Sanya in 2011.The study then takes stock of compliance catalysts embedded in the summits’ discourse: priority placements, numerical targets, timelines, self-accountability pledges and mandates to implement and/or monitor implementation. The authors review trends in the use of catalysts in different years and issue areas and identify commonalities and differences.The analysis then turns to external causes of compliance and focuses on demand for collective actions and members’ collective power to respond and deliver on their pledges. Here the study explores whether the self-accountability mechanisms created by the institutions in response to the demand for effectiveness and legitimacy facilitate compliance.The article concludes by highlighting catalysts, causes of compliance and their combinations with the greatest power to encourage implementation, explaining trends in G20 and BRICS compliance performance. The data sets on G20 and BRICS differ in terms of scale. The G20 data set contains 1,511 commitments of which 114 have been monitored, and the BRICS data set contains 231 commitments of which 23 have been monitored.

  8. GREET Pretreatment Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adom, Felix K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of biofuels and biochemicals can be produced from cellulosic biomass via different pretreatment technologies that yield sugars. Process simulations of dilute acid and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment processes and subsequent hydrolysis were developed in Aspen Plus for four lignocellulosic feedstocks (corn stover, miscanthus, switchgrass, and poplar). This processing yields sugars that can be subsequently converted to biofuels or biochemical. Material and energy consumption data from Aspen Plus were then compiled in a new Greenhouses Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREETTM) pretreatment module. The module estimates the cradle-to-gate fossil energy consumption (FEC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with producing fermentable sugars. This report documents the data and methodology used to develop this module and the cradle-to-gate FEC and GHG emissions that result from producing fermentable sugars.

  9. Compliance with occlusion therapy for childhood amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michael P; Stewart, Catherine E; Moseley, Merrick J; Stephens, David A; Fielder, Alistair R

    2013-09-17

    Explore compliance with occlusion treatment of amblyopia in the Monitored and Randomized Occlusion Treatment of Amblyopia Studies (MOTAS and ROTAS), using objective monitoring. Both studies had a three-phase protocol: initial assessment, refractive adaptation, and occlusion. In the occlusion phase, participants were instructed to dose for 6 hours/day (MOTAS) or randomized to 6 or 12 hour/day (ROTAS). Dose was monitored continuously using an occlusion dose monitor (ODM). One hundred and fifty-two patients (71 male, 81 female; 122 Caucasian, 30 non-Caucasian) of mean ± SD age 68 ± 18 months participated. Amblyopia was defined as an interocular acuity difference of at least 0.1 logMAR and was associated with anisometropia in 50, strabismus in 44, and both (mixed) in 58. Median duration of occlusion was 99 days (interquartile range 72 days). Mean compliance was 44%, mean proportion of days with no patch worn was 42%. Compliance was lower (39%) on weekends compared with weekdays (46%, P = 0.04), as was the likelihood of dosing at all (52% vs. 60%, P = 0.028). Compliance was lower when attendance was less frequent (P amblyopia type, and severity were not associated with compliance. Mixture modeling suggested three subpopulations of patch day doses: less than 30 minutes; doses that achieve 30% to 80% compliance; and doses that achieve around 100% compliance. This study shows that compliance with patching treatment averages less than 50% and is influenced by several factors. A greater understanding of these influences should improve treatment outcome. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00274664).

  10. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Volume 1, The report and Appendix A, Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-01

    This report documents recent progress on ground-water monitoring projects for four Hanford Site facilities: the 300 Area Process Trenches, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds, and the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste (NRDW) Landfill. The existing ground-water monitoring projects for the first two facilities named in the paragraph above are currently being expanded by adding new wells to the networks. During the reporting period, sampling of the existing wells continued on a monthly basis, and the analytical results for samples collected from September through November 1986 are included and discussed in this document. 8 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Eleventh annual Department of Energy low-level waste management conference. Volume 2: Low-level waste strategy and planning, decontamination and decommissioning, compliance monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-11-01

    Nineteen papers are presented in volume 2. The 11 papers in the LLW Strategy and Planning section discuss plans for disposal facilities in Texas, Pennsylvania, Hanford, the Southwest and Southeast Compacts, and others. Three papers discuss decontamination technology and activities. Environmental monitoring requirements and recommendations at LLW facilities are discussed in 5 papers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  12. Advances in aluminum pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudour, Michel; Maintier, Philippe [PPG Industries France, 3 Z.A.E. Les Dix Muids, B.P. 89, F-59583 Marly (France); Simpson, Mark [PPG Industries Inc., 1200 Piedmont Troy, Michigan 48083 (United States); Quaglia, Paolo [PPG Industries Italia, Via Garavelli 21, I-15028 Quattordio (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    As automotive manufacturers continue to look for ways to reduce vehicle weight, aluminum is finding more utility as a body panel component. The substitution of cold-rolled steel and zinc-coated substrates with aluminum has led to new challenges in vehicle pretreatment. As a result, changes to traditional pretreatment chemistries and operating practices are necessary in order to produce an acceptable coating on aluminum body panels. These changes result in increased sludging and other undesirable characteristics. In addition to the chemistry changes, there are also process-related problems to consider. Many existing automotive pretreatment lines simply were not designed to handle aluminum and its increased demands on filtration and circulation equipment. To retrofit such a system is capital intensive and in addition to requiring a significant amount of downtime, may not be totally effective. Thus, the complexities of pre-treating aluminum body panels have actually had a negative effect on efforts to introduce more aluminum into new vehicle design programs. Recent research into ways of reducing the negative effects has led to a new understanding of the nature of zinc phosphate bath -aluminum interactions. Many of the issues associated with the pretreatment of aluminum have been identified and can be mitigated with only minor changes to the zinc phosphate bath chemistry. The use of low levels of soluble Fe ions, together with free fluoride, has been shown to dramatically improve the efficiency of a zinc phosphate system processing aluminum. Appearance of zinc phosphate coatings, coating weights and sludge are all benefited by this chemistry change. (authors)

  13. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site Facilities: Progress report for the period April 1--June 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume set of documents that describes the progress of 10 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1988. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled during this period in the 100-N Area and near the 216-A-36B Crib

  14. Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.

    2012-01-01

    A method combines solid phase acidification with two non-toxic biocides to prevent ammonia volatilization and microbial proliferation. The safe, non-oxidizing biocide combination consists of a quaternary amine and a food preservative. This combination has exhibited excellent stabilization of both acidified and unacidified urine. During pretreatment tests, composite urine collected from donors was challenged with a microorganism known to proliferate in urine, and then was processed using the nonhazardous urine pre-treatment method. The challenge microorganisms included Escherichia coli, a common gram-negative bacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, a ureolytic gram-positive bacteria; Candida albicans, a yeast commonly found in urine; and Aspergillus niger, a problematic mold that resists urine pre-treatment. Urine processed in this manner remained microbially stable for over 57 days. Such effective urine stabilization was achieved using non-toxic, non-oxidizing biocides at higher pH (3.6 to 5.8) than previous methods in use or projected for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). ISS urine pretreatment methods employ strong oxidants including ozone and hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a carcinogenic material, under very acidic conditions (pH = 1.8 to 2.4). The method described here offers a much more benign chemical environment than previous pretreatment methods, and will lower equivalent system mass (ESM) by reducing containment volume and mass, system complexity, and crew time needed to handle pre-treatment chemicals. The biocides, being non-oxidizing, minimize the potential for chemical reactions with urine constituents to produce volatile, airborne contaminants such as cyanogen chloride. Additionally, the biocides are active under significantly less acidic conditions than those used in the current system, thereby reducing the degree of required acidification. A simple flow-through solid phase acidification (SPA) bed is employed to overcome the natural buffering

  15. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  16. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report for the period April 1 to June 30, 1988: Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    This is Volume 2 of a two-volume set of documents that describes the progress of 10 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1988. This volume discusses as-built diagrams, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled during this period in the 100-N Area (Appendix A) and near the 216-A-36B Crib (Appendix B). Volume 1 discusses the 10 projects. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy under Contract AC06-76RL01830.

  17. Mapping Tax Compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2014-01-01

    compliance is constructed, challenges the explanatory reaches of today's social science approaches, arguing that an alternative approach to understanding tax compliance is worthwhile exploring. This other choice of approach, inspired by actor–network theory (ANT), adopts a more practice-oriented focus...... that studies tax compliance where it takes place as well as what it is made of. Consequently, this article argues that tax compliance is a socio-material assemblage and that complying is a distributed action. The article concludes by highlighting how an ANT approach contributes to the further theoretical...

  18. Review of the knowledge available to date on the effects of tritium exposure on health and the environment in Canada - a tool to guide regulatory compliance monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Hamlat, M.S.; Lane, R.; Mihok, S.; Reinhardt, P.; Bundy, K.

    2011-01-01

    The use of tritium in CANDU (Canadian Deuterium-Uranium) reactors, in industry to produce self-luminescent lights and paints, in oil and gas exploration, in hospitals for diagnostic tests and radio-therapeutics, and in research makes the control of tritium releases generated by these activities particularly important in Canada. Releases are regulated and carefully monitored by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC). Some special interest and citizen groups, however, claim that the scientific uncertainty regarding the effects of tritium on health and on the environment is such that regulation of the facilities releasing or using tritium may be inadequate. In response to these concerns, the CNSC asked its staff to initiate the 'Tritium Studies' project. As part of the project, the environmental fate of tritium and its health effects were studied through direct field measurements and the review of the latest scientific literature on the subject. The project made it possible to conclude that the tritium radiation protection measures and regulatory mechanisms are adequate in protecting the health and safety of Canadians. (authors)

  19. Chiral analysis of amphetamines in hair by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: compliance-monitoring of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients under Elvanse® therapy and identification after controlled low-dose application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binz, Tina M; Williner, Elena; Strajhar, Petra; Dolder, Patrick C; Liechti, Matthias E; Baumgartner, Markus R; Kraemer, Thomas; Steuer, Andrea E

    2018-02-01

    Amphetamine (AMP) is used as an illicit drug and also for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Respective drugs most often contain the enantiomer (S)-AMP as active compound or (S)-AMP is formed from the prodrug lisdexamfetamine (Elvanse®) whereas the illicit drug is usually traded as racemate ((R/S)-AMP). A differentiation between the use of the medically prescribed drug and the abuse of illicit street amphetamine is of great importance, for example in retrospective consumption monitoring by hair analysis. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the chiral separation and quantitation of (S)- and (R)-AMP in hair was developed. For this purpose, 20 mg hair was extracted and derivatized with N-(2,4-dinitro-5-fluorophenyl)-L(S)-valinamide L(S)-(DNPV) to yield amphetamine diastereomers. Baseline separation of the resulting diastereomers was achieved on a high-pressure liquid-chromatography system (HPLC) coupled to a Sciex QTRAP® 5500 linear ion trap quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was successfully validated. Analysis of hair samples from nine Elvanse® patients revealed only (S)-AMP in eight cases; one subject showed both enantiomers indicating a (side-) consumption of street amphetamine. The analysis of the 16 amphetamine users' samples showed only racemic amphetamine. Furthermore, it could be shown in a controlled study that (S)-AMP can be detected after administration of even very low doses of lisdexamfetamine and dexamphetamine, which can be of interest in forensic toxicology and especially in drug-facilitated crime (DFC). The method now enables the retrospective compliance-monitoring of ADHD patients and the differentiation between medically prescribed intake of (S)-amphetamine and abuse of illicit street amphetamine. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Environmental compliance management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, A. [Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States); Larrinaga, L.

    1995-12-01

    A cross-functional team of environmental regulatory experts, plant managers, and plant engineers have been working since 1991 on the development, implementation and maintenance of the Environmental Compliance Management System. The Environmental Compliance Management System is a practical and accurate method of determining the applicability of the state and federal environmental regulations and of establishing standard and straightforward procedures to meet these requirements. The Environmental Compliance Management System allows individual manufacturing facilities to avoid the additional manpower that would be required to read, digest and decide on the applicability and plan of action to meet the requirements of all the environmental regulations.

  1. Regulatory Enforcement and Compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Peter J.; Winter, Søren

    1999-01-01

    This study of municipal enforcement of agro-environmental regulations in Denmark provides an empirical understanding of how enforcement affects compliance. A key contribution is sorting out the relative influence of inspectors' different styles of enforcement and choices made by enforcement...... agencies. The latter are shown to be more important in bringing about compliance than are inspectors' enforcement styles. Municipal agencies are shown to increase compliance through the use of third parties, more frequent inspection, and setting priorities for inspection of major items. The findings about...

  2. Environmental Compliance Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The Guide is intended to assist Department of Energy personnel by providing information on the NEPA process, the processes of other environmental statutes that bear on the NEPA process, the timing relationships between the NEPA process and these other processes, as well as timing relationships between the NEPA process and the development process for policies, programs, and projects. This information should be helpful not only in formulating environmental compliance plans but also in achieving compliance with NEPA and various other environmental statutes. The Guide is divided into three parts with related appendices: Part I provides guidance for developing environmental compliance plans for DOE actions; Part II is devoted to NEPA with detailed flowcharts depicting the compliance procedures required by CEQ regulations and Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines; and Part III contains a series of flowcharts for other Federal environmental requirements that may apply to DOE projects

  3. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    An order to establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance

  4. Compliance for Green IT

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The growing range of Green IT regulations are challenging more and more organisations to take specific steps to ensure they are in compliance with sometimes complex regulations, ranging from cap & trade requirements through to regulations concerning IT equipment disposal.

  5. Environmental Compliance Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-01

    The Guide is intended to assist Department of Energy personnel by providing information on the NEPA process, the processes of other environmental statutes that bear on the NEPA process, the timing relationships between the NEPA process and these other processes, as well as timing relationships between the NEPA process and the development process for policies, programs, and projects. This information should be helpful not only in formulating environmental compliance plans but also in achieving compliance with NEPA and various other environmental statutes. The Guide is divided into three parts with related appendices: Part I provides guidance for developing environmental compliance plans for DOE actions; Part II is devoted to NEPA with detailed flowcharts depicting the compliance procedures required by CEQ regulations and Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines; and Part III contains a series of flowcharts for other Federal environmental requirements that may apply to DOE projects.

  6. REMOTE SENSING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE MONITORING

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. Remote Sensing Basics A. The electromagnetic spectrum demonstrates what we can see both in the visible and beyond the visible part of the spectrum through the use of various types of sensors. B. Resolution refers to what a remote sensor can see and how often. 1. Sp...

  7. Toward Automated International Law Compliance Monitoring (TAILCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit , a White House official said Monday. The president will name Cornelia T.L...exchange of which it is a member, or any security-based swap agreement (as defined in section 206B of the Gramm- Leach -Bliley Act), by means of any

  8. 40 CFR 464.16 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... alternate monitoring) 0.363 0.121 (c) Die Casting Operations. PSNS Pollutant or pollutant property Maximum... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Casting Subcategory § 464... CFR part 403 and achieve the following pretreatment standards for new sources. (a) Casting Cleaning...

  9. 40 CFR 464.46 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 0.093 0.0304 Oil and grease (for alternate monitoring) 1.34 0.446 (b) Die Casting Operations. PSNS... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zinc Casting Subcategory § 464.46... and achieve the following pretreatment standards for new sources. (a) Casting Quench Operations. PSNS...

  10. Biologically Pre-Treated Habitation Waste Water as a Sustainable Green Urine Pre-Treat Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Thompson, Bret; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Morse, Audra; Meyer, Caitlin; Callahan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The ability to recover water from urine and flush water is a critical process to allow long term sustainable human habitation in space or bases on the moon or mars. Organic N present as urea or similar compounds can hydrolyze producing free ammonia. This reaction results in an increase in the pH converting ammonium to ammonia which is volatile and not removed by distillation. The increase in pH will also cause precipitation reactions to occur. In order to prevent this, urine on ISS is combined with a pretreat solution. While use of a pretreatment solution has been successful, there are numerous draw backs including: storage and use of highly hazardous solutions, limitations on water recovery (less than 85%), and production of brine with pore dewatering characteristics. We evaluated the use of biologically treated habitation wastewaters (ISS and early planetary base) to replace the current pretreat solution. We evaluated both amended and un-amended bioreactor effluent. For the amended effluent, we evaluated "green" pretreat chemicals including citric acid and citric acid amended with benzoic acid. We used a mock urine/air separator modeled after the urine collection assembly on ISS. The urine/air separator was challenged continually for >6 months. Depending on the test point, the separator was challenged daily with donated urine and flushed with amended or un-amended reactor effluent. We monitored the pH of the urine, flush solution and residual pH in the urine/air separator after each urine event. We also evaluated solids production and biological growth. Our results support the use of both un-amended and amended bioreactor effluent to maintain the operability of the urine /air separator. The ability to use bioreactor effluent could decrease consumable cost, reduce hazards associated with current pre-treat chemicals, allow other membrane based desalination processes to be utilized, and improve brine characteristics.

  11. Industrial effluent quality, pollution monitoring and environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Maqbool; Bajahlan, Ahmad S; Hammad, Waleed S

    2008-12-01

    Royal Commission Environmental Control Department (RC-ECD) at Yanbu industrial city in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has established a well-defined monitoring program to control the pollution from industrial effluents. The quality of effluent from each facility is monitored round the clock. Different strategic measures have been taken by the RC-ECD to implement the zero discharge policy of RC. Industries are required to pre-treat the effluent to conform pretreatment standards before discharging to central biological treatment plant. Industries are not allowed to discharge any treated or untreated effluent in open channels. After treatment, reclaimed water must have to comply with direct discharge standards before discharge to the sea. Data of industrial wastewater collected from five major industries and central industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWTP) is summarized in this report. During 5-year period, 3,705 samples were collected and analyzed for 43,436 parameters. There were 1,377 violations from pretreatment standards from all the industries. Overall violation percentage was 3.17%. Maximum violations were recorded from one of the petrochemical plants. The results show no significant pollution due to heavy metals. Almost all heavy metals were within RC pretreatment standards. High COD and TOC indicates that major pollution was due to hydrocarbons. Typical compounds identified by GC-MS were branched alkanes, branched alkenes, aliphatic ketones, substituted thiophenes, substituted phenols, aromatics and aromatic alcohols. Quality of treated water was also in compliance with RC direct discharge standards. In order to achieve the zero discharge goal, further studies and measures are in progress.

  12. Electronic compliance assessment of antifungal prophylaxis for human immunodeficiency virus-infected women.

    OpenAIRE

    Geletko, S M; Segarra, M; Mayer, K H; Fiore, T C; Bettencourt, F A; Flanigan, T P; Dudley, M N

    1996-01-01

    Several prophylactic medications for opportunistic or recurrent infections are used in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals. Essential to the efficacy evaluation of these agents is the accurate reporting of medication compliance. We hypothesized that poor patient compliance with thrice-weekly fluconazole prophylaxis would correlate with the occurrence of clinical events. Fluconazole compliance was monitored electronically by using the Medication Event Monitoring Systems with 19 w...

  13. Advances in paper-based sample pretreatment for point-of-care testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rui Hua; Yang, Hui; Choi, Jane Ru; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shang Sheng; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Huang, Qing Sheng; Shi, Jun Ling; Mei, Qi Bing; Xu, Feng

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, paper-based point-of-care testing (POCT) has been widely used in medical diagnostics, food safety and environmental monitoring. However, a high-cost, time-consuming and equipment-dependent sample pretreatment technique is generally required for raw sample processing, which are impractical for low-resource and disease-endemic areas. Therefore, there is an escalating demand for a cost-effective, simple and portable pretreatment technique, to be coupled with the commonly used paper-based assay (e.g. lateral flow assay) in POCT. In this review, we focus on the importance of using paper as a platform for sample pretreatment. We firstly discuss the beneficial use of paper for sample pretreatment, including sample collection and storage, separation, extraction, and concentration. We highlight the working principle and fabrication of each sample pretreatment device, the existing challenges and the future perspectives for developing paper-based sample pretreatment technique.

  14. Generic Checklist for Day Care Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Services Monitoring Transfer Consortium.

    This guide presents the results of research on day care monitoring methods conducted by the Children's Services Monitoring Transfer Consortium. It suggests a set of generic predictor items that can be used to monitor day care providers' compliance with standards. The predictor items are at the licensing or minimal compliance level and have been…

  15. Processes for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J.D.

    1992-11-01

    This paper reviews existing and proposed pretreatment processes for biomass. The focus is on the mechanisms by which the various pretreatments act and the influence of biomass structure and composition on the efficacy of particular pretreatment techniques. This analysis is used to identify pretreatment technologies and issues that warrant further research.

  16. Issues in patient compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J; Coster, G

    1997-12-01

    Patient compliance refers to the willingness and ability of an individual to follow health-related advice, to take medication as prescribed, to attend scheduled clinic appointments and to complete recommended investigations. It is a major health issue, with outcomes related to levels of morbidity, mortality and cost utilisation. Poor compliance has been reported as the most common cause of nonresponse to medication, with evidence to show that patients who adhere to treatment recommendations have better health outcomes than those who do not adhere, even when taking a placebo. Evidence-based practice guidelines, founded on clinical, behavioural and educational concepts, provide a means of measuring outcomes related to health status, patient satisfaction and cost-benefit issues, and may help to ensure that responsibility for compliance is shared between the clinician and the patient.

  17. The Amsterdam Hip Protector Study: Compliance and determinants of compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, N.M.; Asma, G.; Smit, J.H.; Bouter, L.M.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Hip protectors appear to be effective in reducing the incidence of hip fractures. However, compliance is often poor. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the compliance and determinants of compliance with external hip protectors. A prospective study was performed in residents from

  18. Rocky Flats Compliance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) (OTD) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. The primary objective of the Office of Technology Development, Rocky Flats Compliance Program (RFCP), is to develop altemative treatment technologies for mixed low-level waste (wastes containing both hazardous and radioactive components) to use in bringing the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) into compliance with Federal and state regulations and agreements. Approximately 48,000 cubic feet of untreated low-level mixed waste, for which treatment has not been specified, are stored at the RFP. The cleanup of the Rocky Flats site is driven by agreements between DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH). Under these agreements, a Comprehensive Treatment and Management Plan (CTMP) was drafted to outline the mechanisms by which RFP will achieve compliance with the regulations and agreements. This document describes DOE's strategy to treat low-level mixed waste to meet Land Disposal Restrictions and sets specific milestones related to the regulatory aspects of technology development. These milestones detail schedules for the development of technologies to treat all of the mixed wastes at the RFP. Under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), the CTMP has been incorporated into Rocky Flats Plant Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP). The CSTP will become the Rocky Flats Plant site Treatment Plan in 1995 and will supersede the CTMP

  19. Strategisk compliance og regulering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühn Pedersen, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    Denne artikel introducerer strategisk compliance og påpeger dens samspil med klassiske og nyere former for reguleringer i digital værdiskabelse. Konteksten er den digitale økonomi, som vokser frem imellem den materielle økonomis bærepiller: Virksomheder og markeder, men består af en helt ny...... materialitet, som er det digitale univers og dets modsvarighed i nye krav til compliance. Den nye materialitet stiller nye krav, hvad angår digitale processer og transaktioner. Klassisk regulering, som aktører ikke selv kan ændre, støder på egenregulering, hvor aktørerne selv opsætter regler for at skabe...... digital værdi. Dette kalder på strategisk compliance. Med digitalisering er strategisk compliance sat på dagsordnen i reguleringsdebatten. Vi hævder, at regulering og egenregulering kan komme til at virke komplementært i det post-industrielle, digitaliserede samfund....

  20. Environmental compliance and cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the roles of the principal agencies, organizations, and public in environmental compliance and cleanup of the Hanford Site. Regulatory oversight, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the role of Indian tribes, public participation, and CERCLA Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee Activities are all discussed

  1. Validating year 2000 compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Deursen (Arie); P. Klint (Paul); M.P.A. Sellink

    1997-01-01

    textabstractValidating year 2000 compliance involves the assessment of the correctness and quality of a year 2000 conversion. This entails inspecting both the quality of the conversion emph{process followed, and of the emph{result obtained, i.e., the converted system. This document provides an

  2. Financial Markets and Compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, T.A.H.M.; Bleker, Sylvie; Houben, Raf

    2017-01-01

    This chapter will focus on the goals of financial market regulation through the rules of economics, the strategies financial regulation employs to achieve these goals and the insights this provides for the compliance profession. For an overview of the goals and strategies of financial regulation

  3. The USAID Environmental Compliance Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Environmental Compliance Database is a record of environmental compliance submissions with their outcomes. Documents in the database can be found by visiting the...

  4. Tank Focus Area pretreatment activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D.; Manke, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    Plans call for the high-level wastes to be retrieved from the tanks and immobilized in a stable waste form suitable for long-term isolation. Chemistry and chemical engineering operations are required to retrieve the wastes, to condition the wastes for subsequent steps, and to reduce the costs of the waste management enterprise. Pretreatment includes those processes between retrieval and immobilization, and includes preparation of suitable feed material for immobilization and separations to partition the waste into streams that yield lower life-cycle costs. Some of the technologies being developed by the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to process these wastes are described. These technologies fall roughly into three areas: (1) solid/liquid separation (SLS), (2) sludge pretreatment, and (3) supernate pretreatment

  5. Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.S.

    1989-12-21

    We have examined changes in Argonne Premium samples of Wyodak coal following 30 min treatment in liquid water at autogenous pressures at 150{degrees}, 250{degrees}, and 350{degrees}C. In most runs the coal was initially dried at 60{degrees}C/1 torr/20 hr. The changes were monitored by pyrolysis field ionization mass spectrometry (py-FIMS) operating at 2.5{degrees}C/min from ambient to 500{degrees}C. We recorded the volatility patterns of the coal tars evolved over that temperature range, and in all cases the tar yields were 25%--30% of the starting coal on mass basis. There was essentially no change after the 150{degrees}C treatment. Small increases in volatility were seen following the 250{degrees}C treatment, but major effects were seen in the 350{degrees} work. The tar quantity remained unchanged; however, the volatility increased so the temperature of half volatility for the as-received coal of 400{degrees}C was reduced to 340{degrees}C. Control runs with no water showed some thermal effect, but the net effect from the presence of liquid water was clearly evident. The composition was unchanged after the 150{degrees} and 250{degrees}C treatments, but the 350{degrees} treatment brought about a 30% loss of oxygen. The change corresponded to loss of the elements of water, although loss of OH'' seemed to fit the analysis data somewhat better. The water loss takes place both in the presence and in the absence of added water, but it is noteworthy that the loss in the hydrothermal runs occurs at p(H{sub 2}O) = 160 atm. We conclude that the process must involve the dehydration solely of chemically bound elements of water, the dehydration of catechol is a specific, likely candidate.

