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Sample records for presynaptic muscarinic receptors

  1. Presynaptic inhibition of synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus by activation of muscarinic receptors: involvement of presynaptic calcium influx

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Jing; Saggau, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Modulation of presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) by muscarinic receptors at the CA3–CA1 synapse of rat hippocampal slices was investigated by using the calcium indicator fura-2. Stimulation-evoked presynaptic calcium transients ([Capre]t) and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fe.p.s.ps) were simultaneously recorded. The relationship between presynaptic calcium influx and synaptic transmission was studied.Activation of muscarinic receptors inhibited [Capre]t, thereb...

  2. Differential presynaptic and postsynaptic expression of m1-m4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors at the perforant pathway/granule cell synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, S T; Gilmor, M L; Levey, A I

    1998-09-01

    A family of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor proteins mediates diverse pre- and postsynaptic functions in the hippocampus. However the roles of individual receptors are not understood. The present study identified the pre- and postsynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine receptors at the perforant pathway synapses in rat brain using a combination of lesioning, immunocytochemistry and electron microscopic techniques. Entorhinal cortex lesions resulted in lamina-specific reductions of m2, m3, and m4 immunoreactivity in parallel with the degeneration of the medial and lateral perforant pathway terminals in the middle and outer thirds of the molecular layer, respectively. In contrast, granule cell lesions selectively reduced m1 and m3 receptors consistent with degeneration of postsynaptic dendrites. Direct visualization of m1-m4 by electron microscopic immunocytochemistry confirmed their differential pre- and postsynaptic localizations. Together, these findings provide strong evidence for both redundancy and spatial selectivity of presynaptic (m2, m3 and m4) and postsynaptic (m1 and m3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors at the perforant pathway synapse.

  3. Immunocytochemical demonstration of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors at the presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes of rat diaphragm endplates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malomouzh, A. I.; Arkhipova, S. S.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2011), s. 185-188 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905; GA ČR GA202/09/0806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : skeletal muscle * M1 muscarinic receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.555, year: 2011

  4. Xanomeline wash-resistantly bound to presynaptic M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors decreases the evoked release of acetylcholine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 101, Suppl.1 (2007), s. 52-53 ISSN 0022-3042. [ESN - meeting /17./ - Conference on Advances in Molecular Mechanims and Disorders /3./. 19.05.2007-22.05.2007, Salamanca] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452 Grant - others:NIH(US) NS25732 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * xanomeline * muscarinic receptor Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  5. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-11-14

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization remain topics of intense speculation. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors belong to class A of the GPCR family. Each muscarinic receptor subtype has its own particular distribution throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the central nervous system, muscarinic receptors regulate several sensory, cognitive, and motor functions while, in the peripheral nervous system, they are involved in the regulation of heart rate, stimulation of glandular secretion and smooth muscle contraction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have long been used as a model for the study of GPCR structure and function and to address aspects of GPCR dimerization using a broad range of approaches. In this review, the prevailing knowledge regarding the quaternary arrangement for the various muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been summarized by discussing work ranging from initial results obtained using more traditional biochemical approaches to those generated with more modern biophysical techniques. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Wash-Resistantly Bound Xanomeline Inhibits Acetylcholine Release by Persistent Activation of Presynaptic M2 and M4 Muscarinic Receptors in Rat Brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 322, č. 1 (2007), s. 316-323 ISSN 0022-3565 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:-(US) NS25743 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine * xanomeline * muscarinic receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.003, year: 2007

  7. Muscarinic receptor compensation in hippocampus of alzheimer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordberg, A.; Larsson, C.; Adolfsson, R.; Alafuzoff, I.; Winblad, B.

    1983-01-01

    The activity of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) (presynaptic marker) and number of muscarine-like receptor binding sites have been measured in the hippocampus from eight individuals with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and ten controls. A negative correlation (r=0.80; p<0.05) was found between the ChAT activity and the number of muscarine-like receptors in the SDAT group but not in the controls. The findings might indicate an ongoing compensatory receptor mechanism as a response to changes in presynaptic cholinergic activity. (Author)

  8. Presynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine autoreceptors (M1, M2 and M4 subtypes), adenosine receptors (A1 and A2A) and tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB) modulate the developmental synapse elimination process at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Laura; Garcia, Neus; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria A; Santafé, Manel; Tomàs, Josep

    2016-06-23

    The development of the nervous system involves an initially exuberant production of neurons that make an excessive number of synaptic contacts. The initial overproduction of synapses promotes connectivity. Hebbian competition between axons with different activities (the least active are punished) leads to the loss of roughly half of the overproduced elements and this refines connectivity and increases specificity. The neuromuscular junction is innervated by a single axon at the end of the synapse elimination process and, because of its relative simplicity, has long been used as a model for studying the general principles of synapse development. The involvement of the presynaptic muscarinic ACh autoreceptors may allow for the direct competitive interaction between nerve endings through differential activity-dependent acetylcholine release in the synaptic cleft. Then, the most active ending may directly punish the less active ones. Our previous results indicate the existence in the weakest axons on the polyinnervated neonatal NMJ of an ACh release inhibition mechanism based on mAChR coupled to protein kinase C and voltage-dependent calcium channels. We suggest that this mechanism plays a role in the elimination of redundant neonatal synapses. Here we used confocal microscopy and quantitative morphological analysis to count the number of brightly fluorescent axons per endplate in P7, P9 and P15 transgenic B6.Cg-Tg (Thy1-YFP)16 Jrs/J mice. We investigate the involvement of individual mAChR M1-, M2- and M4-subtypes in the control of axonal elimination after the Levator auris longus muscle had been exposed to agonist and antagonist in vivo. We also analysed the role of adenosine receptor subtypes (A1 and A2A) and the tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor. The data show that postnatal axonal elimination is a regulated multireceptor mechanism that guaranteed the monoinnervation of the neuromuscular synapses. The three receptor sets considered (mAChR, AR and TrkB receptors

  9. Muscarinic receptors and drugs in cardiovascular medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.; Doods, H. N.

    1995-01-01

    The parasympathetic system and its associated muscarinic receptors have been the subject of a renaissance of interest for the following two main reasons: (1) the association of endothelial muscarinic receptors and the nitric oxide (NO) pathway; (2) the discovery of several muscarinic receptor

  10. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J.; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization...

  11. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  12. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer

  13. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  14. Characterization of central inhibitory muscarinic autoreceptors by the use of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weilie; Basile, Anthony S; Gomeza, Jesus; Volpicelli, Laura A; Levey, Allan I; Wess, Jürgen

    2002-03-01

    Forebrain muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs; M1-M5) are predicted to play important roles in many fundamental central functions, including higher cognitive processes and modulation of extrapyramidal motor activity. Synaptic ACh levels are known to be regulated by the activity of presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptors mediating inhibition of ACh release. Primarily because of the use of ligands with limited receptor subtype selectivity, classical pharmacological studies have led to conflicting results regarding the identity of the mAChR subtypes mediating this activity in different areas of the brain. To investigate the molecular identity of hippocampal, cortical, and striatal inhibitory muscarinic autoreceptors in a more direct manner, we used genetically altered mice lacking functional M2 and/or M4 mAChRs [knock-out (KO) mice]. After labeling of cellular ACh pools with [3H]choline, potassium-stimulated [3H]ACh release was measured in superfused brain slices, either in the absence or the presence of muscarinic drugs. The nonsubtype-selective muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine (0.1-10 microm), inhibited potassium-stimulated [3H]ACh release in hippocampal, cortical, and striatal slices prepared from wild-type mice by up to 80%. This activity was totally abolished in tissues prepared from M2-M4 receptor double KO mice. Strikingly, release studies with brain slices from M2 and M4 receptor single KO mice indicated that autoinhibition of ACh release is mediated primarily by the M2 receptor in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, but predominantly by the M4 receptor in the striatum. These results, together with additional receptor localization studies, support the novel concept that autoinhibition of ACh release involves different mAChRs in different regions of the brain.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS IN GUINEA-PIG UTERUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOODS, HN; WILLIM, KD; BODDEKE, HWGM; ENTZEROTH, M

    1993-01-01

    To characterize the muscarinic receptor present in guinea-pig uterus smooth muscle the affinities of a series of 27 muscarinic receptor antagonists for M1 (rat cortex), M2 (rat heart), M3 (rat submandibular gland), m4 (transfected in CHO cells) and muscarinic binding sites in guinea-pig uterus

  16. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 9 (2010), s. 2838-2860 ISSN 1424-8247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * allosteric modulation * Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  17. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the administration of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP, a GAD inhibitor, modifies not only GABA synthesis but also binding of the antagonist [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB to central muscarinic receptors, an effect due to an increase in affinity without modifications in binding site number. The cholinergic system has been implicated in several experimental epilepsy models and the ability of acetylcholine to regulate neuronal excitability in the neocortex is well known. To study the potential relationship between GABAergic and cholinergic systems with seizure activity, we analyzed the muscarinic receptor after inducing seizure by bicuculline (BIC, known to antagonize the GABA-A postsynaptic receptor subtype. Results We analyzed binding of muscarinic antagonist [3H]-QNB to rat CNS membranes after i.p. administration of BIC at subconvulsant (1.0 mg/kg and convulsant (7.5 mg/kg doses. Subconvulsant BIC dose failed to develop seizures but produced binding alteration in the cerebellum and hippocampus with roughly 40% increase and 10% decrease, respectively. After convulsant BIC dose, which invariably led to generalized tonic-clonic seizures, binding increased 36% and 15% to cerebellar and striatal membranes respectively, but decreased 12% to hippocampal membranes. Kd value was accordingly modified: with the subconvulsant dose it decreased 27% in cerebellum whereas it increased 61% in hippocampus; with the convulsant dose, Kd value decreased 33% in cerebellum but increased 85% in hippocampus. No change in receptor number site was found, and Hill number was invariably close to unity. Conclusion Results indicate dissimilar central nervous system area susceptibility of muscarinic receptor to BIC. Ligand binding was modified not only by a convulsant BIC dose but also by a subconvulsant dose, indicating that changes are not attributable to the seizure process

  18. External Imaging of Cerebral Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckelman, William C.; Reba, Richard C.; Rzeszotarski, Waclaw J.; Gibson, Raymond E.; Hill, Thomas; Holman, B. Leonard; Budinger, Thomas; Conklin, James J.; Eng, Robert; Grissom, Michael P.

    1984-01-01

    A radioiodinated ligand that binds to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was shown to distribute in the brain by a receptor-mediated process. With single-photon-emission imaging techniques, radioactivity was detected in the cerebrum but not in the cerebellum, whereas with a flow-limited radiotracer, radioactivity was detected in cerebrum and cerebellum. Single-photon-emission computed tomography showed good definition of the caudate putamen and cortex in man.

  19. Loss of [3H]4-DAMP binding to muscarinic receptors in the orbitofrontal cortex of Alzheimer's disease patients with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, S W Y; Francis, P T; Esiri, M M; Wong, P T H; Chen, C P L H; Lai, M K P

    2008-06-01

    Neuropsychiatric behaviours in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have been associated with neocortical alterations of presynaptic cholinergic and muscarinic M2 receptor markers. In contrast, it is unclear whether non-M2 muscarinic receptors have a role to play in AD behavioural symptoms. To correlate the alterations of neocortical postsynaptic muscarinic receptors with clinical features of AD. [(3)H]4-DAMP were used in binding assays with lysates of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with M1-M5 receptors. [(3)H]4-DAMP was further used to measure muscarinic receptors in the postmortem orbitofrontal cortex of aged controls and AD patients longitudinally assessed for cognitive decline and behavioural symptoms. [(3)H]4-DAMP binds to human postmortem brain homogenates and M1-, M3-, M4- and M5-transfected CHO lysates with subnanomolar affinity. Compared to the controls, the [(3)H]4-DAMP binding density is reduced only in AD patients with significant psychotic symptoms. The association between reduced [(3)H]4-DAMP binding and psychosis is independent of the effects of dementia severity or neurofibrillary tangle burden. This study suggests that the loss of non-M2 muscarinic receptors in the orbitofrontal cortex may be a neurochemical substrate of psychosis in AD and provides a rationale for further development of muscarinic receptor ligands in AD pharmacotherapy.

  20. Regulation of Brain Muscarinic Receptors by Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-21

    229, 1990. 25. Fryer, A.D., E.E. El-Fakahany and D.B. Jacoby: Parainfluenza Virus Type 1 Reduces the Affinity of Agonists for Muscarinic Receptors in...Abdallah, M. Evinger, C. Forray and E.E. El-Fakahany: The Presence of an M4 Subtype Muscarinic Receptor in the Bovine Adrenal Medulla Revealed by mRNA and

  1. Adenosine receptors and muscarinic receptors cooperate in acetylcholine release modulation in the neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafe, M M; Priego, M; Obis, T; Garcia, N; Tomàs, M; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are present in the motor terminals at the mouse neuromuscular junction. ARs and the presynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) share the functional control of the neuromuscular junction. We analysed their mutual interaction in transmitter release modulation. In electrophysiological experiments with unaltered synaptic transmission (muscles paralysed by blocking the voltage-dependent sodium channel of the muscle cells with μ-conotoxin GIIIB), we found that: (i) a collaborative action between different AR subtypes reduced synaptic depression at a moderate activity level (40 Hz); (ii) at high activity levels (100 Hz), endogenous adenosine production in the synaptic cleft was sufficient to reduce depression through A1 -type receptors (A1 Rs) and A2 A-type receptors (A2 A Rs); (iii) when the non-metabolizable 2-chloroadenosine (CADO) agonist was used, both the quantal content and depression were reduced; (iv) the protective effect of CADO on depression was mediated by A1 Rs, whereas A2 A Rs seemed to modulate A1 Rs; (v) ARs and mAChRs absolutely depended upon each other for the modulation of evoked and spontaneous acetylcholine release in basal conditions and in experimental conditions with CADO stimulation; (vi) the purinergic and muscarinic mechanisms cooperated in the control of depression by sharing a common pathway although the purinergic control was more powerful than the muscarinic control; and (vii) the imbalance of the ARs created by using subtype-selective and non-selective inhibitory and stimulatory agents uncoupled protein kinase C from evoked transmitter release. In summary, ARs (A1 Rs, A2 A Rs) and mAChRs (M1 , M2 ) cooperated in the control of activity-dependent synaptic depression and may share a common protein kinase C pathway. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands 3 H-N-methylscopolamine ( 3 H-NMS), 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB), and 3 H-pirenzepine. 3 H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, 3 H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by 3 H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for 3 H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure

  3. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  4. Identification of rat brain muscarinic M4 receptors coupled to cyclic AMP using the selective antagonist muscarinic toxin 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olianas, M C; Adem, A; Karlsson, E; Onali, P

    1998-09-18

    In membranes of olfactory tubercle and striatum, the selective muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist muscarinic toxin 3 completely antagonized the acetylcholine-induced inhibition of forskolin- and dopamine D1 receptor-stimulated cyclic AMP formation with Ki values of 7 and 4 nM, respectively. In olfactory bulb, where acetylcholine stimulated basal adenylyl cyclase activity and inhibited forskolin-stimulated enzyme activity, muscarinic toxin 3 caused a partial antagonism of both acetylcholine effects with high potencies (Ki values = 4-6 nM). In frontal cortex, muscarinic toxin 3 counteracted the acetylcholine-induced potentiation of corticotropin-releasing hormone-stimulated cyclic AMP with a Ki of 58 nM, which is close to the toxin affinity for the muscarinic M1 receptor. In the same brain region, the acetylcholine inhibition of forskolin-stimulated enzyme activity was not affected by muscarinic toxin 3. In microdissected regions of the hippocampus, a significant portion (33-48%) of the acetylcholine inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity was blocked by muscarinic toxin 3 with Ki values (6-8 nM) consistent with the involvement of muscarinic M4 receptors. These data show that muscarinic toxin 3 discriminates between adenylyl cyclase-coupled muscarinic receptors and demonstrate the utility of the toxin in identifying the relative contribution by the muscarinic M4 receptor subtype.

  5. Muscarinic receptor modulation of acetylcholine release from rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, M G; Pepeu, G

    1995-04-28

    An attempt to identify the muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine (ACh) release from cortical and hippocampal slices was made by means of several muscarinic antagonists. Cortical and hippocampal slices prepared from adult rats were superfused with Krebs solution containing physostigmine; ACh content of the superfusate at rest and after electrical stimulation (1 Hz) was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. The antagonists were added to the Krebs at the concentration of 1 microM. ACh release at rest was enhanced only in the cortex by (+/-)-5,11-dihydro-11-([(2-[2-[(dipropylamino)methyl]-1- piperidinyl)ethyl)amino]carbonyl)-6H-pyrido[2,3-b](1,4)- benzodiazepine-6-one (AFDX384), an M2/M4 selective antagonist. The evoked ACh release from the cerebral cortex was significantly increased by AFDX384, methoctramine, pirenzepine, M2/M4, M2 and M1 selective antagonists, respectively, and scopolamine. This finding suggests that M1, M2 and M4 presynaptic receptor subtypes could regulate evoked ACh release in the cortex. In hippocampal slices, the evoked ACh release was enhanced by AFDX384, pirenzepine and scopolamine but not by methoctramine. In this region ACh release seems therefore regulated only by M1 and M4 receptor subtypes. The M3 antagonist (+/-)-p-fluorohexahydro-sila-difenidol hydrochloride did not affect ACh release.

  6. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues....... The distributions of these subtypes and their potential physiological roles are discussed. By use of molecular genetic manipulation of cloned muscarinic receptor cDNAs, the regions of muscarinic receptors that specify G-protein coupling and ligand binding have been defined in several recent studies. Overall......, these studies have shown that amino acids within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptors define their selectivities for different G-proteins and that multiple discontinuous epitopes contribute to their selectivities for different ligands. The residues that contribute to ligand binding and G-protein coupling...

  7. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 [11-2-[[2-[diethylaminomethyl]- 1-piperidinyl]acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one], hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of [3H]quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of [3H]-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated

  8. Flavonoids with M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyyammai Swaminathan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-active compounds have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic flavones and flavonols was assayed in vitro for their ability to inhibit radioligand binding at human cloned M1 muscarinic receptors. Several compounds were found to possess competitive binding affinity (Ki = 40–110 µM, comparable to that of acetylcholine (Ki = 59 µM. Despite the fact that these compounds lack a positively-charged ammonium group under physiological conditions, molecular modelling studies suggested that they bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor, mainly through non-polar interactions.

  9. Putative M2 muscarinic receptors of rat heart have high affinity for organophosphorus anticholinesterases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, C.L.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    The M2 subtype of muscarinic receptor is predominant in heart, and such receptors were reported to be located in muscles as well as in presynaptic cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals. Muscarinic receptors of rat heart were identified by the high affinity binding of the agonist (+)-[3H]cis-methyldioxolane ([3H]CD), which has been used to label a high affinity population of M2 receptors. A single population of sites was detected and [3H]CD binding was sensitive to the M2 antagonist himbacine but much less so to pirenzepine, the M1 antagonist. These cardiac receptors had different sensitivities to NiCl2 and N-ethylmaleimide from brain muscarinic receptors, that were also labeled with [3H]CD and considered to be of the M2 subtype. Up to 70% of the [3H]CD-labeled cardiac receptors had high affinities for several organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterases. [3H]CD binding was inhibited by the nerve agents soman, VX, sarin, and tabun, with K0.5 values of 0.8, 2, 20, and 50 nM, respectively. It was also inhibited by echothiophate and paraoxon with K0.5 values of 100 and 300 nM, respectively. The apparent competitive nature of inhibition of [3H]CD binding by both sarin and paraoxon suggests that the OPs bind to the acetylcholine binding site of the muscarinic receptor. Other OP insecticides had lower potencies, inhibiting less than 50% of 5 nM [3H]CD binding by 1 microM of EPN, coumaphos, dioxathion, dichlorvos, or chlorpyriphos. There was poor correlation between the potencies of the OPs in reversibly inhibiting [3H]CD binding, and their anticholinesterase activities and toxicities. Acetylcholinesterases are the primary targets for these OP compounds because of the irreversible nature of their inhibition, which results in building of acetylcholine concentrations that activate muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and desensitize them, thereby inhibiting respiration

  10. Effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists on cocaine discrimination in wild-type mice and in muscarinic receptor M1, M2, and M4 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, Lauren; Thomsen, Morgane

    2017-01-01

    Muscarinic M1/M4 receptor stimulation can reduce abuse-related effects of cocaine and may represent avenues for treating cocaine addiction. Muscarinic antagonists can mimic and enhance effects of cocaine, including discriminative stimulus (SD) effects, but the receptor subtypes mediating those...

  11. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells using specific muscarinic receptor antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeskey, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    In cerebellar granule cell cultures, two muscarinic receptor mediated responses were observed: inhibition of adenylate cyclase (M-AC) and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis (M-PI). These responses were antagonized by three purported specific muscarinic antagonists: pirenzipine and (-)QNX (specific for M-PI) and methoctramine (specific for M-AC). However, the specificity for the three antagonists in blocking these responses is not comparable to the specificity observed in binding studies on these cells or to that quoted in the literature. Two peaks of molecular sizes were found in these cells corresponding to the two molecular sizes of muscarinic receptive proteins reported in the literature. Muscarinic receptive proteins were alkylated with 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard followed by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Pirenzipine and (-)QNX were able to block alkylation of the high molecular size peak, which corresponds to the receptive protein m 3 reported in the literature. Methoctramine was able to block alkylation of a portion of the lower molecular size peak, possibly corresponding to the m 2 and/or m 4 receptive proteins reported in the literature. Studies attempting to show the presence of receptor reserve for either of the two biochemical responses present in these cells by alkylation of the receptive protein with nonradiolabeled propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM) were confounded by specificity of this agent for the lower molecular weight peak of muscarinic receptive protein. Thus the muscarinic receptive proteins coupled to M-AC were alkylated preferentially over the ones coupled to M-PI

  12. Reciprocal developmental regulation of presynaptic ionotropic receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tureček, Rostislav; Trussell O., Laurence

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 21 (2002), s. 13884-13889 ISSN 0027-8424 Grant - others:US(XC) DC04450; US(XC) TW05406-01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : ionotropic receptors Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 10.701, year: 2002

  13. Deoxycholic acid conjugates are muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Chen, Ying; Zimniak, Piotr; Cheng, Kunrong

    2002-08-01

    In the course of examining the actions of major human bile acids on cholinergic receptors, we discovered that conjugates of lithocholic acid are partial muscarinic agonists. In the present communication, we report that conjugates of deoxycholic acid (DC) act as cholinergic muscarinic receptor antagonists. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing rat M3-muscarinic receptors were used to test bile acids for inhibition of radioligand [N- (3)H-methylscopolamine ((3)H-NMS)] binding; alteration of inositol phosphate (IP) formation; mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation and cell toxicity. We observed approximately 18.8, 30.3 and 37.1% inhibition of (3)H-NMS binding with DC and its glycine (DCG) and taurine (DCT) conjugates, respectively (all 100 micromol/l, p exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase release from CHO-M3 cells. We observed the following rank order of potency (IC(50) micromol/l) for inhibition of (3)H-NMS by muscarinic antagonists and bile acids: NMS (0.0004) > 4-DAMP (0.009) > atropine (0.012) > DCT (170) > DCG (250). None of the bile acids tested were hydrolyzed by recombinant cholinesterase. At concentrations achieved in human bile, DC derivatives are natural muscarinic antagonists. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. PD 102807, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist, discriminates between striatal and cortical muscarinic receptors coupled to cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olianas, M C; Onali, P

    1999-01-01

    In membranes of Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the cloned human M1-M4 muscarinic receptor subtypes, PD 102807, a novel M4 selective antagonist, was found to counteract the M4 receptor-induced stimulation of [35S]-GTPgammaS binding to membrane G proteins with a pK(B) of 7.40, a value which was 63-, 33- and 10-fold higher than those displayed at M1 (pK(B) = 5.60), M2 (pK(B) = 5.88) and M3 (pK(B) = 6.39) receptor subtypes, respectively. In rat striatal membranes, PD 102807 antagonized the muscarinic inhibition of dopamine (DA) D1 receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase with a pK(B) value of 7.36. In contrast, in membranes of rat frontal cortex, PD 102807 displayed lower potencies in antagonizing either the muscarinic facilitation of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (pK(B) = 5.79) or inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM)-stimulated enzyme activity (pK(B) = 5.95). In each response investigated, PD 102807 interacted with muscarinic receptors in a manner typical of a simple competitive antagonist. These data provide additional evidence that PD 102807 is a M4-receptor preferring antagonist and that this compound can discriminate the striatal muscarinic receptors inhibiting DA D1 receptor activity from the cortical receptors mediating the potentiation of CRH receptor signalling and the inhibition of Ca2+/CaM-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity.

  15. Presynaptic membrane receptors in acetylcholine release modulation in the neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomàs, Josep; Santafé, Manel M; Garcia, Neus; Lanuza, Maria A; Tomàs, Marta; Besalduch, Núria; Obis, Teresa; Priego, Mercedes; Hurtado, Erica

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few years, we have studied, in the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the local involvement in transmitter release of the presynaptic muscarinic ACh autoreceptors (mAChRs), purinergic adenosine autoreceptors (P1Rs), and trophic factor receptors (TFRs; for neurotrophins and trophic cytokines) during development and in the adult. At any given moment, the way in which a synapse works is largely the logical outcome of the confluence of these (and other) metabotropic signalling pathways on intracellular kinases, which phosphorylate protein targets and materialize adaptive changes. We propose an integrated interpretation of the complementary function of these receptors in the adult NMJ. The activity of a given receptor group can modulate a given combination of spontaneous, evoked, and activity-dependent release characteristics. For instance, P1Rs can conserve resources by limiting spontaneous quantal leak of ACh (an A1 R action) and protect synapse function, because stimulation with adenosine reduces the magnitude of depression during repetitive activity. The overall outcome of the mAChRs seems to contribute to upkeep of spontaneous quantal output of ACh, save synapse function by decreasing the extent of evoked release (mainly an M2 action), and reduce depression. We have also identified several links among P1Rs, mAChRs, and TFRs. We found a close dependence between mAChR and some TFRs and observed that the muscarinic group has to operate correctly if the tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (trkB) is also to operate correctly, and vice versa. Likewise, the functional integrity of mAChRs depends on P1Rs operating normally. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Presynaptic G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Gatekeepers of Addiction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari A Johnson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse and addiction cause widespread social and public health problems, and the neurobiology underlying drug actions and drug use and abuse is an area of intensive research. Drugs of abuse alter synaptic transmission, and these actions contribute to acute intoxication as well as the chronic effects of abused substances. Transmission at most mammalian synapses involves neurotransmitter activation of two receptor subtypes, ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast synaptic responses, and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that have slower neuromodulatory actions. The GPCRs represent a large proportion of neurotransmitter receptors involved in almost all facets of nervous system function. In addition, these receptors are targets for many pharmacotherapeutic agents. Drugs of abuse directly or indirectly affect neuromodulation mediated by GPCRs, with important consequences for intoxication, drug taking and responses to prolonged drug exposure, withdrawal and addiction. Among the GPCRs are several subtypes involved in presynaptic inhibition, most of which are coupled to the Gi/o class of G protein. There is increasing evidence that these presynaptic Gi/o-coupled GPCRs have important roles in the actions of drugs of abuse, as well as behaviors related to these drugs. This topic will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on receptors for three neurotransmitters, dopamine (D1- and D2-like receptors, endocannabinoids (CB1 receptors and glutamate (group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu receptors. The focus is on recent evidence from laboratory animal models (and some evidence in humans implicating these receptors in the acute and chronic effects of numerous abused drugs, as well as in the control of drug seeking and taking. The ability of drugs targeting these receptors to modify drug seeking behavior has raised the possibility of using compounds targeting these receptors for addiction pharmacotherapy. This topic is also discussed, with emphasis on

  17. The modulatory role of M2 muscarinic receptor on apomorphine-induced yawning and genital grooming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, Maria Thereza; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Nasello, Antonia Gladys

    2012-12-07

    The interaction between dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways in the induction of behavioral responses has been previously established. In the brain, M2 receptors are found predominantly in presynaptic cholinergic neurons as autoreceptors, and in dopaminergic neurons as heteroceptors, suggesting a control role of acetylcholine and dopamine release, respectively. Our aim was to investigate the role of M2 receptors on the yawning and genital grooming of rats induced by apomorphine, a dopaminergic receptor agonist, focusing on the interaction between cholinergic and dopaminergic pathways. Initially, the effect of atropine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist, on yawning and genital grooming induced by apomorphine (100 μg/kg s.c.) was analyzed. Atropine doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg i.p. were administered to Wistar rats 30 min before induction of the behavioral responses by apomorphine. Number of yawns and time spent genital grooming were quantified over a 60 min period. Apomorphine-induced yawning was increased by low dose (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) but not by high doses (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) of atropine. Genital grooming was antagonized by 2 mg/kg i.p. of atropine and showed no changes at the other doses tested. Tripitramine, a selective M2 cholinergic antagonist, was used as a tool for distinguishing between M2 and all other muscarinic receptor subtypes in yawning and genital grooming. Tripitramine doses of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.04 μmol/kg i.p. were administered to Wistar rats 30 min before apomorphine (100 μg/kg s.c.). Number of yawns and time spent genital grooming were also quantified over a 60 min period. Tripitramine 0.01 μmol/kg increased all parameters. Higher doses, which possibly block all subtypes of muscarinic receptor, did not modify the response of apomorphine, suggesting a non-selective effect of tripitramine at these doses. Given that low doses of tripitramine increased the behavioral responses induced by apomorphine and that the main distribution of the M2

  18. PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF CLONED MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN A9 L CELLS - COMPARISON WITH INVITRO MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BODDEKE, HWGM; BUTTINI, M

    1991-01-01

    The effects of a series of muscarinic agonists and antagonists at cloned ml and m3 muscarinic receptors expressed in mouse fibroblast A9 L cells have been compared with their effects in in vitro models of M1 (rat superior cervical ganglion) and M3 (guinea-pig ileum) muscarinic receptors. A good

  19. Cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Left ventricular samples and blood samples were obtained from autopsies of SIDS and children deceased from non cardiac causes. Binding experiments performed with [(3H]NMS, a selective muscarinic ligand, in cardiac membrane preparations showed that the density of cardiac muscarinic receptors was increased as shown by a more than doubled B(max value in SIDS (n = 9 SIDS versus 8 controls. On average, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity was also significantly increased (n = 9 SIDS versus 11 controls. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, it has been shown for the first time that cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression is associated with SIDS. The increase of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity appears as a possible regulatory mechanism.

  20. Role of muscarinic receptor antagonists in urgency and nocturia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2005-01-01

    The overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is defined as urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia. Muscarinic receptor antagonists are the most established form of treatment for OAB, but until recently their effectiveness was only confirmed for symptoms

  1. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues. The...

  2. Muscarinic receptors of the urinary bladder: detrusor, urothelial and prejunctional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess-Williams, R

    2002-06-01

    1. The parasympathetic nervous system is responsible for maintaining normal bladder function, contracting the bladder smooth muscle (detrusor) and relaxing the bladder outlet during micturition. 2. Contraction of the bladder involves direct contraction via M3 receptors and an indirect 're-contraction' via M2-receptors whereby a reduction in adenylate cyclase activity reverses the relaxation induced by beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. 3. Muscarinic receptors are also located on the epithelial lining of the bladder (urothelium) where they induce the release of a diffusible factor responsible for inhibiting contraction of the underlying detrusor smooth muscle. The factor remains unidentified but is not nitric oxide, a cyclooxygenase product or adenosine triphosphate. 4. Finally, muscarinic receptors are also located prejunctionally in the bladder on cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals, where M1-receptors facilitate transmitter release and M2 or M4-receptors inhibit transmitter release. 5. In pathological states, changes may occur in these receptor systems resulting in bladder dysfunction. Muscarinic receptor antagonists are the main therapeutic agents available for treatment of the overactive bladder, but whether their therapeutic effect involves actions at all three locations (detrusor, prejunctional, urothelial) has yet to be established.

  3. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1996-01-01

    of maximal response, depending on the molar ratio of agonist and antagonist used. Using recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1 and m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT), we have now shown that co-administration of the full agonist, carbachol...... for the true partial muscarinic agonist, 4-[N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamoyloxy]-2-butynyltrimethylammonium chloride (McN A-343). Thus, functional as well as true partial agonist responses became more efficacious and potent with increasing receptor and G-protein levels. The level of maximal functional partial......We have previously defined the concept of functional partial agonism as the partial agonist responses recorded in brain slices after administration of full ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists and competitive antagonists at fixed ratios. Functional partial agonism can be established at any level...

  4. A model of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöhren, Kirstin; Höltje, Hans-Dieter

    2002-11-01

    The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor belongs to the family of rhodopsin like G-Protein Coupled Receptors. This subtype of muscarinic receptors is of special interest because it bears, aside from an orthosteric binding site, also an allosteric binding site. Based on the X-ray structure of bovine rhodopsin a complete homology model of the human M2 receptor was developed. For the orthosteric binding site point mutations and binding studies with different agonists and antagonists are available. This knowledge was utilized for an initial verification of the M2 model. Allosteric modulation of activity is mediated by structurally different ligands such as gallamine, caracurine V salts or W84 (a hexamethonium-derivative). Caracurine V derivatives with different affinities to M2 were docked using GRID-fields. Subsequent molecular dynamics simulations yielded different binding energies based on diverse electrostatic and lipophilic interactions. The calculated affinities are in good agreement to experimentally determined affinities.

  5. Changes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors during aging process of primary cultured neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Guohuang; Yi Ningyu; Xia Zongqin

    1996-01-01

    The dynamic changes of muscarinic receptor density and its reactivity during aging process in primary cultured neutrons were studied. Muscarinic receptor density was measured by 3 H-QNB binding assay, and muscarinic receptor reactivity was assessed by carbachol stimulation of cGMP formation, the latter was measured by RIA. After 2 weeks' incubation of neonatal rat brain cells, the nutrients began to rupture and the cell bodies shrank markedly showing senescent feature. The muscarinic receptor density reached peak at the 12th day in vitro (12 DIV), but the muscarinic receptor reactivity reached peak at 9 DIV and declined significantly at 12 DIV. The results demonstrated that during aging process of primary cultured neutrons, the decline of muscarinic receptor reactivity is likely prior to the decrease of receptor density

  6. Presynaptic localization of histamine H3-receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K.; Mizuguchi, H.; Fukui, H.; Wada, H. (Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1991-06-28

    The localization of histamine H3-receptors in subcellular fractions from the rat brain was examined in a (3H) (R) alpha-methylhistamine binding assay and compared with those of histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors. Major (3H)(R) alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities ((3H)ligand binding vs. protein amount) were recovered from the P2 fraction by differential centrifugation. Minor (3H)(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities were also detected in the P3 fraction. Further subfractionation of the P2 fraction by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed major recoveries of (3H)(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding in myelin (MYE) and synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fractions. A further increase in specific activity was observed in the MYE fraction, but the SPM fraction showed no significant increase in specific activity. Adrenaline alpha 2-receptors, the pre-synaptic autoreceptors, in a (3H) yohimbine binding assay showed distribution patterns similar to histamine H3-receptors. On the other hand, post-synaptic histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1-receptors were closely localized and distributed mainly in the SPM fraction with increased specific activity. Only a negligible amount was recovered in the MYE fraction, unlike the histamine H3- and adrenaline alpha 2-receptors.

  7. Presynaptic localization of histamine H3-receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Mizuguchi, H.; Fukui, H.; Wada, H.

    1991-01-01

    The localization of histamine H3-receptors in subcellular fractions from the rat brain was examined in a [3H] (R) alpha-methylhistamine binding assay and compared with those of histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors. Major [3H](R) alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities ([3H]ligand binding vs. protein amount) were recovered from the P2 fraction by differential centrifugation. Minor [3H](R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities were also detected in the P3 fraction. Further subfractionation of the P2 fraction by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed major recoveries of [3H](R)alpha-methylhistamine binding in myelin (MYE) and synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fractions. A further increase in specific activity was observed in the MYE fraction, but the SPM fraction showed no significant increase in specific activity. Adrenaline alpha 2-receptors, the pre-synaptic autoreceptors, in a [3H] yohimbine binding assay showed distribution patterns similar to histamine H3-receptors. On the other hand, post-synaptic histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1-receptors were closely localized and distributed mainly in the SPM fraction with increased specific activity. Only a negligible amount was recovered in the MYE fraction, unlike the histamine H3- and adrenaline alpha 2-receptors

  8. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1996-01-01

    We have previously defined the concept of functional partial agonism as the partial agonist responses recorded in brain slices after administration of full ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists and competitive antagonists at fixed ratios. Functional partial agonism can be established at any level...... of maximal response, depending on the molar ratio of agonist and antagonist used. Using recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1 and m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT), we have now shown that co-administration of the full agonist, carbachol...

  9. Role of dopamine receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blockade in the antiapomorphine action of neuroleptics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Langel, Yu.L.; Chereshka, K.S.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors analyze the role of dopamine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocking components in the antistereotypic action of neuroleptics with different chemical structure. To determine dopamine-blocking activity in vitro, binding of /sup 3/H-spiperone with membranes of the rat striatum was measured. To study the blocking action of the substances on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, binding of /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzylate with brain membranes was chosen.

  10. Subtype Differences in Pre-Coupling of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Janíčková, Helena; Randáková, Alena; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2011), e27732 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine muscarinic receptors * G proteins * subtype differences Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.092, year: 2011

  11. Outline of therapeutic interventions with muscarinic receptor-mediated transmission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Šantrůčková, Eva; Randáková, Alena; Janíčková, Helena; Zimčík, Pavel; Rudajev, Vladimír; Michal, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S177-S189 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cholinergic transmission * muscarinic receptors * therapy * Alzheimer 's disease, * schizophrenia Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  12. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of

  13. Effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists on cocaine discrimination in wild-type mice and in muscarinic receptor M1, M2, and M4 receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Lauren; Thomsen, Morgane

    2017-06-30

    Muscarinic M 1 /M 4 receptor stimulation can reduce abuse-related effects of cocaine and may represent avenues for treating cocaine addiction. Muscarinic antagonists can mimic and enhance effects of cocaine, including discriminative stimulus (S D ) effects, but the receptor subtypes mediating those effects are not known. A better understanding of the complex cocaine/muscarinic interactions is needed to evaluate and develop potential muscarinic-based medications. Here, knockout mice lacking M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 receptors (M 1 -/- , M 2 -/- , M 4 -/- ), as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline. Muscarinic receptor antagonists with no subtype selectivity (scopolamine), or preferential affinity at the M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 subtype (telenzepine, trihexyphenidyl; methoctramine, AQ-RA 741; tropicamide) were tested alone and in combination with cocaine. In intact animals, antagonists with high affinity at M 1 /M 4 receptors partially substituted for cocaine and increased the S D effect of cocaine, while M 2 -preferring antagonists did not substitute, and reduced the S D effect of cocaine. The cocaine-like effects of scopolamine were absent in M 1 -/- mice. The cocaine S D attenuating effects of methoctramine were absent in M 2 -/- mice and almost absent in M 1 -/- mice. The findings indicate that the cocaine-like S D effects of muscarinic antagonists are primarily mediated through M 1 receptors, with a minor contribution of M 4 receptors. The data also support our previous findings that stimulation of M 1 receptors and M 4 receptors can each attenuate the S D effect of cocaine, and show that this can also be achieved by blocking M 2 autoreceptors, likely via increased acetylcholine release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide and Muscarinic Receptors: Supersensitivity Induced by Long-Term Atropine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Britta; Abens, Janis; Bartfai, Tamas

    1983-04-01

    Long-term treatment of rats with atropine induced large increases in the numbers of muscarinic receptors and receptors for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in the salivary glands. Since receptors for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide coexist with muscarinic receptors on the same neurons in this preparation, the results suggest that a drug that alters the sensitivity of one receptor may also affect the sensitivity of the receptor for a costored transmitter and in this way contribute to the therapeutic or side effects of the drug.

  15. Modulation of prepulse inhibition through both M(1) and M (4) muscarinic receptors in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Wess, Jürgen; Fulton, Brian S

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic M(1) and M(4) receptors may participate in schizophrenia's etiology and have been proposed as targets for antipsychotic medications.......Muscarinic cholinergic M(1) and M(4) receptors may participate in schizophrenia's etiology and have been proposed as targets for antipsychotic medications....

  16. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus....... More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained...... to discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M(1)/M(4)-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M(1)-selective agonist...

  17. Activation of muscarinic receptors by non-neuronal acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Ignaz Karl; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2012-01-01

    The biological role of acetylcholine and the cholinergic system is revisited based particularly on scientific research early and late in the last century. On the one hand, acetylcholine represents the classical neurotransmitter, whereas on the other hand, acetylcholine and the pivotal components of the cholinergic system (high-affinity choline uptake, choline acetyltransferase and its end product acetylcholine, muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and esterase) are expressed by more or less all mammalian cells, i.e. by the majority of cells not innervated by neurons at all. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that acetylcholine and "cholinergic receptors" are expressed in non-neuronal organisms such as plants and protists. Acetylcholine is even synthesized by bacteria and algae representing an extremely old signalling molecule on the evolutionary timescale. The following article summarizes examples, in which non-neuronal acetylcholine is released from primitive organisms as well as from mammalian non-neuronal cells and binds to muscarinic receptors to modulate/regulate phenotypic cell functions via auto-/paracrine pathways. The examples demonstrate that non-neuronal acetylcholine and the non-neuronal cholinergic system are vital for various types of cells such as epithelial, endothelial and immune cells.

  18. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptors in human bronchi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Koppen, C.J.; Blankesteijn, W.M.; Klaassen, A.B.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J.F.; Beld, A.J.; van Ginneken, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    To visualize muscarinic receptors in human bronchi, the stripping film method was used which permits direct autoradiographic localization of tissue labeling. Cryostate sections of human bronchi were fixed in 0.5% glutaraldehyde in Krebs-Ringer buffer, pH 7.0 for 30 min at 0 0 C, washed in Krebs-Ringer buffer for 20 min at 0 0 C and incubated with (-)-[ 3 H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate [(-)-[ 3 H]QNB] for 90 min at 37 0 C. Specific (-)-[ 3 H]QNB binding to tissue sections was saturable (receptor density of 0.14 +/- 0.03 fmol/tissue section) and of high affinity (Kd of 40 +/- 9 pM). For autoradiography, labeled tissue sections were covered with stripping film and exposed for 5 months. Muscarinic receptors in human bronchi were located predominantly in submucosal glands and parasympathetic ganglia. There was less labeling in smooth muscle cells and nerve bundles. Epithelium and blood vessels located within the bronchial wall were devoid of specific labeling

  19. Carbachol-evoked suppression of excitatory neurotransmission in guinea-pig olfactory cortex slices is unlikely to involve an M4-muscarinic receptor subtype.

    OpenAIRE

    Das, B.; Libri, V.; Constanti, A.

    1992-01-01

    Depression of the electrically-evoked surface-negative field potential (N-Wave) by bath-superfusion of carbachol was measured in guinea-pig olfactory cortex slices maintained in vitro. The possibility that this response, previously proposed to be mediated via a presynaptic M1: muscarinic receptor, might in fact be due to M4 receptor activation, was investigated by testing the effectiveness of himbacine (a proposed M4-selective antagonist) on our cortical preparation. Himbacine (100 nM-1 micro...

  20. Pharmacological properties of cloned muscarinic receptors expressed in A9 L cells; comparison with in vitro models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boddeke, H.W.G.M.; Buttini, M.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of a series of muscarinic agonists and antagonists at cloned m1 and m3 muscarinic receptors expressed in mouse fibroblast A9 L cells have been compared with their effects in in vitro models of M1(rat superior cervical ganglion) and M3(guinea-pig ileum) muscarinic receptors. A good

  1. Antipsychotic-like effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Croy, Carrie Hughes; Dencker, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R)-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane...

  2. Parvalbumin-Positive Neurons in Rat Dorsal Hippocampus Contain Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; de Jong, Giena; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus by means of dual-label immunocytochemistry. Fifty-two percent of all muscarinic cholinoceptive

  3. Carbachol-evoked suppression of excitatory neurotransmission in guinea-pig olfactory cortex slices is unlikely to involve an M4-muscarinic receptor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, B; Libri, V; Constanti, A

    1992-01-01

    Depression of the electrically-evoked surface-negative field potential (N-Wave) by bath-superfusion of carbachol was measured in guinea-pig olfactory cortex slices maintained in vitro. The possibility that this response, previously proposed to be mediated via a presynaptic M1: muscarinic receptor, might in fact be due to M4 receptor activation, was investigated by testing the effectiveness of himbacine (a proposed M4-selective antagonist) on our cortical preparation. Himbacine (100 nM-1 microM) had no effect on the N-wave potential alone, but it induced a clear competitive-type inhibition of carbachol effects. Schild plot analysis (regression slope constrained to unity) of pooled data yielded a pA2 value of 7.2 for this antagonist (n = 7 slices). This value accords more with that expected for the interaction of himbacine with M1 receptors (approximately 7.2) than with functionally expressed M4 receptors (approximately 8.5-8.5). We therefore conclude that M4-type muscarinic receptors are unlikely to be involved in mediating this presynaptic carbachol response.

  4. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson's disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor...... antagonists can alleviate extrapyramidal symptoms in Parkinson's disease and motor side effects induced by antipsychotics. The effects of anticholinergics are mediated by muscarinic receptors of which five subtypes (M1–M5) exist. Muscarinic M4 receptors are found at high concentrations in motor parts...... of the striatum, suggesting a role for muscarinic M4 receptors in the motor side effects of antipsychotics, and in the alleviation of these side effects by anticholinergics. Here we investigated the potential role of the muscarinic M4 receptor in catalepsy induced by antipsychotics (haloperidol and risperidone...

  5. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bryon; Molina-Fernández, Claudia; Ugalde, María Beatriz; Tognarelli, Eduardo I; Angel, Cristian; Campusano, Jorge M

    2015-01-01

    The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS), with an unconditioned stimulus (US). The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB), can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA) systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila.

  6. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford); (NIH); (D.E. Shaw); (Hanyang); (UTSMC)

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  7. Treatment of the overactive bladder syndrome with muscarinic receptor antagonists: a matter of metabolites?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.; Hegde, Sharath S.

    2006-01-01

    Antagonists of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, such as darifenacin, oxybutynin, propiverine, solifenacin, tolterodine, and trospium, are the mainstay of the treatment of the overactive bladder syndrome. Fesoterodine is a newer drug awaiting regulatory approval. We briefly review the

  8. Muscarinic receptor subtype-specific effects on cigarette smoke-induced inflammation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kistemaker, Loes E. M.; Bos, I. S. T.; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Wess, Juergen; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic tone contributes to airflow obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Accordingly, anticholinergics are effective bronchodilators by blocking the muscarinic M-3 receptor on airway smooth muscle. Recent evidence indicates that acetylcholine also contributes to airway

  9. Higher levels of different muscarinic receptors in the cortex and hippocampus from subjects with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, Elizabeth; McLean, Catriona; Dean, Brian

    2017-03-01

    It has been suggest that drugs specifically targeting muscarinic receptors will be useful in treating Alzheimer's disease. We decided to determine if the response to such drugs may be altered, because of changes in the levels of muscarinic receptors in the CNS from subjects with the disorder. We used in situ radioligand binding with autoradiography to measure the levels of [ 3 H]pirenzepine binding to muscarinic M1 receptors, [ 3 H]AF-DX 386 binding to muscarinic M1, M2, and M4 receptors, and [ 3 H]4-DAMP binding to muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus from subjects with Alzheimer's and age/sex-matched controls. Compared with controls, [ 3 H]pirenzepine binding was higher in the dentate gyrus from subjects with Alzheimer's disease. [ 3 H]AF-DX 386 binding was higher in the subiculum and parahippocampal gyrus from subjects with the disorder. In Alzheimer's disease, [ 3 H]-DAMP binding was higher in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex but not different in the hippocampus. Our data show complex changes in the levels of muscarinic receptors in the CNS from subjects with Alzheimer's disease which may affect clinical response to treatment with drugs-targeting these receptors.

  10. Role of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-1 in presynaptic differentiation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Alejandra R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wnt signaling pathway regulates several fundamental developmental processes and recently has been shown to be involved in different aspects of synaptic differentiation and plasticity. Some Wnt signaling components are localized at central synapses, and it is thus possible that this pathway could be activated at the synapse. Results We examined the distribution of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-1 in cultured hippocampal neurons and determined that this receptor is located at synaptic contacts co-localizing with presynaptic proteins. Frizzled-1 was found in functional synapses detected with FM1-43 staining and in synaptic terminals from adult rat brain. Interestingly, overexpression of Frizzled-1 increased the number of clusters of Bassoon, a component of the active zone, while treatment with the extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD of Frizzled-1 decreased Bassoon clustering, suggesting a role for this receptor in presynaptic differentiation. Consistent with this, treatment with the Frizzled-1 ligand Wnt-3a induced presynaptic protein clustering and increased functional presynaptic recycling sites, and these effects were prevented by co-treatment with the CRD of Frizzled-1. Moreover, in synaptically mature neurons Wnt-3a was able to modulate the kinetics of neurotransmitter release. Conclusion Our results indicate that the activation of the Wnt pathway through Frizzled-1 occurs at the presynaptic level, and suggest that the synaptic effects of the Wnt signaling pathway could be modulated by local activation through synaptic Frizzled receptors.

  11. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus....... More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained......) conferred lesser nonspecific rate-suppressing effects, with no rate suppression for TBPB. In mutant mice lacking M(1) and M(4) receptors, xanomeline failed to diminish cocaine discrimination while rate-decreasing effects were intact. Our data suggest that central M(1) receptor activation attenuates cocaine...

  12. Muscarinic toxin selective for m4 receptors impairs memory in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerusalinsky, D; Kornisiuk, E; Alfaro, P; Quillfeldt, J; Alonso, M; Verde, E R; Cerveñansky, C; Harvey, A

    1998-05-11

    The selectivity of the muscarinic toxin MT3 from green mamba snake venom was corroborated by inhibition of the binding of [3H]NMS, a classical muscarinic radioligand, to native and cloned muscarinic receptors, showing 214-fold higher affinity for m4 than for m1 subtype, without significant binding to the others. The highest concentrations of MT3 sites (putative m4 receptors) in the rat brain were found in striatum and olfactory tubercle, intermediate concentration in dentate gyrus and CA1, and lower but still conspicuous levels in CA3 and frontal cortex. MT3 caused retrograde amnesia of an inhibitory avoidance task, when injected into the dorsal hippocampus of rats after training, suggesting a positive role of these MT3 sensitive sites, which are probably m4 muscarinic receptors, in memory consolidation of this task.

  13. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-01-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, 3 H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion ( 3 H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that 3 H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin

  14. Impaired functional organization in the visual cortex of muscarinic receptor knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groleau, Marianne; Nguyen, Hoang Nam; Vanni, Matthieu P; Huppé-Gourgues, Frédéric; Casanova, Christian; Vaucher, Elvire

    2014-09-01

    Acetylcholine modulates maturation and neuronal activity through muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in the primary visual cortex. However, the specific contribution of different muscarinic receptor subtypes in these neuromodulatory mechanisms is not fully understood. The present study evaluates in vivo the functional organization and the properties of the visual cortex of different groups of muscarinic receptor knock-out (KO) mice. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals coupled to continuous and episodic visual stimulation paradigms was used. Retinotopic maps along elevation and azimuth were preserved among the different groups of mice. However, compared to their wild-type counterparts, the apparent visual field along elevation was larger in M2/M4-KO mice but smaller in M1-KO. There was a reduction in the estimated relative receptive field size of V1 neurons in M1/M3-KO and M1-KO mice. Spatial frequency and contrast selectivity of V1 neuronal populations were affected only in M1/M3-KO and M1-KO mice. Finally, the neuronal connectivity was altered by the absence of M2/M4 muscarinic receptors. All these effects suggest the distinct roles of different subtypes of muscarinic receptors in the intrinsic organization of V1 and a strong involvement of the muscarinic transmission in the detectability of visual stimuli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Presynaptic Ionotropic Receptors Controlling and Modulating the Rules for Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthijs B. Verhoog

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life, activity-dependent changes in neuronal connection strength enable the brain to refine neural circuits and learn based on experience. In line with predictions made by Hebb, synapse strength can be modified depending on the millisecond timing of action potential firing (STDP. The sign of synaptic plasticity depends on the spike order of presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors, such as NMDA receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, are intimately involved in setting the rules for synaptic strengthening and weakening. In addition, timing rules for STDP within synapses are not fixed. They can be altered by activation of ionotropic receptors located at, or close to, synapses. Here, we will highlight studies that uncovered how network actions control and modulate timing rules for STDP by activating presynaptic ionotropic receptors. Furthermore, we will discuss how interaction between different types of ionotropic receptors may create “timing” windows during which particular timing rules lead to synaptic changes.

  16. Presynaptic Glycine Receptors Increase GABAergic Neurotransmission in Rat Periaqueductal Gray Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwi-Hyung Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The periaqueductal gray (PAG is involved in the central regulation of nociceptive transmission by affecting the descending inhibitory pathway. In the present study, we have addressed the functional role of presynaptic glycine receptors in spontaneous glutamatergic transmission. Spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs were recorded in mechanically dissociated rat PAG neurons using a conventional whole-cell patch recording technique under voltage-clamp conditions. The application of glycine (100 µM significantly increased the frequency of sEPSCs, without affecting the amplitude of sEPSCs. The glycine-induced increase in sEPSC frequency was blocked by 1 µM strychnine, a specific glycine receptor antagonist. The results suggest that glycine acts on presynaptic glycine receptors to increase the probability of glutamate release from excitatory nerve terminals. The glycine-induced increase in sEPSC frequency completely disappeared either in the presence of tetrodotoxin or Cd2+, voltage-gated Na+, or Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that the activation of presynaptic glycine receptors might depolarize excitatory nerve terminals. The present results suggest that presynaptic glycine receptors can regulate the excitability of PAG neurons by enhancing glutamatergic transmission and therefore play an important role in the regulation of various physiological functions mediated by the PAG.

  17. Muscarinic receptors: their distribution and function in body systems, and the implications for treating overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Paul; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Buccafusco, Jerry J; Chapple, Christopher; de Groat, William Chet; Fryer, Alison D; Kay, Gary; Laties, Alan; Nathanson, Neil M; Pasricha, Pankaj Jay; Wein, Alan J

    2006-07-01

    1. The effectiveness of antimuscarinic agents in the treatment of the overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is thought to arise through blockade of bladder muscarinic receptors located on detrusor smooth muscle cells, as well as on nondetrusor structures. 2. Muscarinic M3 receptors are primarily responsible for detrusor contraction. Limited evidence exists to suggest that M2 receptors may have a role in mediating indirect contractions and/or inhibition of detrusor relaxation. In addition, there is evidence that muscarinic receptors located in the urothelium/suburothelium and on afferent nerves may contribute to the pathophysiology of OAB. Blockade of these receptors may also contribute to the clinical efficacy of antimuscarinic agents. 3. Although the role of muscarinic receptors in the bladder, other than M3 receptors, remains unclear, their role in other body systems is becoming increasingly well established, with emerging evidence supporting a wide range of diverse functions. Blockade of these functions by muscarinic receptor antagonists can lead to similarly diverse adverse effects associated with antimuscarinic treatment, with the range of effects observed varying according to the different receptor subtypes affected. 4. This review explores the evolving understanding of muscarinic receptor functions throughout the body, with particular focus on the bladder, gastrointestinal tract, eye, heart, brain and salivary glands, and the implications for drugs used to treat OAB. The key factors that might determine the ideal antimuscarinic drug for treatment of OAB are also discussed. Further research is needed to show whether the M3 selective receptor antagonists have any advantage over less selective drugs, in leading to fewer adverse events.

  18. Pro-inflammatory mechanisms of muscarinic receptor stimulation in airway smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuyderduyn Suzanne

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetylcholine, the primary parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways, plays an important role in bronchoconstriction and mucus production. Recently, it has been shown that acetylcholine, by acting on muscarinic receptors, is also involved in airway inflammation and remodelling. The mechanism(s by which muscarinic receptors regulate inflammatory responses are, however, still unknown. Methods The present study was aimed at characterizing the effect of muscarinic receptor stimulation on cytokine secretion by human airway smooth muscle cells (hASMc and to dissect the intracellular signalling mechanisms involved. hASMc expressing functional muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors were stimulated with the muscarinic receptor agonist methacholine, alone, and in combination with cigarette smoke extract (CSE, TNF-α, PDGF-AB or IL-1β. Results Muscarinic receptor stimulation induced modest IL-8 secretion by itself, yet augmented IL-8 secretion in combination with CSE, TNF-α or PDGF-AB, but not with IL-1β. Pretreatment with GF109203X, a protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor, completely normalized the effect of methacholine on CSE-induced IL-8 secretion, whereas PMA, a PKC activator, mimicked the effects of methacholine, inducing IL-8 secretion and augmenting the effects of CSE. Similar inhibition was observed using inhibitors of IκB-kinase-2 (SC514 and MEK1/2 (U0126, both downstream effectors of PKC. Accordingly, western blot analysis revealed that methacholine augmented the degradation of IκBα and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in combination with CSE, but not with IL-1β in hASMc. Conclusions We conclude that muscarinic receptors facilitate CSE-induced IL-8 secretion by hASMc via PKC dependent activation of IκBα and ERK1/2. This mechanism could be of importance for COPD patients using anticholinergics.

  19. Enhanced sensitivity of muscarinic cholinergic receptor associated with dopaminergic receptor subsensitivity after chronic antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, T.; Matsushita, H.

    1981-01-01

    The chronic effects of antidepressant treatment on striatal dopaminergic (DA) and muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors of the rat brain have been examined comparatively in this study using 3 H-spiroperidol ( 3 H-SPD) and 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB) as the respective radioactive ligands. Imipramine and desipramine were used as prototype antidepressants. Although a single administration of imipramine or desipramine did not affect each receptor sensitivity, chronic treatment with each drug caused a supersensitivity of mACh receptor subsequent to DA receptor subsensitivity. Furthermore, it has been suggested that anti-mACh properties of imipramine or desipramine may not necessarily be related to the manifestation of mACh receptor supersensitivity and that sustained DA receptor subsensitivity may play some role in the alterations of mACh receptor sensitivity

  20. Muscarinic receptors in amygdala control trace fear conditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber N Baysinger

    Full Text Available Intelligent behavior requires transient memory, which entails the ability to retain information over short time periods. A newly-emerging hypothesis posits that endogenous persistent firing (EPF is the neurophysiological foundation for aspects or types of transient memory. EPF is enabled by the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs and is triggered by suprathreshold stimulation. EPF occurs in several brain regions, including the lateral amygdala (LA. The present study examined the role of amygdalar mAChRs in trace fear conditioning, a paradigm that requires transient memory. If mAChR-dependent EPF selectively supports transient memory, then blocking amygdalar mAChRs should impair trace conditioning, while sparing delay and context conditioning, which presumably do not rely upon transient memory. To test the EPF hypothesis, LA was bilaterally infused, prior to trace or delay conditioning, with either a mAChR antagonist (scopolamine or saline. Computerized video analysis quantified the amount of freezing elicited by the cue and by the training context. Scopolamine infusion profoundly reduced freezing in the trace conditioning group but had no significant effect on delay or context conditioning. This pattern of results was uniquely anticipated by the EPF hypothesis. The present findings are discussed in terms of a systems-level theory of how EPF in LA and several other brain regions might help support trace fear conditioning.

  1. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation blocks long-term potentiation at cerebellar parallel fiber–Purkinje cell synapses via cannabinoid signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Hansel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are known to modulate synaptic plasticity in various brain areas. A signaling pathway triggered by mAChR activation is the production and release of endocannabinoids that bind to type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) located on synaptic terminals. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat cerebellar slices, we have demonstrated that the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-m (oxo-m) blocks the induction of presynaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) at parallel fiber (PF)–Purkinje cell synapses in a CB1R-dependent manner. Under control conditions, LTP was induced by delivering 120 PF stimuli at 8 Hz. In contrast, no LTP was observed when oxo-m was present during tetanization. PF-LTP was restored when the CB1R antagonist N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) was coapplied with oxo-m. Furthermore, the suppressive effect of oxo-m on PF-LTP was abrogated by the GDP analog GDP-β-S (applied intracellularly), the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, and the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), suggesting that cannabinoid synthesis results from the activation of Gq-coupled mAChRs present on Purkinje cells. The oxo-m–mediated suppression of LTP was also prevented in the presence of the M3 receptor antagonist DAU 5884, and was absent in M1/M3 receptor double-KO mice, identifying M3 receptors as primary oxo-m targets. Our findings allow for the possibility that cholinergic signaling in the cerebellum—which may result from long-term depression (LTD)-related disinhibition of cholinergic neurons in the vestibular nuclei—suppresses presynaptic LTP to prevent an up-regulation of transmitter release that opposes the reduction of postsynaptic responsiveness. This modulatory capacity of mAChR signaling could promote the functional penetrance of LTD. PMID:23776234

  2. Batrachotoxin Changes the Properties of the Muscarinic Receptor in Rat Brain and Heart: Possible Interaction(s) between Muscarinic Receptors and Sodium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Armon, Malca; Kloog, Yoel; Henis, Yoav I.; Sokolovsky, Mordechai

    1985-05-01

    The effects of Na+-channel activator batrachotoxin (BTX) on the binding properties of muscarinic receptors in homogenates of rat brain and heart were studied. BTX enhanced the affinity for the binding of the agonists carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine to the muscarinic receptors in brainstem and ventricle, but not in the cerebral cortex. Analysis of the data according to a two-site model for agonist binding indicated that the effect of BTX was to increase the affinity of the agonists to the high-affinity site. Guanyl nucleotides, known to induce interconversion of high-affinity agonist binding sites to the low-affinity state, canceled the effect of BTX on carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine binding. BTX had no effect on the binding of the agonist oxotremorine or on the binding of the antagonist [3H]-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate. The local anesthetics dibucaine and tetracaine antagonized the effect of BTX on the binding of muscarinic agonists at concentrations known to inhibit the activation of Na+ channels by BTX. On the basis of these findings, we propose that in specific tissues the muscarinic receptors may interact with the BTX binding site (Na+ channels).

  3. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. ► Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. ► Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers – this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre-treatment with anti-MMP1 antibody. This study contributes to understanding

  4. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  5. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya (Stanford-MED); (Kyoto); (Gakushuin); (Kyushu)

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  6. Development of muscarinic m3 and m4 receptor antibodies with pharmacological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H Y; Zeng, S J; Qiu, P X

    1998-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of developing subtype-selective anti-receptor antibodies with pharmacological activities for the study of subtypes of receptors. New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with synthesized subtype-selective peptide segments of m3 and m4 receptors to develop antibodies. The effects of the antibodies on ligand-binding to muscarinic receptors were studied by competitive radioligand assay. The effects of the prepared antibodies on the contraction or relaxation activity of ACh in isolated rat ilea and aortic rings were studied. Antibodies against synthesized m3 and m4 receptor subtype-selective peptides were successfully prepared. Both antibodies inhibited [3H]QNB binding to muscarinic receptors with different maximal inhibitions which may be the proportions of m3 or m4 subtypes among the total muscarinic receptors in the tissues. The maximal inhibitory rates in rat cerebral cortex, myocardium, and salivary glands were 12.1% +/- 2.1%, 15.7% +/- 1.1%, and 63.6% +/- 2.8% for m3 antibodies, whereas 28% +/- 6%, 19.3% +/- 2.6%, and 1.6% +/- 1.4% for m4 antibodies respectively. The m3 antibodies inhibited the contraction activity of ACh in isolated rat ilea and the relaxation activity of ACh in isolated rat aortic rings. It is feasible to develop subtype-selective anti-receptor antibodies as new tools in the study of the functions of m3 and m4 subtypes of muscarinic receptors.

  7. The pharmacological rationale for combining muscarinic receptor antagonists and beta-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of airway and bladder disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dale, Philippa R.; Cernecka, Hana; Schmidt, Martina; Dowling, Mark R.; Charlton, Steven J.; Pieper, Michael P.; Michel, Martin C.

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists and beta-adrenoceptor agonists are used in the treatment of obstructive airway disease and overactive bladder syndrome. Here we review the pharmacological rationale for their combination. Muscarinic receptors and beta-adrenoceptors are physiological antagonists for

  8. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na/sup +/ channel interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-12

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na/sup +/ channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) (G-protein(s)). These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxin to Na/sup +/ channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na/sup +/ channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na/sup +/channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na/sup +/ channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na/sup +/ channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues.

  9. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na+ channel interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na + channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) [G-protein(s)]. These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of [ 3 H] acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of [ 3 H]batrachotoxin to Na + channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced 22 Na + uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na + channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na + channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na + channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na + channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues

  10. Cooperative regulation of GSK-3 by muscarinic and PDGF receptors is associated with airway myocyte proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, Reinoud; Dueck, Gordon; Rector, Edward; Nunes, Raquel O.; Gerthoffer, William T.; Unruh, Helmut; Zaagsma, Johan; Meurs, Herman; Halayko, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors synergistically induce proliferation of airway smooth muscle (ASM), but the pathways that regulate these effects are not yet completely identified. We hypothesized that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), a kinase that

  11. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin Alexis; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5......). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M......) and muscarine (EC50, 6 × 10(-8) M) and blocked by the classical mAChR antagonists atropine, scopolamine, and 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB), while the other (the B-type; encoded by gene CG7918) is also activated by acetylcholine, but has a 1,000-fold lower sensitivity to muscarine, and is not blocked...

  12. Neto Auxiliary Subunits Regulate Interneuron Somatodendritic and Presynaptic Kainate Receptors to Control Network Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan S. Wyeth

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although Netos are considered auxiliary subunits critical for kainate receptor (KAR function, direct evidence for their regulation of native KARs is limited. Because Neto KAR regulation is GluK subunit/Neto isoform specific, such regulation must be determined in cell-type-specific contexts. We demonstrate Neto1/2 expression in somatostatin (SOM-, cholecystokinin/cannabinoid receptor 1 (CCK/CB1-, and parvalbumin (PV-containing interneurons. KAR-mediated excitation of these interneurons is contingent upon Neto1 because kainate yields comparable effects in Neto2 knockouts and wild-types but fails to excite interneurons or recruit inhibition in Neto1 knockouts. In contrast, presynaptic KARs in CCK/CB1 interneurons are dually regulated by both Neto1 and Neto2. Neto association promotes tonic presynaptic KAR activation, dampening CCK/CB1 interneuron output, and loss of this brake in Neto mutants profoundly increases CCK/CB1 interneuron-mediated inhibition. Our results confirm that Neto1 regulates endogenous somatodendritic KARs in diverse interneurons and demonstrate Neto regulation of presynaptic KARs in mature inhibitory presynaptic terminals.

  13. Differential regulation of mTOR-dependent S6 phosphorylation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Barbara E; Blusztajn, Jan K

    2008-08-01

    Muscarinic receptors subserve many functions in both peripheral and central nervous systems. Some of these processes depend on increases in protein synthesis, which may be achieved by activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a kinase that regulates protein translation capacity. Here, we examined the regulation of mTOR-dependent signaling pathways by muscarinic receptors in SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines transfected with individual muscarinic receptor subtypes. In SK-N-SH cells, the acetylcholine analog carbachol stimulated phosphorylation of the ribosomal S6 protein, a downstream target of mTOR. The sensitivity of the response to subtype-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists indicated that it was mediated by M3 receptors. Carbachol-evoked S6 phosphorylation was blocked by the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, but was independent of phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation. The response was significantly reduced by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126, which also inhibited carbachol-evoked S6 phosphorylation in HEK cells expressing M2 receptors, but was ineffective in M3 receptor-expressing HEK cells, although carbachol activated MAPK in both transfected lines. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinase has been implicated in mTOR regulation by phorbol esters, but was not activated by carbachol in any of the cell lines tested. The protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I reduced carbachol-stimulated S6 phosphorylation in SK-N-SH cells, and in HEK cells expressing M3 receptors, but not in HEK cells expressing M2 receptors. The results demonstrate that multiple muscarinic receptor subtypes regulate mTOR, and that both MAPK-dependent and -independent mechanisms may mediate the response in a cell context-specific manner.

  14. Amplification of the rat m2 muscarinic receptor gene by the polymerase chain reaction: Functional expression of the M sub 2 muscarinic receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, J.; Bloom, J.W.; Yamamura, H.I.; Roeske, W.R. (Univ. of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A selective amplification of the coding sequence of the rat M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor gene was achieved by the polymerase chain reaction. The error rate of this amplification system under conditions specified was 1 nucleotide substitution in 841 base pairs. In vitro expression of this gene in murine fibroblasts (B82) via the eukaryotic expression vector, pH{beta}APr-1-neo, resulted in high level expression of specific ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding in transfected B82 cell lines. One of these clones, M2LKB2-2, showed a stable expression of ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding with a K{sub d} value of 265 pM and a B{sub max} value of 411{plus minus}50 fmol/10{sup 6} cells. Cardiac selective muscarinic antagonists such as himbacine and AF-DX 116 show high affinities for this binding site in the M2LKB2-2 cells. The rank order of potency of several antagonists in inhibiting ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding in these cells conformed to the characteristics of an M{sub 2} type muscarinic receptor. Carbachol showed a single affinity state for the receptors in the M2LKB2-2 cells with a K{sub i} value of 2.0 {mu}M. This receptor appeared to be inversely coupled to adenylate cyclase via a pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein. Carbachol also had a slight stimulatory effect on the hydrolysis of inositol lipids. The polymerase chain reaction proves highly effective in cloning genes from genomic material, as demonstrated by the first in vitro functional expression of the rat M{sub 2} type muscarinic receptor.

  15. Involvement of a subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the antipsychotic-like effects of the M1/M4 preferring muscarinic receptor agonist xanomeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    with D(1) dopamine receptors seems to be especially important in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors. Using mutant mice that lack the M(4) mAChR only in D(1) dopamine receptor-expressing cells (D1-M4-KO), we investigated the role of this neuronal population in the antipsychotic-like effects...... studies indicate that the M(4) muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtype (mAChR) modulates the activity of the dopaminergic system and that this specific mAChR subtype is involved in mediating the antipsychotic-like effects of xanomeline. A specific neuronal subpopulation that expresses M(4) mAChRs together...

  16. Non-Neuronal Functions of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Tikkanen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is an important neurotransmitter whose effects are mediated by two classes of receptors. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ion channels, whereas the muscarinic receptors belong to the large family of G protein coupled seven transmembrane helix receptors. Beyond its function in neuronal systems, it has become evident that acetylcholine also plays an important role in non-neuronal cells such as epithelial and immune cells. Furthermore, many cell types in the periphery are capable of synthesizing acetylcholine and express at least some of the receptors. In this review, we summarize the non-neuronal functions of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, especially those of the M2 muscarinic receptor in epithelial cells. We will review the mechanisms of signaling by the M2 receptor but also the cellular trafficking and ARF6 mediated endocytosis of this receptor, which play an important role in the regulation of signaling events. In addition, we provide an overview of the M2 receptor in human pathological conditions such as autoimmune diseases and cancer.

  17. Analysis of the muscarinic receptor subtype mediating inhibition of the neurogenic contractions in rabbit isolated vas deferens by a series of polymethylene tetra-amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budriesi, R; Cacciaguerra, S; Di Toro, R; Bolognesi, M L; Chiarini, A; Minarini, A; Rosini, M; Spampinato, S; Tumiatti, V; Melchiorre, C

    2001-01-01

    The pharmacological characteristics of the presynaptic muscarinic receptor subtype, which mediates inhibition of the neurogenic contractions in the prostatic portion of rabbit vas deferens, have been investigated by using a series of polymethylene tetra-amines, which were selected for their ability to differentiate among muscarinic receptor subtypes. It was found that all tetra-amines antagonized McN-A-343-induced inhibition in electrically stimulated rabbit vas deferens in a competitive manner and with affinity values (pA2) ranging between 6.27±0.09 (spirotramine) and 8.51±0.02 (AM170). Competition radioligand binding studies, using native muscarinic receptors from rat tissues (M1, cortex; M2, heart; M3, submaxillary gland) or from NG 108-15 cells (M4) and human cloned muscarinic M1-M4 receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells, were undertaken with the same tetra-amines employed in functional assays. All antagonists indicated a one-site fit. The affinity estimates (pKi) of tetra-amines calculated in binding assays using native receptors were similar to those obtained using cloned receptors. Among these compounds some displayed selectivity between muscarinic receptor subtypes, indicating that they may be valuable tools in receptor characterization. Spirotramine was selective for M1 receptors versus all other subtypes (pKi native: M1, 7.32±0.10; M2, 6.50±0.11; M3, 6.02±0.13; M4, 6.28±0.16; pKi cloned: M1, 7.69±0.08; M2, 6.22±0.14; M3, 6.11±0.16; 6.35±0.11) whereas CC8 is highly selective for M2 receptors versus the other subtypes (pKi native: M1, 7.50±0.04; M2, 9.01±0.12; M3, 6.70±0.08; M4, 7.56±0.04; pKi cloned: M1, 7.90±0.20; M2, 9.04±0.08; M3, 6.40±0.07; M4, 7.40±0.04). Furthermore, particularly relevant for this investigation were tetra-amines dipitramine and AM172 for their ability to significantly differentiate M1 and M4 receptors. The apparent affinity values (pA2) obtained for tetra-amines in functional studies using the prostatic portion of

  18. Contribution of the basolateral amygdala NMDA and muscarinic receptors in rat's memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarinia, Efat; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sardari, Maryam; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima

    2017-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the involvement of the muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in memory retrieval. Also, the possible relationship between the BLA muscarinic cholinergic and the NMDA receptor systems was evaluated in the inhibitory avoidance learning. Male Wistar rats were bilaterally cannulated into the BLAs and memory retrieval was measured in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance apparatus. Intra-BLA microinjection of different doses of a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine (0.5-1μg/rat, intra-BLA), 5min before the testing phase dose-dependently induced amnesia. Pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of different doses of NMDA (0.005-0.05μg/rat) reversed scopolamine-induced amnesia and improved memory retrieval. In addition, different doses of a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, D-AP5 (0.001-0.005μg/rat, intra-BLA) potentiated the response of an ineffective dose of scopolamine (0.5μg/rat) to inhibit memory retrieval. It should be considered that pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of the same doses of NMDA or D-AP5 by themselves had no effect on memory retrieval. Similar to ANOVA analysis, our cubic interpolation analysis also predicted that the activation or inactivation of the NMDA receptors by different doses of drugs can affect the scopolamine response. On the other hand, pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of D-AP5 inhibited the reversal effect of NMDA on scopolamine-induced amnesia. It can be concluded that the BLA cholinergic system, via muscarinic receptors, has a critical role in memory retrieval. Our results also suggest that a cooperative interaction between the BLA NMDA and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors modulates memory formation of inhibitory avoidance task in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  20. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Regulate Hippocampal Synapses during Associative Learning in Behaving Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Teresa Jurado-Parras

    Full Text Available GABAB receptors are the G-protein-coupled receptors for GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Pharmacological activation of GABAB receptors regulates neurotransmission and neuronal excitability at pre- and postsynaptic sites. Electrophysiological activation of GABAB receptors in brain slices generally requires strong stimulus intensities. This raises the question as to whether behavioral stimuli are strong enough to activate GABAB receptors. Here we show that GABAB1a-/- mice, which constitutively lack presynaptic GABAB receptors at glutamatergic synapses, are impaired in their ability to acquire an operant learning task. In vivo recordings during the operant conditioning reveal a deficit in learning-dependent increases in synaptic strength at CA3-CA1 synapses. Moreover, GABAB1a-/- mice fail to synchronize neuronal activity in the CA1 area during the acquisition process. Our results support that activation of presynaptic hippocampal GABAB receptors is important for acquisition of a learning task and for learning-associated synaptic changes and network dynamics.

  1. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Rasmussen, Peter; Sørensen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate (HR) response to exercise but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate but not combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exerci...

  2. MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR-EXPRESSION IN ASTROCYTES IN THE CORTEX OF YOUNG AND AGED RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DEJONG, GI; STROSBERG, AD; LUITEN, PGM

    The present report describes the cellular and subcellular distribution pattern of immunoreactivity to M35, a monoclonal antibody raised against purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein, in astrocytes in the cerebral cortex of young and aged rats. Most M35-positive astrocytes were localized

  3. Divergence of allosteric effects of rapacuronium on binding and function of muscarinic receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 15 (2009), s. 1-20 ISSN 1471-2210 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulation * rapacuronium Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  4. Coexistence of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Somatostatin in Nonpyramidal Neurons of the Rat Dorsal Hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Benoit, R.; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    This study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the neuropeptide somatostatin (SOM) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus. SOM and mAChRs were identified by immunocytochemistry employing antibody S309 and M35, respectively. Half of the

  5. Non-selectivity of the monoclonal antibody M35 for subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CarsiGabrenas, JM; VanDerZee, EA; Luiten, PGM; Potter, LT; Carsi-Gabrenas, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody M35, one of the first monoclonal antibodies successfully raised against muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, has been widely used to study the distribution of this protein in a variety of tissues and cell types of different species. It is not fully known, however, to which

  6. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Jan 16 (2017), č. článku 40381. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * N-methylscopolamine * ligand binding * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  7. A specific multi-nutrient formulation enhances M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor responses in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Savelkoul, P.J.M.; Janíčková, Helena; Kuipers, A.A.M.; Hageman, R.J.J.; Kamphuis, P.J.; Doležal, Vladimír; Broersen, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 4 (2012), s. 631-640 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptor * docosahexaenoic acid * Alzheimer’s disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.973, year: 2012

  8. Anticholinesterase Effects on Number and Function of Brain Muscarinic Receptors and Central Cholinergic Activity: Drug Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-30

    chronically with DDVP for the purpose of looking for a change in specific muscarinic receptor binding and then to correlate this with tolerance and...6) 0/ 6 Sweating, tremor, diahrrea 40 106.2 + 10 (4) 2/6 Sweating, tremor, salivation 80 6/ 6 Convulsions & death (5 min) The rats were killed 30

  9. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Act in Synergy to Facilitate Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaderbrand, Katherine; Chen, Helen J.; Corcoran, Kevin A.; Guedea, Anita L.; Jovasevic, Vladimir; Wess, Jurgen; Radulovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how episodic memories are formed and retrieved is necessary if we are to treat disorders in which they malfunction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in the hippocampus and cortex underlie memory formation, but there is conflicting evidence regarding their role in memory retrieval. Additionally, there is no consensus on…

  10. Multiple promoters drive tissue-specific expression of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Alena; Bruce, A. W.; Doležal, Vladimír; Tuček, Stanislav; Buckley, N. J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 1 (2004), s. 88-98 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5011306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : M2 muscarinic receptor * neuron-restrictive silence factor * promoter Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.824, year: 2004

  11. Muscarinic receptor stimulation increases tolerance of rat salivary gland function to radiation damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, RP; Vissink, A; Zeilstra, LJW; Konings, AWT

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate if muscarinic receptor-stimulated activation of the PLC/PIP2 second messenger pathway prior to irradiation increases the radiotolerance of rat salivary gland. Materials and methods: Rats were treated with pilocarpine, methacholine, reserpine, methacholine plus reserpine, or

  12. GABAergic Neurons of the Rat Dorsal Hippocampus Express Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, E.A.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1993-01-01

    The expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-positive cells in the different strata of CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus is examined by way of quantitative immunofluorescent double labeling employing M35, the

  13. Endogenous acetylcholine rescues NMDA-induced long-lasting hippocampal cell damage via stimulation of muscarinic M(1) receptors: elucidation using organic hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Chikako; Thi Le, Xoan; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Fujiwara, Hironori; Miyata, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2013-01-15

    This study aimed to investigate a recuing role of cholinergic systems in the excitotoxicity-induced hippocampal cell damage. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) were prepared from 7-day-old mice and exposed to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) for 24h. After washing out the NMDA, OHSCs were incubated in medium containing test drugs for 0-6 days. Hippocampal cell damage was evaluated by propidium iodide staining, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. NMDA (1-10 μM) dose-dependently damaged hippocampal cells. The toxic effect of 3 μM NMDA was also observed at 3-6 days, even after washing out NMDA, and was blocked by MK-801 from day 3 to day 6. Post-treatments with tacrine, donepezil, and galantamine reduced the NMDA-induced long-lasting hippocampal cell damage. The effect of tacrine was induced in a manner dependent on the incubation period after NMDA treatment and was confirmed by Nissl staining and immunostaining with NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. The effect of tacrine was attenuated by scopolamine and a muscarinic M(1) receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, but not by a muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonist, darifenacin, or a nicotinic receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. The protein kinase C inhibitor Ro-31-8220 abolished the effect of tacrine. The pretreatment with 3 μM NMDA had no effect on the expression level of presynaptic cholinergic markers, choline acetyltransferase and vesicular acetylcholine transporter, in OHSCs. These results suggest that a low concentration of NMDA causes long-lasting hippocampal cell damage and that endogenous acetylcholine plays, via muscarinic M(1) receptor, a rescuing role in the excitotoxicity-induced long-lasting hippocampal cell damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Rat striatal muscarinic receptors coupled to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity: potent block by the selective m4 ligand muscarinic toxin 3 (MT3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olianas, M C; Adem, A; Karlsson, E; Onali, P

    1996-05-01

    1. In rat striatal membranes, muscarinic toxin 3 (MT3), a selective ligand of the cloned m4 receptor subtype, antagonized the acetylcholine (ACh) inhibition of forskolin- and dopamine D1 receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities with pA2 values of 8.09 and 8.15, respectively. 2. In radioligand binding experiments, MT3 increased the Kd but did not change the Bmax value of [3H]-N-methylscopolamine (3H]-NMS) binding to rat striatal muscarinic receptors. The toxin displaced the major portion of the [3H]-NMS binding sites with a Ki of 8.0 nM. 3. In rat myocardium, MT3 antagonized the ACh inhibition of adenylyl cyclase with a Ki value of 860 nM. 4. In rat cerebral cortical membranes prelabelled with [3H]-myo-inositol, MT3 counteracted the methacholine stimulation of [3H]-inositol phosphates formation with a Ki value of 113 nM. 5. The present study shows that MT3 is a potent antagonist of the striatal muscarinic receptors coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. This finding provides strong evidence for the classification of these receptors as pharmacologically equivalent to the m4 gene product (M4). On the other hand, the weaker potencies of MT3 in antagonizing the muscarinic responses in cerebral cortex and in the heart are consistent with the reported lower affinities of the toxin for the cloned m1 and m2 receptor subtypes, respectively.

  15. Presynaptic serotonin 2A receptors modulate thalamocortical plasticity and associative learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Alexander; Berthoux, Coralie; De Bundel, Dimitri; Valjent, Emmanuel; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Bécamel, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level cognitive processes strongly depend on a complex interplay between mediodorsal thalamus nuclei and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Alteration of thalamofrontal connectivity has been involved in cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Prefrontal serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors play an essential role in cortical network activity, but the mechanism underlying their modulation of glutamatergic transmission and plasticity at thalamocortical synapses remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that 5-HT2A receptor activation enhances NMDA transmission and gates the induction of temporal-dependent plasticity mediated by NMDA receptors at thalamocortical synapses in acute PFC slices. Expressing 5-HT2A receptors in the mediodorsal thalamus (presynaptic site) of 5-HT2A receptor-deficient mice, but not in the PFC (postsynaptic site), using a viral gene-delivery approach, rescued the otherwise absent potentiation of NMDA transmission, induction of temporal plasticity, and deficit in associative memory. These results provide, to our knowledge, the first physiological evidence of a role of presynaptic 5-HT2A receptors located at thalamocortical synapses in the control of thalamofrontal connectivity and the associated cognitive functions. PMID:26903620

  16. Muscarinic receptors in the prenatal mouse embryo. Comparison of M35-immunohistochemistry with [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerding-Köppel, M; Greiner-Schröder, A; Drews, U

    1995-04-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors are widespread in nervous tissue and smooth muscle or paracrine epithelial cells of various organs. In the embryo, muscarinic receptors are transitorily expressed in the early blastoderm and later on in blastemic tissues during morphogenesis. Recently, a monoclonal antibody (M35) against muscarinic receptor from calf brain became available. In the present study the use of M35-immunohistochemistry is compared to autoradiographic localization of muscarinic binding sites in the mouse embryo. The aim of the study is to test the suitability of the antibody for localization of muscarinic receptors in embryonic tissues. For autoradiography whole-body sagittal cryostat sections of the 17- and 18-day mouse embryo were covered with LKB-Ultrofilm after incubation with the radioactive ligand [3H] quinuclidinyl benzylate (QNB). For immunohistochemistry cryostat sections of formalin fixed tissues were used. In general, all tissues exhibiting ligand binding were also recognized by the antibody. M35-immunohistochemistry resulted in higher spatial resolution of receptor localization than [3H]QNB autoradiography. Definitive muscarinic receptors were observed in smooth muscle and the epithelial lining of the vasuclar, intestinal, respiratory and urinary system, in the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. The embryonic type of the muscarinic receptor was detected in the mesothelium of lung and liver, in the nephrogenic blastema of the metanephros, and in lung mesenchyme. A large amount of embryonic muscarinic receptors was found in the remnants of the notochord and in the nucleus pulposus of the developing vertebral column. A function in morphogenesis is discussed of the embryonic muscarinic receptor.

  17. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  18. Key Modulatory Role of Presynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors in Cortical Neurotransmission to the Striatal Direct Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Quiroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. Novel insights into M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function by the use of gene targeting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahisa; Basile, Anthony S; Fedorova, Irina; Zhang, Weilie; Duttaroy, Alokesh; Cui, Yinghong; Lamping, Kathryn G; Faraci, Frank M; Deng, Chu Xia; Wess, Jürgen

    2003-12-05

    Until recently, little was known about the possible physiological functions of the M(5) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype, the last member of the muscarinic receptor family (M(1)-M(5)) to be cloned. To learn more about the potential physiological roles of this receptor subtype, we generated and analyzed M(5) receptor-deficient mice (M5 -/- mice). Strikingly, acetylcholine, a potent dilator of most vascular beds, virtually lost the ability to dilate cerebral arteries and arterioles in M5 -/- mice, suggesting that endothelial M(5) receptors mediate this activity in wild-type mice. This effect was specific for cerebral blood vessels, since acetylcholine-mediated dilation of extra-cerebral arteries remained fully intact in M5 -/- mice. In addition, in vitro neurotransmitter release experiments indicated that M(5) receptors located on dopaminergic nerve terminals play a role in facilitating muscarinic agonist-induced dopamine release in the striatum, consistent with the observation that the dopaminergic neurons innervating the striatum almost exclusively express the M(5) receptor subtype. We also found that the rewarding effects of morphine, the prototypical opiate analgesic, were substantially reduced in M5 -/- mice, as measured in the conditioned place preference paradigm. Furthermore, both the somatic and affective components of naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal symptoms were significantly attenuated in M5 -/- mice. It is likely that these behavioral deficits are caused by the lack of mesolimbic M(5) receptors, activation of which is known to stimulate dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. These results convincingly demonstrate that the M(5) muscarinic receptor is involved in modulating several important pharmacological and behavioral functions. These findings may lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of drug addiction and certain cerebrovascular disorders.

  20. Loss of muscarinic receptors and of stimulated phospholipid labeling in ibotenate-treated hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S.K.; Frey, K.A.; Agranoff, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    The stimulation of phospholipid labeling by muscarinic agonists has been examined in nerve ending preparations from lesioned hippocampus in order to investigate the synaptic locus of the effect. Unilateral injections of the neurotoxin, ibotenic acid, into the hippocampus resulted in an extensive loss of nerve cells from both the dentate gyrus and hippocampus on the lesioned side and a parallel loss of muscarinic receptors as revealed by [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate autoradiography. Homogenates and nerve ending fractions prepared from the lesioned side of the hippocampus possessed a reduced specific activity (expressed per milligram of protein) of glutamic acid decarboxylase as well as a reduced number of muscarinic receptors compared with the control side. By contrast, choline acetyltransferase activity was either unchanged or slightly increased on the lesioned side. Although there was a reduced yield (25%) of nerve endings from the lesioned side, the specific activity of 32 Pi incorporation into phospholipids in the absence of added carbachol was comparable to that of the control side. There was, however, a marked reduction in the carbachol stimulation of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol labeling in nerve ending fractions obtained from he lesioned hippocampus. These results indicate that the muscarinic receptors present in nerve ending fractions from hippocampus and implicated in stimulated phospholipid turnover are derived from cholinoceptive intrinsic neurons

  1. Muscarinic receptor blockade in ventral hippocampus and prelimbic cortex impairs memory for socially transmitted food preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Márquez, Anna; Vale-Martínez, Anna; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma; Martí-Nicolovius, Margarita

    2009-05-01

    Acetylcholine is involved in learning and memory and, particularly, in olfactory tasks, but reports on its specific role in consolidation processes are somewhat controversial. The present experiment sought to determine the effects of blocking muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the ventral hippocampus (vHPC) and the prelimbic cortex (PLC) on the consolidation of social transmission of food preference, an odor-guided relational task that depends on such brain areas. Adult male Wistar rats were bilaterally infused with scopolamine (20 microg/site) immediately after social training and showed impairment, relative to vehicle-injected controls, in the expression of the task measured 24 h after learning. Results indicated that scopolamine in the PLC completely abolished memory, suggesting that muscarinic transmission in this cortical region is crucial for consolidation of recent socially acquired information. Muscarinic receptors in the vHPC contribute in some way to task consolidation, as the rats injected with scopolamine in the vHPC showed significantly lower trained food preference than control rats, but higher than both chance level and that of the PLC-injected rats. Behavioral measures such as social interaction, motivation to eat, neophobia, or exploration did not differ between rats infused with scopolamine or vehicle. Such data suggest a possible differential role of muscarinic receptors in the PLC and the vHPC in the initial consolidation of a naturalistic form of nonspatial relational memory. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. On homology modeling of the M-2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Doležal, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2013), s. 525-538 ISSN 0920-654X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptor * G-protein coupled receptor * homology energy estimation * MM-GBSA Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.782, year: 2013

  3. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Interaction of orthosteric ligands with extracellular domain was described at several aminergic G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The orthosteric antagonists quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bind to the binding pocket of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor formed by transmembrane α-helices. We show that high concentrations of either QNB or NMS slow down dissociation of their radiolabeled species from all five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting allosteric binding. The affinity of NMS at the allosteric site is in the micromolar range for all receptor subtypes. Using molecular modelling of the M2 receptor we found that E172 and E175 in the second extracellular loop and N419 in the third extracellular loop are involved in allosteric binding of NMS. Mutation of these amino acids to alanine decreased affinity of NMS for the allosteric binding site confirming results of molecular modelling. The allosteric binding site of NMS overlaps with the binding site of some allosteric, ectopic and bitopic ligands. Understanding of interactions of NMS at the allosteric binding site is essential for correct analysis of binding and action of these ligands.

  4. Agonists with supraphysiological efficacy at the muscarinic M2 ACh receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrage, R; Seemann, W K; Klöckner, J; Dallanoce, C; Racké, K; Kostenis, E; De Amici, M; Holzgrabe, U; Mohr, K

    2013-05-01

    Artificial agonists may have higher efficacy for receptor activation than the physiological agonist. Until now, such 'superagonism' has rarely been reported for GPCRs. Iperoxo is an extremely potent muscarinic receptor agonist. We hypothesized that iperoxo is a 'superagonist'. Signalling of iperoxo and newly synthesized structural analogues was compared with that of ACh at label-free M2 muscarinic receptors applying whole cell dynamic mass redistribution, measurement of G-protein activation, evaluation of cell surface agonist binding and computation of operational efficacies. In CHO-hM2 cells, iperoxo significantly exceeds ACh in Gi /Gs signalling competence. In the orthosteric loss-of-function mutant M2 -Y104(3.33) A, the maximum effect of iperoxo is hardly compromised in contrast to ACh. 'Superagonism' is preserved in the physiological cellular context of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. Structure-signalling relationships including iperoxo derivatives with either modified positively charged head group or altered tail suggest that 'superagonism' of iperoxo is mechanistically based on parallel activation of the receptor protein via two orthosteric interaction points. Supraphysiological agonist efficacy at muscarinic M2 ACh receptors is demonstrated for the first time. In addition, a possible underlying molecular mechanism of GPCR 'superagonism' is provided. We suggest that iperoxo-like orthosteric GPCR activation is a new avenue towards a novel class of receptor activators. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Thiochrome enhances acetylcholine affinity at muscarinic M4 receptors: receptor subtype selectivity via cooperativity rather than affinity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lazareno, S.; Doležal, Vladimír; Popham, A.; Birdsall, N. J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 1 (2004), s. 257-266 ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/01/0283; GA ČR GA309/02/1331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * thiochrome * allosteric effect Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.080, year: 2004

  6. Involvement of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in chloride secretion by cultured rat epididymal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jian-Yang; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Chen, Min-Hui; Xiang, Hui; Zhou, Wen-Liang

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our present study was to investigate the short-circuit current response to carbachol in cultured rat cauda epididymal epithelia and the signal transduction mechanisms involved. Carbachol added basolaterally induced a concentration-dependent increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across the epididymal epithelium consisting of a rapidly rising phase and a long term sustained response. The response was almost abolished by removing Cl(-) from the extracellular medium and blockable by pretreating the tissues with DPC, indicating a substantial contribution of Cl(-) secretion to the carbachol-induced response. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine inhibited the response, but the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors antagonist curarine had no effect, suggesting that only the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors mediated the secretory response of the basolateral side of rat cauda epididymal epithelium to carbachol. Addition of carbachol to the apical side of the tissue was found not to elicit an Isc response. These results suggested that muscarinic receptors are present in the basolateral side of rat cauda epididymal epithelium. Activation of these receptors by acetylcholine released from the nerve endings regulates epididymal transepithelial Cl(-) secretion. Cholinergic stimulation therefore contributes to the formation of luminal fluid microenvironment.

  7. Regional distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the telencephalon of the pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waechtler, K.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was studied autoradiographically in croystat sections of the pigeon telencephalon using 3 H-quinuclidinylbenzylate as a ligand. Highest receptor density was observed in the hyperstriatum ventrale, palaeostriatum augmentatum, septum, and parts of the archistriatum. In sites of known sensory input of neostriatum (field L) and ectostriatum low receptor binding was observed. Acetylcholinesterase distribution is in good agreement with the receptor picture only in the basal telencephalon. In the pallium differences in the pattern of these two components can be seen. (author)

  8. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S; Kanui, Titus I; Abelson, Klas S P

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cholinergic system in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) with focus on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes M1 and M4. The protein sequences for the subtypes m 1-5 of the naked mole-rat were compared to that of the house mouse (Mus musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies with [(3)H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg/kg in the formalin test. Administration of 50 mg/kg VU0152100 resulted in a non-significant tendency towards antinociception. The antinociceptive effects were reversed by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine. Binding studies indicated presence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with a radioligand affinity comparable to that reported in mice. In conclusion, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes are present in the naked mole-rat and contribute to antinociception in the naked mole-rat.

  9. Antipsychotic-like effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC in non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maibritt B Andersen

    Full Text Available Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane (BuTAC exhibits high affinity for muscarinic receptors with no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors and binding sites, including the dopamine receptors and the dopamine transporter. In the present study, we wanted to examine the possible antipsychotic-like effects of BuTAC in primates. To this end, we investigated the effects of BuTAC on d-amphetamine-induced behaviour in antipsychotic-naive Cebus paella monkeys. Possible adverse events of BuTAC, were evaluated in the same monkeys as well as in monkeys sensitized to antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects. The present data suggests that, the muscarinic receptor ligand BuTAC exhibits antipsychotic-like behaviour in primates. The behavioural data of BuTAC as well as the new biochemical data further substantiate the rationale for the use of muscarinic M1/M2/M4-preferring receptor agonists as novel pharmacological tools in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  10. Muscarinic receptors as model targets and antitargets for structure-based ligand discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Andrew C; Weiss, Dahlia R; Rossi, Mario; Hu, Jianxin; Hu, Kelly; Eitel, Katrin; Gmeiner, Peter; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K; Shoichet, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate virtually all aspects of human physiology and represent an important class of therapeutic drug targets. Many GPCR-targeted drugs resemble endogenous agonists, often resulting in poor selectivity among receptor subtypes and restricted pharmacologic profiles. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family exemplifies these problems; thousands of ligands are known, but few are receptor subtype-selective and nearly all are cationic in nature. Using structure-based docking against the M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, we screened 3.1 million molecules for ligands with new physical properties, chemotypes, and receptor subtype selectivities. Of 19 docking-prioritized molecules tested against the M2 subtype, 11 had substantial activity and 8 represented new chemotypes. Intriguingly, two were uncharged ligands with low micromolar to high nanomolar Ki values, an observation with few precedents among aminergic GPCRs. To exploit a single amino-acid substitution among the binding pockets between the M2 and M3 receptors, we selected molecules predicted by docking to bind to the M3 and but not the M2 receptor. Of 16 molecules tested, 8 bound to the M3 receptor. Whereas selectivity remained modest for most of these, one was a partial agonist at the M3 receptor without measurable M2 agonism. Consistent with this activity, this compound stimulated insulin release from a mouse β-cell line. These results support the ability of structure-based discovery to identify new ligands with unexplored chemotypes and physical properties, leading to new biologic functions, even in an area as heavily explored as muscarinic pharmacology.

  11. Muscarinic receptors mediate cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Minagawa, Tomonori; Nakazawa, Masaki; Gautam, Sudha Silwal; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    This study determined if muscarinic receptors could mediate the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity induced in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats. Ten-week-old female Goto-Kakizaki diabetic rats (n = 12) and Wister Kyoto non-diabetic rats (n = 12) were maintained on a high-fat diet for 4 weeks. Cystometric investigations of the unanesthetized rats were carried out at room temperature (27 ± 2°C) for 20 min. They were intravenously administered imidafenacin (0.3 mg/kg, n = 6) or vehicle (n = 6). After 5 min, the rats were transferred to a low temperature (4 ± 2°C) for 40 min where the cystometry was continued. The rats were then returned to room temperature for the final cystometric measurements. Afterwards, expressions of bladder muscarinic receptor M3 and M2 messenger ribonucleic acids and proteins were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. In non-diabetic Wister Kyoto rats, imidafenacin did not reduce cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats, just after transfer to a low temperature, the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in imidafenacin-treated rats was reduced compared with vehicle-treated rats. Within the urinary bladders, the ratio of M3 to M2 receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in the diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats was significantly higher than that of the non-diabetic Wister Kyoto rats. The proportion of muscarinic M3 receptor-positive area within the detrusor in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats was also significantly higher than that in non-diabetic Wister Kyoto rats. Imidafenacin partially inhibits cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. In this animal model, muscarinic M3 receptors partially mediate cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Association of genetic variants of the histamine H1 and muscarinic M3 receptors with BMI and HbA1c values in patients on antipsychotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Risselada, Arne J.; Al Hadithy, Asmar F. Y.; Burger, Huibert; Snieder, Harold; Wilffert, Bob; Arends, Johan; Wunderink, Lex; Knegtering, Henrikus; Wiersma, Durk; Cohen, Dan; Mulder, Hans; Bruggeman, Richard

    Antipsychotic affinity for the histamine H1 receptor and the muscarinic M3 receptor have been associated with the side effects weight gain, and development of diabetes, respectively. We investigated polymorphisms of the histamine H1 (HRH1) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 (CHRM3) receptor

  13. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors subtypes in rat cerebellar cortex: light microscope autoradiography of age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebati, S K; Vitali, D; Scordella, S; Amenta, F

    2001-01-19

    Muscarinic cholinergic M1-M5 receptor subtypes were investigated in the cerebellar cortex of Fischer 344 rats aged 6 (young), 15 (adult) and 22 months (senescent) by combined kinetic and equilibrium binding and light microscope autoradiography. In young rats the rank order of receptor density was M5M4M4 in the molecular and granular layers, respectively. M1, M2, M4 and M5 receptors were also observed within Purkinje neurons. M1 receptor did not show age-related changes as well as the M2 receptor in the molecular layer. In this layer, M3-M5 receptors were increased in senescent compared to younger rats. In the granular layer the expression of M2 and M5 muscarinic receptors was similar in young and senescent rats and higher in adult rats. M3 and M4 receptors were more in adult and senescent rats compared to young animals. In Purkinje neurons, a slight-to-moderate age-related increase of M1 and M5 receptor expression was observed.

  14. Unique presynaptic alpha 2-receptor selectivity and specificity of the antihypertensive agent moxonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, B I

    1988-10-01

    The characteristics of the alpha-receptor activating property of the new antihypertensive agent moxonidine (4-chloro-N-(4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-methyl-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinamine, BDF 5895) was studied using peripheral vasculature and brain membranes of various animals. Moxonidine exerted a full agonist effect in elevating diastolic blood pressure in the pithed rat. Activation of postsynaptic alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors contribute to the vasoconstrictory effect in rats. In the vasculature of the rabbit, moxonidine was a full agonist at presynaptic alpha 2-receptors in inhibiting transmitter release induced by electrical stimulation of pulmonary artery strips. At postsynaptic sites, exogenously applied moxonidine was a full agonist at alpha 1-receptors in the isolated aorta, pulmonary artery and vena cava of the rabbit. Selectivity for alpha 2-receptors in the pulmonary artery was 106-fold. In rat brain membranes, moxonidine showed 288-fold greater selectivity for alpha 2-receptors, when the displacement of [3H]-rauwolscine was compared with the displacement of [3H]-prazosin. On the whole, clonidine exhibited greater potency than moxonidine on both alpha-receptor subtypes, but moxonidine consistently showed greater alpha 2-receptor selectivity than clonidine. In the guinea pig myocardium, moxonidine caused neither bradycardia nor tachycardia in the isolated right atrium and produced a negligible positive inotropic effect at 100 mumol/l in the isolated papillary muscle.

  15. Selective labeling and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari-Dileo, G; Waelbroeck, M; Mash, D C; Flynn, D D

    1994-12-01

    We report here a novel strategy for the selective labeling and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype, based on the distinct kinetics of the muscarinic antagonists dexetimide and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) and on the selectivity profile of guanylpirenzepine and AF-DX 116 for the m1-m5 muscarinic receptor subtypes expressed in CHO-K1 cells. Incubation with 10 nM dexetimide, a nonselective antagonist, resulted in > 90% occupancy of each of the m1-m5 receptor subtypes. The relatively rapid rates of dexetimide dissociation from the m1, m2, and m4 receptor subtypes (t1/2 values of m4 receptor subtypes with short incubations with [3H]NMS. Inclusion of 200 nM guanylpirenzepine and 250 nM AF-DX 116 prevented the binding of [3H]NMS to the majority of the m1 and m2 receptor subtypes, respectively, resulting in primary labeling of the m4 receptor subtype. Brief dissociation of the radioligand in the presence of 1 microM atropine improved the ratio of m4 to m2 labeling by selectively removing [3H]NMS from the m2 subtype. Under these conditions, the ratio of [3H]NMS binding to the m4 versus m1, m2, m3, and m5 receptor subtypes was 4:1. In vitro autoradiography combined with these m4-selective labeling conditions demonstrated that the M4 (m4) receptor subtype was localized to the primary visual area (V1, area 17, occipital cortex) and the basal ganglia, a distribution distinct from that demonstrated for the M1 (m1), M2 (m2), and M3 (m3) receptor subtypes. These results demonstrate that a combination of the distinct kinetics of dexetimide and NMS and the receptor subtype selectivity of guanylpirenzepine and AF-DX 116 provides a valuable labeling strategy to examine the distribution and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype in brain, peripheral tissues, and cell lines.

  16. Muscarinic receptors in separate populations of noradrenaline- and adrenaline-containing chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelena, P.; Moro, M.A.; Castillo, C.J.; Garcia, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    We have performed binding experiments of (a)[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate to partially purified membranes from noradrenaline- and adrenaline-containing chromaffin cells and (b) [3H]N-methyl-quinuclidinyl benzilate to acutely isolated, or 48-h cultured, chromaffin cells subpopulations. Using this approach, we obtained enough evidence to conclude (1st) that muscarinic receptors are present in both noradrenaline- and adrenaline containing cells; (2nd) that noradrenaline cells contain in fact 2-3 fold higher density of those receptors; and (3rd) that those receptors undergo plastic changes upon chronic culturing of the cells

  17. Presynaptic adenosine receptor-mediated regulation of diverse thalamocortical short-term plasticity in the mouse whisker pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eFerrati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In driver thalamocortical (TC synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors, modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release.

  18. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 97, Jul 2015 (2015), s. 27-39 ISSN 1043-6618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * atypical agonists * xanomeline * activation mechanism Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.816, year: 2015

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Methoctramine Binding and Selectivity at Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Zimčík, Pavel; Randáková, Alena; Fuksová, Květoslava; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (2014), s. 180-192 ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * selectivity * methoctramine * allosteric * FRET Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.128, year: 2014

  20. Subtypes of muscarinic receptors in vagal inhibitory pathway to the lower esophageal sphincter of the opossum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, R J; Dodds, W J

    1987-10-01

    We assessed the characteristics of muscarinic neural transmission in the vagal inhibitory pathway to the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) of anesthetized opossums. LES relaxation was induced by electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus. Measurements were made of LES relaxation before and after intravenous administration of nicotinic (hexamethonium), serotonergic (5-Meo-DMT), nonselective muscarinic (atropine), and selective muscarinic (pirenzepine-M1 and 4-DAMP-M2) antagonists. The latency of LES relaxation was increased substantially by pirenzepine and atropine, increased slightly by hexamethonium, but was not affected by 4-DAMP or 5-Meo-DMT. Given as concurrent intravenous infusions, hexamethonium, 5-Meo-DMT and 4-DAMP added to pirenzepine or atropine did not significantly increase LES relaxation latency above that caused by pirenzepine or atropine alone. None of the antagonists alone had a significant effect on percent LES relaxation. The combination of pirenzepine or 4-DAMP with hexamethonium and 5-Meo-DMT did not affect percent LES relaxation. The combination of atropine with hexamethonium and 5-Meo-DMT reduced LES relaxation to 18%. The combination of pirenzepine and 4-DAMP with hexamethonium and 5-Meo-DMT, however, had no effect on percent LES relaxation. We conclude that muscarinic participation in vagally induced LES relaxation exhibits two functional receptor subtypes: (1) M1 receptors that determine LES relaxation latency and are antagonized by pirenzepine or atropine, and (2) non-M1, non-M2 receptors (Mx receptors) that contribute to the magnitude of LES relaxation and are antagonized by atropine, but not by pirenzepine or 4-DAMP.

  1. Uncoupling of M1 muscarinic receptor/G-protein interaction by amyloid beta(1-42)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janíčková, Helena; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Jakubík, Jan; Tanila, H.; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 67, April (2013), s. 272-283 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s Disease * muscarinic receptors * G-proteins Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.819, year: 2013

  2. Crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, David M; Sun, Bingfa; Feng, Dan; Nawaratne, Vindhya; Leach, Katie; Felder, Christian C; Bures, Mark G; Evans, David A; Weis, William I; Bachhawat, Priti; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Sexton, Patrick M; Kobilka, Brian K; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2016-03-17

    Muscarinic M1-M5 acetylcholine receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that regulate many vital functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In particular, the M1 and M4 receptor subtypes have emerged as attractive drug targets for treatments of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, but the high conservation of the acetylcholine-binding pocket has spurred current research into targeting allosteric sites on these receptors. Here we report the crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors bound to the inverse agonist, tiotropium. Comparison of these structures with each other, as well as with the previously reported M2 and M3 receptor structures, reveals differences in the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites that contribute to a role in drug selectivity at this important receptor family. We also report identification of a cluster of residues that form a network linking the orthosteric and allosteric sites of the M4 receptor, which provides new insight into how allosteric modulation may be transmitted between the two spatially distinct domains.

  3. Autoradiography of H-3-pirenzepine and H-3-AFDX-384 in Mouse Brain Regions: Possible Insights into M-1, M-2, and M-4 Muscarinic Receptors Distribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valuskova, P.; Farar, V.; Forczek, Sándor; Křížová, I.; Mysliveček, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 9, FEB 20 (2018), č. článku 124. ISSN 1663-9812 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : 3 h-afdx-384 * 3 H-pirenzepine * 3 h-qnb * Autoradiography * M muscarinic receptor 1 * M muscarinic receptor 2 * M muscarinic receptor 4 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 4.400, year: 2016

  4. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Subtypes of Muscarinic Receptors (5th), Held in Newport Beach, California, October 22-24, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-22

    Humana Press, Clifton (1989). 11. C. MELLIN, H.M. VARGAS and B. RINGDAHL, J. Med. Chem. 32 1590-1593 (1989). 121. B.M. NILSSON, H.M. VARGAS and U. HACKSELL...muscarinic receptor. References 1. B. RINGDAHL, The Muscarinic Receptor: J. H. Brown (ed), 151-218, The Humana Press, Clifton, New Jersey (1989) and...Istituto di Fisiologia Umana II, Universita di Milano, Milano, Italy Our previous papersý, 2 suggested that specific muscarinic receptor subtypes (M

  5. Presynaptic selectivity of a ligand for serotonin 1A receptors revealed by in vivo PET assays of rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Saijo

    Full Text Available A novel investigational antidepressant with high affinity for the serotonin transporter and the serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A receptor, called Wf-516 (structural formula: (2S-1-[4-(3,4-dichlorophenylpiperidin-1-yl]-3-[2-(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-ylbenzo[b]furan-4-yloxy]propan-2-ol monohydrochloride, has been found to exert a rapid therapeutic effect, although the mechanistic basis for this potential advantage remains undetermined. We comparatively investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Wf-516 and pindolol by positron emission tomographic (PET and autoradiographic assays of rat brains in order to elucidate their molecular interactions with presynaptic and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In contrast to the full receptor occupancy by pindolol in PET measurements, the binding of Wf-516 to 5-HT(1A receptors displayed limited capacity, with relatively high receptor occupancy being achieved in regions predominantly containing presynaptic receptors. This selectivity was further proven by PET scans of neurotoxicant-treated rats deficient in presynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In addition, [(35S]guanosine 5'-O-[γ-thio]triphosphate autoradiography indicated a partial agonistic ability of Wf-516 for 5-HT(1A receptors. This finding has lent support to reports that diverse partial agonists for 5-HT(1A receptors exert high sensitivity for presynaptic components. Thus, the present PET data suggest a relatively high capacity of presynaptic binding sites for partial agonists. Since our in vitro and ex vivo autoradiographies failed to illustrate these distinct features of Wf-516, in vivo PET imaging is considered to be, thus far, the sole method capable of pharmacokinetically demonstrating the unique actions of Wf-516 and similar new-generation antidepressants.

  6. Muscarinic M3 receptors on structural cells regulate cigarette smoke-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kistemaker, Loes E.M.; van Os, Ronald P.; Dethmers-Ausema, Albertina; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Hylkema, Machteld N.; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Wess, Jürgen; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A.M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Anticholinergics, blocking the muscarinic M-3 receptor, are effective bronchodilators for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Recent evidence from M-3 receptor-deficient mice (M3R-/-) indicates that M-3 receptors also regulate neutrophilic inflammation in response to cigarette smoke

  7. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Caitlin; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto; de Valdivia, Ernesto Gonzalez; Li, Shizhong; Reisenberger, Julia; Carlsen, Eva M M; Khan, Zaid; Hansen, Niels O; Puhm, Florian; Søndergaard, Leif; Niemiec, Justyna; Heninger, Magdalena; Ren, Guilin R; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2013-09-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M) and muscarine (EC50, 6 × 10(-8) M) and blocked by the classical mAChR antagonists atropine, scopolamine, and 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB), while the other (the B-type; encoded by gene CG7918) is also activated by acetylcholine, but has a 1,000-fold lower sensitivity to muscarine, and is not blocked by the antagonists. A- and B-type mAChRs were also cloned and functionally characterized from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. Recently, Haga et al. (Nature 2012, 482: 547-551) published the crystal structure of the human m2 mAChR, revealing 14 amino acid residues forming the binding pocket for QNB. These residues are identical between the human m2 and the D. melanogaster and T. castaneum A-type mAChRs, while many of them are different between the human m2 and the B-type receptors. Using bioinformatics, one orthologue of the A-type and one of the B-type mAChRs could also be found in all other arthropods with a sequenced genome. Protostomes, such as arthropods, and deuterostomes, such as mammals and other vertebrates, belong to two evolutionarily distinct lineages of animal evolution that split about 700 million years ago. We found that animals that originated before this split, such as cnidarians (Hydra), had two A-type mAChRs. From these data we propose a model for the evolution of mAChRs.

  8. GIRK channel activation via adenosine or muscarinic receptors has similar effects on rat atrial electrophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Liang, Bo; Skibsbye, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channels (GIRK) are important in the regulation of heart rate and atrial electrophysiology. GIRK channels are activated by G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic M2 receptors and adenosine A1 receptors. The aim of this study was to characterize....... The coapplication of TTQ reversed the CPA and ACh-induced effects. When TTQ was applied without exogenous receptor activator, both APD90 and ERP were prolonged and RMP was depolarized, confirming a basal activity of the GIRK current. The results reveal that activation of A1 and M2 receptors has a profound and equal...... effect on the electrophysiology in rat atrium. This effect is to a major extent mediated through GIRK channels. Furthermore, these results support the notion that atrial GIRK currents from healthy hearts have a basal component and additional activation can be mediated via at least 2 different receptor...

  9. Modelling of the binding site of the human m1 muscarinic receptor: Experimental validation and refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Hélène; Trumpp-Kallmeyer, Susanne; Schreuder, Herman; Hoflack, , Jan; Hibert, Marcel; Wermuth, Camille-Georges

    1997-07-01

    Our model of the human m1 muscarinic receptor has been refined on the basis of the recently published projection map of bovine rhodopsin. The refined model has a slightly different helix arrangement, which reveals the presence of an extra hydrophobic pocket located between helices 3, 4 and 5. The interaction of series of agonists and antagonists with the m1 muscarinic receptor has been studied experimentally by site-directed mutagenesis. In order to account for the observed results, three-dimensional models of m1 ligands docked in the target receptor are proposed. Qualitatively, the obtained models are in good agreement with the experimental observations. Agonists and partial agonists have a relatively small size. They can bind to the same region of the receptor using, however, different anchoring receptor residues. Antagonists are usually larger molecules, filling almost completely the same pocket as agonists. They can usually produce much stronger interactions with aromatic residues. Experimental data combined with molecular modelling studies highlight how subtle and diverse receptor-ligand interactions could be.

  10. Antipsychotic Drug-Like Effects of the Selective M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulator VU0152100

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Nellie E; Grannan, Michael; Bubser, Michael; Barry, Robert L; Thompson, Analisa; Rosanelli, John; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Damon, Stephen; Bridges, Thomas M; Melancon, Bruce J; Tarr, James C; Brogan, John T; Avison, Malcolm J; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that selective M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activators may offer a novel strategy for the treatment of psychosis. However, previous efforts to develop selective M4 activators were unsuccessful because of the lack of M4 mAChR subtype specificity and off-target muscarinic adverse effects. We recently developed VU0152100, a highly selective M4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) that exerts central effects after systemic administration. We now repor...

  11. Muscarinic M2 and M4 receptors in anterior cingulate cortex: relation to neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaktong, Thanasak; Piggott, Margaret A; Mckeith, Ian G; Perry, Robert H; Ballard, Clive G; Perry, Elaine K

    2005-06-20

    Alterations in cholinergic functions have been reported to be associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia. Increased M1 muscarinic receptor binding in temporal cortex is associated with delusions in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) patients and increased M2/M4 receptor binding with psychosis in Alzheimer's disease. However, the relation between M2 and M4 muscarinic receptor and psychotic symptoms in DLB is unknown. The aim of this study was to measure M2 and M4 receptors in the anterior cingulate cortex in DLB and to correlate the neurochemical findings with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Muscarinic M2 and M4 receptor levels in the anterior cingulate cortex and adjacent cortex (Brodmann's area [BA] 32) were measured separately by using a radioligand binding protocol based on binding of [(3)H]AF-DX 384 in the presence and absence of dicyclomine, a potent M4 receptor antagonist. M2 receptor binding was significantly increased, while M4 receptor binding was unchanged in the cingulate cortex and BA32 of DLB patients compared with age-matched controls. Impaired consciousness was significantly associated with increased M4 binding and delusions were significantly associated with increased M2 binding. Increased M2 and M4 receptor binding in DLB was also associated with visual hallucinations. Upregulation of M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors in cingulate and adjacent cortex may thus contribute to the development of psychosis in DLB, with potential implications for treatments with drugs acting on these receptors.

  12. Pancreatic and snake venom presynaptically active phospholipases A2 inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfius, Catherine A; Kasheverov, Igor E; Kryukova, Elena V; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Shelukhina, Irina V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Faure, Grazyna; Zouridakis, Marios; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are enzymes found throughout the animal kingdom. They hydrolyze phospholipids in the sn-2 position producing lysophospholipids and unsaturated fatty acids, agents that can damage membranes. PLA2s from snake venoms have numerous toxic effects, not all of which can be explained by phospholipid hydrolysis, and each enzyme has a specific effect. We have earlier demonstrated the capability of several snake venom PLA2s with different enzymatic, cytotoxic, anticoagulant and antiproliferative properties, to decrease acetylcholine-induced currents in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons, and to compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and acetylcholine binding protein. Since nAChRs are implicated in postsynaptic and presynaptic activities, in this work we probe those PLA2s known to have strong presynaptic effects, namely β-bungarotoxin from Bungarus multicinctus and crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus. We also wished to explore whether mammalian PLA2s interact with nAChRs, and have examined non-toxic PLA2 from porcine pancreas. It was found that porcine pancreatic PLA2 and presynaptic β-bungarotoxin blocked currents mediated by nAChRs in Lymnaea neurons with IC50s of 2.5 and 4.8 μM, respectively. Crotoxin competed with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and human α7 nAChRs and to the acetylcholine binding protein. Pancreatic PLA2 interacted similarly with these targets; moreover, it inhibited radioactive α-bungarotoxin binding to the water-soluble extracellular domain of human α9 nAChR, and blocked acetylcholine induced currents in human α9α10 nAChRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These and our earlier results show that all snake PLA2s, including presynaptically active crotoxin and β-bungarotoxin, as well as mammalian pancreatic PLA2, interact with nAChRs. The data obtained suggest that this interaction may be a general property of all PLA2s, which should be proved by

  13. Pancreatic and snake venom presynaptically active phospholipases A2 inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Vulfius

    Full Text Available Phospholipases A2 (PLA2s are enzymes found throughout the animal kingdom. They hydrolyze phospholipids in the sn-2 position producing lysophospholipids and unsaturated fatty acids, agents that can damage membranes. PLA2s from snake venoms have numerous toxic effects, not all of which can be explained by phospholipid hydrolysis, and each enzyme has a specific effect. We have earlier demonstrated the capability of several snake venom PLA2s with different enzymatic, cytotoxic, anticoagulant and antiproliferative properties, to decrease acetylcholine-induced currents in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons, and to compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and acetylcholine binding protein. Since nAChRs are implicated in postsynaptic and presynaptic activities, in this work we probe those PLA2s known to have strong presynaptic effects, namely β-bungarotoxin from Bungarus multicinctus and crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus. We also wished to explore whether mammalian PLA2s interact with nAChRs, and have examined non-toxic PLA2 from porcine pancreas. It was found that porcine pancreatic PLA2 and presynaptic β-bungarotoxin blocked currents mediated by nAChRs in Lymnaea neurons with IC50s of 2.5 and 4.8 μM, respectively. Crotoxin competed with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and human α7 nAChRs and to the acetylcholine binding protein. Pancreatic PLA2 interacted similarly with these targets; moreover, it inhibited radioactive α-bungarotoxin binding to the water-soluble extracellular domain of human α9 nAChR, and blocked acetylcholine induced currents in human α9α10 nAChRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These and our earlier results show that all snake PLA2s, including presynaptically active crotoxin and β-bungarotoxin, as well as mammalian pancreatic PLA2, interact with nAChRs. The data obtained suggest that this interaction may be a general property of all PLA2s, which

  14. Comparison of the in vitro and in vivo profiles of tolterodine with those of subtype-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillberg, P G; Sundquist, S; Nilvebrant, L

    1998-05-22

    Tolterodine [(R)-N,N-diisopropyl-3-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-3-phenylpropanamine ] is a new potent and competitive muscarinic receptor antagonist developed for the treatment of urinary urge incontinence and other symptoms of overactive bladder. In vivo, tolterodine exhibits functional selectivity for the urinary bladder over salivary glands, a profile that cannot be explained in terms of selectivity for a single muscarinic receptor subtype. The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro and in vivo antimuscarinic profiles of tolterodine with those of muscarinic receptor antagonists with distinct receptor subtype-selectivity profiles: darifenacin [(S)-2-[1-[2-(2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl)ethyl]-3-pyrrolidinyl]-2,2-d iphenylacetamide; selective for muscarinic M3 receptors]; UH-AH 37 (6-chloro-5,10-dihydro-5-[(1-methyl-4-piperidinyl)acetyl]-11H-dibenzo-[b ,e][1,4]diazepine-11-one; low affinity for muscarinic M2 receptors); and AQ-RA 741 (11-([4-[4-(diethylamino)butyl]-1-piperidinyl]acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-py rido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one; high affinity for muscarinic M2 receptors). The in vitro profiles of these compounds were in agreement with previous reports; darifenacin and UH-AH 37 demonstrated selectivity for muscarinic M3/m3 over M2/m2 receptors, while the converse was observed for AQ-RA 741. In vivo, AQ-RA 741 was more potent (1.4-2.7-fold) in inhibiting urinary bladder contraction than salivation in the anaesthetised cat (i.e., a profile similar to that of tolterodine [2.5-3.3-fold]), while darifenacin and UH-AH 37 showed the reverse selectivity profile (0.6-0.8 and 0.4-0.5-fold, respectively). The results confirm that it is possible to separate the antimuscarinic effects on urinary bladder and salivary glands in vivo. The data on UH-AH 37 and darifenacin support the view that a selectivity for muscarinic M3/m3 over M2/m2 receptors may result in a more pronounced effect on salivation than on bladder contraction. The data on AQ-RA 741 may indicate

  15. Acetylcholine modulates gamma frequency oscillations in the hippocampus by activation of muscarinic M1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betterton, Ruth T; Broad, Lisa M; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Mellor, Jack R

    2017-06-01

    Modulation of gamma oscillations is important for the processing of information and the disruption of gamma oscillations is a prominent feature of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Gamma oscillations are generated by the interaction of excitatory and inhibitory neurons where their precise frequency and amplitude are controlled by the balance of excitation and inhibition. Acetylcholine enhances the intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons and suppresses both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, but the net modulatory effect on gamma oscillations is not known. Here, we find that the power, but not frequency, of optogenetically induced gamma oscillations in the CA3 region of mouse hippocampal slices is enhanced by low concentrations of the broad-spectrum cholinergic agonist carbachol but reduced at higher concentrations. This bidirectional modulation of gamma oscillations is replicated within a mathematical model by neuronal depolarisation, but not by reducing synaptic conductances, mimicking the effects of muscarinic M1 receptor activation. The predicted role for M1 receptors was supported experimentally; bidirectional modulation of gamma oscillations by acetylcholine was replicated by a selective M1 receptor agonist and prevented by genetic deletion of M1 receptors. These results reveal that acetylcholine release in CA3 of the hippocampus modulates gamma oscillation power but not frequency in a bidirectional and dose-dependent manner by acting primarily through muscarinic M1 receptors. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The role of muscarinic receptors in the beneficial effects of adenosine against myocardial reperfusion injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Sun

    Full Text Available Adenosine, a catabolite of ATP, displays a wide variety of effects in the heart including regulation of cardiac response to myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Nonetheless, the precise mechanism of adenosine-induced cardioprotection is still elusive. Isolated Sprague-Dawley rat hearts underwent 30 min global ischemia and 120 min reperfusion using a Langendorff apparatus. Both adenosine and acetylcholine treatment recovered the post-reperfusion cardiac function associated with adenosine and muscarinic receptors activation. Simultaneous administration of adenosine and acetylcholine failed to exert any additive protective effect, suggesting a shared mechanism between the two. Our data further revealed a cross-talk between the adenosine and acetylcholine receptor signaling in reperfused rat hearts. Interestingly, the selective M(2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist methoctramine significantly attenuated the cardioprotective effect of adenosine. In addition, treatment with adenosine upregulated the expression and the maximal binding capacity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, which were inhibited by the selective A(1 adenosine receptor antagonist 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. These data suggested a possible functional coupling between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors behind the observed cardioprotection. Furthermore, nitric oxide was found involved in triggering the response to each of the two receptor agonist. In summary, there may be a cross-talk between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors in ischemic/reperfused myocardium with nitric oxide synthase might serve as the distal converging point. In addition, adenosine contributes to the invigorating effect of adenosine on muscarinic receptor thereby prompting to regulation of cardiac function. These findings argue for a potentially novel mechanism behind the adenosine

  17. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B.; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cholinergic system in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) with focus on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes M1 and M4. The protein sequences for the subtypes m 1–5 of the naked mole-rat were compared to that of the house mouse (Mus...... musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies...... with [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg...

  18. The muscarinic M1/M4 receptor agonist xanomeline exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Peacock, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Xanomeline is a muscarinic M(1)/M(4) preferring receptor agonist with little or no affinity for dopamine receptors. The compound reduces psychotic-like symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease and exhibits an antipsychotic-like profile in rodents without inducing extrapyramidal side effects...... that xanomeline inhibits D-amphetamine- and (-)-apomorphine-induced behavior in Cebus apella monkeys at doses that do not cause EPS. These data further substantiate that muscarinic receptor agonists may be useful in the pharmacological treatment of psychosis....

  19. The prelimbic cortex muscarinic M₃ receptor-nitric oxide-guanylyl cyclase pathway modulates cardiovascular responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassini, Aline; Antero, Leandro S; Corrêa, Fernando M A; Joca, Sâmia R; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2015-05-01

    The prelimbic cortex (PL), a limbic structure, sends projections to areas involved in the control of cardiovascular responses. Stimulation of the PL with acetylcholine (ACh) evokes depressor and tachycardiac responses mediated by local PL muscarinic receptors. Early studies demonstrated that stimulation of muscarinic receptors induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and cyclic guanosine cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) formation. Hence, this study investigates which PL muscarinic receptor subtype is involved in the cardiovascular response induced by ACh and tests the hypothesis that cardiovascular responses caused by muscarinic receptor stimulation in the PL are mediated by local NO and cGMP formation. PL pretreatment with J104129 (an M3 receptor antagonist) blocked the depressor and tachycardiac response evoked by injection of ACh into the PL. Pretreatment with either pirenzepine (an M1 receptor antagonist) or AF-DX 116 (an M2 and M4 receptor antagonist) did not affect cardiovascular responses evoked by ACh. Moreover, similarly to the antagonism of PL M3 receptors, pretreatment with N(ω)-propyl-L-arginine (an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase), carboxy-PTIO(S)-3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylglicine (an NO scavenger), or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolol-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (a guanylate cyclase inhibitor) blocked both the depressor and the tachycardiac response evoked by ACh. The current results demonstrate that cardiovascular responses evoked by microinjection of ACh into the PL are mediated by local activation of the M3 receptor-NO-guanylate cyclase pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor antagonists on attention and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuail, Joseph A; Burk, Joshua A

    2006-12-01

    Cholinergic receptor antagonists are commonly used to model attentional and mnemonic impairments associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. However, few studies have systematically assessed the effects of these drugs following manipulations that affect attention or working memory within the same task. In the present experiment, rats were trained to discriminate visual signals from "blank" trials when no signal was presented. This task was modified to include retention intervals on some trials to tax working memory. During standard task performance, rats received systemic injections of the muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine, or of the nicotinic receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. A second experiment tested the effects on this task of co-administering doses of scopolamine and mecamylamine that, when administered alone, did not significantly affect task performance. Scopolamine (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) decreased detection of 500 ms signals but did not affect accurate identification of non-signals. Scopolamine did not differentially affect performance across the retention interval. Elevated omission rates were associated with high doses of scopolamine or mecamylamine. Combination drug treatment was associated with decreased signal detection and elevated omission rates. Collectively, the data suggest that muscarinic and nicotinic receptor antagonists do not exclusively impair working memory.

  1. Alterations in alpha-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding in rat brain following nonionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, V.C.; Ross, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    Microwave radiation produces hyperthermia. The mammalian thermoregulatory system defends against changes in temperature by mobilizing diverse control mechanisms. Neurotransmitters play a major role in eliciting thermoregulatory responses. The involvement of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors was investigated in radiation-induced hyperthermia. Rats were subjected to radiation at 700 MHz frequency and 15 mW/cm/sup 2/ power density and the body temperature was raised by 2.5 degrees C. Of six brain regions investigated only the hypothalamus showed significant changes in receptor states, confirming its pivotal role in thermoregulation. Adrenergic receptors, studied by (/sup 3/H)clonidine binding, showed a 36% decrease in binding following radiation after a 2.5 degrees C increase in body temperature, suggesting a mechanism to facilitate norepinephrine release. Norepinephrine may be speculated to maintain thermal homeostasis by activating heat dissipation. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors, studied by (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, showed a 65% increase in binding at the onset of radiation. This may be attributed to the release of acetylcholine in the hypothalamus in response to heat cumulation. The continued elevated binding during the period of cooling after radiation was shut off may suggest the existence of an extra-hypothalamic heat-loss pathway.

  2. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H. [and others

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  3. An allosteric enhancer of M(4) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M(4) acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M(4) receptors could...... be a novel target for modulating psychostimulant effects of cocaine....

  4. Type 3 muscarinic receptors contribute to intestinal mucosal homeostasis and clearance of nippostrongylus brasiliensis through induction of Th2 cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite increased appreciation for the role of nicotinic receptors in the modulation of and response to inflammation, the contribution of muscarinic receptors to mucosal homeostasis, clearance of enteric pathogens, and modulation of immune cell function remains relatively undefined. Uninfected and N...

  5. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor M3 Mutation Causes Urinary Bladder Disease and a Prune-Belly-like Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stefanie; Thiele, Holger; Mir, Sevgi; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Sozeri, Betül; Reutter, Heiko; Draaken, Markus; Ludwig, Michael; Altmüller, Janine; Frommolt, Peter; Stuart, Helen M; Ranjzad, Parisa; Hanley, Neil A; Jennings, Rachel; Newman, William G; Wilcox, Duncan T; Thiel, Uwe; Schlingmann, Karl Peter; Beetz, Rolf; Hoyer, Peter F; Konrad, Martin; Schaefer, Franz; Nürnberg, Peter; Woolf, Adrian S

    2011-11-11

    Urinary bladder malformations associated with bladder outlet obstruction are a frequent cause of progressive renal failure in children. We here describe a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 (CHRM3) (1q41-q44) homozygous frameshift mutation in familial congenital bladder malformation associated with a prune-belly-like syndrome, defining an isolated gene defect underlying this sometimes devastating disease. CHRM3 encodes the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, which we show is present in developing renal epithelia and bladder muscle. These observations may imply that M3 has a role beyond its known contribution to detrusor contractions. This Mendelian disease caused by a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mutation strikingly phenocopies Chrm3 null mutant mice. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Physiological roles of CNS muscarinic receptors gained from knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Sørensen, Gunnar; Dencker, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    , knockout mice are likely to continue to provide valuable insights into brain physiology and pathophysiology, and advance the development of new medications for a range of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and addictions, as well as non-opioid analgesics...... receptors modulating neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release in many brain regions, shaping neuronal plasticity, and affecting functions ranging from motor and sensory function to cognitive processes. As gene targeting technology evolves including the use of conditional, cell type specific strains...

  7. The amygdala modulates morphine-induced state-dependent memory retrieval via muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezayof, A; Khajehpour, L; Zarrindast, M R

    2009-05-05

    The current study was conducted to examine the involvement of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of the amygdala in morphine-induced state-dependent memory retrieval. Male Wistar rats implanted bilaterally with cannulas in the amygdala were submitted to a step-through type passive avoidance task, and tested 24 h after training to measure step-through latency. Post-training s.c. administration of morphine at the doses of 5 and 7.5 mg/kg impaired the memory on the test day, which was restored when the same doses of morphine were used as a pre-test drug. This phenomenon is well known as morphine-induced state-dependent memory retrieval. Bilateral microinjection of the non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, pilocarpine (0.25 and 0.5 microg/side), into the amygdala with an ineffective dose of morphine (0.5 mg/kg s.c.) significantly improved the memory retrieval and mimicked the effects of pre-test administration of a higher dose of morphine. It should be noted that in the animals that received saline after training and tested following intra-amygdala administration of pilocarpine (0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 microg/side) and those which received post-training morphine (7.5 mg/kg s.c.) and pre-test intra-amygdala microinjection of the same doses of pilocarpine, no significant change was observed in the step-through latencies. On the other hand, pre-test intra-amygdala microinjection of a selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine (0.125 and 0.25 microg/side) inhibited morphine-induced state-dependent memory retrieval. In addition, no significant changes were seen in memory retrieval of the animals trained before saline treatment and tested following intra-amygdala microinjection of the same doses of scopolamine (0.0625, 0.125 and 0.25 microg/side). Bilateral microinjection of scopolamine into the amygdala reversed the pilocarpine-induced potentiation of the morphine response. In view of the known actions of the drugs used, the present

  8. Functional and biochemical characteristics of urinary bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To re-examine the function of the urinary bladder in vivo as well as to determine the functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan-induced diabetes rats. Methods Two-month-old male Wistar rats were injected with alloxan and the animals showing blood glucose levels >300mg/dL together with age-paired untreated animals were kept for 11 months. Body weight, bladder weight, blood glucose, and urinary volume over a period of 24 hours were determined in both groups of animals. A voiding cystometry in conscious control and diabetic rats was performed to determine maximal micturition pressure, micturition contraction interval and duration as well as voided and post-voiding residual volume. In addition, concentration-response curves for bethanechol in isolated bladder strips, as well as [3H]-N methyl-scopolamine binding site characteristics in bladder homogenates were determined. Results Mean bladder weight was 162.5±21.2mg versus 290±37.9mg in control and treated animals, respectively (pmuscarinic receptors were also not statistically different. Conclusion Bladder function in vivo is altered in chronic alloxan-induced diabetes rats without changes in functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors. PMID:26466064

  9. Alterations of muscarinic and GABA receptor binding in the posterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Kelly A; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Jew, Stephen Kum; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2007-01-30

    The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a key component of the limbic system, has been implicated in the pathology of schizophrenia because of its sensitivity to NMDA receptor antagonists. Recent studies have shown that the PCC is dysfunctional in schizophrenia, and it is now suspected to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Studies also suggest that there are abnormalities in muscarinic and GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia. Therefore, in the present study we used quantitative autoradiography to investigate the binding of [(3)H]pirenzepine, [(3)H]AF-DX 384 and [(3)H]muscimol, which respectively label M1/4 and M2/4 muscarinic and GABA(A) receptors, in the PCC of schizophrenia and control subjects matched for age and post-mortem interval. The present study found that [(3)H]pirenzepine binding was significantly decreased in the superficial (-24%, p=0.002) and deep (-35%, pM4, M2/M4 and GABA(A) receptors in the PCC in schizophrenia. Whilst the exact mechanism causing these alterations is not yet known, a possible increased acetylcholine and down regulated GABA stimulation in the PCC of schizophrenia is suggested.

  10. Current status of muscarinic M1 and M4 receptors as drug targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Christian C; Goldsmith, Paul J; Jackson, Kimberley; Sanger, Helen E; Evans, David A; Mogg, Adrian J; Broad, Lisa M

    2018-01-25

    The cholinergic signalling system has been an attractive pathway to seek targets for modulation of arousal, cognition, and attention which are compromised in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. The acetylcholine muscarinic receptor M1 and M4 subtypes which are highly expressed in the central nervous system, in cortex, hippocampus and striatum, key areas of cognitive and neuropsychiatric control, have received particular attention. Historical muscarinic drug development yielded first generation agonists with modest selectivity for these two receptor targets over M2 and M3 receptors, the major peripheral sub-types hypothesised to underlie the dose-limiting clinical side effects. More recent compound screening and medicinal chemistry optimization of orthosteric and allosteric agonists, and positive allosteric modulators binding to sites distinct from the highly homologous acetylcholine binding pocket have yielded a collection of highly selective tool compounds for preclinical validation studies. Several M1 selective ligands have progressed to early clinical development and in time will hopefully lead to useful therapeutics for treating symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Dual effects of muscarinic M2 acetylcholine receptors on the synthesis of cyclic AMP in CHO cells: dependence on time, receptor density and receptor agonists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; Lysíková, Michaela; Tuček, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 6 (2001), s. 1217-1228 ISSN 0007-1188 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0214; GA AV ČR IAA7011910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cyclic AMP * muscarinic receptors * CHO cells Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.502, year: 2001

  12. Synthesis and muscarinic receptor pharmacology of a series of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisothiazolo[4,5-c]pyridine bioisosteres of arecoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, H; Bräuner-Osborne, H; Ball, R G

    1999-01-01

    . The muscarinic receptor affinity as well as estimated relative efficacy and subtype selectivity of this series of bicyclic arecoline bioisosteres were determined using rat brain membranes and a number of tritiated muscarinic receptor ligands. The effects at the five cloned human muscarinic receptor subtypes...... of a selected series of chiral analogues, with established absolute stereochemistry, were studied using receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT). The potency, relative efficacy, and receptor subtype selectivity of these compounds were related to the structure of the O...

  13. Increased cocaine self-administration in M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene Sørensen; Thomsen, Morgane; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The reinforcing effects of cocaine are mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system. Behavioral and neurochemical studies have shown that the cholinergic muscarinic M4 receptor subtype plays an important role in regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Objectives Here we investigated...... for the first time the involvement of M4 receptors in the reinforcing effects of cocaine using chronic intravenous cocaine self-administration in extensively backcrossed M4 receptor knockout (M4 -/-) mice. Methods We evaluated acquisition of cocaine self-administration in experimentally naïve mice. Both cocaine...... self-administration and food-maintained operant behavior were evaluated under fixed ratio 1 (FR 1) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In addition, cocaine-induced dopamine release and cocaine-induced hyperactivity were evaluated. Results M4 -/- mice earned significantly more cocaine...

  14. Functional activation of G-proteins coupled with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rat brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Toyoshima, Ryoichi

    2014-01-01

    The functional activation of Gi/o proteins coupled to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) was investigated with the conventional guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio) triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding assay in rat brain membranes. The most efficacious stimulation elicited by acetylcholine or carbachol (CCh) was obtained in striatal membranes. The pharmacological properties of mAChR-mediated [(35)S]GTPγS binding determined with a series of muscarinic agonists and antagonists were almost identical among the three brain regions investigated, i.e., cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, except for the apparent partial agonist effects of (αR)-α-cyclopentyl-α-hydroxy-N-[1-(4-methyl-3-pentenyl)-4-piperidinyl]benzeneacetamide fumarate (J 104129) observed only in the hippocampus, but not in the other two regions. Among the muscarinic toxins investigated, only MT3 attenuated CCh-stimulated [(35)S] GTPγS binding. The highly selective allosteric potentiator at the M4 mAChR subtype, 3-amino-N-[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-4,6-dimethylthieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide (VU 10010), shifted the concentration-response curve for CCh leftwards as well as upwards. On the other hand, neither thiochrome nor brucine N-oxide was effective. The increases induced by CCh and 5-HT were essentially additive, though not completely, indicating that the mAChRs and 5-HT1A receptors were coupled independently to distinct pools of Gi/o proteins. Collectively, all of the data suggest that functional activation of Gi/o proteins coupled to mAChRs, especially the M4 subtype, is detectable by means of CCh-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay in rat discrete brain regions.

  15. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpicelli, Laura A; Levey, Allan I

    2004-01-01

    The M1, M2 and M4 subtypes of mAChRs are the predominant receptors in the CNS. These receptors activate a multitude of signaling pathways important for modulating neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and feedback regulation of ACh release. In addition, novel functions mediated by mAChRs are currently being discovered. These studies are greatly facilitated by the recent development of subtype selective toxins and mice lacking individual mAChR genes. Studies in cell culture and the rodent brain demonstrate that mAChR internalization and intracellular trafficking is an important component of mAChR regulation. Characterizing mAChR intracellular trafficking could help facilitate the development of selective mAChR ligands. For example, a selective M1 agonist would cause a shift in the distribution of M1 from the cell surface to an intracellular distribution, while M2 and M4 would remain on the cell surface. Characterizing mAChR intracellular trafficking is also important for understanding the cellular mechanisms that regulate mAChR cell surface expression and signaling. Furthermore, intracellular trafficking has recently been demonstrated to play a role in the development of tolerance to drugs (Whistler et al., 1999; He et al., 2002). Because individual mAChR subtypes are novel targets for treatments of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, understanding the mechanisms that regulate mAChR signaling and intracellular trafficking following acute and chronic stimulation might lead to the development of rational strategies.

  16. Effects of methylmercury on muscarinic receptors in the mouse brain: A quantitative autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haesung; Yee, S.; Geddes, J.; Choi, Byung, H. (Ewha Women' s Univ., Seoul (Korea) Univ. of California, Irvine (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is reported to inhibit several stages of cholinergic neurotransmission in brain tissue in-vitro and in-vivo. To examine whether or not behavioral disturbances and/or selective vulnerability of specific neuronal groups in MeHg poisoning may be related to MeHg effects on cholinergic receptors in specific regions of the brain, the density and distribution of muscarinic receptors in the brains of C57BL/6J mice were determined following repeated injections of 5 mg/kg of methylmercuric chloride (MMC). The receptor densities in six cortical laminae of seven cerebral cortical regions, hippocampus and striatum were quantitated by computer-assisted imaging system following in-vitro labeling with ({sup 3}H)-pirenzepine (M1) and ({sup 3}H)N-methyl scopolamine (M2). The results showed heterogeneous distribution of M1 and M2 sites in different regions of the brain, and significant reduction in the density of both receptor subtypes following MeHg poisoning in many cortical and subcortical regions. However, the changes in the density were variable in different laminae even in the same cortical regions. Prominent reductions in M1 densities were noted in the temporal and entorhinal cortices, CA3 and hilar regions of the hippocampus as compared to control, whereas the reduction in M2 receptor density was most prominently noted in the frontal, perirhinal and entorhinal cortices, and CA1 and hilar regions of the hippocampus. Thus, it is apparent that MeHg significantly affects muscarinic receptors in the mouse brain, and that these data when used in conjunction with immunocytochemical and other morphological studies would provide further insights into the mechanisms of neurotoxic effects of MeHg.

  17. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2011-01-01

    's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based...... site. Such agents may lead to the development of novel classes of drugs useful for the treatment of psychosis, drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. The present review highlights recent studies carried out using muscarinic receptor knock-out mice and new subtype-selective allosteric ligands to assess......The neurotransmitter dopamine plays important roles in modulating cognitive, affective, and motor functions. Dysregulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, Parkinson...

  18. On homology modeling of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Doležal, Vladimír

    2013-06-01

    Twelve homology models of the human M2 muscarinic receptor using different sets of templates have been designed using the Prime program or the modeller program and compared to crystallographic structure (PDB:3UON). The best models were obtained using single template of the closest published structure, the M3 muscarinic receptor (PDB:4DAJ). Adding more (structurally distant) templates led to worse models. Data document a key role of the template in homology modeling. The models differ substantially. The quality checks built into the programs do not correlate with the RMSDs to the crystallographic structure and cannot be used to select the best model. Re-docking of the antagonists present in crystallographic structure and relative binding energy estimation by calculating MM/GBSA in Prime and the binding energy function in YASARA suggested it could be possible to evaluate the quality of the orthosteric binding site based on the prediction of relative binding energies. Although estimation of relative binding energies distinguishes between relatively good and bad models it does not indicate the best one. On the other hand, visual inspection of the models for known features and knowledge-based analysis of the intramolecular interactions allows an experimenter to select overall best models manually.

  19. The M3 Muscarinic Receptor Is Required for Optimal Adaptive Immunity to Helminth and Bacterial Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Matthew; Schnoeller, Corinna; Vira, Alykhan; Culley, Fiona; Bobat, Saeeda; Logan, Erin; Kirstein, Frank; Wess, Jürgen; Cunningham, Adam F.; Brombacher, Frank; Selkirk, Murray E.; Horsnell, William G. C.

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is regulated by cholinergic signalling through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We show here that signalling through the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) plays an important role in adaptive immunity to both Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, as M3R-/- mice were impaired in their ability to resolve infection with either pathogen. CD4 T cell activation and cytokine production were reduced in M3R-/- mice. Immunity to secondary infection with N. brasiliensis was severely impaired, with reduced cytokine responses in M3R-/- mice accompanied by lower numbers of mucus-producing goblet cells and alternatively activated macrophages in the lungs. Ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation of cells from intact BALB/c mice infected with N. brasiliensis and S. typhimurium with muscarinic agonists resulted in enhanced production of IL-13 and IFN-γ respectively, which was blocked by an M3R-selective antagonist. Our data therefore indicate that cholinergic signalling via the M3R is essential for optimal Th1 and Th2 adaptive immunity to infection. PMID:25629518

  20. The M3 muscarinic receptor is required for optimal adaptive immunity to helminth and bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Matthew; Schnoeller, Corinna; Vira, Alykhan; Culley, Fiona Jane; Culley, Fiona; Bobat, Saeeda; Logan, Erin; Kirstein, Frank; Wess, Jürgen; Cunningham, Adam F; Brombacher, Frank; Selkirk, Murray E; Horsnell, William G C

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is regulated by cholinergic signalling through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We show here that signalling through the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) plays an important role in adaptive immunity to both Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, as M3R-/- mice were impaired in their ability to resolve infection with either pathogen. CD4 T cell activation and cytokine production were reduced in M3R-/- mice. Immunity to secondary infection with N. brasiliensis was severely impaired, with reduced cytokine responses in M3R-/- mice accompanied by lower numbers of mucus-producing goblet cells and alternatively activated macrophages in the lungs. Ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation of cells from intact BALB/c mice infected with N. brasiliensis and S. typhimurium with muscarinic agonists resulted in enhanced production of IL-13 and IFN-γ respectively, which was blocked by an M3R-selective antagonist. Our data therefore indicate that cholinergic signalling via the M3R is essential for optimal Th1 and Th2 adaptive immunity to infection.

  1. Hyperfunction of muscarinic receptor maintains long-term memory in 5-HT4 receptor knock-out mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Segu

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from dementia of Alzheimer's type express less serotonin 4 receptors (5-HTR(4, but whether an absence of these receptors modifies learning and memory is unexplored. In the spatial version of the Morris water maze, we show that 5-HTR(4 knock-out (KO and wild-type (WT mice performed similarly for spatial learning, short- and long-term retention. Since 5-HTR(4 control mnesic abilities, we tested whether cholinergic system had circumvented the absence of 5-HTR(4. Inactivating muscarinic receptor with scopolamine, at an ineffective dose (0.8 mg/kg to alter memory in WT mice, decreased long-term but not short-term memory of 5-HTR(4 KO mice. Other changes included decreases in the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, the required enzyme for acetylcholine synthesis, in the septum and the dorsal hippocampus in 5-HTR(4 KO under baseline conditions. Training- and scopolamine-induced increase and decrease, respectively in ChAT activity in the septum in WT mice were not detected in the 5-HTR(4 KO animals. Findings suggest that adaptive changes in cholinergic systems may circumvent the absence of 5-HTR(4 to maintain long-term memory under baseline conditions. In contrast, despite adaptive mechanisms, the absence of 5-HTR(4 aggravates scopolamine-induced memory impairments. The mechanisms whereby 5-HTR(4 mediate a tonic influence on ChAT activity and muscarinic receptors remain to be determined.

  2. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elevates intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in accessory lobe neurons of the chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Keita; Kitamura, Naoki; Suzuki, Yuki; Yamanaka, Yuko; Shinohara, Hikaru; Shibuya, Izumi

    2015-04-01

    Accessory lobes are protrusions located at the lateral sides of the spinal cord of chicks and it has been proposed that they play a role as a sensory organ for equilibrium during walking. We have reported that functional neurons exist in the accessory lobe. As there is histological evidence that synaptic terminals of cholinergic nerves exist near the somata of accessory lobe neurons, we examined the effects of acetylcholine on changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i), as an index of cellular activities. Acetylcholine (0.1-100 µM) caused a transient rise in the [Ca2+]i. Acetylcholine-evoked [Ca2+]i rises were observed in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, and they were abolished in the presence of cyclopiazonic acid, an inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase of intracellular Ca2+ stores or atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. mRNAs coding M3 and M5 isoforms of the muscarinic receptors were detected in accessory lobes by the RT-PCR. These results indicate that chick accessory lobe neurons express functional muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and that acetylcholine stimulates Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular Ca2+ stores, which elevates the [Ca2+]i in the somata of accessory lobe neurons, through activation of these receptors. Cholinergic synaptic transmission to the accessory lobe neurons may regulate some cellular functions through muscarinic receptors.

  3. Costimulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate and muscarinic neuronal receptors modulates gap junctional communication in striatal astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Rouach, N.; Tencé, M.; Glowinski, J.; Giaume, C.

    2002-01-01

    Cocultures of neurons and astrocytes from the rat striatum were used to determine whether the stimulation of neuronal receptors could affect the level of intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions in astrocytes. The costimulation of N-methyl-D-asparte (NMDA) and muscarinic receptors led to a prominent reduction of astrocyte gap junctional communication (GJC) in coculture. This treatment was not effective in astrocyte cultures, these cells being devoid of NMDA receptors. Both types ...

  4. Characterization of the muscarinic receptor subtype(s) mediating contraction of the guinea-pig lung strip and inhibition of acetylcholine release in the guinea-pig trachea with the selective muscarinic receptor antagonist tripitramine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roffel, A.F; Davids, J.H; Elzinga, C.R S; Wolf, D; Zaagsma, Hans; Kilbinger, H

    1 The muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating contraction of the guinea-pig lung strip and inhibition of the release of acetylcholine from cholinergic vagus nerve endings in the guinea-pig trachea in vitro have previously been characterized as M-2-like, i.e. having antagonist affinity profiles that

  5. Pharmacological Evaluation of the Long-Term Effects of Xanomeline on the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grant, M.K.O.; Noetzel, M.J.; De Lorme, K.C.; Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2010), e15722-16 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Xanomeline * muscarinic acetylcholine receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.411, year: 2010

  6. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus, neocortex and amygdala : A review of immunocytochemical localization in relation to learning and memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, E.A; Luiten, P.G.M.

    Immunocytochemical mapping studies employing the extensively used monoclonal antimuscarinic acetylcholine: receptor (mAChR) antibody M35 are reviewed;sd. We focus on three neuronal muscarinic cholinoceptive substrates. which are target regions of the cholinergic basal forebrain system intimately

  7. The detection of the non-M2 muscarinic receptor subtype in the rat heart atria and ventricles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mysliveček, J.; Klein, M.; Nováková, M.; Říčný, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 378, č. 1 (2008), s. 103-116 ISSN 0028-1298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : heart * muscarinic receptors * PLC activity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.830, year: 2008

  8. Allosteric modulation by persistent binding of xanomeline of the interaction of competitive ligands with the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Tuček, Stanislav; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 301, č. 3 (2002), s. 1033-1041 ISSN 0022-3565 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP305/01/D119 Grant - others:NIH(US) NS25743 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : xanomeline * M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.991, year: 2002

  9. M3 muscarinic receptor in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex modulating the expression of contextual fear conditioning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoce, A G; Ferreira-Junior, N C; Reis, D G; Corrêa, F M A; Resstel, L B M

    2016-01-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons modulate the activation of cortical neurons by several stimuli such as fear and anxiety. However, the role of the muscarinic receptor in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) in the modulation of the conditioned emotional response (CER) evoked in the model contextual conditioned fear remains unclear. The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that inhibition of the muscarinic receptor in ventral MPFC modulates CER observed during animal's re-exposure to the aversive context. Rats implanted with cannulae aimed at the prelimbic (PL) or the infralimbic (IL) were submitted to a high-intensity contextual fear conditioning protocol. Before the test session, they received microinjections of the hemicholinium (choline reuptake blocker), atropine (muscarinic antagonist), J104129 fumarate (M1-M3 muscarinic antagonists), pirenzepine (M1 muscarinic antagonist), neostigmine (inhibitor acetylcholinesterase enzyme), or the systemic administration of the FG7142 (inverse benzodiazepine agonist). Additional independent groups received the neostigmine or FG7142 before the ineffective doses of J104129 fumarate in the low-intensity protocol of contextual fear conditioning. In the high-intensity protocol, the administration of hemicholinium (1 nmol), atropine (0.06-6 nmol), J104129 fumarate (6 nmol), or pirenzepine (6 nmol) attenuated the expression of CER in rats. However, in the low-intensity protocol, only J10129 fumarate (0.06 nmol) reduced the expression of the CER. Finally, neostigmine (0.1-1 nmol) or FG7142 (8 mg/Kg) increased CER expression, an effect inhibited by the low dose of the J10129 fumarate. These results indicated that the blockade of M3 muscarinic receptor in the vMPFC attenuates the CER expression.

  10. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J.; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In “driver” thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  11. Guanylpirenzepine distinguishes between neuronal ml and m4 muscarinic receptor subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monferini, E.; Cereda, E.; Ladinsky, H.; Donetti, A.; Giraldo, E.

    1990-01-01

    Guanylpirenzepine, a polar, non-quaternary analog of pirenzepine, exhibited a novel binding behavior in rat brain regions: in competition binding experiments against [3H]pirenzepine labeling the M1 receptor in membranes from cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum, the compound, differently from pirenzepine, displayed heterogeneous binding curves. Computer assisted analysis of these curves, evidenced the existence of two populations of binding sites: a large proportion (84-89%) of high affinity receptors (KH = 64-92 nM) and a remainder with very low affinity (KL = 19-28 microM). Like pirenzepine, guanylpirenzepine showed low affinity for the glandular M3 and the cardiac M2 receptors when [3H]N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors in membranes from these two tissues; affinity values for guanylpirenzepine were 1336 and 5790 nM respectively, vs 323 and 683 nM for pirenzepine. We conclude that guanylpirenzepine is able to discriminate between m1 and m4 receptor subtypes and may represent a new tool for deeper studies on muscarinic receptors classification

  12. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A Schober

    Full Text Available Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S. Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  13. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Douglas A; Croy, Carrie H; Ruble, Cara L; Tao, Ran; Felder, Christian C

    2017-01-01

    Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon) that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S). Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine) demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  14. Muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol tetrakisphosphate response in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanborn, B.B.; Schneider, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP 3 ), a product of the phosphoinositide cycle, mobilizes intracellular Ca 2+ in many cell types. New evidence suggests that inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP 4 ), an IP 3 derivative, may act as another second messenger to further alter calcium homeostasis. However, the function and mechanism of action of IP 4 are presently unresolved. We now report evidence of muscarinic receptor-mediated accumulation of IP 4 in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, a classic neurosecretory system in which calcium movements have been well studied. Muscarine stimulated an increase in [ 3 H]IP 4 and [ 3 H]IP 3 accumulation in chromaffin cells and this effect was completely blocked by atropine. [ 3 H]IP 4 accumulation was detectable within 15 sec, increased to a maximum by 30 sec and thereafter declined. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an inhibitor of IP 3 and IP 4 hydrolysis, enhanced accumulation of these inositol polyphosphates. The results provide the first evidence of a rapid inositol tetrakisphosphate response in adrenal chromaffin cells, which should facilitate the future resolution of the relationship between IP 4 and calcium homeostasis

  15. Voltage affects the dissociation rate constant of the m2 muscarinic receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Ben Chaim

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs comprise the largest protein family and mediate the vast majority of signal transduction processes in the body. Until recently GPCRs were not considered to be voltage dependent. Newly it was shown for several GPCRs that the first step in GPCR activation, the binding of agonist to the receptor, is voltage sensitive: Voltage shifts the receptor between two states that differ in their binding affinity. Here we show that this shift involves the rate constant of dissociation. We used the m2 muscarinic receptor (m2R a prototypical GPCR and measured directly the dissociation of [(3H]ACh from m2R expressed Xenopus oocytes. We show, for the first time, that the voltage dependent change in affinity is implemented by voltage shifting the receptor between two states that differ in their rate constant of dissociation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that suggest that the above shift is achieved by voltage regulating the coupling of the GPCR to its G protein.

  16. Identification of four areas each enriched in a unique muscarinic receptor subtype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoss, W.; Ellerbrock, B.R.; Goldman, P.S.; Collins, D.A.; Messer, W.S. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The affinities of muscarinic agonists and antagonists were determined by autoradiography and image analysis in selected areas of the rat brain. IC 50 values and Hill coefficients for the inhibition of the binding of 0.2 nM [ 3 H]-QNB to dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, rhomboid thalamus and substantia nigra were measured in coronal sections. Pirenzepine displayed a high affinity for receptors in the dentate gyrus and AF-DX 116, the superior colliculus. Both pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 had high affinities for the substantia nigra and low affinities for the rhomboid thalamus. Gallamine displayed a 50-fold preference for superior colliculus over dentate gyrus receptors. Amitriptyline was less selective, showing a modest preference for substantia nigra receptors and 4-DAMP was essentially nonselective. Carbachol was the most selective agonist with a 4000-fold preference for superior colliculus over dentate gyrus receptors. Other agonists except RS 86 were also selective for superior colliculus receptors in the order carbachol >> arecoline > bethanechol > McN A343 = oxotremorine = pilocarpine

  17. Constitutive inhibitory action of muscarinic receptors on adenylyl cyclase in cardiac membranes and its stereospecific suppression by hyoscyamine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčný, Jan; Gualtieri, F.; Tuček, Stanislav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2002), s. 131-137 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011910; GA ČR GA309/99/0214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * adenylyl cyclase * constitutive activity of receptors Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 0.984, year: 2002

  18. Molecular basis of the functional heterogeneity of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numa, S.; Fukuda, K.; Kubo, T.; Maeda, A.; Akiba, I.; Bujo, H.; Nakai, J.; Mishina, M.; Higashida, H.

    1988-01-01

    The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) mediates a variety of cellular responses, including inhibition of adenylate cyclase, breakdown of phosphoinositides, and modulation of potassium channels, through the action of guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins). The question then arises as to whether multiple mAChR species exist that are responsible for the various biochemical and physiological effects. In fact, pharmacologically distinguishable forms of the mAChR occur in different tissues and have been provisionally classified into M 1 (I), M 2 cardiac (II), and M 2 glandular (III) subtypes on the basis of their difference in apparent affinity for antagonists. Here, the authors have made attempts to understand the molecular basis of the functional heterogeneity of the mAChR, using recombinant DNA technology

  19. Changes in acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptors in rat hippocampus under cold stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatranska, M.; Budai, D.; Gulya, K; Kvetnansky, R.

    1989-01-01

    The aim was to study the mechanism of the previously established decrease in acetylcholine (ACh) concentration in the rat hippocampus under cold stress. Male rats were exposed for 14 days to cold (5 degree C) or kept (controls) at room temperature (24 degree C). Acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptor binding were investigated in the hippocampus. Cold exposure resulted in a decrease of ACh concentration in the dorsal hippocampus. Moreover, the potassium-evoked release of ACh from hippocampal slices was increased and an increase of maximal binding capacity of [ 3 H](-) quinuclidinyl benzilate in the dorsal hippocampus of cold exposed animals was also observed. Thus the decrease of hippocampal ACh concentration under cold exposure is probably due to its increased release. On balance then, our results demonstrate that cold stress in the rat induces significant activation of the hippocampal cholinergic system

  20. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large and ancient superfamily of membraneproteins responsible for the transduction of extracellular signals to the inside of the cells. In thisPh.D. thesis, Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) was used as a model organism to investigate a numberof topics...... is a newly discovered insect peptide hormone. The function of this novel peptide hasnot been well characterised. In this Ph.D. thesis, I identified CCHamide-2 peptides in endocrinecells of the gut and neurones of the brain of larvae and endocrine cells of the gut of adultDrosophila. Behavioural assays...... little is known about muscarinic acetylcholine receptorsignalling in insects. In this study, I found that two types of mAChRs occur in D. melanogaster, onecoupling to Gq (A-type) and the other to Gi (B-type). Both A- and B-type Dm-mAChRs can beactivated by acetylcholine (ACh), but the classical...

  1. Bile acid-induced arrhythmia is mediated by muscarinic M2 receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti H Sheikh Abdul Kadir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a common disease affecting up to 5% of pregnancies and which can cause fetal arrhythmia and sudden intrauterine death. We previously demonstrated that bile acid taurocholate (TC, which is raised in the bloodstream of ICP, can acutely alter the rate and rhythm of contraction and induce abnormal calcium destabilization in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM. Apart from their hepatic functions bile acids are ubiquitous signalling molecules with diverse systemic effects mediated by either the nuclear receptor FXR or by a recently discovered G-protein coupled receptor TGR5. We aim to investigate the mechanism of bile-acid induced arrhythmogenic effects in an in-vitro model of the fetal heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: Levels of bile acid transporters and nuclear receptor FXR were studied by quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunostaining, which showed low levels of expression. We did not observe functional involvement of the canonical receptors FXR and TGR5. Instead, we found that TC binds to the muscarinic M(2 receptor in NRCM and serves as a partial agonist of this receptor in terms of inhibitory effect on intracellular cAMP and negative chronotropic response. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA-knockdown of the M(2 receptor completely abolished the negative effect of TC on contraction, calcium transient amplitude and synchronisation in NRCM clusters. CONCLUSION: We conclude that in NRCM the TC-induced arrhythmia is mediated by the partial agonism at the M(2 receptor. This mechanism might serve as a promising new therapeutic target for fetal arrhythmia.

  2. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype expression in avian vestibular hair cells, nerve terminals and ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G Q; Kevetter, G A; Leonard, R B; Prusak, D J; Wood, T G; Correia, M J

    2007-04-25

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are widely expressed in the CNS and peripheral nervous system and play an important role in modulating the cell activity and function. We have shown that the cholinergic agonist carbachol reduces the pigeon's inwardly rectifying potassium channel (pKir2.1) ionic currents in native vestibular hair cells. We have cloned and sequenced pigeon mAChR subtypes M2-M5 and we have studied the expression of all five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) in the pigeon vestibular end organs (semicircular canal ampullary cristae and utricular maculae), vestibular nerve fibers and the vestibular (Scarpa's) ganglion using tissue immunohistochemistry (IH), dissociated single cell immunocytochemistry (IC) and Western blotting (WB). We found that vestibular hair cells, nerve fibers and ganglion cells each expressed all five (M1-M5) mAChR subtypes. Two of the three odd-numbered mAChRs (M1, M5) were present on the hair cell cilia, supporting cells and nerve terminals. And all three odd numbered mAChRs (M1, M3 and M5) were expressed on cuticular plates, myelin sheaths and Schwann cells. Even-numbered mAChRs were seen on the nerve terminals. M2 was also shown on the cuticular plates and supporting cells. Vestibular efferent fibers and terminals were not identified in our studies. Results from WB of the dissociated vestibular epithelia, nerve fibers and vestibular ganglia were consistent with the results from IH and IC. Our findings suggest that there is considerable co-expression of the subtypes on the neural elements of the labyrinth. Further electrophysiological and pharmacological studies should delineate the mechanisms of action of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on structures in the labyrinth.

  3. Galantamine improves apomorphine-induced deficits in prepulse inhibition via muscarinic ACh receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, K; Koda, K; Ago, Y; Kobayashi, H; Kawasaki, T; Takuma, K; Matsuda, T

    2009-01-01

    Galantamine, a weak acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor and allosteric potentiator of nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs), improves apomorphine-induced deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI), sensory information-processing deficits, via a nAChR-independent mechanism. The present study examined the role of muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) in the effect of galantamine, and studied the mechanism of galantamine-induced increases in prefrontal ACh levels in mice. Apomorphine (1 mg kg(-1)) was administered to male ddY mice (9-10 weeks old) to create a PPI deficit model. Extracellular ACh concentrations in the prefrontal cortex were measured by in vivo microdialysis. Galantamine- and donepezil-mediated improvements in apomorphine-induced PPI deficits were blocked by the preferential M(1) mAChR antagonist telenzepine. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine also improved apomorphine-induced PPI deficits. Galantamine, like donepezil, increased extracellular ACh concentrations in the prefrontal cortex. Galantamine-induced increases in prefrontal ACh levels were partially blocked by the dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist SCH23390, but not by antagonists of mAChRs (telenzepine) and nAChRs (mecamylamine). Galantamine increased dopamine, but not 5-HT, release in the prefrontal cortex. Galantamine improves apomorphine-induced PPI deficits by stimulating mAChRs through increasing brain ACh levels via a dopamine D(1) receptor-dependent mechanism and AChE inhibition.

  4. Gene expression of muscarinic, tachykinin and purinergic receptors in porcine bladder: comparison with cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough eBahadory

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial cells, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells are important cell types contributing to bladder function. Multiple receptors including muscarinic (M3/M5, tachykinin (NK1/NK2 and purinergic (P2X1/P2Y6 receptors are involved in bladder motor and sensory actions. Using female pig bladder, our aim was to differentiate between various cell types in bladder by genetic markers. We compared the molecular expression pattern between the fresh tissue layers and their cultured cell counterparts. We also examined responses to agonists for these receptors in cultured cells. Urothelial, suburothelial (myofibroblasts and smooth muscle cells isolated from pig bladder were cultured (10-14 days and identified by marker antibodies. Gene (mRNA expression level was demonstrated by real-time PCR. The receptor expression pattern was very similar between suburothelium and detrusor, and higher than urothelium. The gene expression of all receptors decreased in culture compared with the fresh tissue, although the reduction in cultured urothelial cells appeared less significant compared to suburothelial and detrusor cells. Cultured myofibroblasts and detrusor cells did not contract in response to the agonists acetylcholine, neurokinin A and β,γ-MeATP, up to concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. The significant reduction of M3, NK2 and P2X1 receptors under culture conditions may be associated with the unresponsiveness of cultured suburothelial and detrusor cells to their respective agonists. These results suggest that under culture conditions, bladder cells lose the receptors that are involved in contraction, as this function is no longer required. The study provides further evidence that cultured cells do not necessarily mimic the actions exerted by intact tissues.

  5. Cyclic stretch induces human bladder smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro through muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yi; Tian, Ye; Luo, De-Yi; Wazir, Romel; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether the cyclic stretch‑induced proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) is mediated by muscarinic (M) receptors, together with the signal transduction mechanisms involved in this process. HBSMCs seeded onto silicone membranes were subjected to different cyclic stretches (5, 10, 15 and 20%) for 6 and 12 h. As the effect of cyclic stretch on M2 and M3 mRNA expression levels was maximal at 6 h 10% stretch, all subsequent experiments were performed at this stretch. Western blot analysis was used to quantify M2, M3, protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphorylated (p)‑PKC protein expression levels, flow cytometry was employed to examine cell cycle distribution and a 5-bromo‑2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay was used to assess cell proliferation at this stretch. Subsequently, HBSMCs were exposed to different acetylcholine concentrations and/or cyclic stretch, M receptor antagonists [AF-DX16, an M2 receptor antagonist; 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP), an M3 receptor antagonist and atropine, a non‑selective antagonist] and GF 109203X, a PKC antagonist, to assess the possible underlying signaling mechanisms. Cyclic stretch was found to increase the proliferation of HBSMCs and the expression levels of M2, M3, PKC and p‑PKC proteins. M receptor and PKC antagonists exerted no apparent effect on nonstretched cells, but reduced the incorporation of BrdU into stretched cells; the most pronounced effects were observed when non‑selective M receptor and PKC antagonists were applied. Notably, 4‑DAMP did not inhibit stretch‑induced PKC activation. These results indicate that the activation of the M3 receptor signaling pathway in stretch‑induced HBSMC proliferation occurs via PKC-independent mechanisms.

  6. Noninvasive quantification of muscarinic receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography in the dog heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delforge, J.; Janier, M.; Syrota, A.; Crouzel, C.; Vallois, J.M.; Cayla, J.; Lancon, J.P.; Mazoyer, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    The in vivo quantification of myocardial muscarinic receptors has been obtained in six closed-chest dogs by using positron emission tomography. The dogs were injected with a trace amount of 11C-labeled methylquinuclidinyl benzilate (MQNB), a nonmetabolized antagonist of the muscarinic receptor. This was followed 30 minutes later by an injection of an excess of unlabeled MQNB (displacement experiment). Two additional injections of unlabeled MQNB with [11C]MQNB and without [11C]MQNB (second displacement experiment) were administered after 70 and 120 minutes, respectively. This protocol allowed a separate evaluation of the quantity of available receptors (B'max) as well as the association and dissociation rate constants (k+1 and k-1) in each dog. The parameters were calculated by using a nonlinear mathematical model in regions of interest over the left ventricle and the interventricular septum. The average value of B'max was 42 +/- 11 pmol/ml tissue, the rate constants k+1, k-1, and Kd were 0.6 +/- 0.1 ml.pmol-1.min-1, 0.27 +/- 0.03 ml.pmol-1.min-1, and 0.49 +/- 0.14 pmol.ml-1, respectively, taking into account the MQNB reaction volume estimated to 0.15 ml/ml tissue. Although [11C]MQNB binding would appear irreversible, our findings indicate that the association of the antagonist is very rapid and that the dissociation is far from negligible. The dissociated ligand, however, has a high probability of rebinding to a free receptor site instead of escaping into the microcirculation. We deduce that the positron emission tomographic images obtained after injecting a trace amount of [11C]MQNB are more representative of blood flow than of receptor density or affinity. We also suggest a simplified protocol consisting of a tracer injection of [11C]MQNB and a second injection of an excess of cold MQNB, which is sufficient to measure B'max and Kd in humans

  7. Direct actions of organophosphate anticholinesterases on nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakry, N.M.; el-Rashidy, A.H.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Four nerve agents and one therapeutic organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterase (anti-ChE) bind to acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, inhibit or modulate binding of radioactive ligands to these receptors, and modify events regulated by them. The affinity of nicotinic (n) ACh receptors of Torpedo electric organs and most muscarinic (m) ACh receptors of rat brain and N1E-115 neuroblastoma cultures for the OP compounds was usually two to three orders of magnitude lower than concentrations required to inhibit 50% (IC-50) of ACh-esterase activity. However, a small population of m-ACh receptors had an affinity as high as that of ACh-esterase for the OP compound. This population is identified by its high-affinity [3H]-cis-methyldioxolane ([3H]-CD) binding. Although sarin, soman, and tabun had no effect, (O-ethyl S[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl)] methyl phosphonothionate (VX) and echothiophate inhibited competitively the binding of [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB) and [3H]-pirenzepine ([3H]-PZ) to m-ACh receptors. However, VX was more potent than echothiophate in inhibiting this binding and 50-fold more potent in inhibiting carbamylcholine (carb)-stimulated [3H]-cGMP synthesis in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells--both acting as m receptor antagonist. All five OPs inhibited [3H]-CD binding, with IC-50s of 3, 10, 40, 100, and 800 nM for VX, soman, sarin, echothiophate, and tabun, respectively. The OP anticholinesterases also bound to allosteric sites on the n-ACh receptor (identified by inhibition of [3H]-phencyclidine binding), but some bound as well to the receptor's recognition site (identified by inhibition of [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin binding). Soman and echothiophate in micromolar concentrations acted as partial agonists of the n-ACh receptor and induced receptor desensitization. On the other hand, VX acted as an open channel blocker of the activated receptor and also enhanced receptor desensitization

  8. LONG-TERM CHOLINERGIC DENERVATION CAUSED BY EARLY POSTNATAL AF64A LESION PREVENTS DEVELOPMENT OF MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS IN RAT HIPPOCAMPUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUITEN, PGM; VANDERZEE, EA; GASPAR, E; BUWALDA, B; STROSBERG, AD; NYAKAS, C

    1992-01-01

    The effect of early postnatal (day 8) intracerebroventricular injections of the putative cholinotoxin ethylcholine aziridinium mustard (AF64A) on development of cholinergic innervation and post-synaptic muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the rat hippocampus was examined. The cholinotoxin applied

  9. Unraveling a molecular determinant for clathrin-independent internalization of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Min; Zhang, Wenhua; Tian, Yangli; Xu, Chanjuan; Xu, Tao; Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Rongying

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis and postendocytic sorting of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important for the regulation of both their cell surface density and signaling profile. Unlike the mechanisms of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE), the mechanisms underlying the control of GPCR signaling by clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) remain largely unknown. Among the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), the M4 mAChR undergoes CDE and recycling, whereas the M2 mAChR is internalized through CIE and targeted to lysosomes. Here we investigated the endocytosis and postendocytic trafficking of M2 mAChR based on a comparative analysis of the third cytoplasmic domain in M2 and M4 mAChRs. For the first time, we identified that the sequence 374KKKPPPS380 servers as a sorting signal for the clathrin-independent internalization of M2 mAChR. Switching 374KKKPPPS380 to the i3 loop of the M4 mAChR shifted the receptor into lysosomes through the CIE pathway; and therefore away from CDE and recycling. We also found another previously unidentified sequence that guides CDE of the M2 mAChR, 361VARKIVKMTKQPA373, which is normally masked in the presence of the downstream sequence 374KKKPPPS380. Taken together, our data indicate that endocytosis and postendocytic sorting of GPCRs that undergo CIE could be sequence-dependent. PMID:26094760

  10. Exploring the binding site of the human muscarinic M3 receptor: Homology modeling and docking study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostopovici, Liliana; Mracec, Maria; Mracec, Mircea; Borota, Ana

    The human muscarinic M3 receptor (hM3) and its interactions with selective agonists and antagonists were investigated by means of combined homology and docking approach. Also, two pharmacophoric models for the hM3 agonist and antagonist binding sites were proposed. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of hM3 receptor was modeled based on the high-resolution X-ray structure of bovine rhodopsin from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). To validate the reliability of the model obtained, the main chain torsion angles phi (?) and psi (?) were examined in a Ramachandran plot, and all omega angles were measured for peptidic bond planarity. The characteristics of the active site, the position, and the orientation of ligands in situ, as well as the binding modes of the representative agonists and antagonists, were analyzed by applying a molecular docking technique using the AutoDock 3.0.5 program. Specific interactions responsible for recognition of the hM3 receptor, like ionic bond formed between protonated amine of the ligands and the Asp3.6 side chain were identified. Structure-reactivity relationships have been explained by analyzing the 3D structure of the hM3 model and the ligand conformations resulted from molecular docking simulation.

  11. Annulated heterocyclic bioisosteres of norarecoline. Synthesis and molecular pharmacology at five recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1995-01-01

    A series of O-alkylated analogs of 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-isoxazolo[4,5-c]azepin-3-ol (THAO) were synthesized and characterized as ligands for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). O-Methyl-THAO (4a), O-ethyl-THAO (4b), O-isopropyl-THAO (4c), and O-propargyl-THAO (4d) were shown to be potent...... inhibitors of the binding of tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB), pirenzepine (PZ), and oxotremorine-M (Oxo-M) to tissue membrane preparations. In the [3H]-Oxo-M binding assay, receptor affinities in the low nanomolar range were measured for 4a (IC50 = 0.010 microM), 4b (IC50 = 0.003 microM), 4c (IC50...... = 0.011 microM), and 4d (IC50 = 0.0008 microM). Pharmacological effects (EC50 or Ki values) and intrinsic activities (per cent of maximal carbachol responses) were determined using five recombinant human mAChRs (m1-m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R...

  12. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Archundia, Marlet; Cordomi, Arnau; Garriga, Pere; Perez, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS). Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand. PMID:22500107

  13. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlet Martinez-Archundia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS. Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand.

  14. Functional cross-talk between endothelial muscarinic and α2-adrenergic receptors in rabbit cerebral arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorin, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Interactions between two classes of receptors have been observed in several cell lines and preparations. The aim of this work was to assess the impact of simultaneous stimulation of endothelial muscarinic and α2-adrenergic receptors (α2-AR) on vascular reactivity.Rabbit middle cerebral arteries were isolated and changes in isometric tension were recorded in the presence of indomethacin.Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase with Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 100 μmol l−1) revealed α-AR-dependent contractions. Pre-addition of acetylcholine (ACH, 1 μmol l−1) augmented oxymetazoline (OXY, 10 μmol l−1, α2-AR agonist)-, but decreased phenylephrine (PE, 10 μmol l−1, α1-AR agonist)-induced contraction (P<0.05). The effects of ACH were endothelium-dependent.Vessels were precontracted with 40 mmol l−1 KCl-physiological salt solution (PSS) in the absence of L-NOARG, or PE or OXY in the presence of L-NOARG. In the presence of high external K+ or PE, ACH induced a potent relaxation (P<0.05). In the presence of OXY, however, ACH mediated contraction (P<0.05).After pertussis toxin (PTX, inactivator of Gαi/o proteins) pre-treatment, α2-AR-dependent contractions were abolished. Forty mmol l−1 KCl-PSS induced contraction was not altered by PTX whereas ACH-induced relaxation was augmented (P<0.05).To investigate if endothelin-1 (ET-1) intervened in the endothelium-dependent contractile response to ACH in the presence of OXY-dependent tone, vessels were incubated in the presence of BQ123 (1 μmol l−1), an ETA receptor antagonist. OXY-mediated tone was not affected by BQ123; however, ACH-induced contraction was reversed to a relaxation (P<0.05).These data indicate that activation of endothelial α2-AR triggers an endothelium-dependent, ET-1 mediated, contraction to ACH. This suggests that activation of α2-AR affects muscarinic receptor/G protein coupling leading to an opposite biological effect. PMID:9863646

  15. Engineering of three-finger fold toxins creates ligands with original pharmacological profiles for muscarinic and adrenergic receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Fruchart-Gaillard

    Full Text Available Protein engineering approaches are often a combination of rational design and directed evolution using display technologies. Here, we test "loop grafting," a rational design method, on three-finger fold proteins. These small reticulated proteins have exceptional affinity and specificity for their diverse molecular targets, display protease-resistance, and are highly stable and poorly immunogenic. The wealth of structural knowledge makes them good candidates for protein engineering of new functionality. Our goal is to enhance the efficacy of these mini-proteins by modifying their pharmacological properties in order to extend their use in imaging, diagnostics and therapeutic applications. Using the interaction of three-finger fold toxins with muscarinic and adrenergic receptors as a model, chimeric toxins have been engineered by substituting loops on toxin MT7 by those from toxin MT1. The pharmacological impact of these grafts was examined using binding experiments on muscarinic receptors M1 and M4 and on the α(1A-adrenoceptor. Some of the designed chimeric proteins have impressive gain of function on certain receptor subtypes achieving an original selectivity profile with high affinity for muscarinic receptor M1 and α(1A-adrenoceptor. Structure-function analysis supported by crystallographic data for MT1 and two chimeras permits a molecular based interpretation of these gains and details the merits of this protein engineering technique. The results obtained shed light on how loop permutation can be used to design new three-finger proteins with original pharmacological profiles.

  16. Effects of stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in medial septum on some immune responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Goutam; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2016-04-21

    Though the immunomodulatory role of medial septum (MS) has been indicated, but the contribution of the muscarinic acetylcholine (mAch) receptors presented in the internal network of the neurons of MS in this regard is not known. The aim of the present study is to assess the contribution of mAch receptors of MS on some immunological parameters. Different immunological parameters i.e. phagocytic activity of peripheral leukocytes, adhesibility and cytotoxicity of splenic mononuclear cells (MNC), delayed type of hypersensitivity (DTH) responses, Total Count (TC) and Differential Count (DC) of WBC with serum corticosterone (CORT) concentration have been measured after stimulation and blocking of mAch receptors of MS in rats. Ach or atropine has been micro infused into MS of separate groups of rats for stimulating or blocking of the mAch receptors respectively. In Ach or atropine microinfused rats, the TC of WBC remained unaltered in the present study. The percentage of neutrophil has increased and the percentage of lymphocyte has decreased in Ach microinfused rats, but these parameters remain unaltered in atropine microinfused rats. The observed immunological parameters have increased after microinfusion of 0.60μM and 0.12μM of Ach and serum CORT concentration has decreased in those animals. These immunological parameters have decreased and serum CORT has increased after microinfusion of atropine (2 and 4mM) in MS of rats. It appears that the Ach receptors in MS can modulate the observed immunological parameters, and serum CORT plays an important role for these immune changes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Xanomeline quasi-irreversibly bound to an ectopic site can stimulate presynaptic M2 receptors via the orthosteric binding site

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. S2 (2005), s. 90-90 ISSN 0022-3042. [Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Neurochemistry and the European Society for Neurochemistry /20./. 21.08.2005-26.08.2005, Innsbruck] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011206; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : xanomeline * presynaptic M2 receptor * acetylcholine release * brain cortex * wash-resistant binding Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  18. Identification of muscarinic receptor subtypes in RINm5F cells by means of polymerase chain reaction, subcloning, and DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S H; Sharp, G W

    1997-09-01

    Carbachol can stimulate insulin release in RINm5F cells by a mechanism that does not involve the elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations or the activation of conventional protein kinase Cs (Mol Pharmacol 47:863-870, 1995). Thus, a novel signal transduction pathway links the muscarinic activation of the cells to increased insulin secretion. The question arises as to whether the pathway results from a novel receptor, different from the five established muscarinic receptors, or whether a "normal" receptor in the RINm5F cell activates a novel pathway. To distinguish between these two possibilities, the muscarinic receptors in the RINm5F cell were identified. Using polymerase chain reaction, combined with subcloning and DNA sequencing techniques, the cDNAs that encode the established M3 and M4 receptors were identified. The cDNAs for the Ml, M2, and M5 receptors were not found. Pharmacological studies showed a rank order of potency for muscarinic receptor subtype antagonists to inhibit carbachol-induced insulin release (half-maximal inhibitory concentration [pIC50] values given in parentheses): atropine (nonselective, 9.0) > 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methyl piperidine methiodide (M3/M1, 8.6) > para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladiphenidol (M3, 8.1) > hexahydrosiladiphenidol (M3, 8.0) > tropicamide (M4, 6.4) > pirenzepine (M1, 6.1) > methoctramine (M2, 5.9). This antagonist profile suggests that it is the M3 receptor that mediates carbachol-induced insulin release. In this case, the novel signaling involved in the unusual carbachol response would not be due to a novel receptor but to the well-characterized M3 receptor. It appears, therefore, that the novel portion of the signaling pathway lies downstream of the M3 receptor and may consist of products of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis, other than inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol, resulting from the activation of phospholipase C. While a contributory role of the M4 receptor cannot be ruled out, there is no evidence in

  19. A Subpopulation of Neuronal M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Plays a Critical Role in Modulating Dopamine-Dependent Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wortwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P. D.; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A.; Levey, Allan I.; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M1–M5 mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M4 mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M4 mAChRs are coexpressed with D1 dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M4 mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we use...

  20. Determinants of positive cooperativity between strychnine-like allosteric modulators and N-methylscopolamine at muscarinic receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1-2 (2006), s. 111-112 ISSN 0895-8696 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * strychnine -like allosteric modulators * cooperativity Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.965, year: 2006

  1. Enhancement of glycine release from human brain cortex synaptosomes by acetylcholine acting at M4 muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, C; Marchi, M; Andrioli, G C; Cavazzani, P; Raiteri, M

    1993-07-01

    Synaptosomes prepared from fresh specimens of human cerebral cortex were labeled with [3H]glycine ([3H]Gly) and distributed in parallel superfusion chambers. Exposure to 15 mM KCl evoked a tritium overflow which was largely prevented by 10 mM Mg++, suggesting a consistent component of Ca(++)-dependent [3H]Gly release. Acetylcholine (ACh; 1-100 microM), added during K(+)-depolarization, increased the release of tritium in a concentration-dependent manner (maximal effect, 60%; EC50 = 7 microM). Oxotremorine (1-100 microM) mimicked ACh. The effect of 10 microM ACh was insensitive to the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (100 microM), but it was blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine (0.1 microM). Three muscarinic receptor antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-[12-[diethylamino-methyl]-1-piperidinyl]acetyl-5-11-dihydro -6H-pyrido-[2-3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one) and himbacine, endowed with relative selectivity for various muscarinic receptor subtypes, prevented with differential affinities the effect of 10 microM ACh. Himbacine was the most potent antagonist of ACh, its pA2 (8.34) being 20- or 50-fold higher than that of pirenzepine (7.27) or AF-DX 116 (6.65). It is concluded that: 1) ACh can increase the release of Gly in human cerebral cortex; 2) the interaction occurs through muscarinic receptors which resemble most the M4 subtype; and 3) considering that Gly is required to activate the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor, the ACh-evoked Gly release may represent a linkage between cholinergic and glutamatergic transmission, two systems strongly implicated in cognitive processes.

  2. Deletion of muscarinic type 1 acetylcholine receptors alters splenic lymphocyte functions and splenic noradrenaline concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainke, Susanne; Wildmann, Johannes; Del Rey, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    The existence of interactions between the immune and the sympathetic nervous systems is well established. Noradrenaline can promote or inhibit the immune response, and conversely, the immune response itself can affect noradrenaline concentration in lymphoid organs, such as the spleen. It is also well known that acetylcholine released by pre-ganglionic neurons can modulate noradrenaline release by the postsynaptic neuron. The spleen does not receive cholinergic innervation, but it has been reported that lymphocytes themselves can produce acetylcholine, and express acetylcholine receptors and acetylcholinesterase. We found that the spleen of not overtly immunized mice in which muscarinic type 1 acetylcholine receptors have been knocked out (M1KO) has higher noradrenaline concentrations than that of the wildtype mice, without comparable alterations in the heart, in parallel to a decreased number of IgG-producing B cells. Splenic lymphocytes from M1KO mice displayed increased in vitro-induced cytotoxicity, and this was observed only when CD4(+) T cells were present. In contrast, heterozygous acetylcholinesterase (AChE+/-) mice, had no alterations in splenic noradrenaline concentration, but the in vitro proliferation of AChE+/- CD4(+) T cells was increased. It is theoretically conceivable that reciprocal effects between neuronally and non-neuronally derived acetylcholine and noradrenaline might contribute to the results reported. Our results emphasize the need to consider the balance between the effects of these mediators for the final immunoregulatory outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Drugs Interfering with Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Their Effects on Place Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Svoboda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs have been found to regulate many diverse functions, ranging from motivation and feeding to spatial navigation, an important and widely studied type of cognitive behavior. Systemic administration of non-selective antagonists of mAChRs, such as scopolamine or atropine, have been found to have adverse effects on a vast majority of place navigation tasks. However, many of these results may be potentially confounded by disruptions of functions other than spatial learning and memory. Although studies with selective antimuscarinics point to mutually opposite effects of M1 and M2 receptors, their particular contribution to spatial cognition is still poorly understood, partly due to a lack of truly selective agents. Furthermore, constitutive knock-outs do not always support results from selective antagonists. For modeling impaired spatial cognition, the scopolamine-induced amnesia model still maintains some limited validity, but there is an apparent need for more targeted approaches such as local intracerebral administration of antagonists, as well as novel techniques such as optogenetics focused on cholinergic neurons and chemogenetics aimed at cells expressing metabotropic mAChRs.

  4. Characterization of muscarinic and P2X receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle of the rat bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogoda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic and purinergic (P2X receptors play critical roles in bladder urothelium under physiological and pathological conditions. Aim of present study was to characterize these receptors in rat bladder urothelium and detrusor muscle using selective radioligands of [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride ([3H]NMS and αβ-methylene ATP [2,8-3H]tetrasodium salt ([3H]αβ-MeATP. Similar binding parameters for each radioligand were observed in urothelium and detrusor muscle. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl-4-piperidinyl diphenylacetate (4-DAMP mustard mustard revealed co-existence of M2 and M3 receptors, with the number of M2 receptors being larger in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. Intravesical administration of imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O (active metabolite of propiverine displayed significant binding of muscarinic receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. The treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYP or resiniferatoxin (RTX resulted in a significant decrease in maximal number of binding sites (Bmax for [3H]NMS and/or [3H]αβ-MeATP in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. These results demonstrated that 1 pharmacological characteristics of muscarinic and P2X receptors in rat bladder urothelium were similar to those in the detrusor muscle, 2 that densities of these receptors were significantly altered by pretreatments with CYP and RTX, and 3 that these receptors may be pharmacologically affected by imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O which are excreted in the urine.

  5. Age-related effects of chlorpyrifos on muscarinic receptor-mediated signaling in rat cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hengshan; Liu, Jing; Pope, Carey N

    2002-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorus pesticide. Earlier work from our laboratory and others has demonstrated that the sensitivity to CPF exposure changes markedly during maturation. A number of studies suggest that in addition to inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE), CPF oxon may also interact directly with m2 and/or m4 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). In the present study, we investigated the in vivo effects of CPF exposure on phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and cAMP formation, second-messenger systems coupled to m1, m3 and m5 (PI hydrolysis) or m2 and m4 (cAMP formation) mAChRs. Neonatal (7-day), juvenile (21-day) and adult (90-day) rats were treated with either peanut oil s.c. or CPF s.c. at 0.3x or 1x the maximum tolerated dosage (MTD: 45, 127 and 279 mg/kg for 7-day, 21-day and 90-day rats, respectively). Neurochemical end-points including AChE activity, muscarinic receptor ([3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate, and [3H]oxotremorine) binding, PI hydrolysis, and cAMP formation in cortex were evaluated at 4 h, 24 h, or 96 h after treatment. Under these conditions, relatively similar maximal degrees of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition were noted, but times to peak inhibition varied among these age groups (24 h in neonates and juveniles, 96 h in adults). Total muscarinic receptor (QNB) binding was reduced in all three age groups with 1x MTD exposure, at both 24 h and 96 h in neonates and juveniles, but only at 96 h in adults. Oxotremorine binding was also reduced at 96 h after MTD exposure in all three age groups. Neither basal nor carbachol-stimulated IP accumulation was affected in any age group or at any time point following CPF exposure. In contrast, basal cAMP formation was significantly increased by MTD exposure in all three age groups 4 h after exposure, and at 4 h, 24 h, and 96 h after exposure in juveniles. Forskolin/Mn2+-stimulated cAMP formation was increased in neonates and juveniles at 96 h, and in juveniles also at 24

  6. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists in the VTA and RMTg have opposite effects on morphine-induced locomotion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidl, Stephan; Dhillon, Ekamjeet S; Sharma, Natasha; Ludwig, Jessica

    2017-04-14

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) each contribute to opiate reward and each receive inputs from the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, the two principle brainstem cholinergic cell groups. We compared the contributions of VTA or RMTg muscarinic cholinergic receptors to locomotion induced by morphine infusions into the same sites. VTA co-infusion of atropine completely blocked VTA morphine-induced locomotion providing additional support for the important role of VTA muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the stimulant effects of opiates. By contrast, RMTg co-infusion of atropine increased RMTg morphine-induced locomotion. Furthermore, RMTg co-infusion of the M3-selective antagonist 4-DAMP, but not the M4-selective antagonist Tropicamide, strongly increased RMTg morphine-induced locomotion. RMTg infusions of 4-DAMP, but not of Tropicamide, by themselves strongly increased drug-free locomotion. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the RMTg thus also contribute to the stimulant effects of morphine, but in a way opposite to those in VTA. We suggest that the net effect of endogenous cholinergic input to the RMTg on drug-free and on RMTg morphine-induced locomotion is inhibitory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Loss of muscarinic and purinergic receptors in urinary bladder of rats with hydrochloric acid-induced cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akira; Kageyama, Aiko; Fujino, Tomomi; Nozawa, Yoshihisa; Yamada, Shizuo

    2010-10-01

    To clarify the basic mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of cystitis by characterizing the urodynamic parameters, pharmacologically relevant (muscarinic and purinergic) receptors, and the in vivo release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the bladder of hydrochloric acid (HCl)-treated rats. The muscarinic and purinergic receptors in rat tissue were measured by radioreceptor assays using (N-methyl-³H) scopolamine methyl chloride ([³H]NMS) and αβ-methylene-ATP (2,8-³H) tetrasodium salt ([³H]αβ-MeATP), respectively. The urodynamic parameters and ATP levels were measured using a cystometric method and the luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. In the HCl-treated rats, the micturition interval and micturition volume were significantly (48% and 55%, respectively, P acid tetrasodium, and MRS2273 was significantly (5.5, 11, and 7.6-fold, respectively, P <.001) increased. Furthermore, the in vivo release of ATP was significantly (P <.05) enhanced in the HCl-treated rat bladder. Both muscarinic and purinergic mechanisms might be, at least in part, associated with the urinary dysfunction due to cystitis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Topographical distribution of decrements and recovery in muscarinic receptors from rat brains repeatedly exposed to sublethal doses of soman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, L.; Pazdernik, T.L.; Jackson, J.L.; Nelson, S.R.; Samson, F.E.; McDonough, J.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    [3H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to rat brain muscarinic receptors decreased after repeated exposure to soman, a potent organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor. The topographical distribution of this decrement was analyzed by quantitative receptor autoradiography. After 4 weeks of soman, three times a week, quinuclidinyl benzilate binding decreased to 67 to 80% of control in frontal and parietal cortex, caudate-putamen, lateral septum, hippocampal body, dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, nucleus of the fifth nerve, and central grey. Minor or no decreases were observed in thalamic or hypothalamic nuclei, reticular formation, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculus, nucleus of the seventh nerve, and cerebellum. Scatchard analyses of saturation curves using frontal cortex sections from soman-treated rats revealed a decrease in maximal quinuclidinyl benzilate binding from that in control rats and a return toward control levels by 24 days without any significant change in affinity. These brain areas showing significant decrements in muscarinic receptors recovered with a similar time course. An estimate of the time for 50% recovery for some of the brain areas was 14 days for superior colliculus, 16 days for cortex, and 19 days for hippocampal body. The application of quantitative receptor autoradiography to analyze receptor alterations has been valuable in localizing the telencephalon as a region more susceptible to change in receptor concentration

  9. A high n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid diet reduces muscarinic M2/M4 receptor binding in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Bois, Teresa Marie; Bell, Warren; Deng, Chao; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of different fat diets on muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding. Nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups and fed a diet of either high saturated fat, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), n-3 PUFA or low fat (control) for 8 weeks. Using quantitative autoradiography, [(3)H]pirenzepine binding to muscarinic M1/M4 receptors and [(3)H]AF-DX384 binding to M2/M4 receptors were measured throughout the brain in all four groups. The main findings were that compared to the low fat control group, M2/M4 receptor binding was significantly reduced in the dorsolateral, dorsomedial and ventromedial parts of the caudate putamen (61-64%, p cortex (59%, p M4 receptor binding densities between the four groups were observed. These results suggest that a diet high in n-6 PUFA, but not of n-3 PUFAs or saturated fat, may selectively alter M2/M4 receptor-mediated signal transduction in the rat brain.

  10. Z-(-,-)-[76Br]BrQNP: a high affinity PET radiotracer for central and cardiac muscarinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strijckmans, V.; Coulon, C.; Loc'h, C.; Maziere, B.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Knapp, F.F.

    1996-01-01

    Racemic E-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl α-(1-bromo-1-1-propen-3-yl)-α -hydroxy-α-phenylacetate (BrQNP) was prepared and evaluated in vivo as a potential candidate for imaging muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptors by Positron Emission Tomography. Initial in vivo blocking studies utilizing Z-(-,-)-[ 125 I]IQNP as a radiolabelled muscarinic probe demonstrated that a preinjection of cold E-BrQNP effectively blocks the uptake of the radiolabelled probe in the brain and heart, by 71% and 86% respectively. Z-(-,-)-[ 76 Br]BrQNP was prepared by electrophilic substitution from a tributylstannyl precursor. Peracetic acid and chloramine T was evaluated as oxidizing agents. After purification by SPE and RP-HPLC, radiolabelling yields of 85% and 95% were obtained with peracetic acid and chloramine T, respectively. The final radiochemical yield was 70% for both oxidizing agents. (author)

  11. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  12. Nicotine effects on muscarinic receptor-mediated free Ca[Formula: see text] level changes in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dawei; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Anbing; Sun, Wenhai; Zhang, Hongmei; Tang, Limin

    2016-06-01

    It was suggested that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca[Formula: see text] levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca[Formula: see text] overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. It is assumed that, following facial nerve injury, the interactions of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in facial nerve nucleus may negatively regulate free Ca[Formula: see text] concentrations in the facial nerve nucleus, which provide important information for the repair and regeneration of the facial nerve. The present study investigated the regulatory effects of nicotine on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion level changes in the facial nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury at 7, 30, and 90 days following facial nerve injury using laser confocal microscopy. The dose-dependent regulation of nicotine on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion level changes in the facial nucleus may decrease the range of free Ca[Formula: see text] increases following facial nerve injury, which is important for nerve cell regeneration. It is concluded that the negative effects of nicotine on muscarinic receptors are related to the [Formula: see text] subtype of nicotinic receptors.

  13. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice show distinct synaptic plasticity impairments in the visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origlia, Nicola; Kuczewski, Nicola; Aztiria, Eugenio; Gautam, Dinesh; Wess, Jürgen; Domenici, Luciano

    2006-01-01

    In the present report, we focused our attention on the role played by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in different forms of long-term synaptic plasticity. Specifically, we investigated long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) expression elicited by theta-burst stimulation (TBS) and low-frequency stimulation (LFS), respectively, in visual cortical slices obtained from different mAChR knockout (KO) mice. A normal LTP was evoked in M1/M3 double KO mice, while LTP was impaired in the M2/M4 double KO animals. On the other hand, LFS induced LTD in M2/M4 double KO mice, but failed to do so in M1/M3 KO mice. Interestingly, LFS produced LTP instead of LTD in M1/M3 KO mice. Analysis of mAChR single KO mice revealed that LTP was affected only by the simultaneous absence of both M2 and M4 receptors. A LFS-dependent shift from LTD to LTP was also observed in slices from M1 KO mice, while LTD was simply abolished in slices from M3 KO mice. Using pharmacological tools, we showed that LTP in control mice was blocked by pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of Gi/o proteins, but not by raising intracellular cAMP levels. In addition, the inhibition of phospholipase C by U73122 induced the same shift from LTD to LTP after LFS observed in M1 single KO and M1/M3 double KO mice. Our results indicate that different mAChR subtypes regulate different forms of long-term synaptic plasticity in the mouse visual cortex, activating specific G proteins and downstream intracellular mechanisms. PMID:17023506

  14. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P D; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A; Levey, Allan I; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas N; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-02-10

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M(1)-M(5) mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M(4) mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M(4) mAChRs are coexpressed with D(1) dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M(4) mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we used Cre/loxP technology to generate mutant mice that lack M(4) mAChRs only in D(1) dopamine receptor-expressing cells. The newly generated mutant mice displayed several striking behavioral phenotypes, including enhanced hyperlocomotor activity and increased behavioral sensitization following treatment with psychostimulants. These behavioral changes were accompanied by a lack of muscarinic inhibition of D(1) dopamine receptor-mediated cAMP stimulation in the striatum and an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens. These novel findings demonstrate that a distinct subpopulation of neuronal M(4) mAChRs plays a critical role in modulating several important dopamine-dependent behaviors. Since enhanced central dopaminergic neurotransmission is a hallmark of several severe disorders of the CNS, including schizophrenia and drug addiction, our findings have substantial clinical relevance.

  15. Muscarinic receptor control of pyramidal neuron membrane potential in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, P; Gawlak, M; Szulczyk, P

    2015-09-10

    Damage to the cholinergic input to the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Cholinergic endings release acetylcholine, which activates nicotinic and/or G-protein-coupled muscarinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors activate transduction systems, which control cellular effectors that regulate the membrane potential in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons. The mechanisms responsible for the cholinergic-dependent depolarization of mPFC layer V pyramidal neurons in slices obtained from young rats were elucidated in this study. Glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission as well as tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na(+) and voltage-dependent Ca(++) currents were eliminated. Cholinergic receptor stimulation by carbamoylcholine chloride (CCh; 100 μM) evoked depolarization (10.0 ± 1.3 mV), which was blocked by M1/M4 (pirenzepine dihydrochloride, 2 μM) and M1 (VU 0255035, 5 μM) muscarinic receptor antagonists and was not affected by a nicotinic receptor antagonist (mecamylamine hydrochloride, 10 μM). CCh-dependent depolarization was attenuated by extra- (20 μM) or intracellular (50 μM) application of an inhibitor of the βγ-subunit-dependent transduction system (gallein). It was also inhibited by intracellular application of a βγ-subunit-binding peptide (GRK2i, 10μM). mPFC pyramidal neurons express Nav1.9 channels. CCh-dependent depolarization was abolished in the presence of antibodies against Nav1.9 channels in the intracellular solution and augmented by the presence of ProTx-I toxin (100 nM) in the extracellular solution. CCh-induced depolarization was not affected by the following reagents: intracellular transduction system blockers, including U-73122 (10 μM), chelerythrine chloride (5 μM), SQ 22536 (100 μM) and H-89 (2 μM); channel blockers, including Ba(++) ions (200 μM), apamin (100 nM), flufenamic acid (200 μM), 2-APB (200 μM), SKF 96365 (50 μM), and ZD 7288 (50 μM); and a Na(+)/Ca(++) exchanger blocker, benzamil (20

  16. Temporal and region-dependent changes in muscarinic M4 receptors in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of adrenalectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta, Ezra; Chandranath, Irwin; Karlsson, Evert; Winblad, Bengt; Adem, Abdu

    2006-08-01

    Long-term adrenalectomy induces a dramatic loss of cells in the dentate gyrus and CA1-CA4 fields of the hippocampus resulting in an impairment of cognitive functions such as spatial learning, memory and exploratory behaviour. Muscarinic M1 and M4 receptor levels in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of adult male Wistar rats were examined 3, 14, 30, 90, and 150 days after adrenalectomy. Receptor levels in the entorhinal cortex and the hippocampus were determined by quantitative autoradiography using 125I-M1-toxin-1 and 125I-M4-toxin-1, M1 and M4 subtype selective antagonists, respectively. Moreover, the level of hippocampal M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors were evaluated 1 month after adrenalectomy by immunoblot analysis. Adrenalectomy induced apoptotic processes were examined by analysing apoptotic markers using Western blot analysis. No significant changes were observed in the level of muscarinic M1 receptors in the entorhinal cortex, the dentate gyrus and in the different CA fields of the hippocampus of adrenalectomized (ADX) rats. However, M4 receptors showed a significant decrease in the entorhinal cortex (at 3 days), dentate gyrus and CA4 (at 14 days), CA3 (at 30 days), and CA2 and CA1 (at 90 days) after adrenalectomy. Moreover, a decrease in the level of M4 receptors was detected in ADX rats 1 month after adrenalectomy as compared with sham groups using M4 specific antibody. Apoptotic markers such as PARP and p53 were significantly increased whereas Bcl-2 marker was decreased in ADX rat brain homogenates compared to controls. Our results show that M1 and M4 receptors are differentially affected by adrenalectomy and indicate that these subtypes have different functions in the hippocampus. Our data on time and region-dependent decreases in hippocampal M4 receptors indicate that the M4 receptor subtype is influenced by adrenal hormones and suggest that the M4 receptor might be linked to memory function in the hippocampus.

  17. Effects of muscarinic M1 and M4 acetylcholine receptor stimulation on extinction and reinstatement of cocaine seeking in male mice, independent of extinction learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoll, Kevin; Hart, Rachel; Lindsley, Craig W

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE: Stimulating muscarinic M1/M4 receptors can blunt reinforcing and other effects of cocaine. A hallmark of addiction is continued drug seeking/craving after abstinence and relapse. OBJECTIVES: We tested whether stimulating M1 and/or M4 receptors could facilitate extinction of cocaine...

  18. Muscarinic receptor binding increases in anterior thalamus and cingulate cortex during discriminative avoidance learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, B.A.; Gabriel, M.; Vogt, L.J.; Poremba, A.; Jensen, E.L.; Kubota, Y.; Kang, E.

    1991-01-01

    Training-induced neuronal activity develops in the mammalian limbic system during discriminative avoidance conditioning. This study explores behaviorally relevant changes in muscarinic ACh receptor binding in 52 rabbits that were trained to one of five stages of conditioned response acquisition. Sixteen naive and 10 animals yoked to criterion performance served as control cases. Upon reaching a particular stage of training, the brains were removed and autoradiographically assayed for 3H-oxotremorine-M binding with 50 nM pirenzepine (OxO-M/PZ) or for 3H-pirenzepine binding in nine limbic thalamic nuclei and cingulate cortex. Specific OxO-M/PZ binding increased in the parvocellular division of the anterodorsal nucleus early in training when the animals were first exposed to pairing of the conditional and unconditional stimuli. Elevated binding in this nucleus was maintained throughout subsequent training. In the parvocellular division of the anteroventral nucleus (AVp), OxO-M/PZ binding progressively increased throughout training, reached a peak at the criterion stage of performance, and returned to control values during extinction sessions. Peak OxO-M/PZ binding in AVp was significantly elevated over that for cases yoked to criterion performance. In the magnocellular division of the anteroventral nucleus (AVm), OxO-M/PZ binding was elevated only during criterion performance of the task, and it was unaltered in any other limbic thalamic nuclei. Specific OxO-M/PZ binding was also elevated in most layers in rostral area 29c when subjects first performed a significant behavioral discrimination. Training-induced alterations in OxO-M/PZ binding in AVp and layer Ia of area 29c were similar and highly correlated

  19. Selective expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype M3 by mouse type III taste bud cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yusuke; Eguchi, Kohgaku; Yoshii, Kiyonori; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka

    2016-11-01

    Each taste bud cell (TBC) type responds to a different taste. Previously, we showed that an unidentified cell type(s) functionally expresses a muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor subtype, M3, and we suggested the ACh-dependent modification of its taste responsiveness. In this study, we found that M3 is expressed by type III TBCs, which is the only cell type that possesses synaptic contacts with taste nerve fibers in taste buds. The application of ACh to the basolateral membrane of mouse fungiform TBCs in situ increased the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in 2.4 ± 1.4 cells per taste bud (mean ± SD, n = 14). After Ca 2+ imaging, we supravitally labeled type II cells (phospholipase C β2 [PLCβ2]-immunoreactive cells) with Lucifer yellow CH (LY), a fluorescent dye and investigated the positional relationship between ACh-responding cells and LY-labeled cells. After fixation, the TBCs were immunohistostained to investigate the positional relationships between immunohistochemically classified cells and LY-labeled cells. The overlay of the two positional relationships obtained by superimposing the LY-labeled cells showed that all of the ACh-responding cells were type III cells (synaptosomal-associated protein 25 [SNAP-25]-immunoreactive cells). The ACh responses required no added Ca 2+ in the bathing solution. The addition of 1 μM U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, decreased the magnitude of the ACh response, whereas that of 1 μM U73343, a negative control, had no effect. These results suggest that type III cells respond to ACh and release Ca 2+ from intracellular stores. We also discuss the underlying mechanism of the Ca 2+ response and the role of M3 in type III cells.

  20. Muscarinic receptor activation enables persistent firing in pyramidal neurons from superficial layers of dorsal perirhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaroli, Vicky L; Zhao, Yanjun; Boguszewski, Pawel; Brown, Thomas H

    2012-06-01

    Persistent-firing neurons in the entorhinal cortex (EC) and the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) continue to discharge long after the termination of the original, spike-initiating current. An emerging theory proposes that endogenous persistent firing helps support a transient memory system. This study demonstrated that persistent-firing neurons are also prevalent in rat perirhinal cortex (PR), which lies immediately adjacent to and is reciprocally connected with EC and LA. Several characteristics of persistent-firing neurons in PR were similar to those previously reported in LA and EC. Persistent firing in PR was enabled by the application of carbachol, a nonselective cholinergic agonist, and it was induced by injecting a suprathreshold current or by stimulating suprathreshold excitatory synaptic inputs to the neuron. Once induced, persistent firing lasted for seconds to minutes. Persistent firing could always be terminated by a sufficiently large and prolonged hyperpolarizing current; it was prevented by antagonists of muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs); and it was blocked by flufenamic acid. The latter has been suggested to inhibit a Ca(2+) -activated nonspecific cation conductance (G(CAN) ) that normally furnishes the sustained depolarization during persistent firing. In many PR neurons, the discharge rate during persistent firing was a graded function of depolarizing and/or hyperpolarizing inputs. Persistent firing was not prevented by blocking fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, demonstrating that it can be generated endogenously. We suggest that persistent-firing neurons in PR, EC, LA, and certain other brain regions may cooperate in support of a transient-memory system. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Urinary Retention, Incontinence, and Dysregulation of Muscarinic Receptors in Male Mice Lacking Mras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Ehrhardt

    Full Text Available Here we show that male, but not female mice lacking expression of the GTPase M-Ras developed urinary retention with distention of the bladder that exacerbated with age but occurred in the absence of obvious anatomical outlet obstruction. There were changes in detrusor morphology in Mras-/- males: Smooth muscle tissue, which exhibited a compact organization in WT mice, appeared disorganized and became increasingly 'layered' with age in Mras-/- males, but was not fibrotic. Bladder tissue near the apex of bladders of Mras-/- males exhibited hypercontractility in response to the cholinergic agonist carbachol in in vitro, while responses in Mras-/- females were normal. In addition, spontaneous phasic contractions of detrusors from Mras-/- males were increased, and Mras-/- males exhibited urinary incontinence. We found that expression of the muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors that mediate the cholinergic contractile stimuli of the detrusor muscle was dysregulated in both Mras-/- males and females, although only males exhibited a urinary phenotype. Elevated expression of M2R in young males lacking M-Ras and failure to upregulate M3R with age resulted in significantly lower ratios of M3R/M2R expression that correlated with the bladder abnormalities. Our data suggests that M-Ras and M3R are functionally linked and that M-Ras is an important regulator of male bladder control in mice. Our observations also support the notion that bladder control is sexually dimorphic and is regulated through mechanisms that are largely independent of acetylcholine signaling in female mice.

  2. Selective activation of heterologously expressed G protein-gated K+ channels by M2 muscarinic receptors in rat sympathetic neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jose M; Wanaverbecq, Nicolas; Halley, Pam; Caulfield, Malcolm P; Brown, David A

    1999-01-01

    G protein-regulated inward rectifier K+ (GIRK) channels were over-expressed in dissociated rat superior cervical sympathetic (SCG) neurones by co-transfecting green fluorescent protein (GFP)-, GIRK1- and GIRK2-expressing plasmids using the biolistic technique. Membrane currents were subsequently recorded with whole-cell patch electrodes.Co-transfected cells had larger Ba2+-sensitive inwardly rectifying currents and 13 mV more negative resting potentials (in 3 mm[K+]o) than non-transfected cells, or cells transfected with GIRK1 or GIRK2 alone.Carbachol (CCh, 1–30 μm) increased the inwardly rectifying current in 70% of GIRK1+ GIRK2-transfected cells by 261 ± 53% (n = 6, CCh 30 μm) at −120 mV, but had no effect in non-transfected cells or in cells transfected with GIRK1 or GIRK2 alone. Pertussis toxin prevented the effect of carbachol but had no effect on basal currents.The effect of CCh was antagonized by 6 nm tripitramine but not by 100 nm pirenzepine, consistent with activation of endogenous M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.In contrast, inhibition of the voltage-activated Ca2+ current by CCh was antagonized by 100 nm pirenzepine but not by 6 nm tripitramine, indicating that it was mediated by M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.We conclude that endogenous M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors selectively couple to GIRK currents and Ca2+ currents respectively, with negligible cross-talk. PMID:10066893

  3. Identification of m3, m4 and m5 subtypes of muscarinic receptor mRNA in human blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, P; Auger, C B; Traver, D J; Costa, L G

    1995-07-01

    In this study we made use of the Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to analyze the expression of mRNA for the five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human blood mononuclear cells. mRNA for m3, m4 and m5 subtypes was detected, while mRNA for m1 and m2 muscarinic receptors was not found. Similar results were obtained for three different healthy human subjects studied. Interestingly, the m5 subtype was expressed at higher levels in blood mononuclear cells than in cerebral cortex. To our knowledge this is the first time that m5 muscarinic receptor mRNA has been found outside of the central nervous system.

  4. Analysis of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors coupling to Gi/o, Gs and Gq heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smyčková, Helena; Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 102, Suppl.1 (2007), s. 268-268 ISSN 0022-3042. [Biennial meeting of the International Society for Neurochemistry /21./ and Annual meeting of the American Society for Neurochemistry /38./. 19.08.2007-24.08.2007, Cancun] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * muscarinic receptors * agonist-specific conformations * allosteric interaction Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  5. Membrane cholesterol content influences binding properties of muscarinic M2 receptors and differentially impacts activation of second messenger pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; Rudajev, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 606, 1-3 (2009), s. 50-60 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:National Institutes of Health(US) NS25743; EC(XE) LipiDiDiet Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic * cholesterol * receptors Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.585, year: 2009

  6. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Intracellular Calcium Dyshomeostasis Through Both Muscarinic and Nicotinic Receptors in Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palee, Siripong; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced intracellular Ca2+ overload plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several heart diseases. Acetylcholine (ACh) has been shown to suppress reactive oxygen species generation during oxidative stress. However, there is little information regarding the effects of ACh on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation in the presence of oxidative stress. Therefore, we investigated the effects of ACh applied before or after hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation in isolated cardiomyocytes. Single ventricular myocytes were isolated from the male Wistar rats for the intracellular Ca2+ transient study by a fluorimetric ratio technique. H2O2 significantly decreased both of intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. ACh applied before, but not after, H2O2 treatment attenuated the reduction of intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. Both atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocker) and mecamylamine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor blocker) significantly decreased the protective effects of acetylcholine on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation. Moreover, the combination of atropine and mecamylamine completely abolished the protective effects of acetylcholine on intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. ACh pretreatment attenuates H2O2-induced intracellular Ca2+ dyshomeostasis through both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine release mediated by P2Y receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, S; Veggetti, M; Muchnik, S; Losavio, A

    2006-09-29

    At the neuromuscular junction, ATP is co-released with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and once in the synaptic space, it is degraded to the presynaptically active metabolite adenosine. Intracellular recordings were performed on diaphragm fibers of CF1 mice to determine the action of extracellular ATP (100 muM) and the slowly hydrolysable ATP analog 5'-adenylylimidodiphosphate lithium (betagamma-imido ATP) (30 muM) on miniature end-plate potential (MEPP) frequency. We found that application of ATP and betagamma-imido ATP decreased spontaneous secretion by 45.3% and 55.9% respectively. 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a selective A(1) adenosine receptor antagonist and alpha,beta-methylene ADP sodium salt (alphabeta-MeADP), which is an inhibitor of ecto-5'-nucleotidase, did not prevent the inhibitory effect of ATP, demonstrating that the nucleotide is able to modulate spontaneous ACh release through a mechanism independent of the action of adenosine. Blockade of Ca(2+) channels by both, Cd(2+) or the combined application of nitrendipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx) (L-type and N-type Ca(2+) channel antagonists, respectively) prevented the effect of betagamma-imido ATP, indicating that the nucleotide modulates Ca(2+) influx through the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels related to spontaneous secretion. betagamma-Imido ATP-induced modulation was antagonized by the non-specific P2 receptor antagonist suramin and the P2Y receptor antagonist 1-amino-4-[[4-[[4-chloro-6-[[3(or4)-sulfophenyl] amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-3-sulfophenyl] amino]-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenesulfonic acid (reactive blue-2), but not by pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo(benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid) tetrasodium salt (PPADS), which has a preferential antagonist effect on P2X receptors. Pertussis toxin and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), which are blockers of G(i/o) proteins, prevented the action of the nucleotide, suggesting that the effect is mediated by P2Y receptors

  8. Distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes mediate pre- and postsynaptic effects in rat neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigout Sylvain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic transmission has been implicated in learning, memory and cognition. However, the cellular effects induced by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs activation are poorly understood in the neocortex. We investigated the effects of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh and various agonists and antagonists on neuronal activity in rat neocortical slices using intracellular (sharp microelectrode and field potential recordings. Results CCh increased neuronal firing but reduced synaptic transmission. The increase of neuronal firing was antagonized by pirenzepine (M1/M4 mAChRs antagonist but not by AF-DX 116 (M2/M4 mAChRs antagonist. Pirenzepine reversed the depressant effect of CCh on excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP but had marginal effects when applied before CCh. AF-DX 116 antagonized the depression of EPSP when applied before or during CCh. CCh also decreased the paired-pulse inhibition of field potentials and the inhibitory conductances mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors. The depression of paired-pulse inhibition was antagonized or prevented by AF-DX 116 or atropine but only marginally by pirenzepine. The inhibitory conductances were unaltered by xanomeline (M1/M4 mAChRs agonist, yet the CCh-induced depression was antagonized by AF-DX 116. Linopirdine, a selective M-current blocker, mimicked the effect of CCh on neuronal firing. However, linopirdine had no effect on the amplitude of EPSP or on the paired-pulse inhibition, indicating that M-current is involved in the increase of neuronal excitability but neither in the depression of EPSP nor paired-pulse inhibition. Conclusions These data indicate that the three effects are mediated by different mAChRs, the increase in firing being mediated by M1 mAChR, decrease of inhibition by M2 mAChR and depression of excitatory transmission by M4 mAChR. The depression of EPSP and increase of neuronal firing might enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, whereas the

  9. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    (4-hydroxy-2-butynyl)-1-trimethylammonium-3-chlorocarbanilate chloride (McN-A-343), and the novel M(1)-selective agonist 1-(1-2-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bipiperidin-4-yl)-1H benzo[d]imidazol-2(3H)-one (TBPB) were tested as substitution and/or pretreatment to cocaine. Both muscarinic antagonists partially...... substituted for cocaine and enhanced its discriminative stimulus. Conversely, muscarinic agonists blunted cocaine discrimination and abolished cocaine self-administration with varying effects on food-maintained behavior. Specifically, increasing selectivity for the M(1) subtype (oxotremorine ... for cocaine addiction....

  10. Interaction of neuromuscular blocking drugs with recombinant human m1–m5 muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cembala, T M; Sherwin, J D; Tidmarsh, M D; Appadu, B L; Lambert, D G

    1998-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking drugs (NMBD's) are known to produce cardiovascular side effects manifesting as brady/tachycardias. In this study we have examined the interaction of a range of steroidal NMBD's with recombinant human m1–m5 muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Our main hypothesis is that NMBD's may interact with m2 (cardiac) muscarinic receptors.All binding studies were performed with cell membranes prepared from CHO m1–m5 cells in 1 ml volumes of 20 mM HEPES, 1...

  11. Chronic morphine selectively sensitizes the effect of D1 receptor agonist on presynaptic glutamate release in basolateral amygdala neurons that project to prelimbic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiaojiao; Chen, Ming; Dong, Yi; Lai, Bin; Zheng, Ping

    2018-05-01

    Drug addiction is a brain disorder characterized by chronic, compulsive use of drugs. Previous studies have found a number of chronic morphine-induced changes in the brain at molecular levels. A study from our lab showed that chronic morphine-induced increase in the expression of presynaptic D1 receptors in basolateral amygdala (BLA) neurons played an important role in environmental cue-induced retrieval of morphine withdrawal memory. However, the downstream neurocircuitry of chronic morphine-induced increase presynaptic D1 receptors in the BLA remains to be elucidated. Using retrogradely labelling technique combined with whole-cell patch-clamp methods, our results showed that (1) chronic morphine sensitized the effect of D1 receptor agonist on presynaptic glutamate release in BLA neurons that projected to the prelimbic cortex (PrL), but had no influence on that in BLA neurons that projected to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) or the CA1 of the hippocampus; (2) chronic morphine sensitized the effect of D1 receptor agonist on action potential firing in BLA neurons that projected to the PrL, but without affecting the intrinsic excitability and the sensitivity of postsynaptic glutamate receptors to glutamate in BLA neurons that projected to the PrL. These results suggest that chronic morphine selectively sensitizes the effect of D1 receptor agonist on presynaptic glutamate release in BLA neurons that project to PrL and induces a sensitization of the effect of D1 receptor agonist on action potential firing in BLA neurons that project to the PrL. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bortezomib induces neuropathic pain through protein kinase C-mediated activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing-Dun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2017-09-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs, including bortezomib, often cause painful peripheral neuropathy, which is a severe dose-limiting adverse effect experienced by many cancer patients. The glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) at the spinal cord level are critically involved in the synaptic plasticity associated with neuropathic pain. In this study, we determined whether treatment with bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, affects the NMDAR activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons. Systemic treatment with bortezomib in rats did not significantly affect postsynaptic NMDAR currents elicited by puff application of NMDA directly to dorsal horn neurons. Bortezomib treatment markedly increased the baseline frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), which was completely normalized by the NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5). AP5 also reduced the amplitude of monosynaptic EPSCs evoked by dorsal root stimulation in bortezomib-treated, but not vehicle-treated, rats. Furthermore, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with chelerythrine fully reversed the increased frequency of miniature EPSCs and the amplitude of evoked EPSCs in bortezomib-treated rats. Intrathecal injection of AP5 and chelerythrine both profoundly attenuated mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by systemic treatment with bortezomib. In addition, treatment with bortezomib induced striking membrane translocation of PKC-βII, PKC-δ, and PKC-ε in the dorsal root ganglion. Our findings indicate that bortezomib treatment potentiates nociceptive input from primary afferent nerves via PKC-mediated tonic activation of presynaptic NMDARs. Targeting presynaptic NMDARs and PKC at the spinal cord level may be an effective strategy for treating chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulation of dopamine presynaptic markers and receptors in the striatum of DJ-1 and Pink1 knockout rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianjun; Kouranova, Evguenia; Cui, Xiaoxia; Mach, Robert H.; Xu, Jinbin

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic autosomal recessive mutations in the DJ-1 (Park7) or the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (Pink1 or PARK6) genes are associated with familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is not well known regarding the pathological mechanisms involving the DJ-1 and Pink1 mutations. Here we characterized DJ-1 and Pink1 knockout rats both through expression profiling and using quantitative autoradiography to measure the densities of the dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in the striatum of transgenic rats and wild type controls. Expression profiling with a commercially available array of 84 genes known to be involved in PD indicated that only the target gene was significantly downregulated in each transgenic rat model. D1 receptor, VMAT2, and DAT were measured using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. No significant changes were observed in the density of DAT in either model. Although the densities of VMAT2 and D1 receptor were unchanged in Pink1 knockout, but both were increased in DJ-1 knockout rats. The densities of D2 and D3 receptors, determined by mathematical analysis of binding of radioligands [3H]WC-10 and [3H]raclopride, were significantly increased in both knockout models. These distinctive changes in the expression of dopamine presynaptic markers and receptors in the striatum may reflect different compensatory regulation of dopamine system in DJ-1 versus Pink1 knockout rat models of familial PD. PMID:24157858

  14. The A- and B-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from Drosophila melanogaster couple to different second messenger pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin; Folke, Jonas; Hauser, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine and blocked by several antagonists, among them atropine. In mammals five mAChRs (m1-m5) exist of which m1, m3, and m5 are coupled to members of the Gq...... to classical antagonists such as atropine. Here, we find that the D. melanogaster A-type mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 and D. melanogaster B-type mAChR to Gi/0. Furthermore, by comparing the second and third intracellular loops of all animal mAChRs for which the G protein coupling has been established, we could...... identify several amino acid residues likely to be specific for either Gq/11 or Gi/0 coupling. Using these hallmarks for specific mAChR G protein interaction we found that all protostomes with a sequenced genome have one mAChR coupled to Gq/11 and one to four mAChRs coupled to Gi/0. Furthermore...

  15. Evaluation of the Interaction between NMDA Receptors of Nucleus Accumbens and Muscarinic Receptors in Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Taheri

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Whereas studies have indicated the interaction between NMDA and cholinergic systems, this study was performed with the aim of determining the role of NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens (NAc in scopolamine-induced amnesia.Methods: In this study, at first rats were anesthetized with intra-peritoneal injection of ketamine hydrochloride plus xylazine, and then placed in a stereotaxic apparatus. Two stainless-steel cannulas were placed 2mm above nucleus accumbens shell. All animals were allowed to recover for one week, before beginning the behavioral testing. Then, animals were trained in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task. The drugs were injected after successful training and before testing. The animals were tested 24h after training, and the step-through latency time was measured as the memory criterion in male Wistar rats. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s test were used for analysis of the data. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Intra-nucleus accumbens (intra-NAc injection of scopolamine or NMDA caused impairment in memory in rats. Although, co-administration of an ineffective dose of NMDA with an ineffective dose of scopolamine had no significant effect on memory performance, effective doses of NMDA prevented the amnesic effect of scopolamine on inhibitory avoidance memory. On the other hand, intra-NAc injection of NMDA receptor antagonist, i.e., MK-801 caused no change in memory performance by itself, and its co-administration with an effective dose of scopolamine could not prevent the impairing effect of the latter drug. Conclusion: The finding of this study indicated that NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens are involved in the modulation of scopolamine-induced amnesia.

  16. Autoantibodies Enhance Agonist Action and Binding to Cardiac Muscarinic Receptors in Chronic Chagas’ Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ciria C.; Nascimento, José H.; Chaves, Elen A.; Costa, Patrícia C.; Masuda, Masako O.; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C.; Giménez, Luis E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M2AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M2AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M2AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M2AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [3H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [3H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC50 of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 × 10−8, 1.33 × 10−7, and 2.0 × 10−7 mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M2AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  17. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located on short noradrenergic neurons of the rat vas deferens: a pharmacological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the pineal hormone produced during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle, modulates neuronal acetylcholine receptors located presynaptically on nerve terminals of the rat vas deferens. Recently we showed the presence of high affinity nicotine-binding sites during the light phase, and low and high affinity binding sites during the dark phase. The appearance of the low affinity binding sites was due to the nocturnal melatonin surge and could be mimicked by exposure to melatonin in vitro. The aim of the present research was to identify the receptor subtypes responsible for the functional response during the light and the dark phase. The rank order of potency of agonists was dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP = cytisine > nicotine > carbachol and DMPP = nicotine = cytisine > carbachol, during the light and dark phase, respectively, due to an increase in apparent affinity for nicotine. Mecamylamine similarly blocked the DMPP response during the light and the dark phase, while the response to nicotine was more efficiently blocked during the light phase. In contrast, methyllycaconitine inhibited the nicotine-induced response only at 21:00 h. Since a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have low affinity for nicotine in binding assays, we suggest that a mixed population composed of a3ß4 - plus a7-bearing nAChR subtypes is present at night. This plasticity in receptor subtypes is probably driven by melatonin since nicotine-induced contraction in organs from animals sacrificed at 15:00 h and incubated with melatonin (100 pg/ml, 4 h is not totally blocked by mecamylamine. Thus melatonin, by acting directly on the short adrenergic neurons that innervate the rat vas deferens, induces the appearance of the low affinity binding site, probably an a7 nAChR subtype.

  18. Anesthesia increases in vivo N-([{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)piperidinyl benzilate binding to the muscarinic cholinergic receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbourn, Michael R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0552 (United States)]. E-mail: mkilbour@umich.edu; Ma Bing [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0552 (United States); Butch, Elizabeth R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0552 (United States); Quesada, Carole [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0552 (United States); Sherman, Phillip S. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0552 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The in vivo binding of N-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl-piperidinyl benzilate ([{sup 18}F]FEPB) to the muscarinic cholinergic receptor was measured in awake and anesthetized rats. Studies were done using an equilibrium infusion technique to provide estimates of specific binding as distribution volume ratios. Anesthesia with either isoflurane or sodium pentobarbital produced a significant (65-90%) increase of radiotracer binding in receptor-rich brain regions (striatum, cortex, hippocampus) relative to awake controls. Pretreatment of anesthetized animals with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor phenserine produced no further increases in radioligand binding, in contrast to the large (>70%) increases previously observed in awake animals following drug treatment. These studies demonstrate that anesthesia can produce significant changes in baseline biochemical measures that can obscure even very large effects of pharmacological challenges.

  19. Differential phosphorylation-dependent regulation of constitutively active and muscarinic receptor-activated IK,ACh channels in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Niels; Friedrich, Adina; Bock, Manja; Wettwer, Erich; Christ, Torsten; Knaut, Michael; Strasser, Ruth H; Ravens, Ursula; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2007-06-01

    In chronic atrial fibrillation (cAF) the potassium current IK,ACh develops agonist-independent constitutive activity. We hypothesized that abnormal phosphorylation-dependent regulation underlies the constitutive IK,ACh activity. We used voltage-clamp technique and biochemical assays to study IK,ACh regulation in atrial appendages from 61 sinus rhythm (SR), 11 paroxysmal AF (pAF), and 33 cAF patients. Compared to SR basal current was higher in cAF only, whereas the muscarinic receptor (2 micromol/L carbachol)-activated IK,ACh was smaller in pAF and cAF. In pAF the selective IK,ACh blocker tertiapin abolished the muscarinic receptor-activated IK,ACh but excluded agonist-independent constitutive IK,ACh activity. Blockade of type-2A phosphatase and the subsequent shift to increased muscarinic receptor phosphorylation (and inactivation) reduced muscarinic receptor-activated IK,ACh in SR but not in cAF, pointing to an impaired function of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase. Using subtype-selective kinase inhibitors we found that in SR the muscarinic receptor-activated IK,ACh requires phosphorylation by protein kinase G (PKG), protein kinase C (PKC), and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not by protein kinase A (PKA). In cAF, constitutive IK,ACh activity results from abnormal channel phosphorylation by PKC but not by PKG or CaMKII, whereas the additional muscarinic receptor-mediated IK,ACh activation occurs apparently without involvement of these kinases. In cAF, the higher protein level of PKCepsilon but not PKCalpha, PKCbeta1 or PKCdelta is likely to contribute to the constitutive IK,ACh activity. The occurrence of constitutive IK,ACh activity in cAF results from abnormal PKC function, whereas the muscarinic receptor-mediated IK,ACh activation does not require the contribution of PKG, PKC or CaMKII. Selective drug targeting of constitutively active IK,ACh channels may be suitable to reduce the ability of AF to become sustained.

  20. PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE TRAINING INDUCES ENHANCED LEVELS OF IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR AND COEXPRESSED PKC-GAMMA AND MAP-2 IN RAT CORTICAL-NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DOUMA, BRK; BOHUS, B; LUITEN, PGM

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neocortical immunoreactivity (ir) for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), protein kinase C gamma (PKC gamma), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) induced by the performance of a one-trial passive shock avoidance (PSA) task

  1. ALTERATIONS IN THE IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTORS AND COLOCALIZED PKC-GAMMA IN MOUSE HIPPOCAMPUS INDUCED BY SPATIAL DISCRIMINATION-LEARNING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; COMPAAN, JC; BOHUS, B; LUITEN, PGM

    1995-01-01

    This study describes changes in the immunoreactivity for muscarinic: acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in the hippocampus of mice in relation to spatial discrimination behavior, employing the monoclonal antibody M35 raised against purified bovine mAChR protein. Performance in a hole hoard in which

  2. Changes of cooperativity between N-methylscopolamine and allosteric modulators alcuronium and gallamine induced by mutations of external loops of muscarinic M(3) receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Alena; Tuček, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2001), s. 761-767 ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulators Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.297, year: 2001

  3. Quantitation of mRNAs for M(1) to M(5) subtypes of muscarinic receptors in rat heart and brain cortex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Alena; Tuček, Stanislav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2002), s. 1267-1272 ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011910 Grant - others:Physiological Society(GB) - Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * mammalian heart Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.480, year: 2002

  4. A novel mechanism of hippocampal LTD involving muscarinic receptor-triggered interactions between AMPARs, GRIP and liprin-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickinson Bryony A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term depression (LTD in the hippocampus can be induced by activation of different types of G-protein coupled receptors, in particular metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and muscarinic acethycholine receptors (mAChRs. Since mGluRs and mAChRs activate the same G-proteins and isoforms of phospholipase C (PLC, it would be expected that these two forms of LTD utilise the same molecular mechanisms. However, we find a distinct mechanism of LTD involving GRIP and liprin-α. Results Whilst both forms of LTD require activation of tyrosine phosphatases and involve internalisation of AMPARs, they use different molecular interactions. Specifically, mAChR-LTD, but not mGluR-LTD, is blocked by peptides that inhibit the binding of GRIP to the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 and the binding of GRIP to liprin-α. Thus, different receptors that utilise the same G-proteins can regulate AMPAR trafficking and synaptic efficacy via distinct molecular mechanisms. Conclusion Our results suggest that mAChR-LTD selectively involves interactions between GRIP and liprin-α. These data indicate a novel mechanism of synaptic plasticity in which activation of M1 receptors results in AMPAR endocytosis, via a mechanism involving interactions between GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α.

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation Is Required for Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in HaCaT Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wymke Ockenga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-neuronal acetylcholine plays a substantial role in the human skin by influencing adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. These processes are regulated by the Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP kinase cascade. Here we show that in HaCaT keratinocytes all five muscarinic receptor subtypes are expressed, but M1 and M3 are the subtypes involved in mitogenic signaling. Stimulation with the cholinergic agonist carbachol leads to activation of the MAP kinase extracellular signal regulated kinase, together with the protein kinase Akt. The activation is fully dependent on the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, which even appears to be the sole pathway for the muscarinic receptors to facilitate MAP kinase activation in HaCaT cells. The transactivation pathway involves a triple-membrane-passing process, based on activation of matrix metalloproteases, and extracellular ligand release; whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Src family kinases or protein kinase C do not appear to be involved in MAP kinase activation. Furthermore, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and endocytosis of the EGF receptor after cholinergic transactivation are different from that induced by a direct stimulation with EGF, suggesting that ligands other than EGF itself mediate the cholinergic transactivation.

  6. Iodine-123 N-methyl-4-iododexetimide: a new radioligand for single-photon emission tomographic imaging of myocardial muscarinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; Kassiou, M.; Eu, P.; Katsifis, A.G.; Garra, M.; Power, J.; Najdovski, L.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Cardiac muscarinic receptor ligands suitable for positron emission tomography have previously been characterised. Attempts to develop radioligands of these receptors suitable for single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) imaging have not been successful due to high lung retention and high non-specific binding of previously investigated potential tracers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution and in vivo imaging characteristics of a new radiopharmaceutical, [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide. Biodistribution studies performed in rats showed high cardiac uptake (2.4% ID/g) 10 min after injection with a heart to lung activity ratio of 5:1. Specificity and stereoselectivity of cardiac binding were demonstrated using blocking experiments in rats. Dynamic imaging studies in anaesthetised greyhounds demonstrated rapid and high myocardial uptake and low lung binding with stable heart to lung activity ratios of >2.5:1 between 10 and 30 min, making SPET imaging feasible. Administration of an excess of an unlabelled muscarinic antagonist, methyl-quinuclidinyl benzylate rapidly displaced myocardial activity to background levels and the pharmacologically inactive enantiomer, [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iodolevetimide, had no detectable cardiac uptake, indicating specific and stereoselective muscarinic receptor binding. SPET revealed higher activity in the inferior than in the anterior wall, this being consistent with previously described regional variation of cardiac parasympathetic innervation. [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide shows promise as an imaging agent for muscarinic receptor distribution in the heart and may be helpful in evaluating diverse cardiac diseases associated with altered muscarinic receptor function, including heart failure and diabetic heart disease. (orig.)

  7. Muscarinic receptor/G-protein coupling is reduced in the dorsomedial striatum of cognitively impaired aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Martinez, Erasmo; Haynes, Kathryn; Childers, Steven R; Sonntag, William E; Nicolle, Michelle M

    2012-02-01

    Behavioral flexibility, the ability to modify responses due to changing task demands, is detrimentally affected by aging with a shift towards increased cognitive rigidity. The neurobiological basis of this cognitive deficit is not clear although striatal cholinergic neurotransmission has been implicated. To investigate the possible association between striatal acetylcholine signaling with age-related changes in behavioral flexibility, young, middle-aged, and aged F344 X Brown Norway F1 rats were assessed using an attentional set-shifting task that includes two tests of behavioral flexibility: reversal learning and an extra-dimensional shift. Rats were also assessed in the Morris water maze to compare potential fronto-striatal-dependent deficits with hippocampal-dependent deficits. Behaviorally characterized rats were then assessed for acetylcholine muscarinic signaling within the striatum using oxotremorine-M-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding and [(3)H]AFDX-384 receptor binding autoradiography. The results showed that by old age, cognitive deficits were pronounced across cognitive domains, suggesting deterioration of both hippocampal and fronto-striatal regions. A significant decline in oxotremorine-M-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding was limited to the dorsomedial striatum of aged rats when compared to young and middle-aged rats. There was no effect of age on striatal [(3)H]AFDX-384 receptor binding. These results suggest that a decrease in M2/M4 muscarinic receptor coupling is involved in the age-associated decline in behavioral flexibility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Eosinophils express muscarinic receptors and corticotropin-releasing factor to disrupt the mucosal barrier in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, Conny; Persborn, Mats; Jönsson, Maria; Wang, Arthur; Phan, Van; Lampinen, Maria; Vicario, Maria; Santos, Javier; Sherman, Philip M; Carlson, Marie; Ericson, Ann-Charlott; McKay, Derek M; Söderholm, Johan D

    2011-05-01

    Altered intestinal barrier function has been implicated in the pathophysiology of ulcerative colitis (UC) in genetic, functional, and epidemiological studies. Mast cells and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) regulate the mucosal barrier in human colon. Because eosinophils are often increased in colon tissues of patients with UC, we assessed interactions among mast cells, CRF, and eosinophils in the mucosal barrier of these patients. Transmucosal fluxes of protein antigens (horseradish peroxidase) and paracellular markers ((51)Cr-EDTA, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4000) were studied in noninflamed, colonic mucosal biopsy samples collected from 26 patients with UC and 53 healthy volunteers (controls); samples were mounted in Ussing chambers. We also performed fluorescence and electron microscopy of human tissue samples, assessed isolated eosinophils, and performed mechanistic studies using in vitro cocultured eosinophils (15HL-60), mast cells (HMC-1), and a colonic epithelial cell line (T84). Colon tissues from patients with UC had significant increases in permeability to protein antigens compared with controls. Permeability was blocked by atropine (a muscarinic receptor antagonist), α-helical CRF(9-41) (a CRF receptor antagonist), and lodoxamide (a mast-cell stabilizer). Eosinophils were increased in number in UC tissues (compared with controls), expressed the most M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors of any mucosal cell type, and had immunoreactivity to CRF. In coculture studies, carbachol activation of eosinophils caused production of CRF and activation of mast cells, which increased permeability of T84 epithelial cells to macromolecules. We identified a neuroimmune intercellular circuit (from cholinergic nerves, via eosinophils to mast cells) that mediates colonic mucosal barrier dysfunction in patients with UC. This circuit might exacerbate mucosal inflammation. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Critical role of CA1 muscarinic receptors on memory acquisition deficit induced by total (TSD) and REM sleep deprivation (RSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javad-Moosavi, Bibi-Zahra; Vaezi, Gholamhassan; Nasehi, Mohammad; Haeri-Rouhani, Seyed-Ali; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-10-03

    Despite different theories regarding sleep physiological function, an overall census indicates that sleep is useful for neural plasticity which eventually strengthens cognition and brain performance. Different studies show that sleep deprivation (SD) leads to impaired learning and hippocampus dependent memory. According to some studies, cholinergic system plays an important role in sleep (particularly REM sleep), learning, memory, and its retrieval. So this study has been designed to investigate the effect of CA1 Cholinergic Muscarinic Receptors on memory acquisition deficit induced by total sleep deprivation (TSD) and REM sleep deprivation (RSD). A modified water box (locomotor activity may be provide a limiting factor in this method of SD) or multiple platforms were used for induction of TSD or RSD, respectively. Inhibitory passive avoidance apparatus has been used to determine the effects of SD and its changes by physostigmine (as cholinesterase inhibitor) or scopolamine (muscarinic receptor antagonist) on memory formation. Because locomotor activity and pain perception induce critical roles in passive avoidance memory formation, we also measured these factors by open field and hot-plate instruments, respectively. The results showed that TSD and RSD for 24 hours impaired memory formation but they did not alter locomotor activity. TSD also induced analgesia effect, but RSD did not alter it. Intra-CA1 injection of physostigmine (0.0001μg/rat) and scopolamine (0.01μg/rat) did not alter memory acquisition in the sham-TSD or sham-RSD, by themselves. Moreover, intra-CA1 injection of sub-threshold dose of physostigmine (0.0001μg/rat) and scopolamine (0.01μg/rat) could restore the memory acquisition deficit induced by RSD, while scopolamine could restore TSD-induced amnesia. Both drugs reversed analgesia induced by TSD. None of previous interventions altered locomotor activity. According to this study, CA1 cholinergic muscarinic receptors play an important role in

  10. Autoradiographic distribution of M1, M2, M3, and M4 muscarinic receptor subtypes in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Puertas, R; Pascual, J; Vilaró, T; Pazos, A

    1997-08-01

    We studied the autoradiographic densities of all pharmacologically characterised muscarinic receptors (MR) in frontal, temporal, and visual cortex, hippocampal formation, and striatum in autopsied brains from 19 histopathologically verified patients of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in matched controls. Almost all (16 of 19) of the AD cases were severe. In AD brains, total MR, M1, and M3 MR subtypes were found to be significantly decreased in entorhinal cortex and in most hippocampal strata. Total MR and M1 receptors were also significantly reduced in visual area and in frontal cortex of AD brains, respectively. M2 receptors were significantly reduced over hippocampal formation but increased significantly in striatum of AD brains as compared with controls. M3 receptors in AD were in the range of controls in neocortex and striatum, whereas the M4 receptor subtype was also preserved in all brain regions in AD brains when compared with controls. This is the first autoradiographic study analysing the distribution of all MR subtypes in AD brains. These changes in MR densities concur with the general pattern of neuronal degeneration occurring in AD brains and partly explain the poor response of AD cognitive decline to present cholinergic supplementation therapies. Although M3 and M4 MR were labelled with nonselective approaches, the preservation of M4 and to a lesser degree M3 MR subtypes in AD brains could open an alternative way for the symptomatic therapy of AD dementia.

  11. Mechanism of the G-protein mimetic nanobody binding to a muscarinic G-protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinglong; McCammon, J Andrew

    2018-03-20

    Protein-protein binding is key in cellular signaling processes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of protein-protein binding, however, are challenging due to limited timescales. In particular, binding of the medically important G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with intracellular signaling proteins has not been simulated with MD to date. Here, we report a successful simulation of the binding of a G-protein mimetic nanobody to the M 2 muscarinic GPCR using the robust Gaussian accelerated MD (GaMD) method. Through long-timescale GaMD simulations over 4,500 ns, the nanobody was observed to bind the receptor intracellular G-protein-coupling site, with a minimum rmsd of 2.48 Å in the nanobody core domain compared with the X-ray structure. Binding of the nanobody allosterically closed the orthosteric ligand-binding pocket, being consistent with the recent experimental finding. In the absence of nanobody binding, the receptor orthosteric pocket sampled open and fully open conformations. The GaMD simulations revealed two low-energy intermediate states during nanobody binding to the M 2 receptor. The flexible receptor intracellular loops contribute remarkable electrostatic, polar, and hydrophobic residue interactions in recognition and binding of the nanobody. These simulations provided important insights into the mechanism of GPCR-nanobody binding and demonstrated the applicability of GaMD in modeling dynamic protein-protein interactions.

  12. Selective activation of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors reverses MK-801-induced behavioral impairments and enhances associative learning in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Dencker, Ditte

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) represent a novel approach for the treatment of psychotic symptoms associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently reported that the selective M4 PAM VU0152100 produced an ant....... VU0467154 produced a robust dose-dependent reversal of MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and deficits in preclinical models of associative learning and memory functions, including the touchscreen pairwise visual discrimination task in wild-type mice, but failed to reverse these stimulant......-induced deficits in M4 KO mice. VU0467154 also enhanced the acquisition of both contextual and cue-mediated fear conditioning when administered alone in wild-type mice. These novel findings suggest that M4 PAMs may provide a strategy for addressing the more complex affective and cognitive disruptions associated...

  13. Muscarinic M1 receptor inhibition reduces gastroduodenal bicarbonate secretion and promotes gastric prostaglandin E2 synthesis in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, Jens; Eskerod, O

    1995-01-01

    The selective muscarinic M1 receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, considerably stimulates duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in the rat and increases gastric luminal release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in humans. This study, therefore, looked at the effect of pirenzepine on bicarbonate secretion...... and luminal output of PGE2 into the stomach and the duodenum of nine healthy volunteers using a new technique permitting simultaneous measurements. In the stomach modified sham feeding increased bicarbonate secretion from 382 (62) mumol/h (mean (SEM)) to 959 (224) mumol/h (p ... sham feeding and acid exposure (HCl 0.1 M; 20 ml; 5 min) of the duodenal bulb increased mucosal bicarbonate secretion from 191 (14) mumol/cm x h to 266 (27) mumol/cm x h (p

  14. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in cerebral cortex of Fisher 344 rats: a light microscope autoradiography study of age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Di Tullio, Maria Antonietta; Amenta, Francesco

    2006-02-01

    The density and localization of muscarinic cholinergic M1-M5 receptor subtypes was investigated in frontal and occipital cortex of male Fisher 344 rats aged 6 months (young-adult), 15 months (mature) and 22 months (senescent) by combined kinetic and equilibrium binding and light microscope autoradiography. In 6-month-old rats, the rank order density of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes was M1>M2>M4>M3>M5 both in frontal and occipital cortex. A not homogeneous distribution of different receptor subtypes throughout cerebrocortical layers of frontal or occipital cortex was found. In frontal cortex silver grains corresponding to the M1 and M2 receptor subtypes were decreased in 15- and 22-month-old groups. The M3 receptor density was remarkably and moderately decreased in layers II/III and V, respectively, of rats aged 15 and 22 months. A reduced M4 receptor density was observed in layer I and to a lesser extent in layer V of mature and senescent rats, whereas no age-related changes of M5 receptor were found. In occipital cortex a diminution of M1 receptor was observed in layers II/III and V of mature and senescent rats. The M2 receptor expression decreased in layer I of 15- and 22-month-old senescent rats, whereas M3-M5 receptors were unchanged with exception of a slight decrease of the M4 receptor in layer IV and of M5 receptor in layers II/III. These findings indicate a different sensitivity to aging of muscarinic receptor subtypes located in various cerebrocortical layers. This may account for the difficulty in obtaining relevant results in manipulating cholinoceptors to counter age-related impairment of cholinergic system.

  15. Expression of m1-m4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor immunoreactivity in septohippocampal neurons and other identified hippocampal afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, S T; Levey, A I

    1996-11-18

    Muscarinic cholinergic transmission plays an important role in modulating hippocampal activity and many higher brain functions. Many of the modulatory effects of acetylcholine on hippocampal function result from direct effects in the hippocampus or from actions on the hippocampal afferent neurons. At each site, the differential expression of a family of five distinct but related receptor subtypes governs the nature of the response. The aim of the present study was to identify the subtypes expressed in the hippocampal afferent neurons by combining retrograde tracing with immunocytochemistry. The retrograde tracer, wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, was injected into the hippocampus unilaterally to label afferent neurons, and was combined with muscarinic (m) acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs) with immunocytochemistry to identify the m1-m4 subtypes expressed. The retrogradely labeled cells in the basal forebrain that contribute to the septohippocampal pathway were found to express m2, m3, and, to a lesser extent, m1. Commissural/associational pathway neurons, which were identified by retrogradely labeled cells in the ipsi- and contralateral dentate gyrus, expressed m1, m3, and m4. The retrogradely labeled cells in the entorhinal cortex of the perforant pathway expressed predominantly m1 and m3, with fewer neurons expressing m2 and m4. Raphe-hippocampal cells were found to express m1. Thus, this study provides evidence for the diversity of mAChR subtypes expressed in neurons that project to the hippocampus. The complex modulation by acetylcholine of hippocampal function, therefore, is governed not only by the variety of mAChRs expressed in the hippocampus but also by their differential expression in extrinsic hippocampal afferents.

  16. Effect of pimozide on the increase of muscarinic receptors caused by mazindol and apomorphine in the rat cerebral motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Sousa, F C; Marinho, M M; Aguiar, G V; Viana, G S

    1995-01-01

    The effects of pimozide, mazindol and apomorphine on muscarinic receptors in homogenates of rat cerebral motor cortex were measured by binding assays, using 3H-N-methylscopolamine (3H-NMS) alone as ligand (for the measurement of M1- and M2-like receptors) or in the presence of carbachol or pirenzepine for determination of M1- and M2-like receptors, respectively. Female Wistar rats (150 g) were treated daily for one week with pimozide, a dopaminergic antagonist (10 and 20 mg/kg, po, by gavage), or with apomorphine (1 mg/kg, ip). In another set of experiments, animals were treated with pimozide and 30 min later with mazindol (10 mg/kg, po, by gavage) or apomorphine. The drugs were administered daily for one week. Controls received the same volume of saline. 3H-NMS binding was increased from the control value of 418 +/- 17 to 548 +/- 42 fmol/mg protein by administration of mazindol (10 mg/kg) but binding was reduced to 360 +/- 11 fmol/mg protein upon administration of pimozide (20 mg/kg) plus mazindol (10 mg/kg). Similarly 10 mg/kg pimozide reduced the increase in M1-like receptors caused by mazindol from 262 +/- 31 to 220 +/- 20 fmol/mg protein. Although 20 mg/kg pimozide alone produced a decrease in M1- plus M2-like receptors (from 418 +/- 17 to 348 +/- 22 fmol/mg protein), its action was preferentially on M2-like receptors, decreasing them from 148 +/- 10 to 111 +/- 15 fmol/mg protein in the control and treated groups, respectively. At the higher dose, 20 mg/kg pimozide also inhibited the 3H-NMS binding (M1- plus M2-like receptors) in the presence of apomorphine (263 +/- 25 vs 418 +/- 17 fmol/mg protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Characterization of the effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating the contraction of guinea-pig isolated gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong-Tao; Liao, Zhi; Meng, Xian-Min; Yan, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Shu-Jie; Mo, Zheng-Ji

    2009-07-01

    The aim was to characterize the effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride, which mediates the relaxation of guinea-pig isolated gastrointestinal smooth muscle, on muscarinic receptor subtypes. Radioimmune assay was used to determine cAMP levels in isolated guinea-pig gastrointestinal smooth muscle to compare the selective effects of penehyclidine hydrochloride on muscarinic receptor subtypes. The results indicated that the relaxing effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on isolated gastrointestinal smooth muscle contraction induced by acetylcholine was stronger than that of atropine (based on PA2 values). In the radioimmune assay, penehyclidine hydrochloride increased the cAMP content in isolated guinea-pig stomach smooth muscle and decreased the cAMP content in isolated guinea-pig intestinal smooth muscle, but the difference was not statistically significant at a dose of 10 mumol/l. The results suggest that penehyclidine hydrochloride has little or no effect on M2 receptor subtypes in guinea-pig gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

  18. Role of ventrolateral orbital cortex muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in modulation of capsaicin-induced orofacial pain-related behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Erfanparast, Amir; Abbas Farshid, Amir; Delkhosh-Kasmaie, Fatmeh

    2017-11-15

    Acetylcholine, as a major neurotransmitter, mediates many brain functions such as pain. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of microinjection of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists and agonists into the ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLOC) on capsaicin-induced orofacial nociception and subsequent hyperalgesia. The right side of VLOC was surgically implanted with a guide cannula in anaesthetized rats. Orofacial pain-related behaviors were induced by subcutaneous injection of a capsaicin solution (1.5µg/20µl) into the left vibrissa pad. The time spent face rubbing with ipsilateral forepaw and general behavior were recorded for 10min, and then mechanical hyperalgesia was determined using von Frey filaments at 15, 30, 45 and 60min post-capsaicin injection. Alone intra-VLOC microinjection of atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) and mecamylamine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) at a similar dose of 200ng/site did not alter nocifensive behavior and hyperalgesia. Microinjection of oxotremorine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist) at doses of 50 and 100ng/site and epibatidine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist) at doses of 12.5, 25, 50 and 100ng/site into the VLOC suppressed pain-related behaviors. Prior microinjections of 200ng/site atropine and mecamylamine (200ng/site) prevented oxotremorine (100ng/site)-, and epibatidine (100ng/site)-induced antinociception, respectively. None of the above-mentioned chemicals changed general behavior. These results showed that the VLOC muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors might be involved in modulation of orofacial nociception and hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential effects of presynaptic versus postsynaptic adenosine A2A receptor blockade on Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) self-administration in squirrel monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justinová, Zuzana; Redhi, Godfrey H; Goldberg, Steven R; Ferré, Sergi

    2014-05-07

    Different doses of an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3 [3,7-dihydro-8-[(1E)-2-(3-ethoxyphenyl)ethenyl]-7 methyl-3-[3-(phosphooxy)propyl-1-(2 propynil)-1H-purine-2,6-dione] were found previously to either decrease or increase self-administration of cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or anandamide in squirrel monkeys. It was hypothesized that the decrease observed with a relatively low dose of MSX-3 was related to blockade of striatal presynaptic A2A receptors that modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, whereas the increase observed with a higher dose was related to blockade of postsynaptic A2A receptors localized in striatopallidal neurons. This hypothesis was confirmed in the present study by testing the effects of the preferential presynaptic and postsynaptic A2A receptor antagonists SCH-442416 [2-(2-furanyl)-7-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propyl]-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine] and KW-6002 [(E)-1, 3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl)-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6-dione], respectively, in squirrel monkeys trained to intravenously self-administer THC. SCH-442416 produced a significant shift to the right of the THC self-administration dose-response curves, consistent with antagonism of the reinforcing effects of THC. Conversely, KW-6002 produced a significant shift to the left, consistent with potentiation of the reinforcing effects of THC. These results show that selectively blocking presynaptic A2A receptors could provide a new pharmacological approach to the treatment of marijuana dependence and underscore corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission as a possible main mechanism involved in the rewarding effects of THC.

  20. Long-Term Activation upon Brief Exposure to Xanomleline Is Unique to M1 and M4 Subtypes of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantrůčková, Eva; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Xanomeline is an agonist endowed with functional preference for M1/M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. It also exhibits both reversible and wash-resistant binding to and activation of these receptors. So far the mechanisms of xanomeline selectivity remain unknown. To address this question we employed microfluorometric measurements of intracellular calcium levels and radioligand binding to investigate differences in the short- and long-term effects of xanomeline among muscarinic receptors expressed individually in Chinese hamster ovary cells. 1/One-min exposure of cells to xanomeline markedly increased intracellular calcium at hM1 and hM4, and to a lesser extent at hM2 and hM3 muscarinic receptors for more than 1 hour. 2/Unlike the classic agonists carbachol, oxotremorine, and pilocarpine 10-min exposure to xanomeline did not cause internalization of any receptor subtype. 3/Wash-resistant xanomeline selectively prevented further increase in intracellular calcium by carbachol at hM1 and hM4 receptors. 4/After transient activation xanomeline behaved as a long-term antagonist at hM5 receptors. 5/The antagonist N-methylscopolamine (NMS) reversibly blocked activation of hM1 through hM4 receptors by xanomeline. 6/NMS prevented formation of xanomeline wash-resistant binding and activation at hM2 and hM4 receptors and slowed them at hM1, hM3 and hM5 receptors. Our results show commonalities of xanomeline reversible and wash-resistant binding and short-time activation among the five muscarinic receptor subtypes. However long-term receptor activation takes place in full only at hM1 and hM4 receptors. Moreover xanomeline displays higher efficacy at hM1 and hM4 receptors in primary phasic intracellular calcium release. These findings suggest the existence of particular activation mechanisms specific to these two receptors. PMID:24558448

  1. Dysfunctional Presynaptic M2 Receptors in the Presence of Chronically High Acetylcholine Levels: Data from the PRiMA Knockout Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Franziska; Krejci, Eric; Zimmermann, Martina; Klein, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The muscarinic M2 receptor (M2R) acts as a negative feedback regulator in central cholinergic systems. Activation of the M2 receptor limits acetylcholine (ACh) release, especially when ACh levels are increased because acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is acutely inhibited. Chronically high ACh levels in the extracellular space, however, were reported to down-regulate M2R to various degrees. In the present study, we used the PRiMA knockout mouse which develops severely reduced AChE activity postnatally to investigate ACh release, and we used microdialysis to investigate whether the function of M2R to reduce ACh release in vivo was impaired in adult PRiMA knockout mice. We first show that striatal and hippocampal ACh levels, while strongly increased, still respond to AChE inhibitors. Infusion or injection of oxotremorine, a muscarinic M2 agonist, reduced ACh levels in wild-type mice but did not significantly affect ACh levels in PRiMA knockout mice or in wild-type mice in which ACh levels were artificially increased by infusion of neostigmine. Scopolamine, a muscarinic antagonist, increased ACh levels in wild-type mice receiving neostigmine, but not in wild-type mice or in PRiMA knockout mice. These results demonstrate that M2R are dysfunctional and do not affect ACh levels in PRiMA knockout mice, likely because of down-regulation and/or loss of receptor-effector coupling. Remarkably, this loss of function does not affect cognitive functions in PRiMA knockout mice. Our results are discussed in the context of AChE inhibitor therapy as used in dementia.

  2. Antipsychotic drug-like effects of the selective M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator VU0152100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Nellie E; Grannan, Michael; Bubser, Michael; Barry, Robert L; Thompson, Analisa; Rosanelli, John; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Damon, Stephen; Bridges, Thomas M; Melancon, Bruce J; Tarr, James C; Brogan, John T; Avison, Malcolm J; Deutch, Ariel Y; Wess, Jürgen; Wood, Michael R; Lindsley, Craig W; Gore, John C; Conn, P Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K

    2014-06-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that selective M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activators may offer a novel strategy for the treatment of psychosis. However, previous efforts to develop selective M4 activators were unsuccessful because of the lack of M4 mAChR subtype specificity and off-target muscarinic adverse effects. We recently developed VU0152100, a highly selective M4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) that exerts central effects after systemic administration. We now report that VU0152100 dose-dependently reverses amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats and wild-type mice, but not in M4 KO mice. VU0152100 also blocks amphetamine-induced disruption of the acquisition of contextual fear conditioning and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex. These effects were observed at doses that do not produce catalepsy or peripheral adverse effects associated with non-selective mAChR agonists. To further understand the effects of selective potentiation of M4 on region-specific brain activation, VU0152100 alone and in combination with amphetamine were evaluated using pharmacologic magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI). Key neural substrates of M4-mediated modulation of the amphetamine response included the nucleus accumbens (NAS), caudate-putamen (CP), hippocampus, and medial thalamus. Functional connectivity analysis of phMRI data, specifically assessing correlations in activation between regions, revealed several brain networks involved in the M4 modulation of amphetamine-induced brain activation, including the NAS and retrosplenial cortex with motor cortex, hippocampus, and medial thalamus. Using in vivo microdialysis, we found that VU0152100 reversed amphetamine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine levels in NAS and CP. The present data are consistent with an antipsychotic drug-like profile of activity for VU0152100. Taken together, these data support the development of selective M4 PAMs as a new approach to the treatment of psychosis

  3. Muscarinic M1 and M4 receptor subtypes in normal and patjhological conditions in the central nervous system : Studies on human and animal tissues using subtype selective ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Mulugeta, Ezra

    2003-01-01

    Snake venoms from different mamba species contain toxins that bind to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR). The toxins MT-1 (selective for M1 after iodination), M1 toxin-1 (also known as MT7, selective for MI) and M4 toxin-1 (also known as MT3, selective for M4 receptors) were isolated and used to study M1 and M4 receptor subtypes in normal and pathological conditions. The pharmacological profile of M1 toxin-1 was determined in functional assays using cloned human M1- ...

  4. Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors regulate the non-quantal release of acetylcholine in the rat neuromuscular junction via NO-dependent mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malomouzh, A. I.; Mukhtarov, M. R.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 6 (2007), s. 2110-2117 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011411; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:-(RU) 112.0/001/481 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * NO synthese Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.451, year: 2007

  5. Nucleus accumbens neurotransmission and effort-related choice behavior in food motivation: effects of drugs acting on dopamine, adenosine, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Podurgiel, Samantha; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2013-11-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Although nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA depletions or antagonism leave aspects of appetite and primary food motivation intact, rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks with high response requirements, and instead select less effortful food-seeking behaviors. Previous work showed that adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D2 antagonists on effort-related choice, and that stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors produces behavioral effects that are similar to those induced by DA antagonism. The present review summarizes the literature on the role of NAc DA and adenosine in effort-related processes, and also presents original data on the effects of local stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in NAc core. Local injections of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine directly into NAc core produces shifts in effort-related choice behavior similar to those induced by DA antagonism or A2A receptor stimulation, decreasing lever pressing but increasing chow intake in rats responding on a concurrent fixed ratio/chow feeding choice task. In contrast, injections into a neostriatal control site dorsal to the NAc were ineffective. The actions of pilocarpine on this task were attenuated by co-administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Thus, drugs that act on DA, adenosine A2A, and muscarinic receptors regulate effort-related choice behavior, which may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia that can be observed in depression and other disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in Membrane Cholesterol Differentially Influence Preferential and Non-preferential Signaling of the M1 and M3 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 10 (2015), s. 2068-2070 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * agonist binding * cholesterol * G-proteins * signal transduction * cAMP synthesis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.472, year: 2015

  7. Differences in kinetics of xanomeline binding and selectivity of activation of G proteins at M(1) and M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 2 (2006), s. 656-666 ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:NIH(US) NS25743 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : xanomeline * muscarinic receptors * G-protein activation Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 4.469, year: 2006

  8. Long-Term Activation upon Brief Exposure to Xanomleline Is Unique to M1 and M4 Subtypes of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šantrůčková, Eva; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2014), e88910 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * functional selectivity * xanomeline Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  9. Asparagine, valine, and threonine in the third extracellular loop of muscarinic receptor have essential roles in the positive cooperativity of strychnine-like allosteric modulators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Krejčí, Alena; Doležal, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 313, č. 2 (2005), s. 688-696 ISSN 0022-3565 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/02/1331; GA ČR(CZ) GP305/02/D090; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011306; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * positive cooperativity * mutation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.098, year: 2005

  10. Mutations in the third extracellular loop of M3 muscarinic receptor induce positive cooperativity between N-Methylscopolamine and Wieland-Gumlich aldehyde

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, č. S1 (2005), s. 221-221 ISSN 1474-3833. [FEBS Congress /30./ and IUBMB Conference /9./. 02.07.2005-07.07.2005, Budapest] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011306; GA ČR(CZ) GP305/02/D090 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric interaction * strychnine -like modulators * mutations * extracellular loop Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  11. Activation of muscarinic receptors by ACh release in hippocampal CA1 depolarizes VIP but has varying effects on parvalbumin-expressing basket cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L Andrew; Bell, Karen A; McQuiston, A Rory

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetically released acetylcholine (ACh) from medial septal afferents activates muscarinic receptors on both vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing (VIP) and parvalbumin-expressing (PV) basket cells (BCs) in mouse hippocampal CA1. ACh release depolarized VIP BCs whereas PV BCs depolarized, hyperpolarized or produced biphasic responses. Depolarizing responses in VIP or PV BCs resulted in increased amplitudes and frequencies of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The instantaneous frequency of sIPSCs that result from excitation of VIP or PV BCs primarily occurred within the low gamma frequency band (25-50 Hz). We investigated the effect of acetylcholine release on mouse hippocampal CA1 perisomatically projecting interneurons. Acetylcholine was optogenetically released in hippocampal slices by expressing the excitatory optogenetic protein oChIEF-tdTomato in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca cholinergic neurons using Cre recombinase-dependent adeno-associated virally mediated transfection. The effect of optogenetically released acetylcholine was assessed on interneurons expressing Cre recombinase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or parvalbumin (PV) interneurons using whole cell patch clamp methods. Acetylcholine released onto VIP interneurons that innervate pyramidal neuron perisomatic regions (basket cells, BCs) were depolarized by muscarinic receptors. Although PV BCs were also excited by muscarinic receptor activation, they more frequently responded with hyperpolarizing or biphasic responses. Muscarinic receptor activation resulting from ACh release increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in downstream hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with peak instantaneous frequencies occurring in both the gamma and theta bandwidths. Both PV and VIP BCs contributed to the increased sIPSC frequency in pyramidal neurons and optogenetic suppression of PV or VIP BCs inhibited s

  12. Identification and characterization of muscarinic receptors potentiating the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by corticotropin-releasing hormone in membranes of rat frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onali, P; Olianas, M C

    1998-08-01

    In membranes of the rat frontal cortex, acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists were found to potentiate the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity elicited by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Oxotremorine-M, carbachol and methacholine were as effective as ACh, whereas oxotremorine and arecoline were much less effective. The facilitating effect of Ach was potently blocked by the M1 antagonists R-trihexyphenidyl, telenzepine and pirenzepine and by the M3 antagonists hexahydro-sila-difenidol and p-fluorohexahydro-sila-difenidol, whereas the M2 and M4 antagonists himbacine, methoctramine, AF-DX 116 and AQ-RA 741 were less potent. The mamba venom toxin MT-1, which binds with high affinity to M1 receptors, was also a potent blocker. The pharmacological profile of the muscarinic potentiation of CRH receptor activity was markedly different from that displayed by the muscarinic inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase, which could be detected in the same membrane preparations. Moreover, the intracerebral injection of pertussis toxin impaired the muscarinic inhibition of cyclic AMP formation and reduced the Ach stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding to membrane G proteins but failed to affect the facilitating effect on CRH receptor activity. The latter response was also insensitive to the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine and to the inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid. These data demonstrate that in the rat frontal cortex, muscarinic receptors of the M1 subtype potentiate CRH transmission by interacting with pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins.

  13. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Subtypes of Muscarinic Receptors 2 (2nd) Held in Boston, Massachusetts on August 22-24 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-30

    mediate intrinsic gastrointestinal display uniform membrane properties,K 16.20 with the reflexes (e.g. peristalsis ) which underlie the co-ordinated...innervation to the gastrointestinal (Fig. I). The muscarinic depolarization in submucous epithelia is extrinsic, via sympathetic axons which come...termed M1 , while the receptors current in smooth muscle cells to a standard dose of ACh on gastrointestinal smooth muscle are designated K.3940

  14. The Effects of Repeated Low-Level Sarin Exposure on Muscarinic M1 Receptor Binding, Amyloid Precursor Protein Levels and Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the subsequent accumulation of synaptic acetylcholine (ACh). Likewise, exposure to the potent cholinergic agonist BM 123...Rev. 1997; 21(5): 559-579. 25. Muller DM, Mendla K, Farber SA and Nitsch RM. Muscarinic M1 receptor agonists increase the secretion of the amyloid...precursor protein ectodomain. Life Sciences. 1997; 60:985-991. 26. Nitsch RM, Deng M, Growdon JH and Wurtman RJ. Serotonin 5- HT2a and 5-HT2c

  15. A comparison of β-adrenoceptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in tissues of brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the black river and old woman creek, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevens, Jeffery A.; Baumann, Paul C.; Jones, Susan B.

    1996-01-01

    β-Adrenoceptors (βARs) and muscarinic cholinergic receptors were measured in brain, gill, and heart tissues of brown bullhead catfish exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Black River, Ohio, USA, and were compared to values from Old Woman Creek, Ohio, a reference site. A decreased number of βARs were found in the gill from Black River fish, possibly indicating a compensatory response subsequent to chemical stress.

  16. The M1 muscarinic receptor and its second messenger coupling in human neuroblastoma cells and transfected murine fibroblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Lin.

    1989-01-01

    The data of this study indicate that pirenzepine (PZ)-high affinity muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) are coupled to the hydrolysis of inositol lipids and not to the adenylate cyclase system in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The maximal carbachol(CCh)-stimulated [ 3 H]IP 1 accumulation in the SH-SY5Y cells was decreased in the presence of 1μg/ml pertussis toxin, suggesting that a pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein may be involved in the coupling. Several cell clones which express only M 1 mAChR were generated by transfecting the murine fibroblast B82 cells with the cloned rat genomic m 1 gene. The transfected B82 cells (cTB10) showed specific [ 3 H](-)QNB binding activity. The mAChRs in these cells are of the M 1 type defined by their high affinity for PZ and low affinity for AF-DX 116 and coupled to hydrolysis of inositol lipids, possibly via a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein. The relationship between the M 1 mAChR density and the receptor-mediated hydrolysis of inositol lipids was studied in 7 clones. The M 1 mAChR densities in these cells characterized by [ 3 H](-)MQNB binding ranged from 12 fmol/10 6 cells in LK3-1 cells to 260 fmol/10 6 cells in the LK3-8 cells

  17. Muscarinic M4 Receptors on Cholinergic and Dopamine D1 Receptor-Expressing Neurons Have Opposing Functionality for Positive Reinforcement and Influence Impulsivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Klawonn

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The neurotransmitter acetylcholine has been implicated in reward learning and drug addiction. However, the roles of the various cholinergic receptor subtypes on different neuron populations remain elusive. Here we study the function of muscarinic M4 receptors (M4Rs in dopamine D1 receptor (D1R expressing neurons and cholinergic neurons (expressing choline acetyltransferase; ChAT, during various reward-enforced behaviors and in a “waiting”-impulsivity test. We applied cell-type-specific gene deletions targeting M4Rs in D1RCre or ChATCre mice. Mice lacking M4Rs in D1R-neurons displayed greater cocaine seeking and drug-primed reinstatement than their littermate controls in a Pavlovian conditioned place preference (CPP paradigm. Furthermore, the M4R-D1RCre mice initiated significantly more premature responses (PRs in the 5-choice-serial-reaction-time-task (5CSRTT than their littermate controls, indicating impaired waiting impulse control. In contrast, mice lacking M4Rs in cholinergic neurons did not acquire cocaine Pavlovian conditioning. The M4R-ChATCre mice were also unable to learn positive reinforcement to either natural reward or cocaine in an operant runway paradigm. Immediate early gene (IEG expression (cFos and FosB induced by repeated cocaine injections was significantly increased in the forebrain of M4R-D1RCre mice, whereas it remained normal in the M4R-ChATCre mice. Our study illustrates that muscarinic M4Rs on specific neural populations, either cholinergic or D1R-expressing, are pivotal for learning processes related to both natural reward and drugs of abuse, with opposing functionality. Furthermore, we found that neurons expressing both M4Rs and D1Rs are important for signaling impulse control.

  18. Effect of partial volume correction on muscarinic cholinergic receptor imaging with single-photon emission tomography in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weckesser, M.; Ziemons, K.; Griessmeier, M.; Sonnenberg, F.; Langen, K.J.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W.; Hufnagel, A.; Elger, C.E.; Hacklaender, T.; Holschbach, M.

    1997-01-01

    Animal experiments and preliminary results in humans have indicated alterations of hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy often present with a reduction in hippocampal volume. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hippocampal atrophy on the quantification of mAChR with single photon emission tomography (SPET) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Cerebral uptake of the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist [ 123 I]4-iododexetimide (IDex) was investigated by SPET in patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy of unilateral (n=6) or predominantly unilateral (n=1) onset. Regions of interest were drawn on co-registered magnetic resonance images. Hippocampal volume was determined in these regions and was used to correct the SPET results for partial volume effects. A ratio of hippocampal IDex binding on the affected side to that on the unaffected side was used to detect changes in muscarinic cholinergic receptor density. Before partial volume correction a decrease in hippocampal IDex binding on the focus side was found in each patient. After partial volume no convincing differences remained. Our results indicate that the reduction in hippocampal IDex binding in patients with epilepsy is due to a decrease in hippocampal volume rather than to a decrease in receptor concentration. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Linking muscarinic receptor activation to UPS-mediated object memory destabilization: Implications for long-term memory modification and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiver, Mikaela L; Cloke, Jacob M; Nightingale, Natalie; Rizos, Julian; Messer, William S; Winters, Boyer D

    2017-11-01

    Consolidated memories can become destabilized during reactivation, resulting in a transient state of instability, a process that has been hypothesized to underlie long-term memory updating. Consistent with this notion, relatively remote memories, which are resistant to standard destabilization procedures, are reliably destabilized when novel information (i.e., the opportunity for memory updating) is present during reactivation. We have also shown that cholinergic muscarinic receptor (mAChR) activation can similarly destabilize consolidated object memories. Synaptic protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has previously been linked to destabilization of fear and object-location memories. Given the role of calcium in regulating proteasome activity, we hypothesized that activation of cholinergic receptors, specifically M 1 mAChRs, stimulates the UPS via inositol triphosphate receptor (IP 3 R)-mediated release of intracellular calcium stores to facilitate object memory destabilization. We present converging evidence for this hypothesis, which we tested using a modified spontaneous object recognition task for rats and microinfusions into perirhinal cortex (PRh), a brain region strongly implicated in object memory. We extend our previous findings by demonstrating that M 1 mAChRs are necessary for novelty-induced object memory destabilization. We also show that proteasome inhibition or IP 3 R antagonism in PRh prevents object memory destabilization induced by novelty or M 1 mAChR stimulation. These results establish an intracellular pathway linking M 1 receptors, IP 3 Rs, and UPS activity to object memory destabilization and suggest a previously unacknowledged role for cholinergic signaling in long-term memory modification and storage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A crosstalk between muscarinic and CRF2 receptors regulates cellular adhesion properties of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissier-Rota, M; Chartier, N T; Bonaz, B; Jacquier-Sarlin, M R

    2017-07-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease often suffer from chronic and relapsing intestinal inflammation that favor the development of colitis associated cancer. An alteration of the epithelial intestinal barrier function observed in IBD is supposed to be a consequence of stress. It has been proposed that corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor (CRF2), one of the two receptors of CRF, the principal neuromediator of stress, acts on cholinergic nerves to induce stress-mediated epithelial barrier dysfunction. Non-neuronal acetylcholine (Ach) and muscarinic receptors (mAchR) also contribute to alterations of epithelial cell functions. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms through which stress and Ach modulate epithelial cell adhesive properties. We show that Ach-induced activation of mAchR in HT-29 cells results in cell dissociation together with changes in cell-matrix contacts, which correlates with the acquisition of invasive potential consistent with a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) mode of invasion. These processes result from mAchR subsequent stimulation of the cascade of src/Erk and FAK activation. Ach-induced secretion of laminin 332 leads to α3β1 integrin activation and RhoA-dependent reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. We show that Ach-mediated effects on cell adhesion are blocked by astressin 2b, a CRF2 antagonist, suggesting that Ach action depends partly on CRF2 signaling. This is reinforced by the fact that Ach-mediated activation of mAchR stimulates both the synthesis and the release of CRF2 ligands in HT-29 cells (effects blocked by atropine). In summary, our data provides evidence for a novel intracellular circuit involving mAchR acting on CRF2-signaling that could mediate colonic mucosal barrier dysfunction and exacerbate mucosal inflammation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. M2/M4 muscarinic receptor binding in the anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavitsanou, Katerina; Katsifis, Andrew; Yu, Yinghua; Huang, Xu Feng

    2005-05-15

    We have previously shown a decrease in [(3)H]pirenzepine binding to M1/M4 muscarinic receptors in the anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia but not in major depression or bipolar disorder. The present study aimed to extend these findings by examining the binding of [(3)H]AF-DX 384 to M2/M4 receptors in the same cohort of subjects. Using quantitative autoradiography we measured [(3)H]AF-DX 384 binding in the anterior cingulate cortex of 15 schizophrenia, 15 bipolar, 15 major depression and 15 control cases. Post-mortem tissue was obtained from the Stanley Foundation Brain Bank. [(3)H]AF-DX 384 binding had a homogenous distribution amongst the layers of the anterior cingulate cortex, was higher in males than in females and declined with prolonged storage of tissue. An inverse correlation between [(3)H]AF-DX384 binding and age of onset of the disease was observed in the schizophrenia group suggesting that the earlier the age at onset the higher the binding was. In the depression group, there was a significant effect of gender on [(3)H]AF-DX 384 binding with females having lower binding in comparison to males. In the bipolar group, there was a significant inverse correlation between antipsychotic medication and [(3)H]AF-DX 384 binding, suggesting that the higher the dose of medication the lower the binding was. No differences in [(3)H]AF-DX 384 binding were seen between the four groups. The present results provide no evidence of M2/M4 receptor alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia and affective disorders and extend the body of evidence implicating cortical M1 but not M2 involvement in the pathology and pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia.

  2. Selective activation of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors reverses MK-801-induced behavioral impairments and enhances associative learning in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Dencker, Ditte; Gould, Robert W; Grannan, Michael; Noetzel, Meredith J; Lamsal, Atin; Niswender, Colleen M; Daniels, J Scott; Poslusney, Michael S; Melancon, Bruce J; Tarr, James C; Byers, Frank W; Wess, Jürgen; Duggan, Mark E; Dunlop, John; Wood, Michael W; Brandon, Nicholas J; Wood, Michael R; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K

    2014-10-15

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) represent a novel approach for the treatment of psychotic symptoms associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently reported that the selective M4 PAM VU0152100 produced an antipsychotic drug-like profile in rodents after amphetamine challenge. Previous studies suggest that enhanced cholinergic activity may also improve cognitive function and reverse deficits observed with reduced signaling through the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of the glutamate receptor (NMDAR) in the central nervous system. Prior to this study, the M1 mAChR subtype was viewed as the primary candidate for these actions relative to the other mAChR subtypes. Here we describe the discovery of a novel M4 PAM, VU0467154, with enhanced in vitro potency and improved pharmacokinetic properties relative to other M4 PAMs, enabling a more extensive characterization of M4 actions in rodent models. We used VU0467154 to test the hypothesis that selective potentiation of M4 receptor signaling could ameliorate the behavioral, cognitive, and neurochemical impairments induced by the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist MK-801. VU0467154 produced a robust dose-dependent reversal of MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and deficits in preclinical models of associative learning and memory functions, including the touchscreen pairwise visual discrimination task in wild-type mice, but failed to reverse these stimulant-induced deficits in M4 KO mice. VU0467154 also enhanced the acquisition of both contextual and cue-mediated fear conditioning when administered alone in wild-type mice. These novel findings suggest that M4 PAMs may provide a strategy for addressing the more complex affective and cognitive disruptions associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  3. Depression of presynaptic excitation by the activation of vanilloid receptor 1 in the rat spinal dorsal horn revealed by optical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeda Hiroshi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, we show that capsaicin (CAP depresses primary afferent fiber terminal excitability by acting on vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1 channels of primary afferent fibers in adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP- and temperature-dependent manner using two optical imaging methods. First, transverse slices of spinal cord were stained with a voltage-sensitive dye and the net excitation in the spinal dorsal horn was recorded. Prolonged treatment (>20 min with the TRPV1 channel agonist, CAP, resulted in a long-lasting inhibition of the net excitation evoked by single-pulse stimulation of C fiber-activating strength. A shorter application of CAP inhibited the excitation in a concentration-dependent manner and the inhibition was reversed within several minutes. This inhibition was Ca++-dependent, was antagonized by the TRPV1 channel antagonist, capsazepine (CPZ, and the P2X and P2Y antagonist, suramin, and was facilitated by the P2Y agonist, uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP. The inhibition of excitation was unaffected by bicuculline and strychnine, antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors, respectively. Raising the perfusate temperature to 39°C from 27°C inhibited the excitation (-3%/°C. This depressant effect was antagonized by CPZ and suramin, but not by the P2X antagonist, 2', 3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP. Second, in order to record the presynaptic excitation exclusively, we stained the primary afferent fibers anterogradely from the dorsal root. CAP application and a temperature increase from 27°C to 33°C depressed the presynaptic excitation, and CPZ antagonized these effects. Thus, this study showed that presynaptic excitability is modulated by CAP, temperature, and ATP under physiological conditions, and explains the reported central actions of CAP. These results may have clinical importance, especially for the control of pain.

  4. Selectivity of muscarinic antagonists in radioligand and in vivo experiments for the putative M1, M2 and M3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doods, H N; Mathy, M J; Davidesko, D; van Charldorp, K J; de Jonge, A; van Zwieten, P A

    1987-07-01

    In the present study we investigated the nature of the muscarinic receptors present in the hippocampus, sympathetic ganglia, atria and salivary glands of the rat. The heterogeneity of the muscarinic receptors was examined both in vivo and in radioligand binding experiments. To study whether the receptors present in the investigated tissues are indeed distinct subtypes we determined the potencies of antagonists in both systems. It is proposed that there are three different binding sites present in hippocampal, atrial and submandibular membranes and we suggest to classify them as M1, M2 and M3, respectively. Both in vivo and in vitro pirenzepine appears to possess high affinity for M1 receptors, whereas 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide and dicyclomine show high affinity for both M1 and M3 receptors. AF-DX 116 (11-2[[2-[(diethylamino)methyl]-1-piperidinyl]acetyl]-5, 11-dihydro-6H-pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one) displayed high affinity for M2 receptors.

  5. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, M.; Ming, X.; McArdle, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p 3 H](-) quinuclidinylbenzilate ([ 3 H](-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, [ 3 H]pirenzepine ([ 3 H]PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and [ 3 H]11-2-[[2-[(diethylamino) methyl]-1-piperidinyl] acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, ([ 3 H]AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (K d ) and density (B max ) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) [ 3 H](-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity

  6. Sex-related differences in the muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor in the healthy human brain. A positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Sasaki, Masayuki; Ichimiya, Atsushi; Takita, Masashi; Ogomori, Koji; Masuda, Kouji; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Ichiya, Yuichi

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the sex-related differences in the decline of the cerebral muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor (mACh-R) due to aging by using 11 C-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate ( 11 C-NMPB) and positron emission tomography (PET). The subjects consisted of 37 (20 males and 17 females) healthy volunteers. The 11 C-NMPB uptake was evaluated by the ratio method (regional 11 C-NMPB uptake/Cerebellar 11 C-NMPB uptake; rNMPB ratio). The correlation between sex, aging, and the rNMPB ratio in normal aging was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The rNMPB ratio was higher in females than in males throughout the entire cerebral region (p<0.01-p<0.0001) and the rNMPB ratio might thus possibly decline with age more rapidly in females. Our study therefore revealed the existence of sex-related differences in the cerebral mACh-R. (author)

  7. A randomised trial of a pre-synaptic stimulator of DA2-dopaminergic and alpha2-adrenergic receptors on morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars; Carlsen, Jan E

    2008-01-01

    Background: By pre-synaptic stimulation of DA(2)-dopaminergic and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors, nolomirole inhibits norepinephrine secretion from sympathetic nerve endings. We performed a clinical study with nolomirole in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods: The study was designed as a mul.......i.d. of nolomirole was not beneficial (or harmful) in patients with heart failure. (c) 2007 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1......Background: By pre-synaptic stimulation of DA(2)-dopaminergic and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors, nolomirole inhibits norepinephrine secretion from sympathetic nerve endings. We performed a clinical study with nolomirole in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods: The study was designed...... as a multicentre, double blind, parallel group trial of 5 mg b.i.d. of nolomirole (n=501) versus placebo (n=499) in patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction, recently in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III/IV. The primary endpoint was time to all cause death or hospitalisation for HF...

  8. Inhibitory effect of diazepam on muscarinic receptor-stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production in rat parotid acinar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujirai, Masao; Sawaki, Kohei; Kawaguchi, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the effect of diazepam (DZP) on phosphoinositide turnover, which plays an important role in the regulation of salivary secretion, in rat parotid acinar cells. DZP (10−9 M to 10−5 M), a potent agonist of both central- and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, dose-dependently decreased inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) production stimulated by carbachol, a muscarinic receptor agonist, in the cells. DZP produced a maximum inhibitory response at a concentration of 10−5 M, with IP3 production decreased to 63% of maximal levels. The concentration inducing half maximal inhibition of IP3 production was approximately 3.5×10−8 M. An inhibitory response to DZP was produced by a short-term pretreatment (benzodiazepine receptors, flumazenil and PK 11195, respectively. DZP showed a non-competitive inhibition of carbachol-stimulated IP3 production. It did not directly inhibit the activities of GTP-binding regulatory proteins and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in the parotid gland membranes, though choline chloride inhibited PLC activity. DZP (10−5 M) attenuated the increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the cells following stimulation of the muscarinic and α1-adrenoceptors. These results suggest that in the parotid acinar cells, DZP inhibits muscarinic receptor-stimulated IP3 production through benzodiazepine receptors and that PLC activity which produces IP3 is inhibited by chloride. The decreases in IP3 and [Ca2+]i in the cells may be connected with the suppression of salivary secretion induced by DZP. PMID:12429566

  9. Benznidazole Therapy Modulates Interferon-γ and M2 Muscarinic Receptor Autoantibody Responses in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrullis, Romina A.; Moscatelli, Guillermo F.; Moroni, Samanta; Volta, Bibiana J.; Cardoni, Rita L.; Altcheh, Jaime M.; Corral, Ricardo S.; Freilij, Héctor L.; Petray, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The presence of autoantibodies with adrenergic and cholinergic activity, capable of triggering neurotransmitter receptor-mediated effects, has been associated with pathogenesis in T. cruzi-infected hosts. The goal of this study was to investigate the production of anti-M2 muscarinic receptor autoantibodies (Anti-M2R AAbs) as well as the IFN-γ profile in children at the early stage of Chagas disease, and to examine whether trypanocidal chemotherapy with benznidazole (BZ) could modify both response patterns. Methods This study comprised 30 T. cruzi-infected children (mean age: 13.8 years) and 19 uninfected controls (mean age: 12.7 years). Infected patients were treated with BZ and followed-up. Blood samples collected at diagnosis-T0, end of treatment-T1, and six months later-T2 were analysed by ELISA for detection of Anti-M2R AAbs and circulating levels of IFN-γ. Results At T0, anti-M2R AAbs were demonstrated in 56.7% of T. cruzi-infected patients, whereas uninfected controls were 100% negative. The average age of Anti-M2R AAbs+ patients was higher than that from negative population. Infected children also displayed significantly stronger serum IFN-γ responses than controls. Upon BZ treatment, a significant linear decreasing trend in Anti-M2R AAb reactivity was recorded throughout the follow-up, with 29.7–88.1% decrease at T2. IFN-γ circulating levels also declined by T2. Conclusion Anti-M2R AAbs and IFN-γ raise early during chagasic infection in children and are downmodulated by BZ therapy. These findings reinforce the usefulness of early BZ treatment not only to eliminate the parasite but also to reduce potentially pathogenic immune responses. PMID:22066031

  10. Benzonidazole therapy modulates interferon-γ and M2 muscarinic receptor autoantibody responses in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina A Cutrullis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The presence of autoantibodies with adrenergic and cholinergic activity, capable of triggering neurotransmitter receptor-mediated effects, has been associated with pathogenesis in T. cruzi-infected hosts. The goal of this study was to investigate the production of anti-M2 muscarinic receptor autoantibodies (Anti-M2R AAbs as well as the IFN-γ profile in children at the early stage of Chagas disease, and to examine whether trypanocidal chemotherapy with benzonidazole (BZ could modify both response patterns. METHODS: This study comprised 30 T. cruzi-infected children (mean age: 13.8 years and 19 uninfected controls (mean age: 12.7 years. Infected patients were treated with BZ and followed-up. Blood samples collected at diagnosis-T0, end of treatment-T1, and six months later-T2 were analysed by ELISA for detection of Anti-M2R AAbs and circulating levels of IFN-γ. RESULTS: At T0, anti-M2R AAbs were demonstrated in 56.7% of T. cruzi-infected patients, whereas uninfected controls were 100% negative. The average age of Anti-M2R AAbs(+ patients was higher than that from negative population. Infected children also displayed significantly stronger serum IFN-γ responses than controls. Upon BZ treatment, a significant linear decreasing trend in Anti-M2R AAb reactivity was recorded throughout the follow-up, with 29.7-88.1% decrease at T2. IFN-γ circulating levels also declined by T2. CONCLUSION: Anti-M2R AAbs and IFN-γ raise early during chagasic infection in children and are downmodulated by BZ therapy. These findings reinforce the usefulness of early BZ treatment not only to eliminate the parasite but also to reduce potentially pathogenic immune responses.

  11. Muscarinic, adenosine and tropomyosin-related kinase B receptors modulate the neuromuscular developmental synapse elimination process

    OpenAIRE

    Nadal Magriñà, Laura

    2017-01-01

    El desarrollo del sistema nervioso periférico implica una inicial exuberante producción de neuronas y, una posterior reducción dependiente de actividad del número de sinapsis en las uniones neuromusculares (NMJ). Este proceso se denomina eliminación sináptica. Al final de la segunda semana postnatal, cada fibra muscular esta inervadas por una solo motoneurona. Los receptores muscarínicos de acetilcolina (mAChR), los receptores de adenosina (AR) y el receptor quinasa de tropomiosina B (TrkB) p...

  12. Inhibition of basal and amphetamine-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in the rat forebrain by muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nan; Mao, Li-Min; Sturich, Adrian; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Wang, John Q

    2018-03-22

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), especially its extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) subfamily, is a group of kinases enriched in the mammalian brain. While ERK is central to cell signaling and neural activities, the regulation of ERK by transmitters is poorly understood. In this study, the role of acetylcholine in the regulation of ERK was investigated in adult rat striatum in vivo. We focused on muscarinic M1 and M4 receptors, two principal muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor subtypes in the striatum. A systemic injection of the M1-perferring antagonist telenzepine did not alter ERK phosphorylation in the two subdivisions of the striatum, the caudate putamen and nucleus accumbens. Similarly, telenzepine did not affect ERK phosphorylation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), hippocampus, and cerebellum. Moreover, telenzepine had no effect on the ERK phosphorylation induced by dopamine stimulation with the psychostimulant amphetamine. In contrast to telenzepine, the M4-preferring antagonist tropicamide consistently increased ERK phosphorylation in the striatum and mPFC. This increase was rapid and transient. Tropicamide and amphetamine when coadministered at subthreshold doses induced a significant increase in ERK phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that mACh receptors exert a subtype-specific modulation of ERK in striatal and mPFC neurons. While the M1 receptor antagonist had no effect on ERK phosphorylation, M4 receptors inhibit constitutive and dopamine-stimulated ERK phosphorylation in these dopamine-innervated brain regions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. N-Ethylmaleimide Dissociates α7 ACh Receptor from a Complex with NSF and Promotes Its Delivery to the Presynaptic Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM)-sensitive factor (NSF) associates with soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP), that binds to SNAP receptors (SNAREs) including syntaxin, SNAP25, and synaptobrevin. The complex of NSF/SNAP/SNAREs plays a critical role in the regulation of vesicular traffic. The present study investigated NEM-regulated α7 ACh receptor translocation. NSF associated with β-SNAP and the SNAREs syntaxin 1 and synaptobrevin 2 in the rat hippocampus. NSF also associated with the α7 ACh receptor subunit, the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2, and the γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor γ2 subunit. NEM, an inhibitor of NSF, significantly dissociated the α7 ACh receptor subunit from a complex with NSF and increased cell surface localization of the receptor subunit, but such effect was not obtained with the GluA1, GluA2 or γ2 subunits. NEM, alternatively, dissociated synaptobrevin 2 from an assembly of NSF/β-SNAP/syntaxin 1/synaptobrevin 2. NEM significantly increased the rate of nicotine-triggered AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, without affecting the amplitude, in rat hippocampal slices. The results of the present study indicate that NEM releases the α7 ACh receptor subunit and synaptobrevin 2 from an assembly of α7 ACh receptor subunit/NSF/β-SNAP/syntaxin 1/synaptobrevin 2, thereby promoting delivery of the α7 ACh receptor subunit to presynaptic membrane.

  14. Distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor proteins m1 to m4 in area 17 of normal and monocularly deprived rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigges, M; Tigges, J; Rees, H; Rye, D; Levey, A I

    1997-11-10

    Antibodies to muscarinic cholinergic receptor proteins m1 to m4 were used in striate cortex tissue of normal rhesus monkeys to determine the laminar distribution of these proteins with special attention to geniculorecipient layers. The normal patterns were compared to those of monkeys whose ocular dominance system had been altered by visual deprivation. In normal monkeys, immunoreactivity of all four proteins was localized in complex laminar patterns; m1 was densest in layers 2, 3, and 6, followed by layer 5. In contrast, m2 reactivity was densest in lower layer 4C and in 4A; the latter exhibited a honeycomb pattern. Layers 2 and 3 displayed alternating dense and light regions; this pattern was complementary to that of cytochrome oxidase (CytOx). Laminar immunoreactivity for the m3 receptor was similar to the CytOx pattern, including a honeycomb in 4A and a pattern of alternating darker and lighter patches in layers 2/3. Antibody to m4 reacted most densely with layers 1, 2, 3, and 5, layers 2 and 3 exhibited alternating dark and light regions, and layer 4A had a faint honeycomb. Layer 4C was the lightest band. The differential distribution of these four muscarinic receptor subtypes suggests distinct roles in cholinergic modulation of visual processing in the primate striate cortex. Furthermore, all four muscarinic receptors appear to be insensitive to elimination of visual input via monocular occlusion from birth, to deprivation of pattern vision in one eye during a specific time period in adulthood, and to long-term retinal injury.

  15. Immunocytochemical localization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the rat endocrine pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Buwalda, B.; Strubbe, J.H.; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    Immunocytochemical application of the antimuscarinic acetylcholine receptor antibody M35 to pancreas tissue revealed the target areas for the parasympathetic nervous system. Immunoreactivity in the endocrine pancreas was much higher than that in the exocrine part. Moreover, the endocrine cells at

  16. Weak toxin WTX from Naja kaouthia cobra venom interacts with both nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mordvintsev, D.Y.; Polyak, Y.L.; Rodionov, D.I.; Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír; Karlsson, E.; Tsetlin, V.I.; Utkin, Y.N.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 18 (2009), s. 5065-5075 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine receptors * allosteric interaction * toxins Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.042, year: 2009

  17. Deficits in the activity of presynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptors contribute to altered neuronal excitability in fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji-Yong; Chadchankar, Jayashree; Vien, Thuy N; Mighdoll, Michelle I; Hyde, Thomas M; Mather, Robert J; Deeb, Tarek Z; Pangalos, Menelas N; Brandon, Nicholas J; Dunlop, John; Moss, Stephen J

    2017-04-21

    The behavioral and anatomical deficits seen in fragile X syndrome (FXS) are widely believed to result from imbalances in the relative strengths of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Although modified neuronal excitability is thought to be of significance, the contribution that alterations in GABAergic inhibition play in the pathophysiology of FXS are ill defined. Slow sustained neuronal inhibition is mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA B ) receptors, which are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors constructed from R1a and R2 or R1b and R2 subunits. Via the activation of G i/o , they limit cAMP accumulation, diminish neurotransmitter release, and induce neuronal hyperpolarization. Here we reveal that selective deficits in R1a subunit expression are seen in Fmr1 knock-out mice (KO) mice, a widely used animal model of FXS, but the levels of the respective mRNAs were unaffected. Similar trends of R1a expression were seen in a subset of FXS patients. GABA B receptors (GABA B Rs) exert powerful pre- and postsynaptic inhibitory effects on neurotransmission. R1a-containing GABA B Rs are believed to mediate presynaptic inhibition in principal neurons. In accordance with this result, deficits in the ability of GABA B Rs to suppress glutamate release were seen in Fmr1-KO mice. In contrast, the ability of GABA B Rs to suppress GABA release and induce postsynaptic hyperpolarization was unaffected. Significantly, this deficit contributes to the pathophysiology of FXS as the GABA B R agonist ( R )-baclofen rescued the imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission evident in Fmr1-KO mice. Collectively, our results provided evidence that selective deficits in the activity of presynaptic GABA B Rs contribute to the pathophysiology of FXS. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Release of acetylcholine from murine embryonic stem cells: effect of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors and blockade of organic cation transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Ignaz; Michel-Schmidt, Rosmarie; Dohle, Eva; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2012-11-27

    The non-neuronal cholinergic system is widely expressed in nature. The present experiments were performed to characterize the non-neuronal cholinergic system in murine embryonic stem cells (CGR8 cell line). CGR8 cells were cultured in gelatinized flasks with Glasgow's buffered minimal essential medium (Gibco, Germany). Acetylcholine was measured by HPLC combined with bioreactor and electrochemical detection. CGR8 cells contained 1.08±0.12 pmol acetylcholine/10(6) cells (n=7) which was reduced to 0.50±0.06 pmol/10(6) cells (n=6; pacetylcholine into the incubation medium was demonstrated, when cholinesterase activity was blocked by 10 μM physostigmine, with 97±13, 180±15 and 216±14 pmol being released from 65×10(6) cells after incubation periods of 2, 4 and 6h, respectively. The cumulative release corresponds to a fractional release rate of 2%/min. Blockade of nicotine or muscarine receptors did not significantly modulate the release of acetylcholine which was substantially reduced by 300 μM quinine (inhibitor of organic cation transporters). This inhibition showed considerable fading over the incubation period, indicating additional release mechanisms activated upon inhibition of organic cation transporters. Murine embryonic stem cells contain and release significant amounts of acetylcholine. The high fractional release rate and the compensation for blocked organic cation transporters indicate that non-neuronal acetylcholine may play a functional role in the homeostasis of murine embryonic stem cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Derek [Department of Psychiatry, Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Jim; Wyper, David [Department of Clinical Physics, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, G51 4TF (United Kingdom); Owens, Jonathan; Pimlott, Sally [Department of Clinical Physics, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-01

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[{sup 123}I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  20. Muscarinic type-1 receptors contribute to IK,AChin human atrial cardiomyocytes and are upregulated in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijman, Jordi; Kirchner, Dorit; Kunze, Franziska; Chrétien, Eva Maria; Michel-Reher, Martina B; Voigt, Niels; Knaut, Michael; Michel, Martin C; Ravens, Ursula; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2018-03-15

    Basal and acetylcholine-gated inward-rectifier K + -currents (I K1 and I K,ACh , respectively) are altered in atrial fibrillation (AF). G i -protein-coupled muscarinic (M) receptors type-2 are considered the predominant receptors activating I K,ACh . Although a role for G q -coupled non-M 2 -receptor subtypes has been suggested, the precise regulation of I K,ACh by multiple M-receptor subtypes in the human atrium is unknown. Here, we investigated M 1 -receptor-mediated I K,ACh regulation and its remodeling in chronic AF (cAF). M 1 -receptor mRNA and protein abundance were increased in atrial cardiomyocyte fractions and atrial homogenates from cAF patients, whereas M 2 -receptor levels were unchanged. The regulation of I K,ACh by M 1 -receptors was investigated in right-atrial cardiomyocytes using two applications of the M-receptor agonist carbachol (CCh, 2μM), with pharmacological interventions during the second application. CCh application produced a rapid current increase (Peak-I K,ACh ), which declined to a quasi-steady-state level (Qss-I K,ACh ). In sinus rhythm (Ctl) the selective M 1 -receptor antagonists pirenzepine (10nM) and muscarinic toxin-7 (MT-7, 10nM) significantly inhibited CCh-activated Peak-I K,ACh , whereas in cAF they significantly reduced both Peak- and Qss-I K,ACh , with no effects on basal inward-rectifier currents in either group. Conversely, the selective M 1 -receptor agonist McN-A-343 (100μM) induced a current similar to the CCh-activated current in Ctl atrial cardiomyocytes pretreated with pertussis toxin to inhibit M 2 -receptor-mediated G i -protein signaling, which was abolished by MT-7. Computational modeling indicated that M 1 - and M 2 -receptors redundantly activate I K,ACh to abbreviate APD, albeit with predominant effects of M 2 -receptors. Our data suggest that G q -coupled M 1 -receptors also regulate human atrial I K,ACh and that their relative contribution to I K,ACh activation is increased in cAF patients. We provide novel

  1. Muscarinic receptor-mediated activation of p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells: permissive role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Xiuwen; Wang, Lijun; Proud, Christopher G; Downes, C Peter

    2003-01-01

    In 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, carbachol stimulation of M3 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, coupled to phospholipase C, evoked a persistent 10-20-fold activation of p70 S6 kinase (S6K1). This response was abolished by chelation of cytosolic Ca2+ and reproduced by the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin, but was not prevented by down-regulation or inhibition of protein kinase C. Carbachol-stimulated activation and phosphorylation of S6K1 at Thr389 were prevented by rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR (mammali...

  2. M4 muscarinic receptors regulate the dynamics of cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission: relevance to the pathophysiology and treatment of related CNS pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzavara, Eleni T; Bymaster, Frank P; Davis, Richard J; Wade, Mark R; Perry, Kenneth W; Wess, Jurgen; McKinzie, David L; Felder, Chris; Nomikos, George G

    2004-09-01

    Dopaminergic dysfunction is an important pathogenetic factor for brain pathologies such as Parkinson's disease, ADHD, schizophrenia, and addiction as well as for metabolic disorders and anorexia. Dopaminergic neurons projecting from the midbrain to forebrain regions, such as the nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex, regulate motor and cognitive functions and coordinate the patterned response of the organism to sensory, affective, and rewarding stimuli. In this study, we showed that dopaminergic neurotransmission is highly dependent on M4 cholinergic muscarinic receptor function. Using in vivo microdialysis, we found elevated dopamine (DA) basal values and enhanced DA response to psychostimulants in the nucleus accumbens of M4 knockout mice. We also demonstrated impaired homeostatic control of cholinergic activity that leads to increased basal acetylcholine efflux in the midbrain of these animals. Thus, loss of M4 muscarinic receptor control of cholinergic function effectuates a state of dopaminergic hyperexcitability. This may be responsible for pathological conditions, in which appetitive motivation as well as affective and cognitive processing is impaired. We propose that M4 receptor agonists could represent an innovative strategy for the treatment of pathologies associated with hyperdopaminergia.

  3. Demonstration of a reduction in muscarinic receptor binding in early Alzheimer's disease using iodine-123 dexetimide single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, J.J.; Dubois, E.A.; Booij, J.; Habraken, J.; Munck, J.C. van; Herk, M. van; Verbeeten, B. Jr.; Royen, E.A. van

    1997-01-01

    Decreased muscarinic receptor binding has been suggested in single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies of Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unclear whether these changes are present in mildly demented patients, and the role of cortical atrophy in receptor binding assessment has not been investigated. We studied muscarinic receptor binding normalized to neostriatum with SPET using [ 123 I[4-iododexetimide in five mildly affected patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and in five age-matched control subjects. Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed in a consensus procedure blind to clinical diagnosis using matched magnetic resonance (MRI) images. Cortical atrophy was assessed by calculating percentages of cerebrospinal fluid in each ROI. An observer study with three observers was conducted to validate this method. Alzheimer patients showed statistically significantly less [ 123 I[4-iododexetimide binding in left temporal and right temporo-parietal cortex compared with controls, independent of age, sex and cortical atrophy. Mean intra-observer variability was 3.6% and inter-observer results showed consistent differences in [ 123 I[4-iododexetimide binding between observers. However, differences between patients and controls were comparable among observers and statistically significant in the same regions as in the consensus procedure. Using an MRI-SPET matching technique, we conclude that [ 123 I[4-iododexetimide binding is reduced in patients with mild probable Alzheimer's disease in areas of temporal and temporo-parietal cortex. (orig.). With 1 fig., 4 tabs

  4. In vivo and in vitro pharmacological characterization of SVT-40776, a novel M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist, for the treatment of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, C; Davalillo, S; Cabellos, J; Lagunas, C; Balsa, D; Pérez-Del-Pulgar, S; Ballarín, M; Fernández, Ag

    2009-03-01

    Highly selective M(3) muscarinic receptor antagonists may represent a better treatment for overactive bladder syndrome, diminishing side effects. Cardiac side effects of non-selective antimuscarinics have been associated with activity at M(2) receptors as these receptors are mainly responsible for muscarinic receptor-dependent bradycardia. We have investigated a novel antimuscarinic, SVT-40776, highly selective for M(3) over M(2) receptors (Ki = 0.19 nmol.L(-1) for M(3) receptor affinity). This study reports the functional activity of SVT-40776 in the bladder, relative to its activity in atria. In vitro and ex vivo (oral dosing) inhibition of mouse detrusor and atrial contractile responses to carbachol were used to study the functional activity of SVT-40776. The in vivo efficacy of SVT-40776 was characterized by suppression of isovolumetric spontaneous bladder contractions in anaesthetized guinea pigs after intravenous administration. SVT-40776 was the most potent in inhibiting carbachol-induced bladder contractions of the anti-cholinergic agents tested, without affecting atrial contractions over the same range of concentrations. SVT-40776 exhibited the highest urinary versus cardiac selectivity (199-fold). In the guinea pig in vivo model, SVT-40776 inhibited 25% of spontaneous bladder contractions at a very low dose (6.97 microg.kg(-1) i.v), without affecting arterial blood pressure. SVT-40776 is a potent inhibitor of M(3) receptor-related detrusor contractile activity. The absence of effects on isolated atria preparations represents an interesting characteristic and suggests that SVT-40776 may lack unwanted cardiac effects; a feature especially relevant in a compound intended to treat mainly elderly patients.

  5. Drugs interfering with Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Their effects on Place Navigation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jan; Popelíková, Anna; Stuchlík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Nov 9 (2017), č. článku 215. ISSN 1664-0640 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-04047S; GA ČR NV17-30833A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) PAN-17-07 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : scopolamine * biperiden * acetylcholine * receptor * behavior * learning Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 3.532, year: 2016

  6. Muscarinic receptor M4 positive allosteric modulators attenuate central effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Camilla; Weikop, Pia; Dencker, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    allosteric modulators VU0152100 and VU0467154 in a drug discrimination assay and a conditioned place preference assay, including extinction and reinstatement of place preference. Specificity of the cocaine discrimination effect was verified using knockout mice lacking either M1or M4receptors (M1-/-, M4....... As previously shown with VU0152100, VU0467154 almost eliminated cocaine-induced hyperactivity and striatal dopamine efflux. VU0467154 failed to attenuate acquisition of cocaine-conditioned place preference, but facilitated extinction and prevented reinstatement of the conditioned place preference. CONCLUSIONS...

  7. Gamma-secretase activity of presenilin 1 regulates acetylcholine muscarinic receptor-mediated signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popescu, Bogdan O; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2004-01-01

    causing an exon 9 deletion in PS1 results in enhanced basal phospholipase C (PLC) activity (Cedazo-Minguez, A., Popescu, B. O., Ankarcrona, M., Nishimura, T., and Cowburn, R. F. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 36646-36655). To further elucidate the mechanisms by which PS1 interferes with PLC-calcium signaling...... by the PLC inhibitor neomycin, the ryanodine receptor antagonist dantrolene, the general aspartyl protease inhibitor pepstatin A, and the specific gamma-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester. The cells expressing either PS1 D257A or PS1 D385N had attenuated...... or PS1 D385N dominant negative cells. Our findings suggest that PS1 can regulate PLC activity and that this function is gamma-secretase activity-dependent....

  8. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein (G/sub i/) and two additional pertussis toxin substrates associated with muscarinic receptors in rat heart myocytes: characterization and age dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscona-Amir, E.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-01

    The coupling of muscarinic receptors with G-proteins was investigated in cultured myocytes prepared from the hearts of newborn rats. The coupling was investigated in both young (5 days after plating) and aged (14 days after plating) cultures, in view of the completely different effects of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] on muscarinic agonist binding to homogenates from young vs aged cultures. Pretreatment of cultures from both ages by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) was found to eliminate any Gpp(NH)p effect on carbamylcholine binding. IAP by itself induced a rightward shift in the carbamylcholine competition curve in homogenates from aged cultures, but no such effect was observed in homogenates from young cultures. IAP-catalyzed [ 32 P]ADP-ribosylation of membrane preparations from young and aged cultures revealed major differences between them. Young cultures exhibited a major IAP substrate at 40 kDa, which was also recognized by anti-α/sub i/ antibodies, and two novel IAP substrates at 28 and 42 kDa, which were weakly ADP-ribosylated by the toxin and were not recognized with either anti-α/sub i/ or anti-α 0 antibodies. In aged cultures, only the 40-kDa band (ribosylated to a lower degree) was detected. The parallel age-dependent changes in the three IAP substrates (28, 40, and 42 kDa) and in the interactions of the G-protein(s) with the muscarinic receptors strongly suggest close association between the two phenomena. All of these age-dependent changes in the G-protein related parameters were prevented by phosphatidylcholine-liposome treatment of the aged cultures. The role of the membrane lipid composition in these phenomena is discussed

  9. In vivo biodistribution of 125IPIP and internal dosimetry of 123IPIP radioiodinated agents selective to the muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeden, W K; Hamby, D M; Carey, J E; Eckerman, K F; McPherson, D W; Knapp, F F

    2000-04-01

    The development of new radioiodinated ligands for imaging the muscarinic acetylcholinergic complex (mAChR) using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) requires the evaluation of human organ doses prior to approval for human use. Animal biodistribution and excretion data were obtained and evaluated for IPIP, a new mAChR agent. Preliminary biodistribution studies were performed on four different stereoisomers of IPIP. A biokinetic model of the Z-(S)-IPIP stereoisomer was constructed for the rat and used to estimate the internal absorbed dose in humans based on an extrapolation of the rat model. The thyroid is the critical organ for this radiopharmaceutical, with an absorbed dose estimate of 2.4 mGy/MBq for both males and females, when labeled with 123I. Even when blocked, the thyroid is still the critical organ, yet with a 90% dose reduction. The heart and brain receive the next highest doses in both males and females. Effective dose estimates for the use of pure 123I-PIP in humans are 0.16 mSv/MBq for males and 0.14 mSv/MBq for females. The biodistribution studies of the Z-(S)-IPIP stereoisomer showed the most promise as a successful agent for imaging muscarinic receptor sites in the heart and brain. IPIP also demonstrated potential as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical for some colon carcinomas where muscarinic receptor sites are expressed in the tumor cells. These results provide preliminary data for use of IPIP in clinical studies on humans.

  10. Roles of hippocampal GABA(A) and muscarinic receptors in consolidation of context memory and context-shock association in contextual fear conditioning: a double dissociation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Dar; Liang, K C

    2012-07-01

    Contextual fear conditioning involves forming a context representation and associating it to a shock, both of which involved the dorsal hippocampus (DH) according to our recent findings. This study tested further whether the two processes may rely on different neurotransmitter systems in the DH. Male Wistar rats with cannula implanted into the DH were subjected to a two-phase training paradigm of contextual fear conditioning to separate context learning from context-shock association in two consecutive days. Immediately after each training phase, different groups of rats received bilateral intra-DH infusion of the GABA(A) agonist muscimol, 5HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT, NMDA antagonist APV or muscarinic antagonist scopolamine at various doses. On the third day, freezing behavior was tested in the conditioning context. Results showed that intra-DH infusion of muscimol impaired conditioned freezing only if it was given after context learning. In contrast, scopolamine impaired conditioned freezing only if it was given after context-shock training. Posttraining infusion of 8-OH-DPAT or APV had no effect on conditioned freezing when the drug was given at either phase. These results showed double dissociation for the hippocampal GABAergic and cholinergic systems in memory consolidation of contextual fear conditioning: forming context memory required deactivation of the GABA(A) receptors, while forming context-shock memory involved activation of the muscarinic receptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Posterior Insular Cortex Is Altered in Preclinical Models of Neuropathic Pain: Key Role of Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Donepezil-Induced Antinociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Dalmann, Romain; El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Aissouni, Youssef; Graveron-Demilly, Danielle; Chalus, Maryse; Pinguet, Jérémy; Eschalier, Alain; Richard, Damien; Daulhac, Laurence; Balayssac, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most debilitating pain conditions, yet no therapeutic strategy has been really effective for its treatment. Hence, a better understanding of its pathophysiological mechanisms is necessary to identify new pharmacological targets. Here, we report important metabolic variations in brain areas involved in pain processing in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy using HRMAS 1H-NMR spectroscopy. An increased concentration of choline has been evidenced in the posterior insular cortex (pIC) of neuropathic animal, which was significantly correlated with animals' pain thresholds. The screening of 34 genes mRNA involved in the pIC cholinergic system showed an increased expression of the high-affinity choline transporter and especially the muscarinic M2 receptors, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis in oxaliplatin-treated rats and the spared nerve injury model (SNI). Furthermore, pharmacological activation of M2 receptors in the pIC using oxotremorine completely reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistently, systemic treatment with donepezil, a centrally active acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, prevented and reversed oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia as well as social interaction impairment. Intracerebral microdialysis revealed a lower level of acetylcholine in the pIC of oxaliplatin-treated rats, which was significantly increased by donepezil. Finally, the analgesic effect of donepezil was markedly reduced by a microinjection of the M2 antagonist, methoctramine, within the pIC, in both oxaliplatin-treated rats and spared nerve injury rats. These findings highlight the crucial role of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission as a critical mechanism of neuropathic pain, and suggest that targeting insular M2 receptors using central cholinomimetics could be used for neuropathic pain treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study describes a decrease in cholinergic neurotransmission in the posterior insular

  12. Overexpression of M3 Muscarinic Receptor Suppressed Adverse Electrical Remodeling in Hypertrophic Myocardium Via Increasing Repolarizing K+ Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cardiac hypertrophy (CH is an adaptive response to diverse cardiovascular conditions, which is accompanied by adverse electrical remodeling manifested as abnormal K+ channel activities. M3 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR is a novel regulator of cardiac electrical activity. In this study we aim to explore if the overexpression of M3-mAChR could attenuate the adverse electrical remodeling in CH and then uncover its underlying electrophysiological mechanisms. Methods: Transgenic mice with M3-mAChR overexpression (M3-TG and wild type (WT mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC to induce CH. Myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac function were quantified by the measurement of echocardiography, electrocardiogram, heart weight and tibia length. Whole-cell and signal-cell patch-clamp were employed to record electrophysiological properties by acute isolation of acutely isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes and Western blot was carried out to evaluate the Kir2.1and Kv4.2/4.3 protein levels in left ventricular tissue. Results: Compared with WT group, the elevation of cardiac index, including heart weight/body weight index and heart weight/tibia length index confirmed the myocardial hypertrophic growth induced by TAC. Echocardiography detection revealed that the TAC-treated mice showed an obvious increase in the thickness of left ventricular posterior wall (LVPW and ejection fraction (EF due to compensatory hypertrophy, which attenuated by the overexpression of M3-mAChR. Pressure overload induced a prolongation of QTc interval in WT mice, an effect blunted in M3-TG mice. Furthermore, compared with WT mice, M3-mAChR overexpression in hypertrophic myocardium accelerated cardiac repolarization and shortened action potential duration, and thus correcting the prolongation of QTc interval. Moreover, M3-TG mice have the greater current density of IK1 and Ito in ventricular myocytes after TAC compared with WT

  13. Differences between proximal and distal portions of the male rabbit posterior urethra in the physiological role of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Katsushi; Tsujii, Toshihiko; Morita, Takashi; Azuma, Hiroshi; Oshima, Hiroyuki

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate functional differences between embryologically different portions of the posterior urethra of male rabbits in response to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) stimulation using in vitro isometric tension experiments and radioligand binding studies. In the in vitro isometric tension experiments, carbachol, produced a dose-dependent contraction of the proximal portion under the resting state, but did not change the basal tone of the distal portion. Contraction of the proximal portion by 10−5 M noradrenaline (NA) was dose-dependently enhanced by carbachol either in the presence or absence of NG-nitro-L-arginine (NOARG). In contrast, carbachol induced relaxation of the distal portion contracted by 10−5 M NA, which was reversed to dose-dependent contraction in the presence of NOARG. Both portions of the urethra had a similar number of [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB) binding sites (195.3±74.1 fmols mg−1 protein for the proximal portion and 146.5±8.5 fmols mg−1 protein for the distal portion) with similar affinities (115.0±45.4 pM for the proximal portion and 79.9± 2.9 pM for the distal portion). The concentration-response curves to carbachol in both portions were shifted to the right in a parallel manner in the presence of pirenzepine (an M1 antagonist), 11-[[2-[(diethylamino)methyl]-1-piperidinyl] acetyl]-5, 11-dihydro-6H-pyrido-2,3-b)-(1,4)-benzodiazepin-6-one (AFDX-116, an M2 antgonist) and 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine (4-DAMP, an M1/M3 antagonist). The pA2 values for pirenzepine, AFDX-116 and 4-DAMP were 7.5±0.1, 7.2±0.02 and 9.3±0.1 respectively for the contraction of the proximal portion, and 7.2±0.1, 7.1±0.2 and 9.1±0.2, respectively for the relaxation of the distal portion. In conclusion mAChR subtypes distribute in a similar fashion throughout the length of the male rabbit posterior urethra with the discrepant responses to carbachol attributable to the

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi infection induces up-regulation of cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in vivo and in vitro

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    K. Peraza-Cruces

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of chagasic cardiomyopathy is not completely understood, but it has been correlated with parasympathetic denervation (neurogenic theory and inflammatory activity (immunogenic theory that could affect heart muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR expression. In order to further understand whether neurogenic and/or immunogenic alterations are related to changes in mAChR expression, we studied two models of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: 1 in 3-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats chronically infected with T. cruzi and 2 isolated primary cardiomyocytes co-cultured with T. cruzi and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Using [³H]-quinuclidinylbenzilate ([³H]-QNB binding assays, we evaluated mAChR expression in homogenates from selected cardiac regions, PBMC, and cultured cardiomyocytes. We also determined in vitro protein expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in serum and cell culture medium by ELISA. Our results showed that: 1 mAChR were significantly (P < 0.05 up-regulated in right ventricular myocardium (means ± SEM; control: 58.69 ± 5.54, N = 29; Chagas: 72.29 ± 5.79 fmol/mg, N = 34 and PBMC (control: 12.88 ± 2.45, N = 18; Chagas: 20.22 ± 1.82 fmol/mg, N = 19, as well as in cardiomyocyte transmembranes cultured with either PBMC/T. cruzi co-cultures (control: 24.33 ± 3.83; Chagas: 43.62 ± 5.08 fmol/mg, N = 7 for both or their conditioned medium (control: 37.84 ± 3.84, N = 4; Chagas: 54.38 ± 6.28 fmol/mg, N = 20; 2 [³H]-leucine uptake was increased in cardiomyocytes co-cultured with PBMC/T. cruzi-conditioned medium (Chagas: 21,030 ± 2321; control 10,940 ± 2385 dpm, N = 7 for both; P < 0.05; 3 plasma IL-6 was increased in chagasic rats, IL-1β, was increased in both plasma of chagasic rats and in the culture medium, and TNF-α level was decreased in the culture medium. In conclusion, our results suggest that cytokines are involved in the up-regulation of mAChR in chronic Chagas disease.

  15. Ligand binding and functional characterization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on the TE671/RD human cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencherif, M.; Lukas, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Cells of the TE671/RD human clonal line express a finite number ((Bmax) of about 350 fmol/mg of membrane protein) of apparently noninteracting, high-affinity binding sites (KD of 0.07 nM and a Hill coefficient close to unity, nH = 0.94) for the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) radio antagonist, tritium-labeled quinuclidinyl benzilate [ 3 H-QNB]. The rank order potency of selective antagonists that inhibit specific 3 HQNB binding is: atropine greater than 4-DAMP (4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide) greater than pirenzepine greater than methoctramine greater than AFDx-116 (11-2[2-[(diethylamino)methyl]-1-[piperidinyl] acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one). Functional studies indicate that phosphoinositide (PIns) hydrolysis in TE671/RD cells is increased by carbachol (EC50 of 10 microM), but not by nicotine (to concentrations as high as 1 mM). Agonist-stimulated PIns metabolism is inhibited by antagonists with the same rank order potency as for inhibition of 3 HQNB binding. Functional responses are augmented in the presence of a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, are strongly inhibited after 24-hr exposure to cholera toxin, but are only slightly inhibited after long-term exposure to pertussis toxin or forskolin. These studies identify a pharmacologically-defined M3-subtype of mAChR strongly coupled via a cholera toxin-sensitive mechanism to PIns hydrolysis in these cells. Within 1 hr of treatment of TE671/RD cells with 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP or with 10 microM phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), there is a 30 to 50% decrease in carbachol-stimulated PIns responsiveness that recovers to control values after 5 days of continued drug treatment. However, a comparable and more persistent inhibition of mAChR function is observed on cell treatment with 20 nM PMA

  16. Ligand binding and functional characterization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on the TE671/RD human cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencherif, M.; Lukas, R.J. (Division of Neurobiology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Cells of the TE671/RD human clonal line express a finite number ((Bmax) of about 350 fmol/mg of membrane protein) of apparently noninteracting, high-affinity binding sites (KD of 0.07 nM and a Hill coefficient close to unity, nH = 0.94) for the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) radio antagonist, tritium-labeled quinuclidinyl benzilate ({sup 3}H-QNB). The rank order potency of selective antagonists that inhibit specific {sup 3}HQNB binding is: atropine greater than 4-DAMP (4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide) greater than pirenzepine greater than methoctramine greater than AFDx-116 (11-2(2-((diethylamino)methyl)-1-(piperidinyl) acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepin-6-one). Functional studies indicate that phosphoinositide (PIns) hydrolysis in TE671/RD cells is increased by carbachol (EC50 of 10 microM), but not by nicotine (to concentrations as high as 1 mM). Agonist-stimulated PIns metabolism is inhibited by antagonists with the same rank order potency as for inhibition of {sup 3}HQNB binding. Functional responses are augmented in the presence of a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, are strongly inhibited after 24-hr exposure to cholera toxin, but are only slightly inhibited after long-term exposure to pertussis toxin or forskolin. These studies identify a pharmacologically-defined M3-subtype of mAChR strongly coupled via a cholera toxin-sensitive mechanism to PIns hydrolysis in these cells. Within 1 hr of treatment of TE671/RD cells with 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP or with 10 microM phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), there is a 30 to 50% decrease in carbachol-stimulated PIns responsiveness that recovers to control values after 5 days of continued drug treatment. However, a comparable and more persistent inhibition of mAChR function is observed on cell treatment with 20 nM PMA.

  17. Highly specific detection of muscarinic M3 receptor, G protein interaction and intracellular trafficking in human detrusor using Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt-Paetz, Mandy; Herbst, Luise; Weimann, Annett; Gonsior, Andreas; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2018-03-15

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) regulate a number of important physiological functions. Alteration of mAChR expression or function has been associated in the etiology of several pathologies including functional bladder disorders (e.g bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis - BPS/IC). In a previous study we found specific mAChR expression patterns associated with BPS/IC, while correlation between protein and gene expression was lacking. Posttranslational regulatory mechanisms, e.g. altered intracellular receptor trafficking, could explain those differences. In addition, alternative G protein (GP) coupling could add to the pathophysiology via modulation of muscarinic signaling. In our proof-of-principle study, we addressed these questions in situ. We established PLA in combination with confocal laserscanning microscopy (CLSM) and 3D object reconstruction for highly specific detection and analysis of muscarinic 3 receptors (M3), G protein (GP) coupling and intracellular trafficking in human detrusor samples. Paraffin sections of formalin-fixed bladder tissue (FFPE) of BPS/IC patients receiving transurethral biopsy were examined by Cy3-PLA for M3 expression, coupling of M3 to GPs (G αq/11 , G αs , G αi ) and interaction of M3 with endocytic regulator proteins. Membranes were labeled with wheat germ agglutinin-Alexa Fluor ® 488, nuclei were stained with DAPI. Object density and co-localization were analyzed in 3D-reconstruction of high resolution confocal z-stacks. Confocal image stack processing resulted in well demarcated objects. Calculated receptor densities correlated significantly with existing confocal expression data, while significantly improved specificity of M3 detection by PLA was verified using bladder tissue samples from transgenic mice. 50-60% of the M3 receptor complexes were plasma membrane associated in human bladder detrusor. Application of PLA for M3 and GPs allowed visualization of M3-GP interactions and revealed individual GP

  18. Cigarette Smoke Disturbs the Survival of CD8+ Tc/Tregs Partially through Muscarinic Receptors-Dependent Mechanisms in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells (Cytotoxic T cells, Tc are known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of smoking related airway inflammation including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, how cigarette smoke directly impacts systematic CD8+ T cell and regulatory T cell (Treg subsets, especially by modulating muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MRs, has yet to be well elucidated.Circulating CD8+ Tc/Tregs in healthy nonsmokers (n = 15, healthy smokers (n = 15 and COPD patients (n = 18 were evaluated by flow cytometry after incubating with anti-CD3, anti-CD8, anti-CD25, anti-Foxp3 antibodies. Peripheral blood T cells (PBT cells from healthy nonsmokers were cultured in the presence of cigarette smoke extract (CSE alone or combined with MRs agonist/antagonist for 5 days. Proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry using Ki-67/Annexin-V antibodies to measure the effects of CSE on the survival of CD8+ Tc/Tregs.While COPD patients have elevated circulating percentage of CD8+ T cells, healthy smokers have higher frequency of CD8+ Tregs. Elevated percentages of CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with declined FEV1 in COPD. CSE promoted the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of CD8+ T cells, while facilitated both the proliferation and apoptosis of CD8+ Tregs. Notably, the effects of CSE on CD8+ Tc/Tregs can be mostly simulated or attenuated by muscarine and atropine, the MR agonist and antagonist, respectively. However, neither muscarine nor atropine influenced the apoptosis of CD8+ Tregs.The results imply that cigarette smoking likely facilitates a proinflammatory state in smokers, which is partially mediated by MR dysfunction. The MR antagonist may be a beneficial drug candidate for cigarette smoke-induced chronic airway inflammation.

  19. Differential anti-ischaemic effects of muscarinic receptor blockade in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease; impaired vs normal left ventricular function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van den Heuvel; D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); G.L. Bartels; M. van der Ent (Martin); W.J. Remme (Willem)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: In patients with coronary artery disease acetylcholine (a muscarinic agonist) causes vasoconstriction. The effect of atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) on coronary vasotone in patients with normal or impaired left ventricular function is unknown.

  20. The M1 Muscarinic Receptor Antagonist VU0255035 Delays the Development of Status Epilepticus after Organophosphate Exposure and Prevents Hyperexcitability in the Basolateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven L.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I.; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Apland, James P.; Krishnan, Jishnu K. S.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to organophosphorus toxins induces seizures that progress to status epilepticus (SE), which can cause brain damage or death. Seizures are generated by hyperstimulation of muscarinic receptors, subsequent to inhibition of acetylcholinesterase; this is followed by glutamatergic hyperactivity, which sustains and reinforces seizure activity. It has been unclear which muscarinic receptor subtypes are involved in seizure initiation and the development of SE in the early phases after exposure. Here, we show that pretreatment of rats with the selective M1 receptor antagonist, VU0255035 [N-(3-oxo-3-(4-(pyridine-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)-benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole-4 sulfonamide], significantly suppressed seizure severity and prevented the development of SE for about 40 minutes after exposure to paraoxon or soman, suggesting an important role of the M1 receptor in the early phases of seizure generation. In addition, in in vitro brain slices of the basolateral amygdala (a brain region that plays a key role in seizure initiation after nerve agent exposure), VU0255035 blocked the effects produced by bath application of paraoxon—namely, a brief barrage of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents, followed by a significant increase in the ratio of the total charge transferred by spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents over that of the inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, paraoxon enhanced the hyperpolarization-activated cation current Ih in basolateral amygdala principal cells, which could be one of the mechanisms underlying the increased glutamatergic activity, an effect that was also blocked in the presence of VU0255035. Thus, selective M1 antagonists may be an efficacious pretreatment in contexts in which there is risk for exposure to organophosphates, as these antagonists will delay the development of SE long enough for medical assistance to arrive. PMID:27799295

  1. Investigation of m1/m4 muscarinic receptors in the anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavitsanou, Katerina; Katerina, Zavitsanou; Katsifis, Andrew; Andrew, Katsifis; Mattner, Filomena; Filomena, Mattner; Huang, Xu-Feng; Xu-Feng, Huang

    2004-03-01

    Abnormal cholinergic neurotransmission has been suggested to occur in psychiatric illness. Therefore, this study investigated cholinergic muscarinic receptors in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression disorder (n=15 per group). We used quantitative autoradiography to measure [(3)H]pirenzepine binding to M1 and M4 receptors. Brain tissue was obtained from the Stanley Foundation Neuropathology Consortium. [(3)H]pirenzepine binding was higher in superficial laminae (I-II) than in deep laminae (III-VI) of the ACC. There was a significant 24% reduction in the density of [(3)H]pirenzepine in the deep laminae and a significant 19% reduction in the upper laminae of the ACC in the schizophrenia group compared to the control group. There were no differences in [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in any laminae of the ACC in the bipolar or major depression groups compared with the control group, except for a trend towards decreased [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in subjects with major depression relative to control subjects. We also detected a significant effect of suicide on [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in the ACC in subjects who died as a result of suicide relative to those who did not, which was more evident in patients with schizophrenia. A significant effect of the onset of the disease was also observed that was more evident in patients with bipolar disorder. The study provides evidence of decreased muscarinic receptor density in the ACC in schizophrenia but no evidence for significant changes in these receptors in the bipolar and major depression groups. The changes observed in schizophrenia may contribute to dysfunctional ACC neural circuits.

  2. Regulation of synaptic MAPK/ERK phosphorylation in the rat striatum and medial prefrontal cortex by dopamine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bing; Mao, Li-Min; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Wang, John Q

    2015-10-01

    Dopamine and acetylcholine are two principal transmitters in the striatum and are usually balanced to modulate local neural activity and to maintain striatal homeostasis. This study investigates the role of dopamine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the regulation of a central signaling protein, i.e., the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We focus on the synaptic pool of MAPKs because of the fact that these kinases reside in peripheral synaptic structures in addition to their somatic locations. We show that a systemic injection of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) agonist SKF81297 enhances phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), a prototypic subclass of MAPKs, in the adult rat striatum. Similar results were observed in another dopamine-responsive region, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The dopamine D2 receptor agonist quinpirole had no such effects. Pretreatment with a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptors (M4Rs), VU0152100, attenuated the D1R agonist-stimulated ERK phosphorylation in the two regions, whereas the PAM itself did not alter basal ERK phosphorylation. All drug treatments had no effect on phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), another MAPK subclass, in the striatum and mPFC. These results demonstrate that dopamine and acetylcholine are integrated to control synaptic ERK but not JNK activation in striatal and mPFC neurons in vivo. Activation of M4Rs exerts an inhibitory effect on the D1R-mediated upregulation of synaptic ERK phosphorylation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Interactions between allosteric modulators and 4-DAMP and other antagonists at muscarinic receptors: potential significance of the distance between the N and Carboxyl C atoms in the molecules of antagonists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lysíková, Michaela; Havlas, Zdeněk; Tuček, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2001), s. 383-394 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0214; GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulation * 4-DAMP Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.638, year: 2001

  4. Effect of aqueous extract of mango kernel (Mangifera Indica on basal activity of virgin rat uterine smooth muscle: role of muscarinic receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Noureddini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mango belongs to the Anacardiaceae and the extracts from its stems, leaves, fruit and kernel are reported to affect smooth muscle contractility. We studied the role of cholinergic muscarinic receptors for the effects of aqueous extract of mango kernel (Mangifera indica on the basal activity of virgin rat uterine smooth muscle. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, mid-sections (n=24 of the uterine of healthy virgin rats were placed in an organ bath containing carbonated Tyrode’s solution under 1 g tension. The cumulative effects of the aqueous extracts of mango kernel (0.002, 0.02, 0.2, 2, 20, 200, and 2000 μg/mL or extract vehicle (Tyrode’s solution in the presence or absence of atropine were examined by isometric method using the strength, frequency and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle. Results: The cumulative concentrations (0.002-20 µg/ml of mango kernel aqueous extract was significantly decreased the strength, frequency and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle, but the contractile activity was returned to the basal level at the concentrations of 200 and 2000 µg/ml. Atropine (1 µM could not significantly change the effects of cumulative use of extract on the strength and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle, but it significantly enhanced the contractile frequency at low concentrations. Conclusion: The effects of aqueous extract of mango kernel on the activity of the uterine smooth muscle might not be through cholinergic muscarinic receptors and atropine could enhance the effects of the extract on frequency through other receptors.

  5. Nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptor cascade inhibits Na+-activated K+ currents in Kenyon cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    The interneurons of the mushroom body, known as Kenyon cells, are essential for the long-term memory of olfactory associative learning in some insects. Some studies have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is strongly related to this long-term memory in Kenyon cells. However, the target molecules and upstream and downstream NO signaling cascades are not completely understood. Here we analyzed the effect of the NO signaling cascade on Na+-activated K+ (KNa) channel activity in Kenyon cells of crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). We found that two different NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), strongly suppressed KNa channel currents. Additionally, this inhibitory effect of GSNO on KNa channel activity was diminished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and KT5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Next, we analyzed the role of ACh in the NO signaling cascade. ACh strongly suppressed KNa channel currents, similar to NO donors. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of ACh was blocked by pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist, but not by 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP) and mecamylamine, an M3 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist and a nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, respectively. The ACh-induced inhibition of KNa channel currents was also diminished by the PLC inhibitor U73122 and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. Finally, we found that ACh inhibition was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). These results suggested that the ACh signaling cascade promotes NO production by activating NOS and NO inhibits KNa channel currents via the sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling cascade in Kenyon cells. PMID:26984419

  6. Triazolam-induced modulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in living brain slices as revealed by a new positron-based imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, T.; Matsumura, K.; Onoe, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Sihver, S.; Sihver, W.; Langstroem, B.; Bergstroem, M.; Yonekura, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of triazolam, a potent benzodiazepine (BZ) agonist, on muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor (mAChR) binding was investigated in living brain slices by use of a novel positron-based imaging technique. Fresh rat brain slices were incubated with [ 11 C]N-methyl-4-piperidylbenzilate ([ 11 C]NMPB), a mAChR antagonist, in oxygenated Krebs-Ringer solution at 37 degree C. During incubation, time-resolved imaging of [ 11 C]NMPB binding in the slices was constructed on the storage phosphor screens. Addition of triazolam (1 μM) plus muscimol (30 μM), a GABA A receptor agonist, to the incubation mixture decreased the specific binding of [ 11 C]NMPB. Ro15-1788, a BZ receptor antagonist, prevented this effect, indicating that the effect was exerted through the GABA A /BZ receptor complex. These results demonstrated that stimulation of the GABA A /BZ receptor lowers the affinity of the mAChR for its ligand, which may underlie the BZ-induced amnesia, a serious clinical side effect of BZ. No such effect in the P2-fraction instead implies that the integrity of the neuronal cells and/or their environment is prerequisite for the modulation of mAChR by GABA A /BZ stimulation. (author)

  7. The Efficacy of LY293558 in Blocking Seizures and Associated Morphological, and Behavioral Alterations Induced by Soman in Immature Male Rats and the Role of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor in Organophosphate Induced Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-30

    Grunberg NE. 2001. Adult vs. adolescent rats differ in biobehavioral responses to chronic nicotine administration . Pharmacology, biochemistry, and...muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The use of OP nerve agents in attacks in Syria recently...higher AChE activity within the BLA. Seizures, if treated within 20 min or 60 min post-soman exposure could be arrested with the administration of

  8. Regional brain uptake of the muscarinic ligand, [18F]FP-TZTP, is greatly decreased in M2 receptor knockout mice but not in M1, M3 and M4 receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoda, E M; Kiesewetter, D O; Shimoji, K; Ravasi, L; Yamada, M; Gomeza, J; Wess, J; Eckelman, W C

    2003-04-01

    A muscarinic receptor radioligand, 3-(3-(3-fluoropropyl)thio) -1,2,5,thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-methylpyridine (fP-TZTP) radiolabeled with the positron emitting radionuclide (18)F ([(18)F]FP-TZTP) displayed regional brain distribution consistent with M2 receptor densities in rat brain. The purpose of the present study is to further elucidate the subtype selectivity of [(18)F]FP-TZTP using genetically engineered mice which lacked functional M1, M2, M3, or M4 muscarinic receptors. Using ex vivo autoradiography, the regional brain localization of [(18)F]FP-TZTP in M2 knockout (M2 KO) was significantly decreased (51.3 to 61.4%; Pcortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, superior colliculus, and thalamus. In similar studies with M1KO, M3KO and M4KO compared to their WT mice, [(18)F]FP-TZTP uptakes in the same brain regions were not significantly decreased at P<0.01. However, in amygdala and hippocampus small decreases of 19.5% and 22.7%, respectively, were observed for M1KO vs WT mice at P<0.05. Given the fact that large decreases in [(18)F]FP-TZTP brain uptakes were seen only in M2 KO vs. WT mice, we conclude that [(18)F]FP-TZTP preferentially labels M2 receptors in vivo.

  9. Combined treatment with a β3 -adrenergic receptor agonist and a muscarinic receptor antagonist inhibits detrusor overactivity induced by cold stress in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Minagawa, Tomonori; Nagai, Takashi; Suzuki, Toshiro; Saito, Tetsuichi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Nakazawa, Masaki; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    This study determined if combined treatment with the muscarinic receptor (MR) antagonist solifenacin and the β 3 -adrenergic receptor (AR) agonist mirabegron could inhibit detrusor overactivity induced by cold stress in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Thirty-two female 10-week-old SHRs were fed an 8% NaCl-supplemented diet for 4 weeks. Cystometric measurements of the unanesthetized, unrestricted rats were performed at room temperature (RT, 27 ± 2°C) for 20 min. The rats were then intravenously administered vehicle, 0.1 mg/kg solifenacin alone, 0.1 mg/kg mirabegron alone, or the combination of 0.1 mg/kg mirabegron and 0.1 mg/kg solifenacin (n = 8 each group). Five minutes later, the treated rats were exposed to low temperature (LT, 4 ± 2°C) for 40 min. Finally, the rats were returned to RT. After the cystometric investigations, the β 3 -ARs and M 3 -MRs expressed within the urinary bladders were analyzed. Just after transfer from RT to LT, vehicle-, solifenacin-, and mirabegron-treated SHRs exhibited detrusor overactivity that significantly decreased voiding interval and bladder capacity. However, treatment with the combination of solifenacin and mirabegron partially inhibited the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity patterns. The decreases of voiding interval and bladder capacity in the combination-treated rats were significantly inhibited compared to other groups. Within the urinary bladders, there were no differences between expression levels of M 3 -MR and β 3 -AR mRNA. The tissue distribution of M 3 -MRs was similar to that of the β 3 -ARs. This study suggested that the combination of solifenacin and mirabegron act synergistically to inhibit the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in SHRs. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:1026-1033, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effects of muscarinic M1 and M4 acetylcholine receptor stimulation on extinction and reinstatement of cocaine seeking in male mice, independent of extinction learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Kevin; Hart, Rachel; Lindsley, Craig W; Thomsen, Morgane

    2018-03-01

    Stimulating muscarinic M 1 /M 4 receptors can blunt reinforcing and other effects of cocaine. A hallmark of addiction is continued drug seeking/craving after abstinence and relapse. We tested whether stimulating M 1 and/or M 4 receptors could facilitate extinction of cocaine seeking, and whether this was mediated via memory consolidation. Experimentally naïve C57BL/6J mice were allowed to acquire self-administration of intravenous cocaine (1 mg/kg/infusion) under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement. Then, saline was substituted for cocaine until responding extinguished to ≤30% of cocaine-reinforced responding. Immediately after each extinction session, mice received saline, the M 1 /M 4 receptor-preferring agonist xanomeline, the M 1 receptor-selective allosteric agonist VU0357017, the M 4 receptor-selective positive allosteric modulator VU0152100, or VU0357017 + VU0152100. In additional experiments, xanomeline was administered delayed after the session or in the home cage before extinction training began. In the latter group, reinstatement of responding by a 10-mg/kg cocaine injection was also tested. Stimulating M 1  + M 4 receptors significantly expedited extinction from 17.2 sessions to 8.3 using xanomeline or 7.8 using VU0357017 + VU0152100. VU0357017 alone and VU0152100 alone did not significantly modify rates of extinction (12.6 and 14.6 sessions). The effect of xanomeline was fully preserved when administered delayed after or unpaired from extinction sessions (7.5 and 6.4 sessions). Xanomeline-treated mice showed no cocaine-induced reinstatement. These findings show that M 1 /M 4 receptor stimulation can decrease cocaine seeking in mice. The effect lasted beyond treatment duration and was not dependent upon extinction learning. This suggests that M 1 /M 4 receptor stimulation modulated or reversed some neurochemical effects of cocaine exposure.

  11. Muscarinic M1 receptors activate phosphoinositide turnover and Ca2+ mobilisation in rat sympathetic neurones, but this signalling pathway does not mediate M-current inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, Elena; Bevilacqua, Jorge A; Marsh, Stephen J; Halley, Pamela; Caulfield, Malcolm P

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between muscarinic receptor activation, phosphoinositide turnover, calcium mobilisation and M-current inhibition has been studied in rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurones in primary culture. Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) stimulation was measured by the accumulation of [3H]-cytidine monophosphate phosphatidate (CMP-PA) after incubation with [3H]-cytidine in the presence of Li+. The muscarinic agonist oxotremorine methiodide (oxo-M) stimulated PLC in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of approximately 3.5 μm. The concentration-response curve for oxo-M was shifted to the right by a factor of about 10 by pirenzepine (100 nm), suggesting a pKB (—log of the apparent dissociation constant) of 7.9 ± 0.4, while himbacine (1 μm) shifted the curve by a factor of about 13 (pKB∼7.1 ± 0.6). This indicates involvement of the M1 muscarinic receptor in this response. The accumulation of CMP-PA was localised by in situ autoradiography to SCG principal neurones, with no detectable signal in glial cells present in the primary cultures. The ability of oxo-M to release Ca2+ from inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive stores was determined by fura-2 microfluorimetry of SCG neurones voltage clamped in perforated patch mode. Oxo-M failed to evoke intracellular Ca2+ (Cai2+) mobilisation in SCG neurones voltage clamped at −60 mV, but produced a significant Cai2+ rise (67 ± 15 nm, n = 9) in cells voltage clamped at −25 mV. Thapsigargin (0.5–1 μm) caused a 70% inhibition of the oxo-M-induced Cai2+ increase, indicating its intracellular origin, while oxo-M-induced inhibition of M-current in the same cells was unaffected by thapsigargin. Our results do not support the involvement of InsP3-sensitive calcium mobilisation in M-current inhibition. PMID:10517804

  12. Hook-up of GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α for cholinergic muscarinic receptor-dependent LTD in the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanism underlying muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent LTD (mAChR-LTD in the hippocampus is less studied. In a recent study, a novel mechanism is described. The induction of mAChR-LTD required the activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, and the expression was mediated by AMPA receptor endocytosis via interactions between GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α. The hook-up of these proteins may result in the recruitment of leukocyte common antigen-related receptor (LAR, a PTP that is known to be involved in AMPA receptor trafficking. Interestingly, the similar molecular interaction cannot be applied to mGluR-LTD, despite the fact that the same G-protein involved in LTD is activated by both mAChR and mGluR. This discovery provides key molecular insights for cholinergic dependent cognitive function, and mAChR-LTD can serve as a useful cellular model for studying the roles of cholinergic mechanism in learning and memory.

  13. Molecular mechanics calculations on muscarinic agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, Huub; Kanters, Jan A.; Kroon, Jan

    1990-10-01

    Molecular mechanics calculations have been performed on the conformation freedom with respect to the torsion angles OCCN and COCC of acetylcholine, α( R-methylacetylcholine,β( S)-methylacetylcholine, α( R),β( S)-diemthylacetylcholine and muscarine, in order to obtain information about the active conformation and its interaction with the muscarinic cholinergic receptor. Muscarine has a rather flexible ring system, which makes modelling of the receptor site on the active conformation of this particular ligand a difficult problem. A common minimum for these compounds was found at {+ gauche,anti}), which is identified with the active conformation. However, OCCN angles of up to 120° can be accommodated in the receptor site. The reduced cholinergic activity of the α-methyl derivatives is probably caused by unfavourable interactions between the α-methyl group and the receptor site. The apparent contradictory high activity of the 2-acetyloxycyclopropylammonium ion can be explained by the distorted geometry of α substitution.

  14. CGEMA and VGAP: a Colour Graphics Editor for Multiple Alignment using a Variable GAP penalty. Application to the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moereels, Henri; De Bie, Ludo; Tollenaere, Jan P.

    1990-06-01

    Today, more than 40 protein amino acid (AA) sequences of membrane receptors coupled to guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) are available. For those working in the field of medicinal chemistry, these sequences present a new type of information that should be taken into consideration. To make maximal use of sequence data it is essential to be able to compare different protein sequences in a similar way to that used for small molecules. A prerequisite, however, is the availability of a processing environment that enables one to handle sequences in an easy way, both by hand and by computer. In order to meet these ends, the package CGEMA (Colour Graphics Editor for Multiple Alignment) was developed in our laboratory. The programme uses a user-definable colour coding for the different AAs. Sequences can be aligned by hand or by computer, using VGAP, and both approaches can be combined. VGAP is a novel in-house written alignment programme with a variable gap penalty that also handles consecutive alignments using one sequence as a probe. In addition, secondary structure prediction tools are available. From the 20 protein sequences, available for the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, 13 different sequences were selected, covering the subtypes m1 to m5. By comparing the sequences, two major groups are revealed that correspond to those found by considering the transducing system coupled to the various receptor subtypes. Different parts of the protein sequences are identified as characterizing the subtype and binding the ligands, respectively.

  15. Distinct presynaptic regulation of dopamine release through NMDA receptors in striosome- and matrix-enriched areas of the rat striatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, M.O.; Trovero, F.; Desban, M.; Gauchy, C.; Glowinski, J.; Kemel, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    Striosome- and matrix-enriched striatal zones were defined in coronal and sagittal brain sections of the rat, on the basis of 3 H-naloxone binding to mu-opiate receptors (a striosome-specific marker). Then, using a new in vitro microsuperfusion device, the NMDA (50 microM)-evoked release of newly synthesized 3 H-dopamine ( 3 H-DA) was examined in these four striatal areas under Mg(2+)-free conditions. The amplitudes of the responses were different in striosomal (171 +/- 6% and 161 +/- 5% of the spontaneous release) than in matrix areas (223 +/- 6% and 248 +/- 12%), even when glycine (1 or 100 microM) was coapplied (in the presence of 1 microM strychnine). In the four areas, the NMDA-evoked release of 3 H-DA was blocked completely by Mg 2+ (1 mM) or (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801; 1 microM) and almost totally abolished by kynurenate (100 microM). Because the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant NMDA-evoked release of 3 H-DA was similar in striosome- (148 +/- 5% and 152 +/- 6%) or matrix-enriched (161 +/- 5% and 156 +/- 7%) areas, the indirect (TTX-sensitive) component of NMDA-evoked responses, which involves striatal neurons and/or afferent fibers, seems more important in the matrix- than in the striosome-enriched areas. The modulation of DA release by cortical glutamate and/or aspartate-containing inputs through NMDA receptors in the matrix appears thus to be partly distinct from that observed in the striosomes, providing some functional basis for the histochemical striatal heterogeneity

  16. Distinct presynaptic regulation of dopamine release through NMDA receptors in striosome- and matrix-enriched areas of the rat striatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, M.O.; Trovero, F.; Desban, M.; Gauchy, C.; Glowinski, J.; Kemel, M.L. (College de France, Paris (France))

    1991-05-01

    Striosome- and matrix-enriched striatal zones were defined in coronal and sagittal brain sections of the rat, on the basis of {sup 3}H-naloxone binding to mu-opiate receptors (a striosome-specific marker). Then, using a new in vitro microsuperfusion device, the NMDA (50 microM)-evoked release of newly synthesized {sup 3}H-dopamine ({sup 3}H-DA) was examined in these four striatal areas under Mg(2+)-free conditions. The amplitudes of the responses were different in striosomal (171 +/- 6% and 161 +/- 5% of the spontaneous release) than in matrix areas (223 +/- 6% and 248 +/- 12%), even when glycine (1 or 100 microM) was coapplied (in the presence of 1 microM strychnine). In the four areas, the NMDA-evoked release of {sup 3}H-DA was blocked completely by Mg{sup 2}{sup +} (1 mM) or (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801; 1 microM) and almost totally abolished by kynurenate (100 microM). Because the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant NMDA-evoked release of {sup 3}H-DA was similar in striosome- (148 +/- 5% and 152 +/- 6%) or matrix-enriched (161 +/- 5% and 156 +/- 7%) areas, the indirect (TTX-sensitive) component of NMDA-evoked responses, which involves striatal neurons and/or afferent fibers, seems more important in the matrix- than in the striosome-enriched areas. The modulation of DA release by cortical glutamate and/or aspartate-containing inputs through NMDA receptors in the matrix appears thus to be partly distinct from that observed in the striosomes, providing some functional basis for the histochemical striatal heterogeneity.

  17. MAM-2201, a synthetic cannabinoid drug of abuse, suppresses the synaptic input to cerebellar Purkinje cells via activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Tomohiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Usami, Makoto; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Goda, Yukihiro; Sekino, Yuko

    2015-08-01

    Herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids-initially sold as legal alternatives to marijuana-have become major drugs of abuse. Among the synthetic cannabinoids, [1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](4-methyl-1-naphthalenyl)-methanone (MAM-2201) has been recently detected in herbal products and has psychoactive and intoxicating effects in humans, suggesting that MAM-2201 alters brain function. Nevertheless, the pharmacological actions of MAM-2201 on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and neuronal functions have not been elucidated. We found that MAM-2201 acted as an agonist of human CB1Rs expressed in AtT-20 cells. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings made from Purkinje cells (PCs) in slice preparations of the mouse cerebellum, we also found that MAM-2201 inhibited glutamate release at parallel fiber-PC synapses via activation of presynaptic CB1Rs. MAM-2201 inhibited neurotransmitter release with an inhibitory concentration 50% of 0.36 μM. MAM-2201 caused greater inhibition of neurotransmitter release than Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol within the range of 0.1-30 μM and JWH-018, one of the most popular and potent synthetic cannabinoids detected in the herbal products, within the range of 0.03-3 μM. MAM-2201 caused a concentration-dependent suppression of GABA release onto PCs. Furthermore, MAM-2201 induced suppression of glutamate release at climbing fiber-PC synapses, leading to reduced dendritic Ca(2+) transients in PCs. These results suggest that MAM-2201 is likely to suppress neurotransmitter release at CB1R-expressing synapses in humans. The reduction of neurotransmitter release from CB1R-containing synapses could contribute to some of the symptoms of synthetic cannabinoid intoxication including impairments in cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Augmentative effect of spinosin on pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex in mice associated with presynaptic 5-HT1A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-En; Zhang, Xue-Qiong; Yin, Yan-Qi; Zhang, Yong-He

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated whether spinosin potentiates pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR) in mice via 5-HT(1A) receptors. Our primary endpoint for sedation was LORR. In addition, the basal rectal temperature was measured. The results demonstrated that the 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT (s.c.) induced reductions in duration of LORR at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg (P pentobarbital (45 mg/kg, i.p.)-treated mice. This effect of 8-OH-DPAT was antagonized either by 5-HT(1A) antagonist p-MPPI (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or by spinosin (15 mg/kg, i.g.) with significance, respectively. Co-administration of spinosin and p-MPPI both at ineffective doses (spinosin at 5.0 mg/kg, i.g. and p-MPPI at 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) showed significant augmentative effects in reducing latency to LORR, and increasing LORR duration (P pentobarbital-treated mice. On the other hand, spinosin inhibited 8-OH-DPAT-induced hypothermia, which has been generally attributed to the activation of somatodendritic 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors in mice. Based on our previous results and the present data, it should be presumed that presynaptic 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor mechanisms may be involved in the inhibitory effect of spinosin on 8-OH-DPAT-induced hypothermia and also in the potentiating effect of spinosin on pentobarbital-induced LORR in mice. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. Beta3 adrenoceptors substitute the role of M(2) muscarinic receptor in coping with cold stress in the heart: evidence from M(2)KO mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, Jan; Novakova, Martina; Rotkova, Jana; Farar, Vladimir; Kvetnansky, Richard; Riljak, Vladimir; Myslivecek, Jaromir

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the role of beta3-adrenoceptors (AR) in cold stress (1 or 7 days in cold) in animals lacking main cardioinhibitive receptors-M2 muscarinic receptors (M(2)KO). There was no change in receptor number in the right ventricles. In the left ventricles, there was decrease in binding to all cardiostimulative receptors (beta1-, and beta2-AR) and increase in cardiodepressive receptors (beta3-AR) in unstressed KO in comparison to WT. The cold stress in WT animals resulted in decrease in binding to beta1- and beta2-AR (to 37%/35% after 1 day in cold and to 27%/28% after 7 days in cold) while beta3-AR were increased (to 216% of control) when 7 days cold was applied. MR were reduced to 46% and 58%, respectively. Gene expression of M2 MR in WT was not changed due to stress, while M3 was changed. The reaction of beta1- and beta2-AR (binding) to cold was similar in KO and WT animals, and beta3-AR in stressed KO animals did not change. Adenylyl cyclase activity was affected by beta3-agonist CL316243 in cold stressed WT animals but CL316243 had almost no effects on adenylyl cyclase activity in stressed KO. Nitric oxide activity (NOS) was not affected by BRL37344 (beta3-agonist) both in WT and KO animals. Similarly, the stress had no effects on NOS activity in WT animals and in KO animals. We conclude that the function of M2 MR is substituted by beta3-AR and that these effects are mediated via adenylyl cyclase rather than NOS.

  20. Beta amyloid differently modulate nicotinic and muscarinic receptor subtypes which regulate in vitro and in vivo the release of glycine in the rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eZappettini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Using both in vitro (hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion and in vivo (microdialysis approaches we investigated whether and to what extent β amyloid peptide 1-40 (Aβ 1-40 interferes with the cholinergic modulation of the release of glycine (GLY in the rat hippocampus. The nicotine-evoked overflow of endogenous GLY in hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion was significantly inhibited by Aβ 1-40 (10 nM while increasing the concentration to 100 nM the inhibitory effect did not further increase. Both the Choline (Ch (α7 agonist; 1 mM and the 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380, α4β2 agonist; 10 nM-evoked GLY overflow were inhibited by Aβ1-40 at 100 nM but not at 10nM concentrations. The KCl evoked [3H]GLY and [3H]Acetylcholine (ACh overflow were strongly inhibited in presence of oxotremorine; however this inhibitory muscarinic effect was not affected by Aβ1-40. The effects of Aβ1-40 on the administration of nicotine, veratridine, 5IA85380 and PHA 543613 hydrochloride (PHA543613 (a selective agonist of α7 subtypes on hippocampal endogenous GLY release in vivo were also studied. Aβ 1-40 significantly reduced (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM the nicotine evoked in vivo release of GLY. Aβ 1-40 (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM significantly inhibited the PHA543613 (1 mM-elicited GLY overflow while was ineffective on the GLY overflow evoked by 5IA85380 (1 mM. Aβ 40-1 (10 μM did not produce any inhibitory effect on nicotine evoked GLY overflow both in the in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our results indicate that a the cholinergic modulation of the release of GLY occurs by the activation of both α7 and α4β2 nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs as well as by the activation of inhibitory muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs and b Aβ 1-40 can modulate cholinergic evoked GLY release exclusively through the interaction with α7 and the α4β2 nAChR nicotinic receptors but not through mAChR subtypes.

  1. No changes in lymphocyte muscarinic receptors and platelet monoamine oxidase-B examined as surrogate central nervous system biomarkers in a Faroese children cohort prenatally exposed to methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coccini, Teresa; Manzo, Luigi; Debes, Frodi

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) are involved in the pathogenesis of neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Blood samples from 7-year-old exposed children were analyzed for platelet M....../or PCB exposure, whereas these markers are significantly altered in sustained exposure scenarios, as shown by clinical studies in drug addicts or patients treated with psychopharmacological agents....

  2. Cortical and nigral deafferentation and striatal cholinergic markers in the rat dorsal striatum: different effects on the expression of mRNAs encoding choline acetyltransferase and muscarinic m1 and m4 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayadjanian, N; Schofield, W N; Andren, J; Sirinathsinghji, D J; Besson, M J

    1999-10-01

    The regulation of the striatal m1 and m4 muscarinic receptor mRNA as well as the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) mRNA expression by nigral dopaminergic and cortical glutamatergic afferent fibres was investigated using quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry. The effects induced by a unilateral lesion of the medial forebrain bundle and a bilateral lesion of the sensorimotor (SM) cortex were analysed in the dorsal striatum 3 weeks after the lesions. Dopaminergic denervation of the striatum resulted in a marked decrease in the levels of m4 mRNA throughout the striatum, while the levels of muscarinic m1 mRNA and ChAT mRNA in cholinergic neurons were unaffected by the lesion. In contrast, following bilateral cortical ablation, the levels of the muscarinic m1 mRNA were significantly increased in the striatal projection area of the SM cortex, whereas the expression of m4 mRNA remained unchanged. Single cholinergic cell analysis by computer-assisted grain counting revealed a decreased labelling for ChAT mRNA per neuron following cortical ablation. However, in contrast to the topographical m1 mRNA changes, the decreased ChAT mRNA expression was evenly distributed within the striatum, suggesting an indirect cortical control upon striatal cholinergic interneurons. Altogether, these data suggest that dopaminergic nigral and glutamatergic cortical afferents modulate differentially cholinergic markers, at the pre- and post-synaptic levels. Beside the fact that nigral and cortical inputs exert an opposite control on cholinergic neurotransmission, our study further shows that this control involved different muscarinic receptor subtypes: the m4 and m1 receptors, respectively.

  3. Exposure to far-infrared rays attenuates methamphetamine-induced recognition memory impairment via modulation of the muscarinic M1 receptor, Nrf2, and PKC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Huynh Nhu; Sharma, Naveen; Shin, Eun-Joo; Nguyen, Bao Trong; Nguyen, Phuong Tram; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Jang, Choon-Gon; Cho, Eun-Hee; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Nam Hun; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2018-03-20

    We demonstrated that activation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) and inactivation of the glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1)-dependent systems are critical for methamphetamine (MA)-induced recognition memory impairment. We also demonstrated that exposure to far-infrared rays (FIR) causes induction of the glutathione (GSH)-dependent system, including induction of the GPx-1 gene. Here, we investigated whether exposure to FIR rays affects MA-induced recognition memory impairment and whether it modulates PKC, cholinergic receptors, and the GSH-dependent system. Because the PKC activator bryostatin-1 mainly induces PKCα, PKCε, and PKCδ, we assessed expression of these proteins after MA treatment. MA treatment selectively increased PKCδ expression and its phosphorylation. Exposure to FIR rays significantly attenuated MA-induced increases in PKCδ phosphorylation. Importantly, bryostatin-1 potentiated MA-induced phosphorylation of PKCδ. MA treatment significantly decreased M1, M3, and M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression. Of these, the decrease was most pronounced in M1 mAChR. Exposure to FIR significantly attenuated MA-induced decreases in the M1 mAChR and phospho-ERK 1/2 , while it facilitated Nrf2-dependent GSH induction. Dicyclomine, an M1 mAChR antagonist, and l-buthionine-(S, R)-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, counteracted against the protective potentials mediated by FIR. More importantly, the memory-enhancing potential of FIR rays was significantly counteracted by bryostatin-1, dicyclomine, and BSO. Our results suggest that exposure to FIR rays attenuates MA-induced impairment in recognition memory via up-regulation of M1 mAChR, Nrf2-dependent GSH induction, and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation by inhibiting PKCδ phosphorylation by bryostatin-1. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Presynaptic nicotinic α7 and non-α7 receptors stimulate endogenous GABA release from rat hippocampal synaptosomes through two mechanisms of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Zappettini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although converging evidence has suggested that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR play a role in the modulation of GABA release in rat hippocampus, the specific involvement of different nAChR subtypes at presynaptic level is still a matter of debate. In the present work we investigated, using selective α7 and α4β2 nAChR agonists, the presence of different nAChR subtypes on hippocampal GABA nerve endings to assess to what extent and through which mechanisms they stimulate endogenous GABA release. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: All agonists elicited GABA overflow. Choline (Ch-evoked GABA overflow was dependent to external Ca(2+, but unaltered in the presence of Cd(2+, tetrodotoxin (TTX, dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE and 1-(4,4-Diphenyl-3-butenyl-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride SKF 89976A. The effect of Ch was blocked by methyllycaconitine (MLA, α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX, dantrolene, thapsigargin and xestospongin C, suggesting that GABA release might be triggered by Ca(2+ entry into synaptosomes through the α7 nAChR channel with the involvement of calcium from intracellular stores. Additionally, 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380 elicited GABA overflow, which was Ca(2+ dependent, blocked by Cd(2+, and significantly inhibited by TTX and DHβE, but unaffected by MLA, SKF 89976A, thapsigargin and xestospongin C and dantrolene. These findings confirm the involvement of α4β2 nAChR in 5IA85380-induced GABA release that seems to occur following membrane depolarization and opening calcium channels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rat hippocampal synaptosomes possess both α7 and α4β2 nAChR subtypes, which can modulate GABA release via two distinct mechanisms of action. The finding that GABA release evoked by the mixture of sub-maximal concentration of 5IA85380 plus sub-threshold concentrations of Ch was significantly larger than that elicited by the sum of the effects of the two agonists is compatible with the possibility that

  5. Frequency-dependent depression of excitatory synaptic transmission is independent of activation of MCPG-sensitive presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, R; Cummings, D D; Dichter, M A

    1995-10-01

    1. A paired-pulse paradigm, and a high-frequency train followed by a test pulse, were used to investigate the possible role of presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in frequency-dependent modulation of the amplitude of excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs). Paired whole cell patch-clamp recordings from monosynaptically connected hippocampal neurons maintained in very low-density cultures were performed, using the mGluR antagonist (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, 500 microM) and the mGluR agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid [(1S,3R)-ACPD, 100 microM]. 2. Paired-pulse depression (PPD) was observed in all the excitatory pairs recorded. The average PPD ratio (amplitude of the 2nd EPSC divided by the amplitude of the 1st EPSC) was 0.80 +/- 0.1 (SD) (n = 8). Application of the mGluR antagonist MCPG had no effect on the amplitude of the EPSCs and did not affect the ratio of the two EPSCs (PPD ratio 0.79 +/- 0.2). 3. The amplitudes of 10 successive EPSCs stimulated at a high frequency (20 Hz) decremented on average in both 4 mM extracellular Ca2+ (n = 5) and in 1 mM extracellular Ca2+ (n = 6). In all pairs tested, posttetanic depression (PTD) was observed (PTD ratio 0.7 +/- 0.2). Bath application of MCPG (500 microM) did not affect the amplitudes of the EPSCs during the train; MCPG also did not affect PTD. 4. The mGluR agonist (1S,3R)-ACPD depressed the amplitudes of the EPSCs in both the paired-pulse (1st EPSC, 35 +/- 9%; 2nd EPSC, 36 +/- 10%) and posttetanic pulse (1 and 4 mM extracellular Ca2+) paradigms. The amount of depression observed, both PPD and PTD, remained unaffected by application of (1S,3R)-ACPD. Coapplication of the antagonist MCPG (500 microM) blocked the effects of (1S,3R)-ACPD (100 microM). 5. We conclude that frequency-dependent depression of EPSC amplitudes occurs independent of endogenous activation of MCPG-sensitive mGluRs in cultured hippocampal neurons. Moreover, we demonstrate that exogenous

  6. Functional activation of Gαqcoupled to 5-HT2Areceptor and M1muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in postmortem human cortical membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Ota, Toshio; Javier Meana, J; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2017-07-07

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) play a pivotal role in a wide range of signal transduction pathways, and receptor/G-protein coupling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of mental disorders. In this study, guanosine-5'-O-(3-[ 35 S]thio)triphosphate ([ 35 S]GTPγS) binding/immunoprecipitation assay for Gα q was applied to postmortem human brains. After its optimization for human prefrontal cortical membranes, we selected 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and carbachol as efficient agonists for subsequent experiments. The concentration-response curve of 5-HT shifted towards the right by the addition of increasing concentrations of ketanserin (with a pA 2 value of 9.18), indicating the involvement of the 5-HT 2A receptor. Besides, the carbachol-stimulated [ 35 S]GTPγS binding to Gα q was competitively antagonized by telenzepine (with a pA 2 value of 8.81), indicating the involvement of the M 1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). Concentration-response curves of 5-HT 2A receptor- and M 1 mAChR-mediated Gα q activation were determined in 40 subjects. The mean maximum percentage increase (%E max ) was 155 and 470%, respectively, and the mean half-maximal effect concentration (EC 50 ) was 131 nM and 15.2 µM, respectively. When the pharmacological parameters were correlated with age, postmortem delay, freezing storage period, and tissue pH, no statistically significant correlation was observed except for the negative correlation between age and %E max value of carbachol-stimulated [ 35 S]GTPγS binding to Gα q . The %E max values for 5-HT 2A receptor- and M 1 mAChR-mediated Gα q activation also tended to correlate with each other. These results provide fundamental information of Gα q -coupled 5-HT 2A receptor and M 1 mAChR in native human brains, and lay the foundation for future studies in mental disorder patients.

  7. Neuronal damage and changes in the expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the neonatal rat cerebral cortical upon exposure to sparteine, a quinolizidine alkaloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Soto, M E; Bañuelos-Pineda, J; Orozco-Suárez, S; Schliebs, R; Beas-Zárate, C

    2006-10-01

    Sparteine is a quinolizidine alkaloid (QA) produced by Lupine species that has generated much interest due to its anti-hypertensive, anti-pyretic, and anti-inflammatory properties. In the nervous system, sparteine has been shown to display anti-cholinergic and depressive activity, although how sparteine exerts its toxic effects in the brain remains unclear. We have addressed this issue by administering subcutaneous injections of sparteine (25 mg/kg of body weight) to rats on postnatal days 1 and 3, and then examining the expression of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subunits m1-m4 in the brains of the neonatal rats 14-60 days later. Administration of sparteine to neonatal rats caused neuronal damage in the cerebral motor cortex accompanied by transient changes in the expression of m1-m4 mAChR subunits as revealed by both RT-PCR and Western blotting. This effect could be prevented by pre-treatment with atropine (10 mg/kg) 1 h prior to the injection of sparteine, suggesting that the cytotoxic activity of sparteine is mediated through mAChRs.

  8. The role of protein kinase-G in the antidepressant-like response of sildenafil in combination with muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico; Wegener, Gregers; Brink, Christiaan

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently we reported on a novel antidepressant-like response following simultaneous administration of sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitor, thereby increasing cGMP levels), and atropine (muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) in the rat forced swim test (FST). It is unclear whether......-PET-cGMP, a PK-G inhibitor, and also whether a combination of 8-Br-cGMP (PK-G activator) ± atropine would likewise be active in the FST, and whether this combination could be attenuated by a PK-G inhibitor. Study methods The FST consisted of a 15 minute pre-conditioning swim session on the first day...... of the experiment, followed by a 5 minute test session on the second day. Injections were given at -24, -6 and -1 hour before the final swim session. Rats received imipramine (15 mg/kg, i.p.), sildenafil (10 mg/kg, i.p.) ± atropine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) ± Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMP (1 nmol, i.c.v.), 8-Br-cGMP (25 nmol, i...

  9. Differential regulation by agonist and phorbol ester of cloned m1 and m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in Y1 cells deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, N.M.; Nathanson, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    Cloned muscarinic acetylcholine m1 and m2 receptors were expressed in stably transfected mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in a variant Y1 line, Kin-8, which is deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (PKA - ). m1 and m2 receptors were rapidly internalized following exposure of transfected PKA + or PKA - cells to the muscarinic agonist carbachol. Thus, agonist-dependent internalization of m1 and m2 did not require PKA activity. A differential effect of PKA on regulation by agonist of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor, was unmasked in PKA - cells. These data indicate that the basal activity of PKA may modulate the agonist-dependent internalization of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor. The internalization of the m1 and m2 receptors in both PKA + and PKA - cells was accompanied by desensitization of functional responses. Exposure of PKA + cells to 10 -7 M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C, resulted in a 30 ± 9% decrease in the number of m1 receptors on the cell surface. The m2 receptor was not internalized following treatment of either PKA + or PKA - cells with PMA. Thus, the m1 and m2 receptors show differential sensitivity to internalization by PMA. Agonist-dependent internalization of the m1 receptor appeared to be independent of activation of PKC because (1) agonist-dependent internalization of m1 was not attenuated in PKA - cells, (2) the rate and extent of internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA were less than those in cells exposed to agonist, and (3) treatment of cells with concanavalin A selectivity blocked internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA, but not to agonist. The effects of agonist and PMA on receptor internalization were not additive. Exposure of PKA + or PKA - cells to PMA reduced the magnitude of pilocarpine-stimulated PI hydrolysis by about 25%

  10. Distinct presynaptic control of dopamine release in striosomal and matrix areas of the cat caudate nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemel, M.L.; Desban, M.; Glowinski, J.; Gauchy, C.

    1989-01-01

    By use of a sensitive in vitro microsuperfusion method, the cholinergic presynaptic control of dopamine release was investigated in a prominent striosome (areas poor in acetylcholinesterase activity) located within the core of cat caudate nucleus and also in adjacent matrix area. The spontaneous release of [ 3 H]dopamine continuously synthesized from [ 3 H]tyrosine in the matrix area was found to be twice that in the striosomal area; the spontaneous and potassium-evoked releases of [ 3 H]dopamine were calcium-dependent in both compartments. With 10 -6 M tetrodotoxin, 5 x 10 -5 M acetylcholine stimulated [ 3 H]dopamine release in both striosomal and matrix areas, effects completely antagonized by atropine, thus showing the involvement of muscarinic receptors located on dopaminergic nerve terminals. Experiments without tetrodotoxin revealed a more complex regulation of dopamine release in the matrix: (i) in contrast to results seen in the striosome, acetylcholine induced only a transient stimulatory effect on matrix dopamine release. (ii) Although 10 -6 M atropine completely abolished the cholinergic stimulatory effect on [ 3 H]dopamine release in striosomal area, delayed and prolonged stimulation of [ 3 H] dopamine release was seen with atropine in the matrix. The latter effect was completely abolished by the nicotinic antagonist pempidine. Therefore, in the matrix, in addition to its direct (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) facilitatory action on [ 3 H]dopamine release, acetylcholine exerts two indirect (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) opposing effects: an inhibition and a stimulation of [ 3 H]dopamine release mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, respectively

  11. Contribution of muscarinic M1 receptors to the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in layer II of the entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Shawnna G; Chapman, C Andrew

    2013-10-25

    The entorhinal cortex is thought to play roles in sensory and mnemonic function, and the cholinergic suppression of the strength of synaptic inputs is likely to have important impacts on these processes. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the medial entorhinal cortex evoked by stimulation of the piriform cortex are suppressed during theta EEG activity in behaving animals, and cholinergic receptor activation suppresses synaptic responses both in vivo, and in layer II entorhinal neurons in vitro. Here, we have used in vitro field potential recordings to investigate the transmitter receptors that mediate the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in layer I inputs to layer II of the medial entorhinal cortex. Bath-application of the cholinergic agonist carbachol suppressed the amplitude of fEPSPs with an EC50 of 5.3μM, and enhanced paired-pulse ratio. The M2/M4 preferring receptor blocker methoctramine, or the M4 receptor blocker PD102807, did not prevent the cholinergic suppression. However, the M1/M4 receptor blocker pirenzepine and the M1 receptor blocker VU0255035 reduced the suppression, suggesting that the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in the entorhinal cortex is dependent in large part on activation of M1 receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Muscarinic Receptors Types 1 and 2 in the Preoptic-Anterior Hypothalamic Areas Regulate Ovulation Unequally in the Rat Oestrous Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadira L. López-Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic receptors types 1 (m1AChR and 2 (m2AChR in the preoptic and anterior hypothalamus areas (POA-AHA were counted, and the effects of blocking these receptors on spontaneous ovulation were analysed throughout the rat oestrous cycle. Rats in each phase of the oestrous cycle were assigned to the following experiments: (1 an immunohistochemical study of the number of cells expressing m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA and (2 analysis of the effects of the unilateral blockade of the m1AChR (pirenzepine, PZP or m2AChR (methoctramine, MTC on either side of the POA-AHA on the ovulation rate. The number of m2AChR-immunoreactive cells was significantly higher at 09:00 h on each day of the oestrous cycle in the POA-AHA region, while no changes in the expression profile of m1AChR protein were observed. The ovulation rate in rats treated with PZP on the oestrous day was lower than that in the vehicle group. Animals treated on dioestrous-1 with PZP or MTC had a higher ovulation rate than those in the vehicle group. In contrast, on dioestrous-2, the MTC treatment decreased the ovulation rate. These results suggest that m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA could participate in the regulation of spontaneous ovulation in rats.

  13. Laminar expression of m1-, m3- and m4-muscarinic cholinergic receptor genes in the developing rat visual cortex using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Effect of monocular visual deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, S; Kues, W; Witzemann, V; Schliebs, R

    1993-06-01

    The postnatal development of laminar pattern of m1-, m3- and m4-mRNA-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the visual cortex of both normally raised and monocularly deprived rats (one eyelid sutured at the age of 11 days) was studied using in situ hybridization histochemistry and computer-assisted image analysis. From birth until day 15 the level of m1-receptor transcript in layer II/III increases markedly as compared to deeper layers. From day 15 up to day 18 a transient bimodal pattern develops with peaks in layers II/III and VI. Already on day 35 a more homogeneous distribution of m1-receptor mRNA level is detectable persisting until adulthood. In contrast, the m3-receptor mRNA shows already at birth a bimodal distribution with peaks in layers II/III and VI. Further development until adulthood results in transient changes in the ratio of the mRNA levels in these layers. In the adult visual cortex a similar laminar pattern as at birth is observed. From day 1 up to day 10 a relative increase in the mRNA level of the m4-receptor in layers II to IV is observed. From day 10 until day 15 a bimodal distribution of receptor mRNA develops with peaks in layers III and VI which is similar to the adult stage. However, between days 18 and 35 a shift in the laminar receptor mRNA distribution occurs resulting in peaks in layers IV and VI. The labeling of the m5-receptor transcript in rat visual cortex was very weak and did not show any alteration with age. Unilateral eyelid closure from postnatal day 11 resulted in transient changes in the laminar distribution of m3- and m4-receptor mRNA between postnatal days 18 and 25, whereas the development of the laminar pattern of the m1-receptor mRNA was not affected regardless of the length of visual deprivation. The distinct laminar developmental pattern of mRNA muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat visual cortex suggests specific roles of the muscarinic receptor subtypes during the first weeks of postnatal maturation of visual

  14. Anxiolytic effects of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors agonist oxotremorine in chronically stressed rats and related changes in BDNF and FGF2 levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Liberto, Valentina; Frinchi, Monica; Verdi, Vincenzo; Vitale, Angela; Plescia, Fulvio; Cannizzaro, Carla; Massenti, Maria F; Belluardo, Natale; Mudò, Giuseppa

    2017-02-01

    In depressive disorders, one of the mechanisms proposed for antidepressant drugs is the enhancement of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Previously, we showed that the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist oxotremorine (Oxo) increases neuronal plasticity in hippocampal neurons via FGFR1 transactivation. Here, we aimed to explore (a) whether Oxo exerts anxiolytic effect in the rat model of anxiety-depression-like behavior induced by chronic restraint stress (CRS), and (b) if the anxiolytic effect of Oxo is associated with the modulation of neurotrophic factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), and phosphorylated Erk1/2 (p-Erk1/2) levels in the dorsal or ventral hippocampus and in the medial prefrontal cortex. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: control unstressed, CRS group, CRS group treated with 0.2 mg/kg Oxo, and unstressed group treated with Oxo. After 21 days of CRS, the groups were treated for 10 days with Oxo or saline. The anxiolytic role of Oxo was tested by using the following: forced swimming test, novelty suppressed feeding test, elevated plus maze test, and light/dark box test. The hippocampi and prefrontal cortex were used to evaluate BDNF and FGF2 protein levels and p-Erk1/2 levels. Oxo treatment significantly attenuated anxiety induced by CRS. Moreover, Oxo treatment counteracted the CRS-induced reduction of BDNF and FGF2 levels in the ventral hippocampus and medial prefrontal cerebral cortex CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that Oxo treatment ameliorates the stress-induced anxiety-like behavior and rescues FGF2 and BDNF levels in two brain regions involved in CRS-induced anxiety, ventral hippocampal formation, and medial prefrontal cortex.

  15. Impaired recovery of brain muscarinic receptor sites following an adaptive down-regulation induced by repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate in aged rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; De Angelis, S.; Michalek, H.

    1990-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the recovery rate of brain cholinesterase activity (ChE) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites (mAChRs) following reduction induced by repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were s.c. injected with DFP on alternate days for 2 weeks and killed 48 hr and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after the last treatment. In the hippocampus and striatum, but not in the cerebral cortex, of control rats there as a significant age-related decline of ChE activity and maximal density of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax). The repeated administration of DFP during the first week caused a syndrome of cholinergic stimulation both in aged and young rats. The syndrome was more pronounced, in terms of intensity and duration in aged than in young animals resulting in 40 and 12% mortality, respectively; during the second week the syndrome attenuated in the two age-groups. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE at the end of DFP treatment did not differ between young and surviving aged rats. The down-regulation of mACRs was present in the three brain regions of both young and age rats (from 20 to 40%). Factorial analysis of variance showed significant differences for age, recovery rate, and significant interaction between age and recovery rate, both for ChE and mAChRs in young rats the three brain areas

  16. Increased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity, sensitization, and accumbal dopamine release in M5 muscarinic receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene S; Miller, Anthony D; Lester, Deranda B

    2010-01-01

    showed that M(5) receptor knockout (M (5) (-/-) ) mice are less sensitive to the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Here, we investigate the role of M(5) receptors in the effects of amphetamine and cocaine on locomotor activity, locomotor sensitization, and dopamine release...... and locomotor sensitization were enhanced in M (5) (-/-) mice, while the effects of cocaine were similar in M (5) (-/-) and wild-type mice. RESULTS: Consistent with the behavioral results, amphetamine-, but not cocaine, -elicited dopamine release in nucleus accumbens was enhanced in M (5) (-/-) mice. DISCUSSION......: The different effects of amphetamine and cocaine in M (5) (-/-) mice may be due to the divergent pharmacological profile of the two drugs, where amphetamine, but not cocaine, is able to release intracellular stores of dopamine. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that amphetamine...

  17. The effect of ZMS on the coupling of muscarinic receptor to G-proteins activation in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Cailong; Hu Yaer; Gao Ruxue; Xia Zongqin

    1999-01-01

    The carbachol-stimulated [ 35 S]GTP γ S binding method was used to observe the effect of ZMS, an active component from Zhimu, on the coupling of M-receptor to G-protein. the effect of ZMS on the ability of learning and memory in aged rats was also observed. It was shown that the carbachol-stimulated elevation of [ 35 S]GTPγS binding was significantly decreased in aged rats as compared with young rats. The carbachol-induced [ 35 S]STPγS binding showed that administration of ZMS at median or high dose have a definite elevation effect on the coupling activity of M-receptors to G-protein in brain, and this elevation was accompanied by an improvement of learning and memory ability

  18. Autoradiography of 3H-pirenzepine and 3H-AFDX-384 in Mouse Brain Regions: Possible Insights into M1, M2, and M4 Muscarinic Receptors Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Paulina Valuskova; Vladimir Farar; Sandor Forczek; Iva Krizova; Jaromir Myslivecek

    2018-01-01

    Autoradiography helps to determine the distribution and density of muscarinic receptor (MR) binding sites in the brain. However, it relies on the selectivity of radioligands toward their target. 3H-Pirenzepine is commonly believed to label predominantly M1MR, 3H-AFDX-384 is considered as M2MR selective ligand. Here we performed series of autoradiographies with 3H-AFDX-384 (2 nM), and 3H-pirenzepine (5 nM) in WT, M1KO, M2KO, and M4KO mice to address the ligand selectivity. Labeling with 3H-pir...

  19. The use of a modified [3H]4-DAMP radioligand binding assay with increased selectivity for muscarinic M3 receptor shows that cortical CHRM3 levels are not altered in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Won Je; Gibbons, Andrew S; Dean, Brian

    2013-12-02

    [(3)H]4-DAMP is a radioligand that has been used to quantify levels of the muscarinic receptor CHRM3 protein in situ. However, in addition to high affinity binding to CHRM3, [(3)H]4-DAMP binds with low affinity to CHRM1 confounding the potential to discriminate between changes in these two muscarinic receptors. We have developed a [(3)H]4-DAMP binding assay, optimised for measuring CHRM3 protein levels in the cortex, with minimal selectivity towards CHRM1. The selectivity of our assay towards CHRM3 was confirmed using recombinant receptor-expressing, cell lysate preparations. [(3)H]4-DAMP binding levels were similar between wildtype and CHRM1 knockout mice, confirming that the amount of [(3)H]4-DAMP binding to CHRM1 was negligible. We used this assay to measure CHRM3 protein levels in the frontal pole, obtained post-mortem from subjects with bipolar disorder (n = 15), major depressive disorder (n = 15) and matched controls (n = 20) and showed that [(3)H]4-DAMP binding was not altered in either bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder. Western blotting confirmed that CHRM3 protein levels were unchanged in these subjects. © 2013.

  20. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2010-01-01

    AChRs are coexpressed with D(1) dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M(4) mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we used Cre/loxP technology to generate mutant mice that lack M(4) mAChRs only in D(1) dopamine....... Since enhanced central dopaminergic neurotransmission is a hallmark of several severe disorders of the CNS, including schizophrenia and drug addiction, our findings have substantial clinical relevance....

  1. Signal regulatory proteins (SIRPS) are secreted presynaptic organizing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemori, Hisashi; Sanes, Joshua R

    2008-12-05

    Formation of chemical synapses requires exchange of organizing signals between the synaptic partners. Using synaptic vesicle aggregation in cultured neurons as a marker of presynaptic differentiation, we purified candidate presynaptic organizers from mouse brain. A major bioactive species was the extracellular domain of signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRP-alpha), a transmembrane immunoglobulin superfamily member concentrated at synapses. The extracellular domain of SIRP-alpha is cleaved and shed in a developmentally regulated manner. The presynaptic organizing activity of SIRP-alpha is mediated in part by CD47. SIRP-alpha homologues, SIRP-beta and -gamma also have synaptic vesicle clustering activity. The effects of SIRP-alpha are distinct from those of another presynaptic organizer, FGF22: the two proteins induced vesicle clusters of different sizes, differed in their ability to promote neurite branching, and acted through different receptors and signaling pathways. SIRP family proteins may act together with other organizing molecules to pattern synapses.

  2. Presynaptic molecular determinants of quantal size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo eTakamori

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The quantal hypothesis for the release of neurotransmitters at the chemical synapse has gained wide acceptance since it was first worked out at the motor endplate in frog skeletal muscle in the 1950s. Considering the morphological identification of synaptic vesicles at the nerve terminals that appeared to be homogeneous in size, the hypothesis proposed that signal transduction at synapses is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters packed in synaptic vesicles that are individually uniform in size; the amount of transmitter in a synaptic vesicle is called a quantum. Although quantal size – the amplitude of the postsynaptic response elicited by the release of neurotransmitters from a single vesicle – clearly depends on the number and sensitivity of the postsynaptic receptors, accumulating evidence has also indicated that the amount of neurotransmitters stored in synaptic vesicles can be altered by various presynaptic factors. Here, I provide an overview of the concepts and underlying presynaptic molecular underpinnings that may regulate quantal size.

  3. Stereoselective synthesis, in vitro, and initial in vivo evaluation of 1-methylpiperidin-4-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IPIP): a novel radioiodinated molecular probe with high affinity for the muscarinic receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Daniel W. E-mail: mcphersod@CSR.NIH.GOV; Breeden, William K.; Beets, Arnold L.; Luo, Huimin; Sood, Victor; Knapp, Furn F

    2001-11-01

    1-Methylpiperidin-4-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IPIP) was investigated as a potential radioiodinated molecular probe targeted to the muscarinic receptor complex. The IPIP stereoisomers were synthesized via a chiral intermediate in >95% enantiomeric excess. The R-isomers demonstrated a M{sub 1} to M{sub 2} subtype selectivity of approximately 3 to 1 and the S-isomers demonstrated non-subtype selective binding in vitro. IPIP was radiolabeled with iodide-125 with an average radiochemical yield of 74.4% ({+-}14.8, n 5), specific activities >800 mCi/{mu}mol, and radiochemical purities >97%. In vivo the Z-isomers demonstrated high uniform cerebral uptake suggesting non-subtype selective binding. In contrast, E-R-IPIP, after allowing a low uptake in M{sub 2} rich areas to clear, demonstrated a retention of activity in M{sub 1} and M{sub 4} rich cerebral regions. In addition, the cerebral uptake of E-R-IPIP and Z-S-IPIP were inhibited by 70-90% via pretreatment with R-QNB, an established muscarinic antagonist. An ex vivo metabolism study demonstrated Z-S-IPIP was stable at the receptor site with an absence of radiolabeled metabolites.

  4. Stereoselective synthesis, in vitro, and initial in vivo evaluation of 1-methylpiperidin-4-yl alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-alpha-phenylacetate (IPIP): a novel radioiodinated molecular probe with high affinity for the muscarinic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, D W; Breeden, W K; Beets, A L; Luo, H; Sood, V; Knapp, F F

    2001-11-01

    1-Methylpiperidin-4-yl alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-alpha-phenylacetate (IPIP, Fig. 1) was investigated as a potential radioiodinated molecular probe targeted to the muscarinic receptor complex. The IPIP stereoisomers were synthesized via a chiral intermediate in >95% enantiomeric excess. The R-isomers demonstrated a M(1) to M(2) subtype selectivity of approximately 3 to 1 and the S-isomers demonstrated non-subtype selective binding in vitro. IPIP was radiolabeled with iodide-125 with an average radiochemical yield of 74.4% (+/-14.8, n = 5), specific activities >800 mCi/micromol, and radiochemical purities >97%. In vivo the Z-isomers demonstrated high uniform cerebral uptake suggesting non-subtype selective binding. In contrast, E-R-IPIP, after allowing a low uptake in M(2) rich areas to clear, demonstrated a retention of activity in M(1) and M(4) rich cerebral regions. In addition, the cerebral uptake of E-R-IPIP and Z-S-IPIP were inhibited by 70-90% via pretreatment with R-QNB, an established muscarinic antagonist. An ex vivo metabolism study demonstrated Z-S-IPIP was stable at the receptor site with an absence of radiolabeled metabolites.

  5. New epitopes and function of anti-M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antibodies in patients with Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, H; Matsumoto, I; Wakamatsu, E; Nakamura, Y; Iizuka, M; Hayashi, T; Goto, D; Ito, S; Sumida, T

    2010-10-01

    M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) plays a crucial role in the secretion of saliva from salivary glands. It is reported that some patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) carried inhibitory autoantibodies against M3R. The purpose of this study is to clarify the epitopes and function of anti-M3R antibodies in SS. We synthesized peptides encoding the extracellular domains of human-M3R including the N-terminal region and the first, second and third extracellular loops. Antibodies against these regions were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in sera from 42 SS and 42 healthy controls. For functional analysis, human salivary gland (HSG) cells were preincubated with immunoglobulin G (IgG) separated from sera of anti-M3R antibody-positive SS, -negative SS and controls for 12 h. After loading with Fluo-3, HSG cells were stimulated with cevimeline hydrochloride, and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations [(Ca(2+) )i] were measured. Antibodies to the N-terminal, first, second and third loops were detected in 42·9% (18 of 42), 47·6% (20 of 42), 54·8% (23 of 42) and 45·2% (19 of 42) of SS, while in 4·8% (two of 42), 7·1% (three of 42), 2·4% (one of 42) and 2·4% (one of 42) of controls, respectively. Antibodies to the second loop positive SS-IgG inhibited the increase of (Ca(2+) )i induced by cevimeline hydrochloride. Antibodies to the N-terminal positive SS-IgG and antibodies to the first loop positive SS-IgG enhanced it, while antibodies to the third loop positive SS-IgG showed no effect on (Ca(2+) )i as well as anti-M3R antibody-negative SS-IgG. Our results indicated the presence of several B cell epitopes on M3R in SS. The influence of anti-M3R antibodies on salivary secretion might differ based on these epitopes. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2010 British Society for Immunology.

  6. [Analysis of epitopes and function of anti-M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antibodies in patients with Sjögren's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Hiroto; Matsuo, Naomi; Iizuka, Mana; Nakamura, Yumi; Matsumoto, Isao; Sumida, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease that affects exocrine glands including salivary and lacrimal glands. It is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration into exocrine glands, leading to dry mouth and eyes. A number of auto-antibodies, such as anti-SS-A and SS-B antibodies, are detected in patients with SS. However, no SS-specific pathologic auto-antibodies have yet been found in this condition. M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) plays a crucial role in the secretion of saliva from salivary glands. It is reported that some patients with SS carried inhibitory auto-antibodies against M3R. To clarify the epitopes and function of anti-M3R antibodies in SS, we examined antibodies to the extracellular domains (N terminal region, the first, second, and third extracellular loop) of M3R by ELISA using synthesized peptide antigens encoding these domains in 42 SS and 42 healthy controls (HC). Titers and positivity of anti-M3R antibodies to every extracellular domain of M3R were significantly higher in SS than in HC. For functional analysis, human salivary gland (HSG) cells were pre-cultured with IgG from anti-M3R antibodies positive SS, negative SS, and HC. HSG cells were stimulated with cevimeline hydrochloride and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) was measured. IgG from anti-M3R antibodies to the second loop positive SS inhibited the increase of [Ca(2+)](i), but IgG from antibodies to the N terminal or the first loop positive SS enhanced it, while IgG from antibodies to the third loop positive SS showed no effect on [Ca(2+)](i) as well as IgG from anti-M3R antibodies negative SS and HC. These findings indicated the presence of several B cell epitopes on M3R in SS and effect of anti-M3R antibodies on the salivary secretion might differ with these epitopes.

  7. Synaptic connections of starburst amacrine cells and localization of acetylcholine receptors in primate retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Elizabeth S; Dmitrieva, Nina; Keyser, Kent T; Lindstrom, Jon M; Hersh, Louis B; Marshak, David W

    2003-06-16

    Starburst amacrine cells in the macaque retina were studied by electron microscopic immunohistochemistry. We found that these amacrine cells make a type of synapse not described previously; they are presynaptic to axon terminals of bipolar cells. We also confirmed that starburst amacrine cells are presynaptic to ganglion cell dendrites and amacrine cell processes. In order to determine the functions of these synapses, we localized acetylcholine receptors using a monoclonal antibody (mAb210) that recognizes human alpha3- and alpha5-containing nicotinic receptors and also antisera against the five known subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The majority of the mAb210-immunoreactive perikarya were amacrine cells and ganglion cells, but a subpopulation of bipolar cells was also labeled. A subset of bipolar cells and a subset of horizontal cells were labeled with antibodies to M3 muscarinic receptors. A subset of amacrine cells, including those that contain cholecystokinin, were labeled with antibodies to M2 receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that acetylcholine can modulate the activity of retinal ganglion cells by multiple pathways. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Synapse-specific and compartmentalized expression of presynaptic homeostatic potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiling; Goel, Pragya; Chen, Catherine; Angajala, Varun; Chen, Xun; Dickman, Dion K

    2018-04-05

    Postsynaptic compartments can be specifically modulated during various forms of synaptic plasticity, but it is unclear whether this precision is shared at presynaptic terminals. Presynaptic Homeostatic Plasticity (PHP) stabilizes neurotransmission at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, where a retrograde enhancement of presynaptic neurotransmitter release compensates for diminished postsynaptic receptor functionality. To test the specificity of PHP induction and expression, we have developed a genetic manipulation to reduce postsynaptic receptor expression at one of the two muscles innervated by a single motor neuron. We find that PHP can be induced and expressed at a subset of synapses, over both acute and chronic time scales, without influencing transmission at adjacent release sites. Further, homeostatic modulations to CaMKII, vesicle pools, and functional release sites are compartmentalized and do not spread to neighboring pre- or post-synaptic structures. Thus, both PHP induction and expression mechanisms are locally transmitted and restricted to specific synaptic compartments. © 2018, Li et al.

  9. SELECTIVITY PROFILE OF SOME RECENT MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS IN BOVINE AND GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA AND HEART

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROFFEL, AF; HAMSTRA, JJ; ELZINGA, CRS; ZAAGSMA, J

    1994-01-01

    The functional affinities of some recently developed subtype-selective muscarinic antagonists towards bovine tracheal smooth muscle muscarinic M(3) receptors were established and compared to binding affinities for bovine cardiac M(2) and functional affinities for guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle

  10. Glycolysis selectively shapes the presynaptic action potential waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Brendan; Kushmerick, Christopher; Banerjee, Tania Das; Dagda, Ruben K; Renden, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are major suppliers of cellular energy in neurons; however, utilization of energy from glycolysis vs. mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in the presynaptic compartment during neurotransmission is largely unknown. Using presynaptic and postsynaptic recordings from the mouse calyx of Held, we examined the effect of acute selective pharmacological inhibition of glycolysis or mitochondrial OxPhos on multiple mechanisms regulating presynaptic function. Inhibition of glycolysis via glucose depletion and iodoacetic acid (1 mM) treatment, but not mitochondrial OxPhos, rapidly altered transmission, resulting in highly variable, oscillating responses. At reduced temperature, this same treatment attenuated synaptic transmission because of a smaller and broader presynaptic action potential (AP) waveform. We show via experimental manipulation and ion channel modeling that the altered AP waveform results in smaller Ca 2+ influx, resulting in attenuated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). In contrast, inhibition of mitochondria-derived ATP production via extracellular pyruvate depletion and bath-applied oligomycin (1 μM) had no significant effect on Ca 2+ influx and did not alter the AP waveform within the same time frame (up to 30 min), and the resultant EPSC remained unaffected. Glycolysis, but not mitochondrial OxPhos, is thus required to maintain basal synaptic transmission at the presynaptic terminal. We propose that glycolytic enzymes are closely apposed to ATP-dependent ion pumps on the presynaptic membrane. Our results indicate a novel mechanism for the effect of hypoglycemia on neurotransmission. Attenuated transmission likely results from a single presynaptic mechanism at reduced temperature: a slower, smaller AP, before and independent of any effect on synaptic vesicle release or receptor activity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Muscarine-like compounds derived from a pyrolysis product of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defant, Andrea; Mancini, Ines; Matucci, Rosanna; Bellucci, Cristina; Dosi, Federico; Malferrari, Danilo; Fabbri, Daniele

    2015-06-14

    Cellulose represents a key component of a renewable biomass source, from which chiral compounds with a high added value in the application for the synthesis of potentially bioactive molecules can be obtained. The anhydrosugar (1R,5S)-1-hydroxy-3,6-dioxa-bicyclo[3.2.1]octan-2-one (LAC), produced on the gram-scale by catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose, was used as a building block in the synthesis of five new enantiomerically pure muscarine-like products. The structures of the target compounds 4-8 showed different substituents at the C-2 and C-4 positions, but each of them had the same (2S,4R) configuration as the natural (+)-muscarine. A renewed interest in new muscarinic analogues is due to the design and synthesis of molecules exhibiting a higher selectivity for a specific muscarinic receptor and due to the development of effective agents in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive disorders. In this context, products 4-8 were investigated with respect to their binding affinity to human M1-M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The data indicated that compound 8, emerging as the most active in the series with values comparable to natural (+)-muscarine and a moderate selectivity in favor of the hM2 subtype receptor, also exhibited the highest stability during the interaction with the hM2 (3UON) subtype muscarinic receptor by using a docking calculation.

  12. Studies of muscarinic neurotransmission with antimuscarinic toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Lincoln T; Flynn, Donna D; Liang, Jing-Sheng; McCollum, Mark H

    2004-01-01

    M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors are the most prevalent receptors for acetylcholine in the brain, and m1-toxin1 and m4-toxin are the most specific ligands yet found for their extracellular faces. Both toxins are antagonists. These toxins and their derivatives with biotin, radioiodine and fluorophores are useful for studying M1- and M4-linked neurotransmission. We have used the rat striatum for many studies because this tissue express exceptionally high concentrations of both receptors, the striatum regulates movement, and movement is altered by antimuscarinic agents, M1-knockout and M4-knockout. These toxins and their derivatives may also be used for studies of M1 and M4 receptors in the hippocampus and cortex.

  13. Interaction of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M₂ subtype with G protein Gα(i/o) isotypes and Gβγ subunits as studied with the maltose-binding protein-M₂-Gα(i/o) fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyama, Susumu; Nemoto, Reiko; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Haga, Tatsuya

    2014-11-01

    We expressed the fusion proteins of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype (M2 receptor) with a maltose-binding protein (MBP) and various G protein α subunits (Gα(i1-i3/o)) at its N- and C-terminals, respectively (MBP-M2-Gα(i/o)), in Escherichia coli, and examined the effect of G protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) on the receptor-Gα interaction as assessed by agonist- and GDP-dependent [(35)S]GTPγS binding of the fusion proteins. We found that (i) Gβγ promoted both the agonist-dependent and -independent [(35)S]GTPγS binding with little effect on the guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, (ii) the specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding activity was much greater for MBP-M2-Gα(oA) than for MBP-M2-Gα(i1-i3) in the absence of Gβγ, whereas Gβγ preferentially promoted the agonist-dependent decrease in the affinity for GDP of MBP-M2-Gα(i1-i3) rather than of MBP-M2-Gα(oA), and (iii) the proportion of agonist-dependent [(35)S]GTPγS binding was roughly 50% irrespective of species of Gα and the presence or absence of Gβγ. These results demonstrate that receptor-Gα fusion proteins expressed in E. coli could be useful for studies of receptor-G interaction. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of stereoisomers of 4-fluoroalkyl analogues of 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate in in vivo competition studies for the M1, M2, and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Eckelman, William C.; Jaetae, Lee; Paik, Chang H.; Park, Seok G.

    1995-01-01

    To develop a subtype selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist for PET, fluorine-19 labeled alkyl analogues of quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) were synthesized by stereoselective reactions. To investigate these analogues for tissue subtype specificity, in vivo competitive binding studies were performed in rat brain using (R)-3-quinuclidinyl (R)-4-[ 125 I]Iodobenzilate (IQNB). Five, fifty, or five-hundred nmol of the non-radioactive ligands were coinjected intravenously with 8 pmol of the radioligand. Cold (R,R)-IQNB blocked (R,R)-[ 125 I]IQNB in a dose-dependent manner, without showing regional specificity. For the (R,S)-fluoromethyl, -fluoroethyl, and -fluoropropyl derivatives, a higher percent blockade was seen at 5 and 50 nmol levels in M2 predominant tissues (medulla, pons, and cerebellum) than in M1 predominant tissues (cortex, striatum and hippocampus). The blockade pattern of the radioligand also correlated qualitatively with the percentage of M2 receptors in the region. The S-quinuclidinyl analogues showed M2 selectivity but less efficient blockade of the radioligand, indicating lower affinities. Radioligand bound to the medulla was inversely correlated to the M2 relative binding affinity of the fluoroalkyl analogues. These results indicate that the nonradioactive ligand blocks the radioligand based on the affinity of the nonradioactive ligand for a particular receptor subtype compared to the affinity of the radioligand for the same receptor subtype. Of the seven compounds evaluated, (R,S)-fluoromethyl-QNB appears to show the most selectivity for the M2 subtypes in competition studies in vivo

  15. An Anti-Nicotinic Cognitive Challenge Model using Mecamylamine in Comparison with the Anti-Muscarinic Cognitive Challenge using Scopolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baakman, A. C.; Alvarez-jimenez, R.; Rissmann, R.; Klaassen, E. S.; Stevens, J.; Goulooze, S. C.; Burger, J.; Swart, E. L.; Van Gerven, J. M. A.; Groeneveld, G. J.

    Aims The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine is often used for proof-of-pharmacology studies with pro-cognitive compounds. From a pharmacological point of view, it would seem more rational to use a nicotinic rather than a muscarinic anticholinergic challenge to prove

  16. Voltage sensitivity of M2 muscarinic receptors underlies the delayed rectifier-like activation of ACh-gated K(+) current by choline in feline atrial myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Polanco, Ricardo A; Aréchiga-Figueroa, Iván A; Salazar-Fajardo, Pedro D; Benavides-Haro, Dora E; Rodríguez-Elías, Julio C; Sachse, Frank B; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Sánchez-Chapula, José A; Moreno-Galindo, Eloy G

    2013-09-01

    Choline (Ch) is a precursor and metabolite of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). In canine and guinea pig atrial myocytes, Ch was shown to activate an outward K(+) current in a delayed rectifier fashion. This current has been suggested to modulate cardiac electrical activity and to play a role in atrial fibrillation pathophysiology. However, the exact nature and identity of this current has not been convincingly established. We recently described the unique ligand- and voltage-dependent properties of muscarinic activation of ACh-activated K(+) current (IKACh) and showed that, in contrast to ACh, pilocarpine induces a current with delayed rectifier-like properties with membrane depolarization. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Ch activates IKACh in feline atrial myocytes in a voltage-dependent manner similar to pilocarpine. Single-channel recordings, biophysical profiles, specific pharmacological inhibition and computational data indicate that the current activated by Ch is IKACh. Moreover, we show that membrane depolarization increases the potency and efficacy of IKACh activation by Ch and thus gives the appearance of a delayed rectifier activating K(+) current at depolarized potentials. Our findings support the emerging concept that IKACh modulation is both voltage- and ligand-specific and reinforce the importance of these properties in understanding cardiac physiology.

  17. Presynaptic Dopamine D2 Receptors Modulate [3H]GABA Release at StriatoPallidal Terminals via Activation of PLC → IP3 → Calcineurin and Inhibition of AC → cAMP → PKA Signaling Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijón-Lorenzo, Rafael; Caballero-Florán, Isaac Hiram; Recillas-Morales, Sergio; Cortés, Hernán; Avalos-Fuentes, José Arturo; Paz-Bermúdez, Francisco Javier; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2018-02-21

    Striatal dopamine D2 receptors activate the PLC → IP3 → Calcineurin-signaling pathway to modulate the neural excitability of En+ Medium-sized Spiny GABAergic neurons (MSN) through the regulation of L-type Ca 2+ channels. Presynaptic dopaminergic D2 receptors modulate GABA release at striatopallidal terminals through L-type Ca 2+ channels as well, but their signaling pathway is still undetermined. Since D2 receptors are Gi/o-coupled and negatively modulate adenylyl cyclase (AC), we investigated whether presynaptic D2 receptors modulate GABA release through the same signaling cascade that controls excitability in the striatum or by the inhibition of AC and decreased PKA activity. Activation of D2 receptors stimulated formation of [ 3 H]IP 1 and decreased Forskolin-stimulated [ 3 H]cAMP accumulation in synaptosomes from rat Globus Pallidus. D2 receptor activation with Quinpirole in the presence of L 745,870 decreased, in a dose-dependent manner, K + -induced [ 3 H]GABA release in pallidal slices. The effect was prevented by the pharmacological blockade of Gi/o βγ subunit effects with Gallein, PLC with U 73122, IP3 receptor activation with 4-APB, Calcineurin with FK506. In addition, when release was stimulated with Forskolin to activate AC, D2 receptors also decreased K + -induced [ 3 H]GABA release, an effect occluded with the effect of the blockade of PKA with H89 or stimulation of release with the cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP. These data indicate that D2 receptors modulate [ 3 H]GABA release at striatopallidal terminals by activating the PLC → IP3 → Calcineurin-signaling cascade, the same one that modulates excitability in soma. Additionally, D2 receptors inhibit release when AC is active. Both mechanisms appear to converge to regulate the activity of presynaptic L-type Ca 2+ channels. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. (+/-)-cis-2-methylspiro[1,3-oxathiolane-5,3'-quinuclidine] hydrochloride, hemihydrate (SNI-2011, cevimeline hydrochloride) induces saliva and tear secretions in rats and mice: the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iga, Y; Arisawa, H; Ogane, N; Saito, Y; Tomizuka, T; Nakagawa-Yagi, Y; Masunaga, H; Yasuda, H; Miyata, N

    1998-11-01

    We investigated effects of (+/-)-cis-2-methylspiro[1,3-oxathiolane-5,3'-quinuclidine] hydrochloride, hemihydrate (SNI-2011, cevimeline hydrochloride), a rigid analogue of acetylcholine, on saliva and tear secretions in rats and mice to evaluate its therapeutical efficacy for xerostomia and xerophthalmia in patients with Sjogren's syndrome and X-ray exposure in the head and neck. Intraduodenal administrations of SNI-2011 increased saliva secretion in a dose-dependent manner at doses ranging from 3 to 30 mg/kg in normal rats and mice, two strains of autoimmune disease mice and X-irradiated saliva secretion defective rats. The salivation elicited by SNI-2011 was completely inhibited by atropine. A similar atropine-sensitive response was observed in tear secretion. In rat submandibular/sublingual gland membranes, [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding was saturable, and Scatchard plot analysis revealed a single population of binding sites with a Kd of 22 pM and a maximal binding capacity of 60 fmol/mg protein. The competitive inhibition curve of the [3H]QNB binding by SNI-2011 was obtained, and its dissociation constant value calculated from IC50 was 1-2 microM. These results suggest that SNI-2011 increases saliva and tear secretions through a direct stimulation to muscarinic receptors in salivary and lacrimal glands, and they suggest that SNI-2011 should be beneficial to patients with Sjögren's syndrome and X-ray exposure in the head and neck.

  19. Semisynthetic analogues of toxiferine I and their pharmacological properties at α7 nAChRs, muscle-type nAChRs, and the allosteric binding site of muscarinic M2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlotos, D.P.; Tränkle, C; Holzgrabe, U

    2014-01-01

    A new series of analogues of the calabash curare alkaloid toxiferine I was prepared and pharmacologically evaluated at α7 and muscle-type nAChRs and the allosteric site of muscarinic M2 receptors. The new ligands differ from toxiferine I by the absence of one (2a–c) or two (3a–c) hydroxy groups......, saturation of the exocyclic double bonds, and various N-substituents (methyl, allyl, 4-nitrobenzyl). At the muscle-type nAChRs, most ligands showed similar binding to the muscle relaxant alcuronium, indicating neuromuscular blocking activity, with the nonhydroxylated analogues 3b (Ki = 75 nM) and 3c (Ki = 82...... nM) displaying the highest affinity. At α7 nAChRs, all ligands showed a moderate to low antagonistic effect, suggesting that the alcoholic functions are not necessary for antagonistic action. Compound 3c exerted the highest preference for the muscle-type nAChRs (Ki = 82 nM) over α7 (IC50 = 21 μ...

  20. Synthesis and muscarinic receptor pharmacology of a series of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisothiazolo[4,5-c]pyridine bioisosteres of arecoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, H; Bräuner-Osborne, H; Ball, R G

    1999-01-01

    A series of O- and ring-alkylated derivatives of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisothiazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-3-ol was synthesized via treatment of appropriately substituted 4-benzylamino-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-3-carboxamides with hydrogen sulfide and subsequent ring closure by oxidation with bromine. The mus...... of a selected series of chiral analogues, with established absolute stereochemistry, were studied using receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT). The potency, relative efficacy, and receptor subtype selectivity of these compounds were related to the structure of the O...

  1. Structural Insight into Specificity of Interactions between Nonconventional Three-finger Weak Toxin from Naja kaouthia (WTX) and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Shulepko, M. A.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Janíčková, Helena; Dolejší, Eva; Doležal, Vladimír; Utkin, Y.N.; Tsetlin, V.I.; Arseniev, A. S.; Efremov, R. G.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 290, č. 39 (2015), s. 23616-23630 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : computer modeling * G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) * site-directed mutagenesis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.258, year: 2015

  2. Variation in the gene coding for the M5 Muscarinic receptor (CHRM5 influences cigarette dose but is not associated with dependence to drugs of addiction: evidence from a prospective population based cohort study of young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson Craig A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mesolimbic structures of the brain are important in the anticipation and perception of reward. Moreover, many drugs of addiction elicit their response in these structures. The M5 muscarinic receptor (M5R is expressed in dopamine-containing neurones of the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area, and regulates the release of mesolimbic dopamine. Mice lacking M5R show a substantial reduction in both reward and withdrawal responses to morphine and cocaine. The CHRM5, the gene that codes for the M5R, is a strong biological candidate for a role in human addiction. We screened the coding and core promoter sequences of CHRM5 using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography to identify common polymorphisms. Additional polymorphisms within the coding and core promoter regions that were identified through dbSNP were validated in the test population. We investigated whether these polymorphisms influence substance dependence and dose in a cohort of 1947 young Australians. Results Analysis was performed on 815 participants of European ancestry who were interviewed at wave 8 of the cohort study and provided DNA. We observed a 26.8% increase in cigarette consumption in carriers of the rs7162140 T-allele, equating to 20.1 cigarettes per week (p=0.01. Carriers of the rs7162140 T-allele were also found to have nearly a 3-fold increased risk of developing cannabis dependence (OR=2.9 (95%CI 1.1-7.4; p=0.03. Conclusion Our data suggest that variation within the CHRM5 locus may play an important role in tobacco and cannabis but not alcohol addiction in European ancestry populations. This is the first study to show an association between CHRM5 and substance use in humans. These data support the further investigation of this gene as a risk factor in substance use and dependence.

  3. Functional activation of Gαq via serotonin2A (5-HT2A) and muscarinic acetylcholine M1 receptors assessed by guanosine-5׳-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding/immunoprecipitation in rat brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Toyoshima, Ryoichi

    2014-03-05

    Functional coupling between serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptors and Gαq proteins in native brain membranes has been sparsely reported thus far. In the present study, the guanosine-5׳-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding assay combined with immunoprecipitation using magnetic beads (Dynabeads Protein A) coated with anti-Gαq antibody was developed. Under experimental conditions optimised for assay constituents (GDP, MgCl2, and NaCl), for contents of membrane protein, anti-Gαq antibody, and Dynabeads Protein A, and for the incubation period, 5-HT stimulated specific [35S]GTPγS binding to Gαq in rat cerebral cortical membranes in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner, with a signal/noise ratio that was sufficiently high for further detailed pharmacological characterisation. This characterisation revealed an involvement of 5-HT2A receptors. Activation of Gαq proteins was also detectable by the addition of carbachol via muscarinic acetylcholine M1 receptors, (-)-epinephrine, and dopamine, but not by L-glutamate or (±)-baclofen. When 5-HT2A receptors and M1 receptors were stimulated simultaneously, there were non-additive effects, indicating that the two receptors were coupled to the same components of Gαq proteins in the rat cerebral cortex. This method will serve as an efficacious strategy for neurobiological investigations aimed at elucidating the physiological and pathological implications of signal transduction systems mediated via Gαq proteins coupled with 5-HT2A receptors and muscarinic acetylcholine M1 receptors.

  4. Analysis of coupling of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors to Gi/o, Gs and Gq heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. S1 (2006), s. 361-361 ISSN 1671-4083. [World Congress of Pharmacology /15./. 02.07.2006-07.07.2006, Beijing] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : M2 receptor * heterotrimeric G-proteins * analysis of coupling Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  5. Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors regulate the non-quantal release of acetylcholine the rat neuromuscular junction via no-dependent mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyskočil, František; Malomouzh, A. I.; Mukhtarov, M. R.; Nikolsky, E. E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 12, Suppl.1 (2008), s. 34-34 ISSN 1211-7579. [Česko-slovenská psychofarmakologická konference /50./. 09.01.2008-13.01.2008, Lázně Jeseník] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011411 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cpr1 * muscaricin * receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  6. Stereoselectivity of presynaptic autoreceptors modulating dopamine release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbilla, S.; Langer, S.Z.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol were studied on the spontaneous and field stimulation-evoked release of total radioactivity from slices of rabbit caudate nucleus prelabelled with [ 3 H]dopamine. (S)-Sulpiride in concentrations ranging from 0.01-1μM enhanced the electrically evoked release of [ 3 H]dopamine while (R)-sulpiride was 10 times less potent than (S)-sulpiride. Exposure to (S)-butaclamol (0.1-1 μM) but not to (R)-butaclamol (0.1-10μM) enhanced the field-stimulated release of [ 3 H]dopamine. The facilitatory effects of (S)- and (R)-sulpiride and (S)-butaclamol on the stimulated release of the labelled neurotransmitter were observed under conditions in which these drugs did not modify the spontaneous outflow of radioactivity. Only the active enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol antagonized the inhibition by apomorphine (1μM) of the stimulated release of [ 3 H]dopamine. Our results indicate that the presynaptic inhibitory dopamine autoreceptors modulating the stimulation-evoked release of [ 3 H]dopamine in the caudate nucleus are, like the classical postsynaptic dopamine receptors, chemically stereoselective. (Auth.)

  7. Proof of concept study for designed multiple ligands targeting the dopamine D2, serotonin 5-HT2A, and muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Monika; Lim, Herman D; Herenbrink, Carmen Klein; Christopoulos, Arthur; Lane, J Robert; Capuano, Ben

    2015-02-12

    Herein we describe the hybridization of a benzoxazinone M1 scaffold with D2 privileged structures derived from putative and clinically relevant antipsychotics to develop designed multiple ligands. The M1 mAChR is an attractive target for the cognitive deficits in key CNS disorders. Moreover, activity at D2 and 5-HT2A receptors has proven useful for antipsychotic efficacy. We identified 9 which retained functional activity at the target M1 mAChR and D2R and demonstrated high affinity for the 5-HT2AR.

  8. Phospho-dependent Accumulation of GABABRs at Presynaptic Terminals after NMDAR Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Saad; Gerrow, Kim; Triller, Antoine; Smart, Trevor G

    2016-08-16

    Here, we uncover a mechanism for regulating the number of active presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs) at nerve terminals, an important determinant of neurotransmitter release. We find that GABABRs gain access to axon terminals by lateral diffusion in the membrane. Their relative accumulation is dependent upon agonist activation and the presence of the two distinct sushi domains that are found only in alternatively spliced GABABR1a subunits. Following brief activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) using glutamate, GABABR diffusion is reduced, causing accumulation at presynaptic terminals in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner that involves phosphorylation of GABABR2 subunits at Ser783. This signaling cascade indicates how synaptically released glutamate can initiate, via a feedback mechanism, increased levels of presynaptic GABABRs that limit further glutamate release and excitotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phospho-dependent Accumulation of GABABRs at Presynaptic Terminals after NMDAR Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Hannan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we uncover a mechanism for regulating the number of active presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs at nerve terminals, an important determinant of neurotransmitter release. We find that GABABRs gain access to axon terminals by lateral diffusion in the membrane. Their relative accumulation is dependent upon agonist activation and the presence of the two distinct sushi domains that are found only in alternatively spliced GABABR1a subunits. Following brief activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs using glutamate, GABABR diffusion is reduced, causing accumulation at presynaptic terminals in a Ca2+-dependent manner that involves phosphorylation of GABABR2 subunits at Ser783. This signaling cascade indicates how synaptically released glutamate can initiate, via a feedback mechanism, increased levels of presynaptic GABABRs that limit further glutamate release and excitotoxicity.

  10. Does human presynaptic striatal dopamine function predict social conformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Paul R A; Benecke, Aaf; Puraite, Julita; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Shotbolt, Paul; Reeves, Suzanne J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver; Egerton, Alice

    2014-03-01

    Socially desirable responding (SDR) is a personality trait which reflects either a tendency to present oneself in an overly positive manner to others, consistent with social conformity (impression management (IM)), or the tendency to view one's own behaviour in an overly positive light (self-deceptive enhancement (SDE)). Neurochemical imaging studies report an inverse relationship between SDR and dorsal striatal dopamine D₂/₃ receptor availability. This may reflect an association between SDR and D₂/₃ receptor expression, synaptic dopamine levels or a combination of the two. In this study, we used a [¹⁸F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET) image database to investigate whether SDR is associated with presynaptic dopamine function. Striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA uptake, (k(i)(cer), min⁻¹), was determined in two independent healthy participant cohorts (n=27 and 19), by Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. SDR was assessed using the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R) Lie scale, and IM and SDE were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. No significant associations were detected between Lie, SDE or IM scores and striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA k(i)(cer). These results indicate that presynaptic striatal dopamine function is not associated with social conformity and suggests that social conformity may be associated with striatal D₂/₃ receptor expression rather than with synaptic dopamine levels.

  11. Urtica dioica leaves modulates muscarinic cholinergic system in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Parashar, Arun; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder and has been associated with cognitive dysfunction. In our earlier study, chronic Urtica dioica (UD) treatment significantly ameliorated diabetes induced associative and spatial memory deficit in mice. The present study was designed to explore the effect of UD leaves extract on muscarinic cholinergic system, which has long been known to be involved in cognition. Streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.p., consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes followed by treatment with UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) or rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, oral) for 8 weeks. STZ-induced diabetic mice showed significant reduction in hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1 and choline acetyltransferase expressions. Chronic diabetes significantly up-regulated the protein expression of acetylcholinesterase associated with oxidative stress in hippocampus. Besides, STZ-induced diabetic mice showed hypolocomotion with up-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. Chronic UD treatment significantly attenuated the cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. UD had no effect on locomotor activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. In conclusion, UD leaves extract has potential to reverse diabetes mediated alteration in muscarinic cholinergic system in hippocampus and thereby improve memory functions.

  12. Neuroimmune interactions in Sjögren's syndrome: relationship of exocrine gland dysfunction with autoantibodies to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-3 and mental health status parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deák, Magdolna; Szvetnik, Attila; Balog, Attila; Sohár, Nicolette; Varga, Renáta; Pokorny, Gyula; Tóth, Gábor; Kiss, Mária; Kovács, László

    2013-01-01

    Antimuscarinic acetylcholine receptor-3 (m3AChR) autoantibodies have been described in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). The aim of this study was to compare various methods for their detection and to assess the contributions of anti-m3AChR and other immunological and psychosocial factors to the pathomechanism of secondary SS (sSS). Sixty-five rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, 103 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, 76 pSS patients and 50 controls were compared. Three immunodominant epitopes of m3AChR were synthesized and used in ELISA. Two extracellular epitopes were also prepared in fusion with glutathione-S-transferase and one in conjugation with bovine serum albumin. Mental health status was assessed with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy fatigue scale. Correlations were evaluated between glandular function and anti-m3AChR positivities and specificities, features of SLE and RA, and mental health parameters. Fourteen RA and 27 SLE patients had sSS. The autoantibody levels to all epitopes of m3AChR were significantly higher in pSS and SLE patients than in the controls. The fusion protein forms discriminated RA from pSS and SLE; furthermore, the YNIP fusion protein also distinguished pSS from SLE. The prevalence and the mean levels of all autoantibodies did not differ statistically between sicca and non-sicca SLE or RA patients. Glandular dysfunction correlated with higher age in SLE and RA and an impaired health-related quality of life in SLE. The second and third extracellular loops of m3AChR are antigenic in pSS. Immunoassays with antigens as fusion peptides demonstrate the best performance. Sicca SLE patients have worse mental health status. Anti-m3AChR antibodies represent a peculiar example of neuroimmune interactions. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Autoradiography of 3H-pirenzepine and 3H-AFDX-384 in Mouse Brain Regions: Possible Insights into M1, M2, and M4 Muscarinic Receptors Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Valuskova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Autoradiography helps to determine the distribution and density of muscarinic receptor (MR binding sites in the brain. However, it relies on the selectivity of radioligands toward their target. 3H-Pirenzepine is commonly believed to label predominantly M1MR, 3H-AFDX-384 is considered as M2MR selective ligand. Here we performed series of autoradiographies with 3H-AFDX-384 (2 nM, and 3H-pirenzepine (5 nM in WT, M1KO, M2KO, and M4KO mice to address the ligand selectivity. Labeling with 3H-pirenzepine using M1KO, M2KO, and M4KO brain sections showed the high selectivity toward M1MR. Selectivity of 3H-AFDX-384 toward M2MR varies among brain regions and depends on individual MR subtype proportion. All binding sites in the medulla oblongata and pons, correspond to M2MR. In caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle, 77.7, 74.2, and 74.6% of 3H-AFDX-384 binding sites, respectively, are represented by M4MR and M2MR constitute only a minor portion. In cortex and hippocampus, 3H-AFDX-384 labels almost similar amounts of M2MR and M4MR alongside significant amounts of non-M2/non-M4MR. In cortex, the proportion of 3H-AFDX-384 binding sites attributable to M2MR can be increased by blocking M4MR with MT3 toxin without affecting non-M4MR. PD102807, which is considered as a highly selective M4MR antagonist failed to improve the discrimination of M2MR. Autoradiography with 3H-QNB showed genotype specific loss of binding sites. In conclusion: while 3H-pirenzepine showed the high selectivity toward M1MR, 3H-AFDX-384 binding sites represent different populations of MR subtypes in a brain-region-specific manner. This finding has to be taken into account when interpreting the binding data.

  14. Autoradiography of3H-pirenzepine and3H-AFDX-384 in Mouse Brain Regions: Possible Insights into M1, M2, and M4Muscarinic Receptors Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuskova, Paulina; Farar, Vladimir; Forczek, Sandor; Krizova, Iva; Myslivecek, Jaromir

    2018-01-01

    Autoradiography helps to determine the distribution and density of muscarinic receptor (MR) binding sites in the brain. However, it relies on the selectivity of radioligands toward their target. 3 H-Pirenzepine is commonly believed to label predominantly M 1 MR, 3 H-AFDX-384 is considered as M 2 MR selective ligand. Here we performed series of autoradiographies with 3 H-AFDX-384 (2 nM), and 3 H-pirenzepine (5 nM) in WT, M 1 KO, M 2 KO, and M 4 KO mice to address the ligand selectivity. Labeling with 3 H-pirenzepine using M 1 KO, M 2 KO, and M 4 KO brain sections showed the high selectivity toward M 1 MR. Selectivity of 3 H-AFDX-384 toward M 2 MR varies among brain regions and depends on individual MR subtype proportion. All binding sites in the medulla oblongata and pons, correspond to M 2 MR. In caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle, 77.7, 74.2, and 74.6% of 3 H-AFDX-384 binding sites, respectively, are represented by M 4 MR and M 2 MR constitute only a minor portion. In cortex and hippocampus, 3 H-AFDX-384 labels almost similar amounts of M 2 MR and M 4 MR alongside significant amounts of non-M 2 /non-M 4 MR. In cortex, the proportion of 3 H-AFDX-384 binding sites attributable to M 2 MR can be increased by blocking M 4 MR with MT3 toxin without affecting non-M 4 MR. PD102807, which is considered as a highly selective M 4 MR antagonist failed to improve the discrimination of M 2 MR. Autoradiography with 3 H-QNB showed genotype specific loss of binding sites. while 3 H-pirenzepine showed the high selectivity toward M 1 MR, 3 H-AFDX-384 binding sites represent different populations of MR subtypes in a brain-region-specific manner. This finding has to be taken into account when interpreting the binding data.

  15. Autoradiography of 3H-pirenzepine and 3H-AFDX-384 in Mouse Brain Regions: Possible Insights into M1, M2, and M4 Muscarinic Receptors Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuskova, Paulina; Farar, Vladimir; Forczek, Sandor; Krizova, Iva; Myslivecek, Jaromir

    2018-01-01

    Autoradiography helps to determine the distribution and density of muscarinic receptor (MR) binding sites in the brain. However, it relies on the selectivity of radioligands toward their target. 3H-Pirenzepine is commonly believed to label predominantly M1MR, 3H-AFDX-384 is considered as M2MR selective ligand. Here we performed series of autoradiographies with 3H-AFDX-384 (2 nM), and 3H-pirenzepine (5 nM) in WT, M1KO, M2KO, and M4KO mice to address the ligand selectivity. Labeling with 3H-pirenzepine using M1KO, M2KO, and M4KO brain sections showed the high selectivity toward M1MR. Selectivity of 3H-AFDX-384 toward M2MR varies among brain regions and depends on individual MR subtype proportion. All binding sites in the medulla oblongata and pons, correspond to M2MR. In caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle, 77.7, 74.2, and 74.6% of 3H-AFDX-384 binding sites, respectively, are represented by M4MR and M2MR constitute only a minor portion. In cortex and hippocampus, 3H-AFDX-384 labels almost similar amounts of M2MR and M4MR alongside significant amounts of non-M2/non-M4MR. In cortex, the proportion of 3H-AFDX-384 binding sites attributable to M2MR can be increased by blocking M4MR with MT3 toxin without affecting non-M4MR. PD102807, which is considered as a highly selective M4MR antagonist failed to improve the discrimination of M2MR. Autoradiography with 3H-QNB showed genotype specific loss of binding sites. In conclusion: while 3H-pirenzepine showed the high selectivity toward M1MR, 3H-AFDX-384 binding sites represent different populations of MR subtypes in a brain-region-specific manner. This finding has to be taken into account when interpreting the binding data. PMID:29515448

  16. Muscarinic control of rostromedial tegmental nucleus GABA neurons and morphine-induced locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, David I; Tan, Joel M J; Kim, Jun Chul; Yeomans, John S

    2016-07-01

    Opioids induce rewarding and locomotor effects by inhibiting rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons that express μ-opioid and nociceptin receptors. These GABA neurons then strongly inhibit dopamine neurons. Opioid-induced reward, locomotion and dopamine release also depend on pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental cholinergic and glutamate neurons, many of which project to and activate ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons. Here we show that laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine cholinergic neurons project to both rostromedial tegmental nucleus and ventral tegmental area, and that M4 muscarinic receptors are co-localized with μ-opioid receptors associated with rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons. To inhibit or excite rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons, we utilized adeno-associated viral vectors and DREADDs to express designed muscarinic receptors (M4D or M3D respectively) in GAD2::Cre mice. In M4D-expressing mice, clozapine-N-oxide increased morphine-induced, but not vehicle-induced, locomotion. In M3D-expressing mice, clozapine-N-oxide blocked morphine-induced, but not vehicle-induced, locomotion. We propose that cholinergic inhibition of rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons via M4 muscarinic receptors facilitates opioid inhibition of the same neurons. This model explains how mesopontine cholinergic systems and muscarinic receptors in the rostromedial tegmental nucleus and ventral tegmental area are important for dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent opioid-induced rewards and locomotion. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Expression of presynaptic markers in a neurodevelopmental animal model with relevance to schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anna S; Kaalund, Sanne Simone; Møller, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) to rat pups at postnatal day (PND) 7, 9, and 11 [neonatal PCP (neoPCP) model] induces cognitive deficits similar to those observed in schizophrenia. Expression of presynaptic SNARE protein, synaptosomal......-associated protein of 25 kDa (Snap25), has been shown to be downregulated in postmortem brains from patients with schizophrenia. The present study was designed to investigate the long-term effects of neoPCP administration on expression of presynaptic markers altered in schizophrenia. Using radioactive in...

  18. Tyrosine-induced release of dopamine is under inhibitory control of presynaptic dopamine D2 and, probably, D3 receptors in the dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusa, K.; Saigusa, T.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    Stimulation of dopamine D2-like receptors decreases extracellular dopamine in the dorsal striatum and the nucleus accumbens. It is unknown whether the role of these receptors differs from that of dopamine D3 receptors. It is also unknown to what extent the role of these two types of receptors varies

  19. Tyrosine-induced release of dopamine is under inhibitory control of presynaptic dopamine D2 and, probably, D3 receptors in the dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusa, K.; Saigusa, T.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    Stimulation of dopamine D2-like receptors decreases extracellular dopamine in the dorsal striatum and the nucleus accumbens. It is unknown whether the role of these receptors differs from that of dopamine D3 receptors. It is also unknown to what extent the role of these two types of receptors varies

  20. 5-HT2A-mGlu2/3 receptor complex in rat spinal cord glutamatergic nerve endings: A 5-HT2Ato mGlu2/3 signalling to amplify presynaptic mechanism of auto-control of glutamate exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Guendalina; Grilli, Massimo; Vergassola, Matteo; Bonfiglio, Tommaso; Padolecchia, Cristina; Garrone, Beatrice; Di Giorgio, Francesco Paolo; Tongiani, Serena; Usai, Cesare; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2018-05-01

    Presynaptic mGlu2/3 autoreceptors exist in rat spinal cord nerve terminals as suggested by the finding that LY379268 inhibited the 15 mM KCl-evoked release of [ 3 H]D-aspartate ([ 3 H]D-Asp) in a LY341495-sensitive manner. Spinal cord glutamatergic nerve terminals also possess presynaptic release-regulating 5-HT 2A heteroreceptors. Actually, the 15 mM KCl-evoked [ 3 H]D-Asp exocytosis from spinal cord synaptosomes was reduced by the 5-HT 2A agonist (±)DOI, an effect reversed by the 5-HT 2A antagonists MDL11,939, MDL100907, ketanserin and trazodone (TZD). We investigated whether mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptors colocalize and cross-talk in these terminals and if 5-HT 2A ligands modulate the mGlu2/3-mediated control of glutamate exocytosis. Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy highlighted the presence of mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptor proteins in spinal cord VGLUT1 positive synaptosomes, where mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptor immunoreactivities largely colocalize. Furthermore, mGlu2/3 immunoprecipitates from spinal cord synaptosomes were also 5-HT 2A immunopositive. Interestingly, the 100 pM LY379268-induced reduction of the 15 mM KCl-evoked [ 3 H]D-Asp overflow as well as its inhibition by 100 nM (±)DOI became undetectable when the two agonists were concomitantly added. Conversely, 5-HT 2A antagonists (MDL11,939, MDL100907, ketanserin and TZD) reinforced the release-regulating activity of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors. Increased expression of mGlu2/3 receptor proteins in synaptosomal plasmamembranes paralleled the gain of function of the mGlu2/3 autoreceptors elicited by 5-HT 2A antagonists. Based on these results, we propose that in spinal cord glutamatergic terminals i) mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptors colocalize and interact one each other in an antagonist-like manner, ii) 5-HT 2A antagonists are indirect positive allosteric modulator of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors controlling glutamate exocytosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could......Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX......)-sensitive fast Na(+) spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers...

  2. Synthesis of N-Substituted Piperidine Salts as Potential Muscarinic Ligands for Alzheimer's Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boulos, J.; Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Avila, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2013), s. 1363-1367 ISSN 0022-152X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : N-piperidine substituted salts * muscarinic receptor antagonists * selectivity Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.873, year: 2013

  3. Prenatal exposure to nicotine with associated in utero hypoxia decreased fetal brain muscarinic mRNA in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Caiping; Yuan, Xin; Cui, Yugui; Li, Hong; Lv, Juanxiu; Feng, Xing; Liu, Yujuan; Chen, Linqi; Xu, Zhice

    2008-01-16

    Prenatal exposure to nicotine can be associated with fetal abnormal development and brain damage. This study determined the effect of administration of nicotine with associated in utero hypoxia in maternal rats from early, middle, and late gestation on fetal blood hemoglobin, and expression of cholinergic receptor subtypes in the fetal brain. Our results demonstrated that maternal subcutaneous nicotine from the early gestation increased fetal hemoglobin and hematocrit, associated with reduction of PO(2). Although exposure to nicotine during late gestation had no effects on fetal brain weight, nicotine administration from the early gestation significantly decreased fetal brain muscarinic receptor (M1, M2, M3, and M4) mRNA expression, associated with restricted brain growth. Nicotine-altered muscarinic receptor subtype expression in the fetal forebrain and hindbrain showed regional differences. In addition, there were gestational differences for fetal brain muscarinic suppression by prenatal nicotine. Together, the results demonstrate that nicotine-induced in utero hypoxia is associated with poor development of muscarinic receptors in the fetal brain and restricted brain growth, and that either prolonged prenatal exposure to nicotine or critical "window" period for the brain development during pregnancy may play a role in prenatal nicotine-induced fetal muscarinic-receptor deficiency in the fetal brain.

  4. Exocytosis: using amperometry to study presynaptic mechanisms of neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.

    2004-01-01

    The development of carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry enabled detailed investigation of the presynaptic response at the single cell level with single vesicle resolution. Consequently, amperometry allowed for detailed studies into the presynaptic mechanisms underlying neurotoxicity. This review

  5. Effects of asparagine mutagenesis of conserved aspartic acids in helix 2 (D2.50) and 3 (D3.32) of M1-M4 muscarinic receptors on the irreversible binding of nitrogen mustard analogs of acetylcholine and McN-A-343.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Hinako; Ehlert, Frederick J

    2013-07-23

    We investigated how asparagine mutagenesis of conserved aspartic acids in helix 2 (D2.50) and 3 (D3.32) of M1-M4 muscarinic receptors alters the irreversible binding of acetylcholine mustard and BR384 (4-[(2-bromoethyl)methyl-amino]-2-butynyl N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamate), a nitrogen mustard derivative of McN-A-343 ([4-[[N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamoyl]oxy]-2-butynyl] trimethylammonium chloride). The D2.50N mutation moderately increased the affinity of the aziridinium ions of acetylcholine mustard and BR384 for M2-M4 receptors and had little effect on the rate constant for receptor alkylation. The D3.32N mutation greatly reduced the rate constant for receptor alkylation by acetylcholine mustard but not by BR384, although the affinity of BR384 was reduced. The combination of both mutations (D2.50N/D3.32N) substantially reduced the rate constant for receptor alkylation by BR384 relative to that of wild type and mutant D2.50N and D3.32N receptors. The change in binding affinity caused by the mutations suggests that the D2.50N mutation alters the interaction of acetylcholine mustard with D3.32 of the M1 and M3 receptors but not that of the M4 receptor. BR384 exhibited the converse relationship. The simplest explanation is that acetylcholine mustard and BR384 alkylate at least two residues on M1-M4 receptors and that the D2.50N mutation alters the rate of alkylation of D3.32 relative to another residue, perhaps D2.50 itself.

  6. Effects of asparagine mutagenesis of conserved aspartic acids in helix two (D2.50) and three (D3.32) of M1 – M4 muscarinic receptors on the irreversible binding of nitrogen mustard analogs of acetylcholine and McN-A-343

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Hinako; Ehlert, Frederick J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated how asparagine mutagenesis of conserved aspartic acids in helix two (D2.50) and three (D3.32) of M1 – M4 muscarinic receptors alters the irreversible binding of acetylcholine mustard and BR384 (4-[(2-bromoethyl)methyl-amino]-2-butynyl N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamate), a nitrogen mustard derivative of McN-A-343 ([4-[[N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamoyl]oxy]-2-butynyl] trimethylammonium chloride). The D2.50N mutation moderately increased the affinity of the aziridinium ions of acetylcholine mustard and BR384 for M2 – M4 receptors and had little effect on the rate constant for receptor alkylation. The D3.32N mutation greatly reduced the rate constant for receptor alkylation by acetylcholine mustard, but not by BR384, although the affinity of BR384 was reduced. The combination of both mutations (D2.50N/D3.32N) substantially reduced the rate constant for receptor alkylation by BR384 relative to wild type and mutant D2.50N and D3.32N receptors. The change in binding affinity caused by the mutations suggests that the D2.50N mutation alters the interaction of acetylcholine mustard with D3.32 of M1 and M3 receptors, but not that of the M4 receptor. BR384 exhibited the converse relationship. The simplest explanation is that acetylcholine mustard and BR384 alkylate at least two residues on M1 – M4 receptors and that the D2.50N mutation alters the rate of alkylation of D3.32 relative to another residue, perhaps D2.50 itself. PMID:23826889

  7. Deformation of attractor landscape via cholinergic presynaptic modulations: a computational study using a phase neuron model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kanamaru

    Full Text Available Corticopetal acetylcholine (ACh is released transiently from the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM into the cortical layers and is associated with top-down attention. Recent experimental data suggest that this release of ACh disinhibits layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons (PYRs via muscarinic presynaptic effects on inhibitory synapses. Together with other possible presynaptic cholinergic effects on excitatory synapses, this may result in dynamic and temporal modifications of synapses associated with top-down attention. However, the system-level consequences and cognitive relevance of such disinhibitions are poorly understood. Herein, we propose a theoretical possibility that such transient modifications of connectivity associated with ACh release, in addition to top-down glutamatergic input, may provide a neural mechanism for the temporal reactivation of attractors as neural correlates of memories. With baseline levels of ACh, the brain returns to quasi-attractor states, exhibiting transitive dynamics between several intrinsic internal states. This suggests that top-down attention may cause the attention-induced deformations between two types of attractor landscapes: the quasi-attractor landscape (Q-landscape, present under low-ACh, non-attentional conditions and the attractor landscape (A-landscape, present under high-ACh, top-down attentional conditions. We present a conceptual computational model based on experimental knowledge of the structure of PYRs and interneurons (INs in cortical layers 1 and 2/3 and discuss the possible physiological implications of our results.

  8. Axonal and presynaptic RNAs are locally transcribed in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, the long-standing opinion that axonal and presynaptic proteins are exclusively derived from the neuron cell body has been substantially modified by the demonstration that active systems of protein synthesis are present in axons and nerve terminals. These observations have raised the issue of the cellular origin of the involved RNAs, which has been generally attributed to the neuron soma. However, data gathered in a number of model systems indicated that axonal RNAs are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. More recent experiments on the perfused squid giant axon have definitively proved that axoplasmic RNAs are transcribed in periaxonal glia. Their delivery to the axon occurs by a modulatory mechanism based on the release of neurotransmitters from the stimulated axon and on their binding to glial receptors. In additional experiments on squid optic lobe synaptosomes, presynaptic RNA has been also shown to be synthesized locally, presumably in nearby glia. Together with a wealth of literature data, these observations indicate that axons and nerve terminals are endowed with a local system of gene expression that supports the maintenance and plasticity of these neuronal domains.

  9. SNAP-25, a known presynaptic protein with emerging postsynaptic functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia eAntonucci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of synaptic specializations is their dependence on highly organized complexes of proteins that interact with each other. The loss or modification of key synaptic proteins directly affects the properties of such networks, ultimately impacting synaptic function. SNAP-25 is a component of the SNARE complex, which is central to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and, by directly interacting with different calcium channels subunits, it negatively modulates neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels, thus regulating intracellular calcium dynamics. The SNAP-25 gene has been associated with distinct brain diseases, including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, indicating that the protein may act as a shared biological substrate among different synaptopathies. The mechanisms by which alterations in SNAP-25 may concur to these psychiatric diseases are still undefined, although alterations in neurotransmitter release have been indicated as potential causative processes. This review summarizes recent work showing that SNAP-25 not only controls exo/endocytic processes at the presynaptic terminal, but also regulates postsynaptic receptor trafficking, spine morphogenesis and plasticity, thus opening the possibility that SNAP-25 defects may contribute to psychiatric diseases by impacting not only presynaptic but also postsynaptic functions.

  10. Synthesis of novel and functionally selective non‐competitive muscarinic antagonists as chemical probes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boulos, J. F.; Jakubík, Jan; Boulos, J. M.; Randáková, Alena; Momirov, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 1 (2018), s. 93-104 ISSN 1747-0277 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : G-protein-coupled receptor * muscarinic acetylcholine receptor * N-methylscopolamine * Parkinson's disease * positive allosteric modulator Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 2.396, year: 2016

  11. Muscarinic Attenuation of Mnemonic Rule Representation in Macaque Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex during a Pro- and Anti-Saccade Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Alex J; Vijayraghavan, Susheel; Everling, Stefan

    2015-12-09

    Maintenance of context is necessary for execution of appropriate responses to diverse environmental stimuli. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) plays a pivotal role in executive function, including working memory and representation of abstract rules. DLPFC activity is modulated by the ascending cholinergic system through nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. Although muscarinic receptors have been implicated in executive performance and gating of synaptic signals, their effect on local primate DLPFC neuronal activity in vivo during cognitive tasks remains poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of muscarinic receptor blockade on rule-related activity in the macaque prefrontal cortex by combining iontophoretic application of the general muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine with single-cell recordings while monkeys performed a mnemonic rule-guided saccade task. We found that scopolamine reduced overall neuronal firing rate and impaired rule discriminability of task-selective cells. Saccade and visual direction selectivity measures were also reduced by muscarinic antagonism. These results demonstrate that blockade of muscarinic receptors in DLPFC creates deficits in working memory representation of rules in primates. Acetylcholine plays a pivotal role in higher-order cognitive functions, including planning, reasoning, impulse-control, and making decisions based on contingencies or rules. Disruption of acetylcholine function is central to many psychiatric disorders manifesting cognitive impairments, including Alzheimer's disease. Although much is known about the involvement of acetylcholine and its receptors in arousal and attention, its involvement in working memory, an essential short-term memory component of cognition dependent on the integrity of prefrontal cortex, remains poorly understood. Herein, we explored the impact of suppressing acetylcholine signaling on neurons encoding memorized rules while macaque monkeys made responses based on

  12. Acute desensitization of presynaptic GABA(B)-mediated inhibition and induction of epileptiform discharges in the neonatal rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tosetti, P; Bakels, R; Colin-Le Brun, [No Value; Ferrand, N; Gaiarsa, JL; Caillard, O

    The consequences of sustained activation of GABA(B) receptors on GABA(B)-mediated inhibition and network activity were investigated in the neonatal rat hippocampus using whole-cell and extracellular field recordings. GABA(B)-mediated presynaptic control of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release

  13. Endocannabinoids mediate muscarine-induced synaptic depression at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Zachary; Malik, Priya; Wu, Tse-Yu; Ochoa, Christopher; Watsa, Nayantara; Lindgren, Clark

    2007-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) inhibit neurotransmitter release throughout the central nervous system. Using the Ceratomandibularis muscle from the lizard Anolis carolinensis we asked whether eCBs play a similar role at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction. We report here that the CB1 cannabinoid receptor is concentrated on motor terminals and that eCBs mediate the inhibition of neurotransmitter release induced by the activation of M3 muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors. N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide, a CB1 antagonist, prevents muscarine from inhibiting release and arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA), a CB1 receptor agonist, mimics M3 activation and occludes the effect of muscarine. As for its mechanism of action, ACPA reduces the action-potential-evoked calcium transient in the nerve terminal and this decrease is more than sufficient to account for the observed inhibition of neurotransmitter release. Similar to muscarine, the inhibition of synaptic transmission by ACPA requires nitric oxide, acting via the synthesis of cGMP and the activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is responsible for the majority of the effects of eCB as inhibitors of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol lipase, two enzymes responsible for synthesis of 2-AG, significantly limit muscarine-induced inhibition of neurotransmitter release. Lastly, the injection of (5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)-N-(4-hydroxy-2-methylphenyl)-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenamide (an inhibitor of eCB transport) into the muscle prevents muscarine, but not ACPA, from inhibiting ACh release. These results collectively lead to a model of the vertebrate neuromuscular junction whereby 2-AG mediates the muscarine-induced inhibition of ACh release. To demonstrate the physiological relevance of this model we show that the CB1 antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide prevents synaptic

  14. Dichotomous Effects of Mu Opioid Receptor Activation on Striatal Low-Threshold Spike Interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Elghaba

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Striatal low-threshold spike interneurons (LTSIs are tonically active neurons that express GABA and nitric oxide synthase and are involved in information processing as well as neurovascular coupling. While mu opioid receptors (MORs and their ligand encephalin are prominent in the striatum, their action on LTSIs has not been investigated. We addressed this issue carrying out whole-cell recordings in transgenic mice in which the NPY-expressing neurons are marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP. The MOR agonist (D-Ala(2, N-MePhe(4, Gly-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO produced dual effects on subpopulations of LTSIs. DAMGO caused inhibitory effects, accompanied by decreases of spontaneous firing, in 62% of LTSIs, while depolarizing effects (accompanied by an increase in spontaneous firing were observed in 23% of LTSIs tested. The dual effects of DAMGO persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, a sodium channel blocker or in the presence of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine. However, in the presence of either the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin or the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist atropine, DAMGO only elicited inhibitory effects on LTSIs. Furthermore, we found that DAMGO decreased the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABAergic events. Unexpectedly, these effects of DAMGO on spontaneous GABAergic events disappeared after blocking of the muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic blockers, showing that GABA inputs to LTSIs are not directly modulated by presynaptic MORs. These finding suggest that activation of MORs affect LTSIs both directly and indirectly, through modulation of GABAergic and cholinergic tones. The complex balance between direct and indirect effects determines the net effect of DAMGO on LTSIs.

  15. Localization of Presynaptic Plasticity Mechanisms Enables Functional Independence of Synaptic and Ectopic Transmission in the Cerebellum

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    Katharine L. Dobson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the cerebellar molecular layer parallel fibre terminals release glutamate from both the active zone and from extrasynaptic “ectopic” sites. Ectopic release mediates transmission to the Bergmann glia that ensheathe the synapse, activating Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors and glutamate transporters. Parallel fibre terminals exhibit several forms of presynaptic plasticity, including cAMP-dependent long-term potentiation and endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression, but it is not known whether these presynaptic forms of long-term plasticity also influence ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia. Stimulation of parallel fibre inputs at 16 Hz evoked LTP of synaptic transmission, but LTD of ectopic transmission. Pharmacological activation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin caused LTP at Purkinje neurons, but only transient potentiation at Bergmann glia, reinforcing the concept that ectopic sites lack the capacity to express sustained cAMP-dependent potentiation. Activation of mGluR1 caused depression of synaptic transmission via retrograde endocannabinoid signalling but had no significant effect at ectopic sites. In contrast, activation of NMDA receptors suppressed both synaptic and ectopic transmission. The results suggest that the signalling mechanisms for presynaptic LTP and retrograde depression by endocannabinoids are restricted to the active zone at parallel fibre synapses, allowing independent modulation of synaptic transmission to Purkinje neurons and ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia.

  16. Evidence against the unitary hypothesis of agonist and antagonist action at presynaptic adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsner, S.

    1982-01-01

    1 The concept that presynaptic receptors regulate noradrenergic transmitter release via a system of inhibitory receptors mediating negative feedback relies on a supposed association between increases in stimulation-induced efflux of [3H]-noradrenaline by antagonists and blockade by them of the inhibitory effects of exogenous noradrenaline. 2 It was shown in guinea-pig ureter, that yohimbine (3 X 10(-7)M), a presumed selective presynaptic antagonist, increased transmitter efflux substantially at 1 Hz and 5 Hz with 100 pulses, purportedly representing antagonism of the inhibitory effect of locally released noradrenaline but did not reduce the inhibitory effect of exogenous noradrenaline (1.8 X 10(-6)M or 1.8 X 10(-7)M) except in one case. 3 Additionally, the inhibitory effect of oxymetazoline (1.0 X 10(-7)M or 1.0 X 10(-8)M) on stimulation-induced efflux was in no way antagonized by yohimbine (3 X 10(-7)M). 4 It is concluded that the increased efflux of [3H]-noradrenaline produced by antagonists and the decreased efflux produced by exogenous agonists may represent actions at different loci and that the hypothesis of presynaptic feedback regulatory sites is still not substantiated. PMID:6128040

  17. Dishevelled proteins are associated with olfactory sensory neuron presynaptic terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J Rodriguez-Gil

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs project their axons from the olfactory epithelium toward the olfactory bulb (OB in a heterogeneous and unsorted arrangement. However, as the axons approach the glomerular layer of the OB, axons from OSNs expressing the same odorant receptor (OR sort and converge to form molecularly homogeneous glomeruli. Axon guidance cues, cell adhesion molecules, and OR induced activity have been implicated in the final targeting of OSN axons to specific glomeruli. Less understood, and often controversial, are the mechanisms used by OSN axons to initially navigate from the OE toward the OB. We previously demonstrated a role for Wnt and Frizzled (Fz molecules in OSN axon extension and organization within the olfactory nerve. Building on that we now turned our attention to the downstream signaling cascades from Wnt-Fz interactions. Dishevelled (Dvl is a key molecule downstream of Fz receptors. Three isoforms of Dvl with specific as well as overlapping functions are found in mammals. Here, we show that Dvl-1 expression is restricted to OSNs in the dorsal recess of the nasal cavity, and labels a unique subpopulation of glomeruli. Dvl-2 and Dvl-3 have a widespread distribution in both the OE and OB. Both Dvl-1 and Dvl-2 are associated with intra-glomerular pre-synaptic OSN terminals, suggesting a role in synapse formation/stabilization. Moreover, because Dvl proteins were observed in all OSN axons, we hypothesize that they are important determinants of OSN cell differentiation and axon extension.

  18. The hydrogen-atom environment of the ether oxygen atom in crystal structures of some representative muscarinic agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, J.; Scherrenberg, R. L.; Kooijman, H.; Kanters, J. A.

    1990-06-01

    The hypothesis that the ether oxygen atom in muscarinic agonists acts as a hydrogen-bond acceptor is supported by evidence from crystallographic data. The same evidence suggests that in such interactions N +CH⋯O bonds donated by the ligand to the receptor may be involved.

  19. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  20. Impairment of muscarinic transmission in transgenic APPswe/PS1dE9 mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; Michal, Pavel; Oksman, M.; Iivonen, H.; Tanila, H.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2008), s. 368-378 ISSN 0197-4580 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011206 Grant - others:EC(XE) QLK1-CT-2002-00172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s disease * muscarinic receptors * cholinergic neurotransmission Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.959, year: 2008

  1. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  2. Muscarinic contribution to the acute cortical effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Justin A.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) has been used to treat more than 60,000 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and is under investigation as a treatment for several other neurological disorders and conditions. Among these, VNS increases memory performance and enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in animal models of traumatic brain injury. Recent research indicates that pairing brief VNS with tones multiple-times a day for several weeks induces long-term, input specific cortical plasticity, which can be used to re-normalize the pathological cortical reorganization and eliminate a behavioral correlate of chronic tinnitus in noise exposed rats. Despite the therapeutic potential, the mechanisms of action of VNS remain speculative. In chapter 2 of this dissertation, the acute effects of VNS on cortical synchrony, excitability, and temporal processing are examined. In anesthetized rats implanted with multi-electrode arrays, VNS increased and decorrelated spontaneous multi-unit activity, and suppressed entrainment to repetitive noise burst stimulation at 6 to 8 Hz, but not after systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Chapter 3 focuses on VNS-tone pairing induced cortical plasticity. Pairing VNS with a tone one hundred times in anesthetized rats resulted in frequency specific plasticity in 31% of the auditory cortex sites. Half of these sites exhibited a frequency specific increase in firing rate and half exhibited a frequency specific decrease. Muscarinic receptor blockade with scopolamine almost entirely prevented the frequency specific increases, but not decreases. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the capacity for VNS to not only acutely influence cortical synchrony, and excitability, but to also influence temporal and spectral tuning via muscarinic receptor activation. These results strengthen the hypothesis that acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of action of VNS and

  3. Sepsis causes presynaptic histamine H3 and alpha2-adrenergic dysfunction in canine myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zao-Qin; Bose, Deepak; Jacobs, Han; Light, R Bruce; Mink, Steven N

    2002-11-01

    Histamine H3 receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors are presynaptic receptors that modulate norepinephrine (NE) release from sympathetic nerves innervating the cardiovascular system. We previously showed that cardiac H3 receptors are activated in sepsis, and that this activation leads to a decrease in the adrenergic response (AR) [J. Appl. Physiol. 85 (1998) 1693-1701] H3-receptors and alpha2-receptors appear to be coupled to GTP binding regulatory proteins (G) that modulate transmitter release by reducing calcium current into the nerve terminals through neuronal calcium channels. There may also be interaction between H3-receptors and alpha2-receptors on AR that may occur either at the receptor or a more downstream level. In the present study, we examined the effect of septic plasma on AR in a canine ventricular preparation in which field stimulation was used to produce AR. We determined whether there was interaction between H(3)-receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors and tested whether H3 activation would attenuate the alpha2-agonist and alpha2-antagonist effects of clonidine and yohimbine, respectively. We also determined whether the mechanism by which septic plasma decreases the adrenergic response involves inactivation of an inhibitory G protein and used pertussis toxin (PTX) to assess this effect. We found that septic plasma attenuated AR produced by field stimulation, and that this decrease was mediated by a PTX sensitive inhibitory G protein. H3 activation also attenuated the alpha2-agonist and alpha2-antagonist effects on adrenergic activation as compared with nonseptic plasma. We conclude that presynaptic sympathetic dysfunction may contribute to cardiovascular collapse in sepsis.

  4. Local synthesis of axonal and presynaptic RNA in squid model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Ferrara, Eugenia; De Stefano, Rosanna; Lavina, Zeno Scotto; Crispino, Marianna; Squillace, Angela; van Minnen, Jan; Kaplan, Barry B; Giuditta, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The presence of active systems of protein synthesis in axons and nerve endings raises the question of the cellular origin of the corresponding RNAs. Our present experiments demonstrate that, besides a possible derivation from neuronal cell bodies, axoplasmic RNAs originate in periaxonal glial cells and presynaptic RNAs derive from nearby cells, presumably glial cells. Indeed, in perfused squid giant axons, delivery of newly synthesized RNA to the axon perfusate is strongly stimulated by axonal depolarization or agonists of glial glutamate and acetylcholine receptors. Likewise, incubation of squid optic lobe slices with [3H]uridine leads to a marked accumulation of [3H]RNA in the large synaptosomes derived from the nerve terminals of retinal photoreceptor neurons. As the cell bodies of these neurons lie outside the optic lobe, the data demonstrate that presynaptic RNA is locally synthesized, presumably by perisynaptic glial cells. Overall, our results support the view that axons and presynaptic regions are endowed with local systems of gene expression which may prove essential for the maintenance and plasticity of these extrasomatic neuronal domains.

  5. Insular muscarinic signaling regulates anxiety-like behaviors in rats on the elevated plus-maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Chen, Lei; Li, Peng; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhai, Haifeng

    2014-08-15

    Anxiety is one of the most prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders, and little is known about its pathogenesis. In order to investigate the neural mechanisms of this mental disorder, we used rat behavior in the elevated plus-maze as an animal model of anxiety and the insular cortex (insula) as a brain target. The microinjection of non-selective and selective M1 and M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonists or antagonists was used to explore whether the insular muscarinic receptor and its subtypes regulate levels of anxiety. The results showed that both non-selective and selective M1 and M4 mAChR agonists increased the time spent on exploring in the open arms, whereas antagonists decreased exploration. Our results indicate that activation of insular mAChRs could produce anxiolytic effects, whereas inhibition of insular mAChRs could increase anxiety. We concluded that the insular muscarinic system plays a role in the modulation of anxiety, and dysfunction of mAChR signaling may be involved in the mechanism of anxiogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2–mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  7. Effects of muscarinic agents on chick choroids in intact eyes and eyecups: evidence for a muscarinic mechanism in choroidal thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickla, Debora L; Zhu, Xiaoying; Wallman, Josh

    2013-01-01

    10 µm per 3 h). In vitro, pirenzepine thickened choroids by 3 h (77 vs 2 µm, p < 0.01). Conclusions Muscarinic agonists caused choroidal thinning in intact eyes and eyecups, supporting a role for acetylcholine in the choroidal response to hyperopic defocus or form deprivation. Only oxotremorine stimulated eye growth, which is inconsistent with a muscarinic receptor mechanism for antagonist-induced eye growth inhibition. The dissociation between choroidal thinning and ocular growth stimulation for the other agonists in vivo suggest separate pathways for the two. PMID:23662958

  8. A presynaptic role for PKA in synaptic tagging and memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Alan Jung; Havekes, Robbert; Choi, Jennifer H K; Luczak, Vincent; Nie, Ting; Huang, Ted; Abel, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling molecules are spatially restricted within neurons by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Although studies on compartmentalized PKA signaling have focused on postsynaptic mechanisms, presynaptically anchored PKA may contribute to synaptic plasticity and

  9. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jähne, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.jaehne1@stud.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); International Max Planck Research School for Neurosciences, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rizzoli, Silvio O. [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); Helm, Martin S., E-mail: martin.helm@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); International Max Planck Research School for Molecular Biology, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures.

  10. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  11. Muscarinic depolarization of layer II neurons of the parasubiculum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Glasgow

    Full Text Available The parasubiculum (PaS is a component of the hippocampal formation that sends its major output to layer II of the entorhinal cortex. The PaS receives strong cholinergic innervation from the basal forebrain that is likely to modulate neuronal excitability and contribute to theta-frequency network activity. The present study used whole cell current- and voltage-clamp recordings to determine the effects of cholinergic receptor activation on layer II PaS neurons. Bath application of carbachol (CCh; 10-50 µM resulted in a dose-dependent depolarization of morphologically-identified layer II stellate and pyramidal cells that was not prevented by blockade of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Bath application of the M1 receptor antagonist pirenzepine (1 µM, but not the M2-preferring antagonist methoctramine (1 µM, blocked the depolarization, suggesting that it is dependent on M1 receptors. Voltage-clamp experiments using ramped voltage commands showed that CCh resulted in the gradual development of an inward current that was partially blocked by concurrent application of the selective Kv7.2/3 channel antagonist XE-991, which inhibits the muscarine-dependent K(+ current I M. The remaining inward current also reversed near EK and was inhibited by the K(+ channel blocker Ba(2+, suggesting that M1 receptor activation attenuates both I M as well as an additional K(+ current. The additional K(+ current showed rectification at depolarized voltages, similar to K(+ conductances mediated by Kir 2.3 channels. The cholinergic depolarization of layer II PaS neurons therefore appears to occur through M1-mediated effects on I M as well as an additional K(+ conductance.

  12. Acetylcholine receptors in the human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, J.B.; Hollyfield, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence for a population of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the human retina is presented. The authors have used the irreversible ligand 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard ( 3 H-PrBCM) to label muscarinic receptors. 3 H- or 125 I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTx) was used to label putative nicotinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors are apparently present in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Autoradiographic grain densities are reduced in the presence of saturating concentrations of atropine, quinuclidinyl benzilate or scopolamine; this indicates that 3 H-PrBCM binding is specific for a population of muscarinic receptors in the human retina. Binding sites for radiolabeled alpha-BTx are found predominantly in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Grain densities are reduced in the presence of d-tubocurarine, indicating that alpha-BTx may bind to a pharmacologically relevant nicotinic ACh receptor. This study provides evidence for cholinergic neurotransmission in the human retina

  13. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  14. Muscarinic signalling affects intracellular calcium concentration during the first cell cycle of sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, P K; Falugi, C; Angelini, C; Whitaker, M J

    2002-06-01

    The existence of a response to acetylcholine (ACh) and cholinomimetic drugs in sea urchin eggs and zygotes was investigated in two sea urchin species: Paracentrotus lividus and Lytechinus pictus. The calcium sensitive fluorescent probe, Fura-2 dextran, was employed to investigate the regulation of cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) by cholinomimetic drugs in unfertilised and fertilised eggs of both the sea urchin species. Exposure to cholinomimetic agonists/antagonists, either extracellularly or intracellularly, had no effect either on resting [Ca(2+)](i) levels in the unfertilised sea urchin egg, or on the transient [Ca(2+)](i) increase at fertilisation. However, following fertilisation, extracellular application of ACh receptors agonists, such as ACh and carbachol, predominantly muscarinic agonist, but not nicotine, induced a significant increase in [Ca(2+)](i), which was partially inhibited by atropine. As a consequence of exposure after fertilisation to the agonists of ACh receptors, chromatin structure was transiently affected. The hypothesis is proposed that muscarinic receptors may be involved in the (presumably Ca(2+)-dependent) modulation of the nuclear status during the first cell cycles.

  15. Desensitization of metabotropic glutamate receptors in neuronal cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catania, M. V.; Aronica, E.; Sortino, M. A.; Canonico, P. L.; Nicoletti, F.

    1991-01-01

    Preexposure of cultured cerebellar neurons to glutamate reduced the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide (PPI) hydrolysis induced by subsequent addition of glutamate without affecting the response to the muscarinic receptor agonist carbamylcholine. Desensitization of glutamate-stimulated PPI

  16. The role of muscarinic cholinergic signaling in cost-benefit decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobbs, Wambura

    Animals regularly face decisions that affect both their immediate success and long term survival. Such decisions typically involve some form of cost-benefit analysis and engage a number of high level cognitive processes, including learning, memory and motivational influences. While decision making has been a focus of study for over a century, it's only in the last 20 years that researchers have begun to identify functional neural circuits that subserve different forms of cost-benefit decision making. Even though the cholinergic system is both functionally and anatomically positioned to modulate cost-benefit decision circuits, the contribution of the cholinergic system to decision making has been little studied. In this thesis, I investigated the cognitive and neural contribution of muscarinic cholinergic signaling to cost-benefit decision making. I, first, re-examined the effects of systemic administration of 0.3 mg/kg atropine on delay and probability discounting tasks and found that blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by atropine induced suboptimal choices (impulsive and risky) in both tasks. Since the effect on delay discounting was restricted to the No Cue version of the delay discounting task, I concluded that muscarinic cholinergic signaling mediates both forms of cost-benefit decision making and is selectively engaged when decisions require valuation of reward options whose costs are not externally signified. Second, I assessed the impact of inactivating the nucleus basalis (NBM) on both forms decision making and the effect of injecting atropine locally into the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), basolateral amygdala (BLA), or nucleus accumbens (NAc) core during the No Cue version of the delay discounting task. I discovered that although NBM inactivation failed to affect delay discounting, it induced risk aversion in the probability discounting task; and blockade of intra- NAc core, but not intra-OFC or intra-BLA, muscarinic cholinergic signaling lead to

  17. Relations between immune and mediator receptors of mouse lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ado, A.D.; Alekseeva, T.A.; Kravchenko, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the action of the specific muscarinic antogonist tritium-quinuclidinyl benzilate (tritium-QNB) on immune rosette formation in mice. It is shown that since the specific muscarini antagonist tritium-QNB inhibits immune rosette formation, this process must be regarded as interconnected with muscarinic receptors of lymphocytes. Interaction of immune (antigen-binding) and mediator receptors, however, is an important factor maintaining immune homeostasis at a certain level

  18. A presynaptic role for PKA in synaptic tagging and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Alan Jung; Havekes, Robbert; Choi, Jennifer Hk; Luczak, Vince; Nie, Ting; Huang, Ted; Abel, Ted

    2014-10-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling molecules are spatially restricted within neurons by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Although studies on compartmentalized PKA signaling have focused on postsynaptic mechanisms, presynaptically anchored PKA may contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory because PKA also regulates presynaptic transmitter release. Here, we examine this issue using genetic and pharmacological application of Ht31, a PKA anchoring disrupting peptide. At the hippocampal Schaffer collateral CA3-CA1 synapse, Ht31 treatment elicits a rapid decay of synaptic responses to repetitive stimuli, indicating a fast depletion of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. The interaction between PKA and proteins involved in producing this pool of synaptic vesicles is supported by biochemical assays showing that synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2), Rim1, and SNAP25 are components of a complex that interacts with cAMP. Moreover, acute treatment with Ht31 reduces the levels of SV2. Finally, experiments with transgenic mouse lines, which express Ht31 in excitatory neurons at the Schaffer collateral CA3-CA1 synapse, highlight a requirement for presynaptically anchored PKA in pathway-specific synaptic tagging and long-term contextual fear memory. These results suggest that a presynaptically compartmentalized PKA is critical for synaptic plasticity and memory by regulating the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic synaptic transmission by adenosine in mouse hypothalamic hypocretin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J X; Xiong, J X; Wang, H K; Duan, S M; Ye, J N; Hu, Z A

    2012-01-10

    Hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, a new wakefulness-promoting center, have been recently regarded as an important target involved in endogenous adenosine-regulating sleep homeostasis. The GABAergic synaptic transmissions are the main inhibitory afferents to hypocretin neurons, which play an important role in the regulation of excitability of these neurons. The inhibitory effect of adenosine, a homeostatic sleep-promoting factor, on the excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmissions in hypocretin neurons has been well documented, whether adenosine also modulates these inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmissions in these neurons has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of adenosine on inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in hypocretin neurons was examined by using perforated patch-clamp recordings in the acute hypothalamic slices. The findings demonstrated that adenosine suppressed the amplitude of evoked IPSCs in a dose-dependent manner, which was completely abolished by 8-cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT), a selective antagonist of adenosine A1 receptor but not adenosine A2 receptor antagonist 3,7-dimethyl-1-(2-propynyl) xanthine. A presynaptic origin was suggested as following: adenosine increased paired-pulse ratio as well as reduced GABAergic miniature IPSC frequency without affecting the miniature IPSC amplitude. Further findings demonstrated that when the frequency of electrical stimulation was raised to 10 Hz, but not 1 Hz, a time-dependent depression of evoked IPSC amplitude was detected in hypocretin neurons, which could be partially blocked by CPT. However, under a higher frequency at 100 Hz stimulation, CPT had no action on the depressed GABAergic synaptic transmission induced by such tetanic stimulation in these hypocretin neurons. These results suggest that endogenous adenosine generated under certain stronger activities of synaptic transmissions exerts an inhibitory effect on GABAergic synaptic transmission in hypocretin

  20. Presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine release induced by adenosine at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Silvana; Veggetti, Mariela; Muchnik, Salomón; Losavio, Adriana

    2004-05-01

    1. At the mouse neuromuscular junction, adenosine (AD) and the A(1) agonist 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyl-adenosine (CCPA) induce presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine (ACh) release by activation of A(1) AD receptors through a mechanism that is still unknown. To evaluate whether the inhibition is mediated by modulation of the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) associated with tonic secretion (L- and N-type VDCCs), we measured the miniature end-plate potential (mepp) frequency in mouse diaphragm muscles. 2. Blockade of VDCCs by Cd(2+) prevented the effect of the CCPA. Nitrendipine (an L-type VDCC antagonist) but not omega-conotoxin GVIA (an N-type VDCC antagonist) blocked the action of CCPA, suggesting that the decrease in spontaneous mepp frequency by CCPA is associated with an action on L-type VDCCs only. 3. As A(1) receptors are coupled to a G(i/o) protein, we investigated whether the inhibition of PKA or the activation of PKC is involved in the presynaptic inhibition mechanism. Neither N-(2[p-bromocinnamylamino]-ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, a PKA inhibitor), nor 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine (H-7, a PKC antagonist), nor phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PHA, a PKC activator) modified CCPA-induced presynaptic inhibition, suggesting that these second messenger pathways are not involved. 4. The effect of CCPA was eliminated by the calmodulin antagonist N-(6-aminohexil)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W-7) and by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester epsilon6TDelta-BM, which suggests that the action of CCPA to modulate L-type VDCCs may involve Ca(2+)-calmodulin. 5. To investigate the action of CCPA on diverse degrees of nerve terminal depolarization, we studied its effect at different external K(+) concentrations. The effect of CCPA on ACh secretion evoked by 10 mm K(+) was prevented by the P/Q-type VDCC antagonist omega-agatoxin IVA. 6. CCPA failed to

  1. Endosulfan and cholinergic (muscarinic) transmission: effect on electroencephalograms and [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate in pigeon brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, M.; Agrawal, A.K.; Gopal, K.; Sur, R.N.; Seth, P.K.

    1986-01-01

    Single exposure of endosulfan (5 mg/kg) to pigeons (Columbia livia) caused neuronal hyperexcitability as evidence by spike discharges of 200-500 μV in the electroencephalograms (EEG) from the telencephalon and hyperstriatum, but there was not effect on the ectostriatal area. Cholinergic (muscarinic) receptor binding study using [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([ 3 H]QNB) as a specific ligand indicated that a single exposure to 5 mg/kg of endosulfan caused a significant increase in [ 3 H]QNB binding to the striatal membrane. Behavior study further indicated that a single dose of 200 μg/kg of oxotremorine produced a significant induction in the tremor in endosulfan-pretreated pigeons. The results of this behavioral and biochemical study indicate the involvement of a cholinergic (muscarinic) transmitter system in endosulfan-induced neurotoxicity

  2. Acetylcholine release in mouse hippocampal CA1 preferentially activates inhibitory-selective interneurons via alpha4 beta2* nicotinic receptor activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Andrew Bell

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh release onto nicotinic receptors directly activates subsets of inhibitory interneurons in hippocampal CA1. However, the specific interneurons activated and their effect on the hippocampal network is not completely understood. Therefore, we investigated subsets of hippocampal CA1 interneurons that respond to ACh release through the activation of nicotinic receptors and the potential downstream effects this may have on hippocampal CA1 network function. ACh was optogenetically released in mouse hippocampal slices by expressing the excitatory optogenetic protein oChIEF-tdTomato in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca cholinergic neurons using Cre recombinase-dependent adeno-associated viral mediated transfection. The actions of optogenetically released ACh were assessed on both pyramidal neurons and different interneuron subtypes via whole cell patch clamp methods. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP-expressing interneurons that selectively innervate other interneurons (VIP/IS were excited by ACh through the activation of nicotinic receptors containing alpah4 and beta2 subunits (alpha4 beta2*. ACh release onto VIP/IS was presynaptically inhibited by M2 muscarinic autoreceptors. ACh release produced spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (sIPSC barrages blocked by dihydro-beta-erythroidine in interneurons but not pyramidal neurons. Optogenetic suppression of VIP interneurons did not inhibit these sIPSC barrages suggesting other interneuron-selective interneurons were also excited by 42* nicotinic receptor activation. In contrast, interneurons that innervate pyramidal neuron perisomatic regions were not activated by ACh release onto nicotinic receptors. Therefore, we propose ACh release in CA1 facilitates disinhibition through activation of 42* nicotinic receptors on interneuron-selective interneurons whereas interneurons that innervate pyramidal neurons are less affected by nicotinic receptor activation.

  3. The clinical benefit of imaging striatal dopamine transporters with [123I]FP-CIT SPET in differentiating patients with presynaptic parkinsonism from those with other forms of parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booij, J.; Speelman, J.DE.; Horstink, M. W.I.M.; Wolters, E.C.

    2001-01-01

    , and in three cases no conclusive diagnosis was established, but presynaptic parkinsonism was excluded clinically. A clinical diagnosis of presynaptic parkinsonism was established in two cases: one case of multiple system atrophy (in this patient loss of dopamine D 2 receptors was found with [ 123 I]iodobenzamide SPET performed 2 weeks after [ 123 I]FP-CIT imaging) and one case of Parkinson's disease. Our data suggest that the positive predictive value of [ 123 I]FP-CIT imaging is very high, and although the negative predictive value is lower, dopamine transporter imaging offers the prospect of a quick, objective method to confirm or exclude presynaptic parkinsonism in inconclusive cases. (orig.)

  4. RIM genes differentially contribute to organizing presynaptic release sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Deng, Lunbin; Fan, Mingming; Südhof, Thomas C

    2012-07-17

    Tight coupling of Ca(2+) channels to the presynaptic active zone is critical for fast synchronous neurotransmitter release. RIMs are multidomain proteins that tether Ca(2+) channels to active zones, dock and prime synaptic vesicles for release, and mediate presynaptic plasticity. Here, we use conditional knockout mice targeting all RIM isoforms expressed by the Rims1 and Rims2 genes to examine the contributions and mechanism of action of different RIMs in neurotransmitter release. We show that acute single deletions of each Rims gene decreased release and impaired vesicle priming but did not alter the extracellular Ca(2+)-responsiveness of release (which for Rims gene mutants is a measure of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx). Moreover, single deletions did not affect the synchronization of release (which depends on the close proximity of Ca(2+) channels to release sites). In contrast, deletion of both Rims genes severely impaired the Ca(2+) responsiveness and synchronization of release. RIM proteins may act on Ca(2+) channels in two modes: They tether Ca(2+) channels to active zones, and they directly modulate Ca(2+)-channel inactivation. The first mechanism is essential for localizing presynaptic Ca(2+) influx to nerve terminals, but the role of the second mechanism remains unknown. Strikingly, we find that although the RIM2 C(2)B domain by itself significantly decreased Ca(2+)-channel inactivation in transfected HEK293 cells, it did not rescue any aspect of the RIM knockout phenotype in cultured neurons. Thus, RIMs primarily act in release as physical Ca(2+)-channel tethers and not as Ca(2+)-channel modulators. Different RIM proteins compensate for each other in recruiting Ca(2+) channels to active zones, but contribute independently and incrementally to vesicle priming.

  5. Presynaptic Active Zone Density during Development and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Gwenaëlle L; Chen, Jie; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density) during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS), active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  6. Presynaptic active zone density during development and synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenaëlle L Clarke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS, active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  7. Coupling of exocytosis and endocytosis at the presynaptic active zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritzen, Tanja; Haucke, Volker

    2018-02-01

    Brain function depends on the ability of neurons to communicate with each other via the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitter-containing synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized presynaptic release sites termed active zones (AZs). The presynaptic AZ comprises an assembly of large multidomain proteins that link the machinery for vesicle fusion to sites of voltage-dependent Ca 2+ entry. Following SV fusion at AZ release sites SV membranes are retrieved by compensatory endocytosis, and SVs are reformed. Recent data suggest that Ca 2+ -triggered SV exocytosis at AZs and endocytic retrieval of SVs may be functionally and physically linked. Here we discuss the evidence supporting such exo-endocytic coupling as well as possible modes and mechanisms that may underlie coupling of exocytosis and endocytosis at and around AZs in presynaptic nerve terminals. As components of the exo-endocytic machinery at synapses have been linked to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, understanding the mechanisms that couple exocytosis and endocytosis at AZs may be of importance for developing novel therapies to treat these diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Nicotinic versus muscarinic blockade alters verbal working memory-related brain activity in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Julie A; Saykin, Andrew J; McDonald, Brenna C; McAllister, Thomas W; Hynes, Mary L; Newhouse, Paul A

    2008-04-01

    An important aspect of furthering our understanding of the central nervous system function after menopause is to examine the cerebral circuitry that appears to be influenced by cholinergic antagonist drugs in the presence and absence of estrogen. This pilot study investigated the effects of two anticholinergic drugs on brain activation and working memory performance in postmenopausal women not taking estrogen. This approach simulates the effects of age- or disease-related neuroreceptor or neuronal loss by temporarily blocking pre- and postsynaptic muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Six healthy postmenopausal women took part in three drug challenges using the antinicotinic drug mecamylamine (MECA, 20 mg, oral), the antimuscarinic drug scopolamine (SCOP, 2.5 microg/kg, i.v.), and placebo during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The cognitive measure was a visually presented verbal N-back test of working memory. Neither MECA nor SCOP significantly impaired performance on the verbal N-back. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results showed greater increases in frontal lobe activation in the placebo condition relative to each drug condition with different specific regional activation for MECA and SCOP. These preliminary results suggest that brain activation patterns are sensitive to cholinergic modulation in postmenopausal women and that differential effects may be observed following nicotinic versus muscarinic blockade. This approach offers a potentially valuable method for modeling age-related changes in brain function, and the findings may have implications for cholinergic contributions to normal and pathologic aging.

  9. Characterization of muscarinic M4 binding sites in rabbit lung, chicken heart, and NG108-15 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareno, S; Buckley, N J; Roberts, F F

    1990-12-01

    We have carried out an extensive pharmacological characterization of muscarinic binding sites in rabbit lung and chicken heart in parallel with M1, M2, and M3 sites, [3H]Pirenzepine, a selective antagonist at M1 receptors, bound saturably and reversibly to membranes from chicken heart and rabbit lung. These binding sites were not M1 receptors, however, because the cardioselective antagonist himbacine had 10-fold higher affinity at these sites than at [3H]pirenzepine sites in rat and rabbit cortex (true M1 sites). We measured the inhibitory potency of 28 antagonists at [3H]N-methylscopolamine-labeled sites in chicken heart, rabbit lung, rat heart (M2 sites), and rat submandibular gland (M3 sites) and at M1 sites in rat cortex. The sites in rabbit lung were different from M1, M2, and M3 sites, because they had moderate to high affinity for M1-selective compounds (pirenzepine and telenzepine), M2-selective compounds (himbacine and methoctramine), and M3-selective compounds (hexahydrosiladifenidol and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide). The sites in chicken heart resembled most those in rabbit lung, with similar high affinity for secoverine, but they were not the same because tropicamide, diphenylacetoxybutynyl dimethylamine, and [3H]-N-methylscopolamine were more potent in rabbit lung. In a further series of experiments, we compared the affinity of six of the most discriminating antagonists in membranes from rabbit lung and NG108-15 cells, a neuroblastoma-glioma cell line reported to express the muscarinic m4 receptor gene. The antagonists had very similar affinities in the two tissues, the largest discrepancy being that pirenzepine was twice as potent in rabbit lung as in NG108-15 cells. Northern blots using probes designed to discriminate between five species of muscarinic receptor RNA detected only m4 mRNA in rabbit lung. We conclude that rabbit lung contains a muscarinic M4 binding site with a quite distinctive pharmacology and that chicken heart

  10. Single cocaine exposure does not alter striatal pre-synaptic dopamine function in mice: an [18 F]-FDOPA PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsall, David R; Kokkinou, Michelle; Veronese, Mattia; Coello, Christopher; Wells, Lisa A; Howes, Oliver D

    2017-12-01

    Cocaine is a recreational drug of abuse that binds to the dopamine transporter, preventing reuptake of dopamine into pre-synaptic terminals. The increased presence of synaptic dopamine results in stimulation of both pre- and post-synaptic dopamine receptors, considered an important mechanism by which cocaine elicits its reinforcing properties. However, the effects of acute cocaine administration on pre-synaptic dopamine function remain unclear. Non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography have revealed impaired pre-synaptic dopamine function in chronic cocaine users. Similar impairments have been seen in animal studies, with microdialysis experiments indicating decreased basal dopamine release. Here we use micro positron emission tomography imaging techniques in mice to measure dopamine synthesis capacity and determine the effect of acute cocaine administration of pre-synaptic dopamine function. We show that a dose of 20 mg/kg cocaine is sufficient to elicit hyperlocomotor activity, peaking 15-20 min post treatment (p cocaine treatment (KiCer: 0.0097 per min vs. 0.0112 per min in vehicle controls, p > 0.05). Furthermore, expression levels of two key enzymes related to dopamine synthesis, tyrosine hydroxylase and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase, within the striatum of scanned mice were not significantly affected by acute cocaine pre-treatment (p > 0.05). Our findings suggest that while the regulation of dopamine synthesis and release in the striatum have been shown to change with chronic cocaine use, leading to a reduced basal tone, these adaptations to pre-synaptic dopaminergic neurons are not initiated following a single exposure to the drug. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Rosiglitazone Suppresses In Vitro Seizures in Hippocampal Slice by Inhibiting Presynaptic Glutamate Release in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bing Wong

    Full Text Available Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor whose agonist, rosiglitazone has a neuroprotective effect to hippocampal neurons in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slice preparations treated in Mg2+ free medium can induce ictal and interictal-like epileptiform discharges, which is regarded as an in vitro model of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. We applied rosiglitazone in hippocampal slices treated in Mg2+ free medium. The effects of rosiglitazone on hippocampal CA1-Schaffer collateral synaptic transmission were tested. We also examined the neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone toward NMDA excitotoxicity on cultured hippocampal slices. Application of 10 μM rosiglitazone significantly suppressed amplitude and frequency of epileptiform discharges in CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not block the effect of rosiglitazone on suppressing discharge frequency, but reverse the effect on suppressing discharge amplitude. Application of rosiglitazone suppressed synaptic transmission in the CA1-Schaffer collateral pathway. By miniature excitatory-potential synaptic current (mEPSC analysis, rosiglitazone significantly suppressed presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This phenomenon can be reversed by pretreating PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Also, rosiglitazone protected cultured hippocampal slices from NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. The protective effect of 10 μM rosiglitazone was partially antagonized by concomitant high dose GW9662 treatment, indicating that this effect is partially mediated by PPARγ receptors. In conclusion, rosiglitazone suppressed NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform discharges by inhibition of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Rosiglitazone protected hippocampal slice from NMDA excitotoxicity partially by PPARγ activation. We suggest that rosiglitazone could be a potential agent to treat patients with TLE.

  12. Development of radiohalogenated muscarinic ligands for the in vivo imaging of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Alterations in the density of acetylcholinergic muscarinic receptors (m-AChR) have been observed in various dementias. This has spurred interest in the development of radiohalogenated ligands which can be used for the non-invasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques. We have developed a new ligand 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ({alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IQNP,12) which demonstrates high affinity for the muscarinic receptor. When labeled with radioiodine it has been shown to be selective and specific for m-ACHR. Initial studies on the separation and in vivo evaluation of the various isomers of IQNP have shown that the stereochemistry of the chiral centers and the configuration around the double bond play an important role in m-AChR subtype specificity. In vivo evaluation of these stereoisomers demonstrate that E-(R,R)-IQNP has a high affinity for the M{sub 1} muscarinic subtype while Z-(R,R)-IQNP demonstrate a high affinity for M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} receptor subtypes. These data demonstrate IQNP (12) has potential for use in the non-evasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A brominated analogue, ``BrQNP,`` in which the iodine has been replaced by a bromine atom, has also been prepared and was shown to block the in vivo uptake of IQNP in the brain and heart and therefore has potential for positron emission tomographic (PET) studies of m-AChR.

  13. Evidence of a M1-muscarinic GPCR homolog in unicellular eukaryotes: featuring Acanthamoeba spp bioinformatics 3D-modelling and experimentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Abdul Mannan; Ahmad, H R

    2017-06-01

    Acetylcholine affects the target cellular function via muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors that are seen to exist in humans. Both the cholinergic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that perform cardinal functions in humans. Anti-muscarinic drugs, particularly the ones that target M1 subtype (mAChR1), have consistently shown to kill unicellular pathogenic eukaryotes like Acanthamoeba spp. As the M1 receptor subtype has not been reported to be expressed in the above protist, the presence of an ancient form of the M1 muscarinic receptor was inferred. Bioinformatic tools and experimental assays were performed to establish the presence of a ligand-binding site. A search for sequence homology of amino acids of human M1 receptor failed to uncover an equivalent ligand-binding site on Acanthamoeba, but structural bioinformatics showed a hypothetical protein L8HIA6 to be a receptor homolog of the human mAChR1. Immunostaining with an anti-mAChR1 antibody showed cellular staining. Growth assays showed proliferation and lethal effects of exposure to mAChR1 agonist and antagonist respectively. With the recent authentication of human mAChR1 structure and its addition to the database, it was possible to discover its structural analog in Acanthamoeba; which could explain the effects of anticholinergics observed in the past on Acanthamoeba spp. The discovery of a receptor homolog of human mAChR1 on Acanthamoeba with future studies planned to show its expression and binding to cholinergic agonist and antagonist would help clarify its role in the biology of this protist pathogen.

  14. New generic approach to the treatment of organophosphate poisoning: Adenosine receptor mediated inhibition of ACh-release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helden, H.P.M. van; Groen, B.; Moor, E.; Westerink, B.H.C.; Bruijnzeel, P.L.B.

    1998-01-01

    Current treatment of acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning includes a combined administration of a cholinesterase reactivator (oxime), a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine) and an anticonvulsant (diazepam). This treatment is not adequate since it does not prevent neuronal brain damage and

  15. New generic approach to the treatment of organophosphate poisoning : Adenosine receptor mediated inhibition of ACh-release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, HPM; Moor, E; Westerink, BHC; Bruijnzeel, PLB

    1998-01-01

    Current treatment of acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning includes a combined administration of a cholinesterase reactivator (oxime), a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine) and an anticonvulsant (diazepam). This treatment is not adequate since it does not prevent neuronal brain damage and

  16. Intra-axonal Synthesis of SNAP25 Is Required for the Formation of Presynaptic Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia F.R. Batista

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Localized protein synthesis is a mechanism for developing axons to react acutely and in a spatially restricted manner to extracellular signals. As such, it is important for many aspects of axonal development, but its role in the formation of presynapses remains poorly understood. We found that the induced assembly of presynaptic terminals required local protein synthesis. Newly synthesized proteins were detectable at nascent presynapses within 15 min of inducing synapse formation in isolated axons. The transcript for the t-SNARE protein SNAP25, which is required for the fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane, was recruited to presynaptic sites and locally translated. Inhibition of intra-axonal SNAP25 synthesis affected the clustering of SNAP25 and other presynaptic proteins and interfered with the release of synaptic vesicles from presynaptic sites. This study reveals a critical role for the axonal synthesis of SNAP25 in the assembly of presynaptic terminals.

  17. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recogn