WorldWideScience

Sample records for pretest posttest control

  1. Impact of a Healthy Nails Program on Nail-Biting in Turkish Schoolchildren: A Controlled Pretest-Posttest Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Ayse; Toprak, Rumeysa; Sisman, Fatma Nevin

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of a healthy nails program on nail-biting in Turkish schoolchildren. This quasi-experimental study was of pretest-posttest control group design. A total of 50 students of a primary school formed the intervention group, while 53 students from the same school formed the control group. Data were…

  2. Evaluation of a caregiver education program to support memory and communication in dementia: a controlled pretest-posttest study with nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Megan; Smith, Erin R; Baker, Rosemary; Angwin, Anthony J; Pachana, Nancy A; Copland, David A; Humphreys, Michael S; Gallois, Cindy; Byrne, Gerard J; Chenery, Helen J

    2011-11-01

    There is a need for simple multimedia training programs designed to upskill the dementia care workforce. A DVD-based training program entitled RECAPS and MESSAGE has been designed to provide caregivers with strategies to support memory and communication in people with dementia. The aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate the effects of the RECAPS and MESSAGE training on knowledge of support strategies, and caregiver satisfaction, in nursing home care staff, and (2) to evaluate staff opinion of the training. A multi-centre controlled pretest-posttest trial was conducted between June 2009 and January 2010, with baseline, immediately post-training and 3-month follow-up assessment. Four nursing homes in Queensland, Australia. All care staff were invited to participate. Of the 68 participants who entered the study, 52 (37 training participants and 15 controls) completed outcome measures at baseline and 3-month follow-up. 63.5% of participants were nursing assistants, 25% were qualified nurses and 11.5% were recreational/activities officers. The training and control groups were compared on the following outcomes: (1) knowledge of memory and communication support strategies, and (2) caregiver satisfaction. In the training group, the immediate effects of training on knowledge, and the effects of role (nurse, nursing assistant, recreational staff) on both outcome measures, were also examined. Staff opinion of the training was assessed immediately post-training and at 3-month follow-up. The training group showed a significant improvement in knowledge of support strategies from baseline to immediately post-training (p=0.001). Comparison of the training and control groups revealed a significant increase in knowledge for the training group (p=0.011), but not for the control group (p=0.33), between baseline and 3-month follow-up. Examination of caregiver satisfaction by care staff role in the training group revealed that only the qualified nurses showed higher levels of

  3. Pretest-Posttest-Posttest Multilevel IRT Modeling of Competence Growth of Students in Higher Education in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Susanne; Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia, Olga; Fox, Gerardus J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal research in higher education faces several challenges. Appropriate methods of analyzing competence growth of students are needed to deal with those challenges and thereby obtain valid results. In this article, a pretest-posttest-posttest multivariate multilevel IRT model for repeated

  4. Measuring Student Learning in Social Statistics: A Pretest-Posttest Study of Knowledge Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucchi, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study used a pretest-posttest design to measure student learning in undergraduate statistics. Data were derived from 185 students enrolled in six different sections of a social statistics course taught over a seven-year period by the same sociology instructor. The pretest-posttest instrument reveals statistically significant gains in…

  5. Effects of video-feedback on the communication, clinical competence and motivational interviewing skills of practice nurses: a pre-test posttest control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordman, Janneke; van der Weijden, Trudy; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    To examine the effects of individual video-feedback on the generic communication skills, clinical competence (i.e. adherence to practice guidelines) and motivational interviewing skills of experienced practice nurses working in primary care. Continuing professional education may be necessary to refresh and reflect on the communication and motivational interviewing skills of experienced primary care practice nurses. A video-feedback method was designed to improve these skills. Pre-test/posttest control group design. Seventeen Dutch practice nurses and 325 patients participated between June 2010-June 2011. Nurse-patient consultations were videotaped at two moments (T0 and T1), with an interval of 3-6 months. The videotaped consultations were rated using two protocols: the Maastrichtse Anamnese en Advies Scorelijst met globale items (MAAS-global) and the Behaviour Change Counselling Index. Before the recordings, nurses were allocated to a control or video-feedback group. Nurses allocated to the video-feedback group received video-feedback between T0 and T1. Data were analysed using multilevel linear or logistic regression. Nurses who received video-feedback appeared to pay significantly more attention to patients' request for help, their physical examination and gave significantly more understandable information. With respect to motivational interviewing, nurses who received video-feedback appeared to pay more attention to 'agenda setting and permission seeking' during their consultations. Video-feedback is a potentially effective method to improve practice nurses' generic communication skills. Although a single video-feedback session does not seem sufficient to increase all motivational interviewing skills, significant improvement in some specific skills was found. Nurses' clinical competences were not altered after feedback due to already high standards. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Comparing Feedback Types in Multimedia Learning of Speech by Young Children With Common Speech Sound Disorders: Research Protocol for a Pretest Posttest Independent Measures Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Doubé

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Children with speech sound disorders benefit from feedback about the accuracy of sounds they make. Home practice can reinforce feedback received from speech pathologists. Games in mobile device applications could encourage home practice, but those currently available are of limited value because they are unlikely to elaborate “Correct”/”Incorrect” feedback with information that can assist in improving the accuracy of the sound. This protocol proposes a “Wizard of Oz” experiment that aims to provide evidence for the provision of effective multimedia feedback for speech sound development. Children with two common speech sound disorders will play a game on a mobile device and make speech sounds when prompted by the game. A human “Wizard” will provide feedback on the accuracy of the sound but the children will perceive the feedback as coming from the game. Groups of 30 young children will be randomly allocated to one of five conditions: four types of feedback and a control which does not play the game. The results of this experiment will inform not only speech sound therapy, but also other types of language learning, both in general, and in multimedia applications. This experiment is a cost-effective precursor to the development of a mobile application that employs pedagogically and clinically sound processes for speech development in young children.

  7. Comparing Feedback Types in Multimedia Learning of Speech by Young Children With Common Speech Sound Disorders: Research Protocol for a Pretest Posttest Independent Measures Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubé, Wendy; Carding, Paul; Flanagan, Kieran; Kaufman, Jordy; Armitage, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    Children with speech sound disorders benefit from feedback about the accuracy of sounds they make. Home practice can reinforce feedback received from speech pathologists. Games in mobile device applications could encourage home practice, but those currently available are of limited value because they are unlikely to elaborate "Correct"/"Incorrect" feedback with information that can assist in improving the accuracy of the sound. This protocol proposes a "Wizard of Oz" experiment that aims to provide evidence for the provision of effective multimedia feedback for speech sound development. Children with two common speech sound disorders will play a game on a mobile device and make speech sounds when prompted by the game. A human "Wizard" will provide feedback on the accuracy of the sound but the children will perceive the feedback as coming from the game. Groups of 30 young children will be randomly allocated to one of five conditions: four types of feedback and a control which does not play the game. The results of this experiment will inform not only speech sound therapy, but also other types of language learning, both in general, and in multimedia applications. This experiment is a cost-effective precursor to the development of a mobile application that employs pedagogically and clinically sound processes for speech development in young children.

  8. Empirical Likelihood-Based Estimation of the Treatment Effect in a Pretest-Posttest Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiung-Yu; Qin, Jing; Follmann, Dean A

    2008-09-01

    The pretest-posttest study design is commonly used in medical and social science research to assess the effect of a treatment or an intervention. Recently, interest has been rising in developing inference procedures that improve efficiency while relaxing assumptions used in the pretest-posttest data analysis, especially when the posttest measurement might be missing. In this article we propose a semiparametric estimation procedure based on empirical likelihood (EL) that incorporates the common baseline covariate information to improve efficiency. The proposed method also yields an asymptotically unbiased estimate of the response distribution. Thus functions of the response distribution, such as the median, can be estimated straightforwardly, and the EL method can provide a more appealing estimate of the treatment effect for skewed data. We show that, compared with existing methods, the proposed EL estimator has appealing theoretical properties, especially when the working model for the underlying relationship between the pretest and posttest measurements is misspecified. A series of simulation studies demonstrates that the EL-based estimator outperforms its competitors when the working model is misspecified and the data are missing at random. We illustrate the methods by analyzing data from an AIDS clinical trial (ACTG 175).

  9. Clay and Anxiety Reduction: A One-Group, Pretest/Posttest Design with Patients on a Psychiatric Unit

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    Kimport, Elizabeth R.; Hartzell, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Little research exists on using clay as an anxiety-reducing intervention with patients in psychiatric hospitals. This article reports on a study that used a one-group, pretest/posttest design with 49 adults in a psychiatric facility who created a clay pinch pot. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used as a pre- and posttest measure.…

  10. Using Pretest-Posttest Research Designs to Enhance Jury Decision-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Goodman-Delahunty

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available When lay jurors are unfamiliar with key evidentiary issues, expert evidence, judicial instructions and group deliberation may enhance their understanding of this evidence. Systematic steps to assess the relationship between juror biases in cases of child sexual abuse are offered as an example to illustrate a programmatic research approach. Using pretest-posttest research designs, the effectiveness of three traditional legal procedural safeguards to reduce common jury misconceptions in the context of simulated trials were tested and compared. By measuring mock-juror knowledge before and after each intervention, knowledge gains attributable to these interventions were distinguished from practice effects. Unexpected increases in acquittals following deliberation underscored the importance of adding adequate control groups and of testing deliberation effects in jury simulation studies. Benefits of this research paradigm to assist courts, legal counsel and policy makers in devising effective methods to enhance jury decisions in complex criminal cases are discussed. Cuando los miembros del jurado popular no están familiarizados con los temas probatorios clave, las pruebas periciales, las instrucciones judiciales y la deliberación de grupo pueden mejorar su comprensión de las evidencias. Se ofrecen pasos sistemáticos para evaluar la relación entre sesgos del jurado en casos de abusos a menores como un ejemplo para ilustrar un enfoque de investigación programática. Se probó y comparó la efectividad de tres garantías procesales jurídicas tradicionales para reducir los malentendidos comunes de los jurados en el contexto de juicios simulados, usando patrones de investigación pre y post análisis. Al medir el conocimiento de jurados en juicios simulados antes y después de cada intervención, se distinguían los conocimientos adquiridos atribuibles a estas intervenciones. Un aumento inesperado de absoluciones después de la deliberación pon

  11. Intermanual transfer effect in young children after training in a complex skill: mechanistic, pseudorandomized, pretest-posttest study.

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    Romkema, Sietske; Bongers, Raoul M; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2015-05-01

    Intermanual transfer implies that motor skills learned on one side of the body transfer to the untrained side. This effect was previously noted in adults practicing with a prosthesis simulator. The study objective was to determine whether intermanual transfer is present in children practicing prosthetic handling. A mechanistic, pseudorandomized, pretest-posttest design was used. The study was conducted in a primary school in the Netherlands. The participants were children who were able-bodied (N=48; 25 boys, 23 girls; mean age=5.1 years) and randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group performed 5 training sessions using a prosthesis simulator on the training arm. Before (pretest), immediately after (posttest), and 6 days after (retention test) the training program, their ability to handle the prosthesis with the contralateral (test) arm was measured. The control group only performed the tests. Half of the children performed the tests with the dominant hand, and the other half performed the tests with the nondominant hand. During the tests, movement time and control of force were measured. An interaction effect of group by test was found for movement time. Post hoc tests revealed significant improvement in the experimental group between the posttest and the retention test. No force control effect was found. Only children who were able-bodied were included. Measurements should have been masked and obtained without tester interference. The fact that 4 children whose results were slower than the mean result discontinued training may have biased the findings. The intermanual transfer effect was present in 5-year-old children undergoing training in prosthetic handling. After training of one hand, children's movement times for the other, untrained hand improved. This finding may be helpful for training children who are novice users of a prosthesis. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  12. Pretest and Posttest Results of the First KEEP Program Year. Technical Report #5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Ronald; And Others

    This report presents a pre- and posttest evaluation of the first program year of the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). Each of the 28 children in the KEEP kindergarten class received three tests: the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI), the Metropolitan Readiness Test (MRT), and the Standard English Repetition…

  13. Intermanual transfer in training with an upper-limb myoelectric prosthesis simulator: a mechanistic, randomized, pretest-posttest study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romkema, Sietske; Bongers, Raoul M; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2013-01-01

    Intermanual transfer may improve prosthetic handling and acceptance if used in training soon after an amputation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intermanual transfer effects can be detected after training with a myoelectric upper-limb prosthesis simulator. A mechanistic, randomized, pretest-posttest design was used. A total of 48 right-handed participants (25 women, 23 men) who were able-bodied were randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group performed a training program of 5 days' duration using the prosthesis simulator. To determine the improvement in skill, a test was administered before, immediately after, and 6 days after training. The control group only performed the tests. Training was performed with the unaffected arm, and tests were performed with the affected arm (the affected arm simulating an amputated limb). Half of the participants were tested with the dominant arm and half with the nondominant arm. Initiation time was defined as the time from starting signal until start of the movement, movement time was defined as the time from the beginning of the movement until completion of the task, and force control was defined as the maximal applied force on a deformable object. The movement time decreased significantly more in the experimental group (F₂,₉₂=7.42, P=.001, η²(G)=.028) when compared with the control group. This finding is indicative of faster handling of the prosthesis. No statistically significant differences were found between groups with regard to initiation time and force control. We did not find a difference in intermanual transfer between the dominant and nondominant arms. The training utilized participants who were able-bodied in a laboratory setting and focused only on transradial amputations. Intermanual transfer was present in the affected arm after training the unaffected arm with a myoelectric prosthesis simulator, and this effect did not depend on laterality. This

  14. Evaluation of a real world intervention using professional football players to promote a healthy diet and physical activity in children and adolescents from a lower socio-economic background: a controlled pretest-posttest design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing rates of obesity among children and adolescents, especially in those from lower socio-economic backgrounds, emphasise the need for interventions promoting a healthy diet and physical activity. The present study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the ‘Health Scores!’ program, which combined professional football player role models with a school-based program to promote a healthy diet and physical activity to socially vulnerable children and adolescents. Methods The intervention was implemented in two settings: professional football clubs and schools. Socially vulnerable children and adolescents (n = 165 intervention group, n = 440 control group, aged 10-14 year) provided self-reported data on dietary habits and physical activity before and after the four-month intervention. Intervention effects were evaluated using repeated measures analysis of variance. In addition, a process evaluation was conducted. Results No intervention effects were found for several dietary behaviours, including consumption of breakfast, fruit, soft drinks or sweet and savoury snacks. Positive intervention effects were found for self-efficacy for having a daily breakfast (p sports participation no significant intervention effect was found. In total, 92 pupils completed the process evaluation, the feedback was largely positive. Conclusions The ‘Health Scores!’ intervention was successful in increasing psychosocial correlates of a healthy diet and PA. The use of professional football players as a credible source for health promotion was appealing to socially vulnerable children and adolescents. PMID:24886227

  15. Community health worker interventions are key to optimal infant immunization coverage, evidence from a pretest-posttest experiment in Mwingi, Kenya.

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    Nzioki, Japheth Mativo; Ouma, James; Ombaka, James Hebert; Onyango, Rosebella Ongutu

    2017-01-01

    Immunization is a powerful and cost-effective health intervention which averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year. Kenya has a high infant and under five mortality and morbidity rates. Increasing routine child immunization coverage is one way of reducing child morbidity and mortality rates in Kenya. Community Health Workers (CHWs) have emerged as critical human resources for health in developing countries. The Community Strategy (CS) is one of the CHW led interventions promoting Maternal and Child Health (MCH) in Kenya. This study sought to establish the effect of CS on infant vaccination Coverage (IVC) in Mwingi west sub-county; Kenya. This was a pretest - posttest experimental study design with 1 pretest and 2 post-test surveys conducted in intervention and control sites. Mwingi west and Mwingi north sub-counties where intervention and control sites respectively. Sample size in each survey was 422 households. Women with a child aged 9-12 months were main respondents. Intervention site end-term evaluation indicated that; the CS increased IVC by 10.1% (Z =6.0241, P health outcomes through immunization coverage, Kenya needs to fast-track nationwide implementation of the CS intervention.

  16. Patient satisfaction is biased by renovations to the interior of a primary care office: a pretest-posttest assessment.

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    Tièche, Raphaël; da Costa, Bruno R; Streit, Sven

    2016-08-11

    Measuring quality of care is essential to improve primary care. Quality of primary care for patients is usually assessed by patient satisfaction questionnaires. However, patients may not be able to judge quality of care without also reflecting their perception of the environment. We determined the effect that redesigning a primary care office had on patient satisfaction. We hypothesized that renovating the interior would make patients more satisfied with the quality of medical care. We performed a Pretest-Posttest analysis in a recently renovated single-practice primary care office in Grenchen, Switzerland. Before and after renovation, we distributed a questionnaire to assess patient satisfaction in four domains. We chose a Likert scale (1 = very poor to 6 = very good), and 12 quality indicators, and included two consecutive samples of patients presenting at the primary care office before (n = 153) and after (n = 153) interior design renovation. Response rate was high (overall 85 %). The sample was similar to the enlisted patient collective, but the sample population was older (60 years) than the collective (52 years). Patient satisfaction was higher for all domains after the office was renovated (p patient satisfaction, including satisfaction in domains otherwise unchanged. Physician skills and patient satisfaction sometimes depend on surrounding factors that may bias the ability of patients to assess the quality of medical care. These biases should be taken into account when quality assessment instruments are designed for patients.

  17. Effects of a job crafting intervention program on work engagement among Japanese employees: a pretest-posttest study.

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    Sakuraya, Asuka; Shimazu, Akihito; Imamura, Kotaro; Namba, Katsuyuki; Kawakami, Norito

    2016-10-24

    Job crafting, an employee-initiated job design/redesign, has become important for employees' well-being such as work engagement. This study examined the effectiveness of a newly developed job crafting intervention program on work engagement (as primary outcome), as well as job crafting and psychological distress (as secondary outcomes), using a pretest-posttest study design among Japanese employees. Participants were managers of a private company and a private psychiatric hospital in Japan. The job crafting intervention program consisted of two 120-min sessions with a two-week interval between them. Outcomes were assessed at baseline (Time 1), post-intervention (Time 2), and a one-month follow-up (Time 3). The mixed growth model analyses were conducted using time (Time 1, Time 2, and Time 3) as an indicator of intervention effect. Effect sizes were calculated using Cohen's d. The program showed a significant positive effect on work engagement (t = 2.20, p = 0.03) in the mixed growth model analyses, but with only small effect sizes (Cohen's d = 0.33 at Time 2 and 0.26 at Time 3). The program also significantly improved job crafting (t = 2.36, p = 0.02: Cohen's d = 0.36 at Time 2 and 0.47 at Time 3) and reduced psychological distress (t = -2.06, p = 0.04: Cohen's d = -0.15 at Time 2 and -0.31 at Time 3). The study indicated that the newly developed job crafting intervention program was effective in increasing work engagement, as well as in improving job crafting and decreasing psychological distress, among Japanese managers. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000024062 . Retrospectively registered 15 September 2016.

  18. Use of a National Continuing Medical Education Meeting to Provide Simulation-Based Training in Temporary Hemodialysis Catheter Insertion Skills: A Pre-Test Post-Test Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward G Clark

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simulation-based-mastery-learning (SBML is an effective method to train nephrology fellows to competently insert temporary, non-tunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs. Previous studies of SBML for NTHC-insertion have been conducted at a local level. Objectives: Determine if SBML for NTHC-insertion can be effective when provided at a national continuing medical education (CME meeting. Describe the correlation of demographic factors, prior experience with NTHC-insertion and procedural self-confidence with simulated performance of the procedure. Design: Pre-testpost-test study. Setting: 2014 Canadian Society of Nephrology annual meeting. Participants: Nephrology fellows, internal medicine residents and medical students. Measurements: Participants were surveyed regarding demographics, prior NTHC-insertion experience, procedural self-confidence and attitudes regarding the training they received. NTHC-insertion skills were assessed using a 28-item checklist. Methods: Participants underwent a pre-test of their NTHC-insertion skills at the internal jugular site using a realistic patient simulator and ultrasound machine. Participants then had a training session that included a didactic presentation and 2 hours of deliberate practice using the simulator. On the following day, trainees completed a post-test of their NTHC-insertion skills. All participants were required to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS previously set at 79%. Trainees who did not reach the MPS were required to perform more deliberate practice until the MPS was achieved. Results: Twenty-two individuals participated in SBML training. None met or exceeded the MPS at baseline with a median checklist score of 20 (IQR, 7.25 to 21. Seventeen of 22 participants (77% completed post-testing and improved their scores to a median of 27 (IQR, 26 to 28; p < 0.001. All met or exceeded the MPS on their first attempt. There were no significant correlations between demographics

  19. Use of a national continuing medical education meeting to provide simulation-based training in temporary hemodialysis catheter insertion skills: a pre-test post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Edward G; Paparello, James J; Wayne, Diane B; Edwards, Cedric; Hoar, Stephanie; McQuillan, Rory; Schachter, Michael E; Barsuk, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    Simulation-based-mastery-learning (SBML) is an effective method to train nephrology fellows to competently insert temporary, non-tunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs). Previous studies of SBML for NTHC-insertion have been conducted at a local level. Determine if SBML for NTHC-insertion can be effective when provided at a national continuing medical education (CME) meeting. Describe the correlation of demographic factors, prior experience with NTHC-insertion and procedural self-confidence with simulated performance of the procedure. Pre-test - post-test study. 2014 Canadian Society of Nephrology annual meeting. Nephrology fellows, internal medicine residents and medical students. Participants were surveyed regarding demographics, prior NTHC-insertion experience, procedural self-confidence and attitudes regarding the training they received. NTHC-insertion skills were assessed using a 28-item checklist. Participants underwent a pre-test of their NTHC-insertion skills at the internal jugular site using a realistic patient simulator and ultrasound machine. Participants then had a training session that included a didactic presentation and 2 hours of deliberate practice using the simulator. On the following day, trainees completed a post-test of their NTHC-insertion skills. All participants were required to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS) previously set at 79%. Trainees who did not reach the MPS were required to perform more deliberate practice until the MPS was achieved. Twenty-two individuals participated in SBML training. None met or exceeded the MPS at baseline with a median checklist score of 20 (IQR, 7.25 to 21). Seventeen of 22 participants (77%) completed post-testing and improved their scores to a median of 27 (IQR, 26 to 28; p < 0.001). All met or exceeded the MPS on their first attempt. There were no significant correlations between demographics, prior experience or procedural self-confidence with pre-test performance. Small sample-size and

  20. Evaluation of World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Topics in Nursing Education: Pre-test, post-test, none-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mansour; Skull, Alice; Parker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide was launched by the World Health Organization to develop a patient safety-friendly curriculum in health education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of teaching related to two topics from the Patient Safety Curriculum Guide on student nurses' knowledge and attitudes toward patient safety. A pretest, posttest, nonexperimental design was used. Patient safety education questionnaires were distributed to a convenience sample of 181 nursing students before the intervention, and 141 questionnaires after the intervention in one university in the East of England. The intervention consisted of two face-to-face lectures and one facilitated group work discussion. Seventy-one responses from pre- and posttest stages were matched. Paired t test, McNemar's test, and frequency measures were used for data analysis. The findings suggest that there are statistically significant differences in the subscales of the error and patient safety and personal influence over safety. The differences in the students' answers on patient safety knowledge before and after the interventions were not statistically significant. Although the student nurses highly commended the teaching delivered in this study, the use of experimental design in future curriculum evaluation may provide a more complementary insight to the findings of this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Flippin' Fluid Mechanics - Quasi-experimental Pre-test and Post-test Comparison Using Two Groups

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    Webster, D. R.; Majerich, D. M.; Luo, J.

    2014-11-01

    A flipped classroom approach has been implemented in an undergraduate fluid mechanics course. Students watch short on-line videos before class, participate in active in-class problem solving (in dyads), and complete individualized on-line quizzes weekly. In-class activities are designed to achieve a trifecta of: 1. developing problem solving skills, 2. learning subject content, and 3. developing inquiry skills. The instructor and assistants provide critical ``just-in-time tutoring'' during the in-class problem solving sessions. Comparisons are made with a simultaneous section offered in a traditional mode by a different instructor. Regression analysis was used to control for differences among students and to quantify the effect of the flipped fluid mechanics course. The dependent variable was the students' combined final examination and post-concept inventory scores and the independent variables were pre-concept inventory score, gender, major, course section, and (incoming) GPA. The R-square equaled 0.45 indicating that the included variables explain 45% of the variation in the dependent variable. The regression results indicated that if the student took the flipped fluid mechanics course, the dependent variable (i.e., combined final exam and post-concept inventory scores) was raised by 7.25 points. Interestingly, the comparison group reported significantly more often that their course emphasized memorization than did the flipped classroom group.

  2. Pretests or advance organizers for Web-based allergy-immunology medical education? A randomized controlled trial.

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    Rank, Matthew A; Volcheck, Gerald W; Swagger, Timothy; Cook, David A

    2012-01-01

    Web-based modules may facilitate instruction on core topics in allergy and immunology (AI). Pretests (PTs) have been shown to improve learning in Web-based courses, but their effectiveness in comparison with advance organizers (AOs) is unknown. We performed a randomized controlled trial of a Web-based educational intervention for teaching the practical aspects of allergen immunotherapy (AIT). AI Fellows-in-Training were randomly assigned to receive the introduction to the modules in an AO outline (AO group) or as PT questions (PT group). The primary outcome was the difference in posttest scores between groups. The secondary outcome was the difference in PT and posttest scores in the PT group. Thirty participants in the AO group and 35 in the PT group completed the modules and the posttest. The mean (SD) posttest score for the AO group was 74% (14%) compared with 73% (9%) for the PT group, a mean difference of -1% (95% CI, -7%, 5%; p = 0.67). A multivariate analysis controlling for year-in-training and total time spent on the modules revealed virtually identical results. The mean (SD) PT score for the PT group increased from 49 (10%) to 73% (9%), a mean difference of 24% (95% CI, 19%, 28%; p < 0.0001). Introducing Web-based allergy education with PT questions or an AO resulted in similar posttest scores. Posttest scores in the PT group improved significantly compared with PT scores.

  3. Does child and adolescent mental health in-service training result in equivalent knowledge gain among cadres of non-specialist health workers in Uganda? A pre-test post-test study.

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    Akol, Angela; Nalugya, Joyce; Nshemereirwe, Sylvia; Babirye, Juliet N; Engebretsen, Ingunn Marie Stadskleiv

    2017-01-01

    Early identification and management of child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) disorders helps to avert mental illness in adulthood but a CAMH treatment gap exists in Uganda. CAMH integration into primary health care (PHC) through in-service training of non-specialist health workers (NSHW) using the World Health Organisation (WHO) Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) Intervention Guide (IG) is a strategy to address this gap. However, results of such training are not supported by information on training development or delivery; and are undifferentiated by NSHW cadre. We aim to describe an in-service CAMH training for NSHW in Uganda and assess cadre-differentiated learning outcomes. Thirty-six clinical officers, nurses and midwives from 18 randomly selected PHC clinics in eastern Uganda were trained for 5 days on CAMH screening and referral using a curriculum based on the mhGAP-IG version 1.0 and PowerPoint slides from the International Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions (IACAPAP). The residential training was evaluated through pre- and post- training tests of CAMH knowledge and attitudes using the participants' post-test scores; and the difference between pre-test and post-test scores. Two-tailed t-tests assessed differences in mean pre-test and post-test scores between the cadres; hierarchical linear regression tested the association between cadre and post test scores; and logistic regression evaluated the relationship between cadre and knowledge gain at three pre-determined cut off points. Thirty-three participants completed both pre-and post-tests. Improved mean scores from pre- to post-test were observed for both clinical officers (20% change) and nurse/midwives (18% change). Clinical officers had significantly higher mean test scores than nurses and midwives (p training. Thus, an option for integrating CAMH into PHC in Uganda using the mhGAP-IG and IACAPAP PowerPoint slides is to proceed without cadre differentiation.

  4. Evaluation of an Education and Training Program to Prevent and Manage Patients' Violence in a Mental Health Setting: A Pretest-Posttest Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Stéphane; Goncalves, Jane; Boyer, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Workplace violence can lead to serious consequences for victims, organizations, and society. Most workplace violence prevention programs aim to train staff to better recognize and safely manage at-risk situations. The Omega education and training program was developed in Canada in 1999, and has since been used to teach healthcare and mental health workers the skills needed to effectively intervene in situations of aggression. The present study was designed to assess the impact of Omega on employee psychological distress, confidence in coping, and perceived exposure to violence. This program was offered to 105 employees in a psychiatric hospital in Montreal, Canada. Eighty-nine of them accepted to participate. Questionnaires were completed before the training, after a short period of time (M = 109 days) and at follow-up (M = 441 days). Repeated-measures ANOVAs and Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated. Results demonstrated statistically significant improvements in short-term and follow-up posttest scores of psychological distress, confidence in coping, and in levels of exposure to violence. This study is one of very few to demonstrate the positive impact of this training program. Further research is needed to understand how to improve the effectiveness of the program, especially among participants resistant to change.

  5. Influence of Training on First-Year Nursing Department Students' Attitudes on Death and Caring for Dying Patients: A Single-Group Pretest-Posttest Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerit, Birgül

    2017-01-01

    The study examined the influence of training on first-year nursing department students' attitudes on death and caring for dying patients. Utilizing the experimental model, the study sample consisted of 81 first-year students attending the nursing department of a university. Death Attitude Profile-Revised and Frommelt Attitude toward Care of the Dying Scale were used for data collection. Data analysis included means, standard deviation, and t test for related samples. Student attitudes toward death were measured as 146.43 (16.741) and 152.75 (15.132) for pre- and posttraining, respectively. Student attitudes toward caring for dying patients were established to be 103.02 (7.655) during pretraining period and 111.02 (10.359) at posttraining period. The difference between pre- and posttests for mean attitudes toward death and caring for the dying patient was statistically significant. Study results determined that training was effective in forming positive student attitudes toward death and caring for dying patients.

  6. Evaluation of an Education and Training Program to Prevent and Manage Patients’ Violence in a Mental Health Setting: A Pretest-Posttest Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Stéphane; Goncalves, Jane; Boyer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Workplace violence can lead to serious consequences for victims, organizations, and society. Most workplace violence prevention programs aim to train staff to better recognize and safely manage at-risk situations. The Omega education and training program was developed in Canada in 1999, and has since been used to teach healthcare and mental health workers the skills needed to effectively intervene in situations of aggression. The present study was designed to assess the impact of Omega on employee psychological distress, confidence in coping, and perceived exposure to violence. This program was offered to 105 employees in a psychiatric hospital in Montreal, Canada. Eighty-nine of them accepted to participate. Questionnaires were completed before the training, after a short period of time (M = 109 days) and at follow-up (M = 441 days). Repeated-measures ANOVAs and Cohen’s d effect sizes were calculated. Results demonstrated statistically significant improvements in short-term and follow-up posttest scores of psychological distress, confidence in coping, and in levels of exposure to violence. This study is one of very few to demonstrate the positive impact of this training program. Further research is needed to understand how to improve the effectiveness of the program, especially among participants resistant to change. PMID:27490582

  7. The Role of Occupational Therapy in Promoting Playfulness, Parent Competence, and Social Participation in Early Childhood Playgroups: A Pretest Posttest Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Sarah; Hubbell, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an inclusive, community-based playgroup intervention on parent and child outcomes. The role of occupational therapy as part of a team of providers in early childhood was also explored. Caregiver-child dyads (n = 36) were enrolled in one of three playgroup conditions (control, occupational therapy support, and…

  8. Measuring the impact of information literacy e-learning and in-class courses via pre-tests and post-test at the Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kratochvíl

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper aims to evaluate the results of the assessment and comparison of the impact of information literacy in e-learning and in-class courses at the Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Czech Republic. The objective herein is to show that e-learning can be as effective a method of teaching IL activities as in-class lessons. Methods: In the autumn of 2012 and the spring of 2013, a total of 159 medical students enrolled in the e-learning course and completed the required pre-tests and post-tests comprising 30 multiple-choice questions on information literacy topics; another 92 PhD students from in-class courses took the 22-question test. The pre-test and post-test scores along with the number of students who correctly answered the questions were counted and the overall percentage was calculated. The final outcome was the extent of knowledge increase and the number of students with correct answers, expressed in percentage. Results: On average, 95.5% and 92.5% increase in knowledge was recorded among the medical students and PhD students respectively; an average of 4.5% medical students and 7.5% of PhD students recorded low scores in the post-test. As for the number of correct answers, the average results of the 22 set questions shared among the study groups were as follows: 15 questions were answered correctly more often by medical students, 6 were answered correctly more often by PhD students and only 1 question was correctly answered in the same average percentage by both the groups. Discussion: The results point to the need for proposing several key revisions. Among these include an exercise to be included in both curricula on online search for an article (Web of Science or Scopus without full text availability via link service, while instructions on manually creating bibliographic references shall be added to the PhD course. Additional search examples shall be added to the study materials and video records of in

  9. Understanding interrelationships among HIV-related stigma, concern about HIV infection, and intent to disclose HIV serostatus: a pretest-posttest study in a rural area of eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongjie; Hu, Zhi; Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita; Naar-King, Sylvie; Yang, Hongmei

    2006-02-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the interrelationships among HIV-related public and felt stigma, worry of HIV infection, HIV/AIDS knowledge and intention to disclose HIV testing results in a rural area of China, where HIV spread among former commercial blood donors. A one-group pretest-posttest study was conducted among 605 marriage license applicants. The following relationships showed statistical significance in path analysis: (1) HIV/AIDS knowledge --> worry [beta (Standardized coefficient) = -0.39]; (2) worry --> public stigma (beta = 0.27); (3) public stigma --> felt stigma (beta = 0.22); and (4) felt stigma --> intention to disclosure (beta = -0.20). Separate path analyses for males and females generated similar association patterns. HIV counseling reduced perceived worry but exerted little impact on HIV-related stigma and the intention. The pathway from a lack of HIV/AIDS knowledge to increased stigma and to decreased intention to disclose one's serostatus is particularly policy relevant as decreased intention to disclosure may be related to continuing practice of HIV risk behaviors. The findings demonstrate interventions aiming at the reduction of stigma should be targeted at both the individual and community levels.

  10. A pre-test and post-test study of the physical and psychological effects of out-of-home respite care on caregivers of children with life-threatening conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Cheryl; Willenberg, Lisa; Zordan, Rachel; Murphy, Andrea; Hessel, Gail; Philip, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    Respite services are recommended as an important support for caregivers of children with life-threatening conditions. However, the benefits of respite have not been convincingly demonstrated through quantitative research. To determine the impact of out-of home respite care on levels of fatigue, psychological adjustment, quality of life and relationship satisfaction among caregivers of children with life-threatening conditions. A mixed-methods, pre-test and post-test study A consecutive sample of 58 parental caregivers whose children were admitted to a children's hospice for out-of-home respite over an average of 4 days. Caregivers had below-standard levels of quality of life compared to normative populations. Paired t-tests demonstrated that caregivers' average psychological adjustment scores significantly improved from pre-respite (mean = 13.9, standard error = 0.71) to post-respite (mean = 10.7, standard error = 1); p psychological adjustment of caregivers of children with life-threatening conditions. Study outcomes inform service provision and future research efforts in paediatric palliative care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Using a retrospective pretest instead of a conventional pretest is replacing biases: a qualitative study of cognitive processes underlying responses to thentest items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taminiau-Bloem, Elsbeth F; Schwartz, Carolyn E; van Zuuren, Florence J; Koeneman, Margot A; Visser, Mechteld R M; Tishelman, Carol; Koning, Caro C E; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2016-06-01

    The thentest design aims to detect and control for recalibration response shift. This design assumes (1) more consistency in the content of the cognitive processes underlying patients' quality of life (QoL) between posttest and thentest assessments than between posttest and pretest assessments; and (2) consistency in the time frame and description of functioning referenced at pretest and thentest. Our objective is to utilize cognitive interviewing to qualitatively examine both assumptions. We conducted think-aloud interviews with 24 patients with cancer prior to and after radiotherapy to elicit cognitive processes underlying their assessment of seven EORTC QLQ-C30 items at pretest, posttest and thentest. We used an analytic scheme based on the cognitive process models of Tourangeau et al. and Rapkin and Schwartz that yielded five cognitive processes. We subsequently used this input for quantitative analysis of count data. Contrary to expectation, the number of dissimilar cognitive processes between posttest and thentest was generally larger than between pretest and posttest across patients. Further, patients considered a range of time frames when answering the thentest questions. Moreover, patients' description at the thentest of their pretest functioning was often not similar to that which was noted at pretest. Items referring to trouble taking a short walk, overall health and QoL were most often violating the assumptions. Both assumptions underlying the thentest design appear not to be supported by the patients' cognitive processes. Replacing the conventional pretest-posttest design with the thentest design may simply be replacing one set of biases with another.

  12. Effects of video-feedback on the communication, clinical competence and motivational interviewing skills of practice nurses: a pre-test posttest control group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Dulmen, S. van

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the effects of individual video-feedback on the generic communication skills, clinical competence (i.e. adherence to practice guidelines) and motivational interviewing skills of experienced practice nurses working in primary care. BACKGROUND: Continuing professional education may be

  13. Effects of video-feedback on the communication, clinical competence and motivational interviewing skills of practice nurses: a pre-test posttest control group study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Weijden, T. van der; Dulmen, S. van

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To examine the effects of individual video-feedback on the generic communication skills, clinical competence (i.e. adherence to practice guidelines) and motivational interviewing skills of experienced practice nurses working in primary care. Background: Continuing professional education may be

  14. Summary of an Investigation into the Relative Effects on Student Performance on a "Block" vs. a "Non-Block" Scheduled Developmental Semester: Pretest-Posttest Control Group Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Clifford A., Jr.

    In fall 1980, a block scheduled developmental semester was offered for the first time at the Boyce Campus of the Community College of Allegheny County. The program was composed of three integrated courses: "Man, Time, and Social Change," a social science elective; "Basic Writing Techniques," a developmental English course; and…

  15. Controlled trial of pretest education approaches to enhance informed decision-making for BRCA1 gene testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, C; Biesecker, B; Benkendorf, J L; Kerner, J; Gomez-Caminero, A; Hughes, C; Reed, M M

    1997-01-15

    In response to the isolation of the BRCA1 gene, a breast-ovarian cancer-susceptibility gene, biotechnology companies are already marketing genetic tests to health care providers and to the public. Initial studies indicate interest in BRCA1 testing in the general public and in populations at high risk. However, the optimal strategies for educating and counseling individuals have yet to be determined. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of alternate strategies for pretest education and counseling on decision-making regarding BRCA1 testing among women at low to moderate risk who have a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. A randomized trial design was used to evaluate the effects of education only (educational approach) and education plus counseling (counseling approach), as compared with a waiting-list (control) condition (n = 400 for all groups combined). The educational approach reviewed information about personal risk factors, inheritance of cancer susceptibility, the benefits, limitations, and risks of BRCA1 testing, and cancer screening and prevention options. The counseling approach included this information, as well as a personalized discussion of experiences with cancer in the family and the potential psychological and social impact of testing. Data on knowledge of inherited cancer and BRCA1 test characteristics, perceived risk, perceived benefits, limitations and risks of BRCA1 testing, and testing intentions were collected by use of structured telephone interviews at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. Provision of a blood sample for future testing served as a proxy measure of intention to be tested (in the education and counseling arms of the study). The effects of intervention group on study outcomes were evaluated by use of hierarchical linear regression modeling and logistic regression modeling (for the blood sample outcome). All P values are for two-sided tests. The educational and counseling approaches both led to significant increases in

  16. Comparison of approaches to estimate confidence intervals of post-test probabilities of diagnostic test results in a nested case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Zaane Bas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nested case–control studies become increasingly popular as they can be very efficient for quantifying the diagnostic accuracy of costly or invasive tests or (biomarkers. However, they do not allow for direct estimation of the test’s predictive values or post-test probabilities, let alone for their confidence intervals (CIs. Correct estimates of the predictive values itself can easily be obtained using a simple correction by the (inverse sampling fractions of the cases and controls. But using this correction to estimate the corresponding standard error (SE, falsely increases the number of patients that are actually studied, yielding too small CIs. We compared different approaches for estimating the SE and thus CI of predictive values or post-test probabilities of diagnostic test results in a nested case–control study. Methods We created datasets based on a large, previously published diagnostic study on 2 different tests (D-dimer test and calf difference test with a nested case–control design. We compared six different approaches; the approaches were: 1. the standard formula for the SE of a proportion, 2. adaptation of the standard formula with the sampling fraction, 3. A bootstrap procedure, 4. A approach, which uses the sensitivity, the specificity and the prevalence, 5. Weighted logistic regression, and 6. Approach 4 on the log odds scale. The approaches were compared with respect to coverage of the CI and CI-width. Results The bootstrap procedure (approach 3 showed good coverage and relatively small CI widths. Approaches 4 and 6 showed some undercoverage, particularly for the D-dimer test with frequent positive results (positive results around 70%. Approaches 1, 2 and 5 showed clear overcoverage at low prevalences of 0.05 and 0.1 in the cohorts for all case–control ratios. Conclusion The results from our study suggest that a bootstrap procedure is necessary to assess the confidence interval for the predictive

  17. Initial experience of evaluation of coronary artery with 320-slice row CT system in high pre-test probability population without heart rate (rhythm) control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Gang; Li Guoying; Li Min; Ding Juan; Li Shenghui; Li Li; Zhu Shifang; Lin Changling; Zou Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the accuracy of 320-slice row CT system for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) in high pre-test probability population without heart rate/rhythm control. Methods: Thirty patients with a high pre-test probability of CAD underwent 320-slice row CT without preceding heart rate/rhythm control. Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) served as the standard reference. Data sets were evaluated by 2 observers in consensus with respect to stenoses ≥50% decreased diameter. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and Youden index were analyzed; the impact of heart rate and calcification on image quality as well as diagnostic accuracy were also analyzed by Chi-square test. Results: Mean heart rate during scanning was 73.7±15.4 beats per min(bpm), and median(QR) of Agatston score of segment was 45.6 (181). On a per-segment analysis, overall sensitivity was 96.1% (74/77, 95% CI:89.03%-99.19%), specificity was 98.3% (337/343, 95% CI:96.23%-99.36%), PPV was 92.5% (74/80, 95% CI:84.39%-97.20%), NPV of 99.1% (337/340, 95% CI: 97.44%-99.82%) and the Youden index was 0.94. In both heart-rate subgroups (242 in heart rate < 70 bpm group, 169 in heart rate ≥70 bpm group), diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of coronary artery stenosis was similar (P<0.05). The accuracy and the quality score of the subgroup Agatston score ≥100 were lower than that of the subgroup Agatston score <100; however, the difference of results between 320-slice row CT and ICA was not significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: 320-detector row CT can reliably detect coronary artery stenoses in a high pre-test probability population without heart rate/rhythm control. (authors)

  18. Battery Post-Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Post-test diagnostics of aged batteries can provide additional information regarding the cause of performance degradation, which, previously, could be only inferred...

  19. Culture Camp, Ethnic Identity, and Adoption Socialization for Korean Adoptees: A Pretest and Posttest Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the impact of racial-ethnic socialization on adopted South Korean children and adolescents who attended a sleepaway Korean culture camp for one week. This camp provided racial-ethnic socialization experiences via exposure to camp counselors, staff, and teachers who were Korean Americans, Korean nationals, and Korean adult…

  20. Evaluation of a Biomedical Informatics course for medical students: a pre-posttest study at UNAM Faculty of Medicine in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor; Martínez-Franco, Adrián I; Lobato-Valverde, Marlette; Fernández-Saldívar, Fabián; Vives-Varela, Tania; Martínez-González, Adrián

    2015-04-01

    Biomedical Informatics (BMI) education in medical schools is developing a sound curricular base, but there are few published reports of their educational usefulness. The goal of this paper is to assess knowledge change and satisfaction in medical students after a BMI curriculum. The National Autonomous University of México Faculty of Medicine (UNAM) recently implemented a curricular reform that includes two BMI sequential courses (BMI-1 and BMI-2). The research design was one-group pretest-posttest. An objective test with evidence of validity was used for knowledge measurement. A satisfaction questionnaire was applied at the end of the courses. Two-tailed paired Student's t-tests were applied, comparing knowledge scores in the pre and post-test for each course. The study included student cohorts during two consecutive academic years. The 2013 BMI-1 course (n = 986 students) knowledge pretest score was 43.0 ± 8.6 (mean percent correct ± SD), and the post-test score was 57.7 ± 10.3 (p < 0.001); the 2014 BMI-1 (n = 907) pretest score was 43.7 ± 8.5, and the post-test was 58.1 ± 10.5 (p < 0.001). The 2012 BMI-2 course (n = 683) pretest score was 26.3 ± 7.9, the post-test score was 44.3 ± 13.3 (p < 0.001); the 2013 BMI-2 (n = 926) pretest score was 27.5 ± 7.5, and the post-test was 42.0 ± 11.0 (p < 0.001). The overall opinion of the students regarding the course was from good to excellent, with a response rate higher than 90%. The satisfaction questionnaires had high reliability (Cronbach's alpha of 0.93). The study shows a significant increase in BMI knowledge after an educational intervention in four medical student cohorts, and an overall positive evaluation by the students. Long-term follow-up is needed, as well as controlled studies of BMI educational interventions using performance endpoints.

  1. QUESTIONNAIRES PRETESTING IN MARKETING RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA-MIHAELA BABONEA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Designing the perfect survey questionnaire is impossible. However, researchers can still create an effective research. To make your questionnaire effective, it is necessary to pretest it before actually using it. The following paper reveals some general guidelines on pretesting and what to do for a more effective marketing research giving the fact that the existing literature highlights the importance and indispensability of pretesting and on the other hand, does not provide sufficient information in terms of methodology about it. Also, we have tried to explain the importance of questionnaires pretesting before applying them in order to obtain the best results in marketing research and we’ve kept in mind that high quality in this domain means using new tools and improving the existing ones if one searches for efficient results.

  2. Pre- and post-test analyses of a KKL turbine trip test at 109% power using RETRAN-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coddington, P.

    2001-01-01

    As part of the PSI/HSK STARS project, pre-test calculations have been performed for a KKL turbine trip test at 109% power using the RETRAN-3D code. In this paper, we first present the results of these calculations, together with a description of the test and a comparison of the results with the measured plant data, and then discuss in more detail the differences between the pre-test results and the plant measurements, including the differences in the initial and boundary conditions, and how these differences influenced the calculated results. Finally, we comment on a series of post-test and sensitivity analyses, which were performed to resolve some of the discrepancies. The results of the pre-test (blind) calculations show good overall agreement with the experimental data, particularly for the maximum in the steam-line mass flow rate following the opening of the turbine bypass valves. This is of critical importance, since the steam-line flow has the least margin to the reactor scram limit. The agreement is especially good since the control rod banks used for the selected rod insertion were changed from those given in the test specification. Following a review of the comparison of the pre-test calculations with the measured data, several deficiencies in the RETRAN-3D model for KKL were identified and corrected as part of the post-test analysis. This allowed for both an improvement in the calculated results, and a deeper understanding of the behaviour of the turbine trip transient. (author)

  3. An Online Drug Abuse Prevention Program for Adolescent Girls: Posttest and 1-Year Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinn, Traci M; Schinke, Steven P; Hopkins, Jessica; Keller, Bryan; Liu, Xiang

    2018-03-01

    Early adolescent girls' rates of drug use have matched, and in some instances, surpassed boys' rates. Though girls and boys share risk factors for drug use, girls also have gender-specific risks. Tailored interventions to prevent girls' drug use are warranted. This study developed and tested a web-based, drug abuse prevention program for adolescent girls. The nationwide sample of 13- and 14-year-old girls (N = 788) was recruited via Facebook ads. Enrolled girls were randomly assigned to the intervention or control condition. All girls completed pretest measures online. Following pretest, intervention girls interacted with the 9-session, gender-specific prevention program online. The program aimed to reduce girls' drug use and associated risk factors by improving their cognitive and behavioral skills around such areas as coping with stress, managing mood, maintaining a healthy body image, and refusing drug use offers. Girls in both conditions again completed measures at posttest and 1-year follow-up. At posttest, and compared to girls in the control condition, girls who received the intervention smoked fewer cigarettes and reported higher self-esteem, goal setting, media literacy, and self-efficacy. At 1-year follow-up, and compared to girls in the control condition, girls who received the intervention reported engaging in less binge drinking and cigarette smoking; girls assigned to the intervention condition also had higher alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana refusal skills, coping skills, and media literacy and lower rates of peer drug use. This study's findings support the use of tailored, online drug abuse prevention programming for early adolescent girls.

  4. Patient perspectives with abbreviated versus standard pre-test HIV counseling in the prenatal setting: a randomized-controlled, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohan, Deborah; Gomez, Elvira; Greenberg, Mara; Washington, Sierra; Charlebois, Edwin D

    2009-01-01

    In the US, an unacceptably high percentage of pregnant women do not undergo prenatal HIV testing. Previous studies have found increased uptake of prenatal HIV testing with abbreviated pre-test counseling, however little is known about patient decision making, testing satisfaction and knowledge in this setting. A randomized-controlled, non-inferiority trial was conducted from October 2006 through February 2008 at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH), the public teaching hospital of the City and County of San Francisco. A total of 278 English- and Spanish-speaking pregnant women were randomized to receive either abbreviated or standard nurse-performed HIV test counseling at the initial prenatal visit. Patient decision making experience was compared between abbreviated versus standard HIV counseling strategies among a sample of low-income, urban, ethnically diverse prenatal patients. The primary outcome was the decisional conflict score (DCS) using O'Connor low-literacy scale and secondary outcomes included satisfaction with test decision, basic HIV knowledge and HIV testing uptake. We conducted an intention-to-treat analysis of 278 women--134 (48.2%) in the abbreviated arm (AA) and 144 (51.8%) in the standard arm (SA). There was no significant difference in the proportion of women with low decisional conflict (71.6% in AA vs. 76.4% in SA, p = .37), and the observed mean difference between the groups of 3.88 (95% CI: -0.65, 8.41) did not exceed the non-inferiority margin. HIV testing uptake was very high (97. 8%) and did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (99.3% in AA vs. 96.5% in SA, p = .12). Likewise, there was no difference in satisfaction with testing decision (97.8% in AA vs. 99.3% in SA, p = .36). However, women in AA had significantly lower mean HIV knowledge scores (78.4%) compared to women in SA (83.7%, pprocess, while associated with slightly lower knowledge, does not compromise patient decision making or satisfaction regarding HIV testing

  5. Single Group, Pre- and Post-Test Research Designs: Some Methodological Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Emma; Torgerson, Carole J.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides two illustrations of some of the factors that can influence findings from pre- and post-test research designs in evaluation studies, including regression to the mean (RTM), maturation, history and test effects. The first illustration involves a re-analysis of data from a study by Marsden (2004), in which pre-test scores are…

  6. Posttest REALP4 analysis of LOFT experiment L1-3A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.; Holmstrom, H.L.O.

    1977-10-01

    This report presents selected results of posttest RELAP4 modeling of LOFT loss-of-coolant experiment L1-3A, a double-ended isothermal cold leg break with lower plenum emergency core coolant injection. Comparisons are presented between the pretest prediction, the posttest analysis, and the experimental data. It is concluded that pressurizer modeling is important for accurately predicting system behavior during the initial portion of saturated blowdown. Using measured initial conditions rather than nominal specified initial conditions did not influence the system model results significantly. Using finer nodalization in the reactor vessel improved the prediction of the system pressure history by minimizing steam condensation effects. Unequal steam condensation between the downcomer and core volumes appear to cause the manometer oscillations observed in both the pretest and posttest RELAP4 analysis

  7. A Pretest for Introductory Crops Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Donald M.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using a pretest in introductory agronomy courses. Provides a pretest that has been developed for use in an introductory crops course taught at Southern Illinois University. Includes 25 definitions, 17 true-false and multiple choice questions, and 6 short answer questions. (TW)

  8. Intermanual Transfer in Training With an Upper-Limb Myoelectric Prosthesis Simulator : A Mechanistic, Randomized, Pretest-Posttest Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkema, Sietske; Bongers, Raoul M.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    Background. Intermanual transfer may improve prosthetic handling and acceptance if used in training soon after an amputation. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intermanual transfer effects can be detected after training with a myoelectric upper-limb prosthesis simulator.

  9. Intermanual Transfer Effect in Young Children After Training in a Complex Skill : Mechanistic, Pseudorandomized, Pretest-Posttest Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkema, Sietske; Bongers, Raoul M.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    Background. Intermanual transfer implies that motor skills learned on one side of the body transfer to the untrained side. This effect was previously noted in adults practicing with a prosthesis simulator. Objective. The study objective was to determine whether intermanual transfer is present in

  10. Evaluating the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia training for use with community-based aged care staff working with people with dementia: a controlled pretest-post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Erin R; Chenery, Helen J

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate the effects of a communication skills training programme on community aged care staff's knowledge of communication support in dementia and on staff's care experience. Dementia can lead to impairments in communication. Therefore, quality community-based dementia care requires that staff be skilled communicators, equipped to facilitate interactions with people with dementia. The current investigation evaluated the effectiveness of the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia for Care Staff training programme with respect to knowledge of communication support and the staff/caregiver experience. A multi-centre controlled pretest/post-test design with randomised cohort allocation was used. Outcome measures were completed at baseline, immediately after training (training group only), and at three-month follow-up. Thirty-eight care staff working in community aged care participated and completed all outcome measures (training = 22; control = 16).Training and control groups completed the following outcome measures: knowledge of communication support strategies, self-efficacy, preparedness to provide care, strain in nursing care and attitude to dementia care. Staff in the training group provided written feedback on the training. A significant improvement in knowledge scores from baseline was found for the training group both immediately after training and at three-month follow-up. There was also a significant training effect for self-efficacy and preparedness to provide care. No significant difference was found for the control group for any measure. No significant training effects were found for measures of strain or attitudes to dementia care. Feedback from staff suggests that the training was well received. The MESSAGE training was positively received by staff and had a significant effect on care staff knowledge, and confidence to provide care for people with dementia. The easily accessible multimedia training programme is well received by

  11. Post-test analysis of PANDA test P4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.; Woudstra, A.; Koning, H.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a post-test analysis of the integral system test P4, which has been executed in the PANDA facility at PSI in Switzerland within the framework of Work Package 2 of the TEPSS project are presented. The post-test analysis comprises an evaluation of the PANDA test P4 and a comparison of the test results with the results of simulations using the RELAPS/MOD3.2, TRAC-BF1, and MELCOR 1.8.4 codes. The PANDA test P4 has provided data about how trapped air released from the drywell later in the transient affects PCCS performance in an adequate manner. The well-defined measurements can serve as an important database for the assessment of thermal hydraulic system analysis codes, especially for conditions that could be met in passively operated advanced reactors, i.e. low pressure and small driving forces. Based on the analysis of the test data, the test acceptance criteria have been met. The test P4 has been successfully completed and the instrument readings were with the permitted ranges. The PCCs showed a favorable and robust performance and a wide margin for decay heat removal from the containment. The PANDA P4 test demonstrated that trapped air, released from the drywell later in the transient, only temporarily and only slightly affected the performance of the passive containment cooling system. The analysis of the results of the RELAPS code showed that the overall behaviour of the test has been calculated quite well with regards to pressure, mass flow rates, and pool boil-down. This accounts both for the pre-test and the post-test simulations. However, due to the one-dimensional, stacked-volume modeling of the PANDA DW, WW, and GDCS vessels, 3D-effects such as in-vessel mixing and recirculation could not be calculated. The post-test MELCOR simulation showed an overall behaviour that is comparable to RELAPS. However, MELCOR calculated almost no air trapping in the PCC tubes that could hinder the steam condensation rate. This resulted in lower calculated

  12. Empirical Likelihood-Based Estimation of the Treatment Effect in a Pretest–Posttest Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiung-Yu; Qin, Jing; Follmann, Dean A.

    2013-01-01

    The pretest–posttest study design is commonly used in medical and social science research to assess the effect of a treatment or an intervention. Recently, interest has been rising in developing inference procedures that improve efficiency while relaxing assumptions used in the pretest–posttest data analysis, especially when the posttest measurement might be missing. In this article we propose a semiparametric estimation procedure based on empirical likelihood (EL) that incorporates the common baseline covariate information to improve efficiency. The proposed method also yields an asymptotically unbiased estimate of the response distribution. Thus functions of the response distribution, such as the median, can be estimated straightforwardly, and the EL method can provide a more appealing estimate of the treatment effect for skewed data. We show that, compared with existing methods, the proposed EL estimator has appealing theoretical properties, especially when the working model for the underlying relationship between the pretest and posttest measurements is misspecified. A series of simulation studies demonstrates that the EL-based estimator outperforms its competitors when the working model is misspecified and the data are missing at random. We illustrate the methods by analyzing data from an AIDS clinical trial (ACTG 175). PMID:23729942

  13. Posttest analysis of a 1:4-scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R.; Hessheimer, M.F.

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, co-sponsored a Cooperative Containment Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. As part of the program, a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model was subjected to a series of overpressurization tests at SNL beginning in July 2000 and culminating in a functional failure mode or Limit State Test (LST) in September 2000 and a Structural Failure Mode Test (SFMT) in November 2001. The PCCV model, uniformly scaled at 1:4, is representative of the containment structure of an actual Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant (OHI-3) in Japan. The objectives of the pressurization tests were to obtain measurement of the structural response to pressure loading beyond design basis accident in order to validate analytical modeling, to find pressure capacity of the model, and to observe its failure mechanisms. This paper compares results of pretest analytical studies of the PCCV model to the PCCV high pressure test measurements and describes results of post-test analytical studies. These analyses have been performed by ANATECH Corp. under contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The post-test analysis represents the third phase of a comprehensive PCCV analysis effort. The first phase consisted of preliminary analyses to determine what finite element models would be necessary for the pretest prediction analyses, and the second phase consisted of the pretest prediction analyses. The principal objectives of the post-test analyses were: (1) to provide insights to improve the analytical methods for predicting the structural response and failure modes of a prestressed concrete containment, and (2) to evaluate by analysis any phenomena or failure mode observed during the test that had not been explicitly predicted by analysis. In addition to summarizing comparisons between measured

  14. Size and power of pretest procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim; Boon, P.C.; Kallenberg, W.C.M.

    2000-01-01

    A pre-test procedure consists of a preliminary test on a nuisance parameter, investigating whether it equals a given value or not, followed by the main testing problem on the parameter of interest. In case of acceptance of the preliminary test, the main test is applied in the restricted family with

  15. Effect of Instruction in Emotional Intelligence Skills on Locus of Control and Academic Self-Efficacy among Junior Secondary School Students in Niger State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaru, Yunusa; Umma, Abdulwahid

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of instruction in emotional intelligence Skills on locus of control and academic self-efficacy among junior secondary school students in Niger state, Nigeria. This study employed a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent control group, pre-test - post-test design. The population of this study was 105,034 secondary…

  16. Learning What Works in ITS from Non-Traditional Randomized Controlled Trial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardos, Zachary A.; Dailey, Matthew D.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2011-01-01

    The well established, gold standard approach to finding out what works in education research is to run a randomized controlled trial (RCT) using a standard pre-test and post-test design. RCTs have been used in the intelligent tutoring community for decades to determine which questions and tutorial feedback work best. Practically speaking, however,…

  17. Pretest characterization of WIPP experimental waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.; Davis, H.

    1991-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is an underground repository designed for the storage and disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities across the country. The Performance Assessment (PA) studies for WIPP address compliance of the repository with applicable regulations, and include full-scale experiments to be performed at the WIPP site. These experiments are the bin-scale and alcove tests to be conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Prior to conducting these experiments, the waste to be used in these tests needs to be characterized to provide data on the initial conditions for these experiments. This characterization is referred to as the Pretest Characterization of WIPP Experimental Waste, and is also expected to provide input to other programmatic efforts related to waste characterization. The purpose of this paper is to describe the pretest waste characterization activities currently in progress for the WIPP bin-scale waste, and to discuss the program plan and specific analytical protocols being developed for this characterization. The relationship between different programs and documents related to waste characterization efforts is also highlighted in this paper

  18. Learning Historical Thinking with Oral History Interviews: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Intervention Study of Oral History Interviews in History Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Christiane; Wagner, Wolfgang; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the effectiveness of the oral history approach with respect to students' historical competence. A total of 35 ninth-grade classes (N = 900) in Germany were randomly assigned to one of four conditions--live, video, text, or a (nontreated) control group--in a pretest, posttest, and follow-up design. Comparing the three…

  19. A Ball Skills Intervention in Preschoolers: The CHAMP Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Leah E; Veldman, Sanne L C; Palmer, Kara K; Okely, Anthony D

    2017-11-01

    Fundamental motor skills (FMS) contribute to positive health trajectories. A high level of competence in ball skills (a subset of FMS) is a predictor for time spent in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity during adolescence. This study examined the effects of a ball skills intervention on ball skill competence among preschool-aged boys and girls. This is a two-armed randomized controlled trial. A total of 124 preschoolers (Mage ± SD = 48.14 ± 6.62 months) were randomly assigned to one of two groups, the Children's Health Activity Motor Program (CHAMP; n = 81) or control (n = 43). FMS were measured before, after (9 wk), and at retention (18 wk) using the object control subscale of the Test of Gross Motor Development, Second Edition. Changes in ball skill scores were calculated (pretest-posttest, pretest-retention, posttest-retention) and were compared using one-way ANOVAs with post hoc Scheffe analysis. Findings support that groups demonstrated significantly different rates of change from pretest to posttest (F3,117 = 179.45, P CHAMP boys and girls had greater positive rates of change from pretest to posttest and pretest to retention as well as greater negative rates of change from posttest to retention. CHAMP was effective in improving and maintaining ball skills in preschool-age boys and girls. Findings support that providing a high-quality motor skill program in early childhood settings could potentially be a sustainable public health approach to promoting FMS and positive developmental trajectories for health.

  20. 40 CFR 89.406 - Pre-test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-test procedures. 89.406 Section 89.406 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Procedures § 89.406 Pre-test procedures. (a) Allow a minimum of 30 minutes warmup in the standby or operating...

  1. Post-test evaluation of the geology, geochemistry, microbiology, and hydrology of the in situ air stripping demonstration site at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy Dilek, C.A.; Looney, B.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Nichols, R.L.; Fliermans, C.B.; Parker, W.H.; Dougherty, J.M.; Kaback, D.S.; Simmons, J.L.

    1993-07-01

    A full-scale demonstration of the use of horizontal wells for in situ air stripping for environment restoration was completed as part of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program. The demonstration of in situ air stripping was the first in a series of demonstrations of innovative remediation technologies for the cleanup of sites contaminated with volatile organic contaminants. The in situ air stripping system consisted of two directionally drilled wells that delivered gases to and extract contamination from the subsurface. The demonstration was designed to remediate soils and sediments in the unsaturated and saturated zones as well as groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds. The demonstration successfully removed significant quantities of solvent from the subsurface. The field site and horizontal wells were subsequently used for an in situ bioremediation demonstration during which methane was added to the injected air. The field conditions documented herein represent the baseline status of the site for evaluating the in situ bioremediation as well as the post-test conditions for the in situ air stripping demonstration. Characterization activities focused on documenting the nature and distribution of contamination in the subsurface. The post-test characterization activities discussed herein include results from the analysis of sediment samples, three-dimensional images of the pretest and post-test data, contaminant inventories estimated from pretest and post-test models, a detailed lithologic cross sections of the site, results of aquifer testing, and measurements of geotechnical parameters of undisturbed core sediments.

  2. Pre-test prediction and post-test analysis of PWR fuel rod ballooning in the MT-3 in-pile LOCA simulation experiment in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.T.; Horwood, R.A.; Healey, T.

    1983-01-01

    The USNRC and the UKAEA have jointly funded a series of in-pile LOCA simulation experiments in the Canadian NRU reactor in order to secure further information on the thermal hydraulic and clad deformation response of PWR fuel rod bundles. Test MT-3 in the series was performed using reflood rate and rod internal pressure conditions specified by the UK nuclear industry. The parameters were selected to ensure the development of a near-isothermal clad temperature history during which zircaloy was required to balloon and rupture near the alpha-alpha/beta phase transition. Specification of the reflood rate conditions was assisted by the performance of a precursor test on an unpressurised rod bundle and by complementary application of appropriate thermal hydraulic analyses. Identification of the rod internal pressure needed to cause ballooning and rupture was achieved using a creep deformation model, BALLOON, in conjunction with the clad thermal history defined by the prior thermal hydraulic test. This paper presents the basis of the BALLOON analysis and describes its application in calculating the fill gas pressure for rods MT-3, their axial ballooning profile and the clad temperature at peak radial strain elevations. (author)

  3. Impact of a "TED-Style" presentation on potential patients' willingness to accept dental implant therapy: a one-group, pre-test post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Henry; Afrashtehfar, Kelvin Ian; Abi-Nader, Samer; Tamimi, Faleh

    2015-12-01

    A survey was conducted to assess the impact of a TED-like educational session on participants' willingness to accept dental implant therapy. Volunteers interested in having information about dental implant therapies were recruited and asked to complete a two-part survey before and after an educational session. The initial survey elicited demographic information, self-perceived knowledge on dental implants and willingness to this kind of treatment. A "TED-style" presentation that provided information about dental implant treatments was conducted before asking the participants to complete a second set of questions assessing the impact of the session. The survey was completed by 104 individuals, 78.8% were women and the mean age was 66.5±10.8. Before the educational session, 76.0% of the participants refused dental implants mainly due to lack of knowledge. After the educational session, the rejection of dental implants decreased by almost four folds to 20.2%. This study proved that an educational intervention can significantly increase willingness to accept treatment with dental implants in a segment of the population who is interested in having information about dental implant therapy. Furthermore, educational interventions, such as TED-like talks, might be useful to increase popular awareness on dental implant therapy.

  4. Hands-On Crops! How Long-Term Activities Improve Students' Knowledge of Crop Species. A Pretest-Posttest Study of the Greenhouse Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Eva-Maria; Lechner-Walz, Cornelia; Dreesmann, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    In terms of sustainability, renewable resources, nourishment and healthy diet, crops are important to the public. Thus, knowledge of crops is needed in order to enable people to participate in public discussions and take responsibility. This is in contrast to former surveys showing that students' knowledge of and interest in plants in general,…

  5. Impact of a "TED-Style" presentation on potential patients' willingness to accept dental implant therapy: a one-group, pre-test post-test study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Henry; Abi-Nader, Samer

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE A survey was conducted to assess the impact of a TED-like educational session on participants' willingness to accept dental implant therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Volunteers interested in having information about dental implant therapies were recruited and asked to complete a two-part survey before and after an educational session. The initial survey elicited demographic information, self-perceived knowledge on dental implants and willingness to this kind of treatment. A "TED-style" presentation that provided information about dental implant treatments was conducted before asking the participants to complete a second set of questions assessing the impact of the session. RESULTS The survey was completed by 104 individuals, 78.8% were women and the mean age was 66.5±10.8. Before the educational session, 76.0% of the participants refused dental implants mainly due to lack of knowledge. After the educational session, the rejection of dental implants decreased by almost four folds to 20.2%. CONCLUSION This study proved that an educational intervention can significantly increase willingness to accept treatment with dental implants in a segment of the population who is interested in having information about dental implant therapy. Furthermore, educational interventions, such as TED-like talks, might be useful to increase popular awareness on dental implant therapy. PMID:26816573

  6. Evaluation of the theory-based Quality Improvement in Physical Therapy (QUIP) programme: a one-group, pre-test post-test pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Geert M.; Harting, Janneke; Bartholomew, L. Kay; Schlief, Angelique; Oostendorp, Rob Ab; de Vries, Nanne K.

    2013-01-01

    Guideline adherence in physical therapy is far from optimal, which has consequences for the effectiveness and efficiency of physical therapy care. Programmes to enhance guideline adherence have, so far, been relatively ineffective. We systematically developed a theory-based Quality Improvement in

  7. Curriculum Evaluation and Revision in a Nascent Field: The Utility of the Retrospective Pretest-Posttest Model in a Homeland Security Program of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelfrey, William V., Sr.; Pelfrey, William V., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Although most academic disciplines evolve at a measured pace, the emerging field of homeland security must, for reasons of safety and security, evolve rapidly. The Department of Homeland Security sponsored the establishment of a graduate educational program for key officials holding homeland security roles. Because homeland security is a nascent…

  8. Pre-Test and Post-Test Applications to Shape the Education of Phlebotomists in A Quality Management Program: An Experience in A Training Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykal Güzin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: After the introduction of modern laboratory instruments and information systems, preanalytic phase is the new field of battle. Errors in preanalytical phase account for approximately half of total errors in clinical laboratory. The objective of this study was to share an experience of an education program that was believed to be successful in decreasing the number of rejected samples received from the Emergency Department (ED.

  9. Improving work functioning and mental health of health care employees using an e-mental health approach to workers' health surveillance: pretest-posttest study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, Sarah M.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Bolier, Linda; Smeets, Odile; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2014-01-01

    Mental health complaints are quite common in health care employees and can have adverse effects on work functioning. The aim of this study was to evaluate an e-mental health (EMH) approach to workers' health surveillance (WHS) for nurses and allied health professionals. Using the waiting-list group

  10. Prediction of Student Performance Through Pretesting in Food and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, Betty Ruth; Lamb, Mina W.

    1971-01-01

    Attempts to develop an objective pretest for identifying students' levels of knowledge in food and nutrition prior to class instruction and for predicting student performance on the final examination. (Editor/MU)

  11. Breaking HIV News to Clients: SPIKES Strategy in Post-Test Counseling Session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Emadi-Koochak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Breaking bad news is one of the most burdensome tasks physicians face in their everyday practice. It becomes even more challenging in the context of HIV+ patients because of stigma and discrimination. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the quality of giving HIV seroconversion news according to SPIKES protocol. Numbers of 154 consecutive HIV+ patients from Imam Khomeini Hospital testing and counseling center were enrolled in this study. Patients were inquired about how they were given the HIV news and whether or not they received pre- and post-test counseling sessions. Around 51% of them were men, 80% had high school education, and 56% were employed. Regarding marital status, 32% were single, and 52% were married at the time of the interview. Among them, 31% had received the HIV news in a counseling center, and only 29% had pre-test counseling. SPIKES criteria were significantly met when the HIV news was given in an HIV counseling and testing center (P.value<0.05. Low coverage of HIV counseling services was observed in the study. SPIKES criteria were significantly met when the HIV seroconversion news was given in a counseling center. The need to further train staff to deliver HIV news seems a priority in the field of HIV care and treatment.

  12. 40 CFR 90.408 - Pre-test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....408 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... during service accumulation is allowed only in accordance with § 90.118. (b) Engine pre-test preparation... by § 90.324(a). If necessary, allow the heated sample line, filters, and pumps to reach operating...

  13. 40 CFR 91.408 - Pre-test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....408 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... accordance with § 91.117. (b) Engine pre-test preparation. (1) Drain and charge the fuel tank(s) with the..., including the sample probe, using mode 1 from Table 2 in appendix A of this subpart. The emission sampling...

  14. Consistent Posttest Calculations for LOCA Scenarios in LOBI Integral Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Reventós

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Integral test facilities (ITFs are one of the main tools for the validation of best estimate thermalhydraulic system codes. The experimental data are also of great value when compared to the experiment-scaled conditions in a full NPP. The LOBI was a single plus a triple-loop (simulated by one loop test facility electrically heated to simulate a 1300 MWe PWR. The scaling factor was 712 for the core power, volume, and mass flow. Primary and secondary sides contained all main active elements. Tests were performed for the characterization of phenomenologies relevant to large and small break LOCAs and special transients in PWRs. The paper presents the results of three posttest calculations of LOBI experiments. The selected experiments are BL-30, BL-44, and A1-84. They are LOCA scenarios of different break sizes and with different availability of safety injection components. The goal of the analysis is to improve the knowledge of the phenomena occurred in the facility in order to use it in further studies related to qualifying nodalizations of actual plants or to establish accuracy data bases for uncertainty methodologies. An example of procedure of implementing changes in a common nodalization valid for simulating tests occurred in a specific ITF is presented along with its confirmation based on posttests results.

  15. Persuasive technology in teaching acute pain assessment in nursing: Results in learning based on pre and post-testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Ana Graziela; Dal Sasso, Grace T Marcon; Iyengar, M Sriram

    2017-03-01

    Thousands of patients seek health services every day with complaints of pain. However, adequate pain assessment is still flawed, a fact that is partly related to gaps in professional learning on this topic. Innovative strategies such as the use of a virtual learning object mediated by persuasive technology in the learning of undergraduate nursing students can help to fill these gaps and to provide different ways of learning to learn. To evaluate the results in learning among undergraduate nursing students about assessment of acute pain in adults and newborns, before and after an online educational intervention. This is a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent study using pre-and post-testing. Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil. 75 undergraduate nursing students. Our study was conducted in three steps (pre-test, education intervention, post-test). Data were collected from November 2013 to February 2014. The educational intervention was performed using online access to virtual learning object about acute pain assessment, which students accessed on their mobile devices. A significant difference was seen in student learning (ppersuasive technology such as small mobile devices as mediators of online educational interventions broadens learning spaces in an innovative, flexible, motivational, and promising manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Making working memory work: a meta-analysis of executive-control and working memory training in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbach, Julia; Verhaeghen, Paul

    2014-11-01

    This meta-analysis examined the effects of process-based executive-function and working memory training (49 articles, 61 independent samples) in older adults (> 60 years). The interventions resulted in significant effects on performance on the trained task and near-transfer tasks; significant results were obtained for the net pretest-to-posttest gain relative to active and passive control groups and for the net effect at posttest relative to active and passive control groups. Far-transfer effects were smaller than near-transfer effects but were significant for the net pretest-to-posttest gain relative to passive control groups and for the net gain at posttest relative to both active and passive control groups. We detected marginally significant differences in training-induced improvements between working memory and executive-function training, but no differences between the training-induced improvements observed in older adults and younger adults, between the benefits associated with adaptive and nonadaptive training, or between the effects in active and passive control conditions. Gains did not vary with total training time. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. MARS-LMR modeling for the post-test analysis of Phenix End-of-Life natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Yong; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chang, Won Pyo; Lee, Kwi Lim

    2011-01-01

    For a successful design and analysis of Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), it is required to have a reliable and well-proven system analysis code. To achieve this purpose, KAERI is enhancing the modeling capability of MARS code by adding the SFR-specific models such as pressure drop model, heat transfer model and reactivity feedback model. This version of MARS-LMR will be used as a basic tool in the design and analysis of future SFR systems in Korea. Before wide application of MARS-LMR code, it is required to verify and validate the code models through analyses for appropriate experimental data or analytical results. The end-of-life test of Phenix reactor performed by the CEA provided a unique opportunity to have reliable test data which is very valuable in the validation and verification of a SFR system analysis code. The KAERI joined this international program of the analysis of Phenix end-of-life natural circulation test coordinated by the IAEA from 2008. The main test of natural circulation was completed in 2009. Before the test the KAERI performed the pre-test analysis based on the design condition provided by the CEA. Then, the blind post-test analysis was also performed based on the test conditions measured during the test before the CEA provide the final test results. Finally, the final post-test analysis was performed recently to predict the test results as accurate as possible. This paper introduces the modeling approach of the MARS-LMR used in the final post-test analysis and summarizes the major results of the analysis

  18. Comparing Traditional and Crowdsourcing Methods for Pretesting Survey Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Edgar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive interviewing is a common method used to evaluate survey questions. This study compares traditional cognitive interviewing methods with crowdsourcing, or “tapping into the collective intelligence of the public to complete a task.” Crowdsourcing may provide researchers with access to a diverse pool of potential participants in a very timely and cost-efficient way. Exploratory work found that crowdsourcing participants, with self-administered data collection, may be a viable alternative, or addition, to traditional pretesting methods. Using three crowdsourcing designs (TryMyUI, Amazon Mechanical Turk, and Facebook, we compared the participant characteristics, costs, and quantity and quality of data with traditional laboratory-based cognitive interviews. Results suggest that crowdsourcing and self-administered protocols may be a viable way to collect survey pretesting information, as participants were able to complete the tasks and provide useful information; however, complex tasks may require the skills of an interviewer to administer unscripted probes.

  19. Engine Tune-up Service. Unit 2: Charging System. Posttests. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Roger L.; Bacon, E. Miles

    This book of posttests is designed to accompany the Engine Tune-Up Service Student Guide for Unit 2, Charging System, available separately as CE 031 208. Focus of the posttest is on the testing of the charging system. One multiple choice posttest is provided, that covers the three performance objectives contained in the unit. (No answer key is…

  20. Engine Tune-Up Service. Unit 3: Primary Circuit. Posttests. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, David T.

    This book of posttests is designed to accompany the Engine Tune-Up Service Student Guide for Unit 3, Primary Circuit, available separately as CE 031 211. Focus of the posttests is setting the primary ignition circuit. One multiple choice posttest is provided, covering the eight performance objectives contained in the unit. (No answer key is…

  1. Engine Tune-Up Service. Unit 1: Battery and Cranking System. Posttests. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson-Roberts, Ludy; And Others

    This book of posttests is designed to accompany the Engine Tune-Up Service Student Guide for Unit 1, Battery and Cranking System. Focus of the posttests is the testing of the battery and cranking system. Four multiple choice posttests are provided, one for each of the performance objectives contained in the unit. (No answer keys are provided.)…

  2. Statistical Processes Under Change: Enhancing Data Quality with Pretests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radermacher, Walter; Sattelberger, Sabine

    Statistical offices in Europe, in particular the Federal Statistical Office in Germany, are meeting users’ ever more demanding requirements with innovative and appropriate responses, such as the multiple sources mixed-mode design model. This combines various objectives: reducing survey costs and the burden on interviewees, and maximising data quality. The same improvements are also being sought by way of the systematic use of pretests to optimise survey documents. This paper provides a first impression of the many procedures available. An ideal pretest combines both quantitative and qualitative test methods. Quantitative test procedures can be used to determine how often particular input errors arise. The questionnaire is tested in the field in the corresponding survey mode. Qualitative test procedures can find the reasons for input errors. Potential interviewees are included in the questionnaire tests, and their feedback on the survey documentation is systematically analysed and used to upgrade the questionnaire. This was illustrated in our paper by an example from business statistics (“Umstellung auf die Wirtschaftszweigklassifikation 2008” - Change-over to the 2008 economic sector classification). This pretest not only gave important clues about how to improve the contents, but also helped to realistically estimate the organisational cost of the main survey.

  3. The Development of Man and His Culture: Old World Prehistory. Grade 5. Teacher Guide [And] Pupil Text [And] Pupil Guide [And] Teacher Background Material [And] A Sequential Curriculum in Anthropology. Test Form 5, Composite Form for Pre- and Post-Test. Revised, January 1968. Publications No. 25, 31, 23, 24 and 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potterfield, James E.; And Others

    This social studies unit includes a teaching guide, student text, study guide, teacher background material, and composite pretest/posttest covering archaeological methods, evolution, fossils and man, and development of culture during the prehistoric periods in the Old World. It is part of the Anthropology Curriculum Project and is designed for…

  4. Effects of the FITKids randomized controlled trial on executive control and brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Charles H; Pontifex, Matthew B; Castelli, Darla M; Khan, Naiman A; Raine, Lauren B; Scudder, Mark R; Drollette, Eric S; Moore, Robert D; Wu, Chien-Ting; Kamijo, Keita

    2014-10-01

    To assess the effect of a physical activity (PA) intervention on brain and behavioral indices of executive control in preadolescent children. Two hundred twenty-one children (7-9 years) were randomly assigned to a 9-month afterschool PA program or a wait-list control. In addition to changes in fitness (maximal oxygen consumption), electrical activity in the brain (P3-ERP) and behavioral measures (accuracy, reaction time) of executive control were collected by using tasks that modulated attentional inhibition and cognitive flexibility. Fitness improved more among intervention participants from pretest to posttest compared with the wait-list control (1.3 mL/kg per minute, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3 to 2.4; d = 0.34 for group difference in pre-to-post change score). Intervention participants exhibited greater improvements from pretest to posttest in inhibition (3.2%, 95% CI: 0.0 to 6.5; d = 0.27) and cognitive flexibility (4.8%, 95% CI: 1.1 to 8.4; d = 0.35 for group difference in pre-to-post change score) compared with control. Only the intervention group increased attentional resources from pretest to posttest during tasks requiring increased inhibition (1.4 µV, 95% CI: 0.3 to 2.6; d = 0.34) and cognitive flexibility (1.5 µV, 95% CI: 0.6 to 2.5; d = 0.43). Finally, improvements in brain function on the inhibition task (r = 0.22) and performance on the flexibility task correlated with intervention attendance (r = 0.24). The intervention enhanced cognitive performance and brain function during tasks requiring greater executive control. These findings demonstrate a causal effect of a PA program on executive control, and provide support for PA for improving childhood cognition and brain health. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. The HOT (Healthy Outcome for Teens) project. Using a web-based medium to influence attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and intention for obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaffar, Henna; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Castelli, Darla M; Scherer, Jane A

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) constructs (behavioral belief, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, knowledge and behavioral intention) regarding preventive behaviors for obesity and type 2 diabetes will change favorably after completing the web-based intervention, HOT (Healthy Outcome for Teens) project, grounded in the TPB; and that passive online learning (POL) group will improve more than the active online learning (AOL) group. The secondary hypothesis was to determine to what extent constructs of the TPB predict intentions. 216 adolescents were recruited, 127 randomly allocated to the treatment group (AOL) and 89 to the control group (POL). The subjects completed a TPB questionnaire pre and post intervention. Both POL and AOL groups showed significant improvements from pretest to posttest survey. However, the results indicated no significant difference between POL and AOL for all constructs except behavioral belief. Correlational analysis indicated that all TPB constructs were significantly correlated with intentions for pretest and posttest for both groups. Attitude and behavioral control showed strongest correlations. Regression analysis indicated that TPB constructs were predictive of intentions and the predictive power improved post intervention. Behavioral control consistently predicted intentions for all categories and was the strongest predictor for pretest scores. For posttest scores, knowledge and attitude were the strongest predictors for POL and AOL groups respectively. Thus, HOT project improved knowledge and the TPB constructs scores for targeted behaviors, healthy eating and physical activity, for prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Influence of Inter-Training Intervals on Intermanual Transfer Effects in Upper-Limb Prosthesis Training: A Randomized Pre-Posttest Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sietske Romkema

    Full Text Available Improvement in prosthetic training using intermanual transfer (the transfer of motor skills from the trained, “unaffected” hand to the untrained, “affected” hand has been shown in previous studies. The aim of this study is to determine the influence of the inter-training interval on the magnitude of the intermanual transfer effects. This was done using a mechanistic, randomized, single-blinded pretest-posttest design. Sixty-four able-bodied, right-handed participants were randomly assigned to the Short and Long Interval Training Groups and the Short and Long Interval Control Groups. The Short and Long Interval Training Groups used a prosthesis simulator in their training program. The Short and Long Interval Control Groups executed a sham training program, that is, a dummy training program in which the same muscles were trained as with the prosthesis simulator. The Short Interval Training Group and the Short Interval Control Groups trained on consecutive days, while the Long Interval Training Group and Long Interval Control Group trained twice a week. To determine the improvement in skills, a test was administered before, immediately after, and at two points in time after the training. Training was performed with the “unaffected” arm; tests were performed with the “affected” arm. The outcome measurements were: the movement time (the time from the beginning of the movement until completion of the task; the duration of maximum hand opening, (the opening of the prosthetic hand while grasping an object; and the grip-force control (the error from the required grip-force during a tracking task. Intermanual transfer was found in movement times, but not in hand opening or grip-force control. The length of the inter-training interval did not affect the magnitude of intermanual transfer effects. No difference in the intermanual transfer effect in upper-limb prosthesis training was found for training on a daily basis as compared to training

  7. 75 FR 70270 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Pretesting of NIAID's Biomedical HIV Prevention...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... NIAID's Biomedical HIV Prevention Research Communication Messages SUMMARY: In compliance with the... Collection: Title: Pretesting of NIAID's Biomedical HIV Prevention Research Communication Messages. Type of... biomedical HIV prevention research. The primary objectives of the pretests are to (1) Assess audience...

  8. Global Health Diplomacy, Monitoring & Evaluation, and the Importance of Quality Assurance & Control: Findings from NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043): A Phase III Randomized Controlled Trial of Community Mobilization, Mobile Testing, Same-Day Results, and Post-Test Support for HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa and Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevany, Sebastian; Khumalo-Sakutukwa, Gertrude; Singh, Basant; Chingono, Alfred; Morin, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Provision and scale-up of high quality, evidence-based services is essential for successful international HIV prevention interventions in order to generate and maintain intervention uptake, study integrity and participant trust, from both health service delivery and diplomatic perspectives. Methods We developed quality assurance (QAC) procedures to evaluate staff fidelity to a cluster-randomized trial of the NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043) assessing the effectiveness of a community-based voluntary counseling and testing strategy. The intervention was comprised of three components—Mobile Voluntary Counseling and Testing (MVCT), Community Mobilization (CM) and Post-Test Support Services (PTSS). QAC procedures were based on standardized criteria, and were designed to assess both provider skills and adherence to the intervention protocol. Supervisors observed a random sample of 5% to 10% of sessions each month and evaluated staff against multiple criteria on scales of 1–5. A score of 5 indicated 100% adherence, 4 indicated 95% adherence, and 3 indicated 90% adherence. Scores below 3 were considered unsatisfactory, and protocol deviations were discussed with the respective staff. Results During the first year of the intervention, the mean scores of MVCT and CM staff across the 5 study sites were 4 (95% adherence) or greater and continued to improve over time. Mean QAC scores for the PTSS component were lower and displayed greater fluctuations. Challenges to PTSS staff were identified as coping with the wide range of activities in the PTSS component and the novelty of the PTSS process. QAC fluctuations for PTSS were also associated with new staff hires or changes in staff responsibilities. Through constant staff monitoring and support, by Year 2, QAC scores for PTSS activities had reached those of MVCT and CM. Conclusions The implementation of a large-sale, evidence based HIV intervention requires extensive QAC to ensure implementation effectiveness

  9. Post-test sensitivity analysis of OECD/CSNI ISP42 panda experiment by Relap5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanocco, P.; D'Auria, F.; Galassi, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    The present document deals with Relap5/Mod3.2 analysis of the International Standard Problem (ISP-42) exercise performed in PANDA facility on April 21-22, 1998. PANDA is installed at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute). PANDA is a large-scale thermal-hydraulic test facility suitable for the simulation of passive containment for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR). The work focuses phase A of the ISP-42 experiment, including the break in the main steam line, and the Passive Containment Cooling System Start-Up. The objective is to investigate the start-up phenomenology of passive cooling system when steam is injected into cold vessel filled with air and to observe the resulting system behavior. A detailed nodalization was set-up at the University of Pisa, in order to model 3-D flow paths with a 1-D code. The comparison between pre-test predictions and experimental data is discussed. Overall time behavior is reasonably well predicted, showing a rather good and robust overall code behavior in the simulation of the global test scenario. The results of a preliminary post-test analysis are discussed, including the comparison with the experimental data. (authors)

  10. Pretest Calculations of Temperature Changes for Field Thermal Conductivity Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.S. Brodsky

    2002-01-01

    A large volume fraction of the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain may reside in the Tptpll (Tertiary, Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, crystal poor, lower lithophysal) lithostratigraphic unit. This unit is characterized by voids, or lithophysae, which range in size from centimeters to meters. A series of thermal conductivity field tests are planned in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. The objective of the pretest calculation described in this document is to predict changes in temperatures in the surrounding rock for these tests for a given heater power and a set of thermal transport properties. The calculation can be extended, as described in this document, to obtain thermal conductivity, thermal capacitance (density x heat capacity, J · m -3 · K -1 ), and thermal diffusivity from the field data. The work has been conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Testing and Monitoring'' (BSC 2001). One of the outcomes of this analysis is to determine the initial output of the heater. This heater output must be sufficiently high that it will provide results in a reasonably short period of time (within several weeks or a month) and be sufficiently high that the heat increase is detectable by the instruments employed in the test. The test will be conducted in stages and heater output will be step increased as the test progresses. If the initial temperature is set too high, the experiment will not have as many steps and thus fewer thermal conductivity data points will result

  11. Comparison of patient comprehension of rapid HIV pre-test fundamentals by information delivery format in an emergency department setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Melissa A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two trials were conducted to compare emergency department patient comprehension of rapid HIV pre-test information using different methods to deliver this information. Methods Patients were enrolled for these two trials at a US emergency department between February 2005 and January 2006. In Trial One, patients were randomized to a no pre-test information or an in-person discussion arm. In Trial Two, a separate group of patients were randomized to an in-person discussion arm or a Tablet PC-based video arm. The video, "Do you know about rapid HIV testing?", and the in-person discussion contained identical Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-suggested pre-test information components as well as information on rapid HIV testing with OraQuick®. Participants were compared by information arm on their comprehension of the pre-test information by their score on a 26-item questionnaire using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results In Trial One, 38 patients completed the no-information arm and 31 completed the in-person discussion arm. Of these 69 patients, 63.8% had twelve years or fewer of formal education and 66.7% had previously been tested for HIV. The mean score on the questionnaire for the in-person discussion arm was higher than for the no information arm (18.7 vs. 13.3, p ≤ 0.0001. In Trial Two, 59 patients completed the in-person discussion and 55 completed the video arms. Of these 114 patients, 50.9% had twelve years or fewer of formal education and 68.4% had previously been tested for HIV. The mean score on the questionnaire for the video arm was similar to the in-person discussion arm (20.0 vs. 19.2; p ≤ 0.33. Conclusion The video "Do you know about rapid HIV testing?" appears to be an acceptable substitute for an in-person pre-test discussion on rapid HIV testing with OraQuick®. In terms of adequately informing ED patients about rapid HIV testing, either form of pre-test information is preferable than for patients

  12. Comparison of patient comprehension of rapid HIV pre-test fundamentals by information delivery format in an emergency department setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Roland C; Gee, Erin M; Clark, Melissa A; Mayer, Kenneth H; Seage, George R; DeGruttola, Victor G

    2007-01-01

    Background Two trials were conducted to compare emergency department patient comprehension of rapid HIV pre-test information using different methods to deliver this information. Methods Patients were enrolled for these two trials at a US emergency department between February 2005 and January 2006. In Trial One, patients were randomized to a no pre-test information or an in-person discussion arm. In Trial Two, a separate group of patients were randomized to an in-person discussion arm or a Tablet PC-based video arm. The video, "Do you know about rapid HIV testing?", and the in-person discussion contained identical Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-suggested pre-test information components as well as information on rapid HIV testing with OraQuick®. Participants were compared by information arm on their comprehension of the pre-test information by their score on a 26-item questionnaire using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results In Trial One, 38 patients completed the no-information arm and 31 completed the in-person discussion arm. Of these 69 patients, 63.8% had twelve years or fewer of formal education and 66.7% had previously been tested for HIV. The mean score on the questionnaire for the in-person discussion arm was higher than for the no information arm (18.7 vs. 13.3, p ≤ 0.0001). In Trial Two, 59 patients completed the in-person discussion and 55 completed the video arms. Of these 114 patients, 50.9% had twelve years or fewer of formal education and 68.4% had previously been tested for HIV. The mean score on the questionnaire for the video arm was similar to the in-person discussion arm (20.0 vs. 19.2; p ≤ 0.33). Conclusion The video "Do you know about rapid HIV testing?" appears to be an acceptable substitute for an in-person pre-test discussion on rapid HIV testing with OraQuick®. In terms of adequately informing ED patients about rapid HIV testing, either form of pre-test information is preferable than for patients to receive no pre-test

  13. A systematic review of the effect of pre-test rest duration on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Measurement of toe and ankle blood pressure is commonly used to evaluate peripheral vascular status, yet the pre-test rest period is inconsistent in published studies and among practitioners, and could affect results. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate all research that has investigated the effect of different periods of pre-test rest on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure. Methods The following databases were searched up to April 2012: Medline (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1947), CINAHL (from 1937), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (from 1800). No language or publication restrictions were applied. Eighty-eight content experts and researchers in the field were contacted by email to assist in the identification of published, unpublished, and ongoing studies. Studies evaluating the effect of two or more pre-test rest durations on toe or ankle systolic blood pressure were eligible for inclusion. No restrictions were placed on participant characteristics or the method of blood pressure measurement. Outcomes included toe or ankle systolic blood pressure and adverse effects. Abstracts identified from the search terms were independently assessed by two reviewers for potential inclusion. Results 1658 abstracts were identified by electronic searching. Of the 88 content experts and researchers in the field contacted by email a total of 33 replied and identified five potentially relevant studies. No studies were eligible for inclusion. Conclusions There is no evidence of the effect of different periods of pre-test rest duration on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure measurements. Rigorous trials evaluating the effect of different durations of pre-test rest are required to direct clinical practice and research. PMID:24708870

  14. Effects of an anger management and stress control program on smoking cessation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Bektas Murat; Unal, Mustafa; Pirdal, Hasan; Karahan, Tevfik Fikret

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a cognitive behavioral therapy-oriented anger management and stress control program on smokers' quit rates. Of 2348 smokers, 350 were randomly allocated into study and control groups (n = 175 each). An individualized therapy cessation technique was selected for each participant (combination of behavioral counseling, nicotine replacement therapy, and/or pharmacotherapy). The participants in the control group attended a standard quit program, whereas the study group also received an additional 5-session (90 minutes each) cognitive behavioral therapy-oriented program aimed at improving their anger and stress coping skills. At the beginning of the study, both groups were asked to complete the Trait Anger Scale (TAS) of the State and Trait Anger Scale and the Self-Confident (SCS) and Hopeless (HS) subscales of the Stress Coping Styles Inventory; pretest smoking status of both groups and their coping skills were compared with each other as soon as the program ended (post-test results) and after 3 and 6 months (first and second follow-up tests). Although there was no difference between pretest scores on the TAS (P = .234), SCS (P = .130), and HS (P = .148) subscales, post-test results indicate that the study groups' TAS and HS scores decreased and SCS scores increased (P .05). The study group had a better quit level after 6 months compared with the control group (44% vs 27.4%; P smoking. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  15. Choreographer Pre-Testing Code Analysis and Operational Testing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, David J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Harrison, Christopher B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Perr, C. W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hurd, Steven A [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Choreographer is a "moving target defense system", designed to protect against attacks aimed at IP addresses without corresponding domain name system (DNS) lookups. It coordinates actions between a DNS server and a Network Address Translation (NAT) device to regularly change which publicly available IP addresses' traffic will be routed to the protected device versus routed to a honeypot. More details about how Choreographer operates can be found in Section 2: Introducing Choreographer. Operational considerations for the successful deployment of Choreographer can be found in Section 3. The Testing & Evaluation (T&E) for Choreographer involved 3 phases: Pre-testing, Code Analysis, and Operational Testing. Pre-testing, described in Section 4, involved installing and configuring an instance of Choreographer and verifying it would operate as expected for a simple use case. Our findings were that it was simple and straightforward to prepare a system for a Choreographer installation as well as configure Choreographer to work in a representative environment. Code Analysis, described in Section 5, consisted of running a static code analyzer (HP Fortify) and conducting dynamic analysis tests using the Valgrind instrumentation framework. Choreographer performed well, such that only a few errors that might possibly be problematic in a given operating situation were identified. Operational Testing, described in Section 6, involved operating Choreographer in a representative environment created through EmulyticsTM . Depending upon the amount of server resources dedicated to Choreographer vis-á-vis the amount of client traffic handled, Choreographer had varying degrees of operational success. In an environment with a poorly resourced Choreographer server and as few as 50-100 clients, Choreographer failed to properly route traffic over half the time. Yet, with a well-resourced server, Choreographer handled over 1000 clients without missrouting. Choreographer

  16. Effect of Prophylactic Ankle-Brace Use During a High School Competitive Basketball Season on Dynamic Postural Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Nathan J; Sandrey, Michelle A

    2015-08-01

    Few studies have evaluated the long-term effects of prophylactic ankle-brace use during a sport season. To determine the effects of prophylactic ankle-brace use during a high school basketball season on dynamic postural control and functional tests. Prospective repeated-measures design. High school athletic facility. 21 healthy high school basketball athletes (13 girls, 8 boys). The order of testing was randomized using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) for posteromedial (PM), medial (M), and anteromedial (AM) directions and 3 functional tests (FT) consisting of the single-leg crossover hop, single-leg vertical jump, and the single-leg 6-m hop for time at pre-, mid-, and postseason. After pretesting, the ankle brace was worn on both limbs during the entire 16-wk competitive basketball season. SEBT for PM, M, and AM and 3 single-leg FTs. Dynamic postural control using the SEBT and the 3 FTs improved over time, notably from pretest to posttest. The left limb was different from the right limb during the single-leg vertical jump. Effect sizes were large for pretest to posttest for the 3 SEBT directions and 2 of the 3 FTs. The 16-wk basketball prophylactic ankle-brace intervention significantly improved dynamic postural control and single-limb FTs over time.

  17. Effects of an Integrated Stress Management Program (ISMP) for Psychologically Distressed Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunah; Lee, Hyangkyu; Kim, Hyunlye; Noh, Dabok; Lee, Hyunhwa

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of an integrated stress management program (ISMP) on college life stress, stress coping, psychological distress, and cortisol among male college students. Out of 137 initially enrolled students, 99 participants were identified as distressed subjects and randomly assigned to either the ISMP or control group. Ultimately, 84 participants (43: experimental, 41: control) completed pretest-posttest. The experimental group received eight 2-hr sessions over 4 weeks. Stress and psychological distress decreased significantly, whereas stress coping and cortisol did not improve significantly. Further studies with longer follow-up periods and physiological interventions are required. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of impulse control training on depression and anxiety mother of children with developmental coordination disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Zamani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Caring of children with psychiatric disorders have significant impact on caregivers especially mothers. So aim of this study was to investigate efficacy of impulse control training on depression and anxiety in mothers of children with developmental coordination disorders (DCD. The study is quasi-experimental by using pretest and posttest with control group. The study population consisted of mothers and children with developmental coordination disorder in rehabilitation clinics in the Hamedan city. Of these 16 participants assigned to experimental and control groups were selected by convenience sampling. Psychological evaluation includes clinical interviews, according to the America Psychological Association and DSM-V Beck Anxiety Inventory (BDI-II and Beck Depression Inventory (BAI. Impulse control was done according to Spray treatment protocol in the experimental group with 8 sessions of 90 minutes and the control group received no training. Scores of pretest, posttest and follow-up of 3 weeks after training in both groups were analyzed. Results showed that treatment of impulse control in reducing anxiety 8.71 and depression 10.46 in experimental group was effective in comparison of control group that efficacy of this treatment was maintained during follow-up. So the treatment of impulse control has been effective in the treatment of anxiety and depression. According to results of this study and previous researches impulse control treatment program can be program of interventions for depression and anxiety disorders and can promote mental health in patients with psychiatric disorders.

  19. A model for developing and pre-testing a multi-media teaching program to enhance the self-care behavior of diabetes insipidus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, O; Schubert, W

    1985-03-01

    A patient-education program was designed by members of the Neurology Nursing Service. The program was designed to provide patients with diabetes insipidus with the information needed to help them manage their condition in the hospital and at home upon discharge. The program was approved by the Nursing Department's Patient Education Committee. The nurses worked closely with the hospital's patient-education coordinator and television-production staff to produce a videotape for educating patients about managing diabetes insipidus. A literature review of patient-education resources on diabetes insipidus revealed that no materials were available in either audiovisual or print media. The program utilized the multi-media approach of a videotape that was shown over closed-circuit television and a booklet outlining the salient points of the television program. All patients utilizing the program have been pre-tested and post-tested to assess their achievement of behavioral objectives.

  20. Post-test analysis of lithium-ion battery materials at Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareno, Javier; Dietz-Rago, Nancy; Bloom, Ira

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical performance is often limited by surface and interfacial reactions at the electrodes. However, routine handling of samples can alter the very surfaces that are the object of study. Our approach combines standardized testing of batteries with sample harvesting under inert atmosphere conditions. Cells of different formats are disassembled inside an Argon glove box with controlled water and oxygen concentrations below 2 ppm. Cell components are characterized in situ, guaranteeing that observed changes in physicochemical state are due to electrochemical operation, rather than sample manipulation. We employ a complementary set of spectroscopic, microscopic, electrochemical and metallographic characterization to obtain a complete picture of cell degradation mechanisms. The resulting information about observed degradation mechanisms is provided to materials developers, both academic and industrial, to suggest new strategies and speed up the Research & Development cycle of Li-ion and related technologies. This talk will describe Argonne's post-test analysis laboratory, with an emphasis on capabilities and opportunities for collaboration. Cell disassembly, sample harvesting procedures and recent results will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies, Hybrid and Electric Systems, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. Can Propensity Score Analysis Approximate Randomized Experiments Using Pretest and Demographic Information in Pre-K Intervention Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Nianbo; Lipsey, Mark W

    2017-01-01

    It is unclear whether propensity score analysis (PSA) based on pretest and demographic covariates will meet the ignorability assumption for replicating the results of randomized experiments. This study applies within-study comparisons to assess whether pre-Kindergarten (pre-K) treatment effects on achievement outcomes estimated using PSA based on a pretest and demographic covariates can approximate those found in a randomized experiment. Data-Four studies with samples of pre-K children each provided data on two math achievement outcome measures with baseline pretests and child demographic variables that included race, gender, age, language spoken at home, and mother's highest education. Research Design and Data Analysis-A randomized study of a pre-K math curriculum provided benchmark estimates of effects on achievement measures. Comparison samples from other pre-K studies were then substituted for the original randomized control and the effects were reestimated using PSA. The correspondence was evaluated using multiple criteria. The effect estimates using PSA were in the same direction as the benchmark estimates, had similar but not identical statistical significance, and did not differ from the benchmarks at statistically significant levels. However, the magnitude of the effect sizes differed and displayed both absolute and relative bias larger than required to show statistical equivalence with formal tests, but those results were not definitive because of the limited statistical power. We conclude that treatment effect estimates based on a single pretest and demographic covariates in PSA correspond to those from a randomized experiment on the most general criteria for equivalence.

  2. TRACG post-test analysis of panthers prototype tests of SBWR passive containment condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitch, J.R.; Billig, P.F.; Abdollahian, D.; Masoni, P.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the validation effort for application of the TRACG code to the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR), calculations have been performed for the various test facilities which are part of the SBWR design and technology certification program. These calculations include post-test calculations for tests in the PANTHERS Passive Containment Condenser (PCC) test program. Sixteen tests from the PANTHERS/PCC test matrix were selected for post-test analysis. This set includes three steady-state pure-steam tests, nine steady-state steam-air tests, and four transient tests. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the results of the post-test analysis. The author includes a brief description of the PANTHERS/PCC test facility and test matrix, a description of the PANTHERS/PCC post-test TRACG model and the manner in which the various types of tests in the post-test evaluation were simulated, and a presentation of the results of the TRACG simulation

  3. Evaluation of a multiple-encounter in situ simulation for orientation of staff to a new paediatric emergency service: a single-group pretest/post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Michelle; Kinnear, Frances B; Fulbrook, Paul

    2017-10-01

    To assess the utility of a multiple-encounter in-situ (MEIS) simulation as an orientation tool for multidisciplinary staff prior to opening a new paediatric emergency service. A single-group pretest/post-test study was conducted. During the MEIS simulation, multidisciplinary staff with participant or observer roles managed eight children (mannequins) who attended triage with their parent/guardians (clinical facilitators) for a range of emergency presentations (structured scenarios designed to represent the expected range of presentations plus test various clinical pathways/systems). Participants were debriefed to explore clinical, systems and crisis-resource management issues. Participants also completed a pre-intervention and post-intervention questionnaire comprising statements about role confidence and orientation adequacy. Pre-test and post-test results were analysed using t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Eighty-nine staff participated in the MEIS simulation, with the majority completing the pre-simulation and post-simulation questionnaire. There was a significant improvement in post-intervention versus pre-intervention Likert scores for role confidence and orientation adequacy (p=0.001 and simulation was of utility in orientation of staff, at least with respect to self-reported role confidence and orientation adequacy. Its effectiveness in practice or compared with other orientation techniques was not assessed, but it did identify several flaws in planned systems allowing remediation prior to opening.

  4. Effect of Simulation on the Confidence of University Nursing Students in Applying Cardiopulmonary Assessment Skills: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawalbeh, Loai I

    2017-08-01

    Simulation is an effective teaching strategy. However, no study in Jordan has examined the effect of simulation on the confidence of university nursing students in applying heart and lung physical examination skills. The current study aimed to test the effect of simulation on the confidence of university nursing students in applying heart and lung physical examination skills. A randomized controlled trial design was applied. The researcher introduced the simulation scenario regarding cardiopulmonary examination skills. This scenario included a 1-hour PowerPoint presentation and video for the experimental group (n= 35) and a PowerPoint presentation and a video showing a traditional demonstration in the laboratory for the control group (n = 34). Confidence in applying cardiopulmonary physical examination skills was measured for both groups at baseline and at 1 day and 3 months posttest. A paired t test showed that confidence was significantly higher in the posttest than in the pretest for both groups. An independent t test showed a statistically significant difference (t(67) = -42.95, p < .001) between the two groups in terms of the difference between the first posttest and second posttest scores (t(67) = -43.36, p < .001) for confidence in applying physical examination skills. Both simulation and traditional training in the laboratory significantly improved the confidence of participants in applying cardiopulmonary assessment skills. However, the simulation training had a more significant effect than usual training in enhancing the confidence of nursing students in applying physical examination skills.

  5. Pragmatic Language Outcomes of Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder After Therapist- and Parent-Delivered Play-Based Interventions: Two One-Group Pretest-Posttest Studies With a Longitudinal Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes-Gillan, Sarah; Munro, Natalie; Cordier, Reinie; Cantrill, Alycia; Pearce, Wendy

    The pragmatic language outcomes of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were explored across two feasibility studies. Five children with ADHD (ages 6-11 yr), their parents, and 5 typically developing peers completed an assessment 18 mo after a therapist-delivered intervention (Study 1). Participants then completed a parent-delivered intervention (Study 2). Blinded ratings of peer-to-peer play interactions documented changes in children's pragmatic language 18 mo after the Study 1 intervention and before, immediately after, and 1 mo after the Study 2 intervention. Nonparametric statistics and Cohen's d were used to measure change. Children's pragmatic language outcomes were maintained 18 mo after the therapist-delivered intervention and significantly improved from before to 1 mo after the parent-delivered intervention. Interventions involving occupational therapist and speech-language pathologist collaboration, play, and parent and peer involvement may facilitate children's pragmatic language skills.

  6. A controlled study of team-based learning for undergraduate clinical neurology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nigel C K; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Chan, Yiong Huak; Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Lee, Sze Haur; Tan, Kevin

    2011-10-30

    Team-based learning (TBL), a new active learning method, has not been reported for neurology education. We aimed to determine if TBL was more effective than passive learning (PL) in improving knowledge outcomes in two key neurology topics - neurological localization and neurological emergencies. We conducted a modified crossover study during a nine-week internal medicine posting involving 49 third-year medical undergraduates, using TBL as the active intervention, compared against self-reading as a PL control, for teaching the two topics. Primary outcome was the mean percentage change in test scores immediately after (post-test 1) and 48 hours after TBL (post-test 2), compared to a baseline pre-test. Student engagement was the secondary outcome. Mean percentage change in scores was greater in the TBL versus the PL group in post-test 1 (8.8% vs 4.3%, p = 0.023) and post-test 2 (11.4% vs 3.4%, p = 0.001). After adjustment for gender and second year examination grades, mean percentage change in scores remained greater in the TBL versus the PL group for post-test 1 (10.3% vs 5.8%, mean difference 4.5%,95% CI 0.7 - 8.3%, p = 0.021) and post-test 2 (13.0% vs 4.9%, mean difference 8.1%,95% CI 3.7 - 12.5%, p = 0.001), indicating further score improvement 48 hours post-TBL. Academically weaker students, identified by poorer examination grades, showed a greater increase in scores with TBL versus strong students (p undergraduates.

  7. A controlled study of team-based learning for undergraduate clinical neurology education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umapathi Thirugnanam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Team-based learning (TBL, a new active learning method, has not been reported for neurology education. We aimed to determine if TBL was more effective than passive learning (PL in improving knowledge outcomes in two key neurology topics - neurological localization and neurological emergencies. Methods We conducted a modified crossover study during a nine-week internal medicine posting involving 49 third-year medical undergraduates, using TBL as the active intervention, compared against self-reading as a PL control, for teaching the two topics. Primary outcome was the mean percentage change in test scores immediately after (post-test 1 and 48 hours after TBL (post-test 2, compared to a baseline pre-test. Student engagement was the secondary outcome. Results Mean percentage change in scores was greater in the TBL versus the PL group in post-test 1 (8.8% vs 4.3%, p = 0.023 and post-test 2 (11.4% vs 3.4%, p = 0.001. After adjustment for gender and second year examination grades, mean percentage change in scores remained greater in the TBL versus the PL group for post-test 1 (10.3% vs 5.8%, mean difference 4.5%,95% CI 0.7 - 8.3%, p = 0.021 and post-test 2 (13.0% vs 4.9%, mean difference 8.1%,95% CI 3.7 - 12.5%, p = 0.001, indicating further score improvement 48 hours post-TBL. Academically weaker students, identified by poorer examination grades, showed a greater increase in scores with TBL versus strong students (p Conclusions Compared to PL, TBL showed greater improvement in knowledge scores, with continued improvement up to 48 hours later. This effect is larger in academically weaker students. TBL is an effective method for improving knowledge in neurological localization and neurological emergencies in undergraduates.

  8. Pre- and Post-Test Results of KEEP Class 2: 1973-74. Technical Report #40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Candy

    This report presents the pre-and posttest results for the kindergarten year of the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP) Class 2, 1973-1974. Results are presented for the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI), the Metropolitan Readiness Test (MRT), and the Standard English Repetition Test (SERT). Comparisons are made…

  9. The Instructional Effects of Matching or Mismatching Lesson and Posttest Screen Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariana, Roy B.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation considers the instructional effects of color as an over-arching context variable when learning from computer displays. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the posttest retrieval effects of color as a local, extra-item non-verbal lesson context variable for constructed-response versus multiple-choice posttest…

  10. Pre-Test Analysis of Major Scenarios for ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Euh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Ki-Yong; Park, Hyun-Sik; Kwon, Tae-Soon

    2007-02-15

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS was constructed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The ATLAS is a 1/2 reduced height and 1/288 volume scaled test facility based on the design features of the APR1400. The simulation capability of the ATLAS for major design basis accidents (DBAs), including a large-break loss-of-coolant (LBLOCA), DVI line break and main steam line break (MSLB) accidents, is evaluated by the best-estimate system code, MARS, with the same control logics, transient scenarios and nodalization scheme. The validity of the applied scaling law and the thermal-hydraulic similarity between the ATLAS and the APR1400 for the major design basis accidents are assessed. It is confirmed that the ATLAS has a capability of maintaining an overall similarity with the reference plant APR1400 for the major design basis accidents considered in the present study. However, depending on the accident scenarios, there are some inconsistencies in certain thermal hydraulic parameters. It is found that the inconsistencies are mainly due to the reduced power effect and the increased stored energy in the structure. The present similarity analysis was successful in obtaining a greater insight into the unique design features of the ATLAS and would be used for developing the optimized experimental procedures and control logics.

  11. Pre-Test Analysis of Major Scenarios for ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Euh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Ki-Yong; Park, Hyun-Sik; Kwon, Tae-Soon

    2007-02-01

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS was constructed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The ATLAS is a 1/2 reduced height and 1/288 volume scaled test facility based on the design features of the APR1400. The simulation capability of the ATLAS for major design basis accidents (DBAs), including a large-break loss-of-coolant (LBLOCA), DVI line break and main steam line break (MSLB) accidents, is evaluated by the best-estimate system code, MARS, with the same control logics, transient scenarios and nodalization scheme. The validity of the applied scaling law and the thermal-hydraulic similarity between the ATLAS and the APR1400 for the major design basis accidents are assessed. It is confirmed that the ATLAS has a capability of maintaining an overall similarity with the reference plant APR1400 for the major design basis accidents considered in the present study. However, depending on the accident scenarios, there are some inconsistencies in certain thermal hydraulic parameters. It is found that the inconsistencies are mainly due to the reduced power effect and the increased stored energy in the structure. The present similarity analysis was successful in obtaining a greater insight into the unique design features of the ATLAS and would be used for developing the optimized experimental procedures and control logics

  12. Realizing the cognitive potential of children 5-7 with a mathematics focus: post-test and long-term effects of a 2-year intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayer, Michael; Adhami, Mundher

    2010-09-01

    In the context of the British Government's policy directed on improving standards in schools, this paper presents research on the effects of a programme intended to promote the cognitive development of children in the first 2 years of primary school (Y1 & 2, aged 5-7 years). The programme is based on earlier work dealing with classroom-based interventions with older children at both primary and secondary levels of schooling. The hypothesis tested is that it is possible to increase the cognitive ability of children by assisting teachers towards that aim in the context of mathematics. A corollary hypothesis is that such an increase would result in an increase in long-term school achievement. The participants were 8 teachers in one local education authority (LEA) and 10 teachers in another. Data were analysed on 275 children present at Year 1 pre-test in 2002 and at long-term Key Stage 2 post-test in 2008. Two intervention methods were employed: a Y1 set of interactive activities designed around Piagetian concrete operational schemata, and mathematics lessons in both Y1 and Y2 designed from a theory-base derived from both Piaget and Vygotsky. At post-test in 2004, the mean effect sizes for cognitive development of the children - assessed by the Piagetian test Spatial Relations - were 0.71 SD in one LEA and 0.60 SD in the other. Five classes achieved a median increase of 1.3 SD. The mean gains over pre-test in 2002 for all children in Key Stage 1 English in 2004 were 0.51 SD, and at Key Stage 2 English in 2008 - the long-term effect - were 0.36 SD, an improvement of 14 percentile points. The main hypothesis was supported by the data on cognitive development. The corollary hypothesis is supported by the gains in English. The implications of this study are that relative intelligence can be increased and is not fixed, and that children can be led into collaborating with each other to the benefit of their own thinking, and that there does exist a theory-based methodology

  13. The effects of reasoning, use of models, sex type, and their interactions on posttest achievement in chemical bonding after constant instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, John R.; Halsted, Douglas A.

    The purpose of the authors in this study was to determine the effects of reasoning, use of models during testing, and sex type on posttest achievement in chemical bonding under controlled instruction. Eighty-four high school students taking chemistry were randomly assigned within their classes to models and no models groups for the posttest. Reasoning capabilities were assessed by the Piagetian Logical Operations Test (PLOT) (Staver & Gabel, JRST, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1979), prior to instruction. All students then received the same instruction on chemical bonding which included teacher demonstrations of concepts with three-dimensional molecular models, interspersed teacher questions during the introduction and development of concepts, student manipulation of three-dimensional molecular models during laboratory experiments, and text reading assignments on concepts prior to their instruction in class. The posttest on molecular geometry and shape contained three sections requiring memory and application (Bloom, Taxonomy of educational objective, handbook I: Cognitive domain. New York: David McKay, 1956). Data were analyzed by regression (Nie et al., Statistical package for the social sciences, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1975). Results indicate that reasoning accounted for a significant portion (p sex type did not account for a significant (p > 0.05) portion of the variance on total scores or any section of posttest. The three-way interaction of reasoning, model usage, and sex type accounted for a significant portion (p < 0.05) of the variance in total scores, and in the memory and application sections of the posttest. Discussion focused on the results, conclusions, and implications for science teaching.

  14. Effects of whole-body vibration on balance and mobility in institutionalized older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Freddy Mh; Chan, Philip Fl; Liao, L R; Woo, Jean; Hui, Elsie; Lai, Charles Wk; Kwok, Timothy Cy; Pang, Marco Yc

    2018-04-01

    To investigate whether a comprehensive exercise program was effective in improving physical function among institutionalized older adults and whether adding whole-body vibration to the program conferred additional therapeutic benefits. A single-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted. This study was carried out in residential care units. In total, 73 older adults (40 women, mean age: 82.3 ± 7.3 years) were enrolled into this study. Participants were randomly allocated to one of the three groups: strength and balance program combined with whole-body vibration, strength and balance program without whole-body vibration, and social and recreational activities consisting of upper limb exercises only. All participants completed three training sessions per week for eight weeks. Assessment of mobility, balance, lower limb strength, walking endurance, and self-perceived balance confidence were conducted at baseline and immediately after the eight-week intervention. Incidences of falls requiring medical attention were recorded for one year after the end of the training period. A significant time × group interaction was found for lower limb strength (five-times-sit-to-stand test; P = 0.048), with the exercise-only group showing improvement (pretest: 35.8 ± 16.1 seconds; posttest: 29.0 ± 9.8 seconds), compared with a decline in strength among controls (pretest: 27.1 ± 10.4 seconds; posttest: 28.7 ± 12.3 seconds; P = 0.030). The exercise with whole-body vibration group had a significantly better outcome in balance confidence (pretest: 39.2 ± 29.0; posttest: 48.4 ± 30.6) than the exercise-only group (pretest: 35.9 ± 24.8; posttest: 38.2 ± 26.5; P = 0.033). The exercise program was effective in improving lower limb strength among institutionalized older adults but adding whole-body vibration did not enhance its effect. Whole-body vibration may improve balance confidence without enhancing actual balance performance.

  15. Certainty rating in pre-and post-tests of study modules in an online clinical pharmacy course - A pilot study to evaluate teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetsch, Karen; Burrows, Judith

    2016-10-14

    Graduate and post-graduate education for health professionals is increasingly delivered in an e-learning environment, where automated, continuous formative testing with integrated feedback can guide students' self-assessment and learning. Asking students to rate the certainty they assign to the correctness of their answers to test questions can potentially provide deeper insights into the success of teaching, with test results informing course designers whether learning outcomes have been achieved. It may also have implications for decision making in clinical practice. A study of pre-and post-tests for five study modules was designed to evaluate the teaching and learning within a pharmacotherapeutic course in an online postgraduate clinical pharmacy program. Certainty based marking of multiple choice questions (MCQ) was adapted for formative pre- and post-study module testing by asking students to rate their certainty of correctness of MCQ answers. Paired t-tests and a coding scheme were used to analyse changes in answers and certainty between pre-and post-tests. A survey evaluated students' experience with the novel formative testing design. Twenty-nine pharmacists enrolled in the postgraduate program participated in the study. Overall 1315 matched pairs of MCQ answers and certainty ratings between pre- and post-module tests were available for evaluation. Most students identified correct answers in post-tests and increased their certainty compared to pre-tests. Evaluation of certainty ratings in addition to correctness of answers identified MCQs and topic areas for revision to course designers. A survey of students showed that assigning certainty ratings to their answers assisted in structuring and focusing their learning throughout online study modules, facilitating identification of areas of uncertainty and gaps in their clinical knowledge. Adding certainty ratings to MCQ answers seems to engage students with formative testing and feedback and focus their

  16. Round Robin Posttest analysis of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel Model Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Kuniaki; Konno, Mutsuo

    1999-01-01

    NUPEC and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) have been jointly sponsoring 'Structural Behavior Test' at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) in Cooperative Containment Research Program'. As one of the test, a test of a mixed scaled SCV model with 1/10 in the geometry and 1/4 in the shell thickness. Round Robin analyses of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel (SCV) Model Test were carried out to obtain an adequate analytical method among seven organizations belonged to five countries in the world. As one of sponsor, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) filled the important role of a posttest analysis of SCV model. This paper describes NUPEC's analytical results in the round robin posttest analysis. (author)

  17. Multilevel Multidimensional Item Response Model with a Multilevel Latent Covariate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Bottge, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    In a pretest-posttest cluster-randomized trial, one of the methods commonly used to detect an intervention effect involves controlling pre-test scores and other related covariates while estimating an intervention effect at post-test. In many applications in education, the total post-test and pre-test scores that ignores measurement error in the…

  18. Post-Test Inspection of Nasa's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster Long Duration Test Hardware: Ion Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulas, George C.; Shastry, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    A Long Duration Test (LDT) was initiated in June 2005 as a part of NASAs Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) service life validation approach. Testing was voluntarily terminated in February 2014, with the thruster accumulating 51,184 hours of operation, processing 918 kg of xenon propellant, and delivering 35.5 MN-s of total impulse. This presentation will present the post-test inspection results to date for the thrusters ion optics.

  19. No evidence for true training and transfer effects after inhibitory control training in young healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enge, Sören; Behnke, Alexander; Fleischhauer, Monika; Küttler, Lena; Kliegel, Matthias; Strobel, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies reported that training of working memory may improve performance in the trained function and beyond. Other executive functions, however, have been rarely or not yet systematically examined. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of inhibitory control (IC) training to produce true training-related function improvements in a sample of 122 healthy adults using a randomized, double-blind pretest/posttest/follow-up design. Two groups performed either adaptive (training group) or nonadaptive (active control) versions of go/no-go and stop-signal tasks for 3 weeks. Training gains as well as near-transfer to an untrained Stroop task and far-transfer to psychometric fluid intelligence were explored. Although the adaptive group could substantially improve overall IC task performance after training, no differences to the active control group occurred, neither at posttest nor at follow-up testing. A large decrease in response latency from pre- to posttest (and from pretest to 4 months' follow-up testing) was found when the training group was compared to the passive control group, which, however, does not sufficiently control for possible confounds. Thus, no conclusive evidence was found that this performance increase mirrors a true increase in IC function. The fact that training improvement was mainly related to response latency may indicate that individuals were more focused on performance gains in the prepotent go trials but less on the stop trials to meet the requirements of the tasks as well as possible. The challenges for response inhibition training studies are extensively discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Posttest examination of the VVER-1000 fuel rod bundle CORA-W2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepold, L.

    1995-06-01

    The bundle meltdown experiment CORA-W2, representing the behavior of a Russian type VVER-1000 fuel element, with one B 4 C/stainless steel absorber rod was selected by the OECD/CSNI as International Standard Problem (ISP-36). The experimental results of CORA-W2 serve as data base for comparison with analytical predictions of the high-temperature material behavior by various code systems. The first part of the experimental results is described in KfK 5363 (1994), the second part is documented in this report which contains the destructive post-test examination results. The metallographical and analytical (SEM/EDX) post-test examinations were performed in Germany and Russia and are summarized in five individual contributions. The upper half of the bundle is completely oxidized, the lower half has kept the fuel rods relatively intact. The post-test examination results show the strong impact of the B 4 C absorber rod and the stainless steel grid spacers on the ''low-temperature'' bundle damage initiation and progression. The B 4 C absorber rod completely disappeared in the upper half of the bundle. The multicomponent melts relocated and formed coolant channel blockages on solidification with a maximum extent of about 30% in the lower part of the bundle. At temperatures above the melting point of the ZrNb1 cladding extensive fuel dissolution occurred. (orig.) [de

  1. Evaluation of an interaction-skills training for reducing the burden of family caregivers of patients with severe mental illness: a pre-posttest design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavi, Yasmin; Stringer, Barbara; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan; Boogaarts, Jan; Van Raaij, Bas; Van Meijel, Berno

    2018-03-27

    Family members who care for patients with severe mental illness experience emotional distress and report a higher incidence of mental illness than those in the general population. They report feeling inadequately prepared to provide the necessary practical and emotional support for these patients. The MAT training, an Interaction-Skills Training program (IST) for caregivers, was developed to meet those needs. This study used a single-arm pretest-posttest design to examine the impact of the training on caregivers' sense of competence (self-efficacy) and burden. One hundred family caregivers recruited from three mental health institutions participated in the training. Burden was assessed using the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire, and self-efficacy using the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to investigate whether participation in the training changed the level of family caregivers' burden and self-efficacy. Pearson's correlation was used to examine the relationships between self-efficacy and burden. Our results indicate that, after the training, self-efficacy increased significantly over time (p training. After following the IST program, family caregivers of patients with severe mental illness experienced a greater sense of competence and a significant decrease in burden. The training was greatly appreciated and satisfied caregivers' need to acquire the skills required in complex caregiving situations. This study was retrospectively registered (14/01/2018) in the ISRCTN registry with study ID ISRCTN44495131 .

  2. Conceptual Mobility of Geoscience Concepts in Introductory College-Level Courses: Results from Pre- and Post-testing with the Geoscience Concept Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. W.; Libarkin, J.

    2012-12-01

    College-level teaching of Earth science concepts typically assumes students have a supporting-science conceptual framework and skills for visualizing in three dimensions. The Geoscience Concept Inventory (GCI) is an assessment instrument for measuring learning that includes questions from most geologic sub-disciplines, as well as some from supporting science areas. Several questions rely on the ability to interpret two and three dimensional situations. Nationwide pre- and post-testing of introductory Earth science courses with the Geoscience Concept Inventory show little gain for many of its questions. Analysis of matched tests shows that students are typically switching between wrong answers. Of the 22 GCI questions that showed a normalized gain of students have high conceptual mobility. These results also pertain to the high pre-test students, suggesting that little conceptual entrenchment occurs for many students enrolled in entry-level courses. We suggest that students may have difficulty settling on a correct geological conception because of the shaky supporting-science underpinnings upon which these ideas are built. These results prompt the following questions; when do our hydrology and other Earth science students learn fundamental science concepts, and what role does an introductory course play in this learning? We suggest that longitudinal studies are needed for time periods longer than a semester, and that more attention be paid to when conceptual change occurs for our advanced learners.

  3. Effectiveness of teaching cognitive-behavioral techniques on locus of control in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtak, Mohammad; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Farzaneh, Esmaeil; Rjaei-Khiavi, Abdollah

    2017-10-01

    Many of the cognitive behavioral models and therapeutic protocols developed so far for psychological disorders and chronic diseases have proved effective through clinical research. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of teaching cognitive-behavioral techniques on locus of control in hemodialysis patients. This controlled clinical trial study was conducted in 2015 with 76 patients selected by census and treated with a hemodialysis machine in the dialysis department of Vali-Asr Hospital in the city of Meshkinshahr. A total of four patients were excluded because of their critical conditions while the rest, who were recruited, were randomly divided into two equal groups of 36 patients as the intervention and control groups. First, the locus of control was measured in both groups through a pretest, and cognitive-behavioral techniques were then taught to the intervention group during eight 45 to 90-minute sessions. The locus of control in patients of both groups was finally re-measured through a posttest. Data were collected using Rotter's Locus of Control Inventory. The Wilcoxon test and Mann-Whitney U test were respectively used in SPSS18 for data analysis. In the pretest and posttest stages respectively, 4.8% and 14.3% of samples in the control group as well as 14.3% and 33.3% of samples in the intervention group enjoyed internal locus of control. The difference between the pretest and posttest scores of internal locus of control in the intervention group was significant (p=0.004), which indicates the positive effect of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapeutic intervention on internalization of locus of control in this group. Given the external locus of control in most of the study patients and also the positive significant effect of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy on internalization of locus of control in this group of patients, it appears necessary to have a psychology resident present in the hemodialysis department to teach the necessary cognitive

  4. An Evaluation of Nutrition Education Program for Low-Income Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemirembe, Olive M. K.; Radhakrishna, Rama B.; Gurgevich, Elise; Yoder, Edgar P.; Ingram, Patreese D.

    2011-01-01

    A quasi-experimental design consisting of pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest comparison control group was used. Nutrition knowledge and behaviors were measured at pretest (time 1) posttest (time 2) and delayed posttest (time 3). General Linear Model (GLM) repeated measure ANCOVA results showed that youth who received nutrition education…

  5. Effects of a health education and telephone counseling program on patients with a positive fecal occult blood test result for colorectal cancer screening: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hui-Chuan; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Chen, Shu-Ching

    2017-10-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of a health education and telephone counseling program on knowledge and attitudes about colorectal cancer and screening and the psychological impact of positive screening results. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 2 groups using a pretest and posttest measures design. Patients with positive colorectal cancer screening results were selected and randomly assigned to an experimental (n = 51) or control (n = 51) group. Subjects in the experimental group received a health education and telephone counseling program, while the control group received routine care only. Patients were assessed pretest before intervention (first visit to the outpatient) and posttest at 4 weeks after intervention (4 weeks after first visit to the outpatient). Patients in the experimental group had a significantly better level of knowledge about colorectal cancer and the psychological impact of a positive screening result than did the control group. Analysis of covariance revealed that the health education and telephone counseling program had a significant main effect on colorectal cancer knowledge. A health education and telephone counseling program can improve knowledge about colorectal cancer and about the psychological impact in patients with positive colorectal cancer screening results. The health education and telephone counseling program is an easy, simple, and convenient method of improving knowledge, improving attitudes, and alleviating psychological distress in patients with positive colorectal cancer screening results, and this program can be expanded to other types of cancer screening. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Using cognitive pretesting to explore causes for ethnic differences on role-plays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostrom, J.K.; Born, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    This study used cognitive pretesting to assess what factors could be causing score differences between ethnic majority and ethnic minority applicants on role-plays. In a laboratory room, equipped with a video camera, cognitive interviews were conducted among 12 ethnic majority and 12 ethnic minority

  7. Achievement of course outcome in vector calculus pre-test questions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. Keywords: pre-test; course outcome; bloom taxanomy; Rasch measurement model; vector calculus. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  8. Targeting as the basis for pre-test market of lithium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuniaristanto, Zakaria, R.; Saputri, V. H. L.; Sutopo, W.; Kadir, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses about market segmentation and targeting as a first step in pre-test market of a new technology. The benefits of targeting towards pre-test market are pre-test market can be conducted to focus on selected target markets so there is no bias during the pre-test market. In determining the target market then do some surveys to identify the state of market in the future, so that the marketing process is not misplaced. Lithium ion battery which is commercialized through start-up companies is the case study. This start-up companies must be able to respond the changes and bring in customers as well as maintain them so that companies can survive and evolve to achieve its objectives. The research aims to determine market segments and target market effectively. Marketing strategy (segmentation and targeting) is used to make questionnaire and cluster analysis in data processing. Respondents were selected by purposive sampling and have obtained data as many as 80 samples. As the results study, there are three segments for lithium ion battery with their own distinguished characteristics and there are two segments that can be used as the target market for the company.

  9. Effects of Art Therapy on Distress Levels of Adults with Cancer: A Proxy Pretest Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinzak, Leara

    2016-01-01

    This study identified decreased distress after art therapy in a proxy pretest study with a convenience sample of 73 patients being treated for cancer. Art therapy outcomes from 4 settings (oncology unit, infusion clinic, individual sessions, and open studio) were measured via the self-report Distress Thermometer, which was collected as part of an…

  10. Validity of a Residualized Dependent Variable after Pretest Covariance Adjustments: Still the Same Variable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimon, Kim; Henson, Robin K.

    2015-01-01

    The authors empirically examined whether the validity of a residualized dependent variable after covariance adjustment is comparable to that of the original variable of interest. When variance of a dependent variable is removed as a result of one or more covariates, the residual variance may not reflect the same meaning. Using the pretest-posttest…

  11. 76 FR 12979 - Submission for OMB Review: Comment Request; Questionnaire Cognitive Interviewing and Pretesting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ...Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve the information collection listed below. This proposed information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on December 17, 2010 (75 FR 79009) and allowed 60 days for public comment. No public comments were received. The purpose of this notice is to allow an additional 30 days for public comment. The National Institutes of Health may not conduct or sponsor, and the respondent is not required to respond to, an information collection that has been extended, revised, or implemented on or after October 1, 1995, unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Questionnaire Cognitive Interview and Pretesting. Type of Information Collection Request: Extension. Need and Use of Information Collection: The purpose of the data collection is to conduct cognitive interviews, focus groups, Pilot household interviews, and experimental research in laboratory and field settings, both for applied questionnaire evaluation and more basic research on response errors in surveys. The most common evaluation method is the cognitive interview, in which a questionnaire design specialist interviews a volunteer participant. The interviewer administers the draft survey questions as written, but also probes the participant in depth about interpretations of questions, recall processes used to answer them, and adequacy of response categories to express answers, while noting points of confusion and errors in responding. Interviews are generally conducted in small rounds of 10-15 interviews. When possible, cognitive interviews are conducted in the survey's intended mode of administration. Cognitive interviewing provides useful information on questionnaire performance at minimal cost and

  12. Cognitive-behavioral group depression prevention compared to bibliotherapy and brochure control: nonsignificant effects in pilot effectiveness trial with college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Gau, Jeff M

    2014-04-01

    Conduct a pilot trial testing whether a brief cognitive-behavioral (CB) group reduced depressive symptoms and secondary outcomes relative to bibliotherapy and brochure controls in college students with elevated depressive symptoms. 82 college students (M age=19.0, SD=0.9; 70% female, 80% White) with elevated self-assessed depressive symptoms were randomized to a 6-session CB group, bibliotherapy, or educational brochure control condition, completing assessments at pretest, posttest, and at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Planned contrasts found no significant effects for CB group on depressive symptoms compared to either bibliotherapy or brochure controls at posttest (d=-.08 and .06, respectively) or over follow-up (d=-.04 and -.10, respectively). There were no intervention effects for social adjustment and substance use, though CB group participants had improved knowledge of CB concepts at posttest, versus brochure controls. Condition differences in major depression onset were nonsignificant but suggested support for CB interventions (CB group=7.4%, bibliotherapy=4.5%, brochure control=15.2%). Unexpectedly modest support was found for a brief CB group depression prevention intervention, compared to bibliotherapy or brochure control, when provided to self-selected college students, suggesting that alternative screening or interventions approaches are needed for this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of post-test probabilities by residents: Bayesian reasoning versus heuristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey; Phang, Sen Han; Schaefer, Jeffrey P; Ghali, William; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Although the process of diagnosing invariably begins with a heuristic, we encourage our learners to support their diagnoses by analytical cognitive processes, such as Bayesian reasoning, in an attempt to mitigate the effects of heuristics on diagnosing. There are, however, limited data on the use ± impact of Bayesian reasoning on the accuracy of disease probability estimates. In this study our objective was to explore whether Internal Medicine residents use a Bayesian process to estimate disease probabilities by comparing their disease probability estimates to literature-derived Bayesian post-test probabilities. We gave 35 Internal Medicine residents four clinical vignettes in the form of a referral letter and asked them to estimate the post-test probability of the target condition in each case. We then compared these to literature-derived probabilities. For each vignette the estimated probability was significantly different from the literature-derived probability. For the two cases with low literature-derived probability our participants significantly overestimated the probability of these target conditions being the correct diagnosis, whereas for the two cases with high literature-derived probability the estimated probability was significantly lower than the calculated value. Our results suggest that residents generate inaccurate post-test probability estimates. Possible explanations for this include ineffective application of Bayesian reasoning, attribute substitution whereby a complex cognitive task is replaced by an easier one (e.g., a heuristic), or systematic rater bias, such as central tendency bias. Further studies are needed to identify the reasons for inaccuracy of disease probability estimates and to explore ways of improving accuracy.

  14. Provision of test results and posttest counseling at STD clinics in 24 health departments: U.S., 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Elin; VanHandel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    We determined the demographic and HIV test characteristics of tests conducted in CDC-funded sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics with provision of test results and posttest counseling. We used CDC's HIV Counseling and Testing System data from 2007 for the 24 U.S. health departments that reported test-level data from STD clinics. We calculated and analyzed newly identified HIV positivity and the percentage of tests with provision of test results and posttest counseling (provision of posttest counseling), by demographic and HIV-related characteristics. Of 372,757 tests conducted among people without a previous HIV diagnosis by self-report, provision of posttest counseling was documented for 191,582 (51.4%) HIV tests overall and 1,922 (71.2%) newly identified HIV-positive test results. At these STD clinics, provision of posttest counseling varied by HIV serostatus, age, race/ethnicity, test type, and risk category; however, documentation of posttest counseling was missing for more than 20% of tests. The newly identified HIV positivity among all testers was 0.7%. One of the main goals of HIV counseling and testing is to inform people of their HIV status, because knowledge of one's HIV-positive serostatus can result in a reduction in risk behaviors and allow the person to access HIV medical care and treatment. STD clinics offering HIV testing may need to further their emphasis on increasing the proportion of clients who are provided posttest counseling and on improving documentation of this information.

  15. Posttest TRAC-PD2/MOD1 predictions for FLECHT SEASET test 31504

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, C.P.

    1982-01-01

    TRAC-PD2/MOD1 is a publicly released version of TRAC that is used primarily to analyze large-break loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). TRAC-PD2 can calculate, among other things, reflood phenomena. TRAC posttest predictions are compared with test 31504 reflood data from the Full-Length Emergency Core Heat Transfer (FLECHT) System Effects and Separate Effects Tests (SEASET) facility. A false top-down quench is predicted near the top of the core and the subcooling is underpredicted at the bottom of the core. However, the overall TRAC predictions are good, especially near the center of the core

  16. Sexual Assertiveness Skills and Sexual Decision-Making in Adolescent Girls: Randomized Controlled Trial of an Online Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widman, Laura; Golin, Carol E; Kamke, Kristyn; Burnette, Jeni L; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of an interactive, Web-based sexual health program (Health Education and Relationship Training [HEART]) for developing sexual assertiveness skills and enhancing sexual decision-making in adolescent girls. Participants were 222 tenth-grade girls (mean age = 15.2; 38% White, 29% Hispanic, 25% Black) in the Southeastern United States who were randomized in fall 2015 to the HEART intervention or an attention-matched control. We assessed participants at pretest, immediate posttest, and 4-month follow-up. Both groups had similar demographic and sexual behavior characteristics at pretest. At immediate posttest, girls who completed the HEART program demonstrated better sexual assertiveness skills measured with a behavioral task, higher self-reported assertiveness, intentions to communicate about sexual health, knowledge regarding HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), safer sex norms and attitudes, and condom self-efficacy compared with the control condition. At 4-month follow-up, group differences remained in knowledge regarding HIV and other STDs, condom attitudes, and condom self-efficacy. This brief online sexual health program can improve short-term outcomes among adolescent girls and offers an exciting new option in the growing array of digital health interventions available to youths. NCT02579135.

  17. Effect of "Touch Rugby" Training on the Cardiovascular Autonomic Control In Sedentary Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filliau, C; Younes, M; Blanchard, A-L; Piscione, J; Van de Louw, A; Seguret, C; Israel, J; Cottin, F

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of "touch-rugby" training on the cardiovascular autonomic control in sedentary subjects. 22 adults (30-64 years old) were included in this study. Before (pre-test) and after (post-test) the period of training, cardio-respiratory recordings were achieved at rest and during a graded maximal exercise on a treadmill. The Smoothed-Pseudo-Wigner-Ville Distribution provided instantaneous time frequency components of RR intervals and systolic blood pressure variability in low- and high-frequency bands. The baroreflex sensitivity was assessed in low-frequency and high-frequency bands. Between pre-test and post-test, resting heart rate (74±10 vs. 69±12 beats.min(-1), pbaroreflex sensitivity increased (13.4±10.1 vs. 26.0±20.9 ms.mmHg(-1), ptraining appears to be beneficial to cardiac health. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Oral Health Literacy and Retention of Health Information Among Pregnant Women: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Karina Duarte; Fraiz, Fabian Calixto; Benelli, Elaine Machado; Assunção, Luciana Reichert da Silva

    This study evaluated the effect of oral health literacy (OHL) on the retention of health information in pregnant women. A total of 175 pregnant women were randomly assigned to standard oral (spoken), written and control intervention groups. With the exception of the control group, the interventions investigated the eating habits and oral hygiene among children under 2 years of age. The participants' answers before the interventions (pre-test), 15 min after the interventions (post-test) and 4 weeks after the interventions (follow-up test) were used to estimate the knowledge score (KS). Information acquisition was determined by comparing pre-test and post-test results, while retention of information was based comparing pre-test and follow-up test results. OHL was analysed by BREALD-30. The data were assessed by nonparametric tests and Poisson regression models with robust variance (α = 0.05). By the end of the follow-up period, 162 pregnant women had been assessed. The BREALD-30 mean was 22.3 (SD = 4.80). Regardless of the type of intervention, pregnant women with low OHL had lower knowledge scores in the three assessments. Participants with low OHL showed higher acquisition and retention of information in the standard oral health intervention. Multiple regression models demonstrated that OHL was independently associated with KS, age, socioeconomic status and type of intervention. The results suggest a negative effect of low OHL on retention of information. Only the standard, spoken oral health intervention could address the differences in literacy levels.

  19. Development and pretest of key visual imagery in a campaign for the prevention of child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Émilie; Gagné, Marie-Hélène; Goulet, Julie

    2017-08-01

    This article discusses the development and pretesting of key visual imagery in a promotional campaign developed in Quebec, Canada. This campaign is the media-based component of a broader prevention strategy involving the use of the Triple P program (Sanders, 1999). The purpose was to pretest with parents the preliminary version of a poster that uses the campaign's key visual imagery prior to final production. In total, 26 parents from the regions of Quebec City and Montreal participated in four focus groups. Two general themes emerged from the focus groups: (i) emotions and reactions arising from the key visual imagery; and (ii) comprehension of the message being conveyed. Based on this information, recommendations were made to the marketing agency, which then modified the campaign's key visual imagery and proposed a final layout.

  20. Pre-testing nutrition education materials for elderly care-givers in Boipatong

    OpenAIRE

    Gaede, Rolf J

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The paper deals with issues and concerns relating to the process of pre-testing visual illustrations used in educational material in a community communication setting. The first part of the paper discusses how selected aspects of nutrition education materials meant for elderly care givers in Boipatong were pre‐tested using questionnaires (n=55) and focus group discussions in order to establish the target group’s views and opinions about different types of visual illustration appro...

  1. Blind Pretesting and Student Performance in an Undergraduate Corporate Finance Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Blind Pretesting and Student Performance in an Undergraduate Corporate Finance Course Brian C. Paynea U.S. Air Force Academy Thomas C...testing effect can be applied to an introductory corporate finance course. Prior research on the testing effect has been used non-quantitative subject...80840. Email: thomas.omalley@usafa.edu. Tel: 719.333.8259. Fax: 713.333.9715. 1 INTRODUCTION Corporate finance courses have long

  2. Diagnostic models of the pre-test probability of stable coronary artery disease: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting He

    Full Text Available A comprehensive search of PubMed and Embase was performed in January 2015 to examine the available literature on validated diagnostic models of the pre-test probability of stable coronary artery disease and to describe the characteristics of the models. Studies that were designed to develop and validate diagnostic models of pre-test probability for stable coronary artery disease were included. Data regarding baseline patient characteristics, procedural characteristics, modeling methods, metrics of model performance, risk of bias, and clinical usefulness were extracted. Ten studies involving the development of 12 models and two studies focusing on external validation were identified. Seven models were validated internally, and seven models were validated externally. Discrimination varied between studies that were validated internally (C statistic 0.66-0.81 and externally (0.49-0.87. Only one study presented reclassification indices. The majority of better performing models included sex, age, symptoms, diabetes, smoking, and hyperlipidemia as variables. Only two diagnostic models evaluated the effects on clinical decision making processes or patient outcomes. Most diagnostic models of the pre-test probability of stable coronary artery disease have had modest success, and very few present data regarding the effects of these models on clinical decision making processes or patient outcomes.

  3. Effects of robotic guidance on sensorimotor control: planning vs. online control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Gerome A; Alekhina, Maria; Srubiski, Shirley L; Williams, Camille K; Bhattacharjee, Arindam; Tremblay, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Robotic guidance has been shown to facilitate motor skill acquisition, through altered sensorimotor control, in neurologically impaired and healthy populations. To determine if robot-guided practice and online visual feedback availability primarily influences movement planning or online control mechanisms. In this two-experiment study, participants first performed a pre-test involving reaches with or without vision, to obtain baseline measures. In both experiments, participants then underwent an acquisition phase where they either actively followed robot-guided trajectories or trained unassisted. Only in the second experiment, robot-guided or unassisted acquisition was performed either with or without online vision. Following acquisition, all participants completed a post-test that was the same as the pre-test. Planning and online control mechanisms were assessed through endpoint error and kinematic analyses. The robot-guided and unassisted groups generally exhibited comparable changes in endpoint accuracy and precision. Kinematic analyses revealed that only participants who practiced with the robot exhibited significantly reduced the proportion of movement time spent during the limb deceleration phase (i.e., time after peak velocity). This was true regardless of online visual feedback availability during training. The influence of robot-assisted motor skill acquisition is best explained by improved motor planning processes.

  4. Post-test thermal calculations and data analyses for the Spent Fuel Test, Climax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montan, D.N.; Patrick, W.C.

    1986-06-01

    After the Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) was completed, additional calculations were performed using the best available (directly measured or inferred from measurements made during the test) input parameters, thermal properties, and power levels. This report documents those calculations and compares the results with measurements made during the three-year heating phase and six-month posttest cooling phase of the SFT-C. Three basic types of heat-transfer calculations include a combined two-dimensional/three-dimensional, infinite-length, finite-difference model; a fully three-dimensional, finite-length, finite-difference model; and a fully three-dimensional, finite-length, analytical solution. The finite-length model much more accurately reflects heat flow near the ends of the array and produces cooler temperatures everywhere than does its infinite-length counterpart. 14 refs., 144 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Mineralogic and petrologic investigation of post-test core samples from the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryerson, F.J.; Beiriger, J.

    1985-02-01

    We have characterized a suite of samples taken subsequent to the end of the Spent Fuel Test - Climax by petrographic and microanalytical techniques and determined their mineral assemblage, modal properties, and mineral chemistry. The samples were obtained immediately adjacent to the canister borehole at a variety of depths and positions within the canister drift, as well as radially outward from each canister hole. This method of sampling allows variations in post-test mineralogic properties to be evaluated on the basis of (1) depth along a particular canister hole and (2) position within the canister drift, with respect to the heat and radiation sources, and with respect to the pre - test samples. In no case did we find any significant correlation between the mineralogical properties and variables listed above. In short, the Spent Fuel Test - Climax has produced no identifiable mineralogical response in the Climax quartz monzonite. 12 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Pre-and Post-test Genetic Counseling for Chromosomal and Mendelian Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jill Fonda; Stoll, Katie; Bernhardt, Barbara A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic carrier screening, prenatal screening for aneuploidy and prenatal diagnostic testing have expanded dramatically over the past two decades. Driven in part by powerful market forces, new complex testing modalities have become available after limited clinical research. The responsibility for offering these tests lies primarily on the obstetrical care provider, and has become more burdensome as the number of testing options expands. Genetic testing in pregnancy is optional, and decisions about undergoing tests, as well as follow-up testing, should be informed and based on individual patients’ values and needs. Careful pre- and post-test counseling is central to supporting informed decision-making. This article explores three areas of technical expansion in genetic testing: expanded carrier screening, non-invasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidies using cell-free DNA, and diagnostic testing using fetal chromosomal microarray testing, and provides insights aimed at enabling the obstetrical practitioner to better support patients considering these tests. PMID:26718445

  7. Can Working Memory and Inhibitory Control Predict Second Language Learning in the Classroom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared A. Linck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of executive functioning in second language (L2 aptitude remains unclear. Whereas some studies report a relationship between working memory (WM and L2 learning, others have argued against this association. Similarly, being bilingual appears to benefit inhibitory control, and individual differences in inhibitory control are related to online L2 processing. The current longitudinal study examines whether these two components of executive functioning predict learning gains in an L2 classroom context using a pretest/posttest design. We assessed 25 university students in language courses, who completed measures of WM and inhibitory control. They also completed a proficiency measure at the beginning and end of a semester and reported their grade point average (GPA. WM was positively related to L2 proficiency and learning, but inhibitory control was not. These results support the notion that WM is an important component of L2 aptitude, particularly for predicting the early stages of L2 classroom learning.

  8. Effects of Training on Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Malaria Prevention and Control among Community Role Model Care Givers in South Western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalekan, Adebimpe W; Adebukola, Adebimpe M

    2015-10-01

    Malaria is endemic in Nigeria, with significant records of mortality and morbidity. Adequate community involvement is central to a successful implementation of malaria control programs. This study assessed the effects of a training programme on knowledge of malaria prevention and control among community role model care givers. A descriptive cross sectional study of a pre-and post-test design method was conducted among 400 eligible community members in Osun State. Training was given in the form of organized lectures, health education and practical demonstration sessions. Scores of pre-test and post-test conducted after four months interval were compared. Multistage sampling method was adopted in selecting study participants, while data was analyzed using the SPSS software version 17.0. Mean age was 43.8 (±1.4) years. Average knowledge score of cause, transmission, risk factors and consequences, awareness of common symptoms and preventive practices improved during post-training test when compared with pr-training test. The overall descriptive mean knowledge score in pre-test and post-test were 2.1 and 3.5 respectively out of an average maximum score of 5.0, giving an increment of 66.7%. Role model care givers with formal education were twice and three times more likely to know about disease 'transmission' (OR 1.9, 95%CI 0.11-0.19, p=0.002) and 'consequences' (OR 2.9, 95%CI 0.25-0.65, p=0.040) respectively compared to those without formal education. Training on malaria improved the knowledge of malaria prevention and control among role model community care givers towards a successful implementation of malaria control programmes.

  9. Post-test examination of a copper electrode from deposition hole 5 in the Prototype Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Three copper electrodes have been exposed for eight years in the outer section of the Prototype Repository at Aespoe. The electrodes were installed in the upper bentonite block of deposition hole 5 in May 2003. Most of the time the temperature of the electrodes has been somewhat below 35 deg C. The electrodes were retrieved for post-test examination in September 2011. This report presents results from electrochemical measurements and the post-test examination of one of the electrodes. The corrosion potential of the examined copper electrode was -40 mV SHE (2011-02-04) when part of the concrete plug to the outer section of the repository had been removed and made measurements possible. When the back-fill in the deposition tunnel had been removed it was 25 mV SHE (2011-09-12). Finally, before letting loose the copper electrode from the retrieved bentonite block, the corrosion potential was found to be 165 mV SHE (2011-11-15) being a sign of air ingress to the electrode/ bentonite interface. It was immediately obvious from the appearance of the copper electrode, when part of the surrounding bentonite had been removed, that both Cu(I) and Cu(II) corrosion products existed on the electrode surface. X-ray diffraction measurements also verified the presence of cuprite, Cu 2 O, and malachite, Cu 2 (OH) 2 CO 3 , on the electrode; however, paratacamite, Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl, was not found. The performed Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy confirmed these observations. The corrosion product film, of which cuprite is the main part, was quite uneven and porous. No unmistakable signs of pitting have been found. The appearance of the copper electrode reminded of the coupons from the retrieved LOT test parcels, but was different from the appearance of the surface on the full-size canisters. For the latter blue-green Cu(II) corrosion products have not or only rarely been observed from visual examination immediately after removing the surrounding bentonite. Differences that

  10. Post-test examination of a copper electrode from deposition hole 5 in the Prototype Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Three copper electrodes have been exposed for eight years in the outer section of the Prototype Repository at Aespoe. The electrodes were installed in the upper bentonite block of deposition hole 5 in May 2003. Most of the time the temperature of the electrodes has been somewhat below 35 deg C. The electrodes were retrieved for post-test examination in September 2011. This report presents results from electrochemical measurements and the post-test examination of one of the electrodes. The corrosion potential of the examined copper electrode was -40 mV SHE (2011-02-04) when part of the concrete plug to the outer section of the repository had been removed and made measurements possible. When the back-fill in the deposition tunnel had been removed it was 25 mV SHE (2011-09-12). Finally, before letting loose the copper electrode from the retrieved bentonite block, the corrosion potential was found to be 165 mV SHE (2011-11-15) being a sign of air ingress to the electrode/ bentonite interface. It was immediately obvious from the appearance of the copper electrode, when part of the surrounding bentonite had been removed, that both Cu(I) and Cu(II) corrosion products existed on the electrode surface. X-ray diffraction measurements also verified the presence of cuprite, Cu{sub 2}O, and malachite, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, on the electrode; however, paratacamite, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}Cl, was not found. The performed Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy confirmed these observations. The corrosion product film, of which cuprite is the main part, was quite uneven and porous. No unmistakable signs of pitting have been found. The appearance of the copper electrode reminded of the coupons from the retrieved LOT test parcels, but was different from the appearance of the surface on the full-size canisters. For the latter blue-green Cu(II) corrosion products have not or only rarely been observed from visual examination immediately after removing the surrounding

  11. Outcome by Exercise Echocardiography in Patients with Low Pretest Probability of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteiro, Jesus; Bouzas-Mosquera, Alberto; Broullon, Javier; Sanchez-Fernandez, Gabriel; Perez-Cebey, Lucia; Yañez, Juan; Martinez, Dolores; Vazquez-Rodriguez, Jose M

    2016-08-01

    Recommendations for testing in patients with low pretest probability of coronary artery disease differ in guidelines from no testing at all to different tests. The aim of this study was to assess the value of exercise echocardiography (ExE) to define outcome in this population. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 1,436 patients with low pretest probability of coronary artery disease (exercise) and fixed wall motion abnormalities were measured. The mean age was 50 ± 12 years. Resting wall motion abnormalities were seen in 13 patients (0.9%) and ischemia in 108 (7.5%). During follow-up, 38 patients died, 10 of cardiac death (annualized death rate, 0.39%); 20 patients had MACEs (annualized MACE rate, 0.21%); and 48 patients (29 with ischemia) underwent revascularization (annualized revascularization rate, 0.51%). The number and percentage of MACEs in the abnormal and normal ExE groups were similar (two [1.7%] vs 18 [1.4%], P = .70), as was the annualized MACE rate (0.31% vs 0.21%, P = .50). Peak left ventricular ejection fraction exhibited a nonsignificant trend for predicting MACEs (P = .11). The number of studies needed to detect an abnormal finding was 12.6 and to detect a patient with extensive ischemia was 26.1. ExE offers limited prognostic information in patients with low pretest probability of coronary artery disease. The small number of abnormal findings on ExE and low event rates and the large number of studies needed to detect an abnormal finding limit further the value of imaging in this population. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of a community-based program for suicide prevention among elders with early-stage dementia: A controlled observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Pill; Yang, Jinhyang

    The purpose of this study was to develop a small-group-focused suicide prevention program for elders with early-stage dementia and to assess its effects. This was a quasi-experimental study with a control group pretest-posttest design. A total of 62 elders diagnosed with early-stage dementia who were receiving care services at nine daycare centers in J City Korea participated in this study. The experimental group participated in the suicide prevention program twice a week for 5 weeks with a pretest and two posttests The developed suicide prevention program had a significant effect on the perceived health status, social support, depression, and suicidal ideation of elders with early-stage dementia. Nurses should integrate risk factors such as depression and protective factors such as health status and social support into a suicide prevention program. This community-based program in geriatric nursing practice can be effective in preventing suicide among elders with early-stage dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pretest round robin analysis of 1:4-scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.; Klamerus, E.W.; Shibata, S.; Mitsugi, S.; Costello, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    The work reported herein represents, arguably, the state of the art in the numerical simulation of the response of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model to pressure loads up to failure. A significant expenditure of time and money on the part of the sponsors, contractors, and Round Robin participants was required to meet the objectives. While it is difficult to summarize the results of this extraordinary effort in a few paragraphs, the following observations are offered for the reader's consideration: almost half the participants used ABAQUS as the primary computational tool for performing the pretest analyses. The other participants used a variety of codes, most of which were developed ''in house''. (author)

  14. Pre-Test CFD for the Design and Execution of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Axdahl, Erik L.; Cabell, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing costs of physics experiments and simultaneous increase in availability and maturity of computational tools it is not surprising that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is playing an increasingly important role, not only in post-test investigations, but also in the early stages of experimental planning. This paper describes a CFD-based effort executed in close collaboration between computational fluid dynamicists and experimentalists to develop a virtual experiment during the early planning stages of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing project at NASA Langley Research Center. This projects aims to investigate supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) fuel injection and mixing physics, improve the understanding of underlying physical processes, and develop enhancement strategies and functional relationships relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than 8. The purpose of the virtual experiment was to provide flow field data to aid in the design of the experimental apparatus and the in-stream rake probes, to verify the nonintrusive measurements based on NO-PLIF, and to perform pre-test analysis of quantities obtainable from the experiment and CFD. The approach also allowed for the joint team to develop common data processing and analysis tools, and to test research ideas. The virtual experiment consisted of a series of Reynolds-averaged simulations (RAS). These simulations included the facility nozzle, the experimental apparatus with a baseline strut injector, and the test cabin. Pure helium and helium-air mixtures were used to determine the efficacy of different inert gases to model hydrogen injection. The results of the simulations were analyzed by computing mixing efficiency, total pressure recovery, and stream thrust potential. As the experimental effort progresses, the simulation results will be compared with the experimental data to calibrate the modeling constants present in the CFD and validate simulation fidelity. CFD will also be used to

  15. Post-Test Analysis of a 10-Year Sodium Heat Pipe Life Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Locci, Ivan E.; Sanzi, James L.; Hull, David R.; Geng, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 years) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described. Lessons learned and future life test plans are also discussed.

  16. Challenges of Pre- and Post-Test Counseling for Orthodox Jewish Individuals in the Premarital Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, E; Schreiber-Agus, N; Bajaj, K; Klugman, S; Goldwaser, T

    2016-02-01

    The Jewish community has traditionally taken ownership of its health, and has taken great strides to raise awareness about genetic issues that affect the community, such as Tay-Sachs disease and Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome. Thanks in part to these heightened awareness efforts, many Orthodox Jewish individuals are now using genetics services as they begin to plan their families. Due to unique cultural and religious beliefs and perceptions, the Orthodox Jewish patients who seek genetic counseling face many barriers to a successful counseling session, and often seek the guidance of programs such as the Program for Jewish Genetic Health (PJGH). In this article, we present clinical vignettes from the PJGH's clinical affiliate, the Reproductive Genetics practice at the Montefiore Medical Center. These cases highlight unique features of contemporary premarital counseling and screening within the Orthodox Jewish Community, including concerns surrounding stigma, disclosure, "marriageability," the use of reproductive technologies, and the desire to include a third party in decision making. Our vignettes demonstrate the importance of culturally-sensitive counseling. We provide strategies and points to consider when addressing the challenges of pre- and post-test counseling as it relates to genetic testing in this population.

  17. Posttest analysis of MIST Test 330302 using TRAC-PF1/MOD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyack, B E [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses a posttest analysis of Multi-Loop Integral System Test (MIST) 330302 which has been performed using TRAC-PF1/MOD1. This test was one of group performed in the MIST facility to investigate high-pressure injection (HPI)-power-operated relief valve (PORV) cooling, also known as feed-and-bleed cooling. In Test 330302, HPI cooling was delayed 20 min after opening and locking the PORV open to induce extensive system voiding. We have concluded that the TRAC-calculated results are in reasonable overall agreement with the data for Test 330302. All major trends and phenomena were correctly predicted. Differences observed between the measured and calculated results have been traced and related, in part, to deficiencies in our knowledge of the facility configuration and operation. We have identified two models forwhich additional review is appropriate. However, in general, the TRAC closure models and correlations appear to be adequate for the prediction of the phenomena expected to occur during feed-and-bleed transientsin the MIST facility. We believe that the correct conclusions about trends and phenomena will be reached if the code is used in similar applications. Conclusions reached regarding use of the code to calculate similar phenomena in full-size plants (scaling implications) and regulatory implications of this work are also presented.

  18. Nonlinear Analysis and Post-Test Correlation for a Curved PRSEUS Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Kevin; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn; Neal, Albert L.; Linton, Kim, A.; Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, developed by The Boeing Company, has been extensively studied as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA s) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program. The PRSEUS concept provides a light-weight alternative to aluminum or traditional composite design concepts and is applicable to traditional-shaped fuselage barrels and wings, as well as advanced configurations such as a hybrid wing body or truss braced wings. Therefore, NASA, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and The Boeing Company partnered in an effort to assess the performance and damage arrestments capabilities of a PRSEUS concept panel using a full-scale curved panel in the FAA Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility. Testing was conducted in the FASTER facility by subjecting the panel to axial tension loads applied to the ends of the panel, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure loadings. Additionally, reactive hoop loads were applied to the skin and frames of the panel along its edges. The panel successfully supported the required design loads in the pristine condition and with a severed stiffener. The panel also demonstrated that the PRSEUS concept could arrest the progression of damage including crack arrestment and crack turning. This paper presents the nonlinear post-test analysis and correlation with test results for the curved PRSEUS panel. It is shown that nonlinear analysis can accurately calculate the behavior of a PRSEUS panel under tension, pressure and combined loading conditions.

  19. Pre- and post-test genetic counseling for chromosomal and Mendelian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda Allen, Jill; Stoll, Katie; Bernhardt, Barbara A

    2016-02-01

    Genetic carrier screening, prenatal screening for aneuploidy, and prenatal diagnostic testing have expanded dramatically over the past 2 decades. Driven in part by powerful market forces, new complex testing modalities have become available after limited clinical research. The responsibility for offering these tests lies primarily on the obstetrical care provider and has become more burdensome as the number of testing options expands. Genetic testing in pregnancy is optional, and decisions about undergoing tests, as well as follow-up testing, should be informed and based on individual patients' values and needs. Careful pre- and post-test counseling is central to supporting informed decision-making. This article explores three areas of technical expansion in genetic testing: expanded carrier screening, non-invasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidies using cell-free DNA, and diagnostic testing using fetal chromosomal microarray testing, and provides insights aimed at enabling the obstetrical practitioner to better support patients considering these tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Posttest analysis of MIST Test 330302 using TRAC-PF1/MOD1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, B.E.

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses a posttest analysis of Multi-Loop Integral System Test (MIST) 330302 which has been performed using TRAC-PF1/MOD1. This test was one of group performed in the MIST facility to investigate high-pressure injection (HPI)-power-operated relief valve (PORV) cooling, also known as feed-and-bleed cooling. In Test 330302, HPI cooling was delayed 20 min after opening and locking the PORV open to induce extensive system voiding. We have concluded that the TRAC-calculated results are in reasonable overall agreement with the data for Test 330302. All major trends and phenomena were correctly predicted. Differences observed between the measured and calculated results have been traced and related, in part, to deficiencies in our knowledge of the facility configuration and operation. We have identified two models forwhich additional review is appropriate. However, in general, the TRAC closure models and correlations appear to be adequate for the prediction of the phenomena expected to occur during feed-and-bleed transientsin the MIST facility. We believe that the correct conclusions about trends and phenomena will be reached if the code is used in similar applications. Conclusions reached regarding use of the code to calculate similar phenomena in full-size plants (scaling implications) and regulatory implications of this work are also presented

  1. A well test analysis method accounting for pre-test operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, D.B.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2003-01-01

    We propose to use regular monitoring data from a production or injection well for estimating the formation hydraulic properties in the vicinity of the wellbore without interrupting the operations. In our approach, we select a portion of the pumping data over a certain time interval and then derive our conclusions from analysis of these data. A distinctive feature of the proposed approach differing it form conventional methods is in the introduction of an additional parameter, an effective pre-test pumping rate. The additional parameter is derived based on a rigorous asymptotic analysis of the flow model. Thus, we account for the non-uniform pressure distribution at the beginning of testing time interval caused by pre-test operations at the well. By synthetic and field examples, we demonstrate that deviation of the matching curve from the data that is usually attributed to skin and wellbore storage effects, can also be interpreted through this new parameter. Moreover, with our method, the data curve is matched equally well and the results of the analysis remain stable when the analyzed data interval is perturbed, whereas traditional methods are sensitive to the choice of the data interval. A special efficient minimization procedure has been developed for searching the best fitting parameters. We enhanced our analysis above with a procedure of estimating ambient reservoir pressure and dimensionless wellbore radius. The methods reported here have been implemented in code ODA (Operations Data Analysis). A beta version of the code is available for free testing and evaluation to interested parties

  2. Pre-test CFD Calculations for a Bypass Flow Standard Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich Johnson

    2011-11-01

    The bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is the flow that occurs between adjacent graphite blocks. Gaps exist between blocks due to variances in their manufacture and installation and because of the expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. Although the temperature of fuel compacts and graphite is sensitive to the presence of bypass flow, there is great uncertainty in the level and effects of the bypass flow. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program at the Idaho National Laboratory has undertaken to produce experimental data of isothermal bypass flow between three adjacent graphite blocks. These data are intended to provide validation for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of the bypass flow. Such validation data sets are called Standard Problems in the nuclear safety analysis field. Details of the experimental apparatus as well as several pre-test calculations of the bypass flow are provided. Pre-test calculations are useful in examining the nature of the flow and to see if there are any problems associated with the flow and its measurement. The apparatus is designed to be able to provide three different gap widths in the vertical direction (the direction of the normal coolant flow) and two gap widths in the horizontal direction. It is expected that the vertical bypass flow will range from laminar to transitional to turbulent flow for the different gap widths that will be available.

  3. Impact on learning of an e-learning module on leukaemia: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background e-learning resources may be beneficial for complex or conceptually difficult topics. Leukaemia is one such topic, yet there are no reports on the efficacy of e-learning for leukaemia. This study compared the learning impact on senior medical students of a purpose-built e-learning module on leukaemia, compared with existing online resources. Methods A randomised controlled trial was performed utilising volunteer senior medical students. Participants were randomly allocated to Study and Control groups. Following a pre-test on leukaemia administered to both groups, the Study group was provided with access to the new e-learning module, while the Control group was directed to existing online resources. A post-test and an evaluation questionnaire were administered to both groups at the end of the trial period. Results Study and Control groups were equivalent in gender distribution, mean academic ability, pre-test performance and time studying leukaemia during the trial. The Study group performed significantly better than the Control group in the post-test, in which the group to which the students had been allocated was the only significant predictor of performance. The Study group’s evaluation of the module was overwhelmingly positive. Conclusions A targeted e-learning module on leukaemia had a significant effect on learning in this cohort, compared with existing online resources. We believe that the interactivity, dialogic feedback and integration with the curriculum offered by the e-learning module contributed to its impact. This has implications for e-learning design in medicine and other disciplines. PMID:22640463

  4. Impact on learning of an e-learning module on leukaemia: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgulis Yuri

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background e-learning resources may be beneficial for complex or conceptually difficult topics. Leukaemia is one such topic, yet there are no reports on the efficacy of e-learning for leukaemia. This study compared the learning impact on senior medical students of a purpose-built e-learning module on leukaemia, compared with existing online resources. Methods A randomised controlled trial was performed utilising volunteer senior medical students. Participants were randomly allocated to Study and Control groups. Following a pre-test on leukaemia administered to both groups, the Study group was provided with access to the new e-learning module, while the Control group was directed to existing online resources. A post-test and an evaluation questionnaire were administered to both groups at the end of the trial period. Results Study and Control groups were equivalent in gender distribution, mean academic ability, pre-test performance and time studying leukaemia during the trial. The Study group performed significantly better than the Control group in the post-test, in which the group to which the students had been allocated was the only significant predictor of performance. The Study group’s evaluation of the module was overwhelmingly positive. Conclusions A targeted e-learning module on leukaemia had a significant effect on learning in this cohort, compared with existing online resources. We believe that the interactivity, dialogic feedback and integration with the curriculum offered by the e-learning module contributed to its impact. This has implications for e-learning design in medicine and other disciplines.

  5. The effects of embodied rhythm and robotic interventions on the spontaneous and responsive verbal communication skills of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A further outcome of a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sudha M; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Gifford, Timothy; Bhat, Anjana N

    2016-07-01

    The current manuscript is the second in a mini-series of manuscripts reporting the effects of alternative, movement-based, rhythm and robotic interventions on the social communication skills of 36 school-age children with ASD. This pilot randomized controlled trial compared the effects of 8-weeks of rhythm and robotic interventions to those of a standard-of-care, comparison intervention. The first manuscript reported intervention effects on the spontaneous and responsive social attention skills of children. In this manuscript, we report intervention effects on the spontaneous and responsive verbal communication skills of children. Communication skills were assessed within a standardized test of responsive communication during the pretest and posttest as well as using training-specific measures of social verbalization during early, mid, and late training sessions. The rhythm and comparison groups improved on the standardized test in the posttest compared to the pretest. The rhythm and robot groups increased levels of social verbalization across training sessions. Movement-based and stationary contexts afforded different types and amounts of communication in children with ASD. Overall, movement-based interventions are a promising tool to enhance verbal and non-verbal communication skills in children with ASD.

  6. Pretest thermal analysis of the Tuff Water Migration/In-Situ Heater Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulmer, B.M.

    1980-02-01

    This report describes the pretest thermal analysis for the Tuff Water Migration/In-Situ Heater Experiment to be conducted in welded tuff in G-tunnel, Nevada Test Site. The parametric thermal modeling considers variable boiling temperature, tuff thermal conductivity, tuff emissivity, and heater operating power. For nominal tuff properties, some near field boiling is predicted for realistic operating power. However, the extent of boiling will be strongly determined by the ambient (100% water saturated) rock thermal conductivity. In addition, the thermal response of the heater and of the tuff within the dry-out zone (i.e., bounded by boiling isotherm) is dependent on the temperature variation of rock conductivity as well as the extent of induced boiling

  7. TOPFLOW-PTS experiments. pre-test calculations with NEPTUNE{sub C}FD code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A., E-mail: alain-cc.martin@edf.fr [Electricite de France, Chatou (France); Heib, C.; Dubois, F., E-mail: caroline.heib@irsn.fr, E-mail: franck.dubois@irsn.fr [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Raynaud, C.; Peturaud, P., E-mail: christelle.raynaud@edf.fr, E-mail: pierre.peturaud@edf.fr [Electricite de France, Chatou (France); Huvelin, F.; Barbier, A., E-mail: fabien.huvelin@areva.com, E-mail: anthony.barbier@areva.com [AREVA-NP, Paris la Defense (France)

    2011-07-01

    Hypothetical Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accident is identified as one of the most severe transients leading to a potential huge Pressurized Thermal Shock on the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This may result in two-phase flow configurations in the cold legs, according to the operating conditions, and to reliably assess the RPV wall integrity, advanced two-phase flow simulations are required. Related needs in development and/or validation of these advanced models are important, and the on-going TOPFLOW-PTS experimental program was designed to provide a well documented data base to meet these needs. This paper focuses on pre-test NEPTUNE{sub C}FD simulations of TOPFLOW-PTS experiments; these simulations were performed to (i) help in the definition of the test matrix and test procedure, and (ii) check the presence of the different key physical phenomena at the mock-up scale. (author)

  8. A field test of a web-based workplace health promotion program to improve dietary practices, reduce stress, and increase physical activity: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Royer F; Billings, Douglas W; Hersch, Rebekah K; Back, Anita S; Hendrickson, April

    2007-06-19

    Most work sites engage in some form of health promotion programming designed to improve worker health and reduce health care costs. Although these programs have typically been delivered through combinations of seminars and print materials, workplace health promotion programs are increasingly being delivered through the Internet. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Web-based multimedia health promotion program for the workplace, designed to improve dietary practices, reduce stress, and increase physical activity. Using a randomized controlled trial design with pretest-posttest comparisons within each group, 419 employees of a human resources company were randomly assigned to the Web-based condition or to a condition that provided print materials on the same topics. All subjects were assessed at pretest and posttest through an online questionnaire containing multiple measures of health behavior and attitudes. The test period was 3 months. Questionnaire data were analyzed mainly by analysis of covariance and t tests. Retention rates were good for both groups-85% for the Web-based group and 87% for the print group. Subjects using the Web-based program performed significantly better than the print group on Attitudes Toward a Healthful Diet (F(1,415) = 7.104, P = .008) and Dietary Stage of Change (F(1,408) = 6.487, P = .01), but there were no significant group differences on the five other dietary measures. Both groups also showed improvement from pretest to posttest on most dietary measures, as indicated by significant t tests. Within the Web-based group, dosage analyses showed significant effects of the number of times the subject accessed the program on measures of Dietary Self-Efficacy (F(2,203) = 5.270, P = .003), Attitudes Toward a Healthful Diet (F(2,204) = 2.585, P = .045), and Dietary Stage of Change (F(2,200) = 4.627, P = .005). No significant differences were found between the two groups on measures of stress or physical

  9. Role of 3D animation in periodontal patient education: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Gertjan; Quirynen, Marc; Ozcelik, Onur; Teughels, Wim

    2014-01-01

    This randomized controlled parallel trial investigates the effect of 3D animation on the increase and recall of knowledge on periodontitis by patients with periodontitis. The effects of a 3D animation (3D animation group) were compared with narration and drawing (control group) for periodontal patient education. A total of 68 periodontitis patients were stratified according to educational level and then randomly allocated to control or 3D animation groups. All patients received: (1) a pre-test (baseline knowledge), (2) a patient education video (3D animation or control video), (3) a post-test (knowledge immediately after looking at the video), and (4) a follow-up test (knowledge recall after 2 weeks). Each test contained 10 multiple-choice questions. There was no significant difference in baseline knowledge. Patients receiving the 3D animations had significantly higher scores for both the post-test and the follow-up test, when compared with patients receiving sketch animations. 3D animations are more effective than real-time drawings for periodontal patient education in terms of knowledge recall. 3D animations may be a powerful tool for assisting in the information process. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A comparison of 200 kN magneto-rheological damper models for use in real-time hybrid simulation pretesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z.; Christenson, R.

    2011-06-01

    Control devices can be used to dissipate the energy of a civil structure subjected to dynamic loading, such as earthquake, wave and wind excitation, thus reducing structural damage and preventing failure. The magneto-rheological (MR) fluid damper is a promising device for use in civil structures due to its mechanical simplicity, inherent stability, high dynamic range, large temperature operating range, robust performance, and low power requirements. The MR damper is intrinsically nonlinear and rate dependent. Thus a challenging aspect of applying this technology is the development of accurate models to describe the behavior of such dampers for control design and evaluation purposes. In particular, a new type of experimental testing called real-time hybrid simulation (RTHS) combines numerical simulation with laboratory testing of physical components. As with any laboratory testing, safety is of critical importance. For RTHS in particular the feedback and dynamic interaction of physical and numerical components can result in potentially unstable behavior. For safety purposes, it is desired to conduct pretest simulations where the physical specimen is replaced with an appropriate numerical model yet the numerical RTHS component is left unchanged. These pretest simulations require a MR damper model that can exhibit stability and convergence at larger fixed integration time steps, and provide computational efficiency, speed of calculation, and accuracy during pretest verification of the experimental setup. Several models for MR dampers have been proposed, including the hyperbolic tangent, Bouc-Wen, viscous plus Dahl and algebraic models. This paper examines the relative performance of four MR damper models of large-scale 200 kN MR dampers as needed for pretest simulations of RTHS. Experimental tests are conducted on two large-scale MR dampers located at two RTHS test facilities at the Smart Structures Technology Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana

  11. Clinician gestalt estimate of pretest probability for acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism in patients with chest pain and dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Stubblefield, William B

    2014-03-01

    Pretest probability helps guide diagnostic testing for patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism. Pretest probability derived from the clinician's unstructured gestalt estimate is easier and more readily available than methods that require computation. We compare the diagnostic accuracy of physician gestalt estimate for the pretest probability of acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism with a validated, computerized method. This was a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected, multicenter study. Patients (N=840) had chest pain, dyspnea, nondiagnostic ECGs, and no obvious diagnosis. Clinician gestalt pretest probability for both acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism was assessed by visual analog scale and from the method of attribute matching using a Web-based computer program. Patients were followed for outcomes at 90 days. Clinicians had significantly higher estimates than attribute matching for both acute coronary syndrome (17% versus 4%; Pgestalt versus 0.78 (95% CI 0.71 to 0.85) for attribute matching. For pulmonary embolism, these values were 0.81 (95% CI 0.79 to 0.92) for clinician gestalt and 0.84 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.93) for attribute matching. Compared with a validated machine-based method, clinicians consistently overestimated pretest probability but on receiver operating curve analysis were as accurate for pulmonary embolism but not acute coronary syndrome. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of early mathematical skills with a tablet intervention: a randomized control trial in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of educational interventions is necessary prior to wide-scale rollout. Yet very few rigorous studies have been conducted on the effectiveness of tablet-based interventions, especially in the early years and in developing countries. This study reports a randomized control trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a tablet intervention for supporting the development of early mathematical skills in primary school children in Malawi. A total sample of 318 children, spanning Standards 1-3, attending a medium-sized urban primary school, were randomized to one of three groups: maths tablet intervention, non-maths tablet control, and standard face-to-face practice. Children were pre-tested using tablets at the start of the school year on two tests of mathematical knowledge and a range of basic skills related to scholastic progression. Class teachers then delivered the intervention over an 8-weeks period, for the equivalent of 30-min per day. Technical support was provided from the local Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO). Children were then post-tested on the same assessments as given at pre-test. A final sample of 283 children, from Standards 1-3, present at both pre- and post-test, was analyzed to investigate the effectiveness of the maths tablet intervention. Significant effects of the maths tablet intervention over and above standard face-to-face practice or using tablets without the maths software were found in Standards 2 and 3. In Standard 3 the greater learning gains shown by the maths tablet intervention group compared to both of the control groups on the tablet-based assessments transferred to paper and pencil format, illustrating generalization of knowledge gained. Thus, tablet technology can effectively support early years mathematical skills in developing countries if the software is carefully designed to engage the child in the learning process and the content is grounded in a solid well-constructed curriculum appropriate for the child's developmental

  13. [Effect of Visiting and a Smartphone Application Based Infection Prevention Education Program for Child Care Teachers: A Non-Randomized Controlled Trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun Jeong; Kwon, In Soo

    2017-12-01

    This study was performed to develop an infection prevention education program for child care teachers and to verify its effects. The study was conducted using a nonequivalent control group with a pretest-posttest design. Four private daycare centers (2 centers per city) that were alike in terms of the number of children by age, number of child care teachers, and child care environment were chosen. Participants were assigned to the experimental group (n=20) or control group (n=20). As a part of the program, visiting education (90 min) was provided in the 1st week, and smartphone application education (10 min) was provided thrice a week, in the 2nd and 3rd weeks. Child care teachers' self-efficacy for infection prevention revealed a significant interaction effect between the group and time of measurement (F=21.62, pteachers. Thus, this program may be effective in enhancing their infection control. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  14. Talking and learning physics: Predicting future grades from network measures and Force Concept Inventory pretest scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Bruun

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of student interactions in learning situations is a foundation of sociocultural learning theory, and social network analysis can be used to quantify student relations. We discuss how self-reported student interactions can be viewed as processes of meaning making and use this to understand how quantitative measures that describe the position in a network, called centrality measures, can be understood in terms of interactions that happen in the context of a university physics course. We apply this discussion to an empirical data set of self-reported student interactions. In a weekly administered survey, first year university students enrolled in an introductory physics course at a Danish university indicated with whom they remembered having communicated within different interaction categories. For three categories pertaining to (1 communication about how to solve physics problems in the course (called the PS category, (2 communications about the nature of physics concepts (called the CD category, and (3 social interactions that are not strictly related to the content of the physics classes (called the ICS category in the introductory mechanics course, we use the survey data to create networks of student interaction. For each of these networks, we calculate centrality measures for each student and correlate these measures with grades from the introductory course, grades from two subsequent courses, and the pretest Force Concept Inventory (FCI scores. We find highly significant correlations (p<0.001 between network centrality measures and grades in all networks. We find the highest correlations between network centrality measures and future grades. In the network composed of interactions regarding problem solving (the PS network, the centrality measures hide and PageRank show the highest correlations (r=-0.32 and r=0.33, respectively with future grades. In the CD network, the network measure target entropy shows the highest correlation

  15. Talking and learning physics: Predicting future grades from network measures and Force Concept Inventory pretest scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Jesper; Brewe, Eric

    2013-12-01

    The role of student interactions in learning situations is a foundation of sociocultural learning theory, and social network analysis can be used to quantify student relations. We discuss how self-reported student interactions can be viewed as processes of meaning making and use this to understand how quantitative measures that describe the position in a network, called centrality measures, can be understood in terms of interactions that happen in the context of a university physics course. We apply this discussion to an empirical data set of self-reported student interactions. In a weekly administered survey, first year university students enrolled in an introductory physics course at a Danish university indicated with whom they remembered having communicated within different interaction categories. For three categories pertaining to (1) communication about how to solve physics problems in the course (called the PS category), (2) communications about the nature of physics concepts (called the CD category), and (3) social interactions that are not strictly related to the content of the physics classes (called the ICS category) in the introductory mechanics course, we use the survey data to create networks of student interaction. For each of these networks, we calculate centrality measures for each student and correlate these measures with grades from the introductory course, grades from two subsequent courses, and the pretest Force Concept Inventory (FCI) scores. We find highly significant correlations (pnetwork centrality measures and grades in all networks. We find the highest correlations between network centrality measures and future grades. In the network composed of interactions regarding problem solving (the PS network), the centrality measures hide and PageRank show the highest correlations (r=-0.32 and r=0.33, respectively) with future grades. In the CD network, the network measure target entropy shows the highest correlation (r=0.45) with future grades

  16. Effectiveness of individual music therapy with mentally ill children and adolescents: A controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gold, Christian

    2003-01-01

    . However, little is known about its effectiveness in clinical settings and about factors that might influence its effectiveness. A controlled quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was used to assess the development in children and adolescents who received on average 23 weekly sessions of music....... Further ANOVAs addressing clinical sub-groups suggested that the effectiveness of music therapy depends on the presence of comorbid medical conditions (p music and verbal reflection in music therapy (p influences included age......This research addressed the efficacy and effectiveness of music therapy for children and adolescents with mental disorders. Findings from previous experimental research, as summarised in a meta-analysis, suggest that music therapy is an efficacious treatment with a medium to large effect size...

  17. Above-real-time training (ARTT) improves transfer to a simulated flight control task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donderi, D C; Niall, Keith K; Fish, Karyn; Goldstein, Benjamin

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the effects of above-real-time-training (ARTT) speed and screen resolution on a simulated flight control task. ARTT has been shown to improve transfer to the criterion task in some military simulation experiments. We tested training speed and screen resolution in a project, sponsored by Defence Research and Development Canada, to develop components for prototype air mission simulators. For this study, 54 participants used a single-screen PC-based flight simulation program to learn to chase and catch an F-18A fighter jet with another F-18A while controlling the chase aircraft with a throttle and side-stick controller. Screen resolution was varied between participants, and training speed was varied factorially across two sessions within participants. Pretest and posttest trials were at high resolution and criterion (900 knots) speed. Posttest performance was best with high screen resolution training and when one ARTT training session was followed by a session of criterion speed training. ARTT followed by criterion training improves performance on a visual-motor coordination task. We think that ARTT influences known facilitators of transfer, including similarity to the criterion task and contextual interference. Use high-screen resolution, start with ARTT, and finish with criterion speed training when preparing a mission simulation.

  18. Pre-test analysis for identification of natural circulation instabilities in TALL-3D facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kööp, Kaspar; Jeltsov, Marti; Grishchenko, Dmitry; Kudinov, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Global optimum search method was used to identify a region of instability. • Parametric study was used for detailed investigation of system behavior modes. • The results include identification of sustained mass flow rate oscillations. • Recommendations are made for selection of optimal experimental conditions. - Abstract: TALL-3D facility is a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) thermal-hydraulic loop designed to provide experimental data on thermal-hydraulics phenomena for validation of stand-alone and coupled System Thermal Hydraulics (STH) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. Pre-test analysis is crucial for proper choice of experimental conditions at which the experimental data would be most useful for code validation and benchmarking. The goal of this work is to identify these conditions at which the experiment is challenging for the STH codes yet minimizes the 3D-effects from the test section on the loop dynamics. The analysis is focused on the identification of limit cycle flow oscillations in the TALL-3D facility main heater leg using a global optimum search tool GA-NPO to find a general region in the parameter space where oscillatory behavior is expected. As a second step a grid study is conducted outlining the boundaries between different stability modes. Phenomena, simulation results and methodology for selection of the test parameters are discussed in detail and recommendations for experiments are provided.

  19. Pre-test analysis for identification of natural circulation instabilities in TALL-3D facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kööp, Kaspar, E-mail: kaspar@safety.sci.kth.se; Jeltsov, Marti, E-mail: marti@safety.sci.kth.se; Grishchenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry@safety.sci.kth.se; Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Global optimum search method was used to identify a region of instability. • Parametric study was used for detailed investigation of system behavior modes. • The results include identification of sustained mass flow rate oscillations. • Recommendations are made for selection of optimal experimental conditions. - Abstract: TALL-3D facility is a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) thermal-hydraulic loop designed to provide experimental data on thermal-hydraulics phenomena for validation of stand-alone and coupled System Thermal Hydraulics (STH) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. Pre-test analysis is crucial for proper choice of experimental conditions at which the experimental data would be most useful for code validation and benchmarking. The goal of this work is to identify these conditions at which the experiment is challenging for the STH codes yet minimizes the 3D-effects from the test section on the loop dynamics. The analysis is focused on the identification of limit cycle flow oscillations in the TALL-3D facility main heater leg using a global optimum search tool GA-NPO to find a general region in the parameter space where oscillatory behavior is expected. As a second step a grid study is conducted outlining the boundaries between different stability modes. Phenomena, simulation results and methodology for selection of the test parameters are discussed in detail and recommendations for experiments are provided.

  20. Comparisons Between Pretest Prediction and Flight Test Data of Aerodynamic Loading for EFT-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration Flight Test One (EFT-1) was an incredible milestone in the development NASA's Orion spacecraft. It incorporated hundreds of articles of flight test instrumentation and returned with a wealth of data. Aerodynamic surface pressures were collected during launch vehicle ascent and capsule reentry and descent. These discrete surface pressure measurements enable comparisons to computational results and ground test data. This paper details the comparisons between pre-test predictions and flight test data for the Orion MPCV Crew Module (CM) and Launch Abort Tower (LAT) during all phases of flight. Regions with strong comparisons, poor predictions, and lessons learned are discussed. 38 pressure measurements were made on the LAT during ascent. Nine of the gauges were Honeywell PPTs and the remainder were Kulite pressure transducers. In order to address bias in the Kulites, a two-point linear calibration was used and the details are discussed. Results from the flight are compared to existing database products. 44 pressure measurements were made on the CM during reentry and descent. Nine of the gauges were Honeywell PPTs and the remainder were Kulite pressure transducers. In order to address bias in the Kulites, a tare was made against the vacuum measurements as described below. Once the bias was removed from the gauges, comparisons between predicted loading and the measured results are compared.

  1. Comparing two methods of education (virtual versus traditional) on learning of Iranian dental students: a post-test only design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazami, Fariborz; Bahrampour, Ehsan; Azar, Mohammad Reza; Jahedi, Farzad; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-03-05

    The importance of using technologies such as e-learning in different disciplines is discussed in the literature. Researchers have measured the effectiveness of e-learning in a number of fields.Considering the lack of research on the effectiveness of online learning in dental education particularly in Iran, the advantages of these learning methods and the positive university atmosphere regarding the use of online learning. This study, therefore, aims to compare the effects of two methods of teaching (virtual versus traditional) on student learning. This post-test only design study approached 40, fifth year dental students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. From this group, 35 students agreed to participate. These students were randomly allocated into two groups, experimental (virtual learning) and comparison (traditional learning). To ensure similarity between groups, we compared GPAs of all participants by the Mann-Whitney U test (P > 0.05). The experimental group received a virtual learning environment courseware package specifically designed for this study, whereas the control group received the same module structured in a traditional lecture form. The virtual learning environment consisted of online and offline materials. Two identical valid, reliable post-tests that consisted of 40 multiple choice questions (MCQs) and 4 essay questions were administered immediately (15 min) after the last session and two months later to assess for knowledge retention. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20. A comparison of the mean knowledge score of both groups showed that virtual learning was more effective than traditional learning (effect size = 0.69). The newly designed virtual learning package is feasible and will result in more effective learning in comparison with lecture-based training. However further studies are needed to generalize the findings of this study.

  2. Development of new risk score for pre-test probability of obstructive coronary artery disease based on coronary CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Kondo, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hideya; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Tarutani, Yasuhiro; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Urabe, Yoji; Konno, Kumiko; Nishizaki, Yuji; Shinozaki, Tomohiro; Kihara, Yasuki; Daida, Hiroyuki; Isshiki, Takaaki; Takase, Shinichi

    2015-09-01

    Existing methods to calculate pre-test probability of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) have been established using selected high-risk patients who were referred to conventional coronary angiography. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate our new method for pre-test probability of obstructive CAD using patients who underwent coronary CT angiography (CTA), which could be applicable to a wider range of patient population. Using consecutive 4137 patients with suspected CAD who underwent coronary CTA at our institution, a multivariate logistic regression model including clinical factors as covariates calculated the pre-test probability (K-score) of obstructive CAD determined by coronary CTA. The K-score was compared with the Duke clinical score using the area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver-operating characteristic curve. External validation was performed by an independent sample of 319 patients. The final model included eight significant predictors: age, gender, coronary risk factor (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, smoking), history of cerebral infarction, and chest symptom. The AUC of the K-score was significantly greater than that of the Duke clinical score for both derivation (0.736 vs. 0.699) and validation (0.714 vs. 0.688) data sets. Among patients who underwent coronary CTA, newly developed K-score had better pre-test prediction ability of obstructive CAD compared to Duke clinical score in Japanese population.

  3. School-based mindfulness intervention for stress reduction in adolescents: Design and methodology of an open-label, parallel group, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette M. Johnstone

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents are in a high-risk period developmentally, in terms of susceptibility to stress. A mindfulness intervention represents a potentially useful strategy for developing cognitive and emotion regulation skills associated with successful stress coping. Mindfulness strategies have been used successfully for emotional coping in adults, but are not as well studied in youth. This article details a novel proposal for the design of an 8-week randomized study to evaluate a high school-based mindfulness curriculum delivered as part of a two semester health class. A wellness education intervention is proposed as an active control, along with a waitlist control condition. All students enrolled in a sophomore (10th grade health class at a private suburban high school will be invited to participate (n = 300. Pre-test assessments will be obtained by youth report, parent ratings, and on-site behavioral testing. The assessments will evaluate baseline stress, mood, emotional coping, controlled attention, and working memory. Participants, divided into 13 classrooms, will be randomized into one of three conditions, by classroom: A mindfulness intervention, an active control (wellness education, and a passive control (waitlist. Waitlisted participants will receive one of the interventions in the following term. Intervention groups will meet weekly for 8 weeks during regularly scheduled health classes. Immediate post-tests will be conducted, followed by a 60-day post-test. It is hypothesized that the mindfulness intervention will outperform the other conditions with regard to the adolescents' mood, attention and response to stress.

  4. Increasing fertility knowledge and awareness by tailored education: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Désirée; Vassena, Rita; Prat, Andrés; Vernaeve, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Women of reproductive age have insufficient fertility knowledge and awareness. Reproductive lifespan and assisted reproduction are the primary areas in which awareness is lacking. Relatively simple interventions can be used to increase knowledge among university students; however, no intervention has been tested to date in a population with more varied education levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate which intervention most improved fertility knowledge in women attending a fertility centre for oocyte donation. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with three intervention groups: tailored, untailored and control. A questionnaire was administered on the day of the first consultation, and again at the oocyte retrieval. Two hundred and one women were enrolled and completed the pre-test, 109 started the cycle and 90 completed the post-test. The effect of the intervention was measured as the difference between the groups in their score from the pre-test to the post test. Only the tailored group showed a significant increase (+2.5; 95% CI [1.8, 3.3]; P = 0.001). Information relating to a woman's most fertile age and limits for childbearing were the most useful. Tailored oral education, therefore, increases fertility knowledge in young women, particularly in relation to their fertility lifespan. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cognitive interviewing methods for questionnaire pre-testing in homeless persons with mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Carol E; Holland, Anna C; Patterson, Michelle L; Mason, Kate S; Goering, Paula N; Hwang, Stephen W

    2012-02-01

    In this study, cognitive interviewing methods were used to test targeted questionnaire items from a battery of quantitative instruments selected for a large multisite trial of supported housing interventions for homeless individuals with mental disorders. Most of the instruments had no published psychometrics in this population. Participants were 30 homeless adults with mental disorders (including substance use disorders) recruited from service agencies in Vancouver, Winnipeg, and Toronto, Canada. Six interviewers, trained in cognitive interviewing methods and using standard interview schedules, conducted the interviews. Questions and, in some cases, instructions, for testing were selected from existing instruments according to a priori criteria. Items on physical and mental health status, housing quality and living situation, substance use, health and justice system service use, and community integration were tested. The focus of testing was on relevance, comprehension, and recall, and on sensitivity/acceptability for this population. Findings were collated across items by site and conclusions validated by interviewers. There was both variation and similarity of responses for identified topics of interest. With respect to relevance, many items on the questionnaires were not applicable to homeless people. Comprehension varied considerably; thus, both checks on understanding and methods to assist comprehension and recall are recommended, particularly for participants with acute symptoms of mental illness and those with cognitive impairment. The acceptability of items ranged widely across the sample, but findings were consistent with previous literature, which indicates that "how you ask" is as important as "what you ask." Cognitive interviewing methods worked well and elicited information crucial to effective measurement in this unique population. Pretesting study instruments, including standard instruments, for use in special populations such as homeless

  6. Pretest clinical diagnosis of coronary artery disease and stress myocardial perfusion scintigram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasalicky, J.; Kovac, I.; Lanska, V.

    2001-01-01

    To assess the probability of perfusion defects at exercise stress myocardial perfusion SPECT scintigraphy from pretest clinical diagnosis (medical personal history, previous ergometric investigation). To determine the value of clinical factors for probability of scintigraphic defects with respect to avoiding unnecessary investigation in subjects with low probability of abnormal scintigrams. 2143 subjects (1235 men, 908 women) were investigated by SPECT perfusion scintigraphy at stepwise increasing exercise stress. They were divided into three groups with regard to their medical history and exercise test at scintigraphy: subjects without any signs of coronary artery disease (CAD), patients with high likelihood of CAD (i.e., typical anginal pain, in particular at stress, positive stress ECG changes, angiographically documented important CAD) and patients after myocardial infarction (MI). Important risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, age and sex), as well as the role of revascularisation procedures, were taken into account for multiple logistic regression in order to express their importance for the odds of scintigraphic defect visualisation. Perfusion scintigraphic defects (PSD) were found in 5.2% of subjects without signs of CAD, in contrast to patients with manifest CAD (68.8% with PSD) and in those after MI (90.2% with PSD). There were other important factors corroborating the likelihood of PSD (in decreasing order of importance): diabetes, male, ECG changes at stress, increasing age. Successful revascularisation improved scintigraphic images. The examination of CAD symptom-free subjects, in particular with atypical chest discomfort, is useless. SMPS in patients after documented MI is to be carried out for other intended purposes, not for CAD diagnosis only. SMPS is highly recommended in patients with CAD symptoms and high CAD probability in order to decide further treatment and prognosis. (author)

  7. A randomised-controlled trial investigating potential underlying mechanisms of a functionality-based approach to improving women's body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleva, Jessica M; Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Halliwell, Emma; Martijn, Carolien; Stuijfzand, Bobby G; Treneman-Evans, Georgia; Rumsey, Nichola

    2018-03-06

    Focusing on body functionality is a promising technique for improving women's body image. This study replicates prior research in a large novel sample, tests longer-term follow-up effects, and investigates underlying mechanisms of these effects (body complexity and body-self integration). British women (N = 261) aged 18-30 who wanted to improve their body image were randomised to Expand Your Horizon (three online body functionality writing exercises) or an active control. Trait body image was assessed at Pretest, Posttest, 1-week, and 1-month Follow-Up. To explore whether changes in body complexity and body-self integration 'buffer' the impact of negative body-related experiences, participants also completed beauty-ideal media exposure. Relative to the control, intervention participants experienced improved appearance satisfaction, functionality satisfaction, body appreciation, and body complexity at Posttest, and at both Follow-Ups. Neither body complexity nor body-self integration mediated intervention effects. Media exposure decreased state body satisfaction among intervention and control participants, but neither body complexity nor body-self integration moderated these effects. The findings underscore the value of focusing on body functionality for improving body image and show that effects persist one month post-intervention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Using cognitive pre-testing methods in the development of a new evidenced-based pressure ulcer risk assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, S; Nixon, J; Keen, J; Muir, D; Wilson, L; McGinnis, E; Stubbs, N; Dealey, C; Nelson, E A

    2016-11-16

    Variation in development methods of Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Instruments has led to inconsistent inclusion of risk factors and concerns about content validity. A new evidenced-based Risk Assessment Instrument, the Pressure Ulcer Risk Primary Or Secondary Evaluation Tool - PURPOSE-T was developed as part of a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) funded Pressure Ulcer Research Programme (PURPOSE: RP-PG-0407-10056). This paper reports the pre-test phase to assess and improve PURPOSE-T acceptability, usability and confirm content validity. A descriptive study incorporating cognitive pre-testing methods and integration of service user views was undertaken over 3 cycles comprising PURPOSE-T training, a focus group and one-to-one think-aloud interviews. Clinical nurses from 2 acute and 2 community NHS Trusts, were grouped according to job role. Focus group participants used 3 vignettes to complete PURPOSE-T assessments and then participated in the focus group. Think-aloud participants were interviewed during their completion of PURPOSE-T. After each pre-test cycle analysis was undertaken and adjustment/improvements made to PURPOSE-T in an iterative process. This incorporated the use of descriptive statistics for data completeness and decision rule compliance and directed content analysis for interview and focus group data. Data were collected April 2012-June 2012. Thirty-four nurses participated in 3 pre-test cycles. Data from 3 focus groups, 12 think-aloud interviews incorporating 101 PURPOSE-T assessments led to changes to improve instrument content and design, flow and format, decision support and item-specific wording. Acceptability and usability were demonstrated by improved data completion and appropriate risk pathway allocation. The pre-test also confirmed content validity with clinical nurses. The pre-test was an important step in the development of the preliminary PURPOSE-T and the methods used may have wider instrument development application

  9. Using cognitive pre-testing methods in the development of a new evidenced-based pressure ulcer risk assessment instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Coleman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in development methods of Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Instruments has led to inconsistent inclusion of risk factors and concerns about content validity. A new evidenced-based Risk Assessment Instrument, the Pressure Ulcer Risk Primary Or Secondary Evaluation Tool - PURPOSE-T was developed as part of a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR funded Pressure Ulcer Research Programme (PURPOSE: RP-PG-0407-10056. This paper reports the pre-test phase to assess and improve PURPOSE-T acceptability, usability and confirm content validity. Methods A descriptive study incorporating cognitive pre-testing methods and integration of service user views was undertaken over 3 cycles comprising PURPOSE-T training, a focus group and one-to-one think-aloud interviews. Clinical nurses from 2 acute and 2 community NHS Trusts, were grouped according to job role. Focus group participants used 3 vignettes to complete PURPOSE-T assessments and then participated in the focus group. Think-aloud participants were interviewed during their completion of PURPOSE-T. After each pre-test cycle analysis was undertaken and adjustment/improvements made to PURPOSE-T in an iterative process. This incorporated the use of descriptive statistics for data completeness and decision rule compliance and directed content analysis for interview and focus group data. Data were collected April 2012-June 2012. Results Thirty-four nurses participated in 3 pre-test cycles. Data from 3 focus groups, 12 think-aloud interviews incorporating 101 PURPOSE-T assessments led to changes to improve instrument content and design, flow and format, decision support and item-specific wording. Acceptability and usability were demonstrated by improved data completion and appropriate risk pathway allocation. The pre-test also confirmed content validity with clinical nurses. Conclusions The pre-test was an important step in the development of the preliminary PURPOSE-T and the

  10. Multimedia-based training on Internet platforms improves surgical performance: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape-Koehler, Carolina; Immenroth, Marc; Sauerland, Stefan; Lefering, Rolf; Lindlohr, Cornelia; Toaspern, Jens; Heiss, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Surgical procedures are complex motion sequences that require a high level of preparation, training, and concentration. In recent years, Internet platforms providing surgical content have been established. Used as a surgical training method, the effect of multimedia-based training on practical surgical skills has not yet been evaluated. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of multimedia-based training on surgical performance. A 2 × 2 factorial, randomized controlled trial with a pre- and posttest design was used to test the effect of multimedia-based training in addition to or without practical training on 70 participants in four groups defined by the intervention used: multimedia-based training, practical training, and combination training (multimedia-based training + practical training) or no training (control group). The pre- and posttest consisted of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a Pelvi-Trainer and was video recorded, encoded, and saved on DVDs. These were evaluated by blinded raters using a modified objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS). The main evaluation criterion was the difference in OSATS score between the pre- and posttest (ΔOSATS) results in terms of a task-specific checklist (procedural steps scored as correct or incorrect). The groups were homogeneous in terms of demographic parameters, surgical experience, and pretest OSATS scores. The ΔOSATS results were highest in the multimedia-based training group (4.7 ± 3.3; p Multimedia-based training improved surgical performance significantly and thus could be considered a reasonable tool for inclusion in surgical curricula.

  11. Relap5/mod2 post-test calculation of a loss of feedwater experiment at the Pactel test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protze, M. [Siemens-KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Post-test calculations for verification purposes of the thermal hydraulic code RELAP5/MOD2 are of fundamental importance for the licensing procedure. The RELAP5/MOD2 code has a large international assessment base regarding western PWR. WWER-reactors are russian designed PWRs with some specific differences compared with the western PWR`s, especially the horizontal steam generators. For that reason some post-test calculations have to be performed to verify the RELAP5/MOD2 code for these WWER typical phenomena. The impact of the horizontal steam generators on the accident behaviour during transients or pipe ruptures on the secondary side is significant. The nodalization of the test facility PACTEL was chosen equally to WWER plant nodalization to verify the use of a coarse modelling of the steam generator secondary side for analyses of transient with decreasing water level in the SG secondary side. The calculational results showed a good compliance to the test results, demonstrating the correct use of a coarse nodalization. To sum up, the RELAP5/ MOD2 results met the test results appropriately thereby the RELAP5/ MOD2 code is validated for analyses of transients with decreasing water level in a horizontal steam generator secondary side. (orig.). 4 refs.

  12. An evaluation of a drama program to enhance social relationships and anti-bullying at elementary school: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joronen, Katja; Konu, Anne; Rankin, H Sally; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2012-03-01

    Drama, theater and role-playing methods are commonly used in health promotion programs, but evidence of their effectiveness is limited. This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a school-based drama program to enhance social relationships and decrease bullying at school in children in grades 4-5 (mean age of 10.4 years). Students (n = 190) were recruited from two primary schools with similar demographics and socio-economics in the Southern Finland and purposively allocated either to an intervention group or a control group. The drama program included classroom drama sessions, follow-up activities at home and three parents' evenings concerning issues of social well being during the school year September 2007-May 2008. Data on social relationships in the class room and experiences of bullying were obtained before and after the program using self-completed questionnaire from the same students (n = 134). The response rate was 71%. No differences in socio-demographics existed between intervention group and control group at pretest. The positive effect on social relationships resulting from the intervention approached statistical significance (p = 0.065). Moreover, the positive effect was found to be statistically significant in the high-intensity intervention classes (p = 0.011). Bullying victimization decreased 20.7 percentage units from pretest (58.8%) to posttest (38.1%) in the intervention group (p drama and theater methods in the classroom may improve children's social relationships at school.

  13. A diagnostic strategy for pulmonary embolism based on standardised pretest probability and perfusion lung scanning: a management study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniati, Massimo; Monti, Simonetta; Bauleo, Carolina; Scoscia, Elvio; Tonelli, Lucia; Dainelli, Alba; Catapano, Giosue; Formichi, Bruno; Di Ricco, Giorgio; Prediletto, Renato; Carrozzi, Laura; Marini, Carlo

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism remains a challenging diagnostic problem. We developed a simple diagnostic strategy based on combination of assessment of the pretest probability with perfusion lung scan results to reduce the need for pulmonary angiography. We studied 390 consecutive patients (78% in-patients) with suspected pulmonary embolism. The pretest probability was rated low ( 10%, ≤50%), moderately high (>50%, ≤90%) or high (>90%) according to a structured clinical model. Perfusion lung scans were independently assigned to one of four categories: normal; near-normal; abnormal, suggestive of pulmonary embolism (wedge-shaped perfusion defects); abnormal, not suggestive of pulmonary embolism (perfusion defects other than wedge shaped). Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in patients with abnormal scans suggestive of pulmonary embolism and moderately high or high pretest probability. Patients with normal or near-normal scans and those with abnormal scans not suggestive of pulmonary embolism and low pretest probability were deemed not to have pulmonary embolism. All other patients were allocated to pulmonary angiography. Patients in whom pulmonary embolism was excluded were left untreated. All patients were followed up for 1 year. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed non-invasively in 132 patients (34%), and excluded in 191 (49%). Pulmonary angiography was required in 67 patients (17%). The prevalence of pulmonary embolism was 41% (n=160). Patients in whom pulmonary embolism was excluded had a thrombo-embolic risk of 0.4% (95% confidence interval: 0.0%-2.8%). Our strategy permitted a non-invasive diagnosis or exclusion of pulmonary embolism in 83% of the cases (95% confidence interval: 79%-86%), and appeared to be safe. (orig.)

  14. [Effectiveness and difficulty of education on nosocomial infection control for pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for students in the Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2009-03-01

    It has been planned to give pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for fifth-grade students in the School of Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, to give them the clinical training needed to perform dental practice and clinical practicum for comprehensive patient care, namely inclusive clinical practice phase II. This study analyzed the educative efficiency of the class on nosocomial infection control (NIC) by comparing achievements pre- and post-test, and discussed appropriate education planning on the NIC for dental students. Sixty-two fifth-grade students in the 2007 academic year sat the pre- and post-tests; the mean score and standard deviation of these tests were 5.30 +/- 1.26 (n = 56) and 8.59 +/- 1.18 (n = 59), respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between them (paired t-test, p < 0.01). Another finding was that students with high scores in the post-test did not necessarily achieve high ratings in the pre-test. It is suggested that the introduction of pre- and post-tests and the clarification of main points in the class as a theme of NIC could be a useful tool for increasing the comprehension of students on the theme. Since students at lower grades will attend clinical practice in the university hospital, it is thought that students should be given NIC training early in the clinical course, and the current curriculum should be improved to increase the opportunity for students to study this important issue.

  15. The effect of treadmill training on gross motor function and walking speed in ambulatory adolescents with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysagis, Nikolaos; Skordilis, Emmanouil K; Stavrou, Nektarios; Grammatopoulou, Eirini; Koutsouki, Dimitra

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a treadmill program on gross motor function, walking speed, and spasticity of ambulatory adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy (diplegia and tetraplegia). In this randomized controlled trial, 22 adolescents (13-19 yrs old) from a special school for children with physical disabilities were randomly allocated to the experimental and control training groups. The experimental training group underwent a treadmill program without body weight support at a comfortable speed. The control group received treatment with conventional physiotherapy, which consisted of three sets of exercises with mat activities, balance, gait training, and functional gross motor activities. The program lasted 12 wks with a frequency of three times per week for both groups. Pretest and posttest measurements of self-selected walking speed, gross motor function, and spasticity were conducted. The analysis of covariance findings examining posttest differences between groups were significant with respect to self-selected walking speed (F = 8.545, P = 0.000) and gross motor function (F = 9.088, P = 0.007), whereas no significance was found for spasticity. Treadmill training may improve the walking speed and gross motor function of adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy, without adverse effects on spasticity.

  16. Comparison of different coupling CFD–STH approaches for pre-test analysis of a TALL-3D experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papukchiev, Angel, E-mail: angel.papukchiev@grs.de [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching n. Munich (Germany); Jeltsov, Marti; Kööp, Kaspar; Kudinov, Pavel [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Lerchl, Georg [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching n. Munich (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Thermal-hydraulic system codes and CFD tools are coupled. • Pre-test calculations for the TALL-3D facility are performed. • Complex flow and heat transfer phenomena are modeled. • Comparative analyses have been performed. - Abstract: The system thermal-hydraulic (STH) code ATHLET was coupled with the commercial 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package ANSYS CFX to improve ATHLET simulation capabilities for flows with pronounced 3D phenomena such as flow mixing and thermal stratification. Within the FP7 European project THINS (Thermal Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems), validation activities for coupled thermal-hydraulic codes are being carried out. The TALL-3D experimental facility, operated by KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, is designed for thermal-hydraulic experiments with lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant at natural and forced circulation conditions. GRS carried out pre-test simulations with ATHLET–ANSYS CFX for the TALL-3D experiment T01, while KTH scientists perform these analyses with the coupled code RELAP5/STAR CCM+. In the experiment T01 the main circulation pump is stopped, which leads to interesting thermal-hydraulic transient with local 3D phenomena. In this paper, the TALL-3D behavior during T01 is analyzed and the results of the coupled pre-test calculations, performed by GRS (ATHLET–ANSYS CFX) and KTH (RELAP5/STAR CCM+) are directly compared.

  17. Living Animals in the Classroom: A Meta-Analysis on Learning Outcome and a Treatment-Control Study Focusing on Knowledge and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Eberhard; Randler, Christoph

    2012-02-01

    Prior research states that the use of living animals in the classroom leads to a higher knowledge but those previous studies have methodological and statistical problems. We applied a meta-analysis and developed a treatment-control study in a middle school classroom. The treatments (film vs. living animal) differed only by the presence of the living animal. Both treatments were based on the self-determination theory. More than 400 pupils filled in pre-test, post-test and two follow-up-tests (with a delay of 6-8 weeks and 7-8 months). After each lesson, pupils rated the lesson on a short intrinsic motivation scale. In the meta-analysis, we found that the living animal treatments significantly scored better than a control group, but not when comparing living animals with alternative treatments. In the treatment-control study, both treatments led to a significant increase in knowledge but there were no differences between film and living animal treatment. Pre-test and previous grading had a significant influence on post- and both follow-up tests. In the mouse lesson, pupils of the living animal group showed higher values in interest and competence and lower values in pressure. Interest and competence correlated positively with achievement, while pressure correlated negatively.

  18. Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) Lubrication Interval Test and Evaluation (LITE). Post-Test Grease Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.; Martinez, James E.; Devivar, Rodrigo V.

    2015-01-01

    The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) is a mechanism of the International Space Station (ISS) that orients the solar power generating arrays toward the sun as the ISS orbits our planet. The orientation with the sun must be maintained to fully charge the ISS batteries and maintain all the other ISS electrical systems operating properly. In 2007, just a few months after full deployment, the starboard SARJ developed anomalies that warranted a full investigation including ISS Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The EVA uncovered unexpected debris that was due to degradation of a nitride layer on the SARJ bearing race. ISS personnel identified the failure root-cause and applied an aerospace grease to lubricate the area associated with the anomaly. The corrective action allowed the starboard SARJ to continue operating within the specified engineering parameters. The SARJ LITE (Lubrication Interval Test and Evaluation) program was initiated by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and Boeing to simulate the operation of the ISS SARJ for an extended time. The hardware was designed to test and evaluate the exact material components used aboard the ISS SARJ, but in a controlled area where engineers could continuously monitor the performance. After running the SARJ LITE test for an equivalent of 36+ years of continuous use, the test was opened to evaluate the metallography and lubrication. We have sampled the SARJ LITE rollers and plate to fully assess the grease used for lubrication. Chemical and thermal analysis of these samples has generated information that has allowed us to assess the location, migration, and current condition of the grease. The collective information will be key toward understanding and circumventing any performance deviations involving the ISS SARJ in the years to come.

  19. Comparison of integrated and isolated training on performance measures and neuromuscular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, Lindsay J; Distefano, Michael J; Frank, Barnett S; Clark, Micheal A; Padua, Darin A

    2013-04-01

    Traditional weight training programs use an exercise prescription strategy that emphasizes improving muscle strength through resistance exercises. Other factors, such as stability, endurance, movement quality, power, flexibility, speed, and agility are also essential elements to improving overall functional performance. Therefore, exercises that incorporate these additional elements may be beneficial additions to traditional resistance training programs. The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of an isolated resistance training program (ISO) and an integrated training program (INT) on movement quality, vertical jump height, agility, muscle strength and endurance, and flexibility. The ISO program consisted of primarily upper and lower extremity progressive resistance exercises. The INT program involved progressive resistance exercises, and core stability, power, and agility exercises. Thirty subjects were cluster randomized to either the ISO (n = 15) or INT (n = 15) training program. Each training group performed their respective programs 2 times per week for 8 weeks. The subjects were assessed before (pretest) and after (posttest) the intervention period using the following assessments: a jump-landing task graded using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS), vertical jump height, T-test time, push-up and sit-up performance, and the sit-and-reach test. The INT group performed better on the LESS test (pretest: 3.90 ± 1.02, posttest: 3.03 ± 1.02; p = 0.02), faster on the T-test (pretest: 10.35 ± 1.20 seconds, posttest: 9.58 ± 1.02 seconds; p = 0.01), and completed more sit-ups (pretest: 40.20 ± 15.01, posttest: 46.73 ± 14.03; p = 0.045) and push-ups (pretest: 40.67 ± 13.85, posttest: 48.93 ± 15.17; p = 0.05) at posttest compared with pretest, and compared with the ISO group at posttest. Both groups performed more push-ups (p = 0.002), jumped higher (p programs should use an integrated approach to exercise selection to optimize performance and

  20. Effectiveness of team-based learning in microbiology: a non-randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harakuni, Sheetal U; Nagamoti, Jyoti M; Mallapur, Maheshwar D

    2015-01-01

    As per the present curriculum in India, pre- and paraclinical subjects are taught away from the clinical setting. Therefore, students fail to connect the subject taught through didactic lectures to the clinical setting. Team-based learning (TBL) can be used in conjunction with lectures to teach applied microbiology. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of TBL sessions in conjunction with lectures to enhance learning of applied microbiology, among Indian students. All students enrolled in the study were taught systemic bacteriology through lectures. Of the 88 students, 49 students (study group) attended TBL sessions on the topics of diarrhea, fever of unknown origin, urinary tract infection and 39 students (control group) preferred self-study on the topics without attending the TBL sessions. Students' feedback on their perception on TBL sessions was collected using a questionnaire of 10 items. The performance of both the groups on the pre- and post-test were analyzed using unpaired t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Gender-wise performance within the teams was analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS version 12. The TBL group outperformed the self-study group on the post-test [F 1 = 5.521, P = 0.021]. Female students as a whole performed better than males on the pre-test, scoring higher within both the TBL and self-study groups. Male students in the TBL group performed significantly better on the post-test than female students who participated in TBL sessions (P = 0.013). Students generally enjoyed and appreciated the TBL sessions. TBL sessions can be used judiciously in combination with the lectures to enhance learning of applied microbiology in India. In this study, TBL improved the performance of male students over self-study, but performance for female students following TBL was no better than when they simply studied by themselves.

  1. Post-test analysis of components from selenide isotope generator modules M-7, M-15, and M-18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, G.C.; Keiser, J.R.; Crouse, R.S.; Allen, M.D.; Schaffhauser, A.C.

    1979-05-01

    Several critical components removed from SIG (Selenide Isotope Generator) thermoelectric modules M-7, M-15C, M-15D, and M-18 were examined. These modules failed to show the predicted stability and conversion efficiency. Understanding the degradation and identifying means for preventing it necessitated detailed post-test examinations of key parts in the modules. Steel springs, which provided pressure for contacts at the hot and cold ends of P- or N-legs, relaxed more than expected. Beryllium oxide insulators had dark deposits that caused electrical shorts. The GdSe 1 49 N-leg exhibited cracking. The (Cu,Ag) 2 Se P-leg lost weight or sublimed excessively in module M-7 and more than expected in the other modules

  2. Test implementation of a school-oriented drug prevention program "Study without Drugs": pre- and post-testing for effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaak, Fariel; de Vries, Nanne Karel; van der Wolf, Kees

    2014-06-11

    In this article, the test implementation of a school-oriented drug prevention program "Study without Drugs" is discussed. The aims of this study were to determine the results of the process evaluation and to determine whether the proposed school-oriented drug prevention program during a pilot project was effective for the participating pupils. Sixty second-grade pupils at a junior high school in Paramaribo, Suriname participated in the test implementation. They were divided into two classes. For the process evaluation the students completed a structured questionnaire focusing on content and teaching method after every lesson. Lessons were qualified with a score from 0-10. The process was also evaluated by the teachers through structured interviews. Attention was paid to reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, connection, achieved effects/observed behaviors, areas for improvement, and lesson strengths. The effect evaluation was conducted by using the General Liniair Model (repeated measure). The research (-design) was a pre-experimental design with pre-and post-test. No class or sex differences were detected among the pupils with regard to the assessment of content, methodology, and qualification of the lessons. Post-testing showed that participating pupils obtained an increased knowledge of drugs, their drug-resisting skills were enhanced, and behavior determinants (attitude, subjective norm, self-efficacy, and intention) became more negative towards drugs. From the results of the test implementation can be cautiously concluded that the program "Study without Drugs" may yield positive results when applied in schools). Thus, this pilot program can be considered a step towards the development and implementation of an evidence-based school-oriented program for pupils in Suriname.

  3. The content analysis of questioning level at p4c classroom | Kamali ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study attempts to see if there is any effect of philosophy for children method on student questioning level. To this end, randomized subjects, pretest-posttest control group design with random assignment (60 subjects in experimental groups and 60 subjects in control groups) were used. Pretest and posttest were ...

  4. Optimizing foster family placement for infants and toddlers: A randomized controlled trial on the effect of the foster family intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Andel, Hans; Post, Wendy; Jansen, Lucres; Van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Knorth, Erik; Grietens, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between foster children and their foster carers comes with many risks and may be very stressful both for parents and children. We developed an intervention (foster family intervention [FFI]) to tackle these risks. The intervention focuses on foster children below the age of 5 years. The objective was to investigate the effects of FFI on the interactions between foster parents and foster children. A randomized control trial was carried out with a sample of 123 preschool aged children (mean age 18.8 months; 51% boys) and their foster carers. A pretest was carried out 6 to 8 weeks after placement and a posttest one half year later. Interactions were videotaped and coded using the Emotional Availability Scales (EAS). Foster carers were asked to fill in the Dutch version of the Parenting Stress Index. Morning and evening samples of children's salivary cortisol were taken. In the posttest, significantly positive effects were found on the following EAS subscales: Sensitivity, Structuring, Nonintrusiveness, and Responsiveness. We found no significant differences on stress levels of foster carers and children (Nijmeegse Ouderlijke Stress Index domains and salivary cortisol). This study shows that the FFI has a significant positive effect on parenting skills as measured with EAS and on Responsiveness of the foster child. Findings are discussed in terms of impact and significance relating to methodology and design of the study and to clinical relevance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics in Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bellido-Fernández

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are a great number of interventions in physiotherapy, but with little evidence of their effectiveness in chronic low back pain. Therefore, this study assesses effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics and the combination of both to decrease pain and lumbar disability while increasing joint mobility and quality of life in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Methods. A randomized, single-blinded, controlled, clinical trial with sample (n=27 was comprised of patients between 20 and 65 years, diagnosed with pain of mechanical origin characterized by having a duration of at least 12 weeks and no serious complications. Each group received 8 interventions of 30 minutes. Results. Friedman ANOVA test obtained statistically significant differences of Oswestry, NRS, and Schober variables (p<0.05 in the three measurements (pretest, posttest 1, and posttest 2, in each individual group. ANOVA Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison between groups, and Oswestry Disability values were significantly higher (p=0.024 in the group receiving both treatments. Conclusion. Both individual groups reduce pain levels, improve disability, and increase the flexibility of the lumbar spine. The combination therapy provides greater benefits in terms of lumbar disability. This study is registered on March 8, 2016, with NCT02721914.

  6. Focused Training for Humanitarian Responders in Regional Anesthesia Techniques for a Planned Randomized Controlled Trial in a Disaster Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluisio, Adam R; Teicher, Carrei; Wiskel, Tess; Guy, Allysia; Levine, Adam

    2016-11-16

    Lower extremity trauma during earthquakes accounts for the largest burden of geophysical disaster-related injuries. Insufficient pain management is common in disaster settings, and regional anesthesia (RA) has the potential to reduce pain in injured patients beyond current standards. To date, no prospective research has evaluated the use of RA in a disaster setting. This cross-sectional study assesses knowledge translation and skill acquisition outcomes for lower extremity RA performed with and without ultrasound guidance among a cohort of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) volunteers who will function as proceduralists in a planned randomized controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of RA for pain management in an earthquake setting. Generalist humanitarian healthcare responders, including both physicians and nurses, were trained in ultrasound guided femoral nerve block (USGFNB) and landmark guided fascia iliaca compartment block (LGFICB) techniques using didactic sessions and interactive simulations during a one-day focused course. Outcome measures evaluated interval knowledge attainment and technical proficiency in performing the RA procedures. Knowledge attainment was assessed via pre- and post-test evaluations and procedural proficiency was evaluated through monitored simulations, with performance of critical actions graded by two independent observers. Twelve humanitarian response providers were enrolled and completed the trainings and assessments. Knowledge scores significantly increased from a mean pre-test score of 79% to post-test score of 88% (ptechniques. This study demonstrates the feasibility of rapidly training generalist humanitarian responders to provide both LGFICB and USGFNB during humanitarian emergencies.

  7. Effectiveness of adolescent suicide prevention e-learning modules that aim to improve knowledge and self-confidence of gatekeepers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoncheh, Rezvan; Kerkhof, Ad J F M; Koot, Hans M

    2014-02-08

    Providing e-learning modules can be an effective strategy for enhancing gatekeepers' knowledge, self-confidence and skills in adolescent suicide prevention. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of an online training program called Mental Health Online which consists of eight short e-learning modules, each capturing an important aspect of the process of recognition, guidance and referral of suicidal adolescents (12-20 years). The primary outcomes of this study are participant's ratings on perceived knowledge, perceived self-confidence, and actual knowledge regarding adolescent suicidality. A randomized controlled trial will be carried out among 154 gatekeepers. After completing the first assessment (pre-test), participants will be randomly assigned to either the experimental group or the waitlist control group. One week after completing the first assessment the experimental group will have access to the website Mental Health Online containing the eight e-learning modules and additional information on adolescent suicide prevention. Participants in both conditions will be assessed 4 weeks after completing the first assessment (post-test), and 12 weeks after completing the post-test (follow-up). At post-test, participants from the experimental group are asked to complete an evaluation questionnaire on the modules. The waitlist control group will have access to the modules and additional information on the website after completing the follow-up assessment. Gatekeepers can benefit from e-learning modules on adolescent suicide prevention. This approach allows them to learn about this sensitive subject at their own pace and from any given location, as long as they have access to the Internet. Given the flexible nature of the program, each participant can compose his/her own training creating an instant customized course with the required steps in adolescent suicide prevention. Netherlands Trial Register NTR3625.

  8. Use of 3D printed models in medical education: A randomized control trial comparing 3D prints versus cadaveric materials for learning external cardiac anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kah Heng Alexander; Loo, Zhou Yaw; Goldie, Stephen J; Adams, Justin W; McMenamin, Paul G

    2016-05-06

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technology capable of readily producing accurate anatomical models, however, evidence for the use of 3D prints in medical education remains limited. A study was performed to assess their effectiveness against cadaveric materials for learning external cardiac anatomy. A double blind randomized controlled trial was undertaken on undergraduate medical students without prior formal cardiac anatomy teaching. Following a pre-test examining baseline external cardiac anatomy knowledge, participants were randomly assigned to three groups who underwent self-directed learning sessions using either cadaveric materials, 3D prints, or a combination of cadaveric materials/3D prints (combined materials). Participants were then subjected to a post-test written by a third party. Fifty-two participants completed the trial; 18 using cadaveric materials, 16 using 3D models, and 18 using combined materials. Age and time since completion of high school were equally distributed between groups. Pre-test scores were not significantly different (P = 0.231), however, post-test scores were significantly higher for 3D prints group compared to the cadaveric materials or combined materials groups (mean of 60.83% vs. 44.81% and 44.62%, P = 0.010, adjusted P = 0.012). A significant improvement in test scores was detected for the 3D prints group (P = 0.003) but not for the other two groups. The finding of this pilot study suggests that use of 3D prints do not disadvantage students relative to cadaveric materials; maximally, results suggest that 3D may confer certain benefits to anatomy learning and supports their use and ongoing evaluation as supplements to cadaver-based curriculums. Anat Sci Educ 9: 213-221. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  9. Evaluation of an Online Campaign for Promoting Help-Seeking Attitudes for Depression Using a Facebook Advertisement: An Online Randomized Controlled Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Alison; Wong, Paul Wai-Ching; Fu, King-Wa

    2015-01-01

    A depression-awareness campaign delivered through the Internet has been recommended as a public health approach that would enhance mental health literacy and encourage help-seeking attitudes. However, the outcomes of such a campaign remain understudied. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an online depression awareness campaign, which was informed by the theory of planned behavior, to encourage help-seeking attitudes for depression and to enhance mental health literacy in Hong Kong. The second aim was to examine click-through behaviors by varying the affective facial expressions of people in the Facebook advertisements. Potential participants were recruited through Facebook advertisements, using either a happy or sad face illustration. Volunteer participants registered for the study by clicking on the advertisement and were invited to leave their personal email addresses to receive educational content about depression. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups (campaign or control), and over a four consecutive week period, received either the campaign material or official information developed by the Hospital Authority in Hong Kong. Pretests and posttests were conducted before and after the campaign to measure the differences in help-seeking attitudes and mental health literacy among the campaign and control groups. Of the 199 participants that registered and completed the pretest, 116 (55 campaign and 62 control) completed the campaign and the posttest. At the posttest, we found no significant changes in help-seeking attitudes between the campaign and control groups, but the campaign group participants demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in mental health literacy (P=.031) and a higher willingness to access additional information (PFacebook advertisement attracted more click-throughs by users into the website than did the sad face advertisement (P=.03). The present study provides evidence that an online

  10. Meaning in the Method: Pretesting Methods for a Diverse Population. Issue Brief. Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprachman, Susan; Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Aikens, Nikki; Caspe, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    A child's ability to develop relationships and connections with others, a sense of who he or she is in the world, and an ability to control impulses and emotions are at the core of social-emotional development. In early childhood, parent reports are one of the most common methods for assessing this type of development. However, parents from…

  11. Effects of an intensive clinical skills course on senior nursing students' self-confidence and clinical competence: A quasi-experimental post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soohyun

    2018-02-01

    To foster nursing professionals, nursing education requires the integration of knowledge and practice. Nursing students in their senior year experience considerable stress in performing the core nursing skills because, typically, they have limited opportunities to practice these skills in their clinical practicum. Therefore, nurse educators should revise the nursing curricula to focus on core nursing skills. To identify the effect of an intensive clinical skills course for senior nursing students on their self-confidence and clinical competence. A quasi-experimental post-test study. A university in South Korea during the 2015-2016 academic year. A convenience sample of 162 senior nursing students. The experimental group (n=79) underwent the intensive clinical skills course, whereas the control group (n=83) did not. During the course, students repeatedly practiced the 20 items that make up the core basic nursing skills using clinical scenarios. Participants' self-confidence in the core clinical nursing skills was measured using a 10-point scale, while their clinical competence with these skills was measured using the core clinical nursing skills checklist. Independent t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze the data. The mean scores in self-confidence and clinical competence were higher in the experimental group than in the control group. This intensive clinical skills courses had a positive effect on senior nursing students' self-confidence and clinical competence for the core clinical nursing skills. This study emphasizes the importance of reeducation using a clinical skills course during the transition from student to nursing professional. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Magic Finger Teaching Method in Learning Multiplication Facts among Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Liong; Yasin, Mohd. Hanafi Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Deaf students face problems in mastering multiplication facts. This study aims to identify the effectiveness of Magic Finger Teaching Method (MFTM) and students' perception towards MFTM. The research employs a quasi experimental with non-equivalent pre-test and post-test control group design. Pre-test, post-test and questionnaires were used. As…

  13. Effect of an occupation-based cultural heritage intervention in long-term geriatric care: a two-group control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersch, Gayle; Hutchinson, Shirley; Davidson, Harriett; Wilson, Christine; Maharaj, Teresa; Watson, Kathleen B

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of an occupation-based cultural heritage intervention to facilitate adaptation to relocation into long-term care (LTC) facilities as measured by quality of life, activity engagement, and social participation. We used a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group design with pre- and posttests. Residents receiving the cultural intervention were compared with residents in a typical activity group. Eight sessions, two per week for 4 wk, were facilitated by certified occupational therapy assistants. Twenty-nine participants completed the group sessions. Quality-of-life scores improved significantly over time for both groups. Statistically, a greater percentage of time was spent in discretionary than obligatory time, pretest and posttest, with no significant difference between groups. The study demonstrated effectiveness of a structured, occupation-based social group intervention that improved quality of life, an indicator of adaptation. It also provided a description of activity patterns and social participation of LTC residents. Copyright © 2012 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  14. Digital I and C system pre-tests using plant specific simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, B.; Probst, H.; Wischert, W.

    2006-01-01

    The paper focuses on strategic aspects of the implementation of modern digital instrumentation and control system (I and C) in nuclear power plant (NPP) training simulators and points out the way to identify the most appropriate implementation method of the digital I and C system in the simulator development environment which fulfils the requirement imposed by the nuclear power plants. This regards mainly training aspects, simulator as a test bed for design verification and validation (V and V), and software maintenance aspects with respect to future evolutions of the digital I and C system. (author)

  15. Pre-Test Analysis Predictions for the Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor Checkout Tests - TA01 and TA02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the pre-test analysis predictions for the SBKF-P2-CYL-TA01 and SBKF-P2-CYL-TA02 shell buckling tests conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in support of the Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor (SBKF) Project, NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Assessment. The test article (TA) is an 8-foot-diameter aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) orthogrid cylindrical shell with similar design features as that of the proposed Ares-I and Ares-V barrel structures. In support of the testing effort, detailed structural analyses were conducted and the results were used to monitor the behavior of the TA during the testing. A summary of predicted results for each of the five load sequences is presented herein.

  16. Pretest Score for Predicting Microbubble Contrast Agent Use in Stress Echocardiography: A Method to Increase Efficiency in the Echo Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Bernier

    2009-01-01

    contrast. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between individual characteristics and contrast use. An 11-point score was derived from the significant characteristics. Results. Variables associated with microbubble use were age, sex, smoking, presence of multiple risk factors, bodymass index (BMI, referral for dobutamine stress echocardiography, history of coronary artery disease, and abnormal baseline electrocardiogram. All variables except BMI were given a score of 1 if present and 0 if absent; BMI was given a score of 0 to 4 according to its value. An increased score was directly proportional to increased likelihood of contrast use. The score cutoff value to optimize sensitivity and specificity was 5. Conclusions. A pretest score can be computed from information available before imaging. It may facilitate contrast agent use through early identification of patients who are likely to benefit from improved endocardial border definition.

  17. Effectiveness of Self-Control Training on Quality of Life Dimensions in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeel Soleimani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder that leads patients to avoid any kind of activities. Since different factors are involved in migraine incidence and its triggers, so drugs are used to prevent or treat it are so variable. Also, combined medications are used to relieve migraine. This study examined the effectiveness of self-control training on quality of life in patients with migraine. Materials and Methods: Statistic population of this study included all migraine patients in Ardabil in 2014(Estimation: N=1150 that 40 patients were selected by convenience sampling. Demographic and disease information questionnaire and quality of life questionnaire (SF-36 were used to collect data in clinical centers. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANCOVA was used to analyze data, because present research was a experimental and clinical trial with pre-test and post-test with control group. Results: The results showed that there is a significant difference between mean in quality of life in migraine patients and control subjects. It means that physical health and mental health of quality of life was different between control and experimental groups after self- control training. Conclusion: Self-control training can be used to enhance quality of life in migraine patients. These results have important and effective applications in the treatment of migraine patients. Generally, specialists of clinical centers can use this method alongside other treatment interventions.

  18. A Randomized Controlled Study of Art Observation Training to Improve Medical Student Ophthalmology Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwin, Jaclyn; Revere, Karen E; Niepold, Suzannah; Bassett, Barbara; Mitchell, Rebecca; Davidson, Stephanie; DeLisser, Horace; Binenbaum, Gil

    2018-01-01

    Observation and description are critical to the practice of medicine, and to ophthalmology in particular. However, medical education does not provide explicit training in these areas, and medical students are often criticized for deficiencies in these skills. We sought to evaluate the effects of formal observation training in the visual arts on the general and ophthalmologic observational skills of medical students. Randomized, single-masked, controlled trial. Thirty-six first-year medical students, randomized 1:1 into art-training and control groups. Students in the art-training group were taught by professional art educators at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, during 6 custom-designed, 1.5-hour art observation sessions over a 3-month period. All subjects completed pre- and posttesting, in which they described works of art, retinal pathology images, and external photographs of eye diseases. Grading of written descriptions for observational and descriptive abilities by reviewers using an a priori rubric and masked to group assignment and pretesting/posttesting status. Observational skills, as measured by description testing, improved significantly in the training group (mean change +19.1 points) compared with the control group (mean change -13.5 points), P = 0.001. There were significant improvements in the training vs. control group for each of the test subscores. In a poststudy questionnaire, students reported applying the skills they learned in the museum in clinically meaningful ways at medical school. Art observation training for first-year medical students can improve clinical ophthalmology observational skills. Principles from the field of visual arts, which is reputed to excel in teaching observation and descriptive abilities, can be successfully applied to medical training. Further studies can examine the impact of such training on clinical care. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Yoga on Stress, Stress Adaption, and Heart Rate Variability Among Mental Health Professionals--A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Huang, Ching-Ya; Shiu, Shau-Ping; Yeh, Shu-Hui

    2015-08-01

    Mental health professionals experiencing work-related stress may experience burn out, leading to a negative impact on their organization and patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of yoga classes on work-related stress, stress adaptation, and autonomic nerve activity among mental health professionals. A randomized controlled trial was used, which compared the outcomes between the experimental (e.g., yoga program) and the control groups (e.g., no yoga exercise) for 12 weeks. Work-related stress and stress adaptation were assessed before and after the program. Heart rate variability (HRV) was measured at baseline, midpoint through the weekly yoga classes (6 weeks), and postintervention (after 12 weeks of yoga classes). The results showed that the mental health professionals in the yoga group experienced a significant reduction in work-related stress (t = -6.225, p stress adaptation (t = 2.128, p = .042). Participants in the control group revealed no significant changes. Comparing the mean differences in pre- and posttest scores between yoga and control groups, we found the yoga group significantly decreased work-related stress (t = -3.216, p = .002), but there was no significant change in stress adaptation (p = .084). While controlling for the pretest scores of work-related stress, participants in yoga, but not the control group, revealed a significant increase in autonomic nerve activity at midpoint (6 weeks) test (t = -2.799, p = .007), and at posttest (12 weeks; t = -2.099, p = .040). Because mental health professionals experienced a reduction in work-related stress and an increase in autonomic nerve activity in a weekly yoga program for 12 weeks, clinicians, administrators, and educators should offer yoga classes as a strategy to help health professionals reduce their work-related stress and balance autonomic nerve activities. © 2015 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society

  20. Efficacy of the Aussie Optimism Program: Promoting Pro-social Behavior and Preventing Suicidality in Primary School Students. A Randomised-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. Roberts

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of an enhanced version of the Aussie Optimism Program (AOP was investigated in a cluster randomized controlled trial. Grade 6 students aged 10–11 years of age (N = 2288 from 63 government primary schools in Perth, Western Australia, participated in the pre, post, and follow-up study. Schools were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: Aussie Optimism with teacher training, Aussie Optimism with teacher training plus coaching, or a usual care condition that received the regular Western Australian Health Education Curriculum. Students in the Aussie Optimism conditions received 20, 1-h lessons relating to social and interpersonal skills and optimistic thinking skills over the last 2 years of primary school. Parents in the active conditions received a parent information booklet each year, plus a self-directed program in Grade 7. Students and parents completed the Extended Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Students who scored in the clinical range on the Emotional Symptoms Scale were given The Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents IV, to assess suicidal ideation and behavior, and depressive and anxiety disorders. Results indicated that Aussie Optimism with teacher training plus coaching was associated with the best outcomes: a significant increase in student-reported pro-social behavior from pre-test to post-test 1 (maintained at post-test 2 and significantly lower incidence rates from suicidal ideation at post-test 2 and follow-up. No significant intervention effects on anxiety and depressive disorders, and total difficulties were reported. These findings suggest that the AOP with teacher training along with coaching may have the potential to positively impact on suicidality and pro-social behavior in the pre-adolescent years.

  1. Influence of the type of training task on intermanual transfer effects in upper-limb prosthesis training: A randomized pre-posttest study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sietske Romkema

    Full Text Available Intermanual transfer, the transfer of motor skills from the trained hand to the untrained hand, can be used to train upper limb prosthesis skills. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between the magnitude of the intermanual transfer effect and the type of training task. The used tasks were based on different aspects of prosthetic handling: reaching, grasping, grip-force production and functional tasks. A single-blinded clinical trial, with a pre-posttest design was executed. Seventy-one able-bodied, right-handed participants were randomly assigned to four training and two control groups. The training groups performed a training program with an upper-limb prosthesis simulator. One control group performed a sham training (a dummy training without the prosthesis simulator and another control group received no training at all. The training groups and sham group trained on five consecutive days. To determine the improvement in skills, a test was administered before, immediately after, and one week after the training. Training was performed with the 'unaffected' arm; tests were performed with the 'affected' arm, with the latter resembling the amputated limb. In this study half of the participants trained with the dominant hand, while the other half trained with the non-dominant hand. Participants executed four tests that corresponded to the different training tasks. The tests measured the reaching (movement time and symmetry ratio, grasping (opening time, duration of maximum hand opening, and closing time, grip-force production (deviation of asked grip-force and functional (movement time performance. Half of the participants were tested with their dominant arm and half of the participants with their non-dominant arm. Intermanual transfer effects were not found for reaching, grasping or functional tasks. However, we did find intermanual transfer effects for grip-force production tasks. Possibly, the study design contributed to the

  2. Family leader empowerment program using participatory learning process for dengue vector control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengvanich, Veerapong

    2011-02-01

    Assess the performance of the empowerment program using participatory learning process for the control of Dengue vector The program focuses on using the leaders of families as the main executer of the vector control protocol. This quasi-experimental research utilized the two-group pretest-posttest design. The sample group consisted of 120 family leaders from two communities in Mueang Municipality, Chachoengsao Province. The research was conducted during an 8-week period between April and June 2010. The data were collected and analyzed based on frequency, percentage, mean, paired t-test, and independent t-test. The result was evaluated by comparing the difference between the mean prevalence index of mosquito larvae before and after the process implementation in terms of the container index (CI) and the house index (HI). After spending eight weeks in the empowerment program, the family leader's behavior in the aspect of Dengue vector control has improved. The Container Index and the House Index were found to decrease with p = 0.05 statistical significance. The reduction of CI and HI suggested that the program worked well in the selected communities. The success of the Dengue vector control program depended on cooperation and participation of many groups, especially the families in the community When the family leaders have good attitude and are capable of carrying out the vector control protocol, the risk factor leading to the incidence of Dengue rims infection can be reduced.

  3. Safety and feasibility of transcranial direct current stimulation in pediatric hemiparesis: randomized controlled preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillick, Bernadette T; Feyma, Tim; Menk, Jeremiah; Usset, Michelle; Vaith, Amy; Wood, Teddi Jean; Worthington, Rebecca; Krach, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a form of noninvasive brain stimulation that has shown improved adult stroke outcomes. Applying tDCS in children with congenital hemiparesis has not yet been explored. The primary objective of this study was to explore the safety and feasibility of single-session tDCS through an adverse events profile and symptom assessment within a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled preliminary study in children with congenital hemiparesis. A secondary objective was to assess the stability of hand and cognitive function. A double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled pretest/posttest/follow-up study was conducted. The study was conducted in a university pediatric research laboratory. Thirteen children, ages 7 to 18 years, with congenital hemiparesis participated. Adverse events/safety assessment and hand function were measured. Participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a control group, with safety and functional assessments at pretest, at posttest on the same day, and at a 1-week follow-up session. An intervention of 10 minutes of 0.7 mA tDCS was applied to bilateral primary motor cortices. The tDCS intervention was considered safe if there was no individual decline of 25% or group decline of 2 standard deviations for motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and behavioral data and no report of adverse events. No major adverse events were found, including no seizures. Two participants did not complete the study due to lack of MEP and discomfort. For the 11 participants who completed the study, group differences in MEPs and behavioral data did not exceed 2 standard deviations in those who received the tDCS (n=5) and those in the control group (n=6). The study was completed without the need for stopping per medical monitor and biostatisticial analysis. A limitation of the study was the small sample size, with data available for 11 participants. Based on the results of this study, tDCS appears to be safe

  4. Development of early mathematical skills with a tablet intervention: a randomized control trial in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola ePitchford

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of educational interventions is necessary prior to wide-scale rollout. Yet very few rigorous studies have been conducted on the effectiveness of tablet-based interventions, especially in the early years and in developing countries. This study reports a randomized control trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a tablet intervention for supporting the development of early mathematical skills in primary school children in Malawi. A total sample of 318 children, spanning Standards 1-3, attending a medium-sized urban primary school, were randomized to one of three groups: maths tablet intervention, non-maths tablet control, and standard face-to-face practice. Children were pre-tested using tablets at the start of the school year on two tests of mathematical knowledge and a range of basic skills related to scholastic progression. Class teachers then delivered the intervention over an 8-week period, for the equivalent of 30-minutes per day. Technical support was provided from the local Voluntary Service Overseas. Children were then post-tested on the same assessments as given at pre-test.A final sample of 283 children from Standards 1-3, present at both pre- and post-test, was analyzed to investigate the effectiveness of the maths tablet intervention. Significant effects of the maths tablet intervention over and above standard face-to-face practice or using tablets without the maths software were found in Standard 2 and 3. In Standard 3 the greater learning gains shown by the maths tablet intervention group compared to both of the control groups on the tablet-based assessments transferred to paper and pencil format, illustrating generalization of knowledge gained. Thus, tablet technology can effectively support early years mathematical skills in developing countries if the software is carefully designed to engage the child in the learning process and the content is grounded in a solid well-constructed curriculum appropriate for the child

  5. Normal myocardial perfusion scan portends a benign prognosis independent from the pretest probability of coronary artery disease. Sub-analysis of the J-ACCESS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Yosihiro; Fukuyama, Takaya; Nishimura, Sigeyuki; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the usefulness of gated stress/rest 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to predict ischemic cardiac events in Japanese patients with various estimated pretest probabilities of coronary artery disease (CAD). Of the 4031 consecutively registered patients for a J-ACCESS (Japanese Assessment of Cardiac Events and Survival Study by Quantitative Gated SPECT) study, 1904 patients without prior cardiac events were selected. Gated stress/rest myocardial perfusion SPECT was performed and segmental perfusion scores and quantitative gated SPECT results were derived. The pretest probability for having CAD was estimated using the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/American College of Physicians- American Society of Internal Medicine guideline data for the management of patients with chronic stable angina, which includes age, gender, and type of chest discomfort. The patients were followed up for three years. During the three-year follow-up period, 96 developed ischemic cardiac events: 17 cardiac deaths, 8 nonfatal myocardial infarction, and 71 clinically driven revascularization. The summed stress score (SSS) was the most powerful independent predictor of all ischemic cardiac events (hazard ratio 1.077, confidence interval (CI) 1.045-1.110). Abnormal SSS (>3) was associated with a significantly higher cardiac event rate in patients with an intermediate to high pretest probability of CAD. Normal SSS (≤3) was associated with a low event rate in patients with any pretest probability of CAD. Myocardial perfusion SPECT is useful for further risk-stratification of patients with suspected CAD. The abnormal scan result (SSS>3) is discriminative for subsequent cardiac events only in the groups with an intermediate to high pretest probability of CAD. The salient result is that normal scan results portend a benign prognosis independent from the pretest probability of CAD. (author)

  6. Cognitive Resources Necessary for Motor Control in Older Adults Are Reduced by Walking and Coordination Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godde, Ben; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    We examined if physical exercise interventions were effective to reduce cognitive brain resources recruited while performing motor control tasks in older adults. Forty-three older adults (63-79 years of age) participated in either a walking ( n = 17) or a motor coordination ( n = 15) intervention (1 year, 3 times per week) or were assigned to a control group ( n = 11) doing relaxation and stretching exercises. Pre and post the intervention period, we applied functional MRI to assess brain activation during imagery of forward and backward walking and during counting backwards from 100 as control task. In both experimental groups, activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during imagery of forward walking decreased from pre- to post-test (Effect size: -1.55 and -1.16 for coordination and walking training, respectively; Cohen's d ). Regression analysis revealed a significant positive association between initial motor status and activation change in the right DLPFC ( R 2 = 0.243, F (3,39) = 4.18, p = 0.012). Participants with lowest motor status at pretest profited most from the interventions. Data suggest that physical training in older adults is effective to free up cognitive resources otherwise needed for the control of locomotion. Training benefits may become particularly apparent in so-called dual-task situations where subjects must perform motor and cognitive tasks concurrently.

  7. The effectiveness of core stabilization exercise in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür, Gözde; Ayhan, Cigdem; Yakut, Yavuz

    2017-06-01

    Core stabilization training is used to improve postural balance in musculoskeletal problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of stabilization training in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A randomized controlled trial, pretest-posttest design. In total, 25 subjects with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were randomly divided into two groups: stabilization group ( n = 12) and control group ( n = 13). The stabilization group received core stabilization in addition to traditional rehabilitation, and the control group received traditional rehabilitation for 10 weeks. Assessment included Cobb's angle on radiograph, apical vertebral rotation in Adam's test, trunk asymmetry (Posterior Trunk Symmetry Index), cosmetic trunk deformity (Trunk Appearance Perception Scale), and quality of life (Scoliosis Research Society-22 questionnaire). Inter-group comparisons showed significantly greater improvements in the mean change in lumbar apical vertebral rotation degree and the pain domain of Scoliosis Research Society-22 in the stabilization group than those in the control group ( p adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Clinical relevance Stabilization exercises are more effective in reducing rotation deformity and pain than traditional exercises in the conservative rehabilitation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. These improvements suggest that stabilization training should be added to rehabilitation programs in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  8. Effects of Video Game Training on Behavioral and Electrophysiological Measures of Attention and Memory: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayas, Julia; Ruiz-Marquez, Eloisa; Prieto, Antonio; Toril, Pilar; Ponce de Leon, Laura; de Ceballos, Maria L; Reales Avilés, José Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Background Neuroplasticity-based approaches seem to offer promising ways of maintaining cognitive health in older adults and postponing the onset of cognitive decline symptoms. Although previous research suggests that training can produce transfer effects, this study was designed to overcome some limitations of previous studies by incorporating an active control group and the assessment of training expectations. Objective The main objectives of this study are (1) to evaluate the effects of a randomized computer-based intervention consisting of training older adults with nonaction video games on brain and cognitive functions that decline with age, including attention and spatial working memory, using behavioral measures and electrophysiological recordings (event-related potentials [ERPs]) just after training and after a 6-month no-contact period; (2) to explore whether motivation, engagement, or expectations might account for possible training-related improvements; and (3) to examine whether inflammatory mechanisms assessed with noninvasive measurement of C-reactive protein in saliva impair cognitive training-induced effects. A better understanding of these mechanisms could elucidate pathways that could be targeted in the future by either behavioral or neuropsychological interventions. Methods A single-blinded randomized controlled trial with an experimental group and an active control group, pretest, posttest, and 6-month follow-up repeated measures design is used in this study. A total of 75 cognitively healthy older adults were randomly distributed into experimental and active control groups. Participants in the experimental group received 16 1-hour training sessions with cognitive nonaction video games selected from Lumosity, a commercial brain training package. The active control group received the same number of training sessions with The Sims and SimCity, a simulation strategy game. Results We have recruited participants, have conducted the training protocol

  9. Interventions to decrease pain and anxiety in patients undergoing urodynamic testing: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Ellen R; Ridgeway, Beri

    2016-11-01

    To determine if music (at 60 beats/min) or watching a pre-procedure educational video decreases pain and anxiety in women undergoing multichannel urodynamic testing compared to usual care. Women undergoing multichannel urodynamic testing at a tertiary care center were randomized to one of three groups: usual care (UC), music (M), in which music was played throughout the urodynamic test, or video (V), in which subjects watched an informational video on the procedure prior to undergoing the test. Visual analog scales (VAS) were used to measure patient's pain and anxiety before and after the test. Demographic information was obtained and five-item Likert questionnaires were given to assess information seeking behavior, preparedness, embarrassment, and privacy. 98 subjects were included in this analysis. In the overall group, mean perceived pain on the pre-test VAS was significantly higher than the post-test VAS with pre-test mean (SD) 47(±30) and post-test mean (SD) 26(±23), P = 0.0001. Overall the anxiety pre-test VAS was significantly greater than post-test VAS with pre-test mean (SD) 46.9(±29) and post-test mean 17.9(±18), P = 0.0001. There were no differences in pain and anxiety scores between the two intervention groups and usual care. Patients who were randomized to usual care or the video arm felt more prepared for the test compared to patients who were randomized to the music arm, with (mean ± SD): usual care (42 ± 8), video (43 ± 9), music (37 ± 11), P = 0.002. Music and an educational video do not decrease pain or anxiety in subjects undergoing multichannel urodynamics compared to usual care. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:975-979, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Determining Risk of Falls in Community Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Using Posttest Probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusardi, Michelle M; Fritz, Stacy; Middleton, Addie; Allison, Leslie; Wingood, Mariana; Phillips, Emma; Criss, Michelle; Verma, Sangita; Osborne, Jackie; Chui, Kevin K

    Falls and their consequences are significant concerns for older adults, caregivers, and health care providers. Identification of fall risk is crucial for appropriate referral to preventive interventions. Falls are multifactorial; no single measure is an accurate diagnostic tool. There is limited information on which history question, self-report measure, or performance-based measure, or combination of measures, best predicts future falls. First, to evaluate the predictive ability of history questions, self-report measures, and performance-based measures for assessing fall risk of community-dwelling older adults by calculating and comparing posttest probability (PoTP) values for individual test/measures. Second, to evaluate usefulness of cumulative PoTP for measures in combination. To be included, a study must have used fall status as an outcome or classification variable, have a sample size of at least 30 ambulatory community-living older adults (≥65 years), and track falls occurrence for a minimum of 6 months. Studies in acute or long-term care settings, as well as those including participants with significant cognitive or neuromuscular conditions related to increased fall risk, were excluded. Searches of Medline/PubMED and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) from January 1990 through September 2013 identified 2294 abstracts concerned with fall risk assessment in community-dwelling older adults. Because the number of prospective studies of fall risk assessment was limited, retrospective studies that classified participants (faller/nonfallers) were also included. Ninety-five full-text articles met inclusion criteria; 59 contained necessary data for calculation of PoTP. The Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) was used to assess each study's methodological quality. Study design and QUADAS score determined the level of evidence. Data for calculation of sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp), likelihood ratios (LR), and Po

  11. Determining Risk of Falls in Community Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Using Posttest Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Stacy; Middleton, Addie; Allison, Leslie; Wingood, Mariana; Phillips, Emma; Criss, Michelle; Verma, Sangita; Osborne, Jackie; Chui, Kevin K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Falls and their consequences are significant concerns for older adults, caregivers, and health care providers. Identification of fall risk is crucial for appropriate referral to preventive interventions. Falls are multifactorial; no single measure is an accurate diagnostic tool. There is limited information on which history question, self-report measure, or performance-based measure, or combination of measures, best predicts future falls. Purpose: First, to evaluate the predictive ability of history questions, self-report measures, and performance-based measures for assessing fall risk of community-dwelling older adults by calculating and comparing posttest probability (PoTP) values for individual test/measures. Second, to evaluate usefulness of cumulative PoTP for measures in combination. Data Sources: To be included, a study must have used fall status as an outcome or classification variable, have a sample size of at least 30 ambulatory community-living older adults (≥65 years), and track falls occurrence for a minimum of 6 months. Studies in acute or long-term care settings, as well as those including participants with significant cognitive or neuromuscular conditions related to increased fall risk, were excluded. Searches of Medline/PubMED and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) from January 1990 through September 2013 identified 2294 abstracts concerned with fall risk assessment in community-dwelling older adults. Study Selection: Because the number of prospective studies of fall risk assessment was limited, retrospective studies that classified participants (faller/nonfallers) were also included. Ninety-five full-text articles met inclusion criteria; 59 contained necessary data for calculation of PoTP. The Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) was used to assess each study's methodological quality. Data Extraction: Study design and QUADAS score determined the level of evidence. Data for calculation

  12. Bentonite buffer pre-test. Core drilling of drillholes ONK-PP264...267 in ONKALO at Olkiluoto 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toropainen, V.

    2010-12-01

    Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled four drillholes for bentonite buffer pre-test in ONKALO at Eurajoki, Olkiluoto in July 2010. The identification numbers of the holes are ONK-PP264..267, and the lengths of the drillholes are approximately 4.30 metres each. The drillholes are 75.7 mm by diameter. The drillholes were drilled in a niche at access tunnel chainage 1475. The hydraulic DE 130 drilling rig was used for the work. The drilling water was taken from the ONKALO drilling water pipeline and premixed sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. In addition to drilling, the drillcores were logged and reported by geologist. Geological logging included the following parameters: lithology, foliation, fracture parameters, fractured zones, core loss, weathering, fracture frequency, RQD and rock quality. The main rock type in the drillholes is pegmatitic granite. The average fracture frequency in the drill cores is 4.0 pcs / m and the average RQD value 94.2 %. (orig.)

  13. Advances in LWD pressure measurements: smart, time optimized pretests and on demand real-time transmission applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafim, Robson; Ferraris, Paolo [Schlumberger, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The StethoScope Logging While Drilling (LWD) Pressure Measurement, introduced in Brazil in 2005, has been extensively used in deep water environment to provide reservoir pressure and mobility in real-time. In the last three years the StethoScope service was further enhanced to allow better real time monitoring using a larger transmission rate, higher RT data resolution and remote visualization. In order to guarantee stable formation pressures with a limited test duration under a wide range of conditions, Time Optimized Pretests (TOP) were developed. These tests adjust automatically drawdown and buildup parameters as a function of formation characteristics (pressure/mobility) without requiring any input from the operator. On-demand frame (ODF), an advanced telemetry triggered automatically during the pressure tests, allowed to increase equivalent transmission rate and resolution and to include quality indices computed downhole. This paper is focused on the TOP and ODF Field Test results in Brazil, which proved to be useful and reliable options for better real-time decisions together with remote monitoring visualization implemented by the RTMonitor program. (author)

  14. Masters in nursing degrees: an evaluation of management and leadership outcomes using a retrospective pre-test design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure the leadership and management abilities of graduates who had completed a master's degree in nursing. A number of reports have recommended that leadership competencies be integrated into education programmes for nurses at a master's level. In spite of the growth in the number of graduates from higher degrees in nursing, there is a paucity of evidence on the management and leadership outcomes that develop as a result of undertaking a master's degree. A cross-sectional survey using a retrospective pre-test design was used to measure self-reported leadership and management outcomes from the graduates' educational programmes. Results found that graduates had gained significantly on their ability to change practice, communicate and work as part of a team and to problem solve as an outcome of completing a master's degree in nursing. Graduates make substantial gains in leadership and management capabilities as a consequence of their higher degree. These capabilities are necessary as nurses take the lead in many areas of healthcare. The masters in nursing degree now has a pivotal role in providing effective continuing education to the nursing profession; especially for those who occupy or intend to occupy senior positions within clinical, management or education branches of the profession. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Comparison of pre-test analyses with the Sizewell-B 1:10 scale prestressed concrete containment test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R.; Parks, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes pretest analyses of a one-tenth scale model of the 'Sizewell-B' prestressed concrete containment building. The work was performed by ANATECH Research Corp. under contract with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Hydraulic testing of the model was conducted in the United Kingdom by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB). In order to further their understanding of containment behavior, the USNRC, through an agreement with the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), also participated in the test program with SNL serving as their technical agent. The analyses that were conducted included two global axisymmetric models with 'bonded' and 'unbonded' analytical treatment of meridional tendons, a 3D quarter model of the structure, an axisymmetric representation of the equipment hatch region, and local plane stress and r-θ models of a buttress. Results of these analyses are described and compared with the results of the test. A global hoop failure at midheight of the cylinder and a shear/bending type failure at the base of the cylinder wall were both found to have roughly equal probability of occurrence; however, the shear failure mode had higher uncertainty associated with it. Consequently, significant effort was dedicated to improving the modeling capability for concrete shear behavior. This work is also described briefly. (author)

  16. Comparison of pre-test analyses with the Sizewell-B 1:10 scale prestressed concrete containment test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R.; Parks, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes pretest analyses of a one-tenth scale model of the Sizewell-B prestressed concrete containment building. The work was performed by ANATECH Research Corp. under contract with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Hydraulic testing of the model was conducted in the United Kingdom by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB). In order to further their understanding of containment behavior, the USNRC, through an agreement with the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), also participated in the test program with SNL serving as their technical agent. The analyses that were conducted included two global axisymmetric models with ''bonded'' and ''unbonded'' analytical treatment of meridional tendons, a 3D quarter model of the structure, an axisymmetric representation of the equipment hatch region, and local plan stress and r-θ models of a buttress. Results of these analyses are described and compared with the results of the test. A global hoop failure at midheight of the cylinder and a shear/bending type failure at the base of the cylinder wall were both found to have roughly equal probability of occurrence; however, the shear failure mode had higher uncertainty associated with it. Consequently, significant effort was dedicated to improving the modeling capability for concrete shear behavior. This work is also described briefly. 5 refs., 7 figs

  17. Round-robin pretest analyses of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment model subject to static internal pressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, D.B.

    1987-05-01

    Analyses of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment model that will be tested to failure at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 1987 were conducted by the following organizations in the United States and Europe: Sandia National Laboratories (USA), Argonne National Laboratory (USA), Electric Power Research Institute (USA), Commissariat a L'Energie Atomique (France), HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (UK), Comitato Nazionale per la ricerca e per lo sviluppo dell'Energia Nucleare e delle Energie Alternative (Italy), UK Atomic Energy Authority, Safety and Reliability Directorate (UK), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (FRG), Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), and Central Electricity Generating Board (UK). Each organization was supplied with a standard information package, which included construction drawings and actual material properties for most of the materials used in the model. Each organization worked independently using their own analytical methods. This report includes descriptions of the various analytical approaches and pretest predictions submitted by each organization. Significant milestones that occur with increasing pressure, such as damage to the concrete (cracking and crushing) and yielding of the steel components, and the failure pressure (capacity) and failure mechanism are described. Analytical predictions for pressure histories of strain in the liner and rebar and displacements are compared at locations where experimental results will be available after the test. Thus, these predictions can be compared to one another and to experimental results after the test

  18. Pre-test analysis of an integral effect test facility for thermal-hydraulic similarities of 6 inches coldleg break and DVI injection line break using MARS-1D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae Soon; Choi, Ki Yong; Park, Hyun Sik; Euh, Dong Jin; Baek, Won Pil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    A pre-test analysis of a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA, DVI Line break) has been performed for the integral effect test loop of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute-ITL), the construction of which will be started soon. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute-ITL is a full-height and 1/310 volume-scaled test facility based on the design features of the APR1400 (Korean Next Generation Reactor). This paper briefly introduces the basic design features of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute-ITL and presents the results of pre-test analysis for a postulated cold leg SBLOCA and DVI line break. Based on the same control logics and accident scenarios, the similarity between the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute-ITL and the prototype plant, APR1400, is evaluated by using the MARS code, which is a multi-dimensional best-estimate thermal hydraulic code being developed by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. It is found that the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute-ITL and APR 1400 have similar thermal hydraulic responses against the analyzed SBLOCA and DVI Line break scenario. It is also verified that the volume scaling law, applied to the design of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute-ITL, gives a reasonable results to keep a similarity with APR1400. 11 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  19. Effect of self-consistency group intervention for adolescents with schizophrenia: An inpatient randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Pan; Zeng, Hongling; Yang, Bingxiang

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the efficacy of structural group therapy on the self-consistency and congruence of inpatient adolescents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Sixty inpatient adolescents with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30). The intervention group was provided with a 12-session structural group therapy program for six weeks (1 h, two times per week), while the control group participated in a handicraft group. All patients were assessed with the Self-Consistency and Congruence Scale (SCCS) and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at pretest, posttest, three-month and one-year follow-up. The results were analyzed using t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. The two groups had no significant difference at the pre-test of outcome measures (p > 0.05). Significant differences existed between the two groups in ego-dystonic, self-flexibility, SCCS scores, positive syndrome, general psychopathology and PANSS scores after the intervention (p < 0.05). At the three-month follow-up, ego-dystonic, self-flexibility and PANSS scores were also found to be significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05). But the outcome measures were not significantly different between the two groups at the one-year follow-up. Structural group therapy in a mental health setting had a positive effect on improving self-consistency and congruence, positive symptoms and general psychopathology of inpatient adolescents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Designing and evaluating the effectiveness of a serious game for safe administration of blood transfusion: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Apphia Jia Qi; Lee, Cindy Ching Siang; Lin, Patrick Yongxing; Cooper, Simon; Lau, Lydia Siew Tiang; Chua, Wei Ling; Liaw, Sok Ying

    2017-08-01

    Preparing nursing students for the knowledge and skills required for the administration and monitoring of blood components is crucial for entry into clinical practice. Serious games create opportunities to develop this competency, which can be used as a self-directed learning strategy to complement existing didactic learning and simulation-based strategies. To describe the development and evaluation of a serious game to improve nursing students' knowledge, confidence, and performance in blood transfusion. An experiential gaming model was applied to guide the design of the serious game environment. A clustered, randomized controlled trial was conducted with 103 second-year undergraduate nursing students who were randomized into control or experimental groups. After a baseline evaluation of the participants' knowledge and confidence on blood transfusion procedure, the experimental group undertook a blood transfusion serious game and completed a questionnaire to evaluate their learning experience. All participants' clinical performances were evaluated in a simulated environment. The post-test knowledge and confidence mean scores of the experimental group improved significantly (pgame intervention compared to pre-test mean scores and to post-test mean scores of the control group (pgame positively. The study provided evidence on the effectiveness of a serious game in improving the knowledge and confidence of nursing students on blood transfusion practice. The features of this serious game could be further developed to incorporate additional scenarios with repetitive exercises and feedback to enhance the impact on clinical performance. Given the flexibility, practicality, and scalability of such a game, they can serve as a promising approach to optimize learning when blended with high-fidelity simulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Pre-Test pan Work Plan sebagai Strategi Pembelajaran Efektif pada Praktikum Bahan Teknik Lanjut Jurusan Pendidikan Teknik Mesin FT UNY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdjito Nurdjito

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To find the most effective learning strategy for the practicum in the laboratory of materials of the department of Mechanical Engineering Education, Faculty of Engineering, Yogyakarta State University (YSU, a study that aims to determine the effect of applying pre-test and work plan on the learning activities and the achievement of students in the laboratory was conducted. This action research used the purposive random sampling technique. Pre-test and work plan were conducted as the treatment. The data of study was collected through a test to analyse the students’ achievement scores, then they were analyzed using t-test with SPSS. The results of this study indicated that the application of pre-test and work plan in addition to the standard module was proven to be more effective than the  normative learning using the module with t = 3.055 p = 0.003 <0.05. The implementation of the pre-test and work plan in addition to the use of standard modules is able to  improve the students’ motivation, independence and readiness to learn as well as the cooperation among the students, therefore the achievement is also improved. The mastery of competencies increased significantly proved by the increasing values of mode 66 to 85 (the experiment, and mean 73.12 into 79.32 (experiment.

  2. Effect of educational training on nutrition and weight control in under-18 Spanish wrestlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Visiedo

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a formative program concerning nutrition, weight control, and its risks wrestlers under the age of 18 (under-18 at the Spanish national level. The sample comprised 36 under-18 wrestlers that were pre-selected for the Spanish national team. A quasi-experimental design with a pre-test and post-test was used. The dependent variableswere the knowledge of nutrition and weight control and its risks. The independent variable was the educational program. The program had three 30-minute sessions that combined talks, videos, and tasks to complete. Descriptive and inferential analyses were done (t-test, Wilcoxon test. Results indicate that the educational program was effective at increasing under-18 wrestlers’ knowledge about weight control and its risks,but was ineffective with regard to nutrition knowledge. The paper concludes with a discussion regarding the effect of the intervention program, the difficulties with including this type of knowledge and skill in the preparation of combat sport athletes, and the need for further research in this area.

  3. Mobile-Based Video Learning Outcomes in Clinical Nursing Skill Education: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Ju; Chae, Sun-Mi; Kim, Haejin; Lee, Ji-Hye; Min, Hyojin Jennifer; Park, Da-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are a regular part of daily life among the younger generations. Thus, now is the time to apply mobile device use to nursing education. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of a mobile-based video clip on learning motivation, competence, and class satisfaction in nursing students using a randomized controlled trial with a pretest and posttest design. A total of 71 nursing students participated in this study: 36 in the intervention group and 35 in the control group. A video clip of how to perform a urinary catheterization was developed, and the intervention group was able to download it to their own mobile devices for unlimited viewing throughout 1 week. All of the students participated in a practice laboratory to learn urinary catheterization and were blindly tested for their performance skills after participation in the laboratory. The intervention group showed significantly higher levels of learning motivation and class satisfaction than did the control. Of the fundamental nursing competencies, the intervention group was more confident in practicing catheterization than their counterparts. Our findings suggest that video clips using mobile devices are useful tools that educate student nurses on relevant clinical skills and improve learning outcomes.

  4. The Three-Step Test-Interview (TSTI: An observation-based method for pretesting self-completion questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-Step Test-Interview (TSTI is a method for pretesting a self-completion questionnaire by first observing actual instances of interaction between the instrument and respondents (the response process before exploring the reasons for this behavior. The TSTI consists of the following three steps: 1. (Respondent-driven observation of response behavior. 2. (Interviewer-driven follow-up probing aimed at remedying gaps in observational data. 3. (Interviewer-driven debriefing aimed at eliciting experiences and opinions. We describe the aims and the techniques of these three steps, and then discuss pilot studies in which we tested the feasibility and the productivity of the TSTI by applying it in testing three rather different types of questionnaires. In the first study, the quality of a set of questions about alcohol consumption was assessed. The TSTI proved to be productive in identifying problems that resulted from a mismatch between the ‘theory’ underlying the questions on the one hand, and features of a respondent’s actual behavior and biography on the other hand. In the second pilot study, Dutch and Norwegian versions of an attitude scale, the 20-item Illegal Aliens Scale, were tested. The TSTI appeared to be productive in identifying problems that resulted from different ‘response strategies’. In the third pilot, a two-year longitudinal study, the TSTI appeared to be an effective method for documenting processes of ‘response shift’ in repeated measurements of health-related Quality of Life (QoL.

  5. Outcomes and radiation exposure of emergency department patients with chest pain and shortness of breath and ultralow pretest probability: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Shapiro, Nathan I; Jones, Alan E; Hernandez, Jackeline; Hogg, Melanie M; Troyer, Jennifer; Nelson, R Darrell

    2014-03-01

    Excessive radiation exposure remains a concern for patients with symptoms suggesting acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism but must be judged in the perspective of pretest probability and outcomes. We quantify and qualify the pretest probability, outcomes, and radiation exposure of adults with both chest pain and dyspnea. This was a prospective, 4-center, outcomes study. Patients were adults with dyspnea and chest pain, nondiagnostic ECGs, and no obvious diagnosis. Pretest probability for both acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism was assessed with a validated method; ultralow risk was defined as pretest probability less than 2.5% for both acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism. Patients were followed for diagnosis and total medical radiation exposure for 90 days. Eight hundred forty patients had complete data; 23 (3%) had acute coronary syndrome and 15 (2%) had pulmonary embolism. The cohort received an average of 4.9 mSv radiation to the chest, 48% from computed tomography pulmonary angiography. The pretest probability estimates for acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism were less than 2.5% in 227 patients (27%), of whom 0 of 277 (0%; 95% confidence interval 0% to 1.7%) had acute coronary syndrome or pulmonary embolism and 7 of 227 (3%) had any significant cardiopulmonary diagnosis. The estimated chest radiation exposure per patient in this ultralow-risk group was 3.5 mSv, including 26 (3%) with greater than 5 mSv radiation to the chest and no significant cardiopulmonary diagnosis. One quarter of patients with chest pain and dyspnea had ultralow risk and no acute coronary syndrome or pulmonary embolism but were exposed to an average of 3.5 mSv radiation to the chest. These data can be used in a clinical guideline to reduce radiation exposure. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Maladaptive Schemas and Affective Control in Students with Learning Disability: Benefits of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy

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    Nasrollah Vaisi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study intended to examine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on moderating maladaptive schemas and affective control in students suffering from learning disabilities. Methods: This experimental research was conducted using pretest-posttest and a control group. The population included all the female students who  were studying in the Koohdasht's middle schools (academic year: 2012-2013. The sample included 40 female students suffering from learning disabilities who had been randomly selected out of Koohdasht's middle school students after identification and a structured clinical interview and  they were put into experimental  and control groups (20 students each group. For data collection, Affective Control Scale and Young Schema Questionnaire were used. Results: The results of multivariate covariance analysis showed that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy has significantly decreased maladaptive schemas, depression, anxiety, and anger in subjects (P<0.001. Discussion: This finding represents important implications regarding education and mental health improvement in exceptional students. Therefore, it is recommended to use this  therapeutic  package in schools and clinics as a supplement to other therapies in order to decrease negative emotions and to prevent formation of maladaptive schemas in these students.

  7. The Effects of Music Intervention on Background Pain and Anxiety in Burn Patients: Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Mohades Ardebili, Fatimah; Rafii, Forough; Haghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of music on the background pain, anxiety, and relaxation levels in burn patients. In this pretest-posttest randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 hospitalized burn patients were selected through convenience sampling. Subjects randomly assigned to music and control groups. Data related to demographic and clinical characteristics, analgesics, and physiologic measures were collected by researcher-made tools. Visual analog scale was used to determine pain, anxiety, and relaxation levels before and after the intervention in 3 consecutive days. Patients' preferred music was offered once a day for 3 days. The control group only received routine care. Data were analyzed using SPSS-PC (V. 20.0). According to paired t-test, there were significant differences between mean scores of pain (P music group. Independent t-test indicated a significant difference between the mean scores of changes in pain, anxiety, and relaxation levels before and after intervention in music and control groups (P music intervention. Music is an inexpensive, appropriate, and safe intervention for applying to burn patients with background pain and anxiety at rest. To produce more effective comfort for patients, it is necessary to compare different types and time lengths of music intervention to find the best approach.

  8. Health Communication and Social Marketing Campaigns for Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention and Control: What Is the Evidence of their Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Allison L; Kachur, Rachel E; Noar, Seth M; McFarlane, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sex in the media, a culture of silence surrounds sexual health in the United States, serving as a barrier to sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention, testing, and treatment. Campaigns can increase STD-related knowledge, communication, and protective behaviors. This review assesses the effectiveness of STD prevention and testing campaigns in the United States to inform the field on their use as a strategy for affecting behavior change. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify original research articles, published between 2000 and 2014, which report on US media campaigns promoting community- or population-level STD testing or prevention behaviors and are evaluated for impact on one or more behavioral outcomes. Titles and abstracts were independently reviewed by 2 researchers. The review yielded 26 articles representing 16 unique STD testing and/or prevention campaigns. Most campaigns were developed using formative research and social marketing or behavioral theory. Most campaigns (68.75%) used posttest-only or pretest-posttest designs without comparison groups for evaluation; only 5 campaigns used control groups, and these proved challenging (i.e., achieving necessary exposure and avoiding contamination). Nearly all campaigns found differences between exposed and unexposed individuals on one or more key behavioral outcomes. Several campaigns found dose-response relationships. Among evaluations with uncontaminated control groups whose campaigns achieved sufficient exposure, sustained campaign effects were observed among targeted populations. Current findings suggest that campaigns can impact targeted STD-related behaviors and add to the evidence that greater exposure is associated with greater behavior change.

  9. Study to assess the effectiveness of modified constraint-induced movement therapy in stroke subjects: A randomized controlled trial

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    Priyanka Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of modified constraint induced movement therapy (m-CIMT in stroke subjects. Materials and Methods: A total of forty sub-acute stroke subjects were randomly assigned to either a m-CIMT (n = 20 or in a control group (n = 20. The m-CIMT group (14 men, 6 women; mean age = 55.2 years consisted of structured 2 h therapy sessions emphasizing affected arm use, occurring 5 times/week for 2 weeks. A mitt was used to restrain the unaffected arm for 10 h/day for 2 week. The control group (11 men, 9 women; mean age = 56.4 years consisted of conventional rehabilitation for time-matched exercise program. The outcome measures were evaluated at pre- and post-intervention by using the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA of motor recovery after stroke. Results: After intervention significant effects were observed in m-CIMT group on WMFT (pre-test and post-test score was 28.04 ± 6.58, 13.59 ± 2.86; P =0.003. Similarly on FMA (pre- and post-test score was 31.15 ± 6.37, 55.7 ± 6.4; P = 0.00. Conclusion: There is a significant improvem ent in upper extremity function so it indicates that m-CIMT is effective in improving the motor function of the affected arm in stroke subjects. However, its long-term effect has not proved since there was no follow-up after intervention.

  10. Assessing a cognitive music training for older participants: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele; Mangiacotti, Anthony

    2018-02-01

    In a randomised controlled trial, we investigated whether a cognitive training based on rhythm-music and music improvisation exercises had positive effects on executive functions in older participants. Thirty-five residents in a guest home with mild-moderate cognitive impairment and healthy ageing were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 18) featuring cognitive music training composed of 12 bi-weekly 70-min sessions, and a control group (n = 17) attended 12 bi-weekly 45-min sessions of gymnastic activities offered by the institute. A neuropsychological test battery was administered at baseline and at the end of treatment, including the Mini-Mental State Examination, verbal fluency test, Trail Making Test A, attentional matrices test and clock-drawing test. Pre-test and post-test comparison showed a significant improvement for the experimental group reflected in the Mini-Mental State Examination (F(1,33) = 13.906; p music-rhythmic exercises and music improvisation exercises is associated with improved cognitive functions in older people with mild-moderate cognitive impairment regardless of the individual's degree of cognitive reserve. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Effectiveness and moderators of the preventive intervention kids in divorce situations: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelleboer-Gunnink, Hannah A; Van der Valk, Inge E; Branje, Susan J T; Van Doorn, Muriel D; Deković, Maja

    2015-10-01

    Children of divorced parents have an increased risk of a variety of problems in comparison to children from intact families. Therefore, several intervention programs have been developed directed at children of divorced parents. Yet, empirical data on the effectiveness of these interventions are limited. This study evaluated the school-based, child-directed prevention program Kids In Divorce Situations (KIDS) using a randomized controlled trial. The sample consisted of 156 children randomly assigned at the school level into an experimental (80 children) and control condition (76 children). In addition, 131 mothers and 76 fathers participated in the study. Four assessments took place: a pretest, a posttest, and two follow-up assessments conducted 6 months and 1 year after finishing KIDS. Latent growth analyses demonstrated that the intervention significantly reduced child-reported emotional problems and enhanced child-reported communication with the father and mother-reported communication with the child. The effect sizes ranged from .30-.63. Few moderation effects of gender, time since divorce, or perceived parental conflict on the intervention effects were found. After parental divorce, a limited school-based intervention for children can be efficacious in promoting children's emotional well-being and parent-child communication. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. The effects of yoga on psychosocial variables and exercise adherence: a randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Stephanie; Pinto Zipp, Genevieve; Parasher, Raju

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a serious issue for the American public. Because of conditions that result from inactivity, individuals incur close to $1 trillion USD in health-care costs, and approximately 250 000 premature deaths occur per year. Researchers have linked engaging in yoga to improved overall fitness, including improved muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and balance. Researchers have not yet investigated the impact of yoga on exercise adherence. The research team assessed the effects of 10 weeks of yoga classes held twice a week on exercise adherence in previously sedentary adults. The research team designed a randomized controlled pilot trial. The team collected data from the intervention (yoga) and control groups at baseline, midpoint, and posttest (posttest 1) and also collected data pertaining to exercise adherence for the yoga group at 5 weeks posttest (posttest 2). The pilot took place in a yoga studio in central New Jersey in the United States. The pretesting occurred at the yoga studio for all participants. Midpoint testing and posttesting occurred at the studio for the yoga group and by mail for the control group. Participants were 27 adults (mean age 51 y) who had been physically inactive for a period of at least 6 months prior to the study. Interventions The intervention group (yoga group) received hour-long hatha yoga classes that met twice a week for 10 weeks. The control group did not participate in classes during the research study; however, they were offered complimentary post research classes. Outcome Measures The study's primary outcome measure was exercise adherence as measured by the 7-day Physical Activity Recall. The secondary measures included (1) exercise self-efficacy as measured by the Multidimensional Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale, (2) general well-being as measured by the General Well-Being Schedule, (3) exercise-group cohesion as measured by the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ), (4) acute feeling response

  13. Efficacy of kinesio taping on isokinetic quadriceps torque in knee osteoarthritis: a double blinded randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandkumar, Sudarshan; Sudarshan, Shobhalakshmi; Nagpal, Pratima

    2014-08-01

    Double blind pre-test post-test control group design. To compare the isokinetic quadriceps torque, standardized stair-climbing task (SSCT) and pain during SSCT between subjects diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis pre and post kinesio tape (KT) application with and without tension. Strength of the quadriceps and torque producing capability is frequently found to be compromised in knee osteoarthritis. The efficacy of KT in improving isokinetic quadriceps torque in knee osteoarthritis is unknown, forming the basis for this study. Forty subjects were randomly allocated to either the experimental (therapeutic KT with tension) or control group (sham KT without tension) with the allocation being concealed. Pre and post test measurements of isokinetic quadriceps torque, SSCT and pain during SSCT were carried out by a blinded assessor. A large effect size with significant improvements in the peak quadriceps torque (concentric and eccentric at angular velocities of 90° per second and 120° per second), SSCT and pain were obtained in the experimental group when compared to the control group. Application of therapeutic KT is effective in improving isokinetic quadriceps torque, SSCT and reducing pain in knee osteoarthritis.

  14. Taking Control: The Efficacy and Durability of a Peer-Led Uncertainty Management Intervention for People Recently Diagnosed With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brashers, Dale E; Basinger, Erin D; Rintamaki, Lance S; Caughlin, John P; Para, Michael

    2017-01-01

    HIV creates substantial uncertainty for people infected with the virus, which subsequently affects a host of psychosocial outcomes critical to successful management of the disease. This study assessed the efficacy and durability of a theoretically driven, one-on-one peer support intervention designed to facilitate uncertainty management and enhance psychosocial functioning for patients newly diagnosed with HIV. Using a pretest-posttest control group design, 98 participants received information and training in specific communication strategies (e.g., disclosing to friends and family, eliciting social support, talking to health care providers, using the Internet to gather information, and building social networks through AIDS service organizations). Participants in the experimental group attended six 1-hour sessions, whereas control participants received standard of care for 12 months (after which they received the intervention). Over time, participants in the intervention fared significantly better regarding (a) illness uncertainty, (b) depression, and (c) satisfaction with social support than did those in the control group. Given the utility and cost-effectiveness of this intervention and the uncertainty of a multitude of medical diagnoses and disease experiences, further work is indicated to determine how this program could be expanded to other illnesses and to address related factors, such as treatment adherence and clinical outcomes.

  15. The effect of physical activity on depressive symptoms and quality of life among elderly nursing home residents: Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Neslihan; Lok, Sefa; Canbaz, Muammer

    Physical activity may have positive effects on decreasing anxiety, stress and depression, maintaining mental health and ensuring psychological vitality.This study aimed to determine how a "Physical Activity Program" for elderly people in nursing homes affected their depressive symptoms and quality of life. We included 80 individuals aged >65years (40 in the intervention group, 40 controls) in this experimental, randomized, controlled pretest-posttest study. Besides socio-demographic data, depressive symptoms and quality of life were assessed by standardized procedures (Beck Depression Scale [BDI], SF 36 Quality of Life Questionnaire) before and after a ten-weeks lasting "Physical Activity Program", consisting of 10min warm-up activities, 20 mintes rhythmic exercices, 10min cool-down exercises and a 30 mintes free walking period on four days of the week. In contast to controls, individuals of the intervention group presented with a significant decrease in the BDI after the "Physical Activity Program". Likewise, eight-subscales and two sub-dimensions of the SF 36 Quality of Life Questionnaire significantly improved only in the experimental group (pquality of life in elderly individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Conditional non-independence of radiographic image features and the derivation of post-test probabilities – A mammography BI-RADS example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benndorf, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Bayes' theorem has proven to be one of the cornerstones in medical decision making. It allows for the derivation of post-test probabilities, which in case of a positive test result become positive predictive values. If several test results are observed successively Bayes' theorem may be used with assumed conditional independence of test results or with incorporated conditional dependencies. Herein it is examined whether radiographic image features should be considered conditionally independent diagnostic tests when post-test probabilities are to be derived. For this purpose the mammographic mass dataset from the UCI (University of California, Irvine) machine learning repository is analysed. It comprises the description of 961 (516 benign, 445 malignant) mammographic mass lesions according to the BI-RADS (Breast Imaging: Reporting and Data System) lexicon. Firstly, an exhaustive correlation matrix is presented for mammography BI-RADS features among benign and malignant lesions separately; correlation can be regarded as measure for conditional dependence. Secondly, it is shown that the derived positive predictive values for the conjunction of the two features “irregular shape” and “spiculated margin” differ significantly depending on whether conditional dependencies are incorporated into the decision process or not. It is concluded that radiographic image features should not generally be regarded as conditionally independent diagnostic tests.

  17. The efficacy of a group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for war-affected young migrants living in Australia: A cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Sia Ooi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPreventative and treatment programmes for people at risk of developing psychological problems after exposure to war trauma have mushroomed in the last decade. However, there is still much contention about evidence-based and culturally sensitive interventions for children. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of the Teaching Recovery Techniques in improving the emotional and behavioural outcomes of war-affected children resettled in Australia. Methods and findings A cluster randomised controlled trial with pretest, posttest, and 3-month follow-up design was employed. A total of 82 participants (aged 10 to 17 years were randomised by school into the 8-week intervention (n = 45 or the waiting list (WL control condition (n = 37. Study outcomes included symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, internalising and externalising problems, as well as psychosocial functioning. A medium intervention effect was found for depression symptoms. Participants in the intervention condition experienced a greater symptom reduction than participants in the WL control condition, F(1,155 = 5.20, p = .024, partial ƞ2 = 0.07. This improvement was maintained at the 3-month follow-up, F(2,122 = 7.24, p = .001, partial ƞ2 = 0.20. ConclusionsThese findings suggest the potential benefit of the school and group-based intervention on depression symptoms but not on other outcomes, when compared to a waiting list control group.Trial registrationAustralian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000948998

  18. Randomized Controlled Trial to Examine the Impact of Aquatic Exercise Training on Functional Capacity, Balance, and Perceptions of Fatigue in Female Patients With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargarfard, Mehdi; Shariat, Ardalan; Ingle, Lee; Cleland, Joshua A; Kargarfard, Mina

    2018-02-01

    To assess the effects of an 8-week aquatic exercise training program on functional capacity, balance, and perceptions of fatigue in women with multiple sclerosis (MS). Randomized controlled design. Referral center of an MS society. Women (N=32; mean age ± SD, 36.4±8.2y) with diagnosed relapsing-remitting MS. After undergoing baseline testing by a neurologist, participants were allocated to either an intervention (aquatic training program, n=17) or a control group (n=15). The intervention consisted of an 8-week aquatic training program (3 supervised training sessions per week; session duration, 45-60min; 50%-75% estimated maximum heart rate). Six-minute walk test (6-MWT), balance (Berg Balance Scale [BBS]), and perceptions of fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale; [MFIS]) at baseline and after the 8-week intervention. Differences over time between the experimental and control groups were assessed by a 2×2 (group by time) repeated-measures analysis of variance. Thirty-two women completed the 8-week aquatic training intervention (experimental group, n=17; control group, n=15). All outcome measures improved in the experimental group: 6-MWT performance (pretest mean ± SD, 451±58m; posttest mean ± SD, 503±57m; PAquatic exercise training improved functional capacity, balance, and perceptions of fatigue in women with MS. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an Internet-based continuing education program on pharmacy-based minor ailment management: a randomized controlled clinical trial

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    Paulo Roque Obreli-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of an internet-based continuing education (CE program on pharmacy-based minor ailment schemes (PMASs. A controlled randomized clinical trial was conducted in community pharmacies in Brazil. Community pharmacists (CPs were enrolled in two groups: intervention (n = 61 and control (n = 60. CPs who were enrolled to the intervention group participated in an Internet-based CE program. CPs in the control group received no educational intervention. We evaluated participant perception, learning outcomes, and practice performance. Learner satisfaction with the CE program was high for every point evaluated (mean ± standard deviation = 4.2 ± 0.4. Posttest learner outcome scores and practice performance in the intervention group after the conclusion of the CE program significantly improved compared with pretest scores (p < 0.001 and were significantly better compared with the control group (p < 0.001. The present Internet-based CE program is a viable educational strategy for improving participant perception, learning outcomes, and practice performance in PMASs.

  20. Changes in affect after completing a mailed survey about trauma: two pre- and post-test studies in former disability applicants for posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Murdoch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One potential concern with using mailed surveys containing trauma-related content is the possibility of re-traumatizing survivors without a trained mental health professional present. Prior research provides insufficient guidance regarding the prevalence and magnitude of this risk because the psychological harms of trauma-related surveys have typically been estimated using single post-test observations. Post-test observations cannot quantify magnitude of change in participants’ emotional states and may over or under estimate associations between participants’ characteristics (risk factors and post-survey upset. Methods We conducted two pre- and post-test studies in samples of former applicants for posttraumatic stress disorder disability benefits: 191 males who served during Gulf War I plus 639 male and 921 female Veterans who served sometime between 1955 and 1998. We used two 9-point items from the Self-Assessment Manikins to measure participants’ valence (sadness/happiness and arousal (tenseness/calmness before and after they completed mailed surveys asking about trauma-related symptoms or experiences. We examined the following potential predictors for post-survey sadness and tenseness: screening positive for posttraumatic stress disorder, having a serious mental illness, and history of military sexual assault or combat. Results After the survey, across the groups, 29.3–41.8% were sadder, 45.3–52.2% had no change in valence, and 12.9–22.5% were happier; 31.7–40.2% were tenser, 40.6–48.2% had no change in arousal, and 17.3–24.0% were calmer. The mean increase in sadness or tenseness post-survey was less than one point in all groups (SD’s < 1.7. Cohen’s d ranged from 0.07 to 0.30. Most hypothesized predictors were associated with greater baseline sadness or tenseness, but not necessarily with larger post-survey changes. Women with a history of military sexual assault had the largest net post

  1. Changes in affect after completing a mailed survey about trauma: two pre- and post-test studies in former disability applicants for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Maureen; Kehle-Forbes, Shannon Marie; Partin, Melissa Ruth

    2017-05-10

    One potential concern with using mailed surveys containing trauma-related content is the possibility of re-traumatizing survivors without a trained mental health professional present. Prior research provides insufficient guidance regarding the prevalence and magnitude of this risk because the psychological harms of trauma-related surveys have typically been estimated using single post-test observations. Post-test observations cannot quantify magnitude of change in participants' emotional states and may over or under estimate associations between participants' characteristics (risk factors) and post-survey upset. We conducted two pre- and post-test studies in samples of former applicants for posttraumatic stress disorder disability benefits: 191 males who served during Gulf War I plus 639 male and 921 female Veterans who served sometime between 1955 and 1998. We used two 9-point items from the Self-Assessment Manikins to measure participants' valence (sadness/happiness) and arousal (tenseness/calmness) before and after they completed mailed surveys asking about trauma-related symptoms or experiences. We examined the following potential predictors for post-survey sadness and tenseness: screening positive for posttraumatic stress disorder, having a serious mental illness, and history of military sexual assault or combat. After the survey, across the groups, 29.3-41.8% were sadder, 45.3-52.2% had no change in valence, and 12.9-22.5% were happier; 31.7-40.2% were tenser, 40.6-48.2% had no change in arousal, and 17.3-24.0% were calmer. The mean increase in sadness or tenseness post-survey was less than one point in all groups (SD's survey changes. Women with a history of military sexual assault had the largest net post-survey changes in sadness (mean = 0.7, SD = 1.4) and tenseness (mean = 0.6, SD = 1.6). While a substantial minority of Veterans reported more sadness or tenseness post-survey, the net change in affect was small. Most hypothesized risk

  2. Effect of music therapy with emotional-approach coping on preprocedural anxiety in cardiac catheterization: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghetti, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Individuals undergoing cardiac catheterization are likely to experience elevated anxiety periprocedurally, with highest anxiety levels occurring immediately prior to the procedure. Elevated anxiety has the potential to negatively impact these individuals psychologically and physiologically in ways that may influence the subsequent procedure. This study evaluated the use of music therapy, with a specific emphasis on emotional-approach coping, immediately prior to cardiac catheterization to impact periprocedural outcomes. The randomized, pretest/posttest control group design consisted of two experimental groups--the Music Therapy with Emotional-Approach Coping group [MT/EAC] (n = 13), and a talk-based Emotional-Approach Coping group (n = 14), compared with a standard care Control group (n = 10). MT/EAC led to improved positive affective states in adults awaiting elective cardiac catheterization, whereas a talk-based emphasis on emotional-approach coping or standard care did not. All groups demonstrated a significant overall decrease in negative affect. The MT/EAC group demonstrated a statistically significant, but not clinically significant, increase in systolic blood pressure most likely due to active engagement in music making. The MT/EAC group trended toward shortest procedure length and least amount of anxiolytic required during the procedure, while the EAC group trended toward least amount of analgesic required during the procedure, but these differences were not statistically significant. Actively engaging in a session of music therapy with an emphasis on emotional-approach coping can improve the well-being of adults awaiting cardiac catheterization procedures.

  3. Relaxation therapy and anxiety, self-esteem, and emotional regulation among adults with intellectual disabilities: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Cyrille; Coulet, Aurélie

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study is a randomized controlled trial on the effects of relaxation on anxiety, self-esteem, and emotional regulation in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) working in a center of supported employment in France. We studied 30 adults with mild or moderate ID who were split at random into a relaxation group (RG, 15 subjects), who completed 10 sessions of relaxation therapy, and a control group (CG, 15 subjects), who were on a waiting list. The method used is the pretest and posttest. Variables were assessed by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory form Y scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, and the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire. We found that in the RG, relaxation significantly reduced state anxiety, t(14, 15) = 17.8***, d = -0.72, and improved self-esteem, t(14, 15) = -7.7***, d = 1.03, and cognitive reappraisal, t(14, 15) = -6.3***, d = 1.3, while the CG showed no change for these variables. We conclude that relaxation seems to be an interesting therapeutic option for reducing anxiety in people with ID in a supported employment setting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Traditional microscopy instruction versus process-oriented virtual microscopy instruction: a naturalistic experiment with control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Laura; Nivala, Markus; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Björk, Pasi; Säljö, Roger

    2011-03-30

    Virtual microscopy is being introduced in medical education as an approach for learning how to interpret information in microscopic specimens. It is, however, far from evident how to incorporate its use into existing teaching practice. The aim of the study was to explore the consequences of introducing virtual microscopy tasks into an undergraduate pathology course in an attempt to render the instruction more process-oriented. The research questions were: 1) How is virtual microscopy perceived by students? 2) Does work on virtual microscopy tasks contribute to improvement in performance in microscopic pathology in comparison with attending assistant-led demonstrations only? During a one-week period, an experimental group completed three sets of virtual microscopy homework assignments in addition to attending demonstrations. A control group attended the demonstrations only. Performance in microscopic pathology was measured by a pre-test and a post-test. Student perceptions of regular instruction and virtual microscopy were collected one month later by administering the Inventory of Intrinsic Motivation and open-ended questions. The students voiced an appreciation for virtual microscopy for the purposes of the course and for self-study. As for learning gains, the results indicated that learning was speeded up in a subgroup of students consisting of conscientious high achievers. The enriched instruction model may be suited as such for elective courses following the basic course. However, the instructional model needs further development to be suited for basic courses.

  5. Standard versus prosocial online support groups for distressed breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golant Mitch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Internet can increase access to psychosocial care for breast cancer survivors through online support groups. This study will test a novel prosocial online group that emphasizes both opportunities for getting and giving help. Based on the helper therapy principle, it is hypothesized that the addition of structured helping opportunities and coaching on how to help others online will increase the psychological benefits of a standard online group. Methods/Design A two-armed randomized controlled trial with pretest and posttest. Non-metastatic breast cancer survivors with elevated psychological distress will be randomized to either a standard facilitated online group or to a prosocial facilitated online group, which combines online exchanges of support with structured helping opportunities (blogging, breast cancer outreach and coaching on how best to give support to others. Validated and reliable measures will be administered to women approximately one month before and after the interventions. Self-esteem, positive affect, and sense of belonging will be tested as potential mediators of the primary outcomes of depressive/anxious symptoms and sense of purpose in life. Discussion This study will test an innovative approach to maximizing the psychological benefits of cancer online support groups. The theory-based prosocial online support group intervention model is sustainable, because it can be implemented by private non-profit or other organizations, such as cancer centers, which mostly offer face-to-face support groups with limited patient reach. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01396174

  6. Video-feedback intervention increases sensitive parenting in ethnic minority mothers: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmur, Sengul; Mesman, Judi; Malda, Maike; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Ekmekci, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Using a randomized control trial design we tested the effectiveness of a culturally sensitive adaptation of the Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD) in a sample of 76 Turkish minority families in the Netherlands. The VIPP-SD was adapted based on a pilot with feedback of the target mothers, resulting in the VIPP-TM (VIPP-Turkish Minorities). The sample included families with 20-47-month-old children with high levels of externalizing problems. Maternal sensitivity, nonintrusiveness, and discipline strategies were observed during pretest and posttest home visits. The VIPP-TM was effective in increasing maternal sensitivity and nonintrusiveness, but not in enhancing discipline strategies. Applying newly learned sensitivity skills in discipline situations may take more time, especially in a cultural context that favors more authoritarian strategies. We conclude that the VIPP-SD program and its video-feedback approach can be successfully applied in immigrant families with a non-Western cultural background, with demonstrated effects on parenting sensitivity and nonintrusiveness.

  7. Decreasing harsh discipline in mothers at risk for maltreatment: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mariana; Negrão, Mariana; Soares, Isabel; Mesman, Judi

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the effectiveness of the attachment-based program Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD; F. Juffer, M.J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, & M.H. van IJzendoorn, 2008) in decreasing harsh discipline of 43 mothers and their 1- to 4-year-old-children from severely deprived families. Based on previous studies, parenting stress was tested as a potential moderator of intervention effects on harsh discipline. Using a randomized control design, maternal harsh discipline was observed during home visits at the pretest and posttest, and mothers filled in questionnaires at both assessments. The VIPP-SD proved to be effective in decreasing maternal harsh discipline, but only for mothers who experienced higher levels of parenting stress at intake. These findings provide support for the program's ability to improve parenting in families who are most at risk for harsh parenting and for potentially maltreating child-parent interactions. The results are discussed in terms of the VIPP-SD elements most relevant to decreasing harsh discipline, and the challenges of parenting interventions in severely deprived populations. © 2014 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  8. Research Article Special Issue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-15

    behavioral group counseling on stress and self-efficacy in second grade female students studying in a high school of Shrvan County. This research is a pre-test and post-test experimental design along with the control group.

  9. Sensitivity to Structure in the Speech Signal by Children with Speech Sound Disorder and Reading Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erin Phinney; Pennington, Bruce F.; Lowenstein, Joanna H.; Nittrouer, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Research Design;Intervention;Biology;Biotechnology;Teaching Methods;Hands on Science;Professional Development;Comparative Analysis;Genetics;Evaluation;Pretests Posttests;Control Groups;Science Education;Science Instruction;Pedagogical Content Knowledge;

  10. Impact of health education intervention on knowledge and utilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HEI) on the knowledge and utilization of postnatal care services among women in Edu, Nigeria. Methods: A quasi-experimental research design using pre-test and post-test control group to examine impact of HEI among women.

  11. The Effect of Climbing as a Recreational Event on Adoles ent ’ s Locus of Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güçlü ÖZEN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of experience of the secondary education ( class 10th and 11th students‟ participation on artificial wall climbing refe r r ed to experiential learning education and defined as high activity on th eir locus of control . Artifical wall climbing is a learning point beyond the sport act ivity that give an opportunity to participants recognize their own limits and others and do they active not passive . This study was done as pretest - posttest control group with quasi - experimental model and the data were collected using „ Nowicki - Strickland Locus of Control Scale‟ adapted to Turkish by Yeşilyaprak (1988 . In this research, 90 students (40 female, 50 male aged 17 ,75 ±1.06 participated voluntery and divided in two groups as a trail and control group randomly. Trial group participated artifcial wall climbing twice a week, totel six weeks. During this time period the control group not join any activity has continued to normal life. As a result of the statistical analysis, no significant difference s were found between control and trial groups pre - test scores (p>0.05. No significant difference s were found between pre and post - test scores of control group (p>0.05, significant differences were found between pre and post - test scores of trial group (p0.05 and no significant differences between the difference of the differences (p>0.05. C onsequently, it could be said that the articifal wall climbing activities has a positive efect on the particip ants‟ locus of control, it caused a movement from out side to inside. And it has a significant effect on gender differences, that women have more gain than men.

  12. Increasing the health literacy of learning disability and mental health nurses in physical care skills: a pre and post-test evaluation of a workshop on diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Steve; Stephenson, John; Trotter, Fiona; Clifton, Andrew; Holdich, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the pre- and post-test results of the outcomes of a workshop designed to increase learning disability and mental health nurses' knowledge and skill to undertake interventions for service users at risk of, or with a diagnosis of, type 2 diabetes. Health literacy is also discussed as a way of explaining why such nurses may lack expertise in physical health care. Findings from the workshop show that learning disability and mental health nurses have the motivation to increase their health literacy (skills and knowledge) in diabetes care. The potential of such workshops, and how organisations looking forward to the future can build health literacy, is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Randomized Controlled Study of a Remote Flipped Classroom Neuro-otology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrick, Frederick Robert; Abdulrahman, Mahera; Hankir, Ahmed; Zayaruzny, Maksim; Najem, Kinda; Lungchukiet, Palita; Edwards, Roger A

    2017-01-01

    Medical Education can be delivered in the traditional classroom or via novel technology including an online classroom. To test the hypothesis that learning in an online classroom would result in similar outcomes as learning in the traditional classroom when using a flipped classroom pedagogy. Randomized controlled trial. A total of 274 subjects enrolled in a Neuro-otology training program for non-Neuro-otologists of 25 h held over a 3-day period. Subjects were randomized into a "control" group attending a traditional classroom and a "trial" group of equal numbers participating in an online synchronous Internet streaming classroom using the Adobe Connect e-learning platform. Subjects were randomized into a "control" group attending a traditional classroom and a "treatment" group of equal numbers participating in an online synchronous Internet streaming classroom. Pre- and post-multiple choice examinations of VOR, Movement, Head Turns, Head Tremor, Neurodegeneration, Inferior Olivary Complex, Collateral Projections, Eye Movement Training, Visual Saccades, Head Saccades, Visual Impairment, Walking Speed, Neuroprotection, Autophagy, Hyperkinetic Movement, Eye and Head Stability, Oscilllatory Head Movements, Gaze Stability, Leaky Neural Integrator, Cervical Dystonia, INC and Head Tilts, Visual Pursuits, Optokinetic Stimulation, and Vestibular Rehabilitation. All candidates took a pretest examination of the subject material. The 2-9 h and 1-8 h sessions over three consecutive days were given live in the classroom and synchronously in the online classroom using the Adobe Connect e-learning platform. Subjects randomized to the online classroom attended the lectures in a location of their choice and viewed the sessions live on the Internet. A posttest examination was given to all candidates after completion of the course. Two sample unpaired t tests with equal variances were calculated for all pretests and posttests for all groups including gender differences. All 274

  14. Relation between exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias and myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients with intermediate pretest probability of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhendy, A.; Sozzi, F.B.; Van Domburg, R.T.; Bax, J.J.; Roelandt, J.R.T.C.

    2000-01-01

    We studied 302 patients (mean age 54±9 years, 152 men and 150 women) with intermediate pretest probability of CAD (range=0.25- 0.80, mean=0.43±0.20) by upright bicycle exercise stress test in conjunction with technetium-99m single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging. Exercise-induced VAs (frequent or complex premature ventricular contractions or ventricular tachycardia) occurred in 65 patients (22%). No significant difference was found between patients with and patient without VAs regarding the pretest probability of CAD (0.45±0.21 vs 0.43±0.20). Patients with exercise-induced VAs had a higher prevalence of perfusion abnormalities (52% vs 26%, P=0.002) and ischaemic electrocardiographic changes (31% vs 16%, P<0.05) compared to patients without VAs. A higher prevalence of perfusion abnormalities in patients with VAs was observed in both men (67% vs 35%, P<0.01) and women (38% vs 16%, P<0.05). However, the positive predictive value of exercise-induced VAs for the presence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities was higher in men than in women (67% vs 38%, P<0.05). The presence of abnormal myocardial perfusion was the only independent predictor of exercise-induced VAs (OR 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.2) by multivariate analysis of clinical and stress test variables. It is concluded that in patients with intermediate pretest probability of CAD, exercise-induced VAs are predictive of a higher prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in both men and women. However, the positive predictive value of exercise-induced VAs for perfusion abnormalities is higher in men. Because of the underestimation of ischaemia by electrocardiographic changes, exercise-induced VAs should be interpreted as a marker of a higher probability of CAD. (orig./MG) (orig.)

  15. Accuracy of multidetector spiral computed tomography in detecting significant coronary stenosis in patient populations with differing pre-test probabilities of disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontone, G.; Andreini, D.; Quaglia, C.; Ballerini, G.; Nobili, E.; Pepi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the clinical impact of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in patients with a low versus a high pre-test likelihood of coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods: A cohort of 120 patients with suspected CAD, scheduled for conventional coronary angiography, underwent MDCT. Using the American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) guidelines, the population was divided into two groups: patients with a low (group 1) and a high (group 2) likelihood of CAD. Results: Analysis of all segments showed a high feasibility (92%), and a patient based-model showed excellent sensitivity and negative predictive values (NPV; both 100%) and acceptable specificity and positive predictive values (PPV; 86 and 90%, respectively), with an accuracy of 94%. Using MDCT in patients with lower pre-test likelihoods of CAD, according to the ACC/AHA guidelines, the accuracy remained high (93%); conversely, in patient groups with a high prevalence of CAD, a non-significant reduction in accuracy (85%) occurred using MDCT. Particularly, MDCT can be used effectively to exclude a diagnosis of CAD because of its high sensitivity and NPV (100%), but shows a significant reduction in specificity (58%). This reduction was due to an increase in the false-positive:true-negative ratio because of the higher percentage of calcified plaque (a relative but non-significant increase in false positives), and the high prevalence of CAD (significant reduction in true negatives). No differences were found between MDCT and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) concerning the number of vessels narrowed. Conclusion: Because of its excellent sensitivity and specificity in patients with a low pre-test likelihood of CAD, MDCT could be helpful in clinical decision-making in this population

  16. Estimation of frequency and pretest probability of CAD in patients presenting with recent onset chest pain by multi-detector CT angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Muayad Sultan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: CAD was seen in 77.5% in those with recent onset chest pain. Higher incidence of significant CAD was seen in hypertensive and diabetic patients. Family history is still not a reliable factor in our society. Male patient <60 years old has higher incidence of CAD than female in same age group. Pretest probability for CAD is a simple and important test as all patients in higher probability have CAD and most of them have significant disease so it is better to direct referral of them to conventional angiography to gain a benefit from direct intervention, radiation and cost benefit.

  17. The effect of empowerment on the self-efficacy, quality of life and clinical and laboratory indicators of patients treated with hemodialysis: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moattari Marzieh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodialysis patients face numerous physical and psychological stresses that result in reduced health. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of an empowerment program on self-efficacy, quality of life, clinical indicators of blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain, and laboratory results in these patients. Methods This randomized, controlled trial was conducted at Boo Ali Sina Dialysis Center, Shiraz, Iran. A total of 48 hemodialysis patients participated in this study. After acquisition of informed consent, eligible patients were randomly divided into two groups, control and experimental. Pre-test data were obtained by using a demographic data form and two questionnaires for self-efficacy and quality of life. Blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain were measured. We extracted laboratory data from patients’ charts. A six-week empowerment intervention that included four individual and two group counselling sessions was performed for the experimental group. Six weeks after intervention, post-test data were obtained from both groups in the same manner as the pre-test. Data were analyzed by ANCOVA using SPSS v11.5. Results There were no statistically significant differences in demographic variables between the groups. Pre-test mean scores for self-efficacy, quality of life, blood pressure, interdialytic weight gain and laboratory results did not differ between the groups. There was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in terms of pre-to post-intervention changes in overall self-efficacy scores, stress reduction, and decision making, in addition to overall quality of life and all dimensions included within quality of life based on this questionnaire. Additionally, the pre- to post-intervention changes in systolic/diastolic blood pressures, interdialytic weight gain, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels significantly differed between the groups. Conclusion Our study demonstrates

  18. Effect on School Language in Assessment of Achievement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eric Wilmot

    4×2×2 pre-test, post–test experimental design with a control group was used in which two hundred ..... Research Design. A 4x2x2 pre-test, post-test randomized factorial group design was used for the study in which there were three experimental groups and one control group. ... Research Instruments and their Validation.

  19. The Influences of Pre-testing Reviews and Delays on Differentialassociative Processing versus A Condition in which Students chose their Learning Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Brenda

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies show that a new strategy called differential-associative processing is effective for learning related concepts. However our knowledge about differential-associative processing is still limited. Therefore the goals of the present study are to assess the duration of knowledge that is acquired from using differential-associative processing, to determine whether the efficacy of differential-associative processing changes with the addition of a 10-minute pre-testing review, and to compare differential-associate processing to two conditions in which students select their own learning strategy. The results revealed that differential-associative processing was a better strategy for learning related concepts than were either of the two comparison conditions. They also revealed that a 10-minute pre-testing review had a positive additive influence on differential-associative processing. Finally, although the knowledge acquired from using differential-associative processing declined with an increase in delay between learning and testing, this decline was equivalent to the decline observed in both comparison conditions.

  20. One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients’ Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jo Chiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD. The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ. Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks, posttest (after 12 therapy sessions, and short- (3 months, medium- (6 months, and long-term (12 months follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P<0.001. Similar effects were seen on the HRSD. ATQ significantly decreased at the 12th session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P<0.001. We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.

  1. Preventive Effect of Liothyronine on Electroconvulsive Therapy-Induced Memory Deficit in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Double-Blind Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mohagheghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objective. Despite the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT in treating major depressive disorder (MDD, its cognitive side effects make it less popular. This study investigated the impact of liothyronine on ECT-induced memory deficit in patients with MDD. Methodology. This is a double-blind clinical trial, in which 60 patients with MDD who were referred for ECT were selected. The diagnosis was based on the criteria of DSM-IV-TR. Patients were divided randomly into two groups to receive either liothyronine (50 mcg every morning or placebo. After the assessment with Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R before first session of ECT, posttests were repeated again, two months after the completion of ECT. Findings. By controlling the pretest scores, the mean scores of the experimental group were higher than the control group in delayed recall, verbal memory, visual memory, general memory, and attention/concentration scales (P<0.05. Conclusion. Liothyronine may prevent ECT-induced memory impairment in patients with MDD. This study has been registered in IRCT under IRCT201401122660N2.

  2. Effects of music intervention on physiological stress response and anxiety level of mechanically ventilated patients in China: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Li, Ji P; Sit, Janet W H; Chung, Loretta; Jiao, Zuo Y; Ma, Wei G

    2010-04-01

    To examine the effects of music intervention on the physiological stress response and the anxiety level among mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care unit. Despite the fact that previous studies have found music interventions to be effective in stress and anxiety reduction, effects of music on the Chinese population are inconclusive and warranted systematic study to evaluate its effect fully for a different Asian culture. A randomised placebo-controlled trial. A total of 137 patients receiving mechanical ventilation were randomly assigned to either music listening group, headphone group or control group. Outcome measures included the Chinese version of Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale and physiological parameters (heart rate, respiratory rate, saturation of oxygen and blood pressure). Comparison of mean differences (pretest score-posttest score) showed significant differences in heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure as well as the Chinese version of Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale, but not in SaO(2) among the three groups (ranging from p music listening group. A significant reduction in physiological stress response (heart rate and respiratory rate) over time was found in music listening group (p music listening group (p music listening results in substantial reduction in physiological stress responses arising from anxiety in mechanically ventilated patients. Music as a non-pharmacological nursing intervention can be used as complementary adjunct in the care of patients with low-energy states who tire easily, such as those requiring mechanical ventilator support.

  3. The role of three-dimensional printed models of skull in anatomy education: a randomized controlled trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi; Pan, Zhouxian; Wu, Yanyan; Gu, Zhaoqi; Li, Man; Liang, Ze; Zhu, Huijuan; Yao, Yong; Shui, Wuyang; Shen, Zhen; Zhao, Jun; Pan, Hui

    2017-04-03

    Three-dimensional (3D) printed models represent educational tools of high quality compared with traditional teaching aids. Colored skull models were produced by 3D printing technology. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to compare the learning efficiency of 3D printed skulls with that of cadaveric skulls and atlas. Seventy-nine medical students, who never studied anatomy, were randomized into three groups by drawing lots, using 3D printed skulls, cadaveric skulls, and atlas, respectively, to study the anatomical structures in skull through an introductory lecture and small group discussions. All students completed identical tests, which composed of a theory test and a lab test, before and after a lecture. Pre-test scores showed no differences between the three groups. In post-test, the 3D group was better than the other two groups in total score (cadaver: 29.5 [IQR: 25-33], 3D: 31.5 [IQR: 29-36], atlas: 27.75 [IQR: 24.125-32]; p = 0.044) and scores of lab test (cadaver: 14 [IQR: 10.5-18], 3D: 16.5 [IQR: 14.375-21.625], atlas: 14.5 [IQR: 10-18.125]; p = 0.049). Scores involving theory test, however, showed no difference between the three groups. In this RCT, an inexpensive, precise and rapidly-produced skull model had advantages in assisting anatomy study, especially in structure recognition, compared with traditional education materials.

  4. Structural analysis of closure cap barriers: A pre-test study for the Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Chung; Pelfrey, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project (BMDP) is a field demonstration study to determine the construction/installation requirements, permeability, and subsidence performance characteristics of a composite barrier. The composite barrier will consist of on-site sandy-clay blanketed by a bentonite mat and a flexible High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner (also called flexible membrane liner). Construction of one control test pad and three bentonite test pads are planned. The control test pad will be used to establish baseline data. Underneath the composite clay cap is a four feet thick loose sand layer in which cavities will be created by evacuation of sand. The present work provides a mathematical model for the BMDP. The mathematical model will be used to simulate the mechanical and structural responses of the composite clay cap during the testing processes. Based upon engineering experience and technical references, a set of nominal soil parameters have been selected

  5. Pengaruh Musik Mozart dalam Mengurangi Stres pada Mahasiswa yang Sedang Skripsi

    OpenAIRE

    Rosanty, Rina

    2014-01-01

    This study aims for determining the effect of Mozart classical music to decrease the stress level among sixteen students who are writing their thesis. The present study used a randomized pretest posttest control group design. The process of Mozart classical music was conducted in four sessions for 1 hour. The score of stress level was analyzed to compare between pretest, posttest and follow up using Friedman test. The result of data analysis showed a significant decreasing of stress level sco...

  6. Post-test analysis of 20kW molten carbonate fuel cell stack operated on coal gas. Final report, August 1993--February 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    A 20kW carbonate fuel cell stack was operated with coal gas for the first time in the world. The stack was tested for a total of 4,000 hours, of which 3,900 hours of testing was conducted at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Incorporated, Plaquemine, Louisiana outdoor site. The operation was on either natural gas or coal gas and switched several times without any effects, demonstrating duel fuel capabilities. This test was conducted with 9142 kJ/m{sup 3} (245 Btu/cft) coal gas provided by a slipstream from Destec`s entrained flow, slagging, slurry-fed gasifier equipped with a cold gas cleanup subsystem. The stack generated up to 21 kW with this coal gas. Following completion of this test, the stack was brought to Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and a detailed post-test analysis was conducted to identify any effects of coal gas on cell components. This investigation has shown that the direct fuel cell (DFC) can be operated with properly cleaned and humidified coal-as, providing stable performance. The basic C direct fuel cell component materials are stable and display normal stability in presence of the coal gas. No effects of the coal-borne contaminants are apparent. Further cell testing at ERC 1 17, confirmed these findings.

  7. Post-test characterization of a solid oxide fuel cell stack operated for more than 30,000 hours: The cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzler, Norbert H.; Sebold, Doris; Guillon, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    A four-layer solid oxide fuel cell stack with planar anode-supported cells was operated galvanostatically at 700 °C and 0.5Acm-2 for nearly 35,000 h. One of the four planes started to degrade more rapidly after ∼28,000 h and finally more progressively after ∼33,000 h. The stack was then shut down and a post-test analysis was carefully performed. The cell was characterized with respect to cathodic impurities and clarification of the reason(s) for failure. Wet chemical analysis revealed very low chromium incorporation into the cathode. However, SEM and TEM observations on polished and fractured surfaces showed catastrophic failure in the degraded layer. The cathode-barrier-electrolyte cell layer system delaminated from the entire cell over large areas. The source of delamination was the formation of a porous, sponge-like secondary phase consisting of zirconia, yttria and manganese (oxide). Large secondary phase islands grew from the electrolyte-anode interface towards the anode and cracked the bonding between both layers. The manganese originated from the contact or protection layers used on the air side. This stack result shows that volatile species - in this case manganese - should be avoided, especially when long-term applications are envisaged.

  8. Ten Year Operating Test Results and Post-Test Analysis of a 1/10 Segment Stirling Sodium Heat Pipe, Phase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, John, H; Minnerly, Kenneth, G; Dyson, Christopher, M.

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 yr) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described.

  9. Post-test calculations of out-of-pile single rod burst experiments with Argentine ZRY-4 tubes using SSYST codes system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassini, H.; Meyder, R.

    1988-11-01

    The calculations were performed with SSYST-3 code system. The experiments have been carried out with shortened REBEKA simulators. The main goal was to verify whether the model for describing the Zircaloy cladding deformation and rupture at high temperatures (NORA2 model) is able to predict the Argentine cladding material behaviour under such conditions. A good agreement between experimental results and model predictions was found in the range of temperatures from 700 to 850 0 C (in α phase and first half of α+β transition phase). There were some discrepances at higher temperatures, probably due to the strong influence of heating rate on material properties. According to the results of these post-test calculations, it can be concluded that NORA2 model is able to well describe the Argentine Zircaloy cladding deformation and rupture under LOCA conditions, because there was a good agreement in the range of burst (ballooning) temperatures which are expected in this type of accident. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Randomized Controlled Study of a Remote Flipped Classroom Neuro-otology Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Robert Carrick

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ContextMedical Education can be delivered in the traditional classroom or via novel technology including an online classroom.ObjectiveTo test the hypothesis that learning in an online classroom would result in similar outcomes as learning in the traditional classroom when using a flipped classroom pedagogy.DesignRandomized controlled trial. A total of 274 subjects enrolled in a Neuro-otology training program for non-Neuro-otologists of 25 h held over a 3-day period. Subjects were randomized into a “control” group attending a traditional classroom and a “trial” group of equal numbers participating in an online synchronous Internet streaming classroom using the Adobe Connect e-learning platform.InterventionsSubjects were randomized into a “control” group attending a traditional classroom and a “treatment” group of equal numbers participating in an online synchronous Internet streaming classroom.Main outcome measuresPre- and post-multiple choice examinations of VOR, Movement, Head Turns, Head Tremor, Neurodegeneration, Inferior Olivary Complex, Collateral Projections, Eye Movement Training, Visual Saccades, Head Saccades, Visual Impairment, Walking Speed, Neuroprotection, Autophagy, Hyperkinetic Movement, Eye and Head Stability, Oscilllatory Head Movements, Gaze Stability, Leaky Neural Integrator, Cervical Dystonia, INC and Head Tilts, Visual Pursuits, Optokinetic Stimulation, and Vestibular Rehabilitation.MethodsAll candidates took a pretest examination of the subject material. The 2–9 h and 1–8 h sessions over three consecutive days were given live in the classroom and synchronously in the online classroom using the Adobe Connect e-learning platform. Subjects randomized to the online classroom attended the lectures in a location of their choice and viewed the sessions live on the Internet. A posttest examination was given to all candidates after completion of the course. Two sample unpaired t tests with equal variances

  11. Combined use of clinical pre-test probability and D-dimer test in the diagnosis of preoperative deep venous thrombosis in colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Mogens Tornby; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Hagedorn Nielsen, Tina Sandie

    2008-01-01

    preoperative DVT in colorectal cancer patients admitted for surgery. Preoperative D-dimer test and compression ultrasonography for DVT were performed in 193 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer. Diagnostic accuracy indices of the D-dimer test were assessed according to the PTP score......The preoperative prevalence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients with colorectal cancer may be as high as 8%. In order to minimize the risk of pulmonary embolism, it is important to rule out preoperative DVT. A large study has confirmed that a negative D-dimer test in combination with a low...... clinical pre-test probability (PTP) can be safely used to rule out the tentative diagnosis of DVT in cancer patients. However, the accuracy in colorectal cancer patients is uncertain. This study assessed the diagnostic accuracy of a quantitative D-dimer assay in combination with the PTP score in ruling out...

  12. Reservoir characterization and final pre-test analysis in support of the compressed-air-energy-storage Pittsfield aquifer field test in Pike County, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, L.E.; McCann, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    The work reported is part of a field experimental program to demonstrate and evaluate compressed air energy storage in a porous media aquifer reservoir near Pittsfield, Illinois. The reservoir is described. Numerical modeling of the reservoir was performed concurrently with site development. The numerical models were applied to predict the thermohydraulic performance of the porous media reservoir. This reservoir characterization and pre-test analysis made use of evaluation of bubble development, water coning, thermal development, and near-wellbore desaturation. The work was undertaken to define the time required to develop an air storage bubble of adequate size, to assess the specification of instrumentation and above-ground equipment, and to develop and evaluate operational strategies for air cycling. A parametric analysis was performed for the field test reservoir. (LEW)

  13. Evaluating response shift in training evaluation: comparing the retrospective pretest with an adapted measurement invariance approach in a classroom management training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowar, Valentina; Thiel, Felicitas

    2014-10-01

    Response shift (RS) can threaten the internal validity of pre-post designs. As RS may indicate a redefinition of the target construct, its occurrence in training evaluation is rather likely. The most common approach to deal with RS is to implement a retrospective pretest (then-test) instead of the traditional pre-test. In health psychology, an adapted measurement invariance approach (MIad) was developed as an alternative technique to study RS. Results produced by identifying RS with the two approaches were rarely studied simultaneously or within an experimental framework. To study RS in two different treatment conditions and compare results produced by both techniques in identifying various types of RS. We further studied validity aspects of the then-test. We evaluated RS by applying the then-test procedure (TP) and the measurement invariance apporach MIad within an experimental design: Participants either attended a short-term or a long-term classroom management training program. Participants were 146 student teachers in their first year of master's study. Pre (before training), post, and then self-ratings (after training) on classroom management knowledge were administered. Results indicated that the two approaches do not yield the same results. The MIad identified more and also group-specific RS as opposed to the findings of the TP, which found less and only little evidence for group-specific RS. Further research is needed to study the usability and validity of the respective approaches. In particular, the usability of the then-test seems to be challenged. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Direct costs and cost-effectiveness of dual-source computed tomography and invasive coronary angiography in patients with an intermediate pretest likelihood for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenkamp, Marc; Bonaventura, Klaus; Sohns, Christian; Becker, Christoph R; Leber, Alexander W

    2012-03-01

    The study aims to determine the direct costs and comparative cost-effectiveness of latest-generation dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) and invasive coronary angiography for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients suspected of having this disease. The study was based on a previously elaborated cohort with an intermediate pretest likelihood for CAD and on complementary clinical data. Cost calculations were based on a detailed analysis of direct costs, and generally accepted accounting principles were applied. Based on Bayes' theorem, a mathematical model was used to compare the cost-effectiveness of both diagnostic approaches. Total costs included direct costs, induced costs and costs of complications. Effectiveness was defined as the ability of a diagnostic test to accurately identify a patient with CAD. Direct costs amounted to €98.60 for DSCT and to €317.75 for invasive coronary angiography. Analysis of model calculations indicated that cost-effectiveness grew hyperbolically with increasing prevalence of CAD. Given the prevalence of CAD in the study cohort (24%), DSCT was found to be more cost-effective than invasive coronary angiography (€970 vs €1354 for one patient correctly diagnosed as having CAD). At a disease prevalence of 49%, DSCT and invasive angiography were equally effective with costs of €633. Above a threshold value of disease prevalence of 55%, proceeding directly to invasive coronary angiography was more cost-effective than DSCT. With proper patient selection and consideration of disease prevalence, DSCT coronary angiography is cost-effective for diagnosing CAD in patients with an intermediate pretest likelihood for it. However, the range of eligible patients may be smaller than previously reported.

  15. Behavioral activation versus physical activity via the internet: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Markus B T; Stenling, Andreas; Sjöström, Emma; Neely, Gregory; Lindner, Philip; Hassmén, Peter; Andersson, Gerhard; Martell, Christopher; Carlbring, Per

    2017-06-01

    A major problem today is that only about fifty percent of those affected by depression seeks help. One way to reach more sufferers would be by offering easily accessible internet based treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare/evaluate four therapist supported internet administered treatments. Two hundred eighty six participants were included. The treatment period lasted twelve weeks, consisting of the following treatments: 1) physical activity without treatment rational, 2) physical activity with treatment rational, 3) behavioral activation without treatment rational and 4) behavioral activation with treatment rational. All groups (including a control-group) showed a significant decrease in depressive symptoms. When the treatment groups were pooled and compared to the control group, there were significant differences from pretest to posttest (Hedges g av treatment =1.01, control group =0.47). This held true also when each of the four treatment groups was compared to the control group, with one exception: Physical activity without treatment rationale. The differences between how many modules the participants completed could indicate that there are other factors than the treatments that caused the symptom reduction, however, the dose-response analysis did not detect any significant differences on account of modules completed. The results support the positive effects of internet administered treatments for depression, and highlights the importance of psychoeducation, which tends to affect both the treatment outcome and the probability of remaining in treatment. These aspects need to be considered when developing and conducting new treatments for depression, since they would increase the likelihood of positive treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrocortisone Cream to Reduce Perineal Pain after Vaginal Birth: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfre, Margaret; Adams, Donita; Callahan, Gloria; Gould, Patricia; Lang, Susan; McCubbins, Holly; Mintz, Amy; Williams, Sommer; Bishard, Mark; Dempsey, Amy; Chulay, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    To determine if the use of hydrocortisone cream decreases perineal pain in the immediate postpartum period. This was a randomized controlled trial (RCT), crossover study design, with each participant serving as their own control. Participants received three different methods for perineal pain management at three sequential perineal pain treatments after birth: two topical creams (corticosteroid; placebo) and a control treatment (no cream application). Treatment order was randomly assigned, with participants and investigators blinded to cream type. The primary dependent variable was the change in perineal pain levels (posttest minus pretest pain levels) immediately before and 30 to 60 minutes after perineal pain treatments. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance, with p creams, with average perineal pain change scores of -4.8 ± 8.4 mm after treatment with hydrocortisone cream (N = 27) and -6.7 ± 13.0 mm after treatment with the placebo cream (N = 27). Changes in pain scores with no cream application were 1.2 ± 10.5 mm (N = 27). Analysis of variance found a significant difference between treatment groups (F2,89 = 3.6, p = 0.03), with both cream treatments having significantly better pain reduction than the control, no cream treatment (hydrocortisone vs. no cream, p = 0.04; placebo cream vs. no cream, p = 0.01). There were no differences in perineal pain reduction between the two cream treatments (p = .54). This RCT found that the application of either hydrocortisone cream or placebo cream provided significantly better pain relief than no cream application.

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Test the Effectiveness of an Immersive 3D Video Game for Anxiety Prevention among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Hanneke; Malmberg, Monique; Lobel, Adam; Engels, Rutger C M E; Granic, Isabela

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent anxiety is debilitating, the most frequently diagnosed adolescent mental health problem, and leads to substantial long-term problems. A randomized controlled trial (n = 138) was conducted to test the effectiveness of a biofeedback video game (Dojo) for adolescents with elevated levels of anxiety. Adolescents (11-15 years old) were randomly assigned to play Dojo or a control game (Rayman 2: The Great Escape). Initial screening for anxiety was done on 1,347 adolescents in five high schools; only adolescents who scored above the "at-risk" cut-off on the Spence Children Anxiety Survey were eligible. Adolescents' anxiety levels were assessed at pre-test, post-test, and at three month follow-up to examine the extent to which playing Dojo decreased adolescents' anxiety. The present study revealed equal improvements in anxiety symptoms in both conditions at follow-up and no differences between Dojo and the closely matched control game condition. Latent growth curve models did reveal a steeper decrease of personalized anxiety symptoms (not of total anxiety symptoms) in the Dojo condition compared to the control condition. Moderation analyses did not show any differences in outcomes between boys and girls nor did age differentiate outcomes. The present results are of importance for prevention science, as this was the first full-scale randomized controlled trial testing indicated prevention effects of a video game aimed at reducing anxiety. Future research should carefully consider the choice of control condition and outcome measurements, address the potentially high impact of participants' expectations, and take critical design issues into consideration, such as individual- versus group-based intervention and contamination issues.

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Test the Effectiveness of an Immersive 3D Video Game for Anxiety Prevention among Adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke Scholten

    Full Text Available Adolescent anxiety is debilitating, the most frequently diagnosed adolescent mental health problem, and leads to substantial long-term problems. A randomized controlled trial (n = 138 was conducted to test the effectiveness of a biofeedback video game (Dojo for adolescents with elevated levels of anxiety. Adolescents (11-15 years old were randomly assigned to play Dojo or a control game (Rayman 2: The Great Escape. Initial screening for anxiety was done on 1,347 adolescents in five high schools; only adolescents who scored above the "at-risk" cut-off on the Spence Children Anxiety Survey were eligible. Adolescents' anxiety levels were assessed at pre-test, post-test, and at three month follow-up to examine the extent to which playing Dojo decreased adolescents' anxiety. The present study revealed equal improvements in anxiety symptoms in both conditions at follow-up and no differences between Dojo and the closely matched control game condition. Latent growth curve models did reveal a steeper decrease of personalized anxiety symptoms (not of total anxiety symptoms in the Dojo condition compared to the control condition. Moderation analyses did not show any differences in outcomes between boys and girls nor did age differentiate outcomes. The present results are of importance for prevention science, as this was the first full-scale randomized controlled trial testing indicated prevention effects of a video game aimed at reducing anxiety. Future research should carefully consider the choice of control condition and outcome measurements, address the potentially high impact of participants' expectations, and take critical design issues into consideration, such as individual- versus group-based intervention and contamination issues.

  19. Art Instruction and the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test in Fifth-Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Carolyn J.; Velicer, Wayne F.

    1977-01-01

    The experiment assessed the effect of ordinary school art instruction in human figure drawing on scores of the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test. Subjects consisted of 44 fifth-grade students. No differences were found in the control group between pretest and posttests. The treatment group showed significant gains on both posttests. (Author)

  20. A Progress Evaluation of Four Bilingual Children's Television Shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

    An evaluation of a bilingual education TV series was conducted involving 6-year-old English speaking, Spanish speaking, and bilingual children at four sites. Children were assigned to control and experimental groups with the latter group seeing four 30 minute shows. A pretest-posttest design was employed with the pretest serving as the covariate…

  1. Detecting Intervention Effects in a Cluster-Randomized Design Using Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling for Binary Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Bottge, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) is frequently used to detect group differences, such as an intervention effect in a pre-test--post-test cluster-randomized design. Group differences on the post-test scores are detected by controlling for pre-test scores as a proxy variable for unobserved factors that predict future attributes. The pre-test and post-test…

  2. Measurement Error Correction Formula for Cluster-Level Group Differences in Cluster Randomized and Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) is frequently used to detect cluster-level group differences in cluster randomized trial and observational studies. Group differences on the outcomes (posttest scores) are detected by controlling for the covariate (pretest scores) as a proxy variable for unobserved factors that predict future attributes. The pretest and…

  3. The Impact of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Secondary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research, carried out in Manicaland Province in Zimbabwe, aimed to investigate the impact of computer-assisted instruction on students' performance in Geography. The equivalent group research design which included a pre-test post-test control group design was used. Respondents to interviews and pre-test and ...

  4. [Assessing the knowledge in primary health care following an educational course structured in the context of GARD chronic airway diseases national control program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öner Erkekol, Ferda; Köktürk, Nurdan; Mungan, Dilşad; Saçkesen, Cansın; Önen, Zeynep Pınar; Özkan, Seçil; Balkan, Arzu; Ergün, Pınar; Kocabaş, Can Naci; Baran Aksakal, Nur; Ekici, Banu; Özkan Altunay, Zübeyde; Gemicioğlu, Bilun; Yorgancıoğlu, Arzu

    2017-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases are common causes of disease in the community and account for considerable percent of the caseload in primary health care facilities. For this reason, it is important to question and improve the knowledge of primary health care physicians. This study is designed to assess the level of knowledge for bronchial asthma and COPD of the primary healthcare physicians, both before and immediately after an educational course structured in the context of GARD Chronic Airway Diseases National Control Program. The participating physicians attended an intensive educational course on asthma and COPD. Twenty five item questionnaires for asthma and COPD were administered to the participants both before and immediately after the end of the course. Contribution of education to the level of knowledge was investigated by comparing the percentages of the correct answers in the pre-and post-test. From 11 different cities, 1817 and 1788 primary health care physician were attended to the asthma and COPD educations, respectively. The accuracy rate of ≥ 75% was obtained from only 4 questions in pre-test asthma questionnaire. On the contrary, in 15 questions the accuracy rate was primary care settings, the level of knowledge in asthma and COPD should be enhanced and that this increase can be achieved with an education course.

  5. Provision of oral hygiene services as a potential method for preventing periodontal disease and control hypertension and diabetes in a community health centre in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Hee; Lee, Ga-Yeong; Park, Su-Kyung; Kim, Yeun-Ju; Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Chun-Bae

    2017-12-28

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a community-based oral hygiene service on general and periodontal health indicators of patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus visiting a community health centre in Korea. The study used a one-group pretest-posttest and interrupted time-series design. A total of 151 participants (45% male), with a mean age of 63 ± 8.4 years, were included in the study; these included patients with hypertension (62%), diabetes (12%) and both hypertension and diabetes (26%). Two dental hygienists dedicated 2 days per week to this project, providing oral hygiene services to 10-13 participants per day. Four oral hygiene service sessions were provided per patient. The objective oral hygiene status and subjective self-reported periodontal status were compared before and after the service. The changes in blood pressure and glycosylated haemoglobin levels were also assessed. A lower frequency of subjective swelling was reported at the fourth session (37.9%) compared to the first (55.6%) session. Further, significantly fewer cases of calculus and bleeding were observed (p oral hygiene services provided by dental hygienists can promote objective oral hygiene and subjective periodontal status in the local community, and may help in the control of hypertension and diabetes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Improving Children's Mental Health with a Digital Social Skills Development Game: A Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial of Adventures aboard the S.S. GRIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rebecca; Brown, Emily; Kocher, Kelly; DeRosier, Melissa

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a computer-based game to improve social skills and mental health in children with social skills deficits would be efficacious. The program, Adventures aboard the S.S. GRIN, translates a proven in-person intervention into a nine-episode interactive online adventure game that provides opportunity for knowledge acquisition and skill practice. Participants (children aged 7-11 years with social skills challenges) were randomly assigned to immediate treatment group (n = 33) or waitlist control group (n = 36). Children in the immediate treatment condition completed the game at home over the course of 9 weeks. Before playing the game and again within 1 week of game completion, children completed surveys about social literacy, social anxiety, bullying, social self-efficacy, and social satisfaction. Children who played Adventures improved significantly more from pretest to posttest than children who did not play the game in social literacy, social anxiety, bullying victimization, and social satisfaction. Online interactive games can be effective in improving mental health for children who struggle with social skills. For children who can access them, serious games have the potential to increase the reach of effective programs by overcoming the logistical and implementation barriers (such as cost, travel, and accessibility) that limit traditionally delivered mental health interventions.

  7. Mobile Phone-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomized Waitlist Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, Corine Hg; Lancee, Jaap; Griffioen-Both, Fiemke; Spruit, Sandor; Fitrianie, Siska; Neerincx, Mark A; Beun, Robbert Jan; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2017-04-11

    This study is one of the first randomized controlled trials investigating cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) delivered by a fully automated mobile phone app. Such an app can potentially increase the accessibility of insomnia treatment for the 10% of people who have insomnia. The objective of our study was to investigate the efficacy of CBT-I delivered via the Sleepcare mobile phone app, compared with a waitlist control group, in a randomized controlled trial. We recruited participants in the Netherlands with relatively mild insomnia disorder. After answering an online pretest questionnaire, they were randomly assigned to the app (n=74) or the waitlist condition (n=77). The app packaged a sleep diary, a relaxation exercise, sleep restriction exercise, and sleep hygiene and education. The app was fully automated and adjusted itself to a participant's progress. Program duration was 6 to 7 weeks, after which participants received posttest measurements and a 3-month follow-up. The participants in the waitlist condition received the app after they completed the posttest questionnaire. The measurements consisted of questionnaires and 7-day online diaries. The questionnaires measured insomnia severity, dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, and anxiety and depression symptoms. The diary measured sleep variables such as sleep efficiency. We performed multilevel analyses to study the interaction effects between time and condition. The results showed significant interaction effects (Pinsomnia severity (d=-0.66) and sleep efficiency (d=0.71). Overall, these improvements were also retained in a 3-month follow-up. This study demonstrated the efficacy of a fully automated mobile phone app in the treatment of relatively mild insomnia. The effects were in the range of what is found for Web-based treatment in general. This supports the applicability of such technical tools in the treatment of insomnia. Future work should examine the generalizability to a more diverse

  8. The Effects of 12 Sessions of Mirror Therapy on Postural Control Kinetic Variables of Amputation below the Knee in Terms of the Manipulation of Afferent Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Batol.mohamadtaghi@yahoo.com

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Mirror therapy is a relatively new intervention which focuses on moving the defective part in front of the mirror. The intervention is proposed to be an important implement to improve stability during rehabilitation program of the amputee. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of 12 sessions of mirror therapy on postural control kinetic variables of amputees when manipulating sensory information. Methods: In the present quasi-experimental study with pretest-posttest and random group design, 14 below knee amputees (n =7 control and n =7 experimental were enrolled. The experimental group engaged in 12 session of exercise therapy in front of mirror, but the control group just did their daily routine activities without any intervention. To asses postural control, Computerized Dynamic Posturography was used which shows the balance score according to two variables of stability and displacement of the center of gravity while manipulating sensory organization in 6 conditions (absence or presence of vision, presence or manipulation of vestibular and kinesthetic information. For data analysis, multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni post-hoc test were used. Results: The results indicated that postural control improved in the experimental group compared to the control group in all six sensory manipulation conditions. The balance improvement in the mirror therapy group in the first condition (existence of three senses of vision, vestibular and kinesthetic and second condition (elimination of sight and presence of vestibular and kinesthetic information was higher than other circumstances. Balance scores were worse in condition 6 (manipulation of vestibular and kinesthetic in the control group compared to other sensory conditions. Conclusion: Findings of the research revealed that 12 sessions of mirror therapy can improve balance in people with below knee amputations. Moreover

  9. Whole body, long-axis rotational training improves lower extremity neuromuscular control during single leg lateral drop landing and stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Burden, Robert; Krupp, Ryan; Caborn, David N M

    2011-05-01

    Poor neuromuscular control during sports activities is associated with non-contact lower extremity injuries. This study evaluated the efficacy of progressive resistance, whole body, long-axis rotational training to improve lower extremity neuromuscular control during a single leg lateral drop landing and stabilization. Thirty-six healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either Training or Control groups. Electromyographic, ground reaction force, and kinematic data were collected from three pre-test, post-test trials. Independent sample t-tests with Bonferroni corrections for multiple comparisons were used to compare group mean change differences (P≤0.05/21≤0.0023). Training group gluteus maximus and gluteus medius neuromuscular efficiency improved 35.7% and 31.7%, respectively. Training group composite vertical-anteroposterior-mediolateral ground reaction force stabilization timing occurred 1.35s earlier. Training group knee flexion angle at landing increased by 3.5°. Training group time period between the initial two peak frontal plane knee displacements following landing increased by 0.17s. Training group peak hip and knee flexion velocity were 21.2°/s and 20.1°/s slower, respectively. Time period between the initial two peak frontal plane knee displacements following landing and peak hip flexion velocity mean change differences displayed a strong relationship in the Training group (r(2)=0.77, P=0.0001) suggesting improved dynamic frontal plane knee control as peak hip flexion velocity decreased. This study identified electromyographic, kinematic, and ground reaction force evidence that device training improved lower extremity neuromuscular control during single leg lateral drop landing and stabilization. Further studies with other populations are indicated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Crew resource management training in the intensive care unit. A multisite controlled before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Peter F; de Bruijne, Martine; van Dyck, Cathy; So, Ralph L; Tangkau, Peter; Wagner, Cordula

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing awareness today that adverse events in the intensive care unit (ICU) are more often caused by problems related to non-technical skills than by a lack of technical, or clinical, expertise. Team training, such as crew resource management (CRM), aims to improve these non-technical skills. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of CRM in the ICU. Six ICUs participated in a paired controlled trial, with one pretest and two post-test measurements (after 3 and 12 months). Three ICUs received CRM training and were compared with a matched control unit. The 2-day classroom-based training was delivered to multidisciplinary groups (ie, ICU physicians, nurses, managers). All levels of Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework were assessed using a mixed method design, including questionnaires, observations and routinely administered patient outcome data. Level I-reaction: participants were very positive directly after the training. Level II-learning: attitudes towards behaviour aimed at optimising situational awareness were relatively high at baseline and remained stable. Level III-behaviour: self-reported behaviour aimed at optimising situational awareness improved in the intervention group. No changes were found in observed explicit professional oral communication. Level IV-organisation: patient outcomes were unaffected. Error management culture and job satisfaction improved in the intervention group. Patient safety culture improved in both control and intervention units. We can conclude that CRM, as delivered in the present study, does not change behaviour or patient outcomes by itself, yet changes how participants think about errors and risks. This indicates that CRM requires a combination with other initiatives in order to improve clinical outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Internet-Based Assessment of Oncology Health Care Professional Learning Style and Optimization of Materials for Web-Based Learning: Controlled Trial With Concealed Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheel, Christine M; Anderson, Ingrid A; Lee, Patricia; Chen, Sheau-Chiann; Justiss, Katy; Giuse, Nunzia B; Ye, Fei; Kusnoor, Sheila V

    2017-01-01

    Background Precision medicine has resulted in increasing complexity in the treatment of cancer. Web-based educational materials can help address the needs of oncology health care professionals seeking to understand up-to-date treatment strategies. Objective This study aimed to assess learning styles of oncology health care professionals and to determine whether learning style-tailored educational materials lead to enhanced learning. Methods In all, 21,465 oncology health care professionals were invited by email to participate in the fully automated, parallel group study. Enrollment and follow-up occurred between July 13 and September 7, 2015. Self-enrolled participants took a learning style survey and were assigned to the intervention or control arm using concealed alternating allocation. Participants in the intervention group viewed educational materials consistent with their preferences for learning (reading, listening, and/or watching); participants in the control group viewed educational materials typical of the My Cancer Genome website. Educational materials covered the topic of treatment of metastatic estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer using cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitors. Participant knowledge was assessed immediately before (pretest), immediately after (posttest), and 2 weeks after (follow-up test) review of the educational materials. Study statisticians were blinded to group assignment. Results A total of 751 participants enrolled in the study. Of these, 367 (48.9%) were allocated to the intervention arm and 384 (51.1%) were allocated to the control arm. Of those allocated to the intervention arm, 256 (69.8%) completed all assessments. Of those allocated to the control arm, 296 (77.1%) completed all assessments. An additional 12 participants were deemed ineligible and one withdrew. Of the 552 participants, 438 (79.3%) self-identified as multimodal learners. The intervention arm showed greater improvement in posttest score

  12. Internet-Based Assessment of Oncology Health Care Professional Learning Style and Optimization of Materials for Web-Based Learning: Controlled Trial With Concealed Allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheel, Christine M; Anderson, Ingrid A; Lee, Patricia; Chen, Sheau-Chiann; Justiss, Katy; Giuse, Nunzia B; Ye, Fei; Kusnoor, Sheila V; Levy, Mia A

    2017-07-25

    Precision medicine has resulted in increasing complexity in the treatment of cancer. Web-based educational materials can help address the needs of oncology health care professionals seeking to understand up-to-date treatment strategies. This study aimed to assess learning styles of oncology health care professionals and to determine whether learning style-tailored educational materials lead to enhanced learning. In all, 21,465 oncology health care professionals were invited by email to participate in the fully automated, parallel group study. Enrollment and follow-up occurred between July 13 and September 7, 2015. Self-enrolled participants took a learning style survey and were assigned to the intervention or control arm using concealed alternating allocation. Participants in the intervention group viewed educational materials consistent with their preferences for learning (reading, listening, and/or watching); participants in the control group viewed educational materials typical of the My Cancer Genome website. Educational materials covered the topic of treatment of metastatic estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer using cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitors. Participant knowledge was assessed immediately before (pretest), immediately after (posttest), and 2 weeks after (follow-up test) review of the educational materials. Study statisticians were blinded to group assignment. A total of 751 participants enrolled in the study. Of these, 367 (48.9%) were allocated to the intervention arm and 384 (51.1%) were allocated to the control arm. Of those allocated to the intervention arm, 256 (69.8%) completed all assessments. Of those allocated to the control arm, 296 (77.1%) completed all assessments. An additional 12 participants were deemed ineligible and one withdrew. Of the 552 participants, 438 (79.3%) self-identified as multimodal learners. The intervention arm showed greater improvement in posttest score compared to the control group (0.4 points

  13. The effects of autonomous difficulty selection on engagement, motivation, and learning in a motion-controlled video game task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiker, Amber M; Bruzi, Alessandro T; Miller, Matthew W; Nelson, Monica; Wegman, Rebecca; Lohse, Keith R

    2016-10-01

    This experiment investigated the relationship between motivation, engagement, and learning in a video game task. Previous studies have shown increased autonomy during practice leads to superior retention of motor skills, but it is not clear why this benefit occurs. Some studies suggest this benefit arises from increased motivation during practice; others suggest the benefit arises from better information processing. Sixty novice participants were randomly assigned to a self-controlled group, who chose the progression of difficulty during practice, or to a yoked group, who experienced the same difficulty progression but did not have choice. At the end of practice, participants completed surveys measuring intrinsic motivation and engagement. One week later, participants returned for a series of retention tests at three different difficulty levels. RM-ANCOVA (controlling for pre-test) showed that the self-controlled group had improved retention compared to the yoked group, on average, β=46.78, 95% CI=[2.68, 90.87], p=0.04, but this difference was only statistically significant on the moderate difficulty post-test (p=0.004). The self-controlled group also showed greater intrinsic motivation during practice, t(58)=2.61, p=0.01. However, there was no evidence that individual differences in engagement (p=0.20) or motivation (p=0.87) were associated with learning, which was the relationship this experiment was powered to detect. These data are inconsistent with strictly motivational accounts of how autonomy benefits learning, instead suggesting the benefits of autonomy may be mediated through other mechanisms. For instance, within the information processing framework, the learning benefits may emerge from learners appropriately adjusting difficulty to maintain an appropriate level of challenge (i.e., maintaining the relationship between task demands and cognitive resources). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The impact of telenursing consultation by using the social networks to promote the self- efficacy and weight control in patients treating with hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Sadat Hosseini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis as the most common renal replacement therapy alone cannot ensure the health and survival of the patient's life and along with it, training and consulting about self-care and adherence is one of the fundamental pillars of treatment. This study was conducted to determine the impact of telenursing consultation by using networks to promote the self-efficacy and weight control in patients treating with hemodialysis. This study was a clinical trial for two groups and had a pre-test and two post-test. 52 patients under treatment by hemodialysis were divided randomly into two groups of experimental and control groups. The experimental group received consultations by using the telegram software and the control group received usual nursing care for a month. The data were collected by the weight control of the patients before and after the sessions of hemodialysis and general self-efficacy questionnaire and were analyzed by SPSS software version 20, and using descriptive statistics and analytical tests. The two groups did not have a significant statistically differences in demographic variables. The average rates of the self-efficacy after intervention in the experimental group was significantly more than the control group and also the average overweight after the intervention was significantly lower. telenursing consultation by using the social networks is effective on the improvement of self-efficacy and weight control in patients treating with hemodialysis and due to the shortage of nurses and their high volume of work it can be used as a new way for training.

  15. Kid-Short Marfan Score (Kid-SMS) Is a Useful Diagnostic Tool for Stratifying the Pre-Test Probability of Marfan Syndrome in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Veronika C; Arndt, Florian; Harring, Gesa; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Kozlik-Feldmann, Rainer; Mueller, Goetz C; Steiner, Kristoffer J; Mir, Thomas S

    2015-03-12

    Due to age dependent organ manifestation, diagnosis of Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a challenge, especially in childhood. It is important to identify children at risk of MFS as soon as possible to direct those to appropriate treatment but also to avoid stigmatization due to false diagnosis. We published the Kid-Short Marfan Score (Kid-SMS) in 2012 to stratify the pre-test probability of MFS in childhood. Hence we now evaluate the predictive performance of Kid-SMS in a new cohort of children. We prospectively investigated 106 patients who were suspected of having MFS. At baseline, children were examined according to Kid-SMS. At baseline and follow-up visit, diagnosis of MFS was established or rejected using standard current diagnostic criteria according to the revised Ghent Criteria (Ghent-2). At baseline 43 patients were identified with a risk of MFS according to Kid-SMS whereas 21 patients had Ghent-2 diagnosis of MFS. Sensitivity was 100%, specificity 77%, negative predictive value 100% and Likelihood ratio of Kid-SMS 4.3. During follow-up period, three other patients with a stratified risk for MFS were diagnosed according to Ghent-2. We confirm very good predictive performance of Kid-SMS with excellent sensitivity and negative predictive value but restricted specificity. Kid-SMS avoids stigmatization due to diagnosis of MFS and thus restriction to quality of life. Especially outpatient pediatricians and pediatric cardiologists can use it for primary assessment.

  16. Pre-test probability risk scores and their use in contemporary management of patients with chest pain: One year stress echo cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Daniela Cassar; Papachristidis, Alexandros; Roper, Damian; Tsironis, Ioannis; Byrne, Jonathan; Monaghan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare how patients with chest pain would be investigated, based on the two guidelines available for UK cardiologists, on the management of patients with stable chest pain. The UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guideline which was published in 2010 and the European society of cardiology (ESC) guideline published in 2013. Both guidelines utilise pre-test probability risk scores, to guide the choice of investigation. Design We undertook a large retrospective study to investigate the outcomes of stress echocardiography. Setting A large tertiary centre in the UK in a contemporary clinical practice. Participants Two thirds of the patients in the cohort were referred from our rapid access chest pain clinics. Results We found that the NICE risk score overestimates risk by 20% compared to the ESC Risk score. We also found that based on the NICE guidelines, 44% of the patients presenting with chest pain, in this cohort, would have been investigated invasively, with diagnostic coronary angiography. Using the ESC guidelines, only 0.3% of the patients would be investigated invasively. Conclusion The large discrepancy between the two guidelines can be easily reduced if NICE adopted the ESC risk score. PMID:26673458

  17. The Effects of Rhythm and Robotic Interventions on the Imitation/Praxis, Interpersonal Synchrony, and Motor Performance of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha M. Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the effects of three interventions, rhythm, robotic, and standard-of-care, on the imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and overall motor performance of 36 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD between 5 and 12 years of age. Children were matched on age, level of functioning, and services received, prior to random assignment to one of the three groups. Training was provided for 8 weeks with 4 sessions provided each week. We assessed generalized changes in motor skills from the pretest to the posttest using a standardized test of motor performance, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, 2nd edition (BOT-2. We also assessed training-specific changes in imitation/praxis and interpersonal synchrony during an early and a late session. Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2. All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis. The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session. Overall, socially embedded movement-based contexts are valuable in promoting imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and motor performance and should be included within the standard-of-care treatment for children with ASD.

  18. Effectiveness of commercial video gaming on fine motor control in chronic stroke within community-level rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Kate; Ali, Suzanne; Carr, Kelly; Crawley, Jamie; McGowan, Cheri; Horton, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of commercial gaming as an intervention for fine motor recovery in chronic stroke. Ten chronic phase post-stroke participants (mean time since CVA = 39 mos; mean age = 72 yrs) completed a 16-session program using the Nintendo Wii for 15 min two times per week with their more affected hand (10 right handed). Functional recovery (Jebsen Hand Function Test (JHFT), Box and Block Test (BBT), Nine Hole Peg Test (NHPT)), and quality of life (QOL; Stroke Impact Scale (SIS)) were measured at baseline (pre-testing), after 8 sessions (mid-testing) and after 16 sessions (post-testing). Significant improvements were found with the JHFT, BBT and NHPT from pre-testing to post-testing (p = 0.03, p = 0.03, p = 0.01, respectively). As well, there was an increase in perceived QOL from pre-testing to post-testing, as determined by the SIS (p = 0.009). Commercial gaming may be a viable resource for those with chronic stroke. Future research should examine the feasibility of this as a rehabilitation tool for this population. Stroke survivors often live with lasting effects from their injury, however, those with chronic stroke generally receive little to no rehabilitation due to a perceived motor recovery plateau. Virtual reality in the form of commercial gaming is a novel and motivating way for clients to complete rehabilitation. The Nintendo Wii may be a feasible device to improve both functional ability and perceived quality of life in chronic stroke survivors.

  19. Implementing blended learning in emergency airway management training: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Madeleine Huei Tze; Chew, Keng Sheng; Azhar, Muhaimin Noor; Hamzah, Mohd Lotfi; Chuah, Kee Man; Bustam, Aida; Chan, Hiang Chuan

    2018-01-15

    While emergency airway management training is conventionally conducted via face-to-face learning (F2FL) workshops, there are inherent cost, time, place and manpower limitations in running such workshops. Blended learning (BL) refers to the systematic integration of online and face-to-face learning aimed to facilitate complex thinking skills and flexible participation at a reduced financial, time and manpower cost. This study was conducted to evaluate its effectiveness in emergency airway management training. A single-center prospective randomised controlled trial involving 30 doctors from Sarawak General Hospital, Malaysia was conducted from September 2016 to February 2017 to compare the effectiveness of BL versus F2FL for emergency airway management training. Participants in the BL arm were given a period of 12 days to go through the online materials in a learning management system while those in the F2FL arm attended a-day of face-to-face lectures (8 h). Participants from both arms then attended a day of hands-on session consisting of simulation skills training with airway manikins. Pre- and post-tests in knowledge and practical skills were administered. E-learning experience and the perception towards BL among participants in the BL arm were also assessed. Significant improvements in post-test scores as compared to pre-test scores were noted for participants in both BL and F2FL arms for knowledge, practical, and total scores. The degree of increment between the BL group and the F2FL arms for all categories were not significantly different (total scores: 35 marks, inter-quartile range (IQR) 15.0 - 41.0 vs. 31 marks, IQR 24.0 - 41.0, p = 0.690; theory scores: 18 marks, IQR 9 - 24 vs. 19 marks, IQR 15 - 20, p = 0.992; practical scores: 11 marks, IQR 5 -18 vs. 10 marks, IQR 9 - 20, p = 0.461 respectively). The overall perception towards BL was positive. Blended learning is as effective as face-to-face learning for emergency airway management training

  20. Acute Effects of Contract-Relax Stretching vs. TENS in Young Subjects With Anterior Knee Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Marie C; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Valenza-Demet, Gerald; Cano-Cappellacci, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    Valenza, MC, Torres-Sánchez, I, Cabrera-Martos, I, Valenza-Demet, G, and Cano-Cappellacci, M. Acute effects of contract-relax stretching vs. TENS in young subjects with anterior knee pain: A randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2271-2278, 2016-The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects on pressure point tenderness, range of motion (ROM), and vertical jump (VJ) of contract-relax stretching vs. transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapy in individuals with anterior knee pain (AKP). Eighty-four subjects with AKP were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 different intervention groups: a contract-relax stretching group (n = 28), a TENS intervention group (n = 28), and a control group (n = 28). The participants included in the sample were both sex (37.5% men vs. 62.5% women) at a mean age of 21 years, with mean values of height and weight of 169 cm and 64 kg, respectively. The main outcome measures were knee ROM, pressure pain threshold (PPT), and VJ. The participants were assessed at baseline and immediately after treatment. In the case of VJ, at baseline, immediately after the intervention, at 3 and at 6 minutes posttreatment. The data analysis showed that PPT scores of participants in the stretching and TENS group significantly increased from pretest to posttest (p ≤ 0.05). A significant increase pre- to posttreatment in ROM (p < 0.001) was also observed in both treatment groups. In VJ measures, TENS and stretching groups showed significant differences between preintervention and all postintervention values (p ≤ 0.05), whereas no significant differences were found in the control group. In conclusion, the results show significant pre-to-post-treatment effects in PPT, ROM, and VJ from both contract-relax stretching and TENS in young subjects with AKP.

  1. The Effect of Conflict Resolution Training on Children’s Behavioral Problems in Shiraz, Southern Iran: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Sara; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Mani, Arash; Keshavarzi, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that marital problems can contribute to child behavior problems. In fact, the way that parents solve their conflicts, such as aggression, physical violence, and poor communication skills, can eventually culminate in aggression and emotional problems in children. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of conflict resolution training on children’s behavioral problems in a sample of Iranian couples. Methods: This randomized controlled trial study was carried out on the couples who referred to counseling centers in Shiraz, Iran. In this study, 56 couples were selected through convenience sampling and assigned to an intervention and a control group. The intervention group received 10 sessions of communication skills training. All the participants filled out conflict resolution questionnaire and Child Behavior Problem Checklist (CBCL). To analyze the data we used the SPSS statistical software (version 16), using repeated measurement test, paired t-test, and independent t test. Results: In this study, no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups regarding the demographic characteristics. Also, no significant difference was observed between the two groups regarding the mean score of child behavior problems. Besides, a significant difference was found in the intervention group’s mean score of marital conflict in post-test compared to the pre-test; however, no such trend was observed in the control group. Conclusion: Conflict resolution skill training was effective in reducing marital conflict. Also, it showed a slight reduction in the score of child behavior problems after the intervention. But this reduction wasn’t statisticaly significant. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201109112812N2 PMID:25349861

  2. The effect of musical attention control training (MACT) on attention skills of adolescents with neurodevelopmental delays: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasiali, Varvara; LaGasse, A Blythe; Penn, Saundra L

    2014-01-01

    Given the effect of musical training on the rate and accuracy of processing auditory information, therapeutic uses of music may potentially have remedial benefits for individuals with neurodevelopmental deficits. However, additional studies are needed to establish efficacy of music therapy interventions for attention skills in children/adolescents with neurodevelopmental disabilities including those with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). To establish feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a group music therapy protocol to improve attention skills (sustained, selective, attentional control/switching) in adolescents diagnosed with autism and/or developmental delays. This single group pretest/posttest study took place in a private school for high functioning adolescents with neurodevelopmental delays. Nine students (4 males, 5 females), ages 13 to 20, participated in the study. Autism severity was assessed using the CARS2-HF and indicated the following distribution for study participants: severe (n = 3), mild (n = 4), or minimal/no (n = 2) symptoms. We assessed feasibility of implementing a 45-min Musical Attention Control Training (MACT) intervention delivered by a board-certified music therapist eight times over 6 weeks in a school setting. We also examined preliminary efficacy of the MACT to improve attention skills using the Test of Everyday Attention for Children (TEA-Ch). Parental consent rate was 100%. All nine participants successfully completed testing measures and 6 weeks of the intervention. Average participation rate was 97%. Data analysis showed positive trends and improvements on measures of attentional control/switching and selective attention. The results showed that the intervention and testing measures were feasible to implement and acceptable to the participants who all completed the protocol. Data analysis demonstrated positive trends indicating that more research on the use of music therapy attention training in high-functioning adolescents with

  3. Effects of Video Game Training on Behavioral and Electrophysiological Measures of Attention and Memory: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Soledad; Mayas, Julia; Ruiz-Marquez, Eloisa; Prieto, Antonio; Toril, Pilar; Ponce de Leon, Laura; de Ceballos, Maria L; Reales Avilés, José Manuel

    2017-01-24

    Neuroplasticity-based approaches seem to offer promising ways of maintaining cognitive health in older adults and postponing the onset of cognitive decline symptoms. Although previous research suggests that training can produce transfer effects, this study was designed to overcome some limitations of previous studies by incorporating an active control group and the assessment of training expectations. The main objectives of this study are (1) to evaluate the effects of a randomized computer-based intervention consisting of training older adults with nonaction video games on brain and cognitive functions that decline with age, including attention and spatial working memory, using behavioral measures and electrophysiological recordings (event-related potentials [ERPs]) just after training and after a 6-month no-contact period; (2) to explore whether motivation, engagement, or expectations might account for possible training-related improvements; and (3) to examine whether inflammatory mechanisms assessed with noninvasive measurement of C-reactive protein in saliva impair cognitive training-induced effects. A better understanding of these mechanisms could elucidate pathways that could be targeted in the future by either behavioral or neuropsychological interventions. A single-blinded randomized controlled trial with an experimental group and an active control group, pretest, posttest, and 6-month follow-up repeated measures design is used in this study. A total of 75 cognitively healthy older adults were randomly distributed into experimental and active control groups. Participants in the experimental group received 16 1-hour training sessions with cognitive nonaction video games selected from Lumosity, a commercial brain training package. The active control group received the same number of training sessions with The Sims and SimCity, a simulation strategy game. We have recruited participants, have conducted the training protocol and pretest assessments, and are

  4. Smokers' responses to television advertisements about the serious harms of tobacco use: pre-testing results from 10 low- to middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Melanie; Bayly, Megan; Durkin, Sarah; Cotter, Trish; Mullin, Sandra; Warne, Charles

    2013-01-01

    While television advertisements (ads) that communicate the serious harms of smoking are effective in prompting quitting-related thoughts and actions, little research has been conducted among smokers in low- to middle-income countries to guide public education efforts. 2399 smokers aged 18-34 years in 10 low- to middle-income countries (Bangladesh, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Philippines, Russia, Turkey and Vietnam) viewed and individually rated the same five anti-smoking ads on a standard questionnaire and then engaged in a structured group discussion about each ad. Multivariate logistic regression analysis, with robust SEs to account for the same individual rating multiple ads, was performed to compare outcomes (message acceptance, perceived personalised effectiveness, feel uncomfortable, likelihood of discussing the ad) across ads and countries, adjusting for covariates. Ads by country interactions were examined to assess consistency of ratings across countries. Three ads with graphic imagery performed consistently highly across all countries. Two of these ads showed diseased human tissue or body parts, and a third used a disgust-provoking metaphor to demonstrate tar accumulation in smokers' lungs. A personal testimonial ad performed more variably, as many smokers did not appreciate that the featured woman's lung cancer was due to smoking or that her altered physical appearance was due to chemotherapy. An ad using a visual metaphor for lung disease was also more variable, mostly due to lack of understanding of the term 'emphysema'. Television ads that graphically communicate the serious harms of tobacco use are likely to be effective with smokers in low- to middle-income countries and can be readily translated and adapted for local use. Ads with complex medical terms or metaphors, or those that feature personal testimonials, are more variable and at least require more careful pre-testing and adaptation to maximise their potential.

  5. Utilization of 4T score to determine the pretest probability of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in a community hospital in upstate New York

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan Samhouri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT is a life-threatening condition which can lead to extensive thrombosis. Diagnosis of HIT relies on clinical suspicion determined by 4T score and immunoassays through testing for anti-PF4/heparin antibodies. Clinical practice guidelines published by the American Society of Hematology in 2013 recommended use of the 4T score before ordering the immunoassays as a measure of pretest probability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utilization of 4T score before ordering anti-PF4/heparin antibodies at Unity Hospital. Methods: We did a retrospective chart review for patients who are 18 years or older, admitted to Unity Hospital between July 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, and had anti-PF4/heparin antibodies ordered. Subjects who had prior history of HIT or had end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis were excluded. After calculating 4T score retrospectively, we calculated the proportion of patients who had 4T score documented prior to ELISA testing and proportion of ELISA tests, which were not indicated due to a 4T score less than or equal to 3 using Minitab 16. Results: Review of 123 patients, with an average age of 69.4 years, showed that testing was indicated in 18 patients. Six subjects had positive results, and testing was indicated in all of them. 4T score was documented in three patients. This quality improvement study showed that 4T score documentation rate at Unity Hospital is 2.4%. Anti-PF4/heparin antibody testing was indicated in 14.6%. This test is being overused in thrombocytopenia work up at Unity Hospital, costing $9,345. The topic was reviewed for residents. A prompt and calculator for 4T score were added to electronic medical records before ordering the test as a step to improve high value care.

  6. The Effects of an Interactive Nursing Skills Mobile Application on Nursing Students' Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Skills Performance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunsun Kim, MSN, RN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical nursing practice is important because it helps nursing students experience realities of clinical nursing that cannot be learned through theoretical education. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an interactive nursing skills mobile application for nursing students. Methods: Sixty-six senior nursing students were randomly assigned to experimental or control groups. The experimental group used an interactive nursing skills mobile application for 1 week. The control group was provided with a mobile application containing noninteractive nursing video contents for 1 week. Before (pre-test and 1 week after (post-test using the mobile application, participants' knowledge of clinical nursing skills, self-efficacy of nursing practice, and nursing skills performance were assessed. Results: The experimental group showed a significantly higher value for knowledge after 1 week of treatment via their mobile application than the control group (t = 3.34, p = .001. In addition, they showed significantly improved self-efficacy before and after intervention (t = 2.46, p = .017 than the control group. The experimental group's nursing skills performance was also significantly enhanced after intervention (t = 7.05, p < .001, with a significant difference in the degree of improvement (t = 4.47, p < .001. Conclusion: The interactive learner-centered nursing education mobile application with systematic contents was an effective method for students to experience practical nursing skills. Developing and applying a mobile application with other nursing contents that can be effectively used across all range of nursing students is recommended. Keywords: interactive learning, mobile applications, nursing education, nursing student, practical nursing

  7. The Effects of an Interactive Nursing Skills Mobile Application on Nursing Students' Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Skills Performance: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsun; Suh, Eunyoung E

    2018-03-01

    Clinical nursing practice is important because it helps nursing students experience realities of clinical nursing that cannot be learned through theoretical education. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an interactive nursing skills mobile application for nursing students. Sixty-six senior nursing students were randomly assigned to experimental or control groups. The experimental group used an interactive nursing skills mobile application for 1 week. The control group was provided with a mobile application containing noninteractive nursing video contents for 1 week. Before (pre-test) and 1 week after (post-test) using the mobile application, participants' knowledge of clinical nursing skills, self-efficacy of nursing practice, and nursing skills performance were assessed. The experimental group showed a significantly higher value for knowledge after 1 week of treatment via their mobile application than the control group (t = 3.34, p = .001). In addition, they showed significantly improved self-efficacy before and after intervention (t = 2.46, p = .017) than the control group. The experimental group's nursing skills performance was also significantly enhanced after intervention (t = 7.05, p mobile application with systematic contents was an effective method for students to experience practical nursing skills. Developing and applying a mobile application with other nursing contents that can be effectively used across all range of nursing students is recommended. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Effects of an intervention with drinking chamomile tea on sleep quality and depression in sleep disturbed postnatal women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shao-Min; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of chamomile tea on sleep quality, fatigue and depression in postpartum women. Sleep quality is a significant issue for postnatal women. Chamomile is widely used as a folk remedy for its presumed sedative-hypnotic effects. A pretest-post-test randomized controlled trial was used. A total of 80 Taiwanese postnatal women with poor sleep quality (Postpartum Sleep Quality Scale; PSQS score ≧16) were recruited from November 2012-August 2013. They were systematically assigned, with a random start, to either the experimental group (n = 40) or the control group (n = 40). The participants in the experimental group were instructed to drink chamomile tea for a period of 2 weeks. The participants in the control group received regular postpartum care only. The PSQS, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, and Postpartum Fatigue Scale were used to assess outcomes. Two-sample t-tests were used to examine the mean differences in outcome variables between the two groups. Compared with the control group, the experimental group demonstrated significantly lower scores of physical-symptoms-related sleep inefficiency (t = -2·482, P = 0·015) and the symptoms of depression (t = -2·372, P = 0·020). However, the scores for all three instruments were similar for both groups at 4-week post-test, suggesting that the positive effects of chamomile tea were limited to the immediate term. Chamomile tea may be recommended to postpartum women as a supplementary approach to alleviating depression and sleep quality problems. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Pediatric emergency medicine asynchronous e-learning: a multicenter randomized controlled Solomon four-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Todd P; Pham, Phung K; Sobolewski, Brad; Doughty, Cara B; Jamal, Nazreen; Kwan, Karen Y; Little, Kim; Brenkert, Timothy E; Mathison, David J

    2014-08-01

    Asynchronous e-learning allows for targeted teaching, particularly advantageous when bedside and didactic education is insufficient. An asynchronous e-learning curriculum has not been studied across multiple centers in the context of a clinical rotation. We hypothesize that an asynchronous e-learning curriculum during the pediatric emergency medicine (EM) rotation improves medical knowledge among residents and students across multiple participating centers. Trainees on pediatric EM rotations at four large pediatric centers from 2012 to 2013 were randomized in a Solomon four-group design. The experimental arms received an asynchronous e-learning curriculum consisting of nine Web-based, interactive, peer-reviewed Flash/HTML5 modules. Postrotation testing and in-training examination (ITE) scores quantified improvements in knowledge. A 2 × 2 analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) tested interaction and main effects, and Pearson's correlation tested associations between module usage, scores, and ITE scores. A total of 256 of 458 participants completed all study elements; 104 had access to asynchronous e-learning modules, and 152 were controls who used the current education standards. No pretest sensitization was found (p = 0.75). Use of asynchronous e-learning modules was associated with an improvement in posttest scores (p e-learning is an effective educational tool to improve knowledge in a clinical rotation. Web-based asynchronous e-learning is a promising modality to standardize education among multiple institutions with common curricula, particularly in clinical rotations where scheduling difficulties, seasonality, and variable experiences limit in-hospital learning. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  10. Argentine tango dance compared to mindfulness meditation and a waiting-list control: a randomised trial for treating depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinniger, Rosa; Brown, Rhonda F; Thorsteinsson, Einar B; McKinley, Patricia

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether tango dancing is as effective as mindfulness meditation in reducing symptoms of psychological stress, anxiety and depression, and in promoting well-being. This study employed analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and multiple regression analysis. Ninety-seven people with self-declared depression were randomised into tango dance or mindfulness meditation classes, or to control/waiting-list. classes were conducted in a venue suitable for both activities in the metropolitan area of Sydney, Australia. Participants completed six-week programmes (1½h/week of tango or meditation). The outcome measures were assessed at pre-test and post-test. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale; The Self Esteem Scale; Satisfaction with Life Scale, and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale. Sixty-six participants completed the program and were included in the statistical analysis. Depression levels were significantly reduced in the tango (effect size d=0.50, p=.010), and meditation groups (effect size d=0.54, p=.025), relative to waiting-list controls. Stress levels were significantly reduced only in the tango group (effect size d=0.45, p=.022). Attending tango classes was a significant predictor for the increased levels of mindfulness R(2)=.10, adjusted R(2)=.07, F (2,59)=3.42, p=.039. Mindfulness-meditation and tango dance could be effective complementary adjuncts for the treatment of depression and/or inclusion in stress management programmes. Subsequent trials are called to explore the therapeutic mechanisms involved. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Portable Radio-Controlled Air Sampler and Environmental Radiation Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, R.B.

    1967-01-01

    The destructive testing of prototype nuclear devices at the United States Atomic Energy Commission's Test Sites and the possible release of radioactive effluent to the atmosphere, necessitates capability in sampling and analysis of these effluents. Understanding of the destruction mechanism, air transport and deposition phenomena as well as an evaluation of the potential hazard to the surrounding population can be gained by a study of gross gamma measurements, nuclides released and particle-size distribution. The acquisition of these fundamental data frequently takes hundreds of man hours to transport, locate and operate power sources of the engine-generator type, laboratory instrumentation and air-sampling devices on a downwind grid from the test site. The sophisticated laboratory equipment normally used is ill suited to rough handling over poor access roads and operation in the severe climatic environment routinely encountered in the test areas. The problems and time associated with the start-up of many tens of these instrumentation systems and the uncertainty in time of the test release due to varying wind parameters are an added inducement for improved hardware and procedures. A portable battery-powered monitoring system has been designed to detect and record pre-test and post-test beta-gamma radiation levels and the radioactivity build-up and decay on an air sampler filter. The capability exists for the remote ON-OFF switching of the air sampler by radio signal. The entire electronic system is housed in an aluminum carrying case with the electronics sealed from moisture and dust contamination. The remote switching concept used provides for 1438 individual control functions or 46 group control functions depending upon the address frequencies selected. The satisfactory operation of the remote control feature is limited only by the path distance over which the radio control link will function. Two channels of radiation data are permanently recorded on a pressure

  12. ORCHIDS: an Observational Randomized Controlled Trial on Childhood Differential Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhangur Rabia R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central tenet in developmental psychopathology is that childhood rearing experiences have a major impact on children’s development. Recently, candidate genes have been identified that may cause children to be differentially susceptible to these experiences (i.e., susceptibility genes. However, our understanding of the differential impact of parenting is limited at best. Specifically, more experimental research is needed. The ORCHIDS study will investigate gene-(gene-environment interactions to obtain more insight into a moderating effects of polymorphisms on the link between parenting and child behavior, and b behavioral mechanisms that underlie these gene-(gene-environment interactions in an experimental design. Methods/Design The ORCHIDS study is a randomized controlled trial, in which the environment will be manipulated with an intervention (i.e., Incredible Years parent training. In a screening, families with children aged 4–8 who show mild to (subclinical behavior problems will be targeted through community records via two Dutch regional healthcare organizations. Assessments in both the intervention and control condition will be conducted at baseline (i.e., pretest, after 6 months (i.e., posttest, and after 10 months (i.e., follow-up. Discussion This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial that investigates gene-(gene-environment interactions in the development of child behavior. Two hypotheses will be tested. First, we expect that children in the intervention condition who carry one or more susceptibility genes will show significantly lower levels of problem behavior and higher levels of prosocial behavior after their parent(s received the Incredible Years training, compared to children without these genes, or children in the control group. Second, we expect that children carrying one or more susceptibility genes will show a heightened sensitivity to changes in parenting behaviors, and

  13. Controlling

    OpenAIRE

    Hriňáková, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The topic of my diploma thesis is controlling. The first part is theoretical where I describe the history, meaning and functions of controlling. After that I also specify the methods of strategical, operational and cost controlling. The practical part applied method of controlling to the selected company. The aim of this study is to determine the benefits of controlling for the company. At the operational level it describes the process of controlling in the firm and there are given suggestion...

  14. Formative Evaluation of a University Birth Control Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettman, Julie K. Doidge; Sarvela, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    A university birth control education program was created to improve student knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Students attended a birth control class before visiting the health clinic for prescriptions. Pre- and posttest questionnaires and clinician assessments indicated knowledge of birth control improved significantly, and students became…

  15. A new virtual-reality training module for laparoscopic surgical skills and equipment handling: can multitasking be trained? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Pim J; Diederick van Hove, P; Stassen, Laurents P S; Dankelman, Jenny; Schreuder, Henk W R

    2015-01-01

    During laparoscopic surgery distractions often occur and multitasking between surgery and other tasks, such as technical equipment handling, is a necessary competence. In psychological research, reduction of adverse effects of distraction is demonstrated when specifically multitasking is trained. The aim of this study was to examine whether multitasking and more specifically task-switching can be trained in a virtual-reality (VR) laparoscopic skills simulator. After randomization, the control group trained separately with an insufflator simulation module and a laparoscopic skills exercise module on a VR simulator. In the intervention group, insufflator module and VR skills exercises were combined to develop a new integrated training in which multitasking was a required competence. At random moments, problems with the insufflator appeared and forced the trainee to multitask. During several repetitions of a different multitask VR skills exercise as posttest, performance parameters (laparoscopy time, insufflator time, and errors) were measured and compared between both the groups as well with a pretest exercise to establish the learning effect. A face-validity questionnaire was filled afterward. University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands. Medical and PhD students (n = 42) from University Medical Centre Utrecht, without previous experience in laparoscopic simulation, were randomly assigned to either intervention (n = 21) or control group (n = 21). All participants performed better in the posttest exercises without distraction of the insufflator compared with the exercises in which multitasking was necessary to solve the insufflator problems. After training, the intervention group was significantly quicker in solving the insufflator problems (mean = 1.60Log(s) vs 1.70Log(s), p = 0.02). No significant differences between both the groups were seen in laparoscopy time and errors. Multitasking has negative effects on the laparoscopic performance. This study suggests

  16. The 1999-2000 North Carolina State Testing Results: Multiple-Choice Grade 3 Pretest, End-of-Grade, High School Comprehensive, and End-of-Course Tests. Reporting on the State and 117 Public School Systems and 76 Charter Schools. "The Green Book."

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Accountability/Testing.

    This document contains results for 1999-2000 for North Carolina state testing programs. The Grade 3 pretest is a multiple-choice reading and mathematics test administered to students in the first 3 weeks of grade 3. This pretest was administered to more than 102,000 students in the 1999-2000 school year. Results showed that 69.8% of students…

  17. The North Carolina State Testing Results, 1998-99. Multiple-Choice, Grade 3 Pretest, End-of-Grade, High School Comprehensive, and End-of-Course Tests. Reporting on the State and 117 Public School Systems and 61 Charter Schools. "The Green Book."

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Accountability/Testing.

    This document contains results for 1998-1999 for several North Carolina state testing programs. The Grade 3 Pretest is a multiple-choice reading and mathematics test administered to students in the first 3 weeks of third grade. This pretest was administered to more than 101,000 students in the beginning of the 1998-1999 school year. Results show…

  18. LEARNER-CENTERED MICRO TEACHING IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman KILIC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of Learner-Centered Micro Teaching (LCMT on the development of teacher candidates’ teaching competencies. To achive this goal, teacher candidates’ teaching behaviors on subject area, planning, teaching process, classroom management, communication, and evaluation have been pre- and posttested, and the effectiveness of LCMT has been determined based on differences in the results of pre- and posttests. In this study, pretest-posttest design was used without a control group. Teacher candidates’ teaching behaviors before they entered the experiment were determined by pretests and at the end of the treatment the teacher candidates were given posttests. The experimentation was constructured based on LCMT model. Results based on the scores in the pre- and posttests showed that LCMT model had a progress in teacher candidates’ teaching behaviors on subject area, planning, teaching process, classroom management, communication, and evaluation.

  19. The effects of the CORE programme on pain at rest, movement-induced and secondary pain, active range of motion, and proprioception in female office workers with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Eun-Hye; Cho, Hwi-young

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effects of the CORE programme on pain at rest, movement-induced pain, secondary pain, active range of motion, and proprioception deficits in female office workers with chronic low back pain. Randomized controlled trial. Rehabilitation clinics. A total of 53 participants with chronic low back pain were randomized into the CORE group and the control group. CORE group participants underwent the 30-minute CORE programme, five times per week, for eight weeks, with additional use of hot-packs and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, while the control group used only hot-packs and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Participants were evaluated pretest, posttest, and two months after the intervention period to measure resting and movement-induced pain, pressure pain as secondary pain, active range of pain-free motion, and trunk proprioception. Pain intensity at rest (35.6 ±5.9 mm) and during movement (39.4 ±9.1 mm) was significantly decreased in the CORE group following intervention compared with the control group. There were significant improvements in pressure pain thresholds (quadratus lumborum: 2.2 ±0.7 kg/cm(2); sacroiliac joint: 2.0 ±0.7 kg/cm(2)), active range of motion (flexion: 30.8 ±14.3°; extension: 6.6 ±2.5°), and proprioception (20° flexion: 4.3 ±2.4°; 10° extension: 3.1 ±2.0°) in the CORE group following intervention (all p proprioception in female office workers with chronic low back pain. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. An evaluation of a nurse-led rehabilitation programme (the ProBalance Programme) to improve balance and reduce fall risk of community-dwelling older people: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Bruna Raquel; Gonçalves Jardim, Helena; Martins, Maria Manuela; Gouveia, Élvio Rúbio; de Freitas, Duarte Luís; Maia, José António; Rose, Debra J

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to assess the effect of a nurse-led rehabilitation programme (the ProBalance Programme) on balance and fall risk of community-dwelling older people from Madeira Island, Portugal. Single-blind, randomised controlled trial. University laboratory. Community-dwelling older people, aged 65-85, with balance impairments. Participants were randomly allocated to an intervention group (IG; n=27) or a wait-list control group (CG; n=25). A rehabilitation nursing programme included gait, balance, functional training, strengthening, flexibility, and 3D training. One trained rehabilitation nurse administered the group-based intervention over a period of 12 weeks (90min sessions, 2 days per week). A wait-list control group was instructed to maintain their usual activities during the same time period. Balance was assessed using the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) scale. The time points for assessment were at zero (pre-test), 12 (post-test), and 24 weeks (follow up). Changes in the mean (SD) FAB scale scores immediately following the 12-week intervention were 5.15 (2.81) for the IG and -1.45 (2.80) for the CG. At follow-up, the mean (SD) change scores were -1.88 (1.84) and 0.75 (2.99) for the IG and CG, respectively. The results of a mixed between-within subjects analysis of variance, controlling for physical activity levels at baseline, revealed a significant interaction between group and time (F (2, 42)=27.89, pbalance and reducing fall risk in a group of older people with balance impairment, immediately after the intervention. A decline in balance was observed for the IG after a period of no intervention. ACTRN12612000301864. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The modulation of motor control by imitating non-biological motions: a study about motor resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Yu; Yamamoto, Taisei

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] Sensorimotor experience modulates motor resonance, such as motor interference, which occurs when observing others' movements; however, it is unclear how motor resonance is modulated by intentionally imitating others' movements. This study examined the effects of imitation experience on subsequent motor resonance. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven healthy participants performed horizontal arm movements while observing non-biological, incongruent (vertical) movements of a visual stimulus (triangle object) in pre- and post-test procedures. Thirteen participants in the imitation group imitated vertical movements (non-biological motion) of the triangle object between pre- and post-test procedures and fourteen participants in the non-imitation group observed that. [Results] Variance in the executed movements was measured as an index of motor resonance. Although there was no significant difference in the non-imitation group, there was a significantly smaller variance for post-test compared to pre-test in the imitation group. [Conclusion] Motor resonance was inhibited by intentionally imitating non-biological motions. Imitating movements different from one's own motor property might inhibit subsequent motor resonance. This finding might be applied to selectively using motor resonance as a form of rehabilitation.

  2. Strengths-based positive psychology interventions: A randomized placebo-controlled online trial on long-term effects for a signature strengths- vs. a lesser strengths-intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René T. Proyer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen an increasing interest in research in positive psychology interventions. There is broad evidence for their effectiveness in increasing well-being and ameliorating depression. Intentional activities that focus on those character strengths, which are most typical for a person (i.e., signature strengths and encourage their usage in a new way have been identified as highly effective. The current study aims at comparing an intervention aimed at using signature strengths with one on using individual low scoring (or lesser strengths in a randomized placebo-controlled trial. A total of 375 adults were randomly assigned to one of the two intervention conditions (i.e., using five signature vs. five lesser strengths in a new way or a placebo control condition (i.e., early memories. We measured happiness and depressive symptoms at five time points (i.e., pre- and post-test, 1-, 3-, and 6-months follow-ups and character strengths at pre-test. The main findings are that (1 there were increases in happiness for up to three months and decreased depressive symptoms in the short term in both intervention conditions; (2 participants found working with strengths equally rewarding (enjoyment and benefit in both conditions; (3 those participants that reported generally higher levels of strengths benefitted more from working on lesser strengths rather than signature strengths and those with comparatively lower levels of strengths tended to benefit more from working on signature strengths; and (4 deviations from an average profile derived from a large sample of German-speakers completing the Values-in-Action Inventory of Strengths (VIA-IS were associated with greater benefit from the interventions in the signature strengths intervention. We conclude that working on character strengths is effective for increasing happiness and discuss how these interventions could be tailored to the individual for promoting their effectiveness.

  3. The effects of scenario-based simulation course training on nurses' communication competence and self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Chang, Wen-Hui; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that an underappreciation of the importance of person-centered communication and inappropriate communication training could result in unsatisfactory communication performance from nurses. There are a large number of studies about communication training for nurses, but not so many about communication training in early stages of nursing career. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of a traditional course versus scenario-based simulation training on nurses' communication competency, communication self-efficacy, and communication performance in discharge planning Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). A randomized controlled trial was used with a pretest and two posttests. The experimental group underwent the scenario-based simulation course, whereas the control group received the traditional course. A convenience sample of 116 nurses with qualifications ranging from N0 level (novice nurses) to N2 level (competent nurses) in Taiwan's clinical nursing ladder system was recruited from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Analysis of covariance was used to determine between-subjects effects on communication competency and self-efficacy, whereas independent t test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to examine between-subjects effects on learner satisfaction and discharge planning communication performance. Paired t test was used to determine communication self-efficacy. In this study, the nurses and independent raters found scenario-based simulation training more effective than traditional communication course. However, standardized patients reported no significant difference in communication performance between the two groups of nurses. Despite that traditional classroom lectures and simulation-based communication training could both produce enhanced communication competency and self-efficacy among nurses, this study has established that the latter may be better than the former in terms of learner satisfaction and communication

  4. Strengths-based positive psychology interventions: a randomized placebo-controlled online trial on long-term effects for a signature strengths- vs. a lesser strengths-intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proyer, René T; Gander, Fabian; Wellenzohn, Sara; Ruch, Willibald

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing interest in research in positive psychology interventions. There is broad evidence for their effectiveness in increasing well-being and ameliorating depression. Intentional activities that focus on those character strengths, which are most typical for a person (i.e., signature strengths, SS) and encourage their usage in a new way have been identified as highly effective. The current study aims at comparing an intervention aimed at using SS with one on using individual low scoring (or lesser) strengths in a randomized placebo-controlled trial. A total of 375 adults were randomly assigned to one of the two intervention conditions [i.e., using five signature vs. five lesser strengths (LS) in a new way] or a placebo control condition (i.e., early memories). We measured happiness and depressive symptoms at five time points (i.e., pre- and post-test, 1-, 3-, and 6-months follow-ups) and character strengths at pre-test. The main findings are that (1) there were increases in happiness for up to 3 months and decreases in depressive symptoms in the short term in both intervention conditions; (2) participants found working with strengths equally rewarding (enjoyment and benefit) in both conditions; (3) those participants that reported generally higher levels of strengths benefitted more from working on LS rather than SS and those with comparatively lower levels of strengths tended to benefit more from working on SS; and (4) deviations from an average profile derived from a large sample of German-speakers completing the Values-in-Action Inventory of Strengths were associated with greater benefit from the interventions in the SS-condition. We conclude that working on character strengths is effective for increasing happiness and discuss how these interventions could be tailored to the individual for promoting their effectiveness.

  5. A RCT Comparing Daily Mindfulness Meditations, Biofeedback Exercises, and Daily Physical Exercise on Attention Control, Executive Functioning, Mindful Awareness, Self-Compassion, and Worrying in Stressed Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Esther I; van der Zwan, J Esi; Bögels, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Our Western society is characterized by multitasking, competition, and constant time pressure. Negative effects of stress for the individual (anxiety, depression, somatic complaints) and for organizations and society (costs due to work absence) are very high. Thus, time-efficient self-help interventions to address these issues are necessary. This study assessed the effects of daily mindfulness meditations (MM) versus daily heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) and daily physical exercise (PE) on attention control, executive functioning, mindful awareness, self-compassion, and worrying. Young adults ( n  = 75, age range 18 to 40) with elevated stress levels were randomized to MM, HRV-BF, or PE, and measurements were taken at pre-test, post-test, and follow-up. Interventions in all three groups were self-guided and lasted for 5 weeks. Generalized estimating equation analyses showed that overall, all three interventions were effective and did not differ from each other. However, practice time differed between groups, with participants in the PE group practicing much more than participants in the other two groups. Therefore, additional analyses were carried out in two subsamples. The optimal dose sample included only those participants who practiced for at least 70 % of the total prescribed time. In the equal dose sample, home practice intensity was equal for all three groups. Again, the effects of the three interventions did not differ. In conclusion, MM, HRV-BF, and PE are all effective self-help methods to improve attention control, executive functioning, mindful awareness, self-compassion, and worrying, and mindfulness meditation was not found to be more effective than HRV-biofeedback or physical exercise for these cognitive processes.

  6. Evaluation of a program to prevent political violence in the Basque conflict: effects on the capacity of empathy, anger management and the definition of peace Evaluación de un programa para la prevención de la violencia política en el conflicto vasco: efectos en la capacidad de empatía, el control de la ira y la definición de paz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Garaigordobil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effects of a program for the prevention of political violence on empathy, expression of feelings of anger, and the capacity to define peace-violence. Method: This study used a quasi-experimental design with pretest-posttest repeated measures and a control group. The sample comprised 276 adolescents aged between 15 and 17 years (191 in the experimental group, 85 in the control group; 127 boys and 149 girls. A battery of three assessment instruments was administered before and after the intervention. The aim of the program was to increase sensitivity to the victims of political violence, promote respect for human rights, and prevent violence. The intervention consisted of 10 sessions over 3 months. Results: MANOVA analyses revealed that the program increased participants' capacity of empathy (perspective-taking, anger control in annoying situations, and capacity to define peace-violence. Conclusions: This study has practical educational implications and provides an intervention tool that enhances the development of personality during adolescence and may have a preventive effect on violent behavior.Objetivo: Evaluar los efectos de un programa para prevenir la violencia política en la capacidad de empatía, la expresión de sentimientos de ira y la definición de paz-violencia. Método: El estudio utilizó un diseño cuasiexperimental de medidas repetidas pretest-intervención-postest con grupo de control. La muestra está configurada con 276 adolescentes de 15 a 17 años de edad; de ellos, 191 son experimentales y 85 controles, 127 hombres y 149 mujeres. Se administró una batería de tres instrumentos de evaluación antes y después de aplicar el programa de intervención. El objetivo del programa fue incrementar la sensibilidad hacia las víctimas de la violencia política, promover el respeto por los derechos humanos y prevenir la violencia. La intervención consistió en 10 sesiones realizadas durante 3 meses

  7. The effect of kinesio® tape on vertical jump and dynamic postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Mikiko A; Baldridge, Carolann

    2013-08-01

    Ankle injuries are one of the most common injuries among physically active individuals. The role of prophylactic ankle taping and bracing has been studied extensively. Kinesio(®) Tape (KT) is a somewhat new type of taping technique gaining popularity as both treatment and performance enhancement tool. However, there is limited research on the effect of KT on functional performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the application of Kinesio Tex(®) Tape had an effect on vertical jump and dynamic postural control in healthy young individuals. 52 healthy subjects free of ankle or lower extremity problems (28 males and 24 females; age: 22.12±2.08 years; height: 170.77±8.69 cm; weight: 69.90±12.03 kg) participated in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (KT with tension) or the control group (KT without tension). Vertical jump was measured using the VertiMetric device and dynamic postural control was assessed using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) under three conditions: (1) without taping; (2) immediately after taping; (3) 24 hours after taping with the taping remaining in situ. Three-way repeated measure ANOVA was conducted in order to identify differences between the experimental and the control group during the three conditions. Overall, there were no differences between groups in vertical jump maximum height, vertical jump average height, or the SEBT scores for the three time periods (pre-test, post-test, 24hrs-post-test). However, the main effect of KT was moderated by a significant gender interaction, resulting in a statistically significant effect of KT for the SEBT scores in the posterior-medial direction, F(1.72, 82.57) = 4.50, p = 0.018 and the medial direction, F(1.75, 83.81) = 4.27, p = 0.021. Follow-up analyses indicated that female subjects in the KT group had increased SEBT scores between three time periods when compared to the placebo group. KT application on the ankle neither decreased

  8. Effects of flipped instruction on the performance and attitude of high school students in mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remalyn Q. Casem

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effects of flipped instruction on the performance and attitude of high school students in Mathematics. The study made use of the true experimental design, specifically the pretest-posttest control group design. There were two instruments used to gather data, the pretest-posttest which was subjected to validity and reliability tests and the Modified Fennema-Sherman Attitudes Scale. It was found out that the experimental and control groups were comparable in the pretest and posttest. Comparison on their gain scores revealed significant difference with performance of the experimental group higher than the control group. There was no significant difference on the level of attitude of the participants in the experimental group before and after the study in terms of confidence in learning mathematics, attitude toward success in mathematics, mathematics anxiety and perception of teacher's attitudes. A very weak positive relationship existed between performance and attitudes toward mathematics.

  9. Effectiveness of a parental training programme in enhancing the parent-child relationship and reducing harsh parenting practices and parental stress in preparing children for their transition to primary school: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ho Cheung William; Chan, Sophia S C; Mak, Yim Wah; Lam, Tai Hing

    2013-11-16

    Entering primary school is an important childhood milestone, marking the beginning of a child's formal education. Yet the change creates a time of vulnerability for the child, the parents and the parent-child relationship. Failure to adjust to the transition may place the family in a psychologically devastating position. The aims of this study were to test the effectiveness of a parental training programme in enhancing the parent-child relationship and decreasing parental stress by reducing harsh parenting in preparing children for the transition to primary school. A randomised controlled trial incorporating a two-group pre-test and repeated post-test was conducted in one of the largest public housing estates in Hong Kong. A total of 142 parents were recruited, with 72 parents randomly assigned to the experimental group and 70 to the control group. Harsh parenting practices, parent-child relationships and parental stress were assessed. In comparison to parents in the control group, those in the experimental group engaged in less harsh parenting practices and reported better parent-child relationships. However, parental stress scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. This study addressed a gap in the literature by examining the effectiveness of the training programme for enhancing parent-child relationship and decreasing parental stress at the time of a child's transition to primary school. The findings from this study provide empirical evidence of the effectiveness of the parental training programme and highlight the significance of parenting in promoting a smooth transition for children from kindergarten to primary 1. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01845948.

  10. Verification of the ATHLET computer code based on post-test analyses of BETHSY experiments (BETHSY 4.1a TC and BETHSY 3.4a). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schall, M.

    1994-10-01

    To validate the fluid dynamic computer code ATHLET a post-test calculation of experiment BETHSY 4.1aTC was performed. The test objective was the investigation of natural circulation at constant core power (5% nominal power) at different mass inventories in the primary circuit and the steam generators. BETHSY 4.1aTC consists of 2 phases with different liquid levels in the steam generators: Nominal liquid level (H=13.5 m) in phase 1 and reduced liquid level (H=1 m) in phase 2. The results of the post-test calculations of both phases showed excellent agreement with the experimental data (pressure differences in the primary circuit, loop flow rates) before the beginning of vaporization in the U-tubes. Subsequently the calculated results concerning the difference of the average void fraction in the ascending and descending leg of the U-tubes disagreed from the measured data in phase 1 leading to discrepancies between calculated and measured data with respect to the loop flow rates and other physical quantities. In phase 2 of the experiment market cyclic filling and voiding processes in the U-tubes are detected, which are not simulated qualitatively in the calculation. These processes possibly lead to an increase in the global heat transfer between primary and secondary circuit in the experiment which is not predicted in the calculation. As a consequence dry out in the core occurs in the calculation, however not in the experiment. The code version ATHLET Mod 1.1, Cycle A has an increased robustness compared to the predecessor version ATHLET Mod 1.0, Cycle E. This could be demonstrated in a post-test calculation of the BETHSY 3.4a, which was already analysed in project 1500887 using the version ATHLET Mod 1.0, Cycle E. Whereas significant numerical problems (e.g. code breakdowns) occured in the latter calculation, the corresponding simulation using the new version performed smoothly and showed identical results with a reduced computer run time. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Efficacy of positive reinforcement and self control in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment is a quasi-experimental type that adopted a pretest, post test treatment control group using a 3 x 2 factorial matrix, with the treatment conditions in the rows and gender in the columns. There were three experimental groups comprising of two treatment groups and a no treatment control group. The participants ...

  12. International Standard problem ISP 14: behaviour of a fuel bundle simulator during a specified heatup and flooding period (Rebeka experiment): results of post-test analyses: final comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwat, H.

    1985-02-01

    The test consisted in investigating the non-steady material behaviour of a bundle of electrically heated fuel rod simulators with respect to local fuel temperatures, cladding strain, time to burst and local strain at location of burst, together with the thermal hydraulic boundary conditions. The original aim has not been fully achievable. The applied codes for mechanical fuel behaviour largely demonstrated their capabilities for pretest predictions when certain local fluid dynamic parameters are well known to the code users. The difficulties expected with proper analysis of thermal hydraulics of the test were confirmed, caused by the coupling between pin cooling conditions, rod upper plenum calculations and the feedback to clad deformation and burst simulation

  13. Impact of contact on adolescents? mental health literacy and stigma: the SchoolSpace cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chisholm, Katharine; Patterson, Paul; Torgerson, Carole; Turner, Erin; Jenkinson, David; Birchwood, Max

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether intergroup contact in addition to education is more effective than education alone in reducing stigma of mental illness in adolescents. Design A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial compared education alone with education plus contact. Blocking was used to randomly stratify classes within schools to condition. Random allocation was concealed, generated by a computer algorithm, and undertaken after pretest. Data was collected at pretest and 2-week...

  14. Impact of contact on adolescents’ mental health literacy and stigma : the SchoolSpace cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chisholm, Katharine Elizabeth; Patterson, Paul; Torgerson, Carole; Turner, Erin; Jenkinson, David J.; Birchwood, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether intergroup contact in addition to education is more effective than education alone in reducing stigma of mental illness in adolescents.A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial compared education alone with education plus contact. Blocking was used to randomly stratify classes within schools to condition. Random allocation was concealed, generated by a computer algorithm, and undertaken after pretest. Data was collected at pretest and 2-week follow-up. Analyses us...

  15. Effects of a music therapy voice protocol on speech intelligibility, vocal acoustic measures, and mood of individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneishi, E

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a Music Therapy Voice Protocol (MTVP) on speech intelligibility, vocal intensity, maximum vocal range, maximum duration of sustained vowel phonation, vocal fundamental frequency, vocal fundamental frequency variability, and mood of individuals with Parkinson's disease. Four female patients, who demonstrated voice and speech problems, served as their own controls and participated in baseline assessment (study pretest), a series of MTVP sessions involving vocal and singing exercises, and final evaluation (study posttest). In study pre and posttests, data for speech intelligibility and all acoustic variables were collected. Statistically significant increases were found in speech intelligibility, as rated by caregivers, and in vocal intensity from study pretest to posttest as the results of paired samples t-tests. In addition, before and after each MTVP session (session pre and posttests), self-rated mood scores and selected acoustic variables were collected. No significant differences were found in any of the variables from the session pretests to posttests, across the entire treatment period, or their interactions as the results of two-way ANOVAs with repeated measures. Although not significant, the mean of mood scores in session posttests (M = 8.69) was higher than that in session pretests (M = 7.93).

  16. The Effects of High- and Low-Anxiety Training on the Anticipation Judgments of Elite Performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, David; Ford, Paul R; Causer, Joe; Williams, A Mark

    2016-02-01

    We examined the effects of high- versus low-anxiety conditions during video-based training of anticipation judgments using international-level badminton players facing serves and the transfer to high-anxiety and field-based conditions. Players were assigned to a high-anxiety training (HA), low-anxiety training (LA) or control group (CON) in a pretraining-posttest design. In the pre- and posttest, players anticipated serves from video and on court under high- and low-anxiety conditions. In the video-based high-anxiety pretest, anticipation response accuracy was lower and final fixations shorter when compared with the low-anxiety pretest. In the low-anxiety posttest, HA and LA demonstrated greater accuracy of judgments and longer final fixations compared with pretest and CON. In the high-anxiety posttest, HA maintained accuracy when compared with the low-anxiety posttest, whereas LA had lower accuracy. In the on-court posttest, the training groups demonstrated greater accuracy of judgments compared with the pretest and CON.

  17. A Componential Approach to Training Reading Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-17

    list roll emptied maintained shot cream 8 felt bees sanded cables strand bridle 9 went both wicked giant classic blue 10 tell pail backing taping snap...Table 3.3 Cumulative Summary of Performance: Subject KG Criterion Speed Racer Ski- Jumo Measure Pretest Posttest/Pretest Posttest/Pretest Posttest Unit

  18. Effects of a skill demonstration video delivered by smartphone on facilitating nursing students' skill competencies and self-confidence: A randomized controlled trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yeu-Hui; Lai, Fu-Chih; Chang, Chia-Chi; Wan, Hsu-Tien

    2018-04-07

    The correct and appropriate performance of nursing skills by students can ensure patient safety and care quality. However, developing appropriate teaching and learning strategies to enhance nursing students' nursing skills and knowledge are challenging tasks for nursing faculty members. Nowadays, smartphones are popular mobile devices that are used on campuses by students and could be considered a potential tool to deliver learning materials to nursing students. This study aimed to examine the effects of a skill demonstration video delivered by smartphone on facilitating nursing students' nursing skill competency and confidence. A randomized controlled trial study design was used. A convenience sample of nursing students at a university was recruited. After receiving a regular nursing skills lab demonstration, pre-test data were collected from nursing students in an intervention group (n = 44) and a comparison group (n = 43). Then, students in the intervention group downloaded the skill demonstration video onto their smartphones, while the comparison group did not. Post-test data were collected at 2 weeks after the intervention. There were significant differences in students' urinary catheterization knowledge (F = 4.219, p = 0.04) and skills (F = 6.739, p = 0.013), but there was no difference in students' confidence level (F = 2.201, p = 0.142) between the two groups after the intervention. Furthermore, the average score of the satisfaction level regarding the intervention was 4.46 (SD = 0.43) on a scale of 1-5. This study found that delivering learning materials through smartphones to nursing students is suitable. Although there was no significant difference in students' self-confidence level, students' knowledge and skills were improved by the intervention. Smartphones can serve as a supplemental tool for learning nursing skills. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of controlled whole-body vibration training in improving fall risk factors among individuals with multiple sclerosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Finlayson, Marcia; Bethoux, Francois; Su, Xiaogang; Dillon, Loretta; Maldonado, Hector M

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically examine the effect of an 8-week controlled whole-body vibration training on improving fall risk factors and the bone mineral density among people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). This study adopted a single group pre-test-post-test design. Twenty-five PwMS (50.3 years SD 14.1) received vibration training on a side-alternating vibration platform. Each training session was repeated three times every week for 8 weeks. Prior to and following the 8-week training course, a battery of fall risk factors were evaluated: the body balance, functional mobility, muscle strength, range of motion, and fear of falling. Bone density at both calcanei was also assessed. Twenty-two participants completed the study. Compared with pre-test, almost all fall risk factors and the bone density measurement were significantly improved at post-test, with moderate to large effect sizes varying between 0.571 and 1.007. The 8-week vibration training was well accepted by PwMS and improved their fall risk factors. The important findings of this study were that vibration training may increase the range of motion of ankle joints on the sagittal plane, lower the fear of falling, and improve bone density. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION An 8-week vibration training course could be well-accepted by people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Vibration training improves the risk factors of falls in people living with MS. Vibration training could be a promising rehabilitation intervention in individuals with MS.

  20. Body weight-supported treadmill training is no better than overground training for individuals with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Addie; Merlo-Rains, Angela; Peters, Denise M; Greene, Jennifaye V; Blanck, Erika L; Moran, Robert; Fritz, Stacy L

    2014-01-01

    Body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) has produced mixed results compared with other therapeutic techniques. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an intensive intervention (intensive mobility training) including BWSTT provides superior gait, balance, and mobility outcomes compared with a similar intervention with overground gait training in place of BWSTT. Forty-three individuals with chronic stroke (mean [SD] age, 61.5 [13.5] years; mean [SD] time since stroke, 3.3 [3.8] years), were randomized to a treatment (BWSTT, n = 23) or control (overground gait training, n = 20) group. Treatment consisted of 1 hour of gait training; 1 hour of balance activities; and 1 hour of strength, range of motion, and coordination for 10 consecutive weekdays (30 hours). Assessments (step length differential, self-selected and fast walking speed, 6-minute walk test, Berg Balance Scale [BBS], Dynamic Gait Index [DGI], Activities-specific Balance Confidence [ABC] scale, single limb stance, Timed Up and Go [TUG], Fugl-Meyer [FM], and perceived recovery [PR]) were conducted before, immediately after, and 3 months after intervention. No significant differences (α = 0.05) were found between groups after training or at follow-up; therefore, groups were combined for remaining analyses. Significant differences (α = 0.05) were found pretest to posttest for fast walking speed, BBS, DGI, ABC, TUG, FM, and PR. DGI, ABC, TUG, and PR results remained significant at follow-up. Effect sizes were small to moderate in the direction of improvement. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of intensive interventions of durations greater than 10 days for improving gait, balance, and mobility in individuals with chronic stroke.

  1. Body Weight–Supported Treadmill Training Is No Better Than Overground Training for Individuals with Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Addie; Merlo-Rains, Angela; Peters, Denise M.; Greene, Jennifaye V.; Blanck, Erika L.; Moran, Robert; Fritz, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT) has produced mixed results compared with other therapeutic techniques. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether an intensive intervention (intensive mobility training) including BWSTT provides superior gait, balance, and mobility outcomes compared with a similar intervention with overground gait training in place of BWSTT. Methods Forty-three individuals with chronic stroke (mean [SD] age, 61.5 [13.5] years; mean [SD] time since stroke, 3.3 [3.8] years), were randomized to a treatment (BWSTT, n = 23) or control (overground gait training, n = 20) group. Treatment consisted of 1 hour of gait training; 1 hour of balance activities; and 1 hour of strength, range of motion, and coordination for 10 consecutive weekdays (30 hours). Assessments (step length differential, self-selected and fast walking speed, 6-minute walk test, Berg Balance Scale [BBS], Dynamic Gait Index [DGI], Activities-specific Balance Confidence [ABC] scale, single limb stance, Timed Up and Go [TUG], Fugl-Meyer [FM], and perceived recovery [PR]) were conducted before, immediately after, and 3 months after intervention. Results No significant differences (α = 0.05) were found between groups after training or at follow-up; therefore, groups were combined for remaining analyses. Significant differences (α = 0.05) were found pretest to posttest for fast walking speed, BBS, DGI, ABC, TUG, FM, and PR. DGI, ABC, TUG, and PR results remained significant at follow-up. Effect sizes were small to moderate in the direction of improvement. Conclusions Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of intensive interventions of durations greater than 10 days for improving gait, balance, and mobility in individuals with chronic stroke. PMID:25467394

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of Facebook to impact the knowledge of evidence-based employment practices by individuals with traumatic brain injury: A knowledge translation random control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inge, Katherine J; Graham, Carolyn W; McLaughlin, James W; Erickson, Doug; Wehman, Paul; Seward, Hannah E

    2017-09-14

    Individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) experience difficulty with obtaining and maintaining employment post-injury. Although vocational rehabilitation (VR) can be one option to provide individuals with TBI support and services to lead to successful employment outcomes, information about these services can be difficult and confusing to navigate. Providing information on evidence-based employment practices to individuals with TBI through social media could be an effective approach. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of a knowledge translation (KT) strategy and the use of a secret Facebook group, on the knowledge of evidence-based employment research by individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The study used a randomized pretest-posttest control group design. Sixty individuals with TBI were recruited through clubhouse programs in the state where the authors resided as well as through support groups nationally for individuals with TBI, and were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Both groups received information on evidence-based employment practices for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) over a three month period. One group received the information via participation in a secret Facebook group while the comparison group received information as an "e-news" email blast. Participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention with a Likert-scale instrument designed to measure knowledge of evidenced-based employment information for TBI. Both groups gained a significant amount of knowledge between baseline and post-intervention. However, there were no significant differences between groups in knowledge gained at post-intervention. While the study did not identify the most effective means of delivering information to individuals with TBI, it does provide some guidance for future KT research.

  3. Single leg jumping neuromuscular control is improved following whole body, long-axis rotational training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Burden, Robert; Krupp, Ryan; Caborn, David N M

    2011-04-01

    Improved lower extremity neuromuscular control during sports may decrease injury risk. This prospective study evaluated progressive resistance, whole body, long-axis rotational training on the Ground Force 360 device. Our hypothesis was that device training would improve lower extremity neuromuscular control based on previous reports of kinematic, ground reaction force (GRF) or electromyographic (EMG) evidence of safer or more efficient dynamic knee stability during jumping. Thirty-six healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either training (Group 1) or control (Group 2) groups. Using a pre-test, post-test study design data were collected from three SLVJ trials. Unpaired t-tests with adjustments for multiple comparisons were used to evaluate group mean change differences (P≤0.05/25≤0.002). During propulsion Group 1 standardized EMG amplitude mean change differences for gluteus maximus (-21.8% vs. +17.4%), gluteus medius (-28.6% vs. +15.0%), rectus femoris (-27.1% vs. +11.2%), vastus medialis (-20.2% vs. +9.1%), and medial hamstrings (-38.3% vs. +30.3%) differed from Group 2. During landing Group 1 standardized EMG amplitude mean change differences for gluteus maximus (-32.9% vs. +11.1%) and rectus femoris (-33.3% vs. +29.0%) also differed from Group 2. Group 1 peak propulsion vertical GRF (+0.24N/kg vs. -0.46N/kg) and landing GRF stabilization timing (-0.68 vs. +0.05s) mean change differences differed from Group 2. Group 1 mean hip (-16.3 vs. +7.8°/s) and knee (-21.4 vs. +18.5°/s) flexion velocity mean change differences also differed from Group 2. Improved lower extremity neuromuscular efficiency, increased peak propulsive vertical GRF, decreased mean hip and knee flexion velocities during landing, and earlier landing stabilization timing in the training group suggests improved lower extremity neuromuscular control. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Divergence of Scientific Heuristic Method and Direct Algebraic Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calucag, Lina S.

    2016-01-01

    This is an experimental study, made used of the non-randomized experimental and control groups, pretest-posttest designs. The experimental and control groups were two separate intact classes in Algebra. For a period of twelve sessions, the experimental group was subjected to the scientific heuristic method, but the control group instead was given…

  5. TEKNIK BERMAIN PERAN PADA LAYANAN BIMBINGAN KELOMPOK UNTUK MENINGKATKAN SELF-ESTEEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addahri Hafidz Awlawi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery from this research are: (1 condition of self-esteem of high school students in particular 8 students experiment is still relatively low. (2 There were significant differences between students’ Self-Esteem in pre-test and post-test from Experimental group. (3 There was no significant defferences between Self-Esteem in pre-test and post-test from control group students. (4 There were significant differences between students’ Self–Esteem  in post-test from Control group and post-test from Experimental group. Based on the discovery above, we can conclude that implemeting role playing  is effective to be used in group guidance service to increase students’ Self-Esteem.  This research shows that is important to apply role playing in group guidance service that espoused with supervision from teacher and counselor at school, so that it can increase students’ Self-Esteem.

  6. Effects of a high intensity intermitent exercise on the postural dynamic control of semi pro football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Francisco Royán-González

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study how intermittent high intensity exercise affects dynamic postural control in soccer players of the 3rd Spanish Division. Through an intermittent effort test (Yo-Yo Intermittent test 1 the players are subjected to a fatigue situation in order to observe the incidence of dynamic postural control, whose alteration is related to the increased risk of sports injuries. Fatigue is an element that brings with it a series of physiological changes and makes our motor response ineffective due to the diversity of stimuli offered by a sport such as football, and can trigger in an injury, the epidemiology of football shows us the importance of the control of Fatigue and its consequences on the actions of players. Objective. To verify the incidence of fatigue in dynamic postural control. Design. Pre experimental, pre and post treatment of a group. Population. Twelve male players (Age = 4 ± 5.3 years, height = 1.81 ± 0.04 m, weight = 76.8 ± 6.35, fat% = 11.9 ± 0.99% Method. We performed a pre-test Y Balance Test (YBT, we immediately induce fatigue through Yo-Yo Intermittent test 1, when the player completes the test we obtain lactam sample in blood and perform a post test YBT to see the differences After induced fatigue. Heart rate (HR was monitored throughout the process to obtain maximum heart rate (HRmax and the subjective perception of exertion of the players was controlled using Borg scale. Results. After performing a Student's T, we compared the pre and post means in order to verify if there were significant differences. All the scopes declined in the post-test, but significantly the right frontal range (p <0, 0100, right postero-lateral (p <0.0000 and left postero-medial range (p <0.0130. Pearson's correlation r found positive but not significant relationships between variables. Conclusion. With the data obtained, we can say that fatigue induced through a test of high intermittent intensity adversely affects

  7. Effects of pretesting implicit self-determined motivation on behavioural engagement: Evidence for the mere measurement effect at the implicit level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Keatley

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Research into individuals’ intended behavior and performance has traditionally adopted explicitly-measured, self-report constructs and outcomes. More recently, research has shown that completing explicit self-report measures of constructs may effect subsequent behavior, termed the ‘mere measurement’ effect. The aim of the present experiment was to investigate whether implicit measures of motivation showed a similar mere measurement effect on subsequent behavior. It may be the case that measuring the implicit systems affects subsequent implicit interventions (e.g., priming, observable on subsequent behaviour. Priming manipulations were also given to participants in order to investigate the interaction between measurement and priming of motivation. Initially, a 2 (IAT: present vs absent x2 (Prime: autonomous vs absent and a 2 (IAT: present vs absent x 2 (Prime: controlled vs. absent between participants designs were conducted, these were them combined into a 2 (IAT: present vs absent x3 (Prime: autonomous vs controlled vs absent between participants design, with attempts at a novel task taken as the outcome measure. Implicit measure completion significantly decreased behavioral engagement. Priming autonomous motivation significantly facilitated, and controlled motivation significantly inhibited performance. Finally, there was a significant implicit measurement x priming interaction, such that priming autonomous motivation only improved performance in the absence of the implicit measure. Overall, this research provides an insight into the effects of implicit measurement and priming of motivation and the combined effect of completing both tasks on behavior.

  8. An Educational Board Game to Assist PharmD Students in Learning Autonomic Nervous System Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J Shawn; Tincher, Lindsay; Odeng-Otu, Emmanuel; Herdman, Michelle

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To examine whether playing a board game can assist PharmD students in learning autonomic nervous system (ANS) pharmacology. Design. Of 72 students enrolled in a required second-year pharmacology course, 22 students volunteered to play the board game, which was followed by an in-class examination consisting of 42 ANS questions (ANSQs) and 8 control questions (CTLQs). Participants were given a pretest and a posttest to assess immediate educational improvement. Participants' scores for pretest, posttest, in-class examination, and ANSQs were compared. Also, scores for examination, ANSQs, and CTLQs were compared between board game participants (PART) and nonparticipating classmates (NPART). Assessment. Board game participants scored progressively higher between the pretest, posttest, examination, and ANSQs. Additionally, PART scores were higher than NPART scores for examination and ANSQs. Difference between PART and NPART CTLQ scores was not significant. Conclusion. A board game can assist PharmD students in learning ANS pharmacology.

  9. Pengaruh Musik Mozart dalam Mengurangi Stres pada Mahasiswa yang Sedang Skripsi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Rosanty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims for determining the effect of Mozart classical music to decrease the stress level among sixteen students who are writing their thesis. The present study used a randomized pretest posttest control group design. The process of Mozart classical music was conducted in four sessions for 1 hour. The score of stress level was analyzed to compare between pretest, posttest and follow up using Friedman test. The result of data analysis showed a significant decreasing of stress level score between pretest, posttest and follow up in the experimental group (Chi-Square = 12,542 p = 0,02 p < 0,05. This result indicated that Mozart classical music was quite effective in decreasing stress among students who is writing their thesis.

  10. The Efficacy of Motivation Management Training for Students' Academic Achievement and Self-Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Ramazan Hasanzadeh; Leyla Vatandoust

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of motivation management training for students' academic achievement and self-concept. The pretest–posttest quasi-experimental study used a cluster random sampling method to select subjects for the experimental (20 subjects) and control (20 subjects) groups. posttest was conducted with both groups to determine the effect of the training. An academic achievement and academic self-concept questionnaire (grade point average requirement) was used for the pretest a...

  11. Promoting Active Transport in Older Adolescents Before They Obtain Their Driving Licence: A Matched Control Intervention Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Verhoeven

    Full Text Available Active transport has great potential to increase physical activity in older adolescents (17-18 years. Therefore, a theory- and evidence-based intervention was developed aiming to promote active transport among older adolescents. The intervention aimed to influence psychosocial factors of active transport since this is the first step in order to achieve a change in behaviour. The present study aimed to examine the effect of the intervention on the following psychosocial factors: intention to use active transport after obtaining a driving licence, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, subjective norm, self-efficacy, habit and awareness towards active transport.A matched control three-arm study was conducted and consisted of a pre-test post-test design with intervention and control schools in Flanders (northern part of Belgium. A lesson promoting active transport was implemented as the last lesson in the course 'Driving Licence at School' in intervention schools (intervention group 1. Individuals in intervention group 2 received this active transport lesson and, in addition, they were asked to become a member of a Facebook group on active transport. Individuals in the control group only attended the regular course 'Driving Licence at School'. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing socio-demographics and psychosocial variables at baseline, post (after one week and follow-up (after eight weeks. To assess intervention effects, multilevel linear mixed models analyses were performed.A sample of 441 older adolescents (56.8% female; 17.4 (0.7 years was analysed. For awareness regarding the existence of car sharing schemes, a significant increase in awareness from baseline to post measurement was found within intervention group 1 (p = 0.001 and intervention group 2 (p = 0.030 compared to the control group in which no change was found. In addition, a significant increase in awareness from baseline to follow-up measurement was found within

  12. Physiological and psychological effects of active-alert hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVos, H M; Potgieter, J R; Blaauw, J H

    1999-06-01

    10 female physical education students were given posthypnotic suggestions alluding to economy of effort in exercise. These suggestions were affirmed under self-hypnosis over two weeks. Experimental subjects pedalled on an exercise bicycle for 20 min. at 60% of their maximal work capacity while listening to suggestions from a hypnotist. The Control group (n = 9) showed no differences between mean pretest and posttest scores on physical self-efficacy, trait anxiety, state anxiety, heart rate, blood pressure, and perceived rate of exertion. The average systolic blood pressure of the experimental group was the only positive significant difference between the pretest and posttest scores.

  13. The Effect of Physical Activity on Resiliency and Productivity and Reducing Staff Absence Based on Public Health of University’s Female Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Habiby Vatan, Maryam; Noorbakhsh, Mahvash; Nourbakhsh, Parivash; Navabi Nejad, Shokoh

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of 12-week physical activity on resiliency and productivity reducing staff absence based on public health of the female staff of Islamic Azad University. In this paper, we used the pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study designs The method of this research was semi-experimental and carried out having pre-test and post-test with pre –post design with two control and experimental groups. The statistical population of the research consisted ...

  14. The impact of distance and duration of travel on participation rates and participants' satisfaction: results from a pilot study at one study centre in Pretest 2 of the German National Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Aparna; Akmatov, Manas K; Kindler, Florentina; Kemmling, Yvonne; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Krause, Gérard; Pessler, Frank

    2015-08-21

    In this pilot study within the Pretest 2 phase of the German National Cohort, we aimed to (1) test the hypothesis that distance and duration of travel to a study centre may affect participation rates and participants' satisfaction and (2) to obtain data that would help to select recruitment areas around the study centre Hannover with the greatest projected participation rate for the main study. Mixed urban/suburban environment in Northern Germany with approximately 600,000 inhabitants. 4 recruitment areas with divergent estimated mean distances (range, 7-40 km) and duration of travel to the study centre Hannover were selected. 1050 men and women (ratio, 1:1), aged 20-69 years, were randomly selected from the population registries of the 4 recruitment areas and invited by mail to participate in the Pretest 2 study programme at the study centre Hannover, covering a variety of questionnaire-based and physical assessments. 166 individuals participated (16%). All 166 participants completed a travel questionnaire containing 5 items relating to travel duration and satisfaction, amounting to a participation rate of 100% in the questionnaire-based part of the study. Participation rates in the Pretest 2 programme at the study centre Hannover by area ranged from 11% (area farthest from the study centre, estimated median distance 38 km) to 18% (nearest area, 2 km). The odds of non-participation were highest in the area farthest from the study centre (adjusted OR 2.06; p=0.01; CI 1.28 to 3.32). Nonetheless, 97% of participants were satisfied with travel duration. Increasing distance was associated with a lower participation rate. However, acceptance of duration of travel was high, irrespective of distance or duration. Thus, recruiting in farther away locations may select individuals with a greater frustration tolerance for travel to the study centre, perhaps due to a greater interest in participating in health-oriented studies and thus different health-related behaviour

  15. Peer tutoring – assisted instruction, parent supportiveness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effect of peer tutoring-assisted instruction, parent supportiveness and students locus of control on achievement in Senior Secondary Mathematics. It adopted a non-randomized pretest posttest control group design in a quasi experimental setting. It involves 300 senior secondary II students from six ...

  16. Photograph Usage in History Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbaba, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the effect of photograph usage in history education to the students' achievement was tried to be identified. In the study which was done with a pre-test post-test control group design, a frame was tried to be established between the experimental group and the analytical usage of the photograph, the control group's courses were done…

  17. The Effect of Online Collaboration on Middle School Student Science Misconceptions as an Aspect of Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Jillian L.; Rockinson-Szapkiw, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative, quasi-experimental pretest/posttest control group design examined the effects of online collaborative learning on middle school students' science literacy. For a 9-week period, students in the control group participated in collaborative face-to-face activities whereas students in the experimental group participated in online…

  18. The Influence of Strengths-Based Development on Leadership Practices among Undergraduate College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Alina Black

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the influence of strengths-based development on leadership practices among undergraduate college students while controlling for gender, years of leadership experience, and number of completed leadership courses using a quasi-experimental approach with a randomized control-group pretest-posttest research design. The sample…

  19. 76 FR 10365 - Agency Information Collection Request. 60-Day Public Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... have prior training experience will be randomly assigned to either the treatment group or the control... of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology to minimize the... research integrity? To answer the first question, a pretest-posttest control group experimental design is...

  20. The Effects of Quality Books for Children and the Metacognitive Strategy on Students' Self-Esteem Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cer, Erkan; Sahin, Ertugrul

    2017-01-01

    Using a quasi-experimental design with pre-test and post-test control groups, 93 eighth grade students were randomly assigned either to the experimental or to the control group and responded to the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale two weeks before and after the intervention. While the students in the experimental group were instructed in quality books…

  1. Impact of Group Sandtray Therapy on the Self-Esteem of Young Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Pei; Armstrong, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of group sandtray therapy was examined using a pretest-posttest control group design with young adolescent girls (n = 37) identified as having low self-esteem. A split-plot analysis of variance (SPANOVA) revealed statistically significant differences between participants in the treatment and control groups in self-esteem on five…

  2. The Effects of the Marriage Enrichment Program Based on the Cognitive-Behavioral Approach on the Marital Adjustment of Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Melek; Ersanli, Ercumend

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of the marriage enrichment program based on the cognitive-behavioral approach on levels of marital adjustment of individuals. The experimental and control group of this research was totally composed of 30 individuals. A pre-test post-test research model with control group was used in this…

  3. Making working memory work: A meta-analysis of executive control and working memory training in younger and older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Karbach, Julia; Verhaeghen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analysis examined the effects of process-based cognitive training (49 studies) in the domains of executive function and working memory in older adults (>60 years). The interventions resulted in significant effects on the trained task (pre-to-posttest net gain: MSD = 0.5 compared to active control, MSD = 0.8 compared to passive control; net posttest effect: MSD = 1.2 compared to active control, MSD = 1.1 compared to passive control), significant near transfer (pre-post: MSD = 0.3, 0....

  4. The Influence of Resistance Exercise Training on the Levels of Anxiety in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe José Aidar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study was to analyze the effect of a strength training program on indicators of trait and state anxiety in patients with ischemic stroke. The subjects were divided into two groups: experimental group (EG consisting of 11 subjects aged years and a control group (CG with 13 subjects aged years. EG underwent 12 weeks of strength training, with a frequency of three times a week. For data collection, a State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI was used. Significant differences were found between pre- and posttest in EG for trait anxiety ( pretest posttest and state anxiety ( pretest posttest with no differences in CG for trait anxiety ( pretest posttest and state anxiety ( pretest posttest. In the evaluation between the groups, significant differences were found for all indicators of trait anxiety ( EG; CG and state anxiety ( EG; CG. This pilot study indicates that strength training may provide an improvement in trait and state anxiety more than one year after stroke.

  5. Interactions in Zircaloy/UO2 fuel rod bundles with Inconel spacers at temperatures above 1200deg C (posttest results of severe fuel damage experiments CORA-2 and CORA-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Schanz, G.; Sepold, L.

    1990-09-01

    In the CORA experiments test bundles of usually 16 electrically heated fuel rod simulators and nine unheated rods are subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. Thus, an accident sequence is simulated, which may develop from a small-break loss-of-coolant accident of an LWR. An aim of CORA-2, as a first test of its kind, was also to gain experience in the test conduct and posttest handling of UO 2 specimens. CORA-3 was performed as a high-temperature test. The transient phases of CORA-2 and CORA-3 were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zircaloy(Zry)-steam reaction started at about 1000deg C, leading the bundles to maximum temperatures of 2000deg C and 2400deg C for tests CORA-2 and CORA-3, respectively. The test bundles resulted in severe oxidation and partial melting of the cladding, fuel dissolution by Zry/UO 2 interaction, complete Inconel spacer destruction, and relocation of melts and fragments to lower elevations in the bundle, where extended blockages have formed. In both tests the fuel rod destruction set in together with the formation of initial melts from the Inconel/Zry interaction. The lower Zry spacer acted as a catcher for relocated material. In test CORA-2 the UO 2 pellets partially disintegrated into fine particles. This powdering occurred during cooldown. There was no physical disintegration of fuel in test CORA-3. (orig./MM) [de

  6. Feasibility and acceptability of training community health workers in ear and hearing care in Malawi: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulwafu, Wakisa; Kuper, Hannah; Viste, Asgaut; Goplen, Frederik K

    2017-10-11

    To assess the feasibility and acceptability of training community health workers (CHWs) in ear and hearing care, and their ability to identify patients with ear and hearing disorders. Cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT). Health centres in Thyolo district, Malawi. Ten health centres participated, 5 intervention (29 CHWs) and 5 control (28 CHWs). Intervention CHWs received 3 days of training in primary ear and hearing care, while among control CHWs, training was delayed for 6 months. Both groups were given a pretest that assessed knowledge about ear and hearing care, only the intervention group was given the posttest on the third day of training. The intervention group was given 1 month to identify patients with ear and hearing disorders in their communities, and these people were screened for hearing disorders by ear, nose and throat clinical specialists. Primary outcome measure was improvement in knowledge of ear and hearing care among CHWs after the training. Secondary outcome measures were number of patients with ear or hearing disorders identified by CHWs and number recorded at health centres during routine activities, and the perceived feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. The average overall correct answers increased from 55% to 68% (95% CI 65 to 71) in the intervention group (phearing disorders were identified by CHWs and 860 patients attended the screening camps, of whom 400 had hearing loss (73 patients determined through bilateral fail on otoacoustic emissions, 327 patients through audiometry). Where cause could be determined, the most common cause of ear and hearing disorders was chronic suppurative otitis media followed by impacted wax. The intervention was perceived as feasible and acceptable to implement. Training was effective in improving the knowledge of CHW in ear and hearing care in Malawi and allowing them to identify patients with ear and hearing disorders. This intervention could be scaled up to other CHWs in low-income and

  7. Reduced-Sodium Lunches Are Well-Accepted by Uninformed Consumers Over a 3-Week Period and Result in Decreased Daily Dietary Sodium Intakes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Anke M; Kremer, Stefanie; van Stipriaan, Willeke L; Noort, Martijn W J; de Vries, Jeanne H M; Temme, Elisabeth H M

    2015-10-01

    Processed foods are major contributors to excessive sodium intake in Western populations. We investigated the effect of food reformulation on daily dietary sodium intake. To determine whether uninformed consumers accept reduced-sodium lunches and to determine the effect of consuming reduced-sodium lunches on 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. A single-blind randomized controlled pretest-posttest design with two parallel treatment groups was used. Participants chose foods in an experimental real-life canteen setting at the Restaurant of the Future in Wageningen, the Netherlands, from May 16 until July 1, 2011. After a run-in period with regular foods for both groups, the intervention group (n=36) consumed foods with 29% to 61% sodium reduction (some were partially flavor compensated). The control group (n=38) continued consuming regular foods. Outcomes for assessment of acceptance were the amount of foods consumed, energy and sodium intake, remembered food liking, and intensity of sensory aspects. Influence on daily dietary sodium intake was assessed by 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. Between and within-subject comparisons were assessed by analysis of covariance. Energy intake and amount consumed of each food category per lunch remained similar for both groups. Compared with the control group, the intervention group's sodium intake per lunch was significantly reduced by -1,093 mg (adjusted difference) (95% CI -1,285 to -901), equivalent to 43 mmol sodium. Remembered food liking, taste intensity, and saltiness were scored similarly for almost all of the reduced-sodium foods compared with the regular foods. After consuming reduced-sodium lunches, compared with the control group, intervention participants' 24-hour urinary sodium excretion was significantly lower by -40 mEq (adjusted difference) (95% CI -63 to -16) than after consuming regular lunches, and this reflects a decreased daily sodium intake of 1 g. Comparing the two treatment groups, consumption of reduced

  8. Dietetics students' ability to choose appropriate communication and counseling methods is improved by teaching behavior-change strategies in computer-assisted instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Ruchi; Bell, Carol; Evers, William D

    2010-06-01

    Several models and theories have been proposed to help registered dietitians (RD) counsel and communicate nutrition information to patients. However, there is little time for students or interns to observe and/or participate in counseling sessions. Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) can be used to give students more opportunity to observe the various methods and theories of counseling. This study used CAI simulations of RD-client communications to examine whether students who worked through the CAI modules would choose more appropriate counseling methods. Modules were created based on information from experienced RD. They contained videos of RD-patient interactions and demonstrated helpful and less helpful methods of communication. Students in didactic programs in dietetics accessed the modules via the Internet. The intervention group of students received a pretest module, two tutorial modules, and a posttest module. The control group only received the pretest and posttest modules. Data were collected during three semesters in 2006 and 2007. Two sample t tests were used to compare pretest and posttest scores. The influence of other factors was measured using factorial analysis of variance. Statistical significance was set at Pdidactic programs participated. A total of 350 students were in the intervention group and 102 students were in the control group. Pretest scores were not different (6.30+/-0.26 vs 6.21+/-0.15, control and intervention, respectively). The intervention group's posttest score was higher than its pretest score (6.21+/-0.15 vs 6.65+/-0.16, pretest and posttest, respectively). Change in score from pretest to posttest was higher for the intervention group (-0.02+/-0.20 vs 0.44+/-0.11, control and intervention, respectively). For the 21 questions in the tutorials, those who answered 19 to 21 correctly had a greater increase from pretest to posttest than those who answered <13 correctly (-0.44+/-0.37 vs 0.84+/-0.17, <13 and 19 to 21 correct

  9. Card Games and Algebra Tic Tacmatics on Achievement of Junior Secondary II Students in Algebraic Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpube, Nnaemeka Michael; Anugwo, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the Card Games and Algebra tic-Tacmatics on Junior Secondary II Students' Achievement in Algebraic Expressions. Three research questions and three null hypotheses guided the study. The study adopted the pre-test, post-test control group design. A total of two hundred and forty (240) Junior Secondary School II students were…

  10. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Participatory Empowerment Group for Chinese Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Vivian W. Q.; Zhang, Yiqi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a Participatory Empowerment Group (PEG) for Chinese type 2 diabetes patients in Shanghai. Method: A randomized waiting list control and pretest and posttest comparisons were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention by comparing blood sugar level and health-related quality of life.…

  11. Effect of Pop Music on Students' Attitudes to Music Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Gökhan; Çiftçibasi, M. Can

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify whether the use of popular music in teaching song creates a significant difference in attitudes of middle school students to music lessons. "Pretest-posttest design" from experimental models was used. The experimental and control groups consists of 8 classes of continuing education from four different middle…

  12. Teaching Mathematical Functions Using Geometric Functions Approach and Its Effect on Ninth Grade Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçakin, Veysel

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of using geometric functions approach on 9th grade students' motivation levels toward mathematics in functions unit. Participants of this study were 87 students who were ongoing in the first year of high school in Turkey. In this research, pretest and posttest control group quasiexperimental…

  13. The Effect of Reading Strategies on Reading Comprehension in Teaching Turkish as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolukbas, Fatma

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine which reading strategies students use while learning Turkish as a foreign language and investigate the effects of these strategies on reading comprehension skill. Conducted in compliance with "pretest-posttest control group model" as the experimental design, this research involved totally 36…

  14. Comprehension and Motivation Levels in Conjunction with the Use of eBooks with Audio: A Quasi-Experimental Study of Post-Secondary Remedial Reading Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Kimberly W.

    2014-01-01

    This quasi-experimental pretest, posttest nonequivalent control group study investigated the comprehension scores and motivation levels of post-secondary remedial reading students in a two-year technical college in Northwest Georgia using an eBook, an eBook with audio, and a print book. After reading a module on Purpose and Tone in the three book…

  15. Effects of a tablet game intervention on simple addition and subtraction fluency in first graders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, F. van der; Segers, P.C.J.; Takashima, A.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to playfully improve arithmetic fluency skills with a tablet game training. Participants were 103 grade 1 children from regular primary schools. The tablet game was tested with a pretest-posttest control group design, and consisted of a racing game environment in which

  16. Assessment of a Peer-Helping Game Program on Children's Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaigordobil, Maite; Echebarria, Agustin

    1995-01-01

    Examined the effects of a game involving cooperative interaction and symbolic play on child development in children ages six and seven. A pretest-intervention-posttest design was used with a sample of 125 experimental and 53 control subjects. Results suggest the intervention stimulated significant improvement in social behavior and in some…

  17. Effects of Mathematical Vocabulary Instruction on Students' Achievement in Mathematics in Secondary Schools of Murang'a County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjiru, Benson; O-Connor, Miheso

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on a study whose main objective was to determine the effects of mathematical vocabulary instruction on students' achievement in Mathematics in Secondary schools in Murang'a County, Kenya. The study was a non-equivalent control group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design and was conducted in the two purposively selected…

  18. The Effects of Scenario Planning on Participant Reports of Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermack, Thomas J.; Coons, Laura M.; O'barr, Gregory; Khatami, Shiva

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of scenario planning on participant ratings of resilience. Design/methodology/approach: The research design is a quasi experimental pretest/posttest with treatment and control groups. Random selection or assignment was not achieved. Findings: Results show a significant difference in…

  19. Mathematical Critical Thinking and Curiosity Attitude in Problem Based Learning and Cognitive Conflict Strategy: A Study in Number Theory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetriuslita; Wahyudin; Jarnawi

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to describe and analyze result of applying Problem-Based Learning and Cognitive Conflict Strategy (PBLCCS) in increasing students' Mathematical Critical Thinking (MCT) ability and Mathematical Curiosity Attitude (MCA). Adopting a quasi-experimental method with pretest-posttest control group design and using mixed method with…

  20. Emotional Disclosure through Journal Writing: Telehealth Intervention for Maternal Stress and Mother-Child Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Rondalyn V.; Smith, Gigi

    2015-01-01

    This study examines emotional disclosure through the activity of journaling as a means of coping with maternal stress associated with parenting a child with disruptive behaviors. Through a randomized control and pre-test post-test study design of an online journal writing intervention, change to maternal stress and quality of mother-child…

  1. An Intervention Including an Online Game to Improve Grade 6 Students' Performance in Early Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolovou, Angeliki; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Koller, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether an intervention including an online game contributed to 236 Grade 6 students' performance in early algebra, that is, solving problems with covarying quantities. An exploratory quasi-experimental study was conducted with a pretest-posttest-control-group design. Students in the experimental group were asked to solve…

  2. Effects of Reflective Inquiry Instructional Technique on Students' Academic Achievement and Ability Level in Electronic Work Trade in Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuanya, T. C.; Owodunni, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of reflective inquiry instructional technique on achievement of students in Technical Colleges. The study adopted a pre-test, post-test, non-equivalent control group, quasi-experimental research design which involved groups of students in their intact class assigned to experimental group and control…

  3. A Quasi-Experimental Study on Using Short Stories: Statistical and Inferential Analyses on the Non-English Major University Students' Speaking and Writing Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iman, Jaya Nur

    2017-01-01

    This research was conducted to find out whether or not using short stories significantly improve the speaking and writing achievements. A quasi-experimental study of non-equivalent pretest-posttest control group design or comparison group design was used in this research. The population of this research was the all first semester undergraduate…

  4. The Effect of Blog Use on Self-Regulatory Learning of Prospective German Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan Yucel, Mukadder

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of blog use on self-regulatory learning of prospective German language teachers. The study is semi-experimental. Pretest-posttest, experiment control model was used. Blog activities were conducted as extensive beyond classroom activities only for the experiment group. As the data collection tool…

  5. Training Orthographic and Sentence Structures Helps Poor Readers in Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Che Kan; Ho, Man Koon

    2012-01-01

    We trained 36 12-year-old Chinese students with reading disorders in the analysis, synthesis and integration of orthographic constituents of semantic and phonetic "bujians" (radicals); and also their writing (spelling and composing) skills. These target students were compared with 37 age-controls in a pre-test and post-test design on a…

  6. Effect of Drama Instruction Method on Students' Turkish Verbal Skills and Speech Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardas, Mehmet Nuri; Koç, Rasit

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the effect of the "drama" method on students' Turkish verbal skills and speech anxiety. Pretest-posttest experimental model with control group was utilized in the study. In the analysis of data obtained by Turkish Rhetorical Skills Scale (TRSS) and Speech Anxiety Scale (SAS), t-test…

  7. Effect of Prior Knowledge of Instructional Objectives on Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The study examined the effect of prior knowledge of instructional objectives on students' achievement in selected difficult concepts in senior secondary school physics. A total of. 100 senior secondary two (SS II) physics students were involved in the study. A non-randomized pretest-posttest control group design was used.

  8. The Effect of Classroom Walkthroughs on Middle School Teacher Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Karen Nadean

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pretest-posttest control group experimental study was to see the effect of classroom walkthroughs on middle school teacher motivation. The independent variable was; classroom walkthroughs and the four dependent variables were teachers' self-concept of the ability to affect student achievement, teachers' attitude toward the…

  9. Determining Attitudes of Postgraduate Students towards Scientific Research and Codes of Conduct, Supported by Digital Script

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavukcu, Tahir

    2016-01-01

    In this research, it is aimed to determine the effect of the attitudes of postgraduate students towards scientific research and codes of conduct, supported by digital script. This research is a quantitative study, and it has been formed according to pre-test & post-test research model of experiment and control group. In both groups, lessons…

  10. Effectiveness of cognitive restructuring and social decision-making ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated effectiveness of cognitive restructuring and social decision making techniques on truancy reduction among secondary school adolescents in Ibadan, Nigeria. Pre-test, post-test, control group quasiexperimental design with a 3x2x2 factorial matrix was adopted for the study. A total of 180 Senior ...

  11. The Effects of Web-Based and Face-to-Face Discussion on Computer Engineering Majors' Performance on the Karnaugh Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yen-Chu

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the different effects of web-based and face-to-face discussion on computer engineering majors' performance using the Karnaugh map in digital logic design. Pretest and posttest scores for two treatment groups (web-based discussion and face-to-face discussion) and a control group were compared and subjected to covariance…

  12. The Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DR-TA) and the Traditional Approach Using Tales of Virtue Based on His Majesty the King's Teaching Concepts in Seventh Grade Students' Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaemsai, Rungruedee; Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the English reading comprehension and ethical awareness of 7th grade students, when using either a directed reading-thinking activity (DR-TA), or a more traditional approach, involving tales of virtue based on His Majesty the King's teaching concepts. A randomized control group pretest-posttest design was used for the study,…

  13. The Effect of a Timed Reading Activity on EFL Learners: Speed, Comprehension, and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna C-S

    2010-01-01

    To develop reading fluency, a 13-week timed reading activity was integrated into a normal curriculum with the aim of improving students' reading rates. Participants were 84 college students divided into an experimental and a control group. The test instruments involved pretests and posttests on reading speed and comprehension. Students'…

  14. Randomized Trials on Consider This, a Tailored, Internet-Delivered Smoking Prevention Program for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B.; Borland, Ron; Woodall, W. Gill; Hall, John R.; Hines, Joan M.; Burris-Woodall, Patricia; Cutter, Gary R.; Miller, Caroline; Balmford, James; Starling, Randall; Ax, Bryan; Saba, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The Internet may be an effective medium for delivering smoking prevention to children. Consider This, an Internet-based program, was hypothesized to reduce expectations concerning smoking and smoking prevalence. Group-randomized pretest-posttest controlled trials were conducted in Australia (n = 2,077) and the United States (n = 1,234) in schools…

  15. Self-Instructional Versus Direct Training in Modifying Children's Impulsive Behavior. Technical Report #63.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, William R.

    This study compares self-instructional (SI) and direct training (DT) effects on task performance of impulsive kindergarten children. Fifteen subjects with a mean age of 5.87 years and mean WPPSI IQ of 87.6 were randomly assigned to three groups: SI, DT and control. A pre-test, treatments, post-tests design which utilized Kagan's (1966) Matching…

  16. Effects of Nursing Students' Practices Using Smartphone Videos on Fundamental Nursing Skills, Self-Efficacy, and Learning Satisfaction in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, HyeSun

    2017-01-01

    This is a quasi-experimental study with a non-equivalent group pre-test and post-test designed to investigate the effects of learning with smartphone video recordings in fundamental nursing practice. General "intramuscular injection" practice for sophomore nursing students was given to the experimental and control groups for two weeks.…

  17. Effects of school location on students' learning outcomes in practical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of school location on students' learning outcomes in practical physics. A pretest, posttest, control group, quasi experimental design was used. Three null hypotheses were tested at 0.05 alpha levels for each of the three dependent variables. The sample consisted of 526 Senior Secondary ...

  18. Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral-Theory-Based Skill Training on Academic Procrastination Behaviors of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, Betül; Avci, Rasit

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral theory (CBT) psycho-educational group program on the academic procrastination behaviors of university students and the persistence of any training effect. This was a quasi-experimental research based on an experimental and control group pretest, posttest, and followup test model.…

  19. Rational Emotive Behavior Based on Academic Procrastination Prevention: Training Programme of Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düsmez, Ihsan; Barut, Yasar

    2016-01-01

    The research is an experimental study which has experimental and control groups, and based on pre-test, post-test, monitoring test model. Research group consists of second and third grade students of Primary School Education and Psychological Counseling undergraduate programmes in Giresun University Faculty of Educational Sciences. The research…

  20. The effectiveness of communication skills and effective dialogue on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study is analyzing the effectiveness of communication skills and effective dialogue on marital satisfaction and commitment of young couples. The research plan was the trueexperiment pre-test, post-test experimental and control groups. The statistical population was consisted of all couples (married less ...

  1. The Effect of Diffused Aromatherapy on Test Anxiety among Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative, randomized, pretest, posttest study was conducted to assess the effect of aromatherapy on cognitive test anxiety among nursing students. Sophomore nursing students (n = 39) from a private, 4-year college, were randomized into either the control group (n = 18) or the experimental group (n = 21). Each participant completed the…

  2. Effect of Self-Instruction Strategy on the Achievement in Algebra of Students with Learning Difficulty in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adani, Anthony; Eskay, Michael; Onu, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study examined the effect of self-instruction strategy on the achievement in algebra of students with learning difficulty in mathematics. Two research questions and one null hypothesis were formulated to guide the study. The study adopted a non-randomized pre-test and post-test control group design with one experimental…

  3. The Impact of Blended Learning Model on Student Attitudes towards Geography Course and Their Critical Thinking Dispositions and Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Ozgen; Karakus, Ufuk

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims to determine the impact of blended learning model on student attitudes towards Geography course and their critical thinking dispositions and skills. An experimental pattern with pretest-posttest control group was used in the study. The study group consists of a total of 57 students--28 in the experiment group and 29 in the…

  4. Effect of Prior Knowledge of Instructional Objectives on Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the effect of prior knowledge of instructional objectives on students' achievement in selected difficult concepts in senior secondary school physics. A total of 100 senior secondary two (SS II) physics students were involved in the study. A non-randomized pretest-posttest control group design was used.

  5. Impact of Integrated Science and English Language Arts Literacy Supplemental Instructional Intervention on Science Academic Achievement of Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jamar Terry

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design study was to determine if any differences existed in upper elementary school students' science academic achievement when instructed using an 8-week integrated science and English language arts literacy supplemental instructional intervention in conjunction…

  6. Utilizing PowerPoint Presentation to Promote Fall Prevention among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrary-Quarles, Audrey R.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated a PowerPoint home safety (PPHS) presentation in enhancing awareness, knowledge and behavior change among senior center attendees in southern Illinois. Twelve centers were utilized as data collection sites in a pretest-posttest control group design. Through stratified randomization, centers were placed into categories (high,…

  7. Combining Primary Prevention and Risk Reduction Approaches in Sexual Assault Protection Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menning, Chadwick; Holtzman, Mellisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The object of this study is to extend prior evaluations of Elemental, a sexual assault protection program that combines primary prevention and risk reduction strategies within a single program. Participants and Methods: During 2012 and 2013, program group and control group students completed pretest, posttest, and 6-week and 6-month…

  8. Problem-Based Learning Method: Secondary Education 10th Grade Chemistry Course Mixtures Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üce, Musa; Ates, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    In this research; aim was determining student achievement by comparing problem-based learning method with teacher-centered traditional method of teaching 10th grade chemistry lesson mixtures topic. Pretest-posttest control group research design is implemented. Research sample includes; two classes of (total of 48 students) an Anatolian High School…

  9. The Effect of Coordinated Teaching Method Practices on Some Motor Skills of 6-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinkok, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to examine the effects of Coordinated Teaching Method activities applied for 10 weeks on 6-year-old children, and to examine the effects of these activities on the development of some motor skills in children. Research Methods: The "Experimental Research Model with Pre-test and Post-test Control Group"…

  10. Goals, Data Use, and Instruction: The Effect of a Teacher Professional Development Program on Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kuijk, Mechteld F.; Deunk, Marjolein I.; Bosker, Roel J.; Ritzema, Evelien S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated whether student reading comprehension could be improved with help of a teacher Professional Development (PD) program targeting goals, data use, and instruction. The effect of this PD program on 2nd- and 3rd-grade student achievement was examined using a pretest-posttest control group design. Applying propensity score…

  11. The effect of group cognitive-behavioral therapy in reducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) on aggression in patients with thalassemia. Methods: This is an applied study in terms of objective and it is semi-experimental due to the nature of the subject, pre-test, post-test and follow-up conducted in the control group.

  12. Effect of differentiated instructional strategies on students' retention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of differentiated instructional strategies on students' retention in geometry in senior secondary schools was examined. The study employed experimental research design of pretest, posttest control group. The area of this study is Abuja Municipal Area Council, the Federal Capital Territory. The target population ...

  13. effect of differentiated instructional strategies on students' retention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    The effect of differentiated instructional strategies on students' retention in geometry in senior secondary schools was examined. The study employed experimental research design of pretest, posttest control group. The area of this study is Abuja Municipal Area Council, the Federal Capital. Territory. The target population ...

  14. Audio-Tutorial Versus Conventional Lecture-Laboratory Instruction in a University Animal Biology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowsey, Robert E.

    The purpose of this study was to analyze two methods of instruction used in an animal biology course. One group of students, the experimental group, was taught using an audio-tutorial program, and another group, the control group, was taught using the conventional lecture-laboratory method. Pretest and posttest data were collected from achievement…

  15. Enhancing Transfer of Knowledge in Physics through Effective Teaching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbobola, Akinyemi Olufunminiyi

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the enhancement of transfer of knowledge in physics through the use of effective teaching strategies in Nigerian senior secondary schools. Non-randomized pretest-posttest control group design was adopted for the study. A total of 278 physics students took part in the study. Transfer of Knowledge Test in Physics (TKTP) with the…

  16. Effectiveness of Mind Mapping in English Teaching among VIII Standard Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen, D.; Sangeetha, N.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find out the effectiveness of mind mapping technique over conventional method in teaching English at high school level (VIII), in terms of Control and Experimental group. The sample of the study comprised, 60 VIII Standard students in Tiruchendur Taluk. Mind Maps and Achievement Test (Pretest & Posttest) were…

  17. The Effect of Using Mind Maps on the Development of Maths and Science Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Ozgul; Yavuz, Ezgi Aksin; Tunc, Ayse Betul Ozkarabak

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of mind mapping activities on the maths and science skills of children 48 to 60 months of age. The study was designed using an experimental model with a pre-test post-test and a control group. Accordingly, the hypotheses of the study was that there would be meaningful differences in the values…

  18. A Tool that Can be Effective in the Self-Regulated Learning of Pre-Service Teachers: The Mind Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriseven, Isil

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the effect of task planning with mind maps on the self-regulation strategies and motivational beliefs of pre-service teachers. A quasi-experimental design, with a pre-test and post-test control group, was applied in the research. The research group comprised of 60 pre-service teachers taking "Teaching…

  19. Investigating whether children's transition from pre-operational stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pretest-posttest quasiexperimental design with random assignment of children to experimental and control groups were employed to examine possible ... There was no difference between the male and female children at the pre-operational stage in their characteristic way of thinking before the intervention strategy.

  20. Using Computers to Solve Mathematics by Junior Secondary School Students in Edo State Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olusi, F. I.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of computer aided instruction and traditional method of instruction on the junior secondary school students achievement in mathematics. Four research questions and hypotheses were stated and tested in the study. The design of the study was the pre-test post-test control group experimental…

  1. The Enhancement of Students' Teacher Mathematical Reasoning Ability through Reflective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohana

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the enhancement of mathematical reasoning ability through reflective learning. This study used quasi-experimental method with nonequivalent pretest and posttest control group design. The subject of this study were students of Mathematics Education Program in one of private universities in Palembang, South Sumatera,…

  2. Spicing Up Basic Science Instruction with Storyline Strategy; What Is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the effect of storyline strategy on primary school pupils‟ achievement in Basic Science with moderating effect of English Language proficiency of pupils. This study is the pre-test, post-test control group. It is a 2 x 2 quasi experimental study in which intact classes were used. This implies that the design ...

  3. Investigating the Effectiveness of Storylines Embedded within a Context-Based Approach: The Case for the Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioglu, Hulya; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Calik, Muammar

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of the context-based approach on 9th grade students' conceptions of the Periodic Table. Within a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design the study was conducted with 80 grade 9 students (aged 15-16) drawn from two classes (39 and 41 students) in a high school in Turkey. The experimental group was exposed to…

  4. Effectiveness of Computer Animation and Geometrical Instructional Model on Mathematics Achievement and Retention among Junior Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, A. I.; Falode, C. O.; Adegbenro, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of computer animation and geometry instructional model on mathematics achievement and retention on Junior Secondary School Students in Minna, Nigeria. It also examined the influence of gender on students' achievement and retention. The research was a pre-test post-test experimental and control group…

  5. Effect of combined teaching method (role playing and storytelling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of combined teaching method (role playing and storytelling) on creative thinking of fourthgrade female students in the course of Heaven Gifts. Research Method: This quasi-experimental study was conducted with pretest-posttest design with control group on 60 fourth-grade female ...

  6. Which One Is Better? Jigsaw II versus Jigsaw IV on the Subject of the Building Blocks of Matter and Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Hakan; Buyukaltay, Didem

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of using Jigsaw II and Jigsaw IV techniques on the subject of "Atoms-The Basic Unit of Matter" in science course of 6th grade on academic achievement was examined. Pre-test post-test control group research was used in the study. Study population is all secondary schools in Turgutlu district of Manisa province…

  7. Effectiveness of Blended Learning and Elearning Modes of Instruction on the Performance of Undergraduates in Kwara State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Amosa Isiaka; Shittu, Ahmed Tajudeen; Ogunlade, O. Olufunmilola; Osunlade, Olourotimi Rufus

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of blended learning and E-learning modes of instruction on the performance of undergraduates in Kwara State, Nigeria. It also determined if the student performance would vary with gender. Quasi experimental that employs pretest, posttest, control group design was adopted for this study. This involves three…

  8. Mindful Music Listening Instruction Increases Listening Sensitivity and Enjoyment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William Todd

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of mindful listening instruction on music listening sensitivity and music listening enjoyment. A pretest--posttest control group design was used. Participants, fourth-grade students (N = 42) from an elementary school in a large city in the Northeastern United States, were randomly assigned to two…

  9. Effect of Solution Focused Group Counseling for High School Students in Order to Struggle with School Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Bünyamin

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of solution focused group counseling upon high school students struggling with school burnout was analyzed. The research was an experimental study in which a pre-test post-test control group random design was used, depending upon the real experimental model. The study group included 30 students that volunteered from…

  10. The Effects of a Flipped Classroom Model of Instruction on Students' Performance and Attitudes towards Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanmi, Eunice Eyitayo

    2017-01-01

    This study establishes the effects of a flipped classroom model of instruction on academic performance and attitudes of 66 first-year secondary school students towards chemistry. A pre-test and post-test experimental design was employed to assign students randomly into either the experimental or control group. In order to assess the suitability of…

  11. Teams Games Tournaments (TGT). Cooperative Technique for Learning Mathematics in Secondary Schools in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Abdus; Hossain, Anwar; Rahman, Shahidur

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of game playing on performance and attitudes of students towards mathematics of Grade VIII. The study was undergone by implementing TGT technique for the experimental group and typical lecture-based approach for the control group. A same achievement test was employed as in both pre-test and post-test, an…

  12. Effects of Video-Based Cooperative, Competitive and Individualized Instructional Strategies on the Performance of Senior Secondary Schools Students in Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Amosa Isiaka; Shittu, Ahmed Tajudeen; Daramola, Florence Olutunu; James, Moses

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of video-based cooperative, competitive and individualized instructional strategies on the performance of senior secondary schools' students in geometry in Nigeria. It also examined the influence of gender on students' achievement. Pretest, posttest, experimental control group design was adopted for this study.…

  13. Comparative Effects of Concept Mapping and Cooperative Learning Strategies on Senior Secondary School Students' Achievement in Mathematics-Trigonometry in Kano State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Thomas D.; Eze, John E.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the findings from an experimental study on the effectiveness of concept mapping and cooperative learning strategies on SSII students' achievement in trigonometry in mathematics. The research design used in conducting the study was quasi-experimental pre-test and post-test non-equivalent control group. The sample consisted of…

  14. An Empirical Study on the Application of Cooperative Learning to Comprehensive English Classes in a Chinese Independent College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ji

    2017-01-01

    This research investigated a comparison between the effect of cooperative learning and lecture teaching on Comprehensive English classes in a Chinese Independent College. An empirical study for two semesters was carried out in the forms of pretest, posttest, questionnaire and interviews. While control class was taught in the conventional way,…

  15. The Effects of an Infant-Feeding Classroom Activity on the Breast-Feeding Knowledge and Intentions of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Audrey; Moseley, Jane; Jackson, Winston

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of an infant-feeding classroom activity on the breast-feeding knowledge and intentions of adolescents living in Nova Scotia, Canada. One hundred twenty-one students attending two high schools were administered one pretest and two posttest questionnaires. Students were arbitrarily assigned to a control or intervention…

  16. Computer Literacy in a Distance Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajollahi, Mehran; Zandi, Bahman; Sarmadi, Mohamadreza; Keshavarz, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    In a Distance Education (DE) system, students must be equipped with seven skills of computer (ICDL) usage. This paper aims at investigating the effect of a DE system on the computer literacy of Master of Arts students at Tehran University. The design of this study is quasi-experimental. Pre-test and post-test were used in both control and…

  17. Applying Computer-Assisted Musical Instruction to Music Appreciation Course: An Example with Chinese Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Guo, Yuan-Chang; Zhu, Yi-Zhen; Shih, Ru-Chu; Dzan, Wei-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effectiveness of computer-assisted musical instruction (CAMI) in the Learning Chinese Musical Instruments (LCMI) course. The CAMI software for Chinese musical instruments was developed and administered to 228 students in a vocational high school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group design with three…

  18. An Experimental Study of Interventions for the Acquisition and Retention of Motivational Interviewing Skills among Probation Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asteris, Mark M., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the differences in Motivational Interviewing (MI) skill acquisition and retention among probation officers. This study had a randomized, experimental, pretest-posttest control group design using the MITI 3.1.1 and the VASE-R to measure MI skill acquisition and retention. A random sample (n = 24) of probation…

  19. Enhancing decoding efficiency in poor readers via a word identification game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorp, K. van; Segers, P.C.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of a word identification game aimed at enhancing decoding efficiency in poor readers were tested. Following a pretest-posttest-retention design with a waiting control group, 62 poor-reading Dutch second graders received a five-hour tablet intervention across a period of five weeks.

  20. Evaluation of An Upper Elementary School Program To Prevent Body Image, Eating, and Weight Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kater, Kathy J.; Rohwer, John; Londre, Karen

    2002-01-01

    Examined whether the 11-lesson "Healthy Body Image: Teaching Kids to Eat and Love Their Bodies Too!" curriculum would have a positive effect on upper elementary students. Pretest- posttest measures indicated that, compared to control children, children who completed the curriculum showed significant or notable improvement regarding body image,…

  1. Effects of Reading Picture Books on Kindergartners' Mathematics Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Elia, Iliada; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a field experiment with a pretest-posttest control group design which investigated the potential of reading picture books to children for supporting their mathematical understanding. The study involved 384 children from 18 kindergarten classes in 18 schools in the Netherlands. During three months, the children in the nine…

  2. Comparative Effectiveness of Conventional Rote Learning and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relative effectiveness of Mnemonics technique (MNIT) and conventional rote learning technique (CRL) on the teaching-learning of physical features (Geography). A pre-test and post-test control group design was adopted for the study. A sample of ninety SS I students was randomly selected out of ...

  3. The Effects of Learning-Style Based Activities on Students' Reading Comprehension Skills and Self-Efficacy Perceptions in English Foreign Language Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Özgül

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of learning-style based activities on students' reading comprehension skills and self-efficacy perceptions in English foreign language classes. A quasi-experimental, matching-only pretest-posttest control group design was utilized. The study was conducted with freshmen university students majoring in Elementary…

  4. Effects of Prior Knowledge of Topics and the Instructional Objectives on Students' Achievement in Literature-in-English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbah, Blessing Akaraka

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of prior knowledge of topics with their instructional objectives on senior secondary school class two (SS II) students. The study was carried out in Abakaliki Education Zone of Ebonyi State, Nigeria. The design of the study is quasi experimental of pretest-posttest of non-equivalent control group. Two research…

  5. The Effects of a Mobile Gamification App on Elementary Students' Spanish Achievement and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachels, Jason R.; Rockinson-Szapkiw, Amanda J.

    2018-01-01

    A quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest, non-equivalent control group design was used to examine the effect of a mobile gamification application on third and fourth grade students' Spanish language achievement and student academic self-efficacy. In this study, the treatment group's Spanish language instruction was through the use of…

  6. Comparison of the Effects of Computer-Based Practice and Conceptual Understanding Interventions on Mathematics Fact Retention and Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanive, Rebecca; Nelson, Peter M.; Burns, Matthew K.; Ysseldyke, James

    2014-01-01

    The authors' purpose was to determine the effects of computer-based practice and conceptual interventions on computational fluency and word-problem solving of fourth- and fifth-grade students with mathematics difficulties. A randomized pretest-posttest control group design found that students assigned to the computer-based practice intervention…

  7. The effect of behavioural objectives used as advance organizers on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Behavioural objectives were used as advance organizers to teach some senior secondary school year two (SSS 2) mathematics topics. The study adopted a pretest, posttest control group quasi experimental design. Ninety SSS 2 students from two purposively selected senior secondary schools, who were the participants, ...

  8. Instruction in text-structure as a determinant of senior secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study determined the effectiveness of instruction in text-structure on achievement of students in English narrative text. The pretest-posttest control group quasi experimental design was adopted for the study. The participants were 120 students in intact classes from four purposively selected senior secondary schools in ...

  9. An Evaluation of the Training Program: "The Alzheimer's Disease Afflicted: Understanding the Disease and the Resident."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M. Mizanur Rahman

    This study was undertaken to evaluate a training program on understanding Alzheimer's disease for nursing home caregivers of those with the disease. A pretest/posttest design control group methodology was used to evaluate 81 staff members. Results of the study showed that: (1) staff satisfaction with working with mentally impaired and demented…

  10. Instructional Theory for Teaching Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Jan R.; Dinham, Sarah M.

    Metatheoretical analysis of Ausubel's Theory of Meaningful Verbal Learning and Gagne's Theory of Instruction using the Dickoff and James paradigm produced two instructional systems for basic statistics. The systems were tested with a pretest-posttest control group design utilizing students enrolled in an introductory-level graduate statistics…

  11. Computer Instructional Approach and Students' Creative Ability in Sculpture Education in Nigeria Universities: Obafemi Awolowo University as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abass, Bada Tayo

    2011-01-01

    This paper assessed the use of computer assisted instruction in enhancing students' creative ability in sculpture education in Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. The study adopted non- randomized pretest, posttest control group. Data were analyzed using mean, standard deviation and analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA). The mean score were used in…

  12. Examining the Impact of ABRACADABRA on Early Literacy in Northern Australia: An Implementation Fidelity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, Jennifer R.; Abrami, Philip C.; Helmer, Janet; Savage, Robert; Harper, Helen; Lea, Tess

    2014-01-01

    To address students' poor literacy outcomes, an intervention using a computer-based literacy tool, ABRACADABRA, was implemented in 6 Northern Australia primary schools. A pretest, posttest parallel group, single blind multisite randomized controlled trial was conducted with 308 students between the ages of 4 and 8 years old (M age = 5.8 years, SD…

  13. Are Facilitated Mentoring Programs Beneficial? A Randomized Experimental Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Toby Marshall; Song, Zhaoli

    2008-01-01

    Results from a pretest-posttest randomized field experiment study with a control group comparing the impact of high- and low-level-facilitated mentoring programs on new employees' performance and perceptions about their jobs and organization were reported in this paper. Results indicated increases in job satisfaction, organizational commitment,…

  14. Effect of Web Assisted Education Supported by Six Thinking Hats on Students' Academic Achievement in Science and Technology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Orhan; Bilen, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    Advances in computer technologies and adoption of related methods and techniques in education have developed parallel to each other. This study focuses on the need to utilize more than one teaching method and technique in education rather than focusing on a single teaching method. By using the pre-test post-test and control group semi-experimental…

  15. Investigating the Effectiveness of Audio Input Enhancement on EFL Learners' Retention of Intensifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negari, Giti Mousapour; Azizi, Aliye; Arani, Davood Khedmatkar

    2018-01-01

    The present study attempted to investigate the effects of audio input enhancement on EFL learners' retention of intensifiers. To this end, two research questions were formulated. In order to address these research questions, this study attempted to reject two null hypotheses. Pretest-posttest control group quasi-experimental design was employed to…

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Computer Applications in Developing English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, James Todd

    2016-01-01

    I examined the effectiveness of self-directed learning and English learning with computer applications on college students in Bangkok, Thailand, in a control-group experimental-group pretest-posttest design. The hypothesis was tested using a t test: two-sample assuming unequal variances to establish the significance of mean scores between the two…

  17. How Much Videos Win over Audios in Listening Instruction for EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Burhanuddin; Mustafa, Faisal; Permatasari, Rizki

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at comparing the benefits of using videos instead of audios for improving students' listening skills. This experimental study used a pre-test and post-test control group design. The sample, selected by cluster random sampling resulted in the selection of 32 second year high school students for each group. The instruments used were…

  18. Effect of Polya Problem-Solving Model on Senior Secondary School Students' Performance in Current Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaniyan, Ademola Olatide; Omosewo, Esther O.; Nwankwo, Levi I.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the Effect of Polya Problem-Solving Model on Senior School Students' Performance in Current Electricity. It was a quasi experimental study of non- randomized, non equivalent pre-test post-test control group design. Three research questions were answered and corresponding three research hypotheses were tested…

  19. Efficacy of Reality Therapy and Cognitive Coping Behaviour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effect of Reality Therapy and Cognitive Coping Behaviour Training and their combination in handling psychological adjustment problems of the empty nesters after retirement. The study adopted the pre-test, posttest, control group, quasi experimental design using a 4x2 factorial matrix.

  20. Fostering Elementary Students' Mathematics Disposition through Music-Mathematics Integrated Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Song A.; Tillman, Daniel A.; Boren, Rachel; Wang, Junjun

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of third grade students (n = 56) from an elementary school located on the western coast of the United States participated in this research study. A pretest-posttest control group design was utilized to examine changes between two groups of participating students' in mathematics achievement and dispositions, including beliefs about…

  1. Metro Navigation for the Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jaime; Saenz, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of using the software program AudioMetro, a tool that supports the orientation and mobility of people who are blind in the Metro system of Santiago de Chile. A quasi-experimental study considering experimental and control groups and using the paired Student's t in a two sample test analysis (pretest-posttest) was…

  2. The Effect of Learning Cycle Constructivist-Based Approach on Students' Academic Achievement and Attitude towards Chemistry in Secondary Schools in North-Eastern Part of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Gladys Uzezi

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of learning cycle constructivist-based approach on secondary schools students' academic achievement and their attitude towards chemistry. The design used was a pre-test, post-test non randomized control group quasi experimental research design. The design consisted of two instructional groups (learning cycle…

  3. Comparison of Effects of Teaching English to Thai Undergraduate Teacher-Students through Cross-Curricular Thematic Instruction Program Based on Multiple Intelligence Theory and Conventional Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed at comparing the effects of teaching English to Thai undergraduate teacher-students through cross-curricular thematic instruction program based on multiple intelligence theory and through conventional instruction. Two experimental groups, which utilized Randomized True Control Group-Pretest-posttest Time Series Design and…

  4. Efficacy of Enrichment Triad and Self-Directed Models on Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Questions about gifted learners and the best way to teach them to face expected challenges is often a source of controversy. This is because old stereotype curriculum and conventional instructional strategies may not be enough to give the needed stimulation. The study adopted the pre-test, post-test, control group ...

  5. Self Management Techniques and Disclosure of Sero Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaye, Ajibola; Afolayan, Joel Adeleke

    2015-01-01

    This study looked at using Self Management Technique (SMT) to promote self-disclosure of Sero status in Kwara State, Nigeria. A pre-test, post-test and control group quasi experimental design using a 2x2x2 factorial matrix was adopted. Sixty participants were sampled by balloting from two HIV/AIDS screening centres. Four instruments were used such…

  6. Effects of Concept Mapping and Problem Solving Instructional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of concept mapping and problem solving instructional strategies on secondary school students' learning outcomes in Chemistry. The study adopted pre-test, post-test, control group quasiexperimental design, using a 3×2×2 factorial matrix. Two null hypotheses were tested at ...

  7. The Effects of a Premarital Relationship Enrichment Program on Relationship Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Tugba; Kalkan, Melek

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a premarital relationship enrichment program on relationship satisfaction among couples. The experimental and control groups were totally composed of 20 individuals. In order to test whether there are any significant differences between the scores of pre-test and post-test within the control…

  8. The effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group counseling on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    education. ... This research is a pre-test and post-test experimental design along with the control group. The statistical population is all 15-18 years-old second grade ... Data were analyzed using variance analysis method. The results showed that ...

  9. Addressing University Students' Anti-Gay Bias: An Extension of the Contact Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Span, Sherry A.

    2011-01-01

    One method frequently employed as an intervention to reduce anti-gay bias is a lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) speaker panel. These speakers share brief biographical sketches about their coming out experiences and then answer questions. A pretest/posttest control group design examined the impact of LGB speaker panels on university students'…

  10. Outdoor education camp and group cohesion: an investigation in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study seeks to investigate the effect of outdoor education camp toward group cohesion among second year undergraduate teacher trainees from selected Teacher Education Institutes of Malaysia. A pre-test and post-test approach with non-equivalent control group was utilised among 350 second year undergraduate ...

  11. Effects of EQUIP for Educators on Students' Self-Serving Cognitive Distortions, Moral Judgment, and Antisocial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Floor; Brugman, Daniel; Boom, Jan; Koops, Willem

    2010-01-01

    A quasi-experimental pretest/posttest study using a control group was conducted to investigate the effects of EQUIP for Educators--implemented as a universal prevention program--on prevalence of antisocial behavior, attitude towards antisocial behavior, self serving cognitive distortions, and moral judgment of young adolescents. Participants were…

  12. Effect of Stress-Response Psycho-Training on the Stress Levels of Mothers with Autistic Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ömer

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of stress-response psycho-training on the stress levels of mothers with autistic children. The research was experimental in design encompassing a pretest-posttest model with control and placebo groups. Participation in the study was voluntary with a total of 28 mothers of autistic children included…

  13. Storytelling Slide Shows to Improve Diabetes and High Blood Pressure Knowledge and Self-Efficacy: Three-Year Results among Community Dwelling Older African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertera, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    This study combined the African American tradition of oral storytelling with the Hispanic medium of "Fotonovelas." A staggered pretest posttest control group design was used to evaluate four Storytelling Slide Shows on health that featured community members. A total of 212 participants were recruited for the intervention and 217 for the…

  14. Improving primary teachers’ attitudes toward science by attitude-focused professional development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalderen-Smeets, Sandra; Walma van der Molen, Julie Henriëtte

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a description of a novel, attitude-focused, professional development intervention, and presents the results of an experimental pretest-posttest control group study investigating the effects of this intervention on primary teachers’ personal attitudes toward science, attitudes

  15. Effect of peer tutoring and cooperative learning instructional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the effect of peer tutoring and cooperative learning instructional strategies on mathematics achievement of students with learning disabilities in Oyo State, Nigeria. The study adopted a pre-test, post-test control group quasi experimental design with 3x2x2 factorial matrix, sampling one hundred and fifty ...

  16. Empirical Test of the Know, See, Plan, Do Model for Curriculum Design in Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Beth Ann; Allen, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    This research assesses the Know, See, Plan, portions of the Know, See, Plan, Do (KSPD) model for curriculum design in leadership education. There were 3 graduate student groups, each taught using 1 of 3 different curriculum designs (KSPD and 2 control groups). Based on a pretest, post-test design, students' performance was measured to assess their…

  17. Effects of Classification Exposure upon Numerical Achievement of Educable Mentally Retarded Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Kerri L.; Tseng, M. S.

    Two groups of 32 educable mentally retarded children (ages 7 to 14 years) were compared as to their arithmetic and classification performances attributable to the presence or absence of a 4 1/2 week exposure to classification tasks. The randomized block pretest-posttest design was used. The experimental group and the control group were matched on…

  18. Enhancing Critical Thinking Skills and Writing Skills through the Variation in Non-Traditional Writing Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaga, Parlindungan; Feranie, Shelly

    2017-01-01

    The research aims to identify the impacts of embedding non-traditional writing tasks within the course of modern physics conducted to the students of Physics Education and Physics Study Programs. It employed a quasi-experimental method with the pretest-posttest control group design. The used instruments were tests on conceptual mastery, tests on…

  19. Effects of Concept Mapping Instruction Approach on Students' Achievement in Basic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogonnaya, Ukpai Patricia; Okafor, Gabriel; Abonyi, Okechukwu S.; Ugama, J. O.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of concept mapping on students' achievement in basic science. The study was carried out in Ebonyi State of Nigeria. The study employed a quasi-experimental design. Specifically the pretest posttest non-equivalent control group research design was used. The sample was 122 students selected from two secondary…

  20. The Effects of Concept Mapping and Academic Self-Efficacy on Mastery Goals and Reading Comprehension Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew; Kim, Wonsun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of concept mapping on mastery goal orientation and academic self-efficacy in a collaborative learning environment. The current study employed a randomized controlled pretest-posttest group design to examine if learning strategies such as concept mapping can help students with both reading…