  6. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic

  7. A systematic review of the associations between dose regimens and medication compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, A J; Cramer, J; Pierce, C

    2001-08-01

    Previous reviews of the literature on medication compliance have confirmed the inverse relationship between number of daily doses and rate of compliance. However, compliance in most of these studies was based on patient self-report, blood-level monitoring, prescription refills, or pill count data, none of which are as accurate as electronic monitoring (EM). In this paper, we review studies in which compliance was measured with an EM device to determine the associations between dose frequency and medication compliance. Articles included in this review were identified through literature searches of MEDLINE, PsychInfo, HealthStar, Health & Psychosocial Instruments, and the Cochrane Library using the search terms patient compliance, patient adherence, electronic monitoring, and MEMS (medication event monitoring systems). The review was limited to studies reporting compliance measured by EM devices, the most accurate compliance assessment method to date. Because EM was introduced only in 1986, the literature search was restricted to the years 1986 to 2000. In the identified studies, data were pooled to calculate mean compliance with once-daily, twice-daily, 3-times-daily, and 4-times-daily dosing regimens. Because of heterogeneity in definitions of compliance, 2 major categories of compliance rates were defined: dose-taking (taking the prescribed number of pills each day) and dose-timing (taking pills within the prescribed time frame). A total of 76 studies were identified. Mean dose-taking compliance was 71% +/- 17% (range, 34%-97%) and declined as the number of daily doses increased: 1 dose = 79% +/- 14%, 2 doses = 69% +/- 15%, 3 doses = 65% +/- 16%, 4 doses = 51% +/- 20% (P dose schedules). Compliance was significantly higher for once-daily versus 3-times-daily (P = 0.008), once-daily versus 4-times-daily (P dose-timing results, mean dose-timing compliance was 59% +/- 24%; more frequent dosing was associated with lower compliance rates. A review of studies that

  8. Managing business compliance using model-driven security management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ulrich; Schreiner, Rudolf

    Compliance with regulatory and governance standards is rapidly becoming one of the hot topics of information security today. This is because, especially with regulatory compliance, both business and government have to expect large financial and reputational losses if compliance cannot be ensured and demonstrated. One major difficulty of implementing such regulations is caused the fact that they are captured at a high level of abstraction that is business-centric and not IT centric. This means that the abstract intent needs to be translated in a trustworthy, traceable way into compliance and security policies that the IT security infrastructure can enforce. Carrying out this mapping process manually is time consuming, maintenance-intensive, costly, and error-prone. Compliance monitoring is also critical in order to be able to demonstrate compliance at any given point in time. The problem is further complicated because of the need for business-driven IT agility, where IT policies and enforcement can change frequently, e.g. Business Process Modelling (BPM) driven Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Model Driven Security (MDS) is an innovative technology approach that can solve these problems as an extension of identity and access management (IAM) and authorization management (also called entitlement management). In this paper we will illustrate the theory behind Model Driven Security for compliance, provide an improved and extended architecture, as well as a case study in the healthcare industry using our OpenPMF 2.0 technology.

  9. Compliance and Health Professionals’ role: The case of osteoporotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fragou Aggeliki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is considered to be a major public health issue worldwide. Despite the large number of effective medication regimens available, patients’ non-compliance in treatment is one of the most common obstacles when attempting to achieve best therapeutic results against osteoporosis. The purpose of this review is to analyze the parameters concerning compliance of osteoporotic patients and to highlight health professionals’ role. Many studies are shown that the compliance in long-term anti-osteoporotic therapeutic schemes is low in developed countries, while it is estimated to be even less in developing countries. Compliance rates are usually lower when the disease is asymptomatic or when the therapy has side effects. There are many factors which lead to non – compliance to treatment regimens, and various techniques that a health professional could utilize in order to improve anti-osteoporotic therapeutic results are presented in this paper. Early identification of potential non-compliant patients is an important first step for health professionals, when aiming at resolving the issue of non-compliance and achieving better therapeutic results. A multi-factor model such as Fracture Liaison Service (FLS, which includes specialized nurses, could optimize the chances of better education, monitoring and achieving treatment compliance for the patient.

  10. 7 CFR 800.216 - Activities that shall be monitored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... merchandising activities identified in this section shall be monitored in accordance with the instructions. (b) Grain merchandising activities. Grain merchandising activities subject to monitoring for compliance with...) Recordkeeping activities. Elevator and merchandising recordkeeping activities subject to monitoring for...

  11. A Process Improvement Evaluation of Sequential Compression Device Compliance and Effects of Provider Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachler, Jason A; Krueger, Chad A; Johnson, Anthony E

    This process improvement study sought to evaluate the compliance in orthopaedic patients with sequential compression devices and to monitor any improvement in compliance following an educational intervention. All non-intensive care unit orthopaedic primary patients were evaluated at random times and their compliance with sequential compression devices was monitored and recorded. Following a 2-week period of data collection, an educational flyer was displayed in every patient's room and nursing staff held an in-service training event focusing on the importance of sequential compression device use in the surgical patient. Patients were then monitored, again at random, and compliance was recorded. With the addition of a simple flyer and a single in-service on the importance of mechanical compression in the surgical patient, a significant improvement in compliance was documented at the authors' institution from 28% to 59% (p < .0001).

  12. Compliance. Regulatory policy P-211

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This regulatory policy describes the basic principles and directives for establishing and conducting the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Compliance Program. The program is aimed at securing compliance by regulated persons with regulatory requirements made under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act ('the Act'). The policy applies to persons who are regulated by the CNSC through the Act, regulations and licences, as well as by decisions and orders made under the Act. The policy applies to officers and employees of the CNSC, and its authorized representatives or agents, who are involved in developing and carrying out compliance activities. Compliance, in the context of this policy, means conformity by regulated persons with the legally binding requirements of the Act, and the CNSC regulations, licences, decisions, and orders made under the Act. Compliance activities are CNSC measures of promotion, verification and enforcement aimed at securing compliance by regulated person with the applicable legally binding requirements. (author)

  13. Compliance. Regulatory policy P-211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-05-01

    This regulatory policy describes the basic principles and directives for establishing and conducting the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Compliance Program. The program is aimed at securing compliance by regulated persons with regulatory requirements made under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act ('the Act'). The policy applies to persons who are regulated by the CNSC through the Act, regulations and licences, as well as by decisions and orders made under the Act. The policy applies to officers and employees of the CNSC, and its authorized representatives or agents, who are involved in developing and carrying out compliance activities. Compliance, in the context of this policy, means conformity by regulated persons with the legally binding requirements of the Act, and the CNSC regulations, licences, decisions, and orders made under the Act. Compliance activities are CNSC measures of promotion, verification and enforcement aimed at securing compliance by regulated person with the applicable legally binding requirements. (author)

  14. Pretreatment Solution for Water Recovery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Dean (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Chemical pretreatments are used to produce usable water by treating a water source with a chemical pretreatment that contains a hexavalent chromium and an acid to generate a treated water source, wherein the concentration of sulfate compounds in the acid is negligible, and wherein the treated water source remains substantially free of precipitates after the addition of the chemical pretreatment. Other methods include reducing the pH in urine to be distilled for potable water extraction by pretreating the urine before distillation with a pretreatment solution comprising one or more acid sources selected from a group consisting of phosphoric acid, hydrochloric acid, and nitric acid, wherein the urine remains substantially precipitate free after the addition of the pretreatment solution. Another method described comprises a process for reducing precipitation in urine to be processed for water extraction by mixing the urine with a pretreatment solution comprising hexavalent chromium compound and phosphoric acid.

  15. Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

  16. Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations

  17. Proactive compliance report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) stipulates requirements to protect public safety, minimize environmental impacts, improve conservation, and ensure equity by promoting orderly and responsible energy development. Surveillance activities by the EUB, such as inspections and audits, ensures compliance with these requirements. This report presents statistical results of the enforcement ladder process (inspections, complaints, activities, major initiatives, and enforcement) for 2004 across ten EUB groups, including, Field Surveillance, Resources Applications Group, Operations Group, Environment Group, Utilities Branch, Facilities Applications Group, Corporate Compliance Group, Fort McMurray, Information and Dissemination Group, and Financial Management Group. When a noncompliance is identified, the EUB uses a process that has an established policy for EUB enforcement actions. Enforcement actions are determined by the severity of the noncompliance event and are escalated for subsequent noncompliance or failure to comply with the EUB's corrective order. Within the process, the EUB provides a grace period after an initial enforcement action. During this period, the EUB will take appropriate enforcement actions for subsequent noncompliances but will not escalate enforcement consequences. Enforcement consequences are escalated after the grace period has expired. 72 tabs

  18. Formalizing and applying compliance patterns for business process compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgammal, A.F.S.A.; Türetken, O.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.M.; Papazoglou, M.

    Today’s enterprises demand a high degree of compliance of business processes to meet diverse regulations and legislations. Several industrial studies have shown that compliance management is a daunting task, and organizations are still struggling and spending billions of dollars annually to ensure

  19. An early warning system for environmental compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quayle, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a process called an early warning system. This system is used for developing a method to monitor regulatory developments as they progress through the federal or state administrative process. The components of this early warning system, methods used to identify, analyze, communicate, and act on regulations, are addressed. The communication system includes a regulatory development tracking system and the methods used to relay information to applicable personnel. This paper also discusses the use of an environmental compliance manual and shows the relationship of the analysis of changing regulatory requirements to the revision process of the manual as well as methods of maintaining the manual as a ''living document''

  20. 49 CFR 1119.1 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 1119.1 Section 1119.1 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE COMPLIANCE WITH BOARD DECISIONS § 1119.1 Compliance. A defendant or respondent... compliance date specified in the decision of the manner of compliance. Notification should be by verified...

  1. Improving ambulatory saliva-sampling compliance in pregnant women: a randomized controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Moeller

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Noncompliance with scheduled ambulatory saliva sampling is common and has been associated with biased cortisol estimates in nonpregnant subjects. This study is the first to investigate in pregnant women strategies to improve ambulatory saliva-sampling compliance, and the association between sampling noncompliance and saliva cortisol estimates. METHODS: We instructed 64 pregnant women to collect eight scheduled saliva samples on two consecutive days each. Objective compliance with scheduled sampling times was assessed with a Medication Event Monitoring System and self-reported compliance with a paper-and-pencil diary. In a randomized controlled study, we estimated whether a disclosure intervention (informing women about objective compliance monitoring and a reminder intervention (use of acoustical reminders improved compliance. A mixed model analysis was used to estimate associations between women's objective compliance and their diurnal cortisol profiles, and between deviation from scheduled sampling and the cortisol concentration measured in the related sample. RESULTS: Self-reported compliance with a saliva-sampling protocol was 91%, and objective compliance was 70%. The disclosure intervention was associated with improved objective compliance (informed: 81%, noninformed: 60%, F(1,60  = 17.64, p<0.001, but not the reminder intervention (reminders: 68%, without reminders: 72%, F(1,60 = 0.78, p = 0.379. Furthermore, a woman's increased objective compliance was associated with a higher diurnal cortisol profile, F(2,64  = 8.22, p<0.001. Altered cortisol levels were observed in less objective compliant samples, F(1,705  = 7.38, p = 0.007, with delayed sampling associated with lower cortisol levels. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that in pregnant women, objective noncompliance with scheduled ambulatory saliva sampling is common and is associated with biased cortisol estimates. To improve sampling compliance, results suggest

  2. 46 CFR 197.575 - Observation of monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Observation of monitoring. 197.575 Section 197.575... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.575 Observation of monitoring. (a) Persons involved in benzene... compliance with § 197.540. Coast Guard officials may also observe all monitoring in compliance with § 197.540...

  3. Special Education Compliance: Program Review Standards and Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City. Div. of Special Education.

    This manual contains special education standards and indicators for educating children with disabilities in Missouri. It is divided into four main sections. Section 1 contains special education compliance standards based upon the federal Office of Special Education Programs Continuous Improvement Monitoring Program clusters and indicators. The…

  4. The Compliance Review and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Janet; Heneghan, John M.

    1979-01-01

    The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) can initiate a compliance review of any company receiving a federal contract. The OFCCP equal opportunity specialist looks for discriminatory patterns of hiring, firing, promotion, and pay. Any company not complying with recommendations of the OFCCP may be prevented from obtaining future…

  5. Compliance Issues in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency in the 1980's, quality in the 1990's, compliance in the 2010's - private sector management techniques and mechanisms find their way to public services. This paper facilitates the understanding of how compliance management controls can improve operations and prevent or detect failure or wrong doing. The last few years' empirical research…

  6. Method for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb M.; Brown, Robert C.; Dalluge, Dustin Lee

    2015-08-18

    The present invention relates to a method for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass containing alkali and/or alkaline earth metal (AAEM). The method comprises providing a lignocellulosic biomass containing AAEM; determining the amount of the AAEM present in the lignocellulosic biomass; identifying, based on said determining, the amount of a mineral acid sufficient to completely convert the AAEM in the lignocellulosic biomass to thermally-stable, catalytically-inert salts; and treating the lignocellulosic biomass with the identified amount of the mineral acid, wherein the treated lignocellulosic biomass contains thermally-stable, catalytically inert AAEM salts.

  7. Survey of Lignin-Structure Changes and Depolymerization during Ionic Liquid Pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Tanmoy; Isern, Nancy G.; Sun, Jian; Wang, Eileen; Hull, Sarah; Cort, John R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singh, Seema

    2017-09-26

    A detailed study of chemical changes in lignin structure during the ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment process is not only pivotal for understanding and overcoming biomass recalcitrance during IL pretreatment, but also is necessary for designing new routes for lignin valorization. Chemical changes in lignin were systematically studied as a function of pretreatment temperature, time and type of IL used. Kraft lignin was used as the lignin source and common pretreatment conditions were employed using three different ILs of varying chemical structure in terms of acidic or basic character. The chemical changes in the lignin structure due to IL pretreatment processes were monitored using 1H-13C HSQC NMR, 31P NMR, elemental analysis, GPC, FT-IR, and the depolymerized products were analyzed using GC-MS. Although pretreatment in acidic IL, triethylammonium hydrogensulfate ([TEA][HSO4]) results in maximum decrease in β-aryl ether bond, maximum dehydration and recondensation pathways were also evident, with the net process showing a minimum decrease in the molecular weight of regenerated lignin. However, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2C1Im][OAc]) pretreatment yields a smaller decrease in the β-aryl ether content along with minimum evidence of recondensation, resulting in the maximum decrease in the molecular weight. Cholinium lysinate ([Ch][Lys]) pretreatment shows an intermediate result, with moderate depolymerization, dehydration and recondensation observed. The depolymerization products after IL pretreatment are found to be a function of the pretreatment temperature and the specific chemical nature of the IL used. At higher pretreatment temperature, [Ch][Lys] pretreatment yields guaiacol, [TEA][HSO4] yields guaiacylacetone, and [C2C1Im][OAc] yields both guaiacol and guaiacylacetone as major products. These results clearly indicate that the changes in lignin structure as well as the depolymerized product profile depend on the pretreatment conditions and the nature

  8. General administrative regulation relating to the Integrated Monitoring and Information System (IMIS) and its application in compliance with the Preventive Radiation Protection Act (StrlSchVG), (AVV-IMIS). As of 27 September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This general administrative regulation applies to the measuring, communication, compilation, processing, and documentation of data recorded within the IMIS system for the purpose of environmental radioactivity monitoring. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Compliance with physical exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Anne Sofie; Bønnelycke, Julie; Rosenkilde Larsen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    , a moderate (MOD; 300 kcal/day) or a high-dose (HIGH; 600 kcal/day) endurance exercise group for 12 weeks. A sub-set of the subjects were interviewed using pre-determined, qualitative questions to elucidate physical activity and health behaviour. In combination with the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB......, and thereby may have increased physical activity levels in areas of their everyday lives that were not related to the intervention. Conclusions: A multidisciplinary approach provided explanations for similar effects of two different doses of exercise. This could not have been determined via either qualitative......Aims: Sixty-one healthy, sedentary, moderately overweight young men participated in a randomised controlled trial to examine the effects of two different doses of endurance exercise on health behaviour and exercise compliance. Methods: Participants were randomised to a sedentary control group...

  10. Environmental compliance assessment review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliday, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    During the period 1972-1991, The United States Congress passed stringent environmental statues which the Environment Protection Agency implemented via regulations. The statues and regulations contain severe civil and criminal penalties. Civil violations resulted in fines, typically payable by the company. The act of willfully and knowingly violating the permit conditions or regulations can result in criminal charges being imposed upon the responsible part, i.e., either the company or individual. Criminal charges can include fines, lawyer fees, court costs and incarceration. This paper describes steps necessary to form an effective Environmental Compliance Assessment Review [CAR] program, train field and engineering personnel and perform a CAR audit. Additionally, the paper discusses the findings of a number of Exploration and Production [E and P] field audits

  11. Imipramine compliance in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, G A; Anderson, L K; Hektner, J M; Realmuto, G M

    2000-03-01

    To investigate side effects, medication compliance, and assumption of medication assignment in adolescents taking imipramine versus placebo in a clinical trial. Sixty-three anxious-depressed adolescents in an 8-week double-blind study of imipramine versus placebo, each in combination with cognitive-behavioral therapy for school refusal, were evaluated. Measures of side effects, global improvement, family functioning, medication compliance based on pill counts, and guesses of drug assignment (imipramine versus placebo) were analyzed. Mean side effects ratings were significantly higher for the imipramine group compared with the placebo group (p = .001). Side effects were not associated with noncompliance or with dropping out. Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in the adolescents was significantly associated with medication noncompliance (p = .036). On the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale II (FACES II), low family adaptability (i.e., rigidity), low family cohesion (i.e., disengagement), and extreme family type were significantly associated with greater noncompliance with medications. Accuracy rates for guessing medication assignment (imipramine versus placebo) were 66% for subjects, 62.5% for mothers, and 79.5% for the psychiatrist. Logistic regression demonstrated that side effects (p = .005) and global improvement scores (p = .06) predicted the psychiatrist's guesses of drug assignment. Side effects were not associated with noncompliance. Nonadherence with taking medications was associated with ODD in the adolescents and problematic family functioning on FACES II. The psychiatrist, who was blind to treatment condition, guessed the subjects' medication assignments with high accuracy. Thus, because of expectancy bias, the data support the use of blind independent evaluators for rating changes in medication trials.

  12. Prescriber compliance with black box warnings in older adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Judith R; Coulen, Charmaine; Berger, Jan E; Moore, Marsha C; McQueen, Angela; Jan, Saira A

    2009-11-01

    Patients prescribed medications with US Food and Drug Administration-issued black box warnings (BBWs) warrant additional vigilance by prescribers because these drugs can cause serious adverse drug events. Seniors are at greater risk for adverse drug events due to increased medication burden and greater health vulnerability. To improve our understanding of the prescribing and patient-monitoring practices of physicians prescribing medications with a BBW to patients age >or=65 years in an ambulatory care setting. A retrospective cohort study of administrative pharmacy and medical claims identified 58,190 patients age >or=65 years in the Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey beneficiary population with >or=1 claim for >or=1 of the 8 targeted medications between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005. Medications included carbamazepine, amiodarone, ketoconazole, loop diuretics, methotrexate, cyclosporine, metformin and combinations, and cilostazol. Patients were followed 12 months from the index prescription date to evaluate prescriber compliance with BBWs using operationalized definitions of compliance. Patients prescribed drugs with a drug-laboratory warning had lower rates of prescriber BBW compliance (0.7%-24.9%) than patients prescribed drugs with a drug-disease warning (84.7%-90.2%). Administrative claims analysis identified low rates of prescriber compliance with BBWs in managing patients age >or=65 years. Claims analysis may be a cost-effective strategy to monitor prescriber compliance with BBWs in older patients at higher risk.

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Cccc of... - Initial Compliance With Emission Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Limitations As stated in § 63.2165 (if you monitor fermenter exhaust) and § 63.2166 (if you monitor brew...)) for which compliance is determined by monitoring brew ethanol concentration and calculating VOC...* performance test does not exceed the applicable maximum concentration.b. You have a record of the brew-to...

  14. The tropospheric monitoring instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voert, M.J. te; Brakel, R. van; Witvoet, G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal and opto-mechanical design and analysis work has been done on the Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI), a spectrometer on the Copernicus Sentinel 5 Precursor satellite. To verify compliance with the stringent opto-mechanical stability requirements, detailed thermal and

  15. Wash water waste pretreatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Investigations were completed on wash waters based on each candidate personal cleansing agent. Evaluations of coagulants, antifoam agents, and the effect of promising antifoams on the chemical precipitation were included. Based on these evaluations two candidate soaps as well as their companion antifoam agents were selected for further work. Operating parameters included the effect of soap concentration, ferric chloride concentration, duration of mixing, and pore size of depth filters on the degree of soap removal. The effect of pressure on water flow through filter cartridges and on the rate of decline of water flow was also investigated. The culmination of the program was the recommendation of a pretreatment concept based on chemical precipitation followed by pressure filtration.

  16. Oil Mist Compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-02-02

    This report summarizes activities at the KCP related to evaluating and modifying machine tools in order to be in compliance with Section 23 of DOE 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. Section 851.23 (a) states that “Contractors must comply with the following safety and health standards that are applicable to the hazards in their covered workplace”, and subsection 9 contains the following applicable standard: “American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), ‘Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices,’ (2005) (incorporated by reference, see §851.27) when the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values are lower (more protective) than permissible exposure limits in 29 CFR 1910.” In the 2005 ACGIH – Threshold Limit Value book a Notice of Change was issued for exposure to mineral oil mist used in metalworking fluids (MWFs). The effects of planning for the new facility and which machine tools would be making the transition to the new facility affected which machine tools were modified.

  17. Oil Mist Compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes activities at the KCP related to evaluating and modifying machine tools in order to be in compliance with Section 23 of DOE 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. Section 851.23 (a) states that 'Contractors must comply with the following safety and health standards that are applicable to the hazards in their covered workplace', and subsection 9 contains the following applicable standard: 'American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), 'Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices,' (2005) (incorporated by reference, see (section)851.27) when the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values are lower (more protective) than permissible exposure limits in 29 CFR 1910'. In the 2005 ACGIH Threshold Limit Value book a Notice of Change was issued for exposure to mineral oil mist used in metalworking fluids (MWFs). The effects of planning for the new facility and which machine tools would be making the transition to the new facility affected which machine tools were modified

  18. Environmental Compliance Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A.; Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy

  19. Air Compliance Complaint Database (ACCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — THIS DATA ASSET NO LONGER ACTIVE: This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Air Compliance Complaint Database (ACCD) which logs all air pollution complaints...

  20. Small Airplane Certification Compliance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-02

    This advisory circular (AC) provides a compilation of historically acceptable means of compliance to specifically selected sections of Part 23 of the Federal Aviation Regulations that have become burdensome for small low performance airplanes to show...

  1. Compliance with Segment Disclosure Initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arya, Anil; Frimor, Hans; Mittendorf, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory oversight of capital markets has intensified in recent years, with a particular emphasis on expanding financial transparency. A notable instance is efforts by the Financial Accounting Standards Board that push firms to identify and report performance of individual business units...... compliance or mandates strict compliance from firms. Under voluntary compliance, a firm is able to credibly withhold individual segment information from its competitors by disclosing data only at the aggregate firm level. Consistent with regulatory hopes, we show that mandatory compliance enhances welfare...... by increasing transparency and leveling the playing field. However, our analysis also demonstrates that in the long run, if firms are unable to use discretion in reporting to maintain their competitive edge, they may seek more destructive alternatives. Accounting for such concerns, in the long run, voluntary...

  2. Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The purpose of ICIS is to meet evolving Enforcement and Compliance business needs for EPA and State users by integrating information into a single integrated data...

  3. 10 CFR 434.604 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 434.604 Section 434.604 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.604 Compliance. 604.1 Compliance with this section is...

  4. 28 CFR 811.11 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 811.11 Section 811.11... OFFENDER REGISTRATION § 811.11 Compliance. (a) A sex offender may be excused from strict compliance with... circumstances that will interfere with compliance and makes alternative arrangements to satisfy the requirements...

  5. 30 CFR 840.16 - Compliance conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance conference. 840.16 Section 840.16... ENFORCEMENT § 840.16 Compliance conference. (a) The State program may provide for compliance conferences... paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section. (b) A permittee may request an on-site compliance conference with...

  6. Pretreatment of the macroalgae Chaetomorpha linum for the production of bioethanol - Comparison of five pretreatment technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Thygesen, Anders; Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe

    2013-01-01

    -assisted pretreatment (PAP) and ball milling (BM), to determine effects of the pretreatment methods on the conversion of C. linum into ethanol by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). WO and BM showed the highest ethanol yield of 44. g ethanol/100. g glucan, which was close to the theoretical ethanol......A qualified estimate for pretreatment of the macroalgae Chaetomorpha linum for ethanol production was given, based on the experience of pretreatment of land-based biomass. C. linum was subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment (HTT), wet oxidation (WO), steam explosion (STEX), plasma...... yield of 57. g ethanol/100. g glucan. A 64% higher ethanol yield, based on raw material, was reached after pretreatment with WO and BM compared with unpretreated C. linum, however 50% of the biomass was lost during WO. Results indicated that the right combination of pretreatment and marine macroalgae...

  7. Corrosion Monitoring of PEO-Pretreated Magnesium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnedenkov, A. S.; Sinebryukhov, S. L.; Mashtalyar, D. V.; Gnedenkov, S. V.; Sergienko, V. I. [Institute of Chemistry, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-15

    The MA8 alloy (formula Mg-Mn-Ce) has been shown to have greater corrosion stability than the VMD10 magnesium alloy (formula Mg-Zn-Zr-Y) in chloride-containing solutions by Scanning Vibrating Electrode Technique (SVET) and by optical microscopy, gravimetry, and volumetry. It has been established that the crucial factor for the corrosion activity of these samples is the occurrence of microgalvanic coupling at the sample surface. The peculiarities of the kinetics and mechanism of the corrosion in the local heterogeneous regions of the magnesium alloy surface were investigated by localized electrochemical techniques. The stages of the corrosion process in artificial defects in the coating obtained by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) at the surface of the MA8 magnesium alloy were also studied. The analysis of the experimental data enabled us to determine that the corrosion process in the defect zone develops predominantly at the magnesium/coating interface. Based on the measurements of the corrosion rate of the samples with PEO and composite polymer-containing coatings, the best anticorrosion properties were displayed by the composite polymer-containing coatings.

  8. Psychopathological predictors of compliance and outcome in weight-loss obesity treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Panfilis, Chiara; Cero, Sara; Dall'Aglio, Elisabetta; Salvatore, Paola; Torre, Mariateresa; Maggini, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    To detect pre-treatment psychopathological predictors of compliance and outcome in a behavioural weight-loss program for obesity. 68 consecutive obese outpatients were evaluated on a wide range of psychopathological variables before entering a behavioural weight reduction program. Baseline assessment included detection of psychiatric (Axis I) and personality (Axis II) disorders, anxiety and depression levels, temperament and character patterns, alexithymia, and eating attitudes. These variables were then tested as predictors of compliance and weight loss after eight months of active treatment. Baseline presence of Axis I diagnoses was found to enhance the likelihood of good compliance to treatment but to lower probability of good outcome. Different psychopathological (and specifically personality) predictors of outcome were found among patients with and without psychiatric disorders. These data suggest the need to perform a full psychiatric evaluation, including personality assessment, to implement obesity treatment strategies.

  9. 7 CFR 246.19 - Management evaluation and monitoring reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION PROGRAM FOR WOMEN, INFANTS AND CHILDREN Monitoring and Review § 246.19 Management evaluation and monitoring reviews... education, participant services, civil rights compliance, accountability, financial management systems, and...

  10. The role of pre-treatment proactive coping skills in successful weight management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinkers, Charlotte D. W.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; Kroese, Floor M.; de Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Proactive coping encompasses future-oriented self-regulatory skills that help people prepare for future difficulties before they occur, such as planning and monitoring. The aim of the present study was to examine the interplay between pre-treatment proactive coping skills and expected

  11. High levels of pre-treatment HIV drug resistance and treatment failure in Nigerian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, Ragna S.; Boender, T. Sonia; Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Ndembi, Nicaise; Adeyemo, Titilope; Temiye, Edamisan O.; Osibogun, Akin; Ondoa, Pascale; Calis, Job C.; Akanmu, Alani Sulaimon

    2016-01-01

    Pre-treatment HIV drug resistance (PDR) is an increasing problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Children are an especially vulnerable population to develop PDR given that paediatric second-line treatment options are limited. Although monitoring of PDR is important, data on the paediatric prevalence in

  12. Integrated analysis of hydrothermal flow through pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archambault-Leger Veronique

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of hydrothermal flowthrough (FT pretreatment severity on pretreatment and solubilization performance metrics was evaluated for three milled feedstocks (corn stover, bagasse, and poplar and two conversion systems (simultaneous saccharification and fermentation using yeast and fungal cellulase, and fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum. Results Compared to batch pretreatment, FT pretreatment consistently resulted in higher XMG recovery, higher removal of non-carbohydrate carbon and higher glucan solubilization by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF. XMG recovery was above 90% for FT pretreatment below 4.1 severity but decreased at higher severities, particularly for bagasse. Removal of non-carbohydrate carbon during FT pretreatment increased from 65% at low severity to 80% at high severity for corn stover, and from 40% to 70% for bagasse and poplar. Solids obtained by FT pretreatment were amenable to high conversion for all of the feedstocks and conversion systems examined. The optimal time and temperature for FT pretreatment on poplar were found to be 16 min and 210°C. At these conditions, SSF glucan conversion was about 85%, 94% of the XMG was removed, and 62% of the non carbohydrate mass was solubilized. Solubilization of FT-pretreated poplar was compared for C. thermocellum fermentation (10% inoculum, and for yeast-fungal cellulase SSF (5% inoculum, cellulase loading of 5 and 10 FPU/g glucan supplemented with β-glucosidase at 15 and 30 U/g glucan. Under the conditions tested, which featured low solids concentration, C. thermocellum fermentation achieved faster rates and more complete conversion of FT-pretreated poplar than did SSF. Compared to SSF, solubilization by C. thermocellum was 30% higher after 4 days, and was over twice as fast on ball-milled FT-pretreated poplar. Conclusions XMG removal trends were similar between feedstocks whereas glucan conversion trends were significantly

  13. Association of Compliance With Process-Related Quality Metrics and Improved Survival in Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graboyes, Evan M; Gross, Jennifer; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Piccirillo, Jay F; Al-Gilani, Maha; Stadler, Michael E; Nussenbaum, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Quality metrics for patients with head and neck cancer are available, but it is unknown whether compliance with these metrics is associated with improved patient survival. To identify whether compliance with various process-related quality metrics is associated with improved survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma who receive definitive surgery with or without adjuvant therapy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at a tertiary academic medical center among 192 patients with previously untreated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma who underwent definitive surgery with or without adjuvant therapy between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2010. Data analysis was performed from January 26 to August 7, 2015. Surgery with or without adjuvant therapy. Compliance with a collection of process-related quality metrics possessing face validity that covered pretreatment evaluation, treatment, and posttreatment surveillance was evaluated. Association between compliance with these quality metrics and overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival was calculated using univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis. Among 192 patients, compliance with the individual quality metrics ranged from 19.7% to 93.6% (median, 82.8%). No pretreatment or surveillance metrics were associated with improved survival. Compliance with the following treatment-related quality metrics was associated with improved survival: elective neck dissection with lymph node yield of 18 or more, no unplanned surgery within 14 days of the index surgery, no unplanned 30-day readmissions, and referral for adjuvant radiotherapy for pathologic stage III or IV disease. Increased compliance with a "clinical care signature" composed of these 4 metrics was associated with improved overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival on univariable analysis (log-rank test; P metrics was associated with improved overall survival (100

  14. Understanding Ionic Liquid Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretreatment of biomass is essential for breaking apart highly ordered and crystalline plant cell walls and loosening the lignin and hemicellulose conjugation to cellulose microfibrills, thereby facilitating enzyme accessibility and adsorption and reducing costs of downstream saccharification proces...

  15. Extrusion Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to bioethanol has shown environmental, economic and energetic advantages in comparison to bioethanol produced from sugar or starch. However, the pretreatment process for increasing the enzymatic accessibility and improving the digestibility of cellulose is hindered by many physical-chemical, structural and compositional factors, which make these materials difficult to be used as feedstocks for ethanol production. A wide range of pretreatment methods has been developed to alter or remove structural and compositional impediments to (enzymatic hydrolysis over the last few decades; however, only a few of them can be used at commercial scale due to economic feasibility. This paper will give an overview of extrusion pretreatment for bioethanol production with a special focus on twin-screw extruders. An economic assessment of this pretreatment is also discussed to determine its feasibility for future industrial cellulosic ethanol plant designs.

  16. Hydrolysis of alkaline pretreated banana peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatmawati, A.; Gunawan, K. Y.; Hadiwijaya, F. A.

    2017-11-01

    Banana peel is one of food wastes that are rich in carbohydrate. This shows its potential as fermentation substrate including bio-ethanol. This paper presented banana peel alkaline pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment was intended to prepare banana peel in order to increase hydrolysis performance. The alkaline pretreatment used 10, 20, and 30% w/v NaOH solution and was done at 60, 70 and 80°C for 1 hour. The hydrolysis reaction was conducted using two commercial cellulose enzymes. The reaction time was varied for 3, 5, and 7 days. The best condition for pretreatment process was one conducted using 30% NaOH solution and at 80°C. This condition resulted in cellulose content of 90.27% and acid insoluble lignin content of 2.88%. Seven-day hydrolysis time had exhibited the highest reducing sugar concentration, which was7.2869 g/L.

  17. Ultrasonic sludge pretreatment under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Ngoc Tuan; Julcour-Lebigue, Carine; Delmas, Henri

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to optimize the ultrasound (US) pretreatment of sludge. Three types of sewage sludge were examined: mixed, secondary and secondary after partial methanisation ("digested" sludge). Thereby, several main process parameters were varied separately or simultaneously: stirrer speed, total solid content of sludge (TS), thermal operating conditions (adiabatic vs. isothermal), ultrasonic power input (PUS), specific energy input (ES), and for the first time external pressure. This parametric study was mainly performed for the mixed sludge. Five different TS concentrations of sludge (12-36 g/L) were tested for different values of ES (7000-75,000 kJ/kgTS) and 28 g/L was found as the optimum value according to the solubilized chemical oxygen demand in the liquid phase (SCOD). PUS of 75-150 W was investigated under controlled temperature and the "high power input - short duration" procedure was the most effective at a given ES. The temperature increase in adiabatic US application significantly improved SCOD compared to isothermal conditions. With PUS of 150 W, the effect of external pressure was investigated in the range of 1-16 bar under isothermal and adiabatic conditions for two types of sludge: an optimum pressure of about 2 bar was found regardless of temperature conditions and ES values. Under isothermal conditions, the resulting improvement of sludge disintegration efficacy as compared to atmospheric pressure was by 22-67% and 26-37% for mixed and secondary sludge, respectively. Besides, mean particle diameter (D[4,3]) of the three sludge types decreased respectively from 408, 117, and 110 μm to about 94-97, 37-42, and 36-40 μm regardless of sonication conditions, and the size reduction process was much faster than COD extraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pretreatment techniques for biofuels and biorefineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhen (ed.) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, YN (China). Xishuangbanna Tropical Botonical Garden

    2013-02-01

    The first book focused on pretreatment techniques for biofuels contributed by the world's leading experts. Extensively covers the different types of biomass, various pretreatment approaches and methods that show the subsequent production of biofuels and chemicals. In addition to traditional pretreatment methods, novel techniques are also introduced and discussed. An accessible reference work for students, researchers, academicians and industrialists in biorefineries. This book includes 19 chapters contributed by the world's leading experts on pretreatment methods for biomass. It extensively covers the different types of biomass (e.g. molasses, sugar beet pulp, cheese whey, sugarcane residues, palm waste, vegetable oil, straws, stalks and wood), various pretreatment approaches (e.g. physical, thermal, chemical, physicochemical and biological) and methods that show the subsequent production of biofuels and chemicals such as sugars, ethanol, extracellular polysaccharides, biodiesel, gas and oil. In addition to traditional methods such as steam, hot-water, hydrothermal, diluted-acid, organosolv, ozonolysis, sulfite, milling, fungal and bacterial, microwave, ultrasonic, plasma, torrefaction, pelletization, gasification (including biogas) and liquefaction pretreatments, it also introduces and discusses novel techniques such as nano and solid catalysts, organic electrolyte solutions and ionic liquids. This book offers a review of state-of-the-art research and provides guidance for the future paths of developing pretreatment techniques of biomass for biofuels, especially in the fields of biotechnology, microbiology, chemistry, materials science and engineering. It intends to provide a systematic introduction of pretreatment techniques. It is an accessible reference work for students, researchers, academicians and industrialists in biorefineries.

  19. Evaluating soft strategies for clean-air compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, T.M.; Stansberry, C.J. Jr.; Estes, S. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga (United States)); Le, K.D.; Boyle, R.F.; Nguyen, M.T.

    1993-04-01

    This article describes the efforts of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) to minimize expenditures, keep rates competitive, encourage local economic growth and conform to emission legislation. The topics of the article include the impact of the Clean Air Act on TVA, their phase one compliance strategy, system operation issues, Wescouger (TM) emission monitoring module, cost/benefit of emission dispatch, impact on pumped-storage utilization and transaction-pricing philosophy.

  20. Contemplating compliance: European compliance mechanisms in international perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    How can international organizations make their Member States comply with the rules of the organization? Which is the more effective method: to coax and entice, to argue and persuade, or to threaten and punish? On the basis of which criteria should a compliance mechanism be construed and applied,

  1. Embodied-self-monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagalkot, Naveen L.

    This thesis aligns with the field of designing and developing pervasive self-monitoring technology to encourage and support people undergoing physical rehabilitation comply with prescribed therapy at home. The works in this field are driven by an aim of integrating the technology as part of the ‘......This thesis aligns with the field of designing and developing pervasive self-monitoring technology to encourage and support people undergoing physical rehabilitation comply with prescribed therapy at home. The works in this field are driven by an aim of integrating the technology as part...... of the ‘context’ where compliance happens. However, field-based works within the field highlight how compliance is shaped by the particularities of the setting of a home. These works call for considering the way rehabilitees comply with their therapy in the design of pervasive self-monitoring technology....... In response to this call, I take an embodied interaction perspective in the design of pervasive self-monitoring technology. Taking the embodied interaction perspective means considering the context as being emergent and constantly shaped by the rehabilitee’s actions of compliance; it is a context...

  2. Challenges and perspectives of compliance with pediatric antiretroviral therapy in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahourou, D L; Leroy, V

    2017-12-01

    More than 3 million children aged less than 15years are infected with HIV worldwide, mainly in Sub-Saharan Africa. The survival of HIV-infected children depends on their access to antiretroviral therapy whose success mainly depends on a good life-long compliance with antiretroviral therapy. Given its complexity and specificity, assessment and monitoring of pediatric compliance with antiretroviral therapy is a major challenge. There is no consensus on a gold standard for monitoring compliance with antiretroviral therapy. Compliance is also influenced by many factors related to the child, the caregiver, the healthcare staff, the healthcare system, and antiretroviral drugs. This review aimed to assess scientific knowledge on pediatric compliance with antiretroviral therapy in Sub-Saharan Africa, and to identify areas for future interventions to improve compliance. Good compliance is essential to achieve the "90% coverage of children on antiretroviral therapy" gold standard of the World Health Organization, and to eliminate HIV infection by 2030. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  3. Tool for evaluation compliance standards and expectations in occupational risk prevention by collaborating companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran Perez, A.; Gomez Pardo, M. A.; Cao Tejero, R.; Millan Verdejo, J. A.; Blas Perez, P.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of a single security in ANAV, in our Action Plan on prevention, we consider it essential to include workers from ECCE working for and by ANAV in compliance with standards and expectations both in the accounts of the incidents. With this system is intended to standardize a set of observed deviations report and a tool for measuring the degree of compliance, allowing to monitor the evolution of each company and the effectiveness of prevention plan.

  4. Understanding Recreational Fishers' Compliance with No-take Zones in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Arias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding fishers' compliance is essential for the successful management of marine protected areas. We used the random response technique (RRT to assess recreational fishers' compliance with no-take zones in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP. The RRT allowed the asking of a sensitive question, i.e., "Did you, knowingly, fish within in a Green Zone during the last 12 months?" while protecting respondents' confidentiality. Application of the RRT through a survey of recreational fishers indicated that the majority of recreational fishers, 90%, comply with no-take zones. Likewise, most fishers, 92%, reported not personally knowing anyone who had intentionally fished in a no-take zone, indicating that fishers' perceive high levels of compliance among their peers. Fishers were motivated to comply with no-take zones primarily by their beliefs about penalties for noncompliance, followed by beliefs about the fishery benefits of no-take zones. Results suggest that compliance-related communication efforts by the managing authority have partially succeeded in maintaining appropriate compliance levels and that future efforts should accentuate normative compliance drivers that will encourage voluntary compliance. We conclude that compliance monitoring should be integrated into the adaptive management of the GBRMP and other protected areas; in this case social surveys using the RRT are effective tools.

  5. AWARENESS AND COMPLIANCE OF ANTITETANUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the awareness level and the compliance to anti-tetanus immunization among adult females in an urban community in South West of Nigeria. The rationale for the study was informed by the fact that high incidence of tetanus infections and deaths are still being reported from our ...

  6. Audit-based compliance control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cederquist, J.G.; Dimitrakos, T.; Corin, R.J.; Martinelli, F.; Ryan, P.Y.A.; Dekker, M.A.C.; Etalle, Sandro; Schneider, S.; den Hartog, Jeremy; Lenzini, Gabriele

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new framework for controlling compliance to discretionary access control policies [Cederquist et al. in Proceedings of the International Workshop on Policies for Distributed Systems and Networks (POLICY), 2005; Corin et al. in Proceedings of the IFIP Workshop on Formal

  7. Project Compliance with Enterprise Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foorthuis, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    This research project set out to identify effective practices and models for working with projects that are required to comply with Enterprise Architecture (EA), and investigate the benefits and drawbacks brought about by compliance. Research methods used are canonical action research, a statistical

  8. ETHICS AND COMPLIANCE IN BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREESCU Nicoleta Alina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied the evolution of the business ethics concept through the prism of definitions from some renowned authors in the field and through the approach model of the business ethics and by implementing it in the company level. We have found out that in the last 40 years this concept has evolved from a theoretical aspect, as well as a practical one. Companies are motivated to implement ethics and compliance programs in business so that they can manage the changes that come from society. If, until recently, all that mattered for a company was profit, in the last decades, the situation changed. In order to develop a durable business, it is essential to have a good reputation. Owning and implementing an ethics and compliance program in business has become an imperative for companies, regardless of their activity sector. The role of the compliance department becomes more pregnant in each company: the employees need safety, the existence of communication lines provides comfort. From the partners in business’ point of view, owning such a program is a necessity, a condition, and not conforming to the principles of business ethics can lead to the isolation of the company. The ethics and compliance programs in business are instruments that protect the company by implementing certain proactive identification mechanisms that ensure the development of an ethical organizational culture.

  9. Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Engine and Vehicle Compliance Certification and Fuel Economy Inventory contains measured emissions and fuel economy compliance information for all types of...

  10. Clean Air Markets - Compliance Query Wizard

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Compliance Query Wizard is part of a suite of Clean Air Markets-related tools that are accessible at http://ampd.epa.gov/ampd/. The Compliance module provides...

  11. Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data Inventory data asset contains measured summary compliance information on light-duty, heavy-duty, and non-road...

  12. GENDER AND ETHNICITY DIFFERENCES IN TAX COMPLIANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Jeyapalan Kasipillai; Hijattulah Abdul Jabbar

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether gender and ethnicity differences occur in relation to tax compliance attitude and behavior. Prior studies on tax compliance have focused little on gender as a predictor of compliance. In Malaysia, ethnic background of a taxpayer could be a major determinant of tax compliance. A personal interview approach is used to obtain information from taxpayers in urban towns. A t-test suggests that males and females were found to have similar compliant...

  13. Compliance with therapeutic guidelines in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group prospective gastrointestinal clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, Christopher G.; Moughan, Jennifer; O’Meara, Elizabeth; Galvin, James M.; Crane, Christopher H.; Winter, Kathryn; Manfredi, Denise; Rich, Tyvin A.; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Lustig, Robert; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This report analyzes the adherence to radiation therapy protocol guidelines in contemporary Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) gastrointestinal trials. We aim to provide insight into current standards and compliance of radiation therapy field design and administration. Methods: From 1994 to 2006, the Gastrointestinal Cancer Committee of the RTOG initiated and completed 15 phase I–III clinical trials utilizing radiation therapy in the multimodality treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. In each protocol, details for planning and executing radiation therapy were outlined and each protocol contained scoring criteria for these components of radiation therapy, characterized according to per-protocol, variation acceptable and deviation unacceptable. Review of treatment planning and implementation was performed in all studies following therapy completion. Results: Radiation therapy planning and implementation was reviewed in 2309 of 2312 (99.9%) patients. The mean rate of compliance over all for the 15 protocols was 65% (total of the 2309 analyzed patients). The mean variation acceptable rate was 21% whereas the mean deviation unacceptable rate was 5%. The mean “other” rate (no RT given or incomplete RT due to death, progression or refusal) was 8%. Two of the 15 trials (13%) had deviation unacceptable rates >10%. In four studies incorporating pre-treatment review of radiation therapy planning and treatment, compliance with protocol therapy was enhanced. Conclusions: The fidelity of radiation planning and execution detailed in protocol to actual therapy is heterogeneous, with a mean per-protocol rate of 65%. As clinical trials evolve, available technology should permit efficient pre-treatment review processes, thus facilitating compliance to protocol therapy. These analyses should also permit prospective analysis of outcome measures by compliance to therapy.

  14. 12 CFR 1710.19 - Compliance and risk management programs; compliance with other laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance and risk management programs; compliance with other laws. 1710.19 Section 1710.19 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE... Practices and Procedures § 1710.19 Compliance and risk management programs; compliance with other laws. (a...

  15. Impacts of operating parameters on oxidation-reduction potential and pretreatment efficacy in the pretreatment of printing and dyeing wastewater by Fenton process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huifang, E-mail: whfkhl@sina.com [College of Environment, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Industrial Water-Conservation and Emission Reduction, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang, Shihe [Department of Municipal Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A real printing and dyeing wastewater was pretreated by Fenton process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated impacts of operating parameters on ORP and pretreatment efficacy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationship among ORP, operating parameters and treatment efficacy was established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pretreatment efficacy was in proportion to the exponent of temperature reciprocal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated kinetics of color and COD removal and BOD{sub 5}/COD ratio in solution. - Abstract: An experiment was conducted in a batch reactor for a real printing and dyeing wastewater pretreatment using Fenton process in this study. The results showed that original pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and ferrous sulfate concentration affected ORP value and pretreatment efficacy greatly. Under experimental conditions, the optimal original pH was 6.61, and the optimal hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulfate concentrations were 1.50 and 0.75 g L{sup -1}, respectively. The relationship among ORP, original pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration, ferrous sulfate concentration, and color (COD or BOD{sub 5}/COD) was established, which would be instructive in on-line monitoring and control of Fenton process using ORP. In addition, the effects of wastewater temperature and oxidation time on pretreatment efficacy were also investigated. With an increase of temperature, color and COD removal efficiencies and BOD{sub 5}/COD ratio increased, and they were in proportion to the exponent of temperature reciprocal. Similarly, color and COD removal efficiencies increased with increasing oxidation time, and both color and COD removal obeyed the first-order kinetics. The BOD{sub 5}/COD ratio could be expressed by a second-degree polynomial with respect to oxidation time, and the best biodegradability of wastewater was present at the oxidation time of 6.10 h.

  16. 36 CFR 223.13 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 223.13 Section... OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER General Provisions § 223.13 Compliance. Forest officers authorizing free use shall ensure that such use is in compliance with applicable land management plans and is...

  17. 44 CFR 206.402 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 206.402 Section... HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE FEDERAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE Minimum Standards § 206.402 Compliance. A... compliance with this subpart following the completion of any repair or construction activities. ...

  18. 5 CFR 2424.41 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 2424.41 Section 2424.41... FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY NEGOTIABILITY PROCEEDINGS Decision and Order § 2424.41 Compliance. The... compliance with its order, including enforcement under 5 U.S.C. 7123(b). ...

  19. 7 CFR 993.518 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 993.518 Section 993.518 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Pack Specification as to Size Compliance § 993.518 Compliance. Whenever the season average price to...

  20. 7 CFR 959.81 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 959.81 Section 959.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Compliance § 959.81 Compliance. Except as provided in this subpart, no handler shall...

  1. 40 CFR 97.54 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 97.54 Section 97.54... Compliance. (a) NOX allowance transfer deadline. The NOX allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with a unit's NOX Budget emissions limitation for a control period in a given year only if the NOX...

  2. 7 CFR 15.5 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 15.5 Section 15.5 Agriculture Office of... Department of Agriculture-Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 § 15.5 Compliance. (a... recipients in obtaining compliance with the regulations and this part and shall provide assistance and...

  3. 45 CFR 1356.85 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 1356.85 Section 1356.85 Public Welfare....85 Compliance. (a) File submission standards. A State agency must submit a data file in accordance... compliance. (1) ACF will determine whether a State agency's data file for each reporting period is in...

  4. 7 CFR 945.70 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 945.70 Section 945.70 Agriculture... DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Compliance § 945.70 Compliance. Except as provided in this part, no handler shall ship potatoes, the shipment of which has been...

  5. 49 CFR 663.15 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 663.15 Section 663.15 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES General § 663.15 Compliance. A recipient subject to this part shall comply with all applicable requirements of this part. Such compliance...

  6. 33 CFR 104.115 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 104.115 Section 104... MARITIME SECURITY: VESSELS General § 104.115 Compliance. (a) Vessel owners or operators must ensure their vessels are operating in compliance with this part. (b) Owners or operators of foreign vessels must comply...

  7. 24 CFR 200.635 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance. 200.635 Section 200.635... GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing Regulations § 200.635 Compliance... Department will enforce compliance through the procedures outlined in 24 CFR part 108. [37 FR 75, Jan. 5...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1207 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 25.1207 Section 25.1207... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 25.1207 Compliance. Unless otherwise specified, compliance with the requirements of §§ 25.1181 through 25.1203 must be shown by a full...

  9. 10 CFR 851.13 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 851.13 Section 851.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Program Requirements § 851.13 Compliance. (a) Contractors must achieve compliance with all the requirements of Subpart C of this part, and their approved worker safety...

  10. 7 CFR 772.3 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 772.3 Section 772.3 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS SERVICING MINOR PROGRAM LOANS § 772.3 Compliance. (a) Requirements. No Minor Program... will conduct a compliance review of all Minor Program borrowers, to determine if a borrower has...

  11. 40 CFR 129.5 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 129.5 Section 129.5... STANDARDS Toxic Pollutant Effluent Standards and Prohibitions § 129.5 Compliance. (a)(1) Within 60 days from... standard established for any particular pollutant. (d)(1) Upon the compliance date for any section 307(a...

  12. 14 CFR 417.203 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 417.203 Section 417.203... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.203 Compliance. (a) General. A launch... need for further demonstration of compliance to the FAA, if: (1) A launch operator has contracted with...

  13. 40 CFR 73.35 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 73.35 Section 73.35... ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Tracking System § 73.35 Compliance. (a) Allowance transfer deadline. No allowance shall be deducted for purposes of compliance with an affected source's sulfur dioxide Acid Rain...

  14. 5 CFR 900.604 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 900.604 Section 900.604... Compliance. (a) Certification by Chief Executives. (1) Certification of agreement by a chief executive of a... of certification by the chief executive, compliance with the Standards may be certified by the heads...

  15. 10 CFR 850.13 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 850.13 Section 850.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Administrative Requirements § 850.13 Compliance. (a) The responsible employer must conduct activities in compliance with its CBDPP. (b) The responsible...

  16. 40 CFR 1507.1 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 1507.1 Section 1507.1 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AGENCY COMPLIANCE § 1507.1 Compliance. All agencies of the Federal Government shall comply with these regulations. It is the intent of these...

  17. 5 CFR 304.108 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 304.108 Section 304.108... APPOINTMENTS § 304.108 Compliance. (a) Each agency using 5 U.S.C. 3109 must establish and maintain a system of controls and oversight necessary to assure compliance with 5 U.S.C. 3109 and these regulations. The system...

  18. 14 CFR 417.402 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 417.402 Section 417.402... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Ground Safety § 417.402 Compliance. (a) General. A launch operator's... of compliance to the FAA if: (1) A launch operator has contracted with a Federal launch range for the...

  19. 40 CFR 96.54 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 96.54 Section 96.54... Tracking System § 96.54 Compliance. (a) NO X allowance transfer deadline. The NOX allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with a unit's NOX Budget emissions limitation for a control period in a...

  20. 40 CFR 720.120 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 720.120 Section 720.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT PREMANUFACTURE NOTIFICATION Compliance and Inspections § 720.120 Compliance. (a) Failure to comply with any...

  1. 7 CFR 948.81 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 948.81 Section 948.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Compliance § 948.81 Compliance. Except as provided in this subpart, no handler...

  2. 10 CFR 434.509 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 434.509 Section 434.509 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.509 Compliance. 509.1If the Design Energy Cost...

  3. 10 CFR 2.1012 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 2.1012 Section 2.1012 Energy NUCLEAR... Geologic Repository § 2.1012 Compliance. (a) If the Department of Energy fails to make its initial... storage media in a format consistent with NRC regulations and guidance, or for non-compliance with any...

  4. 22 CFR 209.6 - Compliance information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance information. 209.6 Section 209.6... § 209.6 Compliance information. (a) Cooperation and assistance. The Administrator shall to the fullest... and accurate compliance reports at such times, and in such form and containing such information, as...

  5. 38 CFR 18.6 - Compliance information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance information... THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 General § 18.6 Compliance information. (a) Cooperation and assistance... compliance reports at such times, and in such form and containing such information, as the responsible agency...

  6. Tax compliance depends on voice of taxpayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casal, Sandro; Kogler, C.; Mittone, Luigi; Kirchler, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the social distance between taxpayers and tax authorities boosts taxpayers' acceptance of tax load and tax compliance. In the present experiment participants had the opportunity to pay their tax due either as one single compliance decision or as separate compliance decisions for each type

  7. 42 CFR 124.503 - Compliance level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance level. 124.503 Section 124.503 Public... Unable To Pay § 124.503 Compliance level. (a) Annual compliance level. Subject to the provisions of this... persons unable to pay if it provides for the fiscal year uncompensated services at a level not less than...

  8. 30 CFR 843.20 - Compliance conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance conference. 843.20 Section 843.20... PERMANENT PROGRAM INSPECTION AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES FEDERAL ENFORCEMENT § 843.20 Compliance conference. (a) A permittee may request an on-site compliance conference with an authorized representative to...

  9. Microwave pretreatment of switchgrass for bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshwani, Deepak Radhakrishin

    Lignocellulosic materials are promising alternative feedstocks for bioethanol production. These materials include agricultural residues, cellulosic waste such as newsprint and office paper, logging residues, and herbaceous and woody crops. However, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass necessitates a pretreatment step to improve the yield of fermentable sugars. The overall goal of this dissertation is to expand the current state of knowledge on microwave-based pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Existing research on bioenergy and value-added applications of switchgrass is reviewed in Chapter 2. Switchgrass is an herbaceous energy crop native to North America and has high biomass productivity, potentially low requirements for agricultural inputs and positive environmental impacts. Based on results from test plots, yields in excess of 20 Mg/ha have been reported. Environmental benefits associated with switchgrass include the potential for carbon sequestration, nutrient recovery from run-off, soil remediation and provision of habitats for grassland birds. Published research on pretreatment of switchgrass reported glucose yields ranging from 70-90% and xylose yields ranging from 70-100% after hydrolysis and ethanol yields ranging from 72-92% after fermentation. Other potential value-added uses of switchgrass include gasification, bio-oil production, newsprint production and fiber reinforcement in thermoplastic composites. Research on microwave-based pretreatment of switchgrass and coastal bermudagrass is presented in Chapter 3. Pretreatments were carried out by immersing the biomass in dilute chemical reagents and exposing the slurry to microwave radiation at 250 watts for residence times ranging from 5 to 20 minutes. Preliminary experiments identified alkalis as suitable chemical reagents for microwave-based pretreatment. An evaluation of different alkalis identified sodium hydroxide as the most effective alkali reagent. Under optimum pretreatment

  10. Modular remote radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Fabio; Farias, Marcos S.; Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Oliveira, Mauro V.

    2013-01-01

    The Modular Remote Radiation Monitor (MRRM) is a novel radiation monitor suitable for monitoring environmental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is a portable compact-size low-power microprocessor-based electronic device which provides its monitoring data to other electronic systems, physically distant from it, by means of an electronic communication channel, which can be wired or wireless according to the requirements of each application. Besides its low-power highly-integrated circuit design, the Modular Remote Radiation Monitor is presented in a modular architecture, which promotes full compliance to the technical requirements of different applications while minimizing cost, size and power consumption. Its communication capability also supports the implementation of a network of multiple radiation monitors connected to a supervisory system, capable of remotely controlling each monitor independently as well as visualizing the radiation levels from all monitors. A prototype of the MRRM, functionally equivalent to the MRA-7027 radiation monitor, was implemented and connected to a wired MODBUS network of MRA-7027 monitors, responsible for monitoring ionizing radiation inside Argonauta reactor room at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear. Based on the highly positive experimental results obtained, further design is currently underway in order to produce a consumer version of the MRRM. (author)

  11. The Current G20 Taxation Agenda: Compliance, Accountability and Legitimacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dries Lesage

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the recent G20 initiatives on taxation, more precisely on “base erosion and profit shifting” (BEPS in the area of corporate taxation and the new G20 norm of automatic exchange of information (AEoI with regard to foreign accounts. After having reflected on the special relationship between the G20 and the OECD, the discussion proceeds through the lens of compliance, accountability and legitimacy. In terms of compliance, the G20 is still in the phase of delivering as a group on recent promises with regard to global standard setting. Compliance to these standards by G20 member states (and third countries is expected to start in the coming years. As to accountability, the G20 and OECD already have ample experience with the peer-review process and public reporting on the G20/OECD standard of information exchange upon request. For AEoI and BEPS the OECD will be designated as the prime mechanism to monitor compliance as well. Both initiatives, which are attempts at universal governance, suffer from legitimacy issues, more precisely because the G20 and OECD exclude most developing countries. Moreover, the policy outputs are not necessarily adjusted to developing countries’ needs and interests. Since a few years, both G20 and OECD attempt to address this issue through institutional fixes, extensive consultations with developing countries and modifications at the level of content.

  12. Magnified Bacteria Powerful Motivator for Hand Hygiene Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Ashley

    2016-08-01

    Infection prevention specialists at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit have found that showing healthcare workers magnified pictures of bacteria found ontheir hands and in their surrounding units can be a powerful motivator for improved hand hygiene compliance. When tested in four units during a one-month period, the intervention boosted hand hygiene compliance by an average of 24%. Investigators note that to be successful, the intervention must be paired with an effective compliance monitoring program. For the study, investigators visited each unit twice per week, during which they would swab various items as well as employees' hands using and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) meter, a hand-held device that measures living organisms. During each unit visit, infection prevention specialists would show unit personnel pictures from a compilation of 12 magnified images of bacteria that had been lifted from the unit. This was to demonstrate what the bacteria would look like under a microscope. The unsavory pictures produced immediate increases in had hygiene compliance, and prompted healthcare workers to see who could produce the best ATP meter readings on subsequent infection prevention specialist visits.

  13. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated soybean straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhong; Wang Qunhui; Jiang Zhaohua; Yang Xuexin; Ji Yongzhen

    2007-01-01

    In order to produce lactic acid, from agricultural residues such as soybean straw, which is a raw material for biodegradable plastic production, it is necessary to decompose the soybean straw into soluble sugars. Enzymatic hydrolysis is one of the methods in common use, while pretreatment is the effective way to increase the hydrolysis rate. The optimal conditions of pretreatment using ammonia and enzymatic hydrolysis of soybean straw were determined. Compared with the untreated straw, cellulose in straw pretreated by ammonia liquor (10%) soaking for 24 h at room temperature increased 70.27%, whereas hemicellulose and lignin in pretreated straw decreased to 41.45% and 30.16%, respectively. The results of infrared spectra (IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis also showed that the structure and the surface of the straw were changed through pretreatment that is in favor of the following enzymatic hydrolysis. maximum enzymatic hydrolysis rate of 51.22% was achieved at a substrate concentration of 5% (w/v) at 50 deg. C and pH 4.8 using cellulase (50 fpu/g of substrate) for 36 h

  14. SCADA: A proven tool for regulatory compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marullo, M.A. [CFAR International Centres for Automation Resources, Kenner, LA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Gone are the days when energy companies rushed to obtain the latest automation technology, not only to meet current and perceived future operational needs but also for bragging rights. Most companies today tend to run a much tighter (and, in many cases, smaller) ship. Indeed, spending four or five times what it takes to get the job done just doesn`t slip by as easily as it once did. But, the changes run much deeper than simple cost justification economics. Whereas before, decisions about what to buy, who to buy it from, and how much to pay for it were made almost entirely on the basis of internal motivations to control costs and/or improve productivity (or, in some cases merely to appease the boss), today there are other mitigating factors. The paper first discusses regulatory mandates, then uses the example of a chemical company needing to comply with new pollution monitoring regulations to illustrate how an existing SCADA system, currently being used for process monitoring and control, could save time and money in meeting the deadlines for compliance.

  15. Temperature Modelling of the Biomass Pretreatment Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Blanke, Mogens; Jensen, Jakob M.

    2012-01-01

    In a second generation biorefinery, the biomass pretreatment stage has an important contribution to the efficiency of the downstream processing units involved in biofuel production. Most of the pretreatment process occurs in a large pressurized thermal reactor that presents an irregular temperature...... distribution. Therefore, an accurate temperature model is critical for observing the biomass pretreatment. More than that, the biomass is also pushed with a constant horizontal speed along the reactor in order to ensure a continuous throughput. The goal of this paper is to derive a temperature model...... that captures the environmental temperature differences inside the reactor using distributed parameters. A Kalman filter is then added to account for any missing dynamics and the overall model is embedded into a temperature soft sensor. The operator of the plant will be able to observe the temperature in any...

  16. Pretreatment biomarkers predicting PTSD psychotherapy outcomes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvonen, Peter J; Glassman, Lisa H; Crocker, Laura D; Buttner, Melissa M; Orff, Henry; Schiehser, Dawn M; Norman, Sonya B; Afari, Niloofar

    2017-04-01

    Although our understanding of the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), brain structure and function, neural networks, stress-related systems, and genetics is growing, there is considerably less attention given to which biological markers predict evidence-based PTSD psychotherapy outcomes. Our systematic PRISMA-informed review of 20 studies examined biomarkers as predictors of evidence-based PTSD psychotherapy outcomes. Results provide preliminary evidence that specific structural and functional neural systems (involved in information processing), glucocorticoid sensitivity and metabolism (part of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the response to stress), heart rate (involved with fear habituation), gene methylation, and certain genotypes (associated with serotonin and glucocorticoids) predicted positive response to PTSD treatment. These pre-treatment biomarkers are associated with processes integral to PTSD treatment, such as those affecting fear learning and extinction, cognitive restructuring, information processing, emotional processing, and interoceptive monitoring. Identifying pre-treatment biomarkers that predict treatment response may offer insight into the mechanisms of psychological treatment, provide a foundation for improving the pharmaceutical augmentation of treatment, and inform treatment matching. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Multicentre validation of IMRT pre-treatment verification: comparison of in-house and external audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornet, Núria; Carrasco, Pablo; Beltrán, Mercè; Calvo, Juan Francisco; Escudé, Lluís; Hernández, Victor; Quera, Jaume; Sáez, Jordi

    2014-09-01

    We performed a multicentre intercomparison of IMRT optimisation and dose planning and IMRT pre-treatment verification methods and results. The aims were to check consistency between dose plans and to validate whether in-house pre-treatment verification results agreed with those of an external audit. Participating centres used two mock cases (prostate and head and neck) for the intercomparison and audit. Compliance to dosimetric goals and total number of MU per plan were collected. A simple quality index to compare the different plans was proposed. We compared gamma index pass rates using the centre's equipment and methodology to those of an external audit. While for the prostate case, all centres fulfilled the dosimetric goals and plan quality was homogeneous, that was not the case for the head and neck case. The number of MU did not correlate with the plan quality index. Pre-treatment verifications results of the external audit did not agree with those of the in-house measurements for two centres: being within tolerance for in-house measurements and unacceptable for the audit or the other way round. Although all plans fulfilled dosimetric constraints, plan quality is highly dependent on the planner expertise. External audits are an excellent tool to detect errors in IMRT implementation and cannot be replaced by intercomparison using results obtained by centres. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pretreatment status report on the identification and evaluation of alternative processes. Milestone Report No. C064

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, D.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Brothers, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Beary, M.M.; Nicholson, G.A. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to support the development and demonstration of a pretreatment system that will (1) destroy organic materials and ferrocyanide in tank wastes so that the wastes can be stored safely, (2) separate the high-activity and low-activity fractions, (3) remove radionuclides and remove or destroy hazardous chemicals in LLW as necessary to meet waste form feed requirements, (4) support development and demonstration of vitrification technology by providing representative feeds to the bench-scale glass melter, (5) support full-scale HLW vitrification operations, including near-term operation, by providing feed that meets specifications, and (6) design and develop pretreatment processes that accomplish the above objectives and ensure compliance with environmental regulations. This report is a presentation of candidate technologies for pretreatment of Hanford Site tank waste. Included are descriptions of studies by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory of Battelle Memorial Institute; Science Applications International Corporation, an independent consultant; BNFL, Inc. representing British technologies; Numatec, representing French technologies; and brief accounts of other relevant activities.

  19. Cleanser, Detergent, Personal Care Product Pretreatment Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Niklas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the Cleanser, Detergent, Personal Care Product, and Pretreatment Evaluation & Selection task is to identify the optimal combination of personal hygiene products, crew activities, and pretreatment strategies to provide the crew with sustainable life support practices and a comfortable habitat. Minimal energy, mass, and crew time inputs are desired to recycle wastewater during long duration missions. This document will provide a brief background on the work this past year supporting the ELS Distillation Comparison Test, issues regarding use of the hygiene products originally chosen for the test, methods and results used to select alternative products, and lessons learned from testing.

  20. Compliance with Environmental Regulations through Complex Geo-Event Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Herrera

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In a context of e-government, there are usually regulatory compliance requirements that support systems must monitor, control and enforce. These requirements may come from environmental laws and regulations that aim to protect the natural environment and mitigate the effects of pollution on human health and ecosystems. Monitoring compliance with these requirements involves processing a large volume of data from different sources, which is a major challenge. This volume is also increased with data coming from autonomous sensors (e.g. reporting carbon emission in protected areas and from citizens providing information (e.g. illegal dumping in a voluntary way. Complex Event Processing (CEP technologies allow processing large amount of event data and detecting patterns from them. However, they do not provide native support for the geographic dimension of events which is essential for monitoring requirements which apply to specific geographic areas. This paper proposes a geospatial extension for CEP that allows monitoring environmental requirements considering the geographic location of the processed data. We extend an existing platform-independent, model-driven approach for CEP adding the geographic location to events and specifying patterns using geographic operators. The use and technical feasibility of the proposal is shown through the development of a case study and the implementation of a prototype.

  1. Fermentation of pretreated corncob hemicellulose hydrolysate to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate the effect of unknown fermentation inhibitors in corncob hemicellulose acid hydrolysate processed by pretreatment and detoxification on fermentation, corncob hemicellulose acid hydrolysate and artificially prepared hydrolysate were fermented in parallel by Candida shehatae YHFK-2. The results show that ...

  2. Antibacterial effect of surface pretreatment techniques against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (CFU/ml), respectively, among the groups evaluated (P < 0.05). Er:YAG laser irradiation and its combinations with other antibacterial surface pretreatment applications also inhibited the bacterial growth with, respectively, 1444, 406, and 294 CFU/ml bacterial recovery being more efficient than KTP laser irradiation and ozone ...

  3. Antibacterial Effect of Surface Pretreatment Techniques against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... of dentin chips were obtained from the cavity walls, and the number of bacteria recovered was counted. Kruskal–Wallis ... Keywords: Antibacterial effect, cavity surface pretreatment techniques, cavity preparation, dental, dental ... wavelengths for removing oral soft and dental hard tissues without pain relief, ...

  4. Bromine pretreated chitosan for adsorption of lead

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pollution by heavy metals like lead (II) is responsible for health hazards and environmental degradation. Adsorption is a prevalent method applied for removal of heavy metal pollutants from water. This study explored adsorption performances of 30% bromine pretreated chitosan for lead (II) abatement from water. Bromine ...

  5. Compliance management and corporate governance; Compliance Management und Corporate Governance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Uwe [Stadt Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Alsheimer, Constantin; Kassebohm, Kristian; Reutler, Susanne [Mainova AG, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Starting in the year 2009, numerous changes in the financial system and accountancy a well as in the corporate law come into effect for enterprises. Thereby, the requirements substantially are intensified to their corporate governance. The actual well-known reproaches of bribery, corruption and injuries of data protection intensify the pressure on executive committees and supervisory boards in order to meet normative and ethical requirements. All the more is valid for power suppliers whose reputation can already carry damage out with the first suspicion. Already in 2008, Mainova AG (Frnkfurt/Main, Federal Republic of Germany) implemented a compliance management.

  6. Untargeted metabolomics as a screening tool for estimating compliance to a dietary pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maj-Britt Schmidt; Rinnan, Åsmund; Manach, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    was used to develop a compliance measure in urine to distinguish between two dietary patterns. A parallel intervention study was carried out in which 181 participants were randomized to follow either a New Nordic Diet (NND) or an Average Danish Diet (ADD) for six months. Dietary intakes were closely......There is a growing interest in studying the nutritional effects of complex diets. For such studies measurement of dietary compliance is a challenge since the currently available compliance markers only cover limited aspects of a diet. In the present study, an untargeted metabolomics approach...... monitored over the whole study period and 24 h urine samples as well as weighed dietary records were collected several times during the study. The urine samples were analysed by UPLC-qTOF-MS and a partial least squares discriminant analysis with feature selection was applied to develop a compliance model...

  7. Engaging the patient as observer to promote hand hygiene compliance in ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittle, Mark J; LaMarche, Suzanne

    2009-10-01

    Monitoring hand hygiene guideline compliance in an ambulatory environment can be challenging. For example, direct observation by independent observers is impractical because the sink and hand sanitizer dispensers are most often located inside the examination room. At Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, an ambulatory care facility located on the campus of The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, patients were engaged as an observer in monitoring hand hygiene compliance. The Johns Hopkins Hospital's ambulatory quality and patient safety (AQPS) task force, after assessing common methods of monitoring hand hygiene compliance including direct observation, self-reporting, and product usage, evaluated using the patient as an observer. Of 50 patients interviewed, 43 (86%) indicated a willingness to monitor and report providers' compliance with hand hygiene guidelines. In collaboration with providers, a patient-as-observer hand hygiene monitoring process was developed and piloted. Qualitative feedback postimplementation did not indicate that the process would inhibit the patient-provider relationship. The cost of the program to implement and maintain averages $0.17 per patient encounter. The overall patient response rate was 21.6% (range, 12%-77%), based on completed observation cards to total appointments completed. Hand hygiene compliance as measured by the patient-as-observer process averaged 88% (range, 74%-100%). Independent observation revealed 100% concurrence between the patient's recorded observation and the independent observer. Engaging the patient to report on hand hygiene compliance was found to be efficient and acceptable to patients and providers, and the results of the observations were representative of actual provider behavior.

  8. 40 CFR 63.704 - Compliance and monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... line valve in the closed position with a car-seal or a lock-and-key type configuration; a visual... functioning properly; or (iv) Use an automatic shutdown system in which any HAP-emitting operations are ceased... automatic system shall be inspected at least once every month to ensure that it is functioning properly. (d...

  9. Regulatory requirements related to maintenance and compliance monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, A.K.H.

    1997-01-01

    The maintenance related regulatory requirements are identified in the regulatory documents and licence conditions. Licensee complies with these requirements by operating the nuclear power plant within the safe operating envelope as given in the operating policies and principles and do maintenance according to approved procedures and/or work plans. Safety systems are regularly tested. AECB project officers review and check to ensure that the licensee operates the nuclear power plant in accordance with the regulatory requirements and licence conditions. (author). 6 tabs

  10. Inducing Corporate Proactive Compliance: liability controls & corporate monitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Oded (Sharon)

    2012-01-01

    textabstract“The steamship 'President Coolidge' arrived in the harbor of Honolulu August 26, 1937, and tied up at pier 8. At about the hour of 10 a.m. of that day, one Norman R. Arthur, a harbor patrol boatman under the United States District Engineer, was passing under the stern of the

  11. 40 CFR 57.305 - Compliance monitoring and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) downstream and 2 diameters upstream from any flow disturbance such as a bend, expansion, constriction, or... ducts or flues used to bypass gases, required under this subpart to be treated by constant controls... volume and SO2 concentration of gas bypassed. (b) Reporting. (1) Each NSO shall require that the smelter...

  12. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

  13. Assisted reproductive technology in China: compliance and non-compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jie; Feng, Huai L

    2014-04-01

    According to the WHO, infertility and sterility will be the third-most serious disease worldwide in the 21st century, after cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In contrast to developed countries, assisted reproductive technology (ART) were not offered in China until the mid-1980s with the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) infant born in Taiwan in 1985, then Hong Kong in 1986, and mainland China in 1988, respectively. Since those inceptions, the practice of ART in China has evoked a variety of social, cultural, political and one-child policy responses that have resulted in restrictions on the number of IVF cycles performed annually. According to recent survey, an estimate 40-50 million women and 45 million men suffered from infertility, which is estimated that more than ten million Chinese infertile couples require ART treatment. However, it has limited access to ART facilities, many of them may not have a child are whirling to all types of fertility therapies. Exposure to radiation, pesticides and other environmental pollutants, work-related stress and unhealthy lifestyles are believed to contribute to the increasing incidence of infertility in China. The aim of this first report is to provide China nationwide ART data and government policy in compliance and 
non-compliance, particularly related to family plan policy in China.

  14. Compliance among soft contact lens wearers.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzman, Tomislav; Barišić Kutija, Marija; Masnec, Sanja; Jandroković, Sonja; Mrazovac, Danijela; Jurišić, Darija; Škegro, Ivan; Kalauz, Miro; Kordić, Rajko

    2014-01-01

    Contact lens compliance is proven to be crucial for preventing lens wear-related complications because of the interdependence of the steps in lens care regime and their influence on lens system microbial contamination. Awareness of the patients' lens handling compliance as well as correct recognition of non-compliant behaviours is the basis for creating more targeted strategies for patient education. The aim of this study was to investigate compliance among soft contact lens (SCL) wearers in ...

  15. Tax compliance under tax regime changes

    OpenAIRE

    Heinemann, Friedrich; Kocher, Martin G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the compliance effects of tax regime changes. According to the economic model of tax evasion, a tax reform should affect compliance through its impact on tax rates and incentives. Our findings demonstrate the importance of at least two further effects not covered by the traditional model: First, reform losers tend to evade more taxes after the reform. Second, a reform from a proportionate to a progressive system decreases compliance compared to a switch in the revers...

  16. Sustained Improvement in Hand Hygiene Compliance Using a Decentralized, Technology-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Emily; Pacholek, Gretchen; Runjo, Demetria; Garcia-Houchins, Sylvia; Ridgway, Jessica P; Weber, Stephen G; Chu, Vera; Marrs, Rachel; Bartlett, Allison H

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background We aimed to use weekly PI calls in conjunction with 24/7 hand hygiene monitoring technology (HHMT) to engage front-line Intensive Care Unit (ICUs) clinicians in improving Hand Hygiene (HH) compliance Methods HHMT is used to monitor aggregate, unit-based HH compliance in real time and displayed on monitors at the nursing stations at our academic medical center. After installation and validation were completed, unit-based teams of nursing and physician leadership joined weekly 15-minute HH PI calls to discuss their previous week’s compliance rate, next steps in their own PI plan, and share successes and failures. Calls were suspended for 6 months and restarted in early 2017. Results Graph representation of weekly HH compliance rates for the ICUs are shown in figure 1. Units AandB underwent physical moves during the break, Unit C had no change, and Unit D moved and consolidated with other ICUs constituting a major change in personnel and patient population. Each ICU participated in 84 calls and recorded approx. 50,000–100,000 HH opportunities during each month resulting in over 8 million opportunities for HH compliance recorded during the call-in periods. Unit A had an average compliance of 39% for the first 4 weeks of calls and 64% during the same 4 week period one year later (P 90% for nursing leadership and engaging local nursing leadership to undertake performance improvement interventions and significantly improved HH compliance that was sustained over 18 months of calls and did not drop back to baseline even after a 6 month break. Disclosures E. Landon, GOJO: Speaker, travel expenses for speaking; 
 J. P. Ridgway, Gilead FOCUS: Grant Investigator, Grant recipient; A. H. Bartlett, CVS Caremark: Consultant, Consulting fee

  17. Compliance Audit and Reporting (CAR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Provides the capability to monitor integrated applications and services to produce reports and generate alerts triggered by events or breach of predetermined event...

  18. Motivation for Compliance with Environmental Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Søren; May, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    A combination of calculated, normative, and social motivations as well as awareness of rules and capacity to comply are thought to foster compliance with regulations. Hypotheses about these factors were tested with data concerning Danish farmers’ compliance with agro-environmental regulations....... Three key findings emerge: that farmers’ awareness of rules plays a critical role; that normative and social motivations are as influential as calculated motivations in enhancing compliance; and that inspectors’ enforcement style affects compliance differently from that posited in much of the literature...

  19. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Environmental Protection Agency's Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) website provides customizable and downloadable information about environmental...

  20. Compliance for reversible client/server interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Barbanera

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the setting of session behaviours, we study an extension of the concept of compliance when a disciplined form of backtracking is present. After adding checkpoints to the syntax of session behaviours, we formalise the operational semantics via a LTS, and define a natural notion of checkpoint compliance. We then obtain a co-inductive characterisation of such compliance relation, and an axiomatic presentation that is proved to be sound and complete. As a byproduct we get a decision procedure for the new compliance, being the axiomatic system algorithmic.

  1. Test ban compliance: is seismology enough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The treaties under debate were signed more than a decade ago: the Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT) by President Nixon in 1974 and the Peaceful Nuclear Explosions Treaty (PNET) by President Ford in 1976. Between them, they prohibit all underground nuclear blasts with an explosive yield greater than 150 kilotons. When negotiated, verification of the testing agreements was entrusted to seismology, but the remote seismic techniques they must rely on today to monitor Soviet nuclear tests, do not provide yield estimates with the accuracy required for effective verifications of compliance. The alternative seized upon was hydrodynamics. The US technique is called CORRTEX, a mercifully terse acronym for Continuous Reflectometry for Radius versus Time Experiments. A cable connected to a suitcase-sized electrical unit and a microcomputer is buried in a deep satellite hole roughly 50 feet away from the emplacement hole holding the nuclear device. The rate at which the CORRTEX cable is crushed and short-circuited by the shock wave generated by the exploding device provides the yield estimate. The paper compares the accuracy and constraints of both methods, and discusses the Soviet reaction to CORRTEX

  2. Characterization of the Micromorphology and Topochemistry of Poplar Wood during Mild Ionic Liquid Pretreatment for Improving Enzymatic Saccharification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids (ILs as designer solvents have been applied in biomass pretreatment to increase cellulose accessibility and therefore improve the enzymatic hydrolysis. We investigated the characterization of the micromorphology and the topochemistry of poplar wood during 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate pretreatment with mild conditions (90 °C for 20 and 40 min by multiple microscopic techniques (FE-SEM, CLSM, and CRM. Chemical composition analysis, XRD, cellulase adsorption isotherm, and enzymatic hydrolysis were also performed to monitor the variation of substrate properties. Our results indicated that the biomass conversion was greatly enhanced (from 20.57% to 73.64% due to the cell wall deconstruction and lignin dissolution (29.83% lignin was removed after incubation for 40 min, rather than the decrystallization or crystallinity transformation of substrates. The mild ILs pretreatment, with less energy input, can not only enhance enzymatic hydrolysis, but also provide a potential approach as the first step in improving the sequential pretreatment effectiveness in integrated methods. This study provides new insights on understanding the ILs pretreatment with low temperature and short duration, which is critical for developing individual and/or combined pretreatment technologies with reduced energy consumption.

  3. Characterization of the Micromorphology and Topochemistry of Poplar Wood during Mild Ionic Liquid Pretreatment for Improving Enzymatic Saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Zhang, Xun; Ling, Zhe; Xu, Feng

    2017-01-11

    Ionic liquids (ILs) as designer solvents have been applied in biomass pretreatment to increase cellulose accessibility and therefore improve the enzymatic hydrolysis. We investigated the characterization of the micromorphology and the topochemistry of poplar wood during 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate pretreatment with mild conditions (90 °C for 20 and 40 min) by multiple microscopic techniques (FE-SEM, CLSM, and CRM). Chemical composition analysis, XRD, cellulase adsorption isotherm, and enzymatic hydrolysis were also performed to monitor the variation of substrate properties. Our results indicated that the biomass conversion was greatly enhanced (from 20.57% to 73.64%) due to the cell wall deconstruction and lignin dissolution (29.83% lignin was removed after incubation for 40 min), rather than the decrystallization or crystallinity transformation of substrates. The mild ILs pretreatment, with less energy input, can not only enhance enzymatic hydrolysis, but also provide a potential approach as the first step in improving the sequential pretreatment effectiveness in integrated methods. This study provides new insights on understanding the ILs pretreatment with low temperature and short duration, which is critical for developing individual and/or combined pretreatment technologies with reduced energy consumption.

  4. Implementation of remote video auditing with feedback and compliance for manual-cleaning protocols of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellino, Donna; Cifu, Kelly; Wallace, Maureen; Johnson, Sherly; DiCapua, John; Dowling, Oonagh; Jacobs, Mitchel; Browning, Susan

    2018-05-01

    A pilot initiative to assess the use of remote video auditing in monitoring compliance with manual-cleaning protocols for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) endoscopes was performed. Compliance with manual-cleaning steps following the initiation of feedback was measured. A video feed of the ERCP reprocessing room was provided to remote auditors who scored items of an ERCP endoscope manual-cleaning checklist. Compliance feedback was provided in the form of reports and reeducation. Outcomes were reported as checklist compliance. The use of remote video auditing to document manual processing is a feasible approach and feedback and reeducation increased manual-cleaning compliance from 53.1% (95% confidence interval, 34.7-71.6) to 98.9% (95.0% confidence interval, 98.1-99.6). Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 40 CFR 160.12 - Statement of compliance or non-compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Statement of compliance or non-compliance. 160.12 Section 160.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... non-compliance. Any person who submits to EPA an application for a research or marketing permit and...

  6. Perspectives on compliance: non-compliance with environmental licenses in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Snellenberg, A.H.L.M.; van de Peppel, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Compliance with environmental law is not self-evident. In many instances enforcement of environmental regulations is a necessary means for achieving compliance. Assuming that an enforcement strategy, in order to be effective, has to fit the type of non-compliance, we integrate six different

  7. Contingent Access to Preferred Items versus a Guided Compliance Procedure to Increase Compliance among Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, David A.; Saulnier, Renee; Beavers, Gracie; Zonneveld, Kimberley

    2008-01-01

    Noncompliance with instructions is among the most common behavior problems exhibited by preschoolers. Although three-step guidance compliance procedures have been shown to be effective to increase compliance among some children, they may require that a child be exposed to a number of trials before compliance begins to increase. In this study, a…

  8. Pretreatment of Latent Prints for Laser Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, E R

    1989-06-01

    The pretreatment procedures for laser detection of latent fingerprints is reviewed. The general features of laser detection and the operational aspects of the examination of physical evidence for laser fingerprint detection are enumerated in the initial sections. The literature review is divided into various pretreatment approaches. Cited studies prior to 1981 are primarily concerned with the demonstration of the viability of laser fingerprint detection, whereas work post-1981 addresses issues of compatibility with the traditional methods of fingerprint development, examination of difficult surfaces, and the routine implementation of laser detection by law enforcement agencies. Related topics of research, review articles, conference reports, case examinations, the research support climate, and future trends are also briefly addressed. Copyright © 1989 Central Police University.

  9. Pretreatment of Dioscorea zingiberensis for Microbial Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxiang Zheng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The influences of five pretreatments on fungal growth and enzyme production during microbial transformation of Dioscorea zingiberensis (DZW were studied. The biomass, α-rhamnase and β-glucosidase activities in the fermentation system were employed in the study to determine how each method affected the efficiency of microbial transformation. The fungal strain grew better on the substrate which contained easily utilized carbon source. While lack of carbon source induced the strain produce more glucosidase. Among five pretreatment methods, complex enzymatic hydrolyzation can remove 84.3% starch and 76.5% fibre from DZW in form of sugar, which resulted in high α-rhamnase activity of 2.89 IU/mL and β-glucosidase activity of 8.17 IU/mL in fermentation broth.

  10. Georgia Compliance Review Self-Study FY 01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    Intended for evaluation of local compliance with special education federal and state legal requirements, this compliance review document includes both the compliance requirements and the criteria by which compliance is determined during the onsite compliance review of Georgia local school systems and state-operated programs. Each legal requirement…

  11. Compliance notices – A new tool in environmental enforcement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This note examines compliance notices, a new administrative remedy that has been created to assist in compliance and enforcement of environmental laws. The note considers the aim and scope of compliance and the process of issuing a compliance notice. In addition, it reflects on objections to compliance notices as well ...

  12. Tax Compliance Inventory: TAX-I Voluntary tax compliance, enforced tax compliance, tax avoidance, and tax evasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchler, Erich; Wahl, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Surveys on tax compliance and non-compliance often rely on ad hoc formulated items which lack standardization and empirical validation. We present an inventory to assess tax compliance and distinguish between different forms of compliance and non-compliance: voluntary versus enforced compliance, tax avoidance, and tax evasion. First, items to measure voluntary and enforced compliance, avoidance, and evasion were drawn up (collected from past research and newly developed), and tested empirically with the aim of producing four validated scales with a clear factorial structure. Second, findings from the first analyses were replicated and extended to validation on the basis of motivational postures. A standardized inventory is provided which can be used in surveys in order to collect data which are comparable across research focusing on self-reports. The inventory can be used in either of two ways: either in its entirety, or by applying the single scales independently, allowing an economical and fast assessment of different facets of tax compliance. PMID:20502612

  13. Pretreatment Capabilities and Benefits of Electrocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    4.1.1.2 Oil-Water Emulsions – Mock Solutions ………………… 20 4.1.1.3 Tannin and Humic Acid Mixture – Mock Solutions …….. 35 4.1.1.4 Silt – Mock...water Influent/ effluent water control Industrial wastewater Pre-treatment for drinking water Oil emulsion breaking Medical waste

  14. Hydrothermal pretreatments of macroalgal biomass for biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Héctor A.; Rodríguez-Jasso, Rosa M.; Aguedo, Mario

    2015-01-01

    ecently, macroalgal biomass is gaining wide attention as an alternative in the production of biofuels (as bioetanol and biogas) and compounds with high added value with specific properties (antioxidants, anticoagulants, anti–inflammatories) for applications in food, medical and energy industries...... in accordance with the integrated biorefineries. Furthermore, biorefinery concept requires processes that allow efficient utilization of all components of the biomass. The pretreatment step in a biorefinery is often based on hydrothermal principles of high temperatures in aqueous solution. Therefore...

  15. Waste Separations and Pretreatment Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, J.M.; Harrington, R.A.; Quadrel, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the minutes from the Waste Separations and Pretreatment Workshop sponsored by the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration in Salt Lake City, Utah, February 3--5, 1993. The Efficient Separations and Processing-Integrated Program and the Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System were joint participants. This document provides the detailed minutes, including responses to questions asked, an attendance list, reproductions of the workshop presentations, and a revised chart showing technology development activities

  16. Compliance with therapy in children with respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöni, M H; Horak, E; Nikolaizik, W H

    1995-01-01

    Compliance with medical treatment was evaluated in 89 children and adolescents with respiratory diseases using two methods of assessment: a double blinded covert recording of the use of an air compressor for nebulization of drugs and the determination of theophylline levels in serum. In the covert monitoring of inhalation the overall compliance with the prescribed medication was 47.6%. In the open randomized theophylline trial, 56%-71% of the patients (according to uncontrolled or controlled intake of the drug) received a dosage of theophylline which was too low to achieve a sufficient serum level in the range of 10-20 mg/l. This, however, was also due to the fact that in 72% of the cases physicians prescribed doses which were substantially below the recommended amount of drug according to age and weight. It is, therefore, concluded that compliance of medication is based on the patients adherence to the medication, to the efficacy of the drug itself and the attitude of the physician.

  17. FDA 2011 process validation guidance: lifecycle compliance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Cliff

    2014-01-01

    This article has been written as a contribution to the industry's efforts in migrating from a document-driven to a data-driven compliance mindset. A combination of target product profile, control engineering, and general sum principle techniques is presented as the basis of a simple but scalable lifecycle compliance model in support of modernized process validation. Unit operations and significant variables occupy pole position within the model, documentation requirements being treated as a derivative or consequence of the modeling process. The quality system is repositioned as a subordinate of system quality, this being defined as the integral of related "system qualities". The article represents a structured interpretation of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's 2011 Guidance for Industry on Process Validation and is based on the author's educational background and his manufacturing/consulting experience in the validation field. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Guidance for Industry on Process Validation (2011) provides a wide-ranging and rigorous outline of compliant drug manufacturing requirements relative to its 20(th) century predecessor (1987). Its declared focus is patient safety, and it identifies three inter-related (and obvious) stages of the compliance lifecycle. Firstly, processes must be designed, both from a technical and quality perspective. Secondly, processes must be qualified, providing evidence that the manufacturing facility is fully "roadworthy" and fit for its intended purpose. Thirdly, processes must be verified, meaning that commercial batches must be monitored to ensure that processes remain in a state of control throughout their lifetime.

  18. 1995 project of the year Hanford Environmental compliance project nomination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.R.

    1996-02-01

    The completion of the Hanford Environmental Compliance (HEC) Project in December 1995 brought to a successful close a long line of major contributions to environmental cleanup. Not since the early days of the Hanford Site during and shortly after World War 11 had such a large group of diverse construction activities, with a common goal, been performed at Hanford. Key to this success was the unique combination of 14 subprojects under the HEC Project which afforded the flexibility to address evolving subproject requirements. This strategy resulted in the accomplishment of the HEC Project stakeholders' objectives on an aggressive schedule, at a $33 million cost savings to the customer. The primary objectives of the HEC Project were to upgrade selected Hanford Site facilities and systems to bring them into compliance with current environmental standards and regulations. The HEC Project contributed significantly towards the Hanford site compliance with Clean Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements. It provided, in part, those construction activities required to comply with those requirements in the areas of liquid and solid waste treatment and disposal, waste characterization, and groundwater monitoring

  19. 1995 project of the year Hanford Environmental compliance project nomination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.R.

    1996-02-01

    The completion of the Hanford Environmental Compliance (HEC) Project in December 1995 brought to a successful close a long line of major contributions to environmental cleanup. Not since the early days of the Hanford Site during and shortly after World War 11 had such a large group of diverse construction activities, with a common goal, been performed at Hanford. Key to this success was the unique combination of 14 subprojects under the HEC Project which afforded the flexibility to address evolving subproject requirements. This strategy resulted in the accomplishment of the HEC Project stakeholders` objectives on an aggressive schedule, at a $33 million cost savings to the customer. The primary objectives of the HEC Project were to upgrade selected Hanford Site facilities and systems to bring them into compliance with current environmental standards and regulations. The HEC Project contributed significantly towards the Hanford site compliance with Clean Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements. It provided, in part, those construction activities required to comply with those requirements in the areas of liquid and solid waste treatment and disposal, waste characterization, and groundwater monitoring.

  20. Cost comparison for REDC pretreatment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, S.M.; Homan, F.J.

    1997-06-01

    This analysis has been prepared to support the planned expenditure to provide the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) with the capability to pretreat their liquid low-level waste (LLLW) before discharging it to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) LLLW system. Pretreatment will remove most of the radioactivity, particularly the transuranic isotopes and Cs-137 from the waste to be discharged. This will render the supernates that accumulate in the storage tanks low-activity Class B low-level wastes rather than high-activity Class B or Class C wastes. The sludges will be Class C rather than remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. When REDC wastes are commingled with other ORNL LLLW, the present-worth treatment and transport costs are higher by a factor of 1.3 for the no-pretreatment cases. This result is consistent with data from similar studies conducted at other sites. Based on the information presented in this analysis, the recommendation is to proceed with REDC treatment projects

  1. Overview of environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    After introductory remarks about the National Lab, the report discusses background radiation, human-produced radiation, radionuclide migration, doses, and health physics risk; the environmental programs at LANL including environmental protection, restoration, waste management, quality assurance, environmental oversight, environmental safety and training; environmental monitoring of external penetrating radiation, surface waters, sediments, soils, foodstuffs, and associated biota; and environmental compliance with existing regulations

  2. 17 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Guidance on Compliance With Registration Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... guidance following each registration criterion is illustrative only of the types of matters an applicant... commission merchants and introducing brokers and the protection of customer funds. (a) A board of trade... the protection of customer funds should include monitoring compliance with the facility's minimum...

  3. Low Thermal Pretreatment as Method for Increasing the Bioavailability of Organic Matters in Domestic Mixed Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seswoya Roslinda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In practice, primary and secondary sludge are fed into anaerobic digestion. However, the microbial cell exists in secondary sludge are an unfavorable substrate for biodegradation. Thermal pretreatment is proved to increase the bioavailability of organic and improve the biodegradation subsequently. During low thermal pretreatment, both intracellular (within the microbial cell and extracellular (within the polymeric network materials were extracted. This process increases the bioavailability meaning that organic compounds are accessible to the microorganisms for their degradation. This research aims to investigate the effect of thermal pretreatment on domestic mixed sludge disintegration. Domestic mixed sludge was thermally treated at 70°C for various holding times. The pre-thermally treated domestic mixed sludge was measured for protein and carbohydrates following the Lowry Method, and Phenol-Sulphuric Acid Method respectively. DR 6000 UV-Vis spectrophotometer, DRB200 Reactor (digester and COD vial (TNT plus 822 were used for COD determination, based on Reactor Digestion Method approved by USEPA. The results showed that the organic matter in domestic mixed sludge is efficiently solubilised during thermal treatment organic matter. The higher soluble yield for each monitored parameter determined in this study indicated that low thermal pretreatment improve bioavailability.

  4. Hand hygiene compliance of healthcare professionals in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zottele, Caroline; Magnago, Tania Solange Bosi de Souza; Dullius, Angela Isabel Dos Santos; Kolankiewicz, Adriane Cristina Bernat; Ongaro, Juliana Dal

    2017-08-28

    To analyze compliance with hand hygiene by healthcare professionals in an emergency department unit. This is a longitudinal quantitative study developed in 2015 with healthcare professionals from a university hospital in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Each professional was monitored three times by direct non-participant observation at WHO's five recommended moments in hand hygiene, taking the concepts of opportunity, indication and action into account. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used. Fifty-nine healthcare professionals participated in the study. The compliance rate was 54.2%. Nurses and physiotherapists showed a compliance rate of 66.6% and resident physicians, 41.3%. When compliance was compared among professional categories, nurses showed greater compliance than resident physicians (OR = 2.83, CI = 95%: 1.09-7.34). Hand hygiene compliance was low. Multidisciplinary approaches could be important strategies for forming partnerships to develop learning and implementation of hand hygiene practices. Analisar a adesão à higienização das mãos dos profissionais de saúde em unidade de Pronto-Socorro. Estudo quantitativo longitudinal desenvolvido com profissionais de saúde de um Hospital Universitário do Rio Grande do Sul, em 2015. Para cada profissional, realizaram-se três acompanhamentos com observação direta não participante nos cinco momentos preconizados para higienização das mãos, levando-se em conta os conceitos de Oportunidade, Indicação e Ação. Utilizou-se da estatística descritiva e analítica. Participaram do estudo 59 profissionais de saúde. A taxa de adesão foi de 54,2%. Os enfermeiros e fisioterapeutas obtiveram a taxa de adesão de 66,6% e os médicos residentes, de 41,3%. Ao ser comparada a adesão entre as categorias profissionais, os enfermeiros tiveram maior aderência do que os médicos residentes (RC=2,83; IC=95%:1,09-7,34). A adesão à higienização das mãos foi baixa. Abordagens multidisciplinares podem ser

  5. Pretreatment of Agave americana stalk for enzymatic saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Pan, Xuejun

    2012-12-01

    Agave americana is one of commonly grown agave species but currently less valuable because its large flower stalk cannot be used for producing alcoholic beverage. In the present study, the stalk was pretreated with dilute acid (DA), sulfite (SPORL), and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to preliminarily assess its potential as feedstock for bioethanol production. The changes of cell wall components during the pretreatments, enzymatic digestibility of the pretreated stalks, and the adsorption of cellulases on the substrates were investigated. Results indicated that the pretreatments significantly improved the enzymatic digestibility of the agave stalk. SPORL pretreatment gave higher substrate and sugar yields, while NaOH pretreated stalk had better digestibility under the investigated conditions. The better hydrolysability of NaOH-pretreated stalk was attributed to low lignin and hemicellulose content and high affinity to cellulases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Compliance with Private Food Safety Standards among ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... and the livelihood impact of compliance. In addition, the project aims to build the capacity of farmers and other locally based actors to enhance compliance and thereby contribute to increased welfare in the project area. Expected outputs include one PhD thesis, five master's theses, and various journal publications and ...

  7. Tax Compliance over the Firm Life Course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, F.C.; Verbeeten, F.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a new model of tax compliance over the firm life course, focusing on the dynamics in the underlying motivations and capacities for tax compliance. We review and structure the relevant literature on the early life course of firms: the traditional stages of growth models and a

  8. Compliance perceived by Dutch periodontists and hygienists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berndsen, M.; Eijkman, M.A.J.; Hoogstraten, J.

    1993-01-01

    Compliance is defined here as the extent to which a patient's behavior is in accordance with the health advice he has received. On the basis of factors which could affect compliance, a quantitative survey was conducted for a group of 38 periodontists and their senior dental hygienists. The opinions

  9. 47 CFR 2.1077 - Compliance information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... each modular component used in the system that is authorized under a Declaration of Conformity. (c) The... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance information. 2.1077 Section 2.1077... information. (a) If a product must be tested and authorized under a Declaration of Conformity, a compliance...

  10. Clinic Attendance Compliance Pattern of Adult Hypertensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: A number of factors affect the clinic attendance compliance of the average adult Nigerian. The consequent default from treatment could affect the management outcome of such patients. This study was therefore, undertaken to evaluate the clinic attendance compliance pattern of adult hypertensive patients being ...

  11. 7 CFR 924.61 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 924.61 Section 924.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... § 924.61 Compliance. Except as provided in this part, no person shall handle prunes, the shipment of...

  12. 40 CFR 766.5 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 766.5 Section 766.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS General Provisions § 766.5 Compliance. Any person who fails or refuses to...

  13. 40 CFR 725.70 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 725.70 Section 725.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Administrative Procedures § 725.70 Compliance. (a) Failure...

  14. 7 CFR 947.81 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 947.81 Section 947.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Miscellaneous Provisions § 947.81 Compliance. Except as provided in this subpart, no handler shall handle...

  15. 7 CFR 925.61 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 925.61 Section 925.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... SOUTHEASTERN CALIFORNIA Miscellaneous Provisions § 925.61 Compliance. Except as provided in this part, no...

  16. 7 CFR 955.80 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 955.80 Section 955.80 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Miscellaneous Provisions § 955.80 Compliance. No handler shall handle Vidalia onions except in conformity with...

  17. 49 CFR 178.33-1 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33-1 Section 178.33-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Specifications for Inside Containers, and Linings § 178.33-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b...

  18. 7 CFR 953.76 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 953.76 Section 953.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... STATES Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 953.76 Compliance. Except as provided in this...

  19. 15 CFR 904.311 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 904.311 Section 904.311 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC... Sanctions and Denials Permit Sanctions for Noncompliance § 904.311 Compliance. If the permit holder pays the...

  20. 7 CFR 915.61 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 915.61 Section 915.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 915.61 Compliance. Except as provided in this part, no person...

  1. 45 CFR 1305.10 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 1305.10 Section 1305.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, ENROLLMENT AND ATTENDANCE IN HEAD START § 1305.10 Compliance. A grantee's failure to...

  2. Satisfaction as a determinant of compliance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, G.; Hoogstraten, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study the relation between satisfaction and compliance is examined in terms of specificity and predictive value. Satisfaction is assumed to be a determinant of compliance, especially if both concepts are measured at the same level of specificity (i.e., a dental level). A total of 176

  3. 7 CFR 958.81 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 958.81 Section 958.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Compliance. No handler shall handle onions the handling of which has been prohibited or otherwise limited by...

  4. 46 CFR 340.9 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 340.9 Section 340.9 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PRIORITY USE AND ALLOCATION OF... NATIONAL DEFENSE RELATED OPERATIONS § 340.9 Compliance. Pursuant to section 103 of the Defense Production...

  5. 45 CFR 3.3 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 3.3 Section 3.3 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE General § 3.3 Compliance. A person must comply with the regulations in...

  6. 7 CFR 929.66 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 929.66 Section 929.66 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Compliance. Except as provided in this part, no person shall handle cranberries, the handling of which has...

  7. 7 CFR 930.80 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 930.80 Section 930.80 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Miscellaneous Provisions § 930.80 Compliance. Except as provided in this part, no person may handle cherries...

  8. 7 CFR 920.61 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 920.61 Section 920.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Miscellaneous Provisions § 920.61 Compliance. (a) Except as provided in this part, no person shall handle...

  9. 7 CFR 946.71 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 946.71 Section 946.71 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 946.71 Compliance. Except as provided in this...

  10. 7 CFR 985.64 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 985.64 Section 985.64 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements....64 Compliance. No person shall handle oil except in conformity with the provisions of this part. ...

  11. 7 CFR 15d.3 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 15d.3 Section 15d.3 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NONDISCRIMINATION IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE § 15d.3 Compliance. The Director of the Office of Civil Rights shall...

  12. 31 CFR 206.7 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 206.7 Section 206.7 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT..., AND OPERATION OF THE CASH MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENTS FUND § 206.7 Compliance. (a) The Service will...

  13. 10 CFR 434.102 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 434.102 Section 434.102 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Administration and Enforcement-General § 434.102 Compliance. 102.1A covered building must be...

  14. 7 CFR 996.74 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 996.74 Section 996.74 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Compliance. (a) A handler or importer shall be subject to withdrawal of inspection services, for a period of...

  15. 7 CFR 983.80 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 983.80 Section 983.80 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Miscellaneous Provisions § 983.80 Compliance. Except as provided in this part, no...

  16. 7 CFR 905.81 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 905.81 Section 905.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 905.81 Compliance. Except as...

  17. 7 CFR 932.65 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 932.65 Section 932.65 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 932.65 Compliance. Except as provided in this part, no person...

  18. 7 CFR 927.71 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 927.71 Section 927.71 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 927.71 Compliance. Except as provided in § 927.65...

  19. 9 CFR 113.1 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 113.1 Section 113.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES... Compliance. The regulations in this part apply to each serial or subserial of a licensed biological product...

  20. 25 CFR 175.3 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance. 175.3 Section 175.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES General Provisions § 175.3 Compliance. All utility customers and the utilities are bound by the rule in this part. ...

  1. 7 CFR 906.52 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 906.52 Section 906.52 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 906.52 Compliance...

  2. 7 CFR 917.64 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 917.64 Section 917.64 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 917.64 Compliance. Each shipper shall comply...

  3. 14 CFR 213.6 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 213.6 Section 213.6 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TERMS, CONDITIONS AND LIMITATIONS OF FOREIGN AIR CARRIER PERMITS § 213.6 Compliance. Any violation...

  4. 45 CFR 50.8 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 50.8 Section 50.8 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION U.S. EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM-REQUEST FOR WAIVER OF THE TWO-YEAR FOREIGN RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT § 50.8 Compliance. If an alien physician acquires H...

  5. 7 CFR 987.76 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 987.76 Section 987.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 987.76 Compliance. No...

  6. Patient compliance and effect of orthopaedic shoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, A B; Ellitsgaard, N; Krogsgaard, M R

    1999-01-01

    Orthopaedic shoes are individually handmade after a prescription from an orthopaedic surgeon, hence relatively expensive. Bad compliance is mentioned in the literature but not investigated. In order to evaluate patient compliance and the effect of orthopaedic shoes, 85 patients who were prescribed...

  7. 7 CFR 922.61 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 922.61 Section 922.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 922.61 Compliance. Except as...

  8. 7 CFR 956.89 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 956.89 Section 956.89 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... VALLEY OF SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON AND NORTHEAST OREGON Miscellaneous Provisions § 956.89 Compliance. No...

  9. 12 CFR 1770.5 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 1770.5 Section 1770.5 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION § 1770.5 Compliance. (a) An employment agreement or contract...

  10. 7 CFR 923.61 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 923.61 Section 923.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 923.61 Compliance. Except as...

  11. 32 CFR 263.3 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance. 263.3 Section 263.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS TRAFFIC AND VEHICLE CONTROL ON CERTAIN DEFENSE MAPPING AGENCY SITES § 263.3 Compliance. (a) All persons entering the...

  12. 5 CFR 724.105 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 724.105 Section 724.105 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED... 2002 Reimbursement of Judgement Fund § 724.105 Compliance. An agency's failure to reimburse the...

  13. 7 CFR 984.65 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 984.65 Section 984.65 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Reserve Walnuts § 984.65 Compliance. Except as provided in this subpart, no person shall...

  14. 7 CFR 966.81 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 966.81 Section 966.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 966.81 Compliance. Except as provided in this subpart, no...

  15. 7 CFR 916.61 - Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance. 916.61 Section 916.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 916.61 Compliance. Except as provided in this part, no person...

  16. 12 CFR 1102.38 - Compliance activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance activities. 1102.38 Section 1102.38 Banks and Banking FEDERAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS EXAMINATION COUNCIL APPRAISER REGULATION Rules of Practice for Proceedings § 1102.38 Compliance activities. (a) Where, from complaints received from members...

  17. 5 CFR 900.406 - Compliance information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... enable the primary recipient to carry out its obligations under this subpart. (c) Access to sources of..., accounts, and other sources of information, and its facilities as may be pertinent to ascertain compliance... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance information. 900.406 Section...

  18. 40 CFR 61.23 - Determining compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) computer code COMPLY-R. An underground uranium mine owner or operator... 61.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... From Underground Uranium Mines § 61.23 Determining compliance. (a) Compliance with the emission...

  19. 22 CFR 141.5 - Compliance information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance information. 141.5 Section 141.5... DEPARTMENT OF STATE-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 § 141.5 Compliance information... such information, as a responsible Departmental official or his designee may determine to be necessary...

  20. 45 CFR 80.6 - Compliance information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance information. 80.6 Section 80.6 Public... THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 § 80.6 Compliance information. (a) Cooperation and assistance. The... reports at such times, and in such form and containing such information, as the responsible Department...

  1. Determinants of Compliance among Pediatric Amblyopia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Hans; Juhasz, Anne McCreary

    Given the recent focus on patient responsibility for health status and improvement, it is important to understand the dynamics involved in patient compliance to treatment regimens. The determinants of patching compliance among 30 pediatric amblyopia patients and their parents were investigated by means of parent, patient, and physician…

  2. 30 CFR 90.207 - Compliance sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance sampling. 90.207 Section 90.207... MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-COAL MINERS WHO HAVE EVIDENCE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS Sampling Procedures § 90.207 Compliance sampling. (a) The operator shall take five valid respirable dust samples for...

  3. 42 CFR 3.308 - Compliance reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance reviews. 3.308 Section 3.308 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Enforcement Program § 3.308 Compliance reviews. The Secretary may...

  4. Changes in Fracture Compliance Due to Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, M.; Dahi Taleghani, A.; Sayers, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Rock fractures are a source of extra compliance, and the effect of fractures on seismic wave propagation can be quantified in terms of the normal and shear fracture compliances. However, fractures are usually assumed to be smooth discontinuities with no preferential orientation for slippage. This assumption rarely matches with outcrop studies. Irregularities always exist on the fracture faces in the form of hackles, slickensides, or gouges. These features may facilitate movement in one direction while oppose shear deformation in the other direction due to the saw-tooth structure of irregularities. This direction dependence of the shear compliance of the fracture planes may affect the measured ratio of normal to shear fracture compliance for different locations along the fracture. Furthermore, these effects may contribute to the pressure dependence of fracture compliance, because fracture opening or shear sliding would change the number of asperities in contact and, consequently, affect the ratio of the normal to shear compliance. Here, we use numerical modeling to investigate the change in normal and shear compliance caused by the presence of slickensides. The effect of the hackles' geometry, the friction coefficient between the fracture surfaces, and the offset between the fracture faces will be discussed in this presentation. Our analysis shows that even in the case of low asperity angles or small offsets between the fracture faces, the fracture compliance ratio could be greater than one, in agreement with several field observations available in the literature.

  5. International monitoring of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.; Stein, G.

    1990-01-01

    The monitoring of the civilian nuclear energy sector has been effected successfully by IAEA and EURATOM and has contributed to a reduction of fears within the communities of nations. Certainly, it will not be possible to subject the whole world and whole spectrum of technology to monitoring. However, the nations should be enabled to reduce their greatest fears concerning an abuse and a misuse of technology by verification, and to check the compliance with such international agreements which regulate the application of a number of technologies. There are some (as yet rudimentary) approaches to an international verification in the field of environmental protection and resource policies. Nuclear energy with its sophisticated verification procedure has taken one great step ahead of the other fields. The strengths and weaknesses of its verification regime should be learned from when filling the virgin fields of international technology monitoring and its instrument, i.e. international verification. (orig./HSCH) [de

  6. A Review of Factors for Tax Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta BARBUTA-MISU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify the variables of tax compliance analysed by researchers from various countries and adapting them to the Romanian conditions to create a model to include factors that influence decision of tax compliance. Tax compliance has been studied in economics by analysing the individual decision of a representative person between paying taxes and evading taxes. In the research of tax compliance have been done many empirical studies that emphasized the impact of a wide variety of potential determinants of voluntary compliance with individual income/profit tax filing and reporting obligations. The most important determinants identified are: economic factors as the level of income, audit probabilities, tax audit, tax rate, tax benefits, penalties, fines and other non-economic factors as attitudes toward taxes, personal, social and national norms, perceived fairness etc.

  7. 28 CFR 512.17 - Monitoring approved research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring approved research projects... MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH Research § 512.17 Monitoring approved research projects. The BRRB shall monitor all research projects for compliance with Bureau policies. At a minimum, yearly reviews...

  8. Slope Monitoring using Total Station: What are the Challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afeni

    implications of incorrect use or negligence during slope monitoring surveys utilising a total station. 1. Introduction ... monitoring frequency depends on the nature of the rock type, operations around the slope and the objectives of ... to do with correct design, legal compliance, monitoring requirements and systems design that.

  9. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Effluent Charts Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Summary of compliance status each outfall and parameter for one Clean Water Act discharge permit. Provides the current compliance status and overall compliance...

  10. International Criminal Justice and the Politics of Compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamont, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    International Criminal Justice and the Politics of Compliance provides a comprehensive study of compliance with legal obligations derived from the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia's (ICTY) Statute and integrates theoretical debates on compliance into international justice

  11. Pretreatment of Reed by Wet Oxidation and Subsequent Utilization of the Pretreated Fibers for Ethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szijarto, Nora; Kádár, Zsófia; Varga, Eniko

    2009-01-01

    lignocelluloses usually do. In the present study, wet oxidation was investigated as the pretreatment method to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of reed cellulose to soluble sugars and thus improve the convertibility of reed to ethanol. The most effective treatment increased the digestibility of reed cellulose...... by cellulases more than three times compared to the untreated control. During this wet oxidation, 51.7% of the hemicellulose and 58.3% of the lignin were solubilized, whereas 87.1% of the cellulose remained in the solids. After enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated fibers from the same treatment, the conversion...... of cellulose to glucose was 82.4%. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated solids resulted in a final ethanol concentration as high as 8.7 g/L, yielding 73% of the theoretical....

  12. Towards a Compliance Reporting using a Balanced Scorecard

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Amberg; Dipl. Kfm. Johannes C. Panitz

    2009-01-01

    Compliance requires an effective communication within an enterprise as well as towards a company-s external environment. This requirement commences with the implementation of compliance within large scale compliance projects and still persists in the compliance reporting within standard operations. On the one hand the understanding of compliance necessities within the organization is promoted. On the other hand reduction of asymmetric information with compliance stakeh...

  13. A systematic review on hand hygiene knowledge and compliance in student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, L J; McEnroe-Petitte, D M; van de Mortel, T; Nasirudeen, A M A

    2017-10-27

    Hand hygiene competence is one of the critical outcomes in nursing education. Ensuring nursing students recognize the what, when and how of hand hygiene is critical in the light of the increasing rates of healthcare-associated infections. To systematically appraise and synthesize articles on hand hygiene knowledge and compliance among nursing students. This is a systematic review of scientific articles published from 2006 to 2016. The primary databases used were as follows: PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature, Proquest and PsychINFO. Key search terms utilized were as follows: 'handwashing', 'hand hygiene', 'compliance', 'knowledge', 'practice' and 'nursing students'. Nineteen studies met the review criteria. The findings revealed a low-to-moderate knowledge of and compliance with hand hygiene among nursing students. In addition, there were significantly higher rates of hand hygiene compliance in nursing students when compared to medical students. Relatively few studies attempted to identify predictors of hand hygiene knowledge and compliance. This review demonstrated suboptimal knowledge and compliance to hand hygiene among student nurses. In addition, this review also highlighted the paucity of studies that examined individual and organizational factors, which influence nursing students hand hygiene knowledge and compliance. The findings of this review emphasized the role of nurse educators in enhancing hand hygiene competence in nursing students. Implementation of empirically tested strategies such as utilizing multidimensional interventions, scenario-based hand hygiene simulation activities and hand hygiene education programmes that would enhance nursing students' hand hygiene knowledge and compliance is an asset. Hospital and nursing administrators should ensure continuous support and monitoring to guarantee that hand hygiene programmes are institutionalized in every healthcare setting by every healthcare worker. © 2017

  14. Impacts of operating parameters on oxidation-reduction potential and pretreatment efficacy in the pretreatment of printing and dyeing wastewater by Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huifang; Wang, Shihe

    2012-12-01

    An experiment was conducted in a batch reactor for a real printing and dyeing wastewater pretreatment using Fenton process in this study. The results showed that original pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and ferrous sulfate concentration affected ORP value and pretreatment efficacy greatly. Under experimental conditions, the optimal original pH was 6.61, and the optimal hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulfate concentrations were 1.50 and 0.75 gL(-1), respectively. The relationship among ORP, original pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration, ferrous sulfate concentration, and color (COD or BOD(5)/COD) was established, which would be instructive in on-line monitoring and control of Fenton process using ORP. In addition, the effects of wastewater temperature and oxidation time on pretreatment efficacy were also investigated. With an increase of temperature, color and COD removal efficiencies and BOD(5)/COD ratio increased, and they were in proportion to the exponent of temperature reciprocal. Similarly, color and COD removal efficiencies increased with increasing oxidation time, and both color and COD removal obeyed the first-order kinetics. The BOD(5)/COD ratio could be expressed by a second-degree polynomial with respect to oxidation time, and the best biodegradability of wastewater was present at the oxidation time of 6.10h. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Physiochemical Characterization of Lignocellulosic Biomass Dissolution by Flowthrough Pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Lishi; Pu, Yunqiao; Bowden, Mark; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-04

    Comprehensive understanding of biomass solubilization chemistry in aqueous pretreatment such as water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment is of fundamental importance to achieve the goal of valorizing biomass to fermentable sugars and lignin for biofuels production. In this study, poplar wood was flowthrough pretreated by water-only or 0.05% (w/w) sulfuric acid at different temperatures (220-270 °C), flow rate (25 mL/min), and reaction times (8-90 min), resulting in significant disruption of the lignocellulosic biomass. Ion chromatography (IC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and solid state cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were applied to characterize the pretreated biomass whole slurries in order to reveal depolymerization as well as solubilization mechanism and identify unique dissolution structural features during these pretreatments. Results showed temperature-dependent cellulose decrystallization in flowthrough pretreatment. Crystalline cellulose was completely disrupted, and mostly converted to amorphous cellulose and oligomers by water-only operation at 270 °C for 10 min and by 0.05 wt % H2SO4 flowthrough pretreatment at 220 °C for 12 min. Flowthrough pretreatment with 0.05% (w/w) H2SO4 led to a greater disruption of structures in pretreated poplar at a lower temperature compared to water-only pretreatment.

  16. Pretreatment on corn stover with low concentration of formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2009-08-01

    Bioethanol derived from lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to replace gasoline. Cellulose is naturally recalcitrant to enzymatic attack, and it also surrounded by the matrix of xylan and lignin, which enhances the recalcitrance. Therefore, lignocellulosic materials must be pretreated to make the cellulose easily degraded into sugars and further fermented to ethanol. In this work, hydrothermal pretreatment on corn stover at 195 degrees for 15 min with and without lower concentration of formic acid was compared in terms of sugar recoveries and ethanol fermentation. For pretreatment with formic acid, the overall glucan recovery was 89% and pretreatment without formic acid yielded the recovery of 94%. Compared with glucan, xylan was more sensitive to the pretreatment condition. The lowest xylan recovery of 55% was obtained after pretreatment with formic acid and the highest of 75% found following pretreatment without formic acid. Toxicity tests of liquor parts showed that there were no inhibitions found for both pretreatment conditions. After simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the pretreated corn stover with Baker's yeast, the highest ethanol yield of 76.5% of the theoretical was observed from corn stover pretreated at 195 degrees for 15 min with formic acid.

  17. Predictive factors for compliance with transanal irrigation for the treatment of defecation disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildstein, Clémence; Melchior, Chloé; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Boueyre, Estelle; Bridoux, Valérie; Vérin, Eric; Leroi, Anne-Marie

    2017-03-21

    To investigate compliance with transanal irrigation (TAI) one year after a training session and to identify predictive factors for compliance. The compliance of one hundred eight patients [87 women and 21 men; median age 55 years (range 18-83)] suffering from constipation or fecal incontinence (FI) was retrospectively assessed. The patients were trained in TAI over a four-year period at a single institution. They were classified as adopters if they continued using TAI for at least one year after beginning the treatment or as non-adopters if they stopped. Predictive factors of compliance with TAI were based on pretreatment assessments and training progress. The outcomes of the entire cohort of patients who had been recruited for the TAI treatment were expressed in terms of intention-to-treat. Forty-six of the 108 (43%) trained patients continued to use TAI one year after their training session. The patients with FI had the best results, with 54.5% remaining compliant with TAI. Only one-third of the patients who complained of slow transit constipation or obstructed defecation syndrome continued TAI. There was an overall discontinuation rate of 57%. The most common reason for discontinuing TAI was the lack of efficacy (41%). However, 36% of the patients who discontinued TAI gave reasons independent of the efficacy of the treatment such as technical problems (catheter expulsion, rectal balloon bursting, instilled water leakage or retention, pain during irrigation, anal bleeding, anal fissure) while 23% said that there were too many constraints. Of the patients who reported discontinuing TAI, the only predictive factor was the progress of the training (OR = 4.9, 1.3-18.9, P = 0.02). The progress of the training session was the only factor that predicted patient compliance with TAI.

  18. Rheological evaluation of pretreated cladding removal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, D.; Chan, M.K.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    Cladding removal waste (CRW) contains concentrations of transuranic (TRU) elements in the 80 to 350 nCi/g range. This waste will require pretreatment before it can be disposed of as glass or grout at Hanford. The CRW will be pretreated with a rare earth strike and solids removal by centrifugation to segregate the TRU fraction from the non-TRU fraction of the waste. The centrifuge centrate will be neutralized with sodium hydroxide. This neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) is expected to be suitable for grouting. The TRU solids removed by centrifugation will be vitrified. The goal of the Rheological Evaluation of Pretreated Cladding Removal Waste Program was to evaluate those rheological and transport properties critical to assuring successful handling of the NCRW and TRU solids streams and to demonstrate transfers in a semi-prototypic pumping environment. This goal was achieved by a combination of laboratory and pilot-scale evaluations. The results obtained during these evaluations were correlated with classical rheological models and scaled-up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The Program used simulated NCRW and TRU solid slurries. Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) provided 150 gallons of simulated CRW and 5 gallons of simulated TRU solid slurry. The simulated CRW was neutralized by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The physical and rheological properties of the NCRW and TRU solid slurries were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCRW allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic or yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The TRU solids slurry contained very few solids. This slurry exhibited the properties associated with a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid

  19. Energy consumption modeling during dairy sewage pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Wojciech; Żyłka, Radosław; Malinowski, Paweł; Boruszko, Dariusz

    2017-11-01

    The research was conducted in a dairy WWTP located in north-eastern Poland with the average flow of 546 m3d-1 and PE 11500 in 2016. Energy consumption was measured with the help of Lumel 3-phase network parameter transducers installed within the plant. The modeling was conducted based on the quantity and quality of raw sewage, after its screening, averaging and dissolved air flotation. The following parameters were determined: BOD5, COD. N-total and P-total. During the research period. 15 measurement series were carried out. Pollution loads removed in primary treatment varied from 167.0 to 803.5 kgO2d-1 and 1205.9 to 10032 kgO2d-1 for BOD5 and COD respectively. The energy consumption share during dairy pretreatment in relation to the total energy consumption was in the range from 13.8 to 28.5% with the mean value of 18.7% during the research period. Energy consumption indicators relating to removed pollution loads for primary treatment were established with the mean values of 0.74 and 0.83 kWhkg-1d-1 for BOD5 and COD respectively. An attempt was made to determine the influence of raw sewage characteristics and pretreatment efficiency on energy consumption of the object. A model of energy consumption during pretreatment was estimated according to the experimental data obtained in the research period. It was modeled using the linear regression model and principal component analysis.

  20. Energy consumption modeling during dairy sewage pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dąbrowski Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted in a dairy WWTP located in north-eastern Poland with the average flow of 546 m3d-1 and PE 11500 in 2016. Energy consumption was measured with the help of Lumel 3-phase network parameter transducers installed within the plant. The modeling was conducted based on the quantity and quality of raw sewage, after its screening, averaging and dissolved air flotation. The following parameters were determined: BOD5, COD. N-total and P-total. During the research period. 15 measurement series were carried out. Pollution loads removed in primary treatment varied from 167.0 to 803.5 kgO2d-1 and 1205.9 to 10032 kgO2d-1 for BOD5 and COD respectively. The energy consumption share during dairy pretreatment in relation to the total energy consumption was in the range from 13.8 to 28.5% with the mean value of 18.7% during the research period. Energy consumption indicators relating to removed pollution loads for primary treatment were established with the mean values of 0.74 and 0.83 kWhkg-1d-1 for BOD5 and COD respectively. An attempt was made to determine the influence of raw sewage characteristics and pretreatment efficiency on energy consumption of the object. A model of energy consumption during pretreatment was estimated according to the experimental data obtained in the research period. It was modeled using the linear regression model and principal component analysis.

  1. Surface pretreatments for medical application of adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Michael

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Medical implants and prostheses (artificial hips, tendono- and ligament plasties usually are multi-component systems that may be machined from one of three material classes: metals, plastics and ceramics. Typically, the body-sided bonding element is bone. The purpose of this contribution is to describe developments carried out to optimize the techniques , connecting prosthesis to bone, to be joined by an adhesive bone cement at their interface. Although bonding of organic polymers to inorganic or organic surfaces and to bone has a long history, there remains a serious obstacle in realizing long-term high-bonding strengths in the in vivo body environment of ever present high humidity. Therefore, different pretreatments, individually adapted to the actual combination of materials, are needed to assure long term adhesive strength and stability against hydrolysis. This pretreatment for metal alloys may be silica layering; for PE-plastics, a specific plasma activation; and for bone, amphiphilic layering systems such that the hydrophilic properties of bone become better adapted to the hydrophobic properties of the bone cement. Amphiphilic layering systems are related to those developed in dentistry for dentine bonding. Specific pretreatment can significantly increase bond strengths, particularly after long term immersion in water under conditions similar to those in the human body. The bond strength between bone and plastic for example can be increased by a factor approaching 50 (pealing work increasing from 30 N/m to 1500 N/m. This review article summarizes the multi-disciplined subject of adhesion and adhesives, considering the technology involved in the formation and mechanical performance of adhesives joints inside the human body.

  2. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alkaline Pretreated Coconut Coir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbarningrum Fatmawati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to study the effect of concentration and temperature on the cellulose and lignin content, and the reducing sugars produced in the enzymatic hydrolysis of coconut coir. In this research, the coconut coir is pretreated using 3%, 7%, and 11% NaOH solution at 60oC, 80oC, and 100oC. The pretreated coir were assayed by measuring the amount of cellulose and lignin and then hydrolysed using Celluclast and Novozyme 188 under various temperature (30oC, 40oC, 50oC and pH (3, 4, 5. The hydrolysis results were assayed for the reducing sugar content. The results showed that the alkaline delignification was effective to reduce lignin and to increase the cellulose content of the coir. The best delignification condition was observed at 11% NaOH solution and 100oC which removed 14,53% of lignin and increased the cellulose content up to 50,23%. The best condition of the enzymatic hydrolysis was obtained at 50oC and pH 4 which produced 7,57 gr/L reducing sugar. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 2nd October 2012; Revised: 31st January 2013; Accepted: 6th February 2013[How to Cite: Fatmawati, A., Agustriyanto, R., Liasari, Y. (2013. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alkaline Pre-treated Coconut Coir. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 8 (1: 34-39 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4048.34-39[Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4048.34-39] | View in  |

  3. GENDER AND ETHNICITY DIFFERENCES IN TAX COMPLIANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyapalan Kasipillai

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate whether gender and ethnicity differences occur in relation to tax compliance attitude and behavior. Prior studies on tax compliance have focused little on gender as a predictor of compliance. In Malaysia, ethnic background of a taxpayer could be a major determinant of tax compliance. A personal interview approach is used to obtain information from taxpayers in urban towns. A t-test suggests that males and females were found to have similar compliant attitude. As for ethnicity, asimilar result was observed. Results of a regression analysis indicate that gender, academic qualification, and the person preparing tax return were statistically significant as determinants of non-compliant attitude. In terms of compliant behavior, a regression analysis revealed that "attitude towards non-compliance" and "receipt of cash income" were two significant explanatory variables of tax non-compliance behavior of understating income knowingly. The findings of this study are useful for policyimplications in identifying groups that require additional attention to increase voluntary tax compliance.

  4. Patient compliance following isolated mandibular fracture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radabaugh, J Paul; Horn, Adam Van; Chan, Stephen A; Shelton, Jared M; Gal, Thomas J

    2017-10-01

    Compliance with postoperative care in the maxillofacial trauma population often is considered poor. This lack of follow-up does not seem to be a function of decreased access to care but rather its anticipated lack of utilization. The goal of this study is to identify what factors are associated with increased compliance in postoperative management of mandible fractures. Retrospective cohort study. Using Current Procedural Terminology codes to identify maxillofacial injuries requiring operative repair, a subset of isolated mandibular fractures was identified. Age, gender, race, insurance type, travel distance, mandible fracture location, surgical approach, and complications were used as variables in univariate regression modeling to examine factors associated with compliance to postoperative care. Between 2010 and 2013, 344 isolated mandible fractures were identified. A total of 83.1% of patients made their first postoperative follow-up visit. Demographic data, fracture location, distance to medical center (odds ratio [OR] = 1, P = 0.75), type of repair, use of drains (OR = 1.27, P = 0.61), or nonabsorbable suture (OR = 1.44, P = 0.32) did not appear to be associated with compliance. No association between complications and postoperative compliance was observed (OR = 2.37, P = 0.17). Trends toward improved compliance were observed when evaluating insurance type and use of temporary fixation hardware. The presence of current tobacco use was found to be negatively associated with patient compliance (OR = 0.33, P compliance after surgical repair is better than what is currently represented in the literature. It appears that postoperative compliance is dependent on patient-related factors more so than what can be modified by the surgeon. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2230-2235, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. [Compliance of treatment in glaucoma patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banc, Ana; Stan, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment compliance level of glaucoma patients and the correlation between the compliance level and a series of patient's demographic characteristics. We conducted an observational study in which we studied 100 glaucoma patients who answered the questions we included into a questionnaire. We defined and calculated a broad compliance score and a narrow score, and we investigated the connection between the first score and age, gender, demographic location (urban versus rural), education level, current occupation and duration of disease respectively. The mean of the broad compliance score was 9.64 +/- 1.72, which represents 80% of the maximum value of the score, and the mean of the narrow compliance score was 4.73 +/- 1.12, (78% of the maximum value). The correlation coefficient between score and age was z = -0.09 (p value = 0.19), the Z value for the evaluation of the connection between score and gender was -1.16 (p value = 0.24), and for the connection between compliance score and demographic location Z value = -2.42 (p value = 0.01). Chi-square value for the evaluation of the relation between the score and education level was 14.66 (p value = 0.001), and for the current occupation Chi-square value = 3.47 (p value = 0.06). The correlation coefficient between score and disease duration was tau = 0.09 (p value = 0.23). According to the answers the patients gave, we identified the parameters that require more attention in the ophthalmologist - glaucoma patient communication: genetic transmission of glaucoma, treatment's side effects, number of visits to the ophthalmologist, awareness of the life-long gradului period of treatment. In this study, the compliance level of glaucoma patients is relatively high and we observe a correlation between the compliance level and demographic location, and between the compliance level and patient's education level respectively.,

  6. Online treatment compliance checking for clinical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengxing; Bao, Yurong; Dong, Wei; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2014-10-01

    Compliance checking for clinical pathways (CPs) is getting increasing attention in health-care organizations due to stricter requirements for cost control and treatment excellence. Many compliance measures have been proposed for treatment behavior inspection in CPs. However, most of them look at aggregated data seen from an external perspective, e.g. length of stay, cost, infection rate, etc., which may provide only a posterior impression of the overall conformance with the established CPs such that in-depth and in near real time checking on the compliance of the essential/critical treatment behaviors of CPs is limited. To provide clinicians real time insights into violations of the established CP specification and support online compliance checking, this article presents a semantic rule-based CP compliance checking system. In detail, we construct a CP ontology (CPO) model to provide a formal grounding of CP compliance checking. Using the proposed CPO, domain treatment constraints are modeled into Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL) rules to specify the underlying treatment behaviors and their quantified temporal structure in a CP. The established SWRL rules are integrated with the CP workflow such that a series of applicable compliance checking and evaluation can be reminded and recommended during the pathway execution. The proposed approach can, therefore, provides a comprehensive compliance checking service as a paralleling activity to the patient treatment journey of a CP rather than an afterthought. The proposed approach is illustrated with a case study on the unstable angina clinical pathway implemented in the Cardiology Department of a Chinese hospital. The results demonstrate that the approach, as a feasible solution to provide near real time conformance checking of CPs, not only enables clinicians to uncover non-compliant treatment behaviors, but also empowers clinicians with the capability to make informed decisions when dealing with treatment compliance

  7. Motivation and compliance with intraoral elastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeroo, Helen J; Cunningham, Susan J; Newton, Jonathon Timothy; Travess, Helen C

    2014-07-01

    Intraoral elastics are commonly used in orthodontics and require regular changing to be effective. Unfortunately, poor compliance with elastics is often encountered, especially in adolescents. Intention for an action and its implementation can be improved using "if-then" plans that spell out when, where, and how a set goal, such as elastic wear, can be put into action. Our aim was to determine the effect of if-then plans on compliance with elastics. To identify common barriers to compliance with recommendations concerning elastic wear, semistructured interviews were carried out with 14 adolescent orthodontic patients wearing intraoral elastics full time. Emerging themes were used to develop if-then plans to improve compliance with elastic wear. A prospective pilot study assessed the effectiveness of if-then planning aimed at overcoming the identified barriers on compliance with elastic wear. Twelve participants were randomized equally into study and control groups; the study group received information about if-then planning. The participants were asked to collect used elastics, and counts of these were used to assess compliance. A wide range of motivational and volitional factors were described by the interviewed participants, including the perceived benefits of elastics, cues to remember, pain, eating, social situations, sports, loss of elastics, and breakages. Compliance with elastic wear was highly variable among patients. The study group returned more used elastics, suggesting increased compliance, but the difference was not significant. The use of if-then plans might improve compliance with elastic wear when compared with routine clinical instructions. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Butyric acid fermentation of sodium hydroxide pretreated rice straw with undefined mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Binling; Li, Jianzheng; Chi, Xue; Meng, Jia; Liu, Chong; Shi, En

    2014-05-01

    This study describes an alternative mixed culture fermentation technology to anaerobically convert lignocellulosic biomass into butyric acid, a valuable product with wide application, without supplementary cellulolytic enzymes. Rice straw was soaked in 1% NaOH solution to increase digestibility. Among the tested pretreatment conditions, soaking rice straw at 50°C for 72 h removed ~66% of the lignin, but retained ~84% of the cellulose and ~71% of the hemicellulose. By using an undefined cellulose-degrading butyrate-producing microbial community as butyric acid producer in batch fermentation, about 6 g/l of butyric acid was produced from the pretreated rice straw, which accounted for ~76% of the total volatile fatty acids. In the repeated-batch operation, the butyric acid production declined batch by batch, which was most possibly caused by the shift of microbial community structure monitored by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. In this study, batch operation was observed to be more suitable for butyric acid production.

  9. Acetic acid pretreatment improves the hardness of cooked potato slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenlin; Shehzad, Hussain; Yan, Shoulei; Li, Jie; Wang, Qingzhang

    2017-08-01

    The effects of acetic acid pretreatment on the texture of cooked potato slices were investigated in this work. Potato slices were pretreated with acetic acid immersion (AAI), distilled water immersion (DWI), or no immersion (NI). Subsequently, the cell wall material of the pretreated samples was isolated and fractioned to evaluate changes in the monosaccharide content and molar mass (MM), and the hardness and microscopic structure of the potato slices in different pretreatments before and after cooking were determined. The results showed that the highest firmness was obtained with more intact structure of the cell wall for cooked potato slices with AAI pretreatment. Furthermore, the MM and sugar ratio demonstrated that the AAI pretreated potato slices contained a higher content of the small molecular polysaccharides of cell walls, especially in the hemicellulose fraction. This work may provide a reference for potato processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of pretreatment on colour and texture of watermelon rind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athmaselvi, K.; Alagusundaram, K.; Kavitha, C.; Arumuganathan, T.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of osmotic dehydration pretreatment on water loss, solid gain, colour and textural change was investigated. Watermelon rind 1 x 1 cm size was immersed in sucrose solution of 40, 50 and 60° Brix after pretreatment with microwave and conventional boiling in water for 1, 3, and 5 min, respectively. Water loss and solid gain increased with the time of cooking and sugar concentration. Microwave pretreated samples showed higher water loss and solid gain. Increase in the time of cooking decreased the brightness of all the samples. Microwave pretreated samples showed higher `b' values than conventionally pretreated ones. There was no significant difference (P≤0.05) in texture profile analysis parameters except for hardness. Hardness decreased with increase in time of cooking and sugar concentration. Second order regression model was developed for water loss and solid gain of microwave and conventional pretreated watermelon rind.

  11. Information security policy development for compliance

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Barry L

    2013-01-01

    Although compliance standards can be helpful guides to writing comprehensive security policies, many of the standards state the same requirements in slightly different ways. Information Security Policy Development for Compliance: ISO/IEC 27001, NIST SP 800-53, HIPAA Standard, PCI DSS V2.0, and AUP V5.0 provides a simplified way to write policies that meet the major regulatory requirements, without having to manually look up each and every control. Explaining how to write policy statements that address multiple compliance standards and regulatory requirements, the book will he

  12. Architecture-based regulatory compliance argumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihaylov, Boyan; Onea, Lucian; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2016-01-01

    . An increasing number of applications (for example in healthcare) are expected to have to live up to regulatory requirements in the future, which will lead to more software development projects having to deal with such requirements. We present an approach that models regulations such that compliance arguments......Standards and regulations are difficult to understand and map to software, which makes compliance with them challenging to argue for software products and development process. This is problematic since lack of compliance may lead to issues with security, safety, and even to economic sanctions...

  13. Compliance with Corporate Governance Principles: Australian Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Safari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the association between the level of compliance of Australian listed companies with Australian corporate governance principles, in aggregate, and the level of discretionary accruals using the modified Jones model. It is hypothesised that higher levels of compliance would be associated with lower levels of discretionary accruals. Data from a random sample of 214 Australian listed companies for the years 2009 and 2010 were used to test the hypothesis. The results demonstrate a significant negative relationship indicating that companies with higher levels of compliance engage in lower levels of earnings management via discretionary accruals.

  14. Lignocellulosic biomass-Thermal pretreatment with steam: Pretreatment techniques for biofuels and biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Hoffmann, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    technologies; thermal pre-treatment with steam. The Norwegian company CAMBI developed a process for treatment of sludge from waste water treatment plants, and the idea was based on the experience that cooking sludge under pressure at temperature from 150oC to 180oC improved the digestibility and at the same...

  15. The characteristic changes of betung bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper pretreated by fungal pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widya Fatriasari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The fungal pretreatment effect on chemical structural and morphological changes of Betung Bamboo was evaluated based on its biomass components after being cultivated by white rot fungi, Trametes versicolor. Betung bamboo powder (15 g was exposed to liquid inoculum of white rot fungi and incubated at 270C for 15, 30 and 45 days. The treated samples were then characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction and SEM-EDS analyses. Cultivation for 30 days with 5 and 10% loadings retained greater selectivity compared to that of the other treatments. FTIR spectra demonstrated that the fungus affected the decreasing of functional group quantities without changing the functional groups. The decrease in intensity at wave number of 1246 cm-1 (guaiacyl of lignin was greater than that at wave number of 1328 cm-1 (deformation combination of syringyl and xylan after fungal treatment. X-ray analysis showed the pretreated samples had a higher crystallinity than the untreated ones which might be due to the cleavage of amorphous fractions of cellulose. The pretreated samples have more fragile than the untreated ones confirmed by SEM. Crystalline allomorph calculated by XRD analysis showed that fungus pretreatment for 30 days has transformed triclinic structure of cellulose to monoclinic structure.

  16. All that glisters is not gold: a comparison of electronic monitoring versus filled prescriptions--an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzels, Gwenn E C; Nelemans, Patricia J; Schouten, Jan S A G; van Wijk, Boris L G; Prins, Martin H

    2006-02-10

    Poor compliance with antihypertensive medication is assumed to be an important reason for unsatisfactory control of blood pressure. Poor compliance is difficult to detect. Each method of measuring compliance has its own strengths and weaknesses. The aim of the present study was to compare patient compliance with antihypertensive drugs as measured by two methods, electronic monitoring versus refill compliance. 161 patients with a diagnosis of hypertension for at least a year prior to inclusion, and inadequate blood pressure control (systolic blood pressure > or = 160 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure > or = 95 mmHg) despite the use of antihypertensive drugs, were included. Patients' pharmacy records from 12 months prior to inclusion were obtained. Refill compliance was calculated as the number of days for which the pills were prescribed divided by the total number of days in this period. After inclusion compliance was measured with an electronic monitor that records time and date of each opening of the pillbox. Agreement between both compliance measures was calculated using Spearman's correlation coefficient and Cohen's kappa coefficient. There was very little agreement between the two measures. Whereas refill compliance showed a large range of values, compliance as measured by electronic monitoring was high in almost all patients with estimates between 90% and 100%. Cohen's kappa coefficient was 0.005. While electronic monitoring is often considered to be the gold standard for compliance measurements, our results suggest that a short-term electronic monitoring period with the patient being aware of electronic monitoring is probably insufficient to obtain valid compliance data. We conclude that there is a strong need for more studies that explore the effect of electronic monitoring on patient's compliance.

  17. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION TESTING WITH INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM FEEDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING DL

    2008-01-01

    The fractional crystallization process was developed as a pretreatment method for saltcake waste retrieved from Hanford single-shell tanks (SST). The process separates the retrieved SST waste into a high-level waste stream containing the bulk of the radionuclides and a low-activity waste stream containing the bulk of the nonradioactive sodium salts. The Interim Pretreatment System project shifted the focus on pretreatment planning from SST waste to double-shell tank waste

  18. Cellulose conversion of corn pericarp without pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehwan; Orrego, David; Ximenes, Eduardo A; Ladisch, Michael R

    2017-12-01

    We report enzyme hydrolysis of cellulose in unpretreated pericarp at a cellulase loading of 0.25FPU/g pericarp solids using a phenol tolerant Aspergillus niger pectinase preparation. The overall protein added was 5mg/g and gave 98% cellulose conversion in 72h. However, for double the amount of enzyme from Trichoderma reesei, which is significantly less tolerant to phenols, conversion was only 16%. The key to achieving high conversion without pretreatment is combining phenol inhibition-resistant enzymes (such as from A. niger) with unground pericarp from which release of phenols is minimal. Size reduction of the pericarp, which is typically carried out in a corn-to-ethanol process, where corn is first ground to a fine powder, causes release of highly inhibitory phenols that interfere with cellulase enzyme activity. This work demonstrates hydrolysis without pretreatment of large particulate pericarp is a viable pathway for directly producing cellulose ethanol in corn ethanol plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Local Government Internal Audit Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Jones

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Local government councils (LGC rely on a number of funding sources including state and federal governments as well as their community constituents to enable them to provide a range of public services. Given the constraints on these funding sources councils need to have in place a range of strategies and policies capable of providing good governance and must appropriately discharge their financial accountabilities. To assist LGC with meeting their governance and accountability obligations they often seek guidance from their key stakeholders. For example, in the Australian State of New South Wales (NSW, the Office of Local Government has developed a set of guidelines, the Internal Audit Guidelines. In 2010 the NSW Office of Local Government issued revised guidelines emphasising that an internal audit committee is an essential component of good governance. In addition, the guidelines explained that to improve the governance and accountability of the councils, these committees should be composed of a majority of independent members. To maintain committee independence the guidelines indicated that the Mayor should not be a member of the committee. However these are only guidelines, not legislated requirements and as such compliance with the guidelines, before they were revised, has been demonstrated to be quite low (Jones & Bowrey 2013. This study, based on a review of NSW Local Government Councils’ 2012/2013 reports, including Annual Reportsrelation to internal audit committees, to determine if the guidelines are effective in improving local government council governance.

  20. Feasibility of Hydrothermal Pretreatment on Maize Silage for Bioethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2010-01-01

    The potential of maize silage as a feedstock to produce bioethanol was evaluated in the present study. The hydrothermal pretreatment with five different pretreatment severity factors (PSF) was employed to pretreat the maize silage and compared in terms of sugar recovery, toxic test, and ethanol...... the liquors from the five conditions were not toxic to the Baker’s yeast. Pretreatment under 195°C for 7 min had the similar PSF with that of 185°C for 15 min, and both gave the higher ethanol concentration of 19.92 and 19.98 g/L, respectively. The ethanol concentration from untreated maize silage was only 7...

  1. Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method for Future Exploration Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A nonhazardous urine pretreatment system prototype is proposed that will stabilize urine against biological growth or chemical instabilities without using hazardous...

  2. Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method for Future Exploration Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel urine pretreatment that will prevent biological growth or chemical instabilities in urine without using hazardous chemicals is proposed. Untreated urine...

  3. Awareness and Compliance with Guidelines on Occupational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa is increased by non-adherence to the principles of infection prevention practices. This study assessed the level of awareness and compliance with guideline on occupational exposure to HIV by health care workers (HCW).

  4. Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — ECHO provides integrated compliance and enforcement information for about 800,000 regulated facilities nationwide. Its features range from simple to advanced,...

  5. 40 CFR 52.626 - Compliance schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Hawaii § 52.626 Compliance schedules. (a) (b) The.... Source Location Regulation sections involved Date of adoption Nanakuli Paving & Rock Co., Ltd Molokai 8...

  6. Consolidated Audit And Compliance System (CACS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Consolidated Audit and Compliance System: is an audit findings management and reporting system. CACS is an implementation of the Agency Secure Image and Storage...

  7. Corporate culture, compliance and railroad operating rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A focus group was held at the 1996 Bi-annual Operating Rules Association meeting of North American railroads to discuss the : general issue of compliance and operating rules. Twelve operating rules officers participated, representing Class I, II, and...

  8. Hemodilution causes decreased compliance in puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, C; Ebert, P A

    1978-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass and hemodilution in the newborn have been associated with increased myocardial edema, which may be due to immature connective tissue formation. Five adult and four puppy dogs were placed on bypass while compliance and ventricular function (intraventricular balloon) were measured during normohemoconcentration (NH) (hematocrit 45.1, osmolality 307) and hemodilution with normal saline (hematocrit 24.7, osmolality 307). Compared with NH, the adult group showed no change in compliance or function after 90 min of hemodilution. The puppy group showed a marked decrease in compliance with hemodilution compared to NH (P sensitive to edema formation than the adult during hemodilution and that filling pressures do not necessarily reflect ventricular performance during the early post-perfusion period when compliance is decreased.

  9. Utah Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  10. Iowa Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-09-04

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  11. Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  12. Exercise Compliance. A Data Documentation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherf, Joanne; Franklin, Barry A.

    1987-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Fitness and Rehabilitation Program of Sinai Hospital of Detroit implemented an exercise compliance data documentation system in 1984 which is used in its outpatient gymnasium cardiac fitness and rehabilitation program. This documentation system is described. (MT)

  13. Design Compliance Matrices to ANSI and OSHA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BENDIXSEN, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Letter 98-SFD-028 requested Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. to provide clarifications as to compliance with ANSI 57.1, 57.2, 57.9, and 29 CFR 1910.179 (OSHA), in the form of an item-by-item compliance matrix, for the CSB. This Supporting Document contains Fluor Daniel, Inc.'s response for use by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. regarding the clarifications requested by the U.S. Department of Energy

  14. Compliance with RSV prophylaxis: Global physicians’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari S Anderson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Kari S Anderson, Victoria M Mullally, Linda M Fredrick, Andrew L CampbellAbbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL, USAAbstract: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a significant cause of morbidity in high-risk infants. Palivizumab is proven to prevent serious RSV disease, but compliance with prophylaxis (monthly doses during the RSV season is essential to ensure protection. We invited 453 pediatricians to participate in a survey to identify their perspectives of barriers to compliance and interventions to improve compliance with palivizumab prophylaxis schedules. One hundred physicians from five continents completed the survey, identifying caregiver inconvenience, distance to clinic, cost of prophylaxis, and lack of understanding of the severity of RSV as the most common reasons for noncompliance. They recommended provision of educational materials about RSV, reminders from hospital or clinic, and administration of prophylaxis at home to increase compliance. Globally, physicians recognize several obstacles to prophylaxis compliance. This survey suggests that focused proactive interventions such as empowering caregivers with educational materials and reducing caregiver inconvenience may be instrumental to increase compliance.Keywords: medication adherence, respiratory syncytial virus infections, infant, premature, immunization, passive

  15. Saccharification and ethanol fermentation from cholinium ionic liquid-pretreated bagasse with a different number of post-pretreatment washings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Omote, Sayuri; Ogino, Chiaki; Kuroda, Kosuke; Noguchi, Mana; Endo, Takatsugu; Kakuchi, Ryohei; Shimizu, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Choline acetate (ChOAc), a cholinium ionic liquid (IL), was compared with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimOAc) with regard to biomass pretreatment, inhibition on cellulase and yeast, residuals in pretreated biomass, and saccharification and fermentation of pretreated biomass. Irrespective of ChOAc and EmimOAc, cellulose and hemicellulose saccharification of the IL-pretreated bagasse were over 90% and 60%, respectively. Median effective concentrations (EC50) based on cellulase activity were 32 wt% and 16 wt% for ChOAc and EmimOAc, respectively. The EC50 based on yeast growth were 3.1 wt% and 0.3 wt% for ChOAc and EmimOAc respectively. The residuals in IL-pretreated bagasse were 10% and 23% for ChOAc and EmimOAc, respectively, when washed 2 times after pretreatment. Ethanol yield on a bagasse basis were 60% and 24% for ChOAc and EmimOAc, respectively, in the saccharification and fermentation of IL-pretreated bagasse when washed 2 times. ChOAc-pretreated bagasse could be saccharified and fermented with fewer wash times than EmimOAc-pretreated bagasse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Glycerol carbonate as green solvent for pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is a prerequisite for effective saccharification to produce fermentable sugars. In this study, “green” solvent systems based on acidified mixtures of glycerol carbonate (GC) and glycerol were used to treat sugarcane bagasse and the roles of each solvent in deconstructing biomass were determined. Results Pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse at 90°C for only 30 min with acidified GC produced a solid residue having a glucan digestibility of 90% and a glucose yield of 80%, which were significantly higher than a glucan digestibility of 16% and a glucose yield of 15% obtained for bagasse pretreated with acidified ethylene carbonate (EC). Biomass compositional analyses showed that GC pretreatment removed more lignin than EC pretreatment (84% vs 54%). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that fluffy and size-reduced fibres were produced from GC pretreatment whereas EC pretreatment produced compact particles of reduced size. The maximal glucan digestibility and glucose yield of GC/glycerol systems were about 7% lower than those of EC/ethylene glycol (EG) systems. Replacing up to 50 wt% of GC with glycerol did not negatively affect glucan digestibility and glucose yield. The results from pretreatment of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) showed that (1) pretreatment with acidified alkylene glycol (AG) alone increased enzymatic digestibility compared to pretreatments with acidified alkylene carbonate (AC) alone and acidified mixtures of AC and AG, (2) pretreatment with acidified GC alone slightly increased, but with acidified EC alone significantly decreased, enzymatic digestibility compared to untreated MCC, and (3) there was a good positive linear correlation of enzymatic digestibility of treated and untreated MCC samples with congo red (CR) adsorption capacity. Conclusions Acidified GC alone was a more effective solvent for pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse than acidified EC alone. The higher glucose yield obtained

  17. Understanding of alkaline pretreatment parameters for corn stover enzymatic saccharification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research on alkaline pretreatment has mainly focused on optimization of the process parameters to improve substrate digestibility. To achieve satisfactory sugar yield, extremely high chemical loading and enzyme dosages were typically used. Relatively little attention has been paid to reduction of chemical consumption and process waste management, which has proven to be an indispensable component of the bio-refineries. To indicate alkali strength, both alkali concentration in pretreatment solution (g alkali/g pretreatment liquor or g alkali/L pretreatment liquor and alkali loading based on biomass solids (g alkali/g dry biomass have been widely used. The dual approaches make it difficult to compare the chemical consumption in different process scenarios while evaluating the cost effectiveness of this pretreatment technology. The current work addresses these issues through pretreatment of corn stover at various combinations of pretreatment conditions. Enzymatic hydrolysis with different enzyme blends was subsequently performed to identify the effects of pretreatment parameters on substrate digestibility as well as process operational and capital costs. Results The results showed that sodium hydroxide loading is the most dominant variable for enzymatic digestibility. To reach 70% glucan conversion while avoiding extensive degradation of hemicellulose, approximately 0.08 g NaOH/g corn stover was required. It was also concluded that alkali loading based on total solids (g NaOH/g dry biomass governs the pretreatment efficiency. Supplementing cellulase with accessory enzymes such as α-arabinofuranosidase and β-xylosidase significantly improved the conversion of the hemicellulose by 6–17%. Conclusions The current work presents the impact of alkaline pretreatment parameters on the enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover as well as the process operational and capital investment costs. The high chemical consumption for alkaline

  18. Evaluation of High Solids Alkaline Pretreatment of Rice Straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Shen; Zheng, Yi; Yu, Chao Wei; Dooley, Todd M.; Jenkins, Bryan M.

    2010-01-01

    Fresh-harvested, air-dried rice straw was pretreated at a water content of 5 g H2O/g straw using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and compared to pretreatment at 10 g H2O/g straw by hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2). Full factorial experiments including parallel wash-only treatments were completed with both sources of alkali. The experiments were designed to measure the effects of alkaline loading and pretreatment time on delignification and sugar yield upon enzymatic hydrolysis. Reaction temperature was held constant at 95°C for lime pretreatment and 55°C for NaOH pretreatment. The range of delignification was 13.1% to 27.0% for lime pretreatments and was 8.6% to 23.1% for NaOH pretreatments. Both alkaline loading and reaction time had significant positive effects (p delignification under the design conditions, but only alkaline loading had a significant positive effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment at higher temperature also improved delignification; delignification with water alone ranged from 9.9% to 14.5% for pretreatment at 95°C, but there was little effect observed at 55°C. Post-pretreatment washing of biomass was not necessary for subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Maximum glucose yields were 176.3 mg/g dried biomass (48.5% conversion efficiency of total glucose) in lime-pretreated and unwashed biomass and were 142.3 mg/g dried biomass (39.2% conversion efficiency of total glucose) in NaOH-pretreated and unwashed biomass. PMID:20440580

  19. KNOWLEDGE IS POWER. IMPROVING TAX COMPLIANCE BY MEANS OF BOOSTING TAX LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichita Ramona-Anca

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Because empirical investigations entailing classical tax evasion models often reported consistent deviations from perfect rationality, social scientists interested in tax behavior have extended their area of research by focusing on compliance determinants outside the economic spectrum (i.e., tax rate, audit rate, penalty rate, income. Consequently, a manifold of variables from psychology (attitudes, norms, perceptions, sociology (education, gender or political science (fiscal policy, tax law complexity, voting were taken into account as determinants of taxpayers’ decisions. In addition, behavioral models like the Australian Taxation Office compliance model, New Zealand Inland Revenue compliance model or the “slippery slope” framework have incorporated such variables. Recent empirical developments have indicated that tax literacy can be counted as a significant determinant of tax compliance. Forasmuch compliance strategies exclusively grounded on coercion are rather costly (high monitoring outlays, large staff employed in the monitoring process, etc., generally yield short-term outcomes and may attract the resistance of otherwise honest taxpayers, authorities worldwide have begun searching for the adequate combination between cooperation and coercion, in which the emphasis on the former should prevail. State budgets are better off when authorities enact compliance strategies extensively built on cooperation, for they generate long-term results, require fewer outlays and secure the support of most honest taxpayers. The current paper draws on the effects of tax literacy (i.e., the level of tax knowledge on taxpayers’ behavior, highlighting miscellaneous strategies employed by national tax authorities around the world. As a general trend, increasing tax literacy among very young and soon-to-be taxpayers is preferred by several tax authorities, because potential contributors have to be accustomed to the requirements of tax systems before

  20. Correlation of compliance to statin therapy with lipid profile and serum HMGCoA reductase levels in dyslipidemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Abhinav; Rehan, Harmeet Singh; Gupta, Lalit Kumar; Yadav, Madhur

    The efficacy of statin therapy may be lost or vary with reduction in compliance and intensity of statin therapy. To study and correlate the quantitative effect of compliance on lipid profile and 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoA-R) levels in dyslipidemic patients. Compliance to different intensity of statin therapy assessed by pill count was correlated with serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and HMGCoA-R. Out of 200 patients, 160 received moderate intensity statin therapy whereas 40 were on high intensity statin therapy. The overall mean compliance of patients was 56.7%. The compliance of patients on moderate intensity statin therapy was higher (56.8%) than those on high intensity (56.4%) (p=0.92). There was significant inverse correlation (pstatin therapy was increased above 60%. It is appropriate to improve the compliance to existing statin therapy than switching over to higher intensity statin therapy. Estimation of HMGCoA-R levels may be explored as a surrogate marker to monitor and assess the compliance of patients to statin therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Environmental Compliance Assessment System (ECAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    characterize the impact of the spill. Verify that the following parameters are monitored in the receiving stream: - dissolved oxygen - fecal coliform bacteria ...or other microorganism, except viruses, bacteria or other microor- ganisms on or in living man or other living animals which the USEPA or the...cf jordani Lipstick Darter E Fundulus auroguntatus Undescribed Topminnow R Fundulus bifax Stippled Studflsh E Fundulus catenatus Northern Studfish T

  2. 47 CFR 73.53 - Requirements for authorization of antenna monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for authorization of antenna... antenna monitors. (a) Antenna monitors shall be verified for compliance with the technical requirements in...) An antenna monitor shall meet the following specifications: (1) The monitor shall be designed to...

  3. Plasma-Assisted Pretreatment of Wheat Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Leipold, Frank; Bindslev, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    O3 generated in a plasma at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, fed with dried air (or oxygen-enriched dried air), has been used for the degradation of lignin in wheat straw to optimize the enzymatic hydrolysis and to get more fermentable sugars. A fixed bed reactor was used combined...... with a CO2 detector and an online technique for O3 measurement in the fed and exhaust gas allowing continuous measurement of the consumption of O3. This rendered it possible for us to determine the progress of the pretreatment in real time (online analysis). The process time can be adjusted to produce wheat...... straw with desired lignin content because of the online analysis. The O3 consumption of wheat straw and its polymeric components, i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, as well as a mixture of these, dry as well as with 50% water, were studied. Furthermore, the process parameters dry matter content...

  4. Improved perception of communication and compliance with a revised, intensive care unit-specific bedside communication sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte-Patel, Linda; Sen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Although many pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) use beside communication sheets (BCSs) to highlight daily goals, the optimal format is unknown. A site-specific BCS could improve both PICU communication and compliance completing the BCS. Via written survey, PICU staff at an academic children's hospital provided recommendations for improving and revising an existing BCS. Pre- and post-BCS revision, PICU staff were polled regarding PICU communication and BCS effectiveness, and daily compliance for completing the BCS was monitored. After implementation of the revised BCS, staff reporting "excellent" or "very good" day-to-day communication within the PICU increased from 57% to 77% (P = .02). Compliance for completing the BCS also increased significantly (75% vs 83%, P = .03). Introduction of a focused and concise BCS tailored to a specific PICU leads to improved perceptions of communication by PICU staff and increased compliance completing the daily BCS. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Assessment of public perception and environmental compliance at a pulp and paper facility: a Canadian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Emma; Bernier, Meagan; Blotnicky, Brenden; Golden, Peter G; Janes, Jeffrey; Kader, Allison; Kovacs-Da Costa, Rachel; Pettipas, Shauna; Vermeulen, Sarah; Walker, Tony R

    2015-12-01

    Communities across Canada rely heavily on natural resources for their livelihoods. One such community in Pictou County, Nova Scotia, has both benefited and suffered, because of its proximity to a pulp and paper mill (currently owned by Northern Pulp). Since production began in 1967, there have been increasing impacts to the local environment and human health. Environmental reports funded by the mill were reviewed and compared against provincial and federal regulatory compliance standards. Reports contrasted starkly to societal perceptions of local impacts and independent studies. Most environmental monitoring reports funded by the mill indicate some levels of compliance in atmospheric and effluent emissions, but when compliance targets were not met, there was a lack of regulatory enforcement. After decades of local pollution impacts and lack of environmental compliance, corporate social responsibility initiatives need implementing for the mill to maintain its social licence to operate.

  6. Pharmacokinetically based estimation of patient compliance with oral anticancer chemotherapies: in silico evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénin, Emilie; Tod, Michel; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique; Rioufol, Catherine; Tranchand, Brigitte; Girard, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    distributions, and concentration values were simulated at several timepoints under various compliance patterns to compare with the predicted ones. In addition, several simulation scenarios were run in order to explore the impact of the quality of the error model, interoccasion variability (IOV), error in the number of pills taken, and the performance of the compliance estimation method. The best compliance estimate was obtained with pharmacokinetic samples taken 5 hours after the last dose. Performance of the method varied between simulation scenarios. In both the imatinib and capecitabine basic simulations, patient compliance was correctly estimated on the two last scheduled doses (with better results for imatinib). The magnitude of the error model also had a great impact on the quality of the compliance estimate. We highlight the effect of three parameters on the quality of compliance estimates based on limited pharmacokinetic information: the plasma elimination half-life, interdose interval and magnitude of the error model. Nevertheless, the pharmacokinetic method is not informative enough and should be used with electronic monitoring, which provides additional information on compliance. Our method will be used in a future phase IV clinical trial where the relationships between compliance, efficacy and tolerability will be assessed.

  7. Quality evaluation of beverage produced from pre-treated tigernut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Beverage samples from pretreated and untreated tigernut were evaluated for physical and chemical properties. Sensory evaluation of the beverage samples were carried out and the best preferred tigernutbeverage was compared with a popularly consumed beverage, soymilk. All the pre-treatments, except germination, ...

  8. Effects of magnetic fields pretreatment of mungbean seeds on sprout ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of magnetic fields pretreatment of mungbean seeds on sprout yield and quality. Yi-Ping Chen, Jun-Min He, Ran Li. Abstract. The aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of magnetic field pretreatment of mungbean seeds on the yield and quality of sprout. The sprout elongation, biomass and nutrition ...

  9. Wet explosion pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biswas, Rajib; Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2014-01-01

    Wet explosion pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse was investigated in pilot-scale with the aim of obtaining the highest possible sugar yield after pretreatment. The temperatures used were 155, 170, 185 and 200 C with or without addition of oxygen (0.6 MPa pressure). Enzymatic hydrolysis of washed...

  10. Synergistic Effect of Trehalose and Saccharose Pretreatment on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the synergistic effect of trehalose and saccharose pretreatment on maintenance of lyophilized human red blood cell (RBC) quality. Methods: RBCs were pre-treated with trehalose and saccharose, and then lyophilized and re-hydrated. Prior to lyophilization and after re hydration, RBC parameters, ...

  11. 40 CFR 406.26 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Pretreatment standards for new sources. 406.26 Section 406.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GRAIN MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Corn Dry Milling Subcategory § 406.26 Pretreatment...

  12. 40 CFR 406.34 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Pretreatment standards for existing sources. 406.34 Section 406.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... § 406.34 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source subject to this subpart that...

  13. 40 CFR 406.44 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Pretreatment standards for existing sources. 406.44 Section 406.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... § 406.44 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source subject to this subpart that...

  14. 40 CFR 406.16 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Pretreatment standards for new sources. 406.16 Section 406.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GRAIN MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Corn Wet Milling Subcategory § 406.16 Pretreatment...

  15. Effect of chemical pretreatment of some lignocellulosic wastes on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highest cellulase activity (0.06777 IU/ml/min) was display d by the organism grown on bagasse substrate pretreated with 2M NaOH for one hour. The proximate analysis of the cellulosic residues differed from one substrate to another, with the bagasse being the best. Pulverized substrates syndicated with alkali pretreatment ...

  16. Influence of Chemical Pretreatment on the Quality of Dried Whole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical pretreatment of vegetables prior to drying is widely used to improve colour, texture and overall acceptability. Thus, this study investigated the effect of chemical pretreatment on some physico-chemical properties, colour and rehydration properties of dried red bell pepper. Fresh samples of whole red bell peppers ...

  17. Organosolv pretreatment of olive tree biomass for fermentable sugars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M.J.; Cara, C.; Castro, E. [Department of Chemical, Environmental and Materials Engineering, Campus Las Lagunillas, University of Jaen, Jaen (Spain); Huijgen, W.J.J.; Van der Laan, R.R.; Reith, J.H. [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environmental Research, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    Olive tree pruning biomass is one of the main agricultural residues available in Mediterranean countries and is currently lacking commercial applications. To take advantage of its sugar content, a pretreatment is necessary to enhance enzyme accessibility of the cellulose fraction of the residue. This paper describes for the first time the use of organosolv pretreatment in this regard. The main process variables such as pretreatment temperature, residence time, and solvent composition (aqueous ethanol) are studied. Results show that organosolv pretreatment causes delignification and hydrolysis of hemicelluloses and improves the enzymatic digestibility of olive tree pruning biomass. A higher pretreatment severity and ethanol content of the solvent were found to increase delignification (up to 64% at 66% w/w aqueous ethanol, 210C, 60 min). By contrast, xylan hydrolysis was promoted by a lower ethanol content (maximum 92%). The highest enzymatic hydrolysis yield (90% of the structural glucan present in the raw material) has been obtained after pretreatment with 43% w/w aqueous ethanol at 210C for 15 min. Organosolv pretreatment was found to be the most effective pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of olive tree pruning biomass.

  18. Effect of combination pre-treatment on physicochemical, sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of combination pre-treatment on physicochemical, sensory and microbial characteristics of fresh aerobically stored minced goat (Black Bengal) meat organs. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... However, acetic acid and glucose pretreatment controlled the fungal growth in meat samples most effectively. The

  19. 40 CFR 427.86 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for new sources. 427.86 Section 427.86 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT... Textiles Subcategory § 427.86 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject to this...

  20. Alkaline pretreatment of Mexican pine residues for bioethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLAUDIA

    2013-07-31

    Jul 31, 2013 ... form of branches and tree tops are left on the field. Part of this residue is cut into ..... Table 3. Chemical composition of the solids from pretreated and hydrolyzed biomass and black and white liquors obtained in the pretreatment during the enzymatic .... (2000) employed Oak wood lignocellulosic biomass ...

  1. Development of pretreatment of empty fruit bunches for enhanced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heating, boiling and steaming are among the physical agents and different concentrations of nitric acid, sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were the chemical agents used for the pretreatment of EFB to enhance the enzymatic saccharification of EFB. NaOH was proved to be the best among all the pretreatment ...

  2. Structural Analysis of Alkaline Pretreated Rice Straw for Ethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paripok Phitsuwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice straw (RS is an abundant, readily available agricultural waste, which shows promise as a potential feedstock for Asian ethanol production. To enhance release of glucose by enzymatic hydrolysis, RS was pretreated with aqueous ammonia (27% w/w at two pretreatment temperatures: room temperature and 60°C. Statistical analysis indicated similarity of enzymatic glucose production at both pretreatment temperatures after 3-day incubation. Chemical composition, FTIR, and EDX analyses confirmed the retention of glucan and xylan in the pretreated solid, but significant reduction of lignin (60.7% removal and silica. SEM analysis showed the disorganized surfaces and porosity of the pretreated RS fibers, thus improving cellulose accessibility for cellulase. The crystallinity index increased from 40.5 to 52.3%, indicating the higher exposure of cellulose. With 10% (w/v solid loadings of pretreated RS, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation yielded a final ethanol concentration of 24.6 g/L, corresponding to 98% of maximum theoretical yield. Taken together, aqueous ammonia pretreatment is an effective method to generate highly digestible pretreated RS for bioethanol production and demonstrates potential application in biorefinery industry.

  3. Evaluation of a novel device for measuring patient compliance with oral appliances in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Yves K; Verrett, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel intraoral monitor for measuring patient compliance of oral appliances for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. A clinical trial was conducted to compare objective recording by an intraoral compliance monitor and self-reporting by participants using a mandibular repositioning device (MRD). Ten participants were fitted with a Thornton Adjustable Positioner (TAP III) with an embedded compliance monitor. The participants were asked to wear the test appliance for seven nights and to record their usage of the appliance and any adverse effects in a treatment journal. The data were downloaded to a dedicated computer using radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology, and the information was compared to the data in the participant's journal. The mean objective wearing time, as detected by the compliance monitor, was found to be 6.6 ± 1.6 hours/night. The mean subjective wearing time, as recorded by the participants, was 6.5 ± 1.5 hours/night. The correlation between subjective and objective times was 0.9985. The use of the test appliance by this sample population was 68.7% with a range of 24% to 100%. Participants reported a range of adverse outcomes related to the MRD consistent with those reported in the literature and were found to be transient in nature. This study supports previously reported usage times and adverse outcomes. The compliance monitor showed a very high linear correlation between subjective and objective data, validating its use in future compliance studies. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma pretreatment on hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fangmin; Long, Zhouyang; Liu, Sa; Qin, Zhenglong

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was used as a pretreatment method for downstream hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). The degree of polymerization (DP) of MCC decreased after it was pretreated by DBD plasma under a carrier gas of air/argon. The effectiveness of depolymerization was found to be influenced by the crystallinity of MCC when under the pretreatment of DBD plasma. With the addition of tert-butyl alcohol in the treated MCC water suspension solution, depolymerization effectiveness of MCC was inhibited. When MCC was pretreated by DBD plasma for 30 min, the total reducing sugar concentration (TRSC) and liquefaction yield (LY) of pretreated-MCC (PMCC) increased by 82.98% and 34.18% respectively compared with those for raw MCC.

  5. Pretreatment of Biomass by Aqueous Ammonia for Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Gupta, Rajesh; Lee, Y. Y.

    The methods of pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using aqueous ammonia are described. The main effect of ammonia treatment of biomass is delignification without significantly affecting the carbohydrate contents. It is a very effective pretreatment method especially for substrates that have low lignin contents such as agricultural residues and herbaceous feedstock. The ammonia-based pretreatment is well suited for simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) because the treated biomass retains cellulose as well as hemicellulose. It has been demonstrated that overall ethanol yield above 75% of the theoretical maximum on the basis of total carbohydrate is achievable from corn stover pretreated with aqueous ammonia by way of SSCF. There are two different types of pretreatment methods based on aqueous ammonia: (1) high severity, low contact time process (ammonia recycle percolation; ARP), (2) low severity, high treatment time process (soaking in aqueous ammonia; SAA). Both of these methods are described and discussed for their features and effectiveness.

  6. Patient compliance with exercise: different theoretical approaches to short-term and long-term compliance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, E.M.; Knibbe, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    Compliance with exercise regimens is difficult to obtain as is compliance with other medical regimens. In analyzing noncompliance, two problems exist: (I) current theories only partly explain patients’ noncompliance; (2) health care providers seldom act according to the recommendations derived from

  7. NCAA Compliance: An Examination of NCAA Division I Compliance Officers' Perceptions on the Educative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbert, Tonya L.

    2013-01-01

    A review of the literature indicates an absence of studies about compliance officers working in higher education institutions belonging to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The current qualitative study explored the perceptions of compliance officers in the field of intercollegiate athletics at NCAA Division I institutions in…

  8. Compliance pluralisme and processes : Understanding compliance behavior in restaurants in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to offer a case study of dynamic compliance processes in selected Chinese restaurants with the main methods of participant observation and in-depth interviews. It applied an integrated and dynamic research approach, called descriptive analysis of compliance behavior, which

  9. Development of a Low Toxicity Urine Pretreatment for Water Recovery in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Niklas; Alvarez, Giraldo; Mitchell, Julie; Pickering, Karen; Shull, Sarah; Carrier, Chris; Vega, Letty

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater stabilization was an essential component of the spacecraft water cycle. The purpose of stabilizing wastewater was two-fold. First, stabilization prevents the breakdown of urea into ammonia, a toxic gas at high concentrations. Second, it prevents the growth of microorganisms, thereby mitigating hardware and water quality issues due to due biofilm and planktonic growth. Current stabilization techniques involve oxidizers and strong acids (pH=2) such as chromic and sulfuric acid, which are highly toxic and pose a risk to crew health. The purpose of this effort was to explore less toxic stabilization techniques, such as food-grade and commercial care preservatives. Additionally, certain preservatives were tested in the presence of a low-toxicity organic acid. Triplicate 300-mL volumes of urine were dosed with a predetermined quantity of stabilizer and stored for two weeks. During that time, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), ammonia, and turbidity were monitored. Those preservatives that showed the lowest visible microbial growth and stable pH were further tested in a six-month stability study. The results of the six-month study are also included in this paper. Additionally, the pretreatment formulations were tested to determine if the pretreated urine could be distilled to remove 85% of the water, as would occur on the ISS. The goal of the pretreatment was to produce no solids in the resulting brine at 85% water recovery.

  10. TiO2-Based Photocatalytic Treatment of Raw and Constructed-Wetland Pretreated Textile Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunja Mahne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately, 15% of the total textile colorant production is estimated to be lost during dyeing and processing of textile fibres. If left untreated, these wastewaters can represent a serious environmental threat. In the present paper a combination of photocatalytic and biological degradation of prepared textile wastewaters (simulation of real textile effluent is presented. Samples have been monitored through the course of photocatalytic experiments: change in UV-VIS absorbance spectra and complete decolouration were achieved for all three tested dyed wastewaters; however, only partial COD removal was achieved with photocatalytic oxidation (PCOx and photocatalytic ozonation (PCOz. Toxicity test (Vibrio fischeri of untreated and pretreated (constructed wetland, CW samples showed a decrease in toxicity values only for the red-dyed wastewater. Comparison of efficiency of PCOx and PCOz for decolouration and mineralization of three structurally different dyes (anthraquinone and two azo dyes has been done. CW pretreatment caused faster decolouration and substantial COD removal in PCOx (up to 45%. Pretreatment also accelerated decolouration during PCOz, but it accelerated COD removal only in the case of red-dyed wastewater due to short irradiation times applied.

  11. Ractor stability monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Yutaka.

    1991-01-01

    A stability monitor for a BWR type reactor determines the index of stability by statistic processing of signals from an average power region monitor or the like, but it takes much time and the reliability thereof is not always high. Then, parameters such as reactor core power are measured on every sampling periods as observation data and pretreatments such as normalization are applied successively, to obtain monitored amount and store them successively. Differentiation coefficient relative to time are calculated by using the observed amount at present and that one sample period before, to evaluate on a phasal plane using the amount of observation and the differentiation coefficient with time on the axes of coordinate. As a result, information relative to the stability can be represented accurately, thereby enabling to monitor the stability at a high accuracy. Further, judgement for the condition considering the amplitude is conducted upon oscillation, thereby enabling to conduct control operation certainly. The operation in a region where it has been limited under great caution can be conducted appropriately and safely, enabling to conduct controlled operation of excellent economical property. (N.H.)

  12. 40 CFR 63.8 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in the relevant standard; or (B) The CMS fails a performance test audit (e.g., cylinder gas audit... operator must install an applicable CMS at each emission point unless the installation of fewer systems is... compliance period. (c) Operation and maintenance of continuous monitoring systems. (1) The owner or operator...

  13. Compliance with children's television food advertising regulations in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michele; Pettigrew, Simone; Chapman, Kathy; Miller, Caroline; Quester, Pascale

    2012-10-05

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Australian co-regulatory system in limiting children's exposure to unhealthy television food advertising by measuring compliance with mandatory and voluntary regulations. An audit was conducted on food and beverage television advertisements broadcast in five major Australian cities during children's programming time from 1st September 2010 to 31st October 2010. The data were assessed against mandatory and voluntary advertising regulations, the information contained in an industry report of breaches, and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating. During the two months of data collection there were a total of 951 breaches of the combined regulations. This included 619 breaches of the mandatory regulations (CTS) and 332 breaches of the voluntary regulations (RCMI and QSRI). Almost 83% of all food and beverages advertised during children's programming times were for foods classified as 'Extras' in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating. There were also breaches in relation to the amount of advertising repetition and the use of promotional appeals such as premium offers, competitions, and endorsements by popular children's characters. The self-regulatory systems were found to have flaws in their reporting and there were errors in the Australian Food and Grocery Council's compliance report. This audit suggests that current advertising regulations are inadequate. Regulations need to be closely monitored and more tightly enforced to protect children from advertisements for unhealthy foods.

  14. Effluent Treatment Facility tritium emissions monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved sampling and analysis protocol was developed and executed to verify atmospheric emissions compliance for the new Savannah River Site (SRS) F/H area Effluent Treatment Facility. Sampling equipment was fabricated, installed, and tested at stack monitoring points for filtrable particulate radionuclides, radioactive iodine, and tritium. The only detectable anthropogenic radionuclides released from Effluent Treatment Facility stacks during monitoring were iodine-129 and tritium oxide. This paper only examines the collection and analysis of tritium oxide

  15. Low temperature lignocellulose pretreatment: effects and interactions of pretreatment pH are critical for maximizing enzymatic monosaccharide yields from wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Johansen, Katja S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The recent development of improved enzymes and pentose-using yeast for cellulosic ethanol processes calls for new attention to the lignocellulose pretreatment step. This study assessed the influence of pretreatment pH, temperature, and time, and their interactions on the enzymatic...... alkaline pretreatments. Alkaline pretreatments also solubilized most of the lignin. Conclusions: Pretreatment pH exerted significant effects and factor interactions on the enzymatic glucose and xylose releases. Quite extreme pH values were necessary with mild thermal pretreatment strategies (T...... glucose and xylose yields from mildly pretreated wheat straw in multivariate experimental designs of acid and alkaline pretreatments. Results: The pretreatment pH was the most significant factor affecting both the enzymatic glucose and xylose yields after mild thermal pretreatments at maximum 140 degrees...

  16. The importance of patient compliance in repeated rounds of mass drug administration (MDA) for the elimination of intestinal helminth transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Sam H; Truscott, James E; Anderson, Roy M

    2017-06-12

    Systematic non-compliance to chemotherapeutic treatment among a portion of the eligible population is thought to be a major obstacle to the elimination of helminth infections by mass drug administration (MDA). MDA for helminths is repeated at defined intervals such as yearly or every 2 years, as a consequence of the inability of the human host to develop fully protective immunity to reinfection. As such, how an individual complies to these repeated rounds of MDA can have a significant impact on parasite transmission. The importance of this factor is poorly understood at present. Few epidemiological studies have examined longitudinal trends in compliance in the many communities in areas of endemic helminth infection that are undergoing MDA. Reducing systematic non-compliance will obviously increase the number of individuals treated, but it may also alter the dynamics of parasite transmission. Here we develop an individual-based stochastic model of helminth transmission and MDA treatment to investigate how different patterns of compliance influence the impact of MDA for two groups of helminths, the soil transmitted nematode infections and the schistosome parasites. We study the effect of several alternative treatment and compliance patterns on the dynamics of transmission. We find that the impact of different compliance patterns, ranging from random treatment at each round of chemotherapy to systematic non-compliance by a proportion of the population, is very dependent on both transmission intensity in a defined setting and the type of infection that the treatment is targeted at. Systematic non-compliance has a greater impact on the potential for elimination of Schistosoma mansoni transmission by intensive MDA, than it does on Ascaris lumbricoides. We discuss the implications of our findings for the prioritisation of resources in MDA programmes and for monitoring and evaluation programme design. The key message generated by the analyses is that great care must be

  17. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet.

  18. Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data Inventory data asset contains measured summary compliance information on light-duty, heavy-duty, and non-road engine manufacturers by model, as well as fee payment data required by Title II of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act, to certify engines for sale in the U.S. and collect compliance certification fees. Data submitted by manufacturers falls into 12 industries: Heavy Duty Compression Ignition, Marine Spark Ignition, Heavy Duty Spark Ignition, Marine Compression Ignition, Snowmobile, Motorcycle & ATV, Non-Road Compression Ignition, Non-Road Small Spark Ignition, Light-Duty, Evaporative Components, Non-Road Large Spark Ignition, and Locomotive. Title II also requires the collection of fees from manufacturers submitting for compliance certification. Manufacturers submit data on an annual basis, to document engine model changes for certification. Manufacturers also submit compliance information on already certified in-use vehicles randomly selected by the EPA (1) year into their life and (4) years into their life to ensure that emissions systems continue to function appropriately over time.The EPA performs targeted confirmatory tests on approximately 15% of vehicles submitted for certification. Confirmatory data on engines is associated with its corresponding submission data to verify the accuracy of manufacturer submission beyond standard business rules.Section 209 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clea

  19. Non-compliance in optometric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, B E; Efron, N; Woods, C

    1998-03-01

    The purposes of this paper is to explore how some of the recent and future changes relating to the optometric profession could affect non-compliant behaviour among patients. Non-compliance has been widely documented and discussed in numerous health care fields and is understood to be the responsibility of both the practitioner and patient working in a health care partnership. At least one third of patients have been reported to be non-compliant with health care recommendations which can result in the poor outcome of a treatment, secondary medical problems, dissatisfaction, frustration and the wasting of health resources. In recent years contact lens complications have been linked with non-compliant behaviour with contact lens care and maintenance regimens which has led to several media scares over contact lens related hygiene risks and has heightened interest in the issue of non-compliance in the field of optometry. Shared care schemes have already been adopted in some areas of the United Kingdom and if therapeutic pharmaceutical agents are introduced to the list of drugs permitted for use by optometrists in the future the issue of non-compliance will become even more poignant. Every optometrist needs to be aware of the high probability of non-compliant behaviour among patients, the consequences of this non-compliance and the steps that can be taken to enhance compliance in different areas of eye-care.

  20. Non-compliance in contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, B E; Efron, N

    1994-10-01

    Non-compliance is emerging as a critical issue in the contact lens field. This problem has been studied at depth in general health care situations and is seen as the responsibility of both practitioner and patient (client) working in a health care partnership. The contact lens practitioner and patient present a specific case for the study of non-compliance in areas such as hygiene, solution use, appointment attendance and wearing times. From 40 to 91% of contact lens patients have been reported as non-complaint in the use of recommended care and maintenance regimens and many of these are confused or ignorant about their behaviour. In order to arrive at a general set of conclusions from the studies published to date, it is important to understand the methodology of each study, it purpose, the definition of non-compliance used and the way the results were analysed and described. This review summarizes the research into non-compliance in the contact lens field to data. A set of general conclusions is drawn and a model for compliance in the context of contact lens practice is proposed